WorldWideScience

Sample records for excitation light intensity

  1. Lifetime of fluorescence from light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins: excitation intensity dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordlund, T.M. (Univ. of Rochester, NY); Knox, W.H.

    1981-10-01

    The fluorescence from a purified, aggregate form of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein has a lifetime of 1.2 +/- 0.5 ns at low excitation intensity, but the lifetime decreases significantly when the intensity of the 20-ps, 5300nm excitation pulse is increased above about 10/sup 16/ photons/cm/sup 2/. A solubilized, monomeric form of the protein, on the other hand, has a fluorescence lifetime of 3.1 +/- 0.3 ns independent of excitation intensity from 10/sup 14/-10/sup 18/ photons/cm/sup 2//pulse. We interpret the lifetime shortening in the aggregates and the lack of shortening in monomers in terms of exciton annihilation, facilitated in the aggregate by the larger population of interacting chlorophylls.

  2. Luminescent rise times of inorganic phosphors excited by high intensity ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R J; Ricchio, S G

    1973-11-01

    The relative delay between excitation and luminescence was measured for a number of common inorganic phosphors using short, high intensity excitation pulses. The delays were found to be much shorter than anticipated; on the basis of low intensity pulsed luminescence measurements and were found to be extremely intensity-dependent. Both the luminescence rise and decay times were found to be intensitydependent as well, with the luminescence pulse waveform tending to approach the exciting pulse at the higher excitation intensities.

  3. Ponderomotive dressing of doubly-excited states with intensity-controlled laser light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We laser-dress several doubly-excited states in helium. Tuning the coupling-laser intensity from perturbative to the strong-coupling regime, we are able to measure phases imprinted on the two-electron wavefunctions, and observe a new continuum coupling mechanism.

  4. A Bloch equation approach to intensity dependent optical spectra of light harvesting complex II: excitation dependence of light harvesting complex II pump-probe spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Marten; Renger, Thomas; Knorr, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the recent progress in the resolution of the structure of the antenna light harvesting complex II (LHC II) of the photosystem II, we propose a microscopically motivated theory to predict excitation intensity-dependent spectra. We show that optical Bloch equations provide the means to include all 2( N ) excited states of an oligomer complex of N coupled two-level systems and analyze the effects of Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation on pump-probe spectra. We use LHC Bloch equations for 14 Coulomb coupled two-level systems, which describe the S (0) and S (1) level of every chlorophyll molecule. All parameter introduced into the Hamiltonian are based on microscopic structure and a quantum chemical model. The derived Bloch equations describe not only linear absorption but also the intensity dependence of optical spectra in a regime where the interplay of Pauli Blocking effects as well as exciton-exciton annihilation effects are important. As an example, pump-probe spectra are discussed. The observed saturation of the spectra for high intensities can be viewed as a relaxation channel blockade on short time scales due to Pauli blocking. The theoretical investigation is useful for the interpretation of the experimental data, if the experimental conditions exceed the low intensity pump limit and effects like strong Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation need to be considered. These effects become important when multiple excitations are generated by the pump pulse in the complex.

  5. Infrared (IR) stimulated luminescence from feldspars with linearly increasing excitation light intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Bulur, E

    1999-01-01

    IR stimulated luminescence signal from potassium and sodium feldspars were studied by linearly increasing the excitation power from zero to a maximum value during the readout. The peak shaped signals observed in both feldspars could be approximated using a linear combination of three first-order components as deduced by curve fitting. The thermal and radiation dose dependent behavior of the IR-stimulated OSL curves were also studied.

  6. Effect of the breakdown nature on Er-related electroluminescence intensity and excitation efficiency in Si:Er light emitting diodes grown with sublimation MBE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmagin, V.B.; Kuznetsov, V.P.; Remizov, D.Yu.; Krasil' nik, Z.F.; Krasil' nikova, L.V.; Kryzhkov, D.I

    2003-12-15

    The influence of the p-n junction breakdown mechanism on the Er{sup 3+} electroluminescence (EL) intensity and excitation efficiency (an intra 4f transition {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} of Er{sup 3+} ion at the wavelength of 1.54 {mu}m) has been investigated in Si:Er light emitting diodes (LED) grown with sublimation molecular beam epitaxy (SMBE) method. It is shown that the avalanche LEDs are characterized by a greater Er{sup 3+} EL intensity and excitation efficiency compared with the tunnel LEDs. At the same time, an excessive advance into the avalanche breakdown parameter region leads to microplasma breakdown of the p-n junction, which causes a non-uniform distribution of the drive current density over p-n junction area and an appreciable decrease of the Er{sup 3+} EL intensity. Si:Er LEDs operating in mixed breakdown conditions seem to be more preferable for reaching maximal Er{sup 3+} EL intensity at room temperature, as they provide an optimum combination of high Er{sup 3+} EL excitation efficiency with the uniformity of the p-n junction breakdown.

  7. Plasmons excited in a large dense silver nanoparticle layer enhance the luminescence intensity of organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuura, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    We observe that a layer of large (∼300 nm in diameter) closely packed (∼15 nm interparticle separation) silver nanoparticles separated by a spacer layer at least 50-nm thick from a 30-nm-thick Alq3 layer results in the enhancement of bulk luminescence efficiency in the Alq3 layer. To study the potential for practical application of this long-range luminescence enhancement, an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was fabricated with the silver nanoparticle layer serving as the enhancement element. This device exhibits a luminescence efficiency 4.5 times stronger than that of a similar device with no silver nanoparticle layer. If such an enhancement is applied to deep-blue emissive materials, the efficiency should reach the levels required for practical use. This combination could lead to the broad use of OLEDs in displays and lighting.

  8. Intense pulsed light therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltes, Barbara

    2010-12-01

    Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) is an FDA-approved photo therapy for the treatment of a variety of conditions such as acne and hirsutism. It utilizes the principle of selective photothermolysis. Photothermolysis allows a specific wavelength to be delivered to a chromophore of a designated tissue while leaving the surrounding tissue unaffected. The results of IPL are similar to that of laser treatments but it offers the advantage of a relative low cost. It is a safe and rapid treatment with minimal discomfort to the patient. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Traffic light intensity meter, TIM®

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leden, N. van der; Varkevisser, J.; Vroom, J. de; Oijen, T van

    2005-01-01

    The intensity of traffic lights decreases over time as a result of pollution and ageing. The Dutch Traffic Research Centre of the Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management is searching for a convenient method for measuring the luminous intensity of traffic lights on the road, in order

  10. High Intensity Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Nightime illumination is an important part of round-the-clock pre-launch preparations because NASA uses TV and film cameras to monitor each step of the preliminaries and at times to identify the cause of malfunction during countdown. Generating a one billion candlepower beam visible 50 miles away, the lamps developed by Duro-Test Corporation provide daylight quality light that eliminates color distortion in film and TV coverage. The lighting system was first used at Kennedy Space Center in 1968 for the launch of Apollo 8. Modified versions are available in wide range of applications, such as the battery of spotlights with colored filters that light up Niagara Falls, as well as the lamps used in the projectors for the Smithsonian's IMAX Theatre, indoor theatres with supersized screens and outdoor projection systems.

  11. Creation of Excitons Excited by Light with a Spatial Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syouji, Atsushi; Saito, Shingo; Otomo, Akira

    2017-12-01

    When light is absorbed into matter, its degrees of freedom (i.e., energy, polarization, and phase) are transferred to the matter and conserved. In this study, we demonstrate that elementary excitations in matter, which are one-photon-forbidden transition states, become allowed states because of the phase conservation across the entire cross section of excitation light. In particular, when 1S orthoexcitons of the yellow series in the semiconductor cuprous oxide (Cu2O) were resonantly excited by light with a spatial mode, an increase in the Γ 3 - -phonon-emission peak intensity of the excitons was detected depending on the spatial mode. Using group-theory-based analysis, we show that the irreducible representation of a one-photon-forbidden exciton, which is one of the orthoexcitons, can be transmuted to an allowed state by taking the direct product with the polar vector produced from the spatial mode of the light. Although the transition process of the exciton is locally characterized by the usual quadrupole interaction, the phase conservation at each position at which the sample is irradiated causes the exciton to be in the same spatial-mode state. That causes a change in the transition selection rule. The selection rule relaxation due to the spatial mode of the light was also applied for paraexciton creation.

  12. Light intensity modulation in phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanovich, P. A.; Zon, B. A.; Kunin, A. A.; Pankova, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    A hypothesis that blocking ATP synthesis is one of the main causes of the stimulating effect is considered based on analysis of the primary photostimulation mechanisms. The light radiation intensity modulation is substantiated and the estimates of such modulation parameters are made. An explanation is offered to the stimulation efficiency decrease phenomenon at the increase of the radiation dose during the therapy. The results of clinical research of the medical treatment in preventive dentistry are presented depending on the spectrum and parameters of the light flux modulation.

  13. Intensity Coding in Two-Dimensional Excitable Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    In the light of recent experimental findings that gap junctions are essential for low level intensity detection in the sensory periphery, the Greenberg-Hastings cellular automaton is employed to model the response of a two-dimensional sensory network to external stimuli. We show that excitable elements (sensory neurons) that have a small dynamical range are shown to give rise to a collective large dynamical range. Therefore the network transfer (gain) function (which is Hill or Stevens law-like) is an emergent property generated from a pool of small dynamical range cells, providing a basis for a "neural psychophysics". The growth of the dynamical range with the system size is approximately logarithmic, suggesting a functional role for electrical coupling. For a fixed number of neurons, the dynamical range displays a maximum as a function of the refractory period, which suggests experimental tests for the model. A biological application to ephaptic interactions in olfactory nerve fascicles is proposed.

  14. [Investigation of exciting light and plant leaves age effects on chlorophyll fluorescense of radish plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterenko, T V; Tikhomirov, A A; Shikhov, V N

    2012-01-01

    The effect of exciting light intensity and leaves age on characteristics of slow stage of chlorophyll fluorescence induction (CFI) of radish leaves has been investigated. Light dependence of the relationship of maximum fluorescence intensity in the peak P and the stationary fluorescence level (F(P)/F(S)) and also light dependence of temporal characteristics of CFI (T0.5 - half decrease of chlorophyll fluorescence intensity during slow stage of fluorescence induction and tmin - summarized CFI characteristics derived by calculating via integral proportional to variable part of illuminated in the result of chlorophyll fluorescence energy during slow stage of CFI) have been studied. Plants were grown in controlled conditions of light culture at 100 Wt/m2 of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). It has been shown that variability of the characteristics under study, associated with the effect of leaves age, significantly decreases at exciting light intensity equal to 40 Wt/m2 of PAR and more. The lowest effect of leaves age on the value of fluorescence characteristics for T0.5 and tmin and also for F(P)/F(S) ratio was observed at the intensity of exciting fluorescence light of 60 Wt/m2 of PAR. In the researched range of light intensities the temporal characteristics of T0.5 and tmin for uneven-aged radish leaves appeared to be by an order less responsive to the intensity changes of exciting fluorescence light as compared with F(P)/F(S) ratio.

  15. Universal Behavior in Excited Heavy-Light and Light-Light Mesons

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, M. G.

    1996-01-01

    A common pattern of large orbital and radial excitations in heavy-light and light-light mesons is demonstrated. Within a general potential model the Regge slopes of the light degrees of freedom for these mesons are shown to be in the ratio of two. The possibility of ``tower'' degeneracy occurs only with pure scalar confinement.

  16. Average Light Intensity Inside a Photobioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herby Jean

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For energy production, microalgae are one of the few alternatives with high potential. Similar to plants, algae require energy acquired from light sources to grow. This project uses calculus to determine the light intensity inside of a photobioreactor filled with algae. Under preset conditions along with estimated values, we applied Lambert-Beer's law to formulate an equation to calculate how much light intensity escapes a photobioreactor and determine the average light intensity that was present inside the reactor.

  17. Self-organization of intense light within erosive gas discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torchigin, V.P. [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: v_torchigin@mail.ru; Torchigin, A.V. [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-01-22

    Process of appearance of fire balls at gas discharges is considered. It is shown that the intense white light radiated by atoms excited at gas discharge is subject to self-organization in such a way that miniature ball lightnings appear.

  18. Generation of powerful tungsten reductants by visible light excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Wesley; Ener, Maraia E; Blakemore, James D; Rachford, Aaron A; LaBeaume, Paul J; Thackeray, James W; Cameron, James F; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2013-07-24

    The homoleptic arylisocyanide tungsten complexes, W(CNXy)6 and W(CNIph)6 (Xy = 2,6-dimethylphenyl, Iph = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl), display intense metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) absorptions in the visible region (400-550 nm). MLCT emission (λ(max) ≈ 580 nm) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution at rt is observed for W(CNXy)6 and W(CNIph)6 with lifetimes of 17 and 73 ns, respectively. Diffusion-controlled energy transfer from electronically excited W(CNIph)6 (*W) to the lowest energy triplet excited state of anthracene (anth) is the dominant quenching pathway in THF solution. Introduction of tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate, [Bu(n)4N][PF6], to the THF solution promotes formation of electron transfer (ET) quenching products, [W(CNIph)6](+) and [anth](•-). ET from *W to benzophenone and cobalticenium also is observed in [Bu(n)4N][PF6]/THF solutions. The estimated reduction potential for the [W(CNIph)6](+)/*W couple is -2.8 V vs Cp2Fe(+/0), establishing W(CNIph)6 as one of the most powerful photoreductants that has been generated with visible light.

  19. Intense Pulsed Light Therapy for Skin Rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBernardo, Barry E; Pozner, Jason N

    2016-07-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL), also known as pulsed light and broad band light, is a nonlaser light source used to treat a variety of vascular and pigmented lesions, photo damage, active acne, and unwanted hair. Current IPL systems are much improved from older-generation devices with better calibration, integrated cooling, and improved tuning. These devices are extremely popular because of their versatility and are often the first devices recommended and purchased in many offices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. White light emission from Er2O3 nano-powder excited by infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanli, Sevcan; Eryurek, Gonul; Di Bartolo, Baldassare

    2017-07-01

    Phosphors of Er2O3 nano-crystalline powders were synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structural properties of the nano-powders were investigated with XRD and HRTEM measurements. The cubic phase with a = 10.540 Å was the only phase observed. The average crystalline sizes and the widths of the grain size distribution curves were determined to be 27.2, 18.7 and 9.7 nm, respectively. The spectroscopic properties of the Er2O3 nano-powder were studied by measuring the luminescence, decay and rise patterns under 808 and 975 nm diode laser excitations. A peculiar effect of the pressure was observed since an optically active ion (Er) is part of the complex and not a dopant. A broad band of the white light emission combined with blue, green and red up-conversion emission bands of Er3+ ions were observed at 0.03 mbar pressure under both excitation wavelengths. Only, an intense broad band white light emission was observed from these nanocrystals at atmospheric pressure. Rising patterns show that the white light intensity reaches its maximum value more rapidly under 975 nm excitation although it decays slower than that of 808 nm excitation. The color quality parameters such as the color coordinate (CRI), correlated color temperature and the color rendering index were found to vary with both the excitation wavelength and the ambient pressure indicating that these nanocrystals could be considered good white light emitting source under the infrared excitations.

  1. Stimulated Raman scattering excited by incoherent light in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS excited by incoherent light is studied via particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a large bandwidth of incoherent light can reduce the growth of SRS and electron heating considerably in the linear stage. However, different components of the incoherent light can be coupled by the Langmuir waves, so that stimulated Raman backward scattering can develop. When the bandwidth of incoherent light is larger than the Langmuir wave frequency, forward SRS can be seeded between different components of the incoherent light. The incoherent light can only increase the time duration for nonlinear saturation but cannot diminish the saturation level obviously.

  2. Intense, ultrashort light and dense, hot matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This article presents an overview of the physics and applications of the interaction of high intensity laser light with matter. It traces the crucial advances that have occurred over the past few decades in laser technology and nonlinear optics and then discusses physical phenomena that occur in intense laser fields and their ...

  3. Intense, ultrashort light and dense, hot matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    key to further enhancement lies in focusing in time, thus producing pulses of light, as shown in figure 2. ... higher is the electric field and at large light fluxes the electric fields can be gigantic. How does one get a feel for .... that the highest intensity laser pulses can apply on the same electron an electric field that is 1000 times ...

  4. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2013-12-17

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  5. effect of light curing unit characteristics on light intensity output

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 90 No. 9 September 2013. EFFECT OF LIGHT CURING UNIT CHARACTERISTICS ON LIGHT INTENSITY OUTPUT, DEPTH OF CURE AND. SURFACE MICRO-HARDNESS OF DENTAL RESIN COMPOSITE. B. A. Kassim, BDS, MDS, Lecturer, B. K. Kisumbi, BDS, MPHIL, Senior Lecturer, ...

  6. Photoprotection of photosystems in fluctuating light intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Suorsa, Marjaana; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-05-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms experience strong fluctuations in light intensity in their natural terrestrial and aquatic growth environments. Recent studies with both plants and cyanobacteria have revealed that Photosystem (PS) I is the potential target of damage upon abrupt changes in light intensity. Photosynthetic organisms have, however, developed powerful mechanisms in order to protect their photosynthetic apparatus against such potentially hazardous light conditions. Although the electron transfer chain has remained relatively unchanged in both plant chloroplasts and their cyanobacterial ancestors, the photoprotective and regulatory mechanisms of photosynthetic light reactions have experienced conspicuous evolutionary changes. In cyanobacteria, the specific flavodiiron proteins (Flv1 and Flv3) are responsible for safeguarding PSI under rapidly fluctuating light intensities, whilst the thylakoid located terminal oxidases are involved in the protection of PSII during 12h diurnal cycles involving abrupt, square-wave, changes from dark to high light. Higher plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana have evolved different protective mechanisms. In particular, the PGR5 protein controls electron flow during sudden changes in light intensity by allowing the regulation mostly via the Cytochrome b6f complex. Besides the function of PGR5, plants have also acquired other dynamic regulatory mechanisms, among them the STN7-related LHCII protein phosphorylation that is similarly responsible for protection against rapid changes in the light environment. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, as an evolutionary intermediate between cyanobacteria and higher plants, probably possesses both protective mechanisms. In this review, evolutionarily different photoprotective mechanisms under fluctuating light conditions are described and their contributions to cyanobacterial and plant photosynthesis are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  7. Theory of slow light excitation in 1D photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudistira, D.; Marpaung, D.A.I.; Handoyo, H.P.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Hammer, Manfred; Tjia, M.O.; Iskandar, A.A.P.; Iskandar, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Slow light (SL) states corresponding to wavelength regions near the bandgap edge of grated structures are known to show strong eld enhancement. Such states may be excited efciently by well-optimised adiabatic transitions in grating structures, e.g., by slowly turning on the modulation depth. To

  8. Slow light excitation in tapered 1D photonic crystals: theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudistira, D.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Hammer, Manfred; Marpaung, D.A.I.

    2006-01-01

    Slow light (SL) states corresponding to wavelength regions near the bandgap edge of grated structures are known to show strong field enhancement. Such states may be excited efficiently by well-optimised adiabatic transitions in grated structures, e.g., by slowly turning on the modulation depth. To

  9. Light and Light Sources High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    CERN Document Server

    Flesch, Peter G

    2006-01-01

    Light and Light Sources gives an introduction to the working principles of high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps and points out challenges and problems associated with the development and operation of HID lamps. The state-of-the-art in electrode and plasma diagnostics as well as numerical methods used for the understanding of HID lamps are described. This volume addresses students as well as scientists and researchers at universities and in industry.

  10. Parallel-multiplexed excitation light-sheet microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Zhou, Weibin; Peng, Leilei

    2017-02-01

    Laser scanning light-sheet imaging allows fast 3D image of live samples with minimal bleach and photo-toxicity. Existing light-sheet techniques have very limited capability in multi-label imaging. Hyper-spectral imaging is needed to unmix commonly used fluorescent proteins with large spectral overlaps. However, the challenge is how to perform hyper-spectral imaging without sacrificing the image speed, so that dynamic and complex events can be captured live. We report wavelength-encoded structured illumination light sheet imaging (λ-SIM light-sheet), a novel light-sheet technique that is capable of parallel multiplexing in multiple excitation-emission spectral channels. λ-SIM light-sheet captures images of all possible excitation-emission channels in true parallel. It does not require compromising the imaging speed and is capable of distinguish labels by both excitation and emission spectral properties, which facilitates unmixing fluorescent labels with overlapping spectral peaks and will allow more labels being used together. We build a hyper-spectral light-sheet microscope that combined λ-SIM with an extended field of view through Bessel beam illumination. The system has a 250-micron-wide field of view and confocal level resolution. The microscope, equipped with multiple laser lines and an unlimited number of spectral channels, can potentially image up to 6 commonly used fluorescent proteins from blue to red. Results from in vivo imaging of live zebrafish embryos expressing various genetic markers and sensors will be shown. Hyper-spectral images from λ-SIM light-sheet will allow multiplexed and dynamic functional imaging in live tissue and animals.

  11. Intense switchable fluorescence in light wave coupled electrowetting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikenfeld, J.; Steckl, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    Switchable fluorescence has been obtained from light wave coupled (LWC) electrowetting (EW) devices fabricated on an optical waveguide substrate. The LWC device structure contains a polar water component and a nonpolar oil component that compete for placement on a hydrophobic surface under the influence of an applied electric field. The oil film contains organic lumophores that fluoresce intense red (608nm), green (503nm), and blue (433nm) light with ˜90% quantum efficiency when excited by violet light. Violet InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) couple ˜405nm excitation light into the waveguide substrate. EW of the water layer displaces the fluorescent oil film such that it is either optically coupled to, or decoupled from, the underlying waveguide. The output luminance can be modulated from >100cd/m2to<5cd/m2 as a dc voltage ranging from 0to-24V is applied to the water layer. Maximum luminance of 15×30 arrays of the devices may exceed ˜500cd/m2 by simply increasing the output of the InGaN LEDs.

  12. Short-wavelength two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy of tryptophan with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Palero (Jonathan); V.O. Boer (Vincent); J.C. Vijverberg (Jacob); H.C. Gerritsen (Hans); H.J.C.M. Sterenborg (Dick)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe report on a novel and simple light source for short-wavelength two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy based on the visible nonsolitonic radiation from a photonic crystal fiber. We demonstrate tunability of the light source by varying the wavelength and intensity of the

  13. Intense pulsed light (IPL): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babilas, Philipp; Schreml, Stephan; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Landthaler, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) devices use flashlamps and bandpass filters to emit polychromatic incoherent high-intensity pulsed light of determined wavelength spectrum, fluence, and pulse duration. Similar to lasers, the basic principle of IPL devices is a more or less selective thermal damage of the target. The combination of prescribed wavelengths, fluences, pulse durations, and pulse intervals facilitates the treatment of a wide spectrum of skin conditions. To summarize the physics of IPL, to provide guidance for the practical use of IPL devices, and to discuss the current literature on IPL in the treatment of unwanted hair growth, vascular lesions, pigmented lesions, acne vulgaris, and photodamaged skin and as a light source for PDT and skin rejuvenation. A systematic search of several electronic databases, including Medline and PubMed and the authors experience on intense pulsed light. Numerous trials show the effectiveness and compatibility of IPL devices. Most comparative trials attest IPLs similar effectiveness to lasers (level of evidence: 2b to 4, depending on the indication). However, large controlled and blinded comparative trials with an extended follow-up period are necessary.

  14. Simulations of light intensity variation in photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner-Nochta, Iris; Posten, Clemens

    2007-09-15

    In photobioreactors, turbulent flow conditions and light gradients frequently occur. Thus, algal cells cultivated in such reactors experience fluctuations in light intensity. This work presents a new method for the calculation of these light-dark patterns. The investigation is focused on temporal and spatial aspects of light patterns which may affect the photosynthetic reaction. The method combines computational fluid dynamics simulations of three-dimensional turbulent single-phase fluid flow with statistical particle tracking and signal analysis. In this way, light-dark phases are derived which affect singular (algal) cells. An example case is presented of a tubular photobioreactor in which static mixers are used for the efficient mixing of liquid and also of gases with liquid. Particle trajectories representing the path of algal cells were analysed to obtain light fluctuations on single cells. Particles were exposed to light-dark phases with frequencies between 3 and 25Hz in a helical mixer at a mean velocity of 0.5ms(-1), which contrasts to the case of a tube without static mixers, where only frequencies of 0.2-3.1Hz were obtained under the same conditions. The simulations show the potential of improving radial flow in a tubular photobioreactor by means of using a static mixer and the usefulness of CFD and trajectory analysis for scale-down/scale-up.

  15. Unconventional Use of Intense Pulsed Light

    OpenAIRE

    Piccolo, D.; D. Di Marcantonio; Crisman, G.; G. Cannarozzo; Sannino, M.; A. Chiricozzi; Chimenti, S.

    2014-01-01

    According to the literature, intense pulsed light (IPL) represents a versatile tool in the treatment of some dermatological conditions (i.e., pigmentation disorders, hair removal, and acne), due to its wide range of wavelengths. The authors herein report on 58 unconventional but effective uses of IPL in several cutaneous diseases, such as rosacea (10 cases), port-wine stain (PWS) (10 cases), disseminated porokeratosis (10 cases), pilonidal cyst (3 cases), seborrheic keratosis (10 cases), hype...

  16. Excitation of anodized alumina films with a light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerbeck, Martin; Canulescu, Stela; Rechendorff, K.

    Optical properties of anodized aluminium alloys were determined by optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of such films. Samples with different concentrations of dopants were excited with a white-light source combined with an integrating sphere for fast determination of diffuse reflectance....... The UV-VIS reflectance of Ti-doped anodized aluminium films was measured over the wavelength range of 200 nm to 900 nm. Titanium doped-anodized aluminium films with 5-15 wt% Ti were characterized. Changes in the diffuse light scattering of doped anodized aluminium films, and thus optical appearance......, with doping are discussed. Using the Kubelka-Munk model on the diffuse reflectance spectra of such films, the bandgap Eg of the oxide alloys can be determined....

  17. White light source with laser-excited phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullaev, O. R.; Aluev, A. V.; Akhmerov, Yu. L.; Kourova, N. V.; Mezhennyi, M. V.; Chelny, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    The principles of operation of a white light source based on a remote phosphor, made of cerium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG : Ce3+), whose luminescence is excited by a blue laser diode, are considered. The colorimetric and photometric characteristics of phosphors of different types are analysed as functions of the phosphor film thickness. The following parameters are obtained at an output power of 1 W and a wavelength of 445±3 nm in the cw regime: luminous flux of 165 lm, correlated colour temperature of 5595 K, colour rendering index of 66, colour coordinates x = 0.3303 and y = 0.3427, luminous efficiency of 165 lm W‑1, and light efficacy of 30 lm W‑1. These characteristics are comparable with similar parameters of commercial white LEDs.

  18. Effect of Light Curing Unit Characteristics on Light Intensity Output ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mean Vickers Hardness Number (VHN) for LED was 57.44 and for QTH was 44.14 (p=0.713). Mean light intensity for LCUs . 5years was 596.03mW/cm2 and 363.17mW/cm2 for units > 5years old (p=0.024). The mean DOC for the two age groups was 1.74mm and 1.57mm respectively (p=0.073). For SMH, the . 5years and ...

  19. Integrated OLED as excitation light source in fluorescent lateral flow immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Vishak; Steckl, Andrew J

    2015-12-15

    The integration of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) as excitation light sources for quantum dot-based fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay systems (LFIA) was investigated. This approach has the potential to deliver a sensitive visible detection scheme for low-cost, disposable lab-on-chip point-of-care (POC) diagnosis system. Thin film phosphorescent green OLEDs fabricated on plastic substrates were integrated on-chip to excite the test line of a quantum dot-based LFIA (QD-LFIA). OLEDs were fabricated by sequential deposition of organic thin films (total of ~100 nm) onto ITO-coated PET substrates. CdSe/ZnS QDs emitting at 655 nm and Au nanoparticles (NP - 10 nm size) conjugated antibodies were used for the fluorescence QD-LFIA and conventional reflection-mode Au NP-LFIA, respectively. Thin plastic color light filters were integrated for filtering the excitation light source and, thereby, increasing the contrast of the emitted light for optimized visual detection. Integration of the OLED and color filters with the analytical membrane was achieved using adhesive techniques facilitated by the planar nature of the layers, which suggests possible large scale manufacturing using roll-to-roll processing. Gray scale analysis from digital images captured with a digital camera was used to quantify the visual sensitivity. The signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limit of detection (LOD) of OLED integrated QD-LFIAs were compared to Au NP LFIAs. OLED QD-LFIA exhibited superior performance in all signal aspects: 7-8× higher signal intensity and SNR, and a 7× lower LOD of 3 nM (measured at S/N=3). These results demonstrate the potential of OLED-integrated in LFIA devices for obtaining sensitive, fast and low-cost POC diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons by fluorescent light from organic nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Józefowski, Leszek; Kawalec, Tomasz; Leißner, Till; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Adam, Jost; Fiutowski, Jacek

    2017-11-01

    Micro- and nano-scale systems with defined active elements acting as local surface plasmons polariton (SPP) sources are crucial for the development of future plasmonic circuits. We demonstrate SPP excitation by fluorescent light from crystalline organic para-hexaphenylene nanofibers deposited on a dielectric/metal surface. We characterize the SPPs using angle-resolved leakage radiation spectroscopy, in the excitation wavelength range 420 - 675 nm, corresponding to the nanofiber photoluminescence band. The nanofiber arrangement's capability to act as an SPP coupler for coherent as well as non-coherent excitation indicates its prospect for future integrated systems. To support our experimental results, we investigate the proposed geometries by analytical calculations and finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) modelling. The experimentally obtained angular leakage radiation peak positions can readily be predicted by our analytical calculations. Nevertheless, the experimental results exhibit a distinct asymmetry in the peak intensities. In agreement with our FDTD calculations, we address this asymmetrical SPP excitation to the nanofiber molecular orientation. The proposed structure's high flexibility, the ease of selective positioning of organic nanofibers, together with the gained insight into its photon-SPP coupling mechanism show great promise towards future local SPP excitation-based integrated devices.

  1. [Hair removal with intense pulsed light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Meng-Hua; Chen, Guo-Zhang; Yao, Li-Ying

    2005-07-01

    To evaluate the hair-removal effect of intense pulsed light (IPL). The unwanted hairs were removed with ELITE plus IPL. The treatment took 3 - 5 procedures, with an interval of over 2 months. 341 patients underwent the treatment. All the patients were well tolerant without anesthesia. The unwanted hairs were wholly removed after 3 - 5 procedures. After operation, routine cleaning and make-up were allowed and bandaging was not necessary. There were blister in 3 cases and infection in 1 case. No pigmentation and scarring happened. Following-up of 3 - 6 months showed steady results with less regeneration of very thin and soft hair. IPL is an ideal hair-removal method because of the credible effect, simple operation, rapid treatment and no serious complications.

  2. submitter Measurement of LYSO Intrinsic Light Yield Using Electron Excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez Turtos, Rosana; Pizzichemi, Marco; Ghezzi, Alessio; Pauwels, Kristof; Auffray, Etiennette; Lecoq, Paul; Paganoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the intrinsic light yield $(LY_{int})$ of scintillating crystals, i.e. number of optical photons created per amount of energy deposited, constitutes a key factor in order to characterize and optimize their energy and time resolution. However, until now measurements of this quantity are affected by large uncertainties and often rely on corrections for bulk absorption and surface/edge state. The novel idea presented in this contribution is based on the confinement of the scintillation emission in the central upper part of a 10 mm cubic crystal using a 1.5 MeV electron beam with diameter of 1 mm. A black non-reflective pinhole aligned with the excitation point is used to fix the light extraction solid angle (narrower than total reflection angle), which then sets a light cone travel path through the crystal. The final number of photoelectrons detected using a Hamamatsu R2059 photomultiplier tube (PMT) was corrected for the extraction solid angle, the Fresnel reflection coefficient and quantum...

  3. Hair removal with intense pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bedewi, Ahmed F

    2004-01-01

    The use of light and laser for hair removal has evolved during the past few years. Laser systems such as the ruby laser (694 nm), alexandrite laser (755 nm), diode laser (810 nm) and neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1,064 nm) are commonly used in hair removal. However, permanent hair removal has been difficult to achieve using lasers owing to the long growth/rest cycle of normal human hair follicles. There is still an increasing demand for safer and more efficient hair removal techniques. The latest and most effective choice in the treatment of hair removal is non-coherent intense pulsed light (IPL), which is both efficient and safe for hair removal. A group of 210 patients with skin type III-V were treated for superfluous hair in different areas of the body (face, extremities, axillae, bikini line and back) for three to five sessions at 6-week intervals using IPL. There was a significant hair reduction of about 80% with no side effects and minimal complications. Follow-up was done 6 months after the last session. In conclusion, IPL is very effective and safe for hair removal.

  4. Melasma treated with intense pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccali, Giovanni; Piccolo, Domenico; Allegra, Piergiorgio; Giuliani, Maurizio

    2010-08-01

    Hypermelanosis includes a diverse group of genetic and acquired skin anomalies that appear as darker, hyperpigmented areas. Melasma, in particular, is a hypermelanotic condition that affects sun-exposed skin in females. Whether this condition is acquired or genetic is still controversial. However, it clearly correlates with exposure to UV light, a genetic predisposition, and hormonal variations (from pregnancy or oral contraceptives). Between October 2006 and March 2008, 38 patients with melasma were treated with intense pulsed light (IPL) at the LASER Center of the Department of Health Science, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Session, University of L'Aquila. Diagnosis was based on medical history, physical examination, and video microscopy. Results were graded as excellent, good, moderate, or poor. Grades were given according to outcome scale and reported complications. All 38 patients had follow-up checks at 30 days, 3 months, and 6 months and someone at more than 1 year. Results were excellent in 18 patients (47.37%), good in 11 (28.95%), moderate in 5 (13.16%), and poor in 4 cases (10.52%). From a careful review of the scientific literature and according to our personal clinical experience, IPL stands out as an effective tool in the treatment and healing of a high percentage of hypermelanosis and melasma, with a very low risk of complications and an excellent satisfaction rate among patients.

  5. Infrared light excites cells by changing their electrical capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.; Homma, Kazuaki; Villarreal, Sebastian; Richter, Claus-Peter; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Optical stimulation has enabled important advances in the study of brain function and other biological processes, and holds promise for medical applications ranging from hearing restoration to cardiac pace making. In particular, pulsed laser stimulation using infrared wavelengths >1.5 μm has therapeutic potential based on its ability to directly stimulate nerves and muscles without any genetic or chemical pre-treatment. However, the mechanism of infrared stimulation has been a mystery, hindering its path to the clinic. Here we show that infrared light excites cells through a novel, highly general electrostatic mechanism. Infrared pulses are absorbed by water, producing a rapid local increase in temperature. This heating reversibly alters the electrical capacitance of the plasma membrane, depolarizing the target cell. This mechanism is fully reversible and requires only the most basic properties of cell membranes. Our findings underscore the generality of pulsed infrared stimulation and its medical potential. PMID:22415827

  6. Infrared light excites cells by changing their electrical capacitance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Mikhail G; Homma, Kazuaki; Villarreal, Sebastian; Richter, Claus-Peter; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2012-03-13

    Optical stimulation has enabled important advances in the study of brain function and other biological processes, and holds promise for medical applications ranging from hearing restoration to cardiac pace making. In particular, pulsed laser stimulation using infrared wavelengths >1.5 μm has therapeutic potential based on its ability to directly stimulate nerves and muscles without any genetic or chemical pre-treatment. However, the mechanism of infrared stimulation has been a mystery, hindering its path to the clinic. Here we show that infrared light excites cells through a novel, highly general electrostatic mechanism. Infrared pulses are absorbed by water, producing a rapid local increase in temperature. This heating reversibly alters the electrical capacitance of the plasma membrane, depolarizing the target cell. This mechanism is fully reversible and requires only the most basic properties of cell membranes. Our findings underscore the generality of pulsed infrared stimulation and its medical potential.

  7. Effect of light intensity on the cure characteristics of photo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the light intensity emitted by light curing units (LCUs) and its effect on the cure characteristics of composites polymerised with it. Design: A laboratory based cross sectional study. Setting: Public and private dental clinics in Nairobi, Kenya. Results: Thirty five (42.17%) LCUs produced light of intensity ...

  8. On the Intensity Profile of Electric Lamps and Light Bulbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacalla, Xavier; Salumbides, Edcel John

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that the time profile of the light intensity from domestic lighting sources exhibits simple yet interesting properties that foster lively student discussions. We monitor the light intensity of an industrial fluorescent lamp (also known as TL) and an incandescent bulb using a photodetector connected to an oscilloscope. The light…

  9. Excitation of coherent oscillations in underdoped cuprate superconductors by intense THz pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Turner, Joshua J.; Gerber, Simon M.; Bonn, Doug; Hardy, Walter; Liang, Ruixing; Salluzzo, Marco

    2016-05-01

    We use intense broadband THz pulses to excite the cuprate superconductors YBCO and NBCO in their underdoped phase, where superconducting and charge density wave ground states compete. We observe pronounced coherent oscillations at attributed to renormalized low-energy phonon modes. These oscillation features are much more prominent than those observed in all-optical pump-probe measurements, suggesting a different excitation mechanism.

  10. Unconventional use of intense pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, D; Di Marcantonio, D; Crisman, G; Cannarozzo, G; Sannino, M; Chiricozzi, A; Chimenti, S

    2014-01-01

    According to the literature, intense pulsed light (IPL) represents a versatile tool in the treatment of some dermatological conditions (i.e., pigmentation disorders, hair removal, and acne), due to its wide range of wavelengths. The authors herein report on 58 unconventional but effective uses of IPL in several cutaneous diseases, such as rosacea (10 cases), port-wine stain (PWS) (10 cases), disseminated porokeratosis (10 cases), pilonidal cyst (3 cases), seborrheic keratosis (10 cases), hypertrophic scar (5 cases) and keloid scar (5 cases), Becker's nevus (2 cases), hidradenitis suppurativa (2 cases), and sarcoidosis (1 case). Our results should suggest that IPL could represent a valid therapeutic support and option by providing excellent outcomes and low side effects, even though it should be underlined that the use and the effectiveness of IPL are strongly related to the operator's experience (acquired by attempting at least one specific course on the use of IPL and one-year experience in a specialized centre). Moreover, the daily use of these devices will surely increase clinical experience and provide new information, thus enhancing long-term results and improving IPL effectiveness.

  11. Unconventional Use of Intense Pulsed Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Piccolo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the literature, intense pulsed light (IPL represents a versatile tool in the treatment of some dermatological conditions (i.e., pigmentation disorders, hair removal, and acne, due to its wide range of wavelengths. The authors herein report on 58 unconventional but effective uses of IPL in several cutaneous diseases, such as rosacea (10 cases, port-wine stain (PWS (10 cases, disseminated porokeratosis (10 cases, pilonidal cyst (3 cases, seborrheic keratosis (10 cases, hypertrophic scar (5 cases and keloid scar (5 cases, Becker’s nevus (2 cases, hidradenitis suppurativa (2 cases, and sarcoidosis (1 case. Our results should suggest that IPL could represent a valid therapeutic support and option by providing excellent outcomes and low side effects, even though it should be underlined that the use and the effectiveness of IPL are strongly related to the operator’s experience (acquired by attempting at least one specific course on the use of IPL and one-year experience in a specialized centre. Moreover, the daily use of these devices will surely increase clinical experience and provide new information, thus enhancing long-term results and improving IPL effectiveness.

  12. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Oketa, Takatsugu; Masuda, Shinichi; Koga, James K.; Kondo, Shuji; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2002-10-01

    We investigate a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 1018 cm-3 is measured with a time-resolved frequency domain interferometer (FDI). The results show an accelerating wakefield excitation of 20 GeV/m with good coherency. This is the first time-resolved measurement of laser wakefield excitation in a gas-jet plasma. The experimental results agree with the simulation results and linear theory. The pump-probe interferometer system of FDI will be modified to the optical injection system as a relativistic electron beam injector. In 1D particle in cell simulation we obtain results of high quality intense electron beam generation.

  13. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) in Aesthetic Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytras, B.; Drozdowski, P.; Zub, K.

    2011-08-01

    Introduction. Newer and newer technologies have been widely developed in recent years due to increasing need for aesthetic medicine procedures. Less invasive methods of skin imperfection and time-related lesions removal, IPL (Intense Pulse Light) being one of them, are gaining more and more interest. The shorter the "downtime" for the patient is and the more efficient the procedure results, the more popular the method becomes. Materials and methods_Authors analyse the results of treatment of a 571 patients-group (501 women and 70 men) aged 5-72 years in the period: October 2006-August 2010. IPL™ Quantum (Lumenis Ltd.) device with 560 nm. cut-off filter was used. Results. The results were regarded as: very good, good or satisfying (%):Skin photoaging symptomes 37/40/23, Isolated facial dyschromia 30/55/25, Isolated facial erythema 62/34/4, Lower limbs teleangiectasia 12/36/52, Keratosis solaris on hands 100/-/-. Approximately half of the patients developed transitory erythema and 25%- transitory, mild, circumscribed oedema. Following undesirable effects were noted: skin thermal irritation (6,1% of the patients) and skin hypopigmentation (2% of the patients). Discussion. Results and post-treatment management proposed by authors are similar to those reported by other authors. Conclusions. Treatment results of the 571-patients group prove IPL to be a very efficient method of non-ablative skin rejuvenation. It turned out effective also in lower limbs teleangiectasia treatment. It presents low risk of transitory and mild side effects. Futhermore, with short or no downtime, it is well-tolerated by the patients.

  14. The Impact of Environmental Light Intensity on Experimental Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckow, Mark A; Wolter, William R; Duffield, Giles E

    2017-09-01

    Cancer research requires for consistent models that minimize environmental variables. Within the typical laboratory animal housing facility, animals may be exposed to varying intensities of light as a result of cage type, cage position, light source, and other factors; however, studies evaluating the differential effect of light intensity during the light phase on tumor growth are lacking. The effect of cage face light intensity, as determined by cage rack position was evaluated with two tumor models using the C57Bl/6NHsd mouse and transplantable B16F10 melanoma cells or Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. Animals were housed in individually-ventilated cages placed at the top, middle, or bottom of the rack in a diagonal pattern so that the top cage was closest to the ceiling light source, and cage face light intensity was measured. Following a two-week acclimation period at the assigned cage position, animals were subcutaneously administered either 1.3×106 B16F10 melanoma cells or 2.5×105 Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Weights of excised tumors were measured following euthanasia 18 days (melanoma) or 21 days (LCC) after tumor cell administration. Cage face light intensity was significantly different depending on the location of the cage, with cages closest to the light source have the greatest intensity. Mean tumor weights were significantly less (plight intensity mice compared to high and low light intensity mice. The environmental light intensity to which experimental animals are exposed may vary markedly with cage location and can significantly influence experimental tumor growth, thus supporting the idea that light intensity should be controlled as an experimental variable for animals used in cancer research. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Intensity-dependent modulatory effects of vagus nerve stimulation on cortical excitability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollet, L.; Grimonprez, A.; Raedt, R.; Delbeke, J.; El Tahry, R.; De Herdt, V.; Meurs, A.; Wadman, W.; Boon, P.; Vonck, K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES - Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an effective treatment for refractory epilepsy. It remains unknown whether VNS efficacy is dependent on output current intensity. The present study investigated the effect of various VNS output current intensities on cortical excitability in the motor

  16. Excitation energy transfer in individual light-harvesting chlorosome from green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Shibata, Yutaka; Itoh, Shigeru

    2005-06-01

    The excitation energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)- c self-aggregates to energy-accepting BChl- a in proteins (baseplates) in an individual photosynthetic light-harvesting complex (chlorosome) of a green filamentous photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was successfully observed at cryogenic temperature. The ratio of intensity of the fluorescence peak of BChl- a to that of BChl- c self-aggregates in individual chlorosomes, which demonstrated relative efficiency of the excitation energy transfer, was heterogeneous between 0.09 and 0.72. This suggests that excitonic interaction between BChl- c self-aggregates and BChl- a in baseplates was heterogeneous among individual chlorosomes.

  17. IR microscopy utilizing intense supercontinuum light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Sune; Petersen, Christian; Thøgersen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    . The supercontinuum light source has a high brightness and spans the infrared region from 1400 nm to 4000 nm. This combination allows contact free high resolution hyper spectral infrared microscopy. The microscope is demonstrated by imaging an oil/water sample with 20 μm resolution.......Combining the molecular specificity of the infrared spectral region with high resolution microscopy has been pursued by researchers for decades. Here we demonstrate infrared supercontinuum radiated from an optical fiber as a promising new light source for infrared microspectroscopy...

  18. Intense, ultrashort light and dense, hot matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    custom-built systems (commercial as well as those developed in-house – a picture is shown later). 3. The light pulse is almost impulsive in charac- ter. .... our Universe houses not just enormous, incred- ible amount of energy but stores it at remark- ...... The debate on whether or not waves influence the cascade mechanism ...

  19. Current-voltage characteristics of light-emitting diodes under optical and electrical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Jing; Wen Yumei; Li Ping; Li Lian, E-mail: wenjing@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Opto-Electronic Technologies and Systems of Ministry of Education, College of Opto-Electronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2011-08-15

    The factors influencing the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated to reveal the connection of I-V characteristics under optical excitation and those under electrical excitation. By inspecting the I-V curves under optical and electrical excitation at identical injection current, it has been found that the I-V curves exhibit apparent differences in voltage values. Furthermore, the differences are found to originate from the junction temperatures in diverse excitation ways. Experimental results indicate that if the thermal effect of illuminating spot is depressed to an ignorable extent by using pulsed light, the junction temperature will hardly deflect from that under optical excitation, and then the I-V characteristics under two diverse excitation ways will be the same.

  20. Current-voltage characteristics of light-emitting diodes under optical and electrical excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wen; Yumei, Wen; Ping, Li; Lian, Li

    2011-08-01

    The factors influencing the current—voltage (I—V) characteristics of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated to reveal the connection of I—V characteristics under optical excitation and those under electrical excitation. By inspecting the I—V curves under optical and electrical excitation at identical injection current, it has been found that the I—V curves exhibit apparent differences in voltage values. Furthermore, the differences are found to originate from the junction temperatures in diverse excitation ways. Experimental results indicate that if the thermal effect of illuminating spot is depressed to an ignorable extent by using pulsed light, the junction temperature will hardly deflect from that under optical excitation, and then the I—V characteristics under two diverse excitation ways will be the same.

  1. Exciting Graphene Surface Plasmon Polaritons through Light and Sound Interplay

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-12-05

    We propose a concept that allows for efficient excitation of surface plasmon spolaritons (SPPs) on a thin graphene sheet located on a substrate by an incident electromagnetic field. Elastic vibrations of the sheet, which are generated by a flexural wave, act as a grating that enables the electromagnetic field to couple to propagating graphene SPPs. This scheme permits fast on-off switching of the SPPs and dynamic tuning of their excitation frequency by adjusting the vibration frequency (grating period). Potential applications include single molecule detection and enhanced control of SPP trajectories via surface wave patterning of graphene metasurfaces. Analytical calculations and numerical experiments demonstrate the practical applicability of the proposed concept.

  2. LIGHT INTENSITY INFLUENCE ON STRONTIUM TITANATE BASED PHOTO- ELECTROCHEMICAL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hertkorn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of light intensity on photo-electrochemical cells (PECs consisting of an n-type strontium titanate (SrTiO₃ photoanode and nickel cathode in potassium hydroxide electrolyte is studied. The band levels of an electrolyte-metal-semiconductor-electrolyte system are presented and the effect of different light intensities on the energy levels is investigated. Photocurrent density, quantum efficiency, and open circuit potential measurements are performed on the processed PECs under different light intensities (375 nm. It is demonstrated that a threshold value of the light intensity has to be reached in order to obtain positive photo activity and that beyond this value the performance remains nearly constant.

  3. effect of light intensity on the cure characteristics of photo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-05

    May 5, 2012 ... 1800mWcm-2 group. Statistical analysis showed significant differences in the mean. DOC (p=0.000) and surface micro-hardness (p=0.002) for the different intensity groups. Conclusion: Light intensity output of LCUs has a significant influence on the cure characteristics of dental composites with both DOC ...

  4. Laser and intense pulsed light hair removal technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, M; Beerwerth, F; Nash, J F

    2011-01-01

    Light-based hair removal (LHR) is one of the fastest growing, nonsurgical aesthetic cosmetic procedures in the United States and Europe. A variety of light sources including lasers, e.g. alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) and broad-spectrum intense...

  5. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kotaki, H

    2002-01-01

    We investigate a mechanism of nonlinear phenomena in laser-plasma interaction, a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. We need to understand and further employ some of these phenomena for our purposes. We measure self-focusing, filamentation, and the anomalous blueshift of the laser pulse. The ionization of gas with the self-focusing causes a broad continuous spectrum with blueshift. The normal blueshift depends on the laser intensity and the plasma density. We, however, have found different phenomenon. The laser spectrum shifts to fixed wavelength independent of the laser power and gas pressure above some critical power. We call the phenomenon 'anomalous blueshift'. The results are explained by the formation of filaments. An intense laser pulse can excite a laser wakefield in plasma. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 10 sup 1 sup 8 cm sup - sup 3 is mea...

  6. Excited state dynamics in photosynthetic reaction center and light harvesting complex 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Key to efficient harvesting of sunlight in photosynthesis is the first energy conversion process in which electronic excitation establishes a trans-membrane charge gradient. This conversion is accomplished by the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) that is, in case of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides studied here, surrounded by light harvesting complex 1 (LH1). The RC employs six pigment molecules to initiate the conversion: four bacteriochlorophylls and two bacteriopheophytins. The excited states of these pigments interact very strongly and are simultaneously influenced by the surrounding thermal protein environment. Likewise, LH1 employs 32 bacteriochlorophylls influenced in their excited state dynamics by strong interaction between the pigments and by interaction with the protein environment. Modeling the excited state dynamics in the RC as well as in LH1 requires theoretical methods, which account for both pigment-pigment interaction and pigment-environment interaction. In the present study we describe the excitation dynamics within a RC and excitation transfer between light harvesting complex 1 (LH1) and RC, employing the hierarchical equation of motion method. For this purpose a set of model parameters that reproduce RC as well as LH1 spectra and observed oscillatory excitation dynamics in the RC is suggested. We find that the environment has a significant effect on LH1-RC excitation transfer and that excitation transfers incoherently between LH1 and RC.

  7. Search for gluonic excitations in light unconventional mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-07-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenologicalmodels for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  8. Structural intensity analysis of a large container carrier under harmonic excitations of propulsion system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Seung Cho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The structural intensity analysis, which calculates the magnitude and direction of vibrational energy flow from vibratory velocity and internal force at any point of a structure, can give information on dominant transmission paths, positions of sources and sinks of vibration energy. This paper presents a numerical simulation system for structural intensity analysis and visualization to apply for ship structures based on the finite element method. The system consists of a general purpose finite element analysis program MSC/Nastran, its pre- and post-processors and an in-house program module to calculate structural intensity using the model data and its forced vibration analysis results. Using the system, the structural intensity analysis for a 4,100 TEU container carrier is carried out to visualize structural intensity fields on the global ship structure and to investigate dominant energy flow paths from harmonic excitation sources to superstructure at resonant hull girder and superstructure modes.

  9. Temperature- and excitation intensity-dependent photoluminescence in TlInSeS single crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Gasanly, N M; Yuksek, N S

    2002-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of TlInSeS layered single crystals were investigated in the wavelength region 460-800 nm and in the temperature range 10-65 K. We observed one wide PL band centred at 584 nm (2.122 eV) at T=10 K and an excitation intensity of 7.5 W cm sup - sup 2. We have also studied the variation of the PL intensity versus excitation laser intensity in the range from 0.023 to 7.5 W cm sup - sup 2. The red shift of this band with increasing temperature and blue shift with increasing laser excitation intensity was observed. The PL was found to be due to radiative transitions from the moderately deep donor level located at 0.243 eV below the bottom of the conduction band to the shallow acceptor level at 0.023 eV located above the top of the valence band. The proposed energy-level diagram permits us to interpret the recombination processes in TlInSeS layered single crystals.

  10. Battery Charge Affects the Stability of Light Intensity from Light-emitting Diode Light-curing Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtaksin, A; Leevailoj, C

    This study investigated the influence of battery charge levels on the stability of light-emitting diode (LED) curing-light intensity by measuring the intensity from fully charged through fully discharged batteries. The microhardness of resin composites polymerized by the light-curing units at various battery charge levels was measured. The light intensities of seven fully charged battery LED light-curing units-1) LY-A180, 2) Bluephase, 3) Woodpecker, 4) Demi Plus, 5) Saab II, 6) Elipar S10, and 7) MiniLED-were measured with a radiometer (Kerr) after every 10 uses (20 seconds per use) until the battery was discharged. Ten 2-mm-thick cylindrical specimens of A3 shade nanofilled resin composite (PREMISE, Kerr) were prepared per LED light-curing unit group. Each specimen was irradiated by the fully charged light-curing unit for 20 seconds. The LED light-curing units were then used until the battery charge fell to 50%. Specimens were prepared again as described above. This was repeated again when the light-curing units' battery charge fell to 25% and when the light intensity had decreased to 400 mW/cm 2 . The top/bottom surface Knoop hardness ratios of the specimens were determined. The microhardness data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance with Tukey test at a significance level of 0.05. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine significant correlations between surface hardness and light intensity. We found that the light intensities of the Bluephase, Demi Plus, and Elipar S10 units were stable. The intensity of the MiniLED unit decreased slightly; however, it remained above 400 mW/cm 2 . In contrast, the intensities of the LY-A180, Woodpecker, and Saab II units decreased below 400 mW/cm 2 . There was also a significant decrease in the surface microhardnesses of the resin composite specimens treated with MiniLED, LY-A180, Woodpecker, and Saab II. In conclusion, the light intensity of several LED light-curing units decreased as the battery was

  11. Excitation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons by Fluorescent Light from Organic Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Jozefowski, Leszek; Kawalec, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    -coherent excitation indicates its prospect for future integrated systems. To support our experimental results, we investigate the proposed geometries by analytical calculations and finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) modelling. The experimentally obtained angular leakage radiation peak positions can readily...... be predicted by our analytical calculations. Nevertheless, the experimental results exhibit a distinct asymmetry in the peak intensities. In agreement with our FDTD calculations, we address this asymmetrical SPP excitation to the nanofiber molecular orientation. The proposed structure’s high flexibility...

  12. The blue light indicator in rubidium 5S-5P-5D cascade excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Waseem; Ali, Md. Sabir; Chakrabarti, Alok; Ray, Ayan

    2017-07-01

    The cascade system has played an important role in contemporary research areas related to fields like Rydberg excitation, four wave mixing and non-classical light generation, etc. Depending on the specific objective, co or counter propagating pump-probe laser experimental geometry is followed. However, the stepwise excitation of atoms to states higher than the first excited state deals with increasingly much fewer number of atoms even compared to the population at first excited level. Hence, one needs a practical indicator to study the complex photon-atom interaction of the cascade system. Here, we experimentally analyze the case of rubidium 5S → 5P → 5D as a specimen of two-step excitation and highlight the efficacy of monitoring one branch, which emits 420 nm, of associated cascade decay route 5D → 6P → 5S, as an effective monitor of the coherence in the system.

  13. Lead paint removal with high-intensity light pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapperhaus, Michael J; Schaefer, Raymond B

    2006-12-15

    This paper presents the results of an initial investigation into using high-intensity incoherent light pulses to strip paint. Measurements of light pulse characteristics, the reflectivity of different paints and initial experiments on the threshold for paint removal, and paint removal are presented, along with an approximate model consistent with experimental results. Paint removal tests include lead paint, the reduction of lead levels to below levels required for lead abatement, as well as air and light emissions measurements that are within regulatory guidelines.

  14. Design of Automatic Intensity Varying Smart Street Lighting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Gupta, Shipra

    2017-08-01

    The paper is proposed with an aim of power conservation. In this era of development, it is essential to develop a streetlight that turns on and off automatically without human interference. To achieve this light sensor have been placed in each panel which turns the street light on and off automatically. For energy conservation cool-white LED’s have been used in street light panel and dimmer modules have been installed which changes the intensity of the streetlight depending on the darkness.

  15. Open system perspective on incoherent excitation of light-harvesting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Botero, Juan D.; Brumer, Paul

    2017-09-01

    The nature of excited states of open quantum systems produced by incoherent natural thermal light is analyzed based on a description of the quantum dynamical map. Natural thermal light is shown to generate long-lasting coherent dynamics because of (i) the super-Ohmic character of the radiation, and (ii) the absence of pure dephasing dynamics. In the presence of an environment, the long-lasting coherences induced by suddenly turned-on incoherent light dissipate and stationary coherences are established. As a particular application, dynamics in a subunit of the PC645 light-harvesting complex is considered where it is further shown that aspects of the energy pathways landscape depend on the nature of the exciting light and number of chromophores excited. Specifically, pulsed laser and natural broadband incoherent excitation induce significantly different energy transfer pathways. In addition, we discuss differences in perspective associated with the eigenstate versus site basis, and note an important difference in the phase of system coherences when coupled to blackbody radiation or when coupled to a phonon background. Finally, an appendix contains an open systems example of the loss of coherence as the turn-on time of the light assumes natural time scales.

  16. A single molecule as a high-fidelity photon gun for producing intensity-squeezed light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiao-Liu; Götzinger, Stephan; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    A two-level atom cannot emit more than one photon at a time. As early as the 1980s, this quantum feature was identified as a gateway to 'single-photon sources', where a regular excitation sequence would create a stream of light particles with photon number fluctuations below the shot noise. Such an intensity-squeezed beam of light would be desirable for a range of applications, such as quantum imaging, sensing, enhanced precision measurements and information processing. However, experimental realizations of these sources have been hindered by large losses caused by low photon-collection efficiencies and photophysical shortcomings. By using a planar metallodielectric antenna applied to an organic molecule, we demonstrate the most regular stream of single photons reported to date. The measured intensity fluctuations were limited by our detection efficiency and amounted to 2.2 dB squeezing.

  17. Development of atomic spectroscopy technologies - Study on the ac stark from intense light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Dong Hyun; Lim, Dong Kun; Park, Chang Yong; Lee, Chung Mok [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    We studied the ac Stark shift on heavy atoms from an intense laser light using the spherical tensor formalism. In the experimental part, we used a low-velocity intense source constructed from a magneto-optical trap and the stimulated Raman spectroscopy as well as a vapor cell with the saturated absorption spectroscopy. We found that when the laser light is circularly polarized and properly detuned the resulting ac Stark shift could take the form of a pure Zeeman shift. We also found a condition where an atomic clock driven by a stimulated Raman process did not have a systematic shift from the ac Stark shift. We also studied the energy shift of an excited state in relation to that of the ground state. 10 refs., 18 figs. (Author)

  18. Effect of temperature, light intensity and growth regulators on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ansellia africana (Orchidaceae) is an important endangered medicinal plant species of South Africa which has been heavily exploited in recent years. Experiments were conducted in growth rooms at different temperatures (16, 26, 36°C) and in a nursery at different light intensities induced by shade cloth densities (200, 400, ...

  19. Effects of light intensity on cylindrospermopsin production in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of light intensity on growth and the production of the hepatotoxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) in the cyanobacterial harmful algal bloom species Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii was investigated using cultured isolates grown in N-free media under a series of neutral density screens. Maximum growth as indicated by ...

  20. Blue luminescence of SrTiO3 under intense optical excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubano, A.; Paparo, D.; Granozio, F. Miletto; Scotti di Uccio, U.; Marrucci, L.

    2009-11-01

    The blue-green photoluminescence emitted by pure and electron-doped strontium titanate under intense pulsed near-ultraviolet excitation is studied experimentally as a function of excitation intensity and temperature. Both emission spectra and time-resolved decays of the emission are measured and analyzed in the framework of simple phenomenological models. We find an interesting blue-to-green transition occurring for increasing temperatures in pure samples, which is absent in doped materials. The luminescence yield and decay rate measured as a function of temperature can be modeled well as standard activated behaviors. The leading electron-hole recombination process taking place in the initial decay is established to be second order, or bimolecular, in contrast to recent reports favoring a third-order interpretation as an Auger process. The temporal decay of the luminescence can be described well by a model based on two interacting populations of excitations, respectively identified with interacting defect-trapped (possibly forming excitons) and mobile charges. Finally, from the measured doping and sample dependence of the luminescence yield, we conclude that the radiative centers responsible for the luminescence are probably intrinsic structural defects other than bulk oxygen vacancies.

  1. Selective emission and luminescence of Er2O3 under intense laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, V. M.; Iskhakova, L. D.; Studenikin, M. I.

    2013-09-01

    The microstructure of Er2O3 polycrystals synthesised by laser heating is studied. The synthesis of erbium silicate (Er2SiO5) layers was observed upon interaction of Er2O3 and SiO2 melts. The dependences of the selective emission (SE) and luminescence spectra of Er2O3 polycrystals in the range 200 - 1700 nm on the intensity of laser-thermal (at the wavelength λ = 10.6 μm) and resonant laser (λ ≈ 975 nm) excitation are investigated. The emission of heated Er2O3 polycrystals arises as a result of multiphonon relaxation of absorbed energy and is a superposition of the SE at the electronic-vibrational transitions of Er3+ ions and the thermal radiation of the crystal lattice. The shape of the SE spectra of Er2O3 polycrystals in the range 400 - 1700 nm almost does not change upon laser-thermal heating from 300 to 1500 K and subsequent cooling and corresponds to the absorption spectra of Er3+ ions. With increasing temperature, the thermal radiation intensity increases faster than the SE intensity, and the shape of the Er2O3 spectrum becomes closer to the calculated spectrum of a blackbody. The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Er3+ ions formed under intense laser excitation of the 4I11/2 level are explained by additional SE caused by heating of the crystal matrix due to the Stokes losses. A difference between the SE and luminescence spectra is observed at low intensities of resonant laser excitation and low temperatures, when only the Stokes luminescence occurs. The temperature dependences of the SE and luminescence spectra of Er2O3 upon laser excitation testify to the fundamental role played by the interaction of the electronic f-shell of Er3+ ions with crystal lattice vibrations in the processes of multiphonon radiative and nonradiative relaxation. The laser-thermal synthesis is promising for inprocess variation of the chemical composition of rare-earth samples.

  2. Rhodopsin gene expression regulated by the light dark cycle, light spectrum and light intensity in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shi, Xinguo; Li, Ling; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Xin; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    .... While found in several lineages of dinoflagellates, this gene has not been studied in Prorocentrales species and whether it functionally tunes to light spectra and intensities as in bacteria remains unclear...

  3. Before there was light : Excited state dynamics in luminescent (nano)materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouw, F.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413318036

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we examine two types of luminescent materials: colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (also known as quantum dots), and crystals doped with lanthanide ions. These materials convert one color of light to another. By investigating the dynamics of the excited state, we gain new insights

  4. Coherent effects in the relaxation dynamics of a multilevel quantum system excited by ultrashort light pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbukh, I.Sh; Kovarsky, V.A.; Perelman, N.F.

    1989-05-22

    Interference effects in luminescence produced by short light pulse excitation of a single quantum level interacting with a quasi-continuum of background states have been considered. Different regimes of subsequent luminescence quenching are revealed and analytically studied in a unified way: radiationless decay controlled emission, multiple repetitions of the initial pulse form, anharmonic dephasing and following revival, etc. (orig.).

  5. Excitation of a global plasma mode by an intense electron beam in a dc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydorenko, D.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Ventzek, P. L. G.; Chen, L.

    2018-01-01

    The interaction of an intense electron beam with a finite-length, inhomogeneous plasma is investigated numerically. The plasma density profile is maximal in the middle and decays towards the plasma edges. Two regimes of the two-stream instability are observed. In one regime, the frequency of the instability is the plasma frequency at the density maximum and plasma waves are excited in the middle of the plasma. In the other regime, the frequency of the instability matches the local plasma frequency near the edges of the plasma and the intense plasma oscillations occur near plasma boundaries. The latter regime appears sporadically and only for strong electron beam currents. This instability generates a copious amount of suprathermal electrons. The energy transfer to suprathermal electrons is the saturation mechanism of the instability.

  6. Spectral characteristics of intense red luminescence in Pr:Y2O3 nanophosphor on UV excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kavita; Dwivedi, Y.; Rai, A.; Rai, S. B.

    2012-12-01

    Detailed structural and spectroscopic characterizations of Pr:Y2O3 nanophosphor have been carried out. On ultraviolet light (at 266 nm) excitation, intense red emission along with weak emissions in blue, green and infrared regions have been observed. The phenomena for the observed emission have been thoroughly explained in the present work and it was finally concluded that the direct excitation through low-lying 4f15d band of Pr3+ ions and through the conduction band of Y2O3 nanophosphor are the main channels for the observed emissions. The calculated quantum efficiency (QE) for the red emission is found to be ~80 % while the CIE coordinates are (0.65, 0.34) quite close to the standard values. These studies clearly indicate that Pr:Y2O3 nanophosphors are promising and futuristic red luminescent material for the development of various display devices and UV detectors. Time resolved spectroscopy has been further used to investigate luminescence dynamics.

  7. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  8. Effect of temporary changes in light intensity on carbon transport, partitioning and respiratory loss in young tomato seedlings raised under different light intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Takashi; Shishido, Yoshihiro; Murakami, Hiroharu

    2009-07-01

    Tomato plants were grown under light intensities of 36 or 90 W m(-2) [photosynthetically active radiation (PAR)], and then the light intensity was changed to 36, 90 or 180 W m(-2) for 8 h to investigate the effect of temporary changes in light intensity on the carbon budget of photoassimilates from the third leaf using a (14)CO(2) steady-state feeding method. In the plants that were raised under 90 W m(-2), the photosynthetic rate increased when the light intensity was increased to 180 W m(-2), whereas no increase occurred in the plants that were raised under 36 W m(-2). Although the total amount of carbon fixed during the 8-h light period showed a large difference between plants grown at the two initial light intensities, the proportion of carbon exported during the light period did not differ apparently, irrespective of the change in light intensity. However, the amount of carbon exported during the time course was higher in plants that were raised under 90 W m(-2) than those raised under 36 W m(-2), irrespective of the change in light intensity. The partitioning pattern of (14)C-photoassimilates was not changed by the change in light intensity, irrespective of whether the light intensity was increased or not. However, the amount of (14)C-photoassimilates accumulated in each part differed according to the two initial light intensities. The carbon transport from a source leaf was also investigated through a quantitative analysis of carbon balance.

  9. Light intensity-dependent retrograde signalling in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2013-11-15

    Plants are able to acclimate to highly fluctuating light environment and evolved a short- and long-term light acclimatory responses, that are dependent on chloroplasts retrograde signalling. In this review we summarise recent evidences suggesting that the chloroplasts act as key sensors of light intensity changes in a wide range (low, high and excess light conditions) as well as sensors of darkness. They also participate in transduction and synchronisation of systemic retrograde signalling in response to differential light exposure of distinct leaves. Regulation of intra- and inter-cellular chloroplast retrograde signalling is dependent on the developmental and functional stage of the plastids. Therefore, it is discussed in following subsections: firstly, chloroplast biogenic control of nuclear genes, for example, signals related to photosystems and pigment biogenesis during early plastid development; secondly, signals in the mature chloroplast induced by changes in photosynthetic electron transport, reactive oxygen species, hormones and metabolite biosynthesis; thirdly, chloroplast signalling during leaf senescence. Moreover, with a help of meta-analysis of multiple microarray experiments, we showed that the expression of the same set of genes is regulated specifically in particular types of signals and types of light conditions. Furthermore, we also highlight the alternative scenarios of the chloroplast retrograde signals transduction and coordination linked to the role of photo-electrochemical signalling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. 1.319 μm excited intense 800 nm frequency upconversion emission in Tm{sup 3+}-doped fluorogermanate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia-Neto, A. S.; Vermelho, M. V. D.; Gouveia, E. A.; Jacinto, C., E-mail: cjacinto@fis.ufal.br [Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil); Bueno, L. A. [Universidade de Sorocaba, 18023-000 Sorocaba-SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-23

    Generation of near-infrared light within the first biological optical window via frequency upconversion in Tm{sup 3+}-doped PbGeO{sub 3}-PbF{sub 2}-CdF{sub 2} glass excited within the second biological window at 1.319 μm is reported. The upconversion emission at 800 nm is the sole light signal observed in the entire ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectral region making it possible obtaining high contrast imaging. The dependence of the 800 nm signal upon the sample temperature was investigated and results showed an increase by a factor of ×2.5 in the 30–280 °C range. Generation of detectable 690 nm for temperatures above 100 °C in addition to the intense 800 nm main signal was also observed. The proposed excitation mechanism for the 800 nm thulium emitting level is assigned to a multiphonon-assisted excitation from the ground-state {sup 3}H{sub 6} to the {sup 3}H{sub 5} excited-state level, a rapid relaxation to the {sup 3}F{sub 4} level and followed by an excited-state absorption of the pump photons mediated by multiphonons connecting the {sup 3}F{sub 4} level to the {sup 3}H{sub 4} emitting level.

  11. Visible-Light Excitation of a Molecular Motor with an Extended Aromatic Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Pol, Jasper; Roke, Diederik; Wezenberg, Sander J; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-03-17

    Exploring routes to visible-light-driven rotary motors, the possibility of red-shifting the excitation wavelength of molecular motors by extension of the aromatic core is studied. Introducing a dibenzofluorenyl moiety in a standard molecular motor resulted in red-shifting of the absorption spectrum. UV/vis and 1 H NMR spectroscopy showed that these motors could be isomerized with light of wavelengths up to 490 nm and that the structural modification did not impair the anticipated rotary behavior. Extension of the aromatic core is therefore a suitable strategy to apply in pursuit of visible-light-driven molecular motors.

  12. Direct observation of surface mode excitation and slow light coupling in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V.S.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2007-01-01

    A scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) is used to systematically study the properties of guided modes in linear and slow-light regimes of silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) with different terminations of the photonic lattice. High quality SNOM images...... are obtained for light at telecom wavelengths propagating in the PhCW, demonstrating directly, for the first time to our knowledge, drastic widening of the PhCW guided mode in the slow-light regime and excitation of surface waves at the PhCW interface along with their feeding into the guided mode...

  13. Current indications and new applications of intense pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, A J; Lorente-Gual, R

    2015-06-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) systems have evolved since they were introduced into medical practice 20 years ago. Pulsed light is noncoherent, noncollimated, polychromatic light energy emitted at different wavelengths that target specific chromophores. This selective targeting capability makes IPL a versatile therapy with many applications, from the treatment of pigmented or vascular lesions to hair removal and skin rejuvenation. Its large spot size ensures a high skin coverage rate. The nonablative nature of IPL makes it an increasingly attractive alternative for patients unwilling to accept the adverse effects associated with other procedures, which additionally require prolonged absence from work and social activities. In many cases, IPL is similar to laser therapy in effectiveness, and its versatility, convenience, and safety will lead to an expanded range of applications and possibilities in coming years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three...... observation period. Side effects were evaluated clinically. No tumors appeared in untreated control mice or in just IPL-treated mice. Skin tumors developed in UV-exposed mice independently of IPL treatments. The time it took for 50% of the mice to first develop skin tumor ranged from 47 to 49 weeks...... in preoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.94) and from 22 to 23 weeks in pre- and postoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.11). IPL rejuvenation of lightly pigmented skin did not induce pigmentary changes (p=1.00). IPL rejuvenation of UV-pigmented skin resulted in an immediate increased skin pigmentation and a subsequent...

  15. Nonlinear excitations and charge transport in lithium niobate crystals investigated using femtosecond-light gratings; Nichtlineare Anregungen und Ladungstransport in Lithiumniobatkristallen untersucht mit Femtosekunden-Lichtgittern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxein, Karl Dominik

    2009-12-15

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) is a widely employed material in nonlinear optics and photonics. Its usage is hampered by the photorefractive effect, which can destroy beam profiles and phase matching conditions. Existing methods to suppress photorefraction fail for the interesting regime of very high intensities and short pulses. Therefore, the photorefractive effect is investigated using femtosecond laser pulses: By utilizing so-called 2K holography, the occupation of energetically shallow traps is observed to occur in less than 100 fs after a two-photon excitation. Writing of photorefractive gratings into oxidized iron-doped LiNbO{sub 3} is much faster with pulses than with cw light. This is explained by the sensitization of the crystal due to charge trapping in photorefractive centers after nonlinear excitations. Finally, light-induced scattering of pulse light is suppressed compared to the scattering of cw light due to the small coherence length of pulses. (orig.)

  16. Fast and effective: intense pulse light photodynamic inactivation of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Tim; Spannberger, Franz; Regensburger, Johannes; Felgenträger, Ariane; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the photodynamic toxicity of TMPyP (5, 10, 15, 20-Tetrakis (1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-porphyrin tetra p-toluenesulfonate) in combination with short pulses (ms) of an intense pulse light source within 10 s against Bacillus atrophaeus, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Escherichia coli, major pathogens in food industry and in health care, respectively. Bacteria were incubated with a photoactive dye (TMPyP) that is subsequently irradiated with visible light flashes of 100 ms to induce oxidative damage immediately by generation of reactive oxygen species like singlet oxygen. A photodynamic killing efficacy of up to 6 log(10) (>99.9999%) was achieved within a total treatment time of 10 s using a concentration range of 1-100 μmol TMPyP and multiple light flashes of 100 ms (from 20 J cm(-2) up to 80 J cm(-2)). Both incubation of bacteria with TMPyP alone or application of light flashes only did not have any negative effect on bacteria survival. Here we could demonstrate for the first time that the combination of TMPyP as the respective photosensitizer and a light flash of 100 ms of an intense pulsed light source is enough to generate sufficient amounts of reactive oxygen species to kill these pathogens within a few seconds. Increasing antibiotic resistance requires fast and efficient new approaches to kill bacteria, therefore the photodynamic process seems to be a promising tool for disinfection of horizontal surfaces in industry and clinical purposes where savings in time is a critical point to achieve efficient inactivation of microorganisms.

  17. Lighting Direction and Visual Field Modulate Perceived Intensity of Illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E McCourt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When interpreting object shape from shading the visual system exhibits a strong bias that illumination comes from above and slightly from the left. We asked whether such biases in the perceived direction of illumination might also influence its perceived intensity. Arrays of nine cubes were stereoscopically rendered where individual cubes varied in their 3D pose, but possessed identical triplets of visible faces. Arrays were virtually illuminated from one of four directions: Above-Left, Above-Right, Below-Left, and Below-Right (±24.4o azimuth; ±90o elevation. Illumination intensity possessed 15 levels, resulting in mean cube array luminances ranging from 1.31-3.45 cd/m2. A reference array was consistently illuminated from Above-Left at mid-intensity (mean array luminance = 2.38 cd/m2. The reference array’s illumination was compared to that of matching arrays which were illuminated from all four directions at all intensities. Reference and matching arrays appeared in the left and right visual field, respectively, or vice versa. Subjects judged which cube array appeared to be under more intense illumination. Using the method of constant stimuli we determined the illumination level of matching arrays required to establish subjective equality with the reference array as a function of matching cube visual field, illumination elevation, and illumination azimuth. Cube arrays appeared significantly more intensely illuminated when they were situated in the left visual field (p = .017, and when they were illuminated from below (p = .001, and from the left (p = .001. An interaction of modest strength was that the effect of illumination azimuth was greater for matching arrays situated in the left visual field (p = .042. We propose that objects lit from below appear more intensely illuminated than identical objects lit from above due to long-term adaptation to downward lighting. The amplification of perceived intensity of illumination for stimuli

  18. Study on light intensity in the process of photocatalytic degradation of indoor gaseous formaldehyde for saving energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liping [Research Center of Combustion and Environmental Technology, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Liu, Zhenyan [Research Center of Combustion and Environmental Technology, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)]. E-mail: yanglp@sjtu.edu.cn

    2007-03-15

    The light intensity, one of the most important factors for photocatalysis, directly influences the photocatalytic reaction rate and the utilization ratio of energy. Its rational selection has vital significance for saving energy. In the present paper, light energy losses in the heterogeneous photocatalysis process were analyzed. A method was presented to determine appropriate light intensities for the photocatalytic degradation of indoor gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on the degradation mechanism. For simplifying the method, an excess coefficient of light intensity was defined based on the assumption of complete utilization of excited electron-hole pairs. The excess coefficients and the appropriate light intensities for degrading formaldehyde were determined according to the data from a titania-coated glass plate reactor and a titania-coated reticular foam nickel reactor. The results showed that the derived light intensities according to our method were appropriate. Good degradation performance and high utilization ratio of light energy can be attained simultaneously when the excess coefficient was 1.3-1.5 for formaldehyde with the concentration from 20.45 {mu}mol/m{sup 3} (0.5 ppm) to 81.8 {mu}mol/m{sup 3} (2 ppm), which is the concentration range of formaldehyde in 'sick buildings'.

  19. High-intensity light-emitting diode vs fluorescent tubes for intensive phototherapy in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbiny, Hanan S; Youssef, Doaa M; Sherbini, Ahmad S; El-Behedy, Rabab; Sherief, Laila M

    2016-05-01

    Special blue fluorescent tubes are recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) as the most effective light source for lowering serum bilirubin. A high-intensity light-emitting diode ('super LED') could render intensive phototherapy more effective than the above conventional methods. This study compared the efficacy and safety of a high-intensity light-emitting diode bed vs conventional intensive phototherapy with triple fluorescent tube units as a rescue treatment for severe unconjugated neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia. This was a randomised, prospective trial. Two hundred jaundiced neonates ≥ 35 weeks gestation who met the criteria for intensive phototherapy as per AAP guidelines were randomly assigned to be treated either with triple fluorescent tube units (group 1, n = 100) or a super LED bed (group 2, n = 100). The outcome was the avoidance of exchange transfusion by successful control of hyperbilirubinaemia. Statistically significant higher success rates of intensive phototherapy were achieved among neonates treated with super LED (group 2) than in those treated conventionally (group 1) (87% vs 64%, P = 0.003). Significantly higher 'bilirubin decline' rates were reported in both haemolytic and non-haemolytic subgroups treated with the super LED bed compared with a similar sub-population in the conventionally treated group. Comparable numbers of neonates in both groups developed rebound jaundice (8% vs 10% of groups 1 and 2, respectively). Side-effects were mild in both groups, but higher rates of hyperthermia (12% vs 0%, P = 0.03), dehydration (8% vs 2%, P = 0.26) and skin rash (39% vs 1%, P = 0.002) were reported in the fluorescent tubes-treated group compared with the LED group. Super LED is a safe rescue treatment for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia, and its implementation may reduce the need for exchange transfusion.

  20. Influence of geomagnetic field for continuous wave (CW) laser excited sodium guide stars backward fluorescence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-peng; Wang, Hong-yan; Hua, Wei-hong; Ning, Yu; Xu, Xiao-jun

    2013-09-01

    Recent years, benefited from their greater coverage and smaller focus anisoplanatism, sodium laser guide stars are becoming more attractive in providing artificial beacons for adaptive optical (AO) system in large ground telescopes compared to Rayleigh guide stars. And it had been found that the Sodium laser guide stars backward fluorescence intensity is closely related with the local magnetic field intensity and direction. In this paper, we make use of the World Magnetic Model (WMM) 2010 and by considering the geographical differences in Beijing, Nanjing and Kunming we investigate the effects of the light intensity, line-width, polarization of the CW laser and re-pumping conditions on the photon return flux by numerically solving the Rochester et al. Bloch model. So in theory we can get better Sodium guide star in Beijing. In conclusion, according to the simulation results, we can acquire much bright of Sodium guide stars by optimize the parameter of the launched 589 nm laser.

  1. Vibronic resonances sustain excited state coherence in light harvesting proteins at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Novelli, Fabio; Roozbeh, Ashkan; Wilk, Krystyna E; Curmi, Paul M G; Davis, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that photosynthesis, a fundamental process for life on earth, could be fully understood with semi-classical models. However, puzzling quantum phenomena have been observed in several photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, prompting questions regarding the nature and role of these effects. Recent attention has focused on discrete vibrational modes that are resonant or quasi-resonant with excitonic energy splittings and strongly coupled to these excitonic states. Here we report a series of experiments that unambiguously identify excited state coherent superpositions that dephase on the timescale of the excited state lifetime. Low energy (56 cm-1) oscillations on the signal intensity provide direct experimental evidence for the role of vibrational modes resonant with excitonic splittings in sustaining coherences involving different excited excitonic states at physiological temperature.

  2. The instantaneous light-intensity function of a fluorescent lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluskin, Emanuel [Holon Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb St., Holon 58102 (Israel): Electrical Engineering Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: gluskin@ee.bgu.ac.il; Topalis, Frangiskos V. [Technical University of Athens, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 9 Iroon Politechniou St., 15780 Athens (Greece); Kateri, Ifigenia [Technical University of Athens, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 9 Iroon Politechniou St., 15780 Athens (Greece); Bisketzis, Nikolas [Technical University of Athens, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 9 Iroon Politechniou St., 15780 Athens (Greece)

    2006-05-08

    Using some simple physics and 'system' considerations, the instantaneous light intensity function {psi}(t) of a fluorescent lamp fed via a regular ballast from the 50-60 Hz line is argued to be {psi}(t)={psi}{sub min}+bp(t), where p(t) is the instantaneous power function of the lamp, and b is a constant, and experiment confirms this formula well. The main frequency of {psi}(t), the very significant singularity of its waveform, and the relative intensity of the ripple, i.e., the depth of the modulation, are the focus. The results are important for research into the vision problem that some humans (autistic, but others, too) experience regarding fluorescent light. The inertia of the processes in the lamp which are responsible for the light emission, provides some nonzero emission at the instants when p(t) has zeros. The smaller the volume of the tube and the mass of the gas are, the more weakly the inertia of the processes is expressed, and the relatively smaller is {psi}{sub min}. However, it should be very difficult to theoretically obtain {psi}(t), in particular {psi}{sub min}, from the very complicated physics of the low-pressure discharge in the tube. We conclude that {psi}{sub min} has to be connected with the (also easily measured) lamp's inductance. The work should attract more attention of the physicists to the properties of the common fluorescent lamps. escent lamps.

  3. The instantaneous light-intensity function of a fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluskin, Emanuel; Topalis, Frangiskos V.; Kateri, Ifigenia; Bisketzis, Nikolas

    2006-05-01

    Using some simple physics and “system” considerations, the instantaneous light intensity function ψ(t) of a fluorescent lamp fed via a regular ballast from the 50 60 Hz line is argued to be ψ(t)=ψ+bp(t), where p(t) is the instantaneous power function of the lamp, and b is a constant, and experiment confirms this formula well. The main frequency of ψ(t), the very significant singularity of its waveform, and the relative intensity of the ripple, i.e., the depth of the modulation, are the focus. The results are important for research into the vision problem that some humans (autistic, but others, too) experience regarding fluorescent light. The inertia of the processes in the lamp which are responsible for the light emission, provides some nonzero emission at the instants when p(t) has zeros. The smaller the volume of the tube and the mass of the gas are, the more weakly the inertia of the processes is expressed, and the relatively smaller is ψ. However, it should be very difficult to theoretically obtain ψ(t), in particular ψ, from the very complicated physics of the low-pressure discharge in the tube. We conclude that ψ has to be connected with the (also easily measured) lamp's inductance. The work should attract more attention of the physicists to the properties of the common fluorescent lamps.

  4. Phytoplankton productivity in relation to light intensity: A simple equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D.H.; Perry, M.J.; Bencala, K.E.; Talbot, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    A simple exponential equation is used to describe photosynthetic rate as a function of light intensity for a variety of unicellular algae and higher plants where photosynthesis is proportional to (1-e-??1). The parameter ?? (=Ik-1) is derived by a simultaneous curve-fitting method, where I is incident quantum-flux density. The exponential equation is tested against a wide range of data and is found to adequately describe P vs. I curves. The errors associated with photosynthetic parameters are calculated. A simplified statistical model (Poisson) of photon capture provides a biophysical basis for the equation and for its ability to fit a range of light intensities. The exponential equation provides a non-subjective simultaneous curve fitting estimate for photosynthetic efficiency (a) which is less ambiguous than subjective methods: subjective methods assume that a linear region of the P vs. I curve is readily identifiable. Photosynthetic parameters ?? and a are used widely in aquatic studies to define photosynthesis at low quantum flux. These parameters are particularly important in estuarine environments where high suspended-material concentrations and high diffuse-light extinction coefficients are commonly encountered. ?? 1987.

  5. Resonance excitation and light concentration in sets of dielectric nanocylinders in front of a subwavelength aperture. Effects on extraordinary transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Valero, F J; Nieto-Vesperinas, M

    2010-03-29

    We study the excitation of whispering gallery modes (WGM) in dielectric nanocylinders by light transmitted through a subwavelength slit in a metallic slab. Calculations are done both by the finite elements method and using FDTD simulations. We discuss the effect of that excitation on extraordinary transmission by the slit. In this way, we show the dominant role of the WGMs over the aperture enhanced transmission as regards the resulting transmitted intensity and its concentration inside the cylinders. When sets of these particles are placed in front of the slit, like linear or bifurcated chains, with or without bends, the concentration of WGMs is controlled by designing the geometry parameters, so that these surface waves are coupled by both waveguiding of the nanocylinder eigenmodes and by scattered propagating waves. Also, the choice of the wavelength and polarization of the illumination, allows to select the excitation of either bonding or antibonding states of the field transmitted through the aperture into the particles. These resonances are further enhanced when a beam emerges from the slit due to adding a periodic corrugation in the slab.

  6. Low-cost photoacoustic imaging systems based on laser diode and light-emitting diode excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingkai Yao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging, an emerging biomedical imaging modality, holds great promise for preclinical and clinical researches. It combines the high optical contrast and high ultrasound resolution by converting laser excitation into ultrasonic emission. In order to generate photoacoustic signal efficiently, bulky Q-switched solid-state laser systems are most commonly used as excitation sources and hence limit its commercialization. As an alternative, the miniaturized semiconductor laser system has the advantages of being inexpensive, compact, and robust, which makes a significant effect on production-forming design. It is also desirable to obtain a wavelength in a wide range from visible to near-infrared spectrum for multispectral applications. Focussing on practical aspect, this paper reviews the state-of-the-art developments of low-cost photoacoustic system with laser diode and light-emitting diode excitation source and highlights a few representative installations in the past decade.

  7. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  8. Microscopic Observation of the Light-Cone-Like Thermal Correlations in Cracking Excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2016-01-01

    Many seemingly intractable systems can be reduced to a system of interacting spins. Here, we introduce a system of artificial acoustic spins which are manipulated with ultrasound excitations associated with micro-cracking sources in thin sheets of crystals. Our spin-like system shows a peculiar relaxation mechanism after inducing an impulsive stress-ramp akin to splitting, or rupturing, of the system. Using real-time construction of correlations between spins states, we observe a clear emergence of the light cone effect. It has been proposed that equilibration horizon occurs on a local scale in systems where correlations between distant sites are established at a finite speed. The observed equilibration horizon in our observations defines a region where elements of the material are in elastic communication through excited elementary excitations. These results yield important insights into dynamic communication between failing elements in brittle materials during processes such as brittle fragmentation and dyn...

  9. Light Dark Matter in Superfluid Helium: Detection with Multi-excitation Production

    CERN Document Server

    Knapen, Simon; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-01-01

    We examine in depth a recent proposal to utilize superfluid helium for direct detection of sub-MeV mass dark matter. For sub-keV recoil energies, nuclear scattering events in liquid helium primarily deposit energy into long-lived phonon and roton quasiparticle excitations. If the energy thresholds of the detector can be reduced to the meV scale, then dark matter as light as ~MeV can be reached with ordinary nuclear recoils. If, on the other hand, two or more quasiparticle excitations are directly produced in the dark matter interaction, the kinematics of the scattering allows sensitivity to dark matter as light as ~keV at the same energy resolution. We present in detail the theoretical framework for describing excitations in superfluid helium, using it to calculate the rate for the leading dark matter scattering interaction, where an off-shell phonon splits into two or more higher-momentum excitations. We validate our analytic results against the measured and simulated dynamic response of superfluid helium. F...

  10. Light dark matter in superfluid helium: Detection with multi-excitation production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapen, Simon; Lin, Tongyan; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2017-03-01

    We examine in depth a recent proposal to utilize superfluid helium for direct detection of sub-MeV mass dark matter. For sub-keV recoil energies, nuclear scattering events in liquid helium primarily deposit energy into long-lived phonon and roton quasiparticle excitations. If the energy thresholds of the detector can be reduced to the meV scale, then dark matter as light as ˜MeV can be reached with ordinary nuclear recoils. If, on the other hand, two or more quasiparticle excitations are directly produced in the dark matter interaction, the kinematics of the scattering allows sensitivity to dark matter as light as ˜keV at the same energy resolution. We present in detail the theoretical framework for describing excitations in superfluid helium, using it to calculate the rate for the leading dark matter scattering interaction, where an off-shell phonon splits into two or more higher-momentum excitations. We validate our analytic results against the measured and simulated dynamic response of superfluid helium. Finally, we apply this formalism to the case of a kinetically mixed hidden photon in the superfluid, both with and without an external electric field to catalyze the processes.

  11. Early Birds by Light at Night: Effects of Light Color and Intensity on Daily Activity Patterns in Blue Tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maaike; Caro, Samuel P; Gienapp, Phillip; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Visser, Marcel E

    2017-08-01

    Artificial light at night disturbs the daily rhythms of many organisms. To what extent this disturbance depends on the intensity and spectral composition of light remain obscure. Here, we measured daily activity patterns of captive blue tits ( Cyanistes caeruleus) exposed to similar intensities of green, red, or white light at night. Birds advanced their onset of activity in the morning under all light colors but more under red and white light than under green light. Offset of activity was slightly delayed in all light colors. The total activity over a 24-h period did not change but birds moved a part of their daily activity into the night. Since the effect of red and white lights are comparable, we tested the influence of light intensity in a follow-up experiment, where we compared the activity of the birds under different intensities of green and white light only. While in the higher range of intensities, the effects of white and green light were comparable; at lower intensities, green light had a less disturbing effect as compared with white light on daily rhythms in blue tits. Our results show that the extent of this disturbance can be mitigated by modulating the spectral characteristics and intensity of outdoor lighting, which is now feasible through the use of LED lighting.

  12. Comparison of intensive light-emitting diode and intensive compact fluorescent phototherapy in non-hemolytic jaundice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takcı, Sahin; Yiğit, Sule; Bayram, Gülperi; Korkmaz, Ayşe; Yurdakök, Murat

    2013-01-01

    ...: intensive compact fluorescent tube (CFT) and intensive light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy. Forty-three infants over 35 weeks of gestation with severe non-hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled in the prospective study...

  13. Impact of laser excitation intensity on deep UV fluorescence detection in microchip electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Philipp; Ludwig, Martin; Belder, Detlev

    2008-12-01

    A high intensity 266 nm continuous wave (cw-) laser developed for material processing was utilised as an excitation source for sensitive native fluorescence detection of unlabelled compounds in MCE. This 120 mW laser was attached via an optical fibre into a commercial epifluorescence microscope. With this MCE set-up we evaluated the impact of laser power on the S/N of aromatic compounds as well as of proteins. Compared with a previous work which used a 4 mW pulsed laser for excitation, improved S/N for small aromatics and to a lesser extent for proteins could be attained. The LOD of the system was determined down to 24 ng/mL for serotonin (113 nM), 24 ng/mL for propranolol (81 nM), 80 ng/mL for tryptophan (392 nM) and 80 ng/mL for an aromatic diol (475 nM). Sensitive protein detection was obtained at concentrations of 5 microg/mL for lysocyme, trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen (340, 208 and 195 nM, respectively). Finally, a comparison of the cw- with a pulsed 266 nm laser, operating at the same average power, showed a higher attainable sensitivity of the cw-laser. This can be attributed to fluorescence saturation and photobleaching effects of the pulsed laser at high pulse energies.

  14. Harmonic plasma waves excitation and structure evolution of intense ion beams in background plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zhang-Hu, E-mail: zhanghu@dlut.edu.cn; Wang, You-Nian [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2016-08-15

    The long-term dynamic evolutions of intense ion beams in plasmas have been investigated with two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations, taking into account the effect of the two-stream instability between beam ions and plasma electrons. Depending on the initial beam radial density profile and velocity distribution, ring structures may be formed in the beam edge regions. At the later stage of beam-plasma interactions, the ion beams are strongly modulated by the two-stream instability and multiple density spikes are formed in the longitudinal direction. The formation of these density spikes is shown to result from the excitation of harmonic plasma waves when the instability gets saturated. Comparisons between the beam cases with initial flat-top and Gaussian radial density profiles are made, and a higher instability growth rate is observed for the flat-top profile case.

  15. Dark excited states of carotenoid in light harvesting complex probing with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational dynamics of dark excited states in carotenoids have been investigated using tunable Raman pump pulses. The S1 state has same vibrational dynamics in light-harvesting complex (LH1 and solution. The S* state in LH1 has similar vibrational modes with the triplet state of carotenoid. However, the so-called S* state in solution does not have the modes and is concluded to be different from the S* state in LH1.

  16. Excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1996-12-31

    A short introduction to instrumental resolution is followed by a discussion of visibilities of phonon modes due to their eigenvectors. High precision phonon dispersion curves in GaAs are presented together with `ab initio` calculations. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is taken as an example of selected visibility due to group theory. By careful determination of phonon intensities eigenvectors can be determined, such as in Silicon and Diamond. The investigation of magnon modes is shown for the garnet Fe{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3}, where also a quantum gap due to zero point spin fluctuations was observed. The study of the splitting of excitons in CsFeCl{sub 3} in an applied magnetic field demonstrates the possibilities of neutron polarisation analysis, which made it possible to observe a mode crossing. An outlook to inelastic X-ray scattering with very high energy resolution of synchrotron radiation is given with the examples of phonons in Beryllium and in water. (author) 19 figs., 36 refs.

  17. Shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy using a microsystem light source at 488 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, M.; Sowoidnich, K.; Schmidt, H.; Sumpf, B.; Erbert, G.; Kronfeldt, H.-D.

    2010-04-01

    Experimental results in shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy (SERRDS) at 488 nm will be presented. A novel compact diode laser system was used as excitation light source. The device is based on a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser as a pump light source and a nonlinear frequency doubling using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide crystal. All elements including micro-optics are fixed on a micro-optical bench with a footprint of 25 mm × 5 mm. An easy temperature management of the DFB laser and the crystal was used for wavelength tuning. The second harmonic generation (SHG) provides an additional suppression of the spontaneous emission. Raman spectra of polystyrene demonstrate that no laser bandpass filter is needed for the Raman experiments. Resonance-Raman spectra of the restricted food colorant Tartrazine (FD&C Yellow 5, E 102) in distilled water excited at 488 nm demonstrate the suitability of this light source for SERRDS. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.4 μmol.l-1 of E102 enables SERRDS at 488 nm for trace detection in e.g. food safety control as an appropriate contactless spectroscopic technique.

  18. Effects of a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Treadmill Training on Corticomotor Excitability following Stroke: Implications for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. High intensity interval treadmill training (HIITT has been gaining popularity for gait rehabilitation after stroke. In this study, we examined the changes in excitability of the lower limb motor cortical representation (M1 in chronic stroke survivors following a single session of HIITT. We also determined whether exercise-induced changes in excitability could be modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS enhanced with a paretic ankle skill acquisition task. Methods. Eleven individuals with chronic stroke participated in two 40-minute treadmill-training sessions: HIITT alone and HITT preceded by anodal tDCS enhanced with a skill acquisition task (e-tDCS+HIITT. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was used to assess corticomotor excitability of paretic and nonparetic tibialis anterior (TA muscles. Results. HIIT alone reduced paretic TA M1 excitability in 7 of 11 participants by ≥ 10%. e-tDCS+HIITT increased paretic TA M1 excitability and decreased nonparetic TA M1 excitability. Conclusions. HIITT suppresses corticomotor excitability in some people with chronic stroke. When HIITT is preceded by tDCS in combination with a skill acquisition task, the asymmetry of between-hemisphere corticomotor excitability is reduced. Significance. This study provides preliminary data indicating that the cardiovascular benefits of HIITT may be achieved without suppressing motor excitability in some stroke survivors.

  19. Acne treatment by methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy with red light vs. intense pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jong Soo; Jung, Jae Yoon; Yoon, Ji Young; Suh, Dae Hun

    2013-05-01

    Various methods of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for acne have been introduced. However, comparative studies among them are still needed. We performed this study to compare the effect of methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) PDT for acne between red light and intense pulsed light (IPL). Twenty patients were enrolled in this eight-week, prospective, split-face study. We applied MAL cream over the whole face with a three-hour incubation time. Then patients were irradiated with 22 J/cm(2) of red light on one-half of the face and 8-10 J/cm(2) of IPL on the other half during each treatment session. We performed three treatment sessions at two-week intervals and followed-up patients until four weeks after the last session. Inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions were reduced significantly on both sides. The red light side showed a better response than the IPL side after the first treatment. Serious adverse effects after treatment were not observed. MAL-PDT with red light and IPL are both an effective and safe modality in acne treatment. Red light showed a faster response time than IPL. After multiple sessions, both light sources demonstrated satisfactory results. We suggest that reducing the total dose of red light is desirable when performing MAL-PDT in Asian patients with acne compared with Caucasians. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  20. Ultrafast shift and rectification photocurrents in GaAs quantum wells: Excitation intensity dependence and the importance of bandmixing

    CERN Document Server

    Duc, H T; Priyadarshi, S; Bieler, M; Meier, T

    2016-01-01

    A microscopic approach that is based on the multisubband semiconductor Bloch equations formulated in the basis of a 14-band ${\\mathbf k} \\cdot {\\mathbf p}$ model is employed to compute the temporal dynamics of photocurrents in GaAs quantum wells following the excitation with femtosecond laser pulses. This approach provides a transparent description of the interband, intersubband, and intraband excitations, fully includes all resonant as well as off-resonant excitations, and treats the light-matter interaction non-perturbatively. For linearly polarized excitations the photocurrents contain contributions from shift and rectification currents. We numerically compute and analyze these currents generated by the excitation with femtosecond laser pulses for [110]- and [111]-oriented GaAs quantum wells. It is shown that the often employed perturbative $\\chi^{(2)}$-approach breaks down for peak fields larger than about 10~kV/cm and that non-perturbative effects lead to a reduction of the peak values of the shift and r...

  1. On the origin of nonclassical light generation upon resonant excitation of a GaAs semiconductor microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demenev, A. A.; Domaretskii, D. R.; Parakhonskii, A. L.; Lebedev, M. V.

    2017-10-01

    It was shown in JETP Lett. 102, 508 (2015) that the intensity correlation function of the emission from a high-quality-factor semiconductor microcavity under resonant optical pumping exhibits an oscillatory behavior with an unexpectedly long oscillation period and a long decay time, which fall in the nanosecond range. A further investigation demonstrates that the origin of these oscillations is not related to the weak Rabi interaction between long-lived localized exciton states in the quantum well and the electromagnetic field of the microcavity mode. It proves that the semiconductor microcavity plays a secondary role in the observation of nonclassical light: it provides the spectral selection of the modes of the pump laser. We believe that intrinsic instabilities lead to the chaotic excitation of spiking in the laser modes under a constant operating current.

  2. Simultaneous live cell imaging using dual FRET sensors with a single excitation light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Niino

    Full Text Available Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between fluorescent proteins is a powerful tool for visualization of signal transduction in living cells, and recently, some strategies for imaging of dual FRET pairs in a single cell have been reported. However, these necessitate alteration of excitation light between two different wavelengths to avoid the spectral overlap, resulting in sequential detection with a lag time. Thus, to follow fast signal dynamics or signal changes in highly motile cells, a single-excitation dual-FRET method should be required. Here we reported this by using four-color imaging with a single excitation light and subsequent linear unmixing to distinguish fluorescent proteins. We constructed new FRET sensors with Sapphire/RFP to combine with CFP/YFP, and accomplished simultaneous imaging of cAMP and cGMP in single cells. We confirmed that signal amplitude of our dual FRET measurement is comparable to of conventional single FRET measurement. Finally, we demonstrated to monitor both intracellular Ca(2+ and cAMP in highly motile cardiac myocytes. To cancel out artifacts caused by the movement of the cell, this method expands the applicability of the combined use of dual FRET sensors for cell samples with high motility.

  3. Dynamics of triacylglycerol and EPA production in Phaeodactylum tricornutum under nitrogen starvation at different light intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse M Remmers

    Full Text Available Lipid production in microalgae is highly dependent on the applied light intensity. However, for the EPA producing model-diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, clear consensus on the impact of incident light intensity on lipid productivity is still lacking. This study quantifies the impact of different incident light intensities on the biomass, TAG and EPA yield on light in nitrogen starved batch cultures of P. tricornutum. The maximum biomass concentration and maximum TAG and EPA contents were found to be independent of the applied light intensity. The lipid yield on light was reduced at elevated light intensities (>100 μmol m-2 s-1. The highest TAG yield on light (112 mg TAG molph-1 was found at the lowest light intensity tested (60 μmol m-2 s-1, which is still relatively low to values reported in literature for other algae. Furthermore, mass balance analysis showed that the EPA fraction in TAG may originate from photosynthetic membrane lipids.

  4. Effects of day-time exposure to different light intensities on light-induced melatonin suppression at night

    OpenAIRE

    Kozaki, Tomoaki; Kubokawa, Ayaka; Taketomi, Ryunosuke; Hatae, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Background Bright nocturnal light has been known to suppress melatonin secretion. However, bright light exposure during the day-time might reduce light-induced melatonin suppression (LIMS) at night. The effective proportion of day-time light to night-time light is unclear; however, only a few studies on accurately controlling both day- and night-time conditions have been conducted. This study aims to evaluate the effect of different day-time light intensities on LIMS. Methods Twelve male subj...

  5. Directional migration of cancer cells induced by a blue light intensity gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chien-Chih; Lu, Eugene Youjhen; Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2015-07-01

    We used a spatial light modulator to project an optical micropattern of 473 nm light with a quartic intensity gradient on a single lung cancer cell. We observed that the intracellular amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the cancer cells were proportional to the intensity of the blue light, and the blue light intensity gradients could drive directional cell migration. This optically induced directional cell migration was inhibited by a ROS scavenger in the culture medium in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the ROS levels in fibroblasts were saturated by the blue light at low intensity and therefore the fibroblasts did not exhibit directional migration in the intensity gradient.

  6. Risk of retina damage from high intensity light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollak, V.A.; Romanchuk, K.G.

    1980-05-01

    The risk of thermal damage to the retina of the eye by exposure to excesive light intensities from continuous and pulsed man-made sources is discussed. The probability of injury increases, the larger the radiant power absorbed by the retina and the smaller the size of the retinal image of the source. A method of estimating the temperature increase of the immediately affected area of the retina is presented. The time constants involved are also briefly considered. Using numerical values from literature for the relevant parameters of the eye, threshold values for a variety of conditions can be established. Below these values little risk of retina damage should exist. The degree of hazard when these values are exceeded depends upon the circumstances. A case study of a welding accident showed good agreement between the conclusions of the theoretical analysis and clinical findings.

  7. Optoelectrofluidic field separation based on light-intensity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Park, Hyun Jin; Yoon, Jin Sung; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2010-07-14

    Optoelectrofluidic field separation (OEFS) of particles under light -intensity gradient (LIG) is reported, where the LIG illumination on the photoconductive layer converts the short-ranged dielectrophoresis (DEP) force to the long-ranged one. The long-ranged DEP force can compete with the hydrodynamic force by alternating current electro-osmosis (ACEO) over the entire illumination area for realizing effective field separation of particles. In the OEFS system, the codirectional illumination and observation induce the levitation effect, compensating the attenuation of the DEP force under LIG illumination by slightly floating particles from the surface. Results of the field separation and concentration of diverse particle pairs (0.82-16 mum) are well demonstrated, and conditions determining the critical radius and effective particle manipulation are discussed. The OEFS with codirectional LIG strategy could be a promising particle manipulation method in many applications where a rapid manipulation of biological cells and particles over the entire working area are of interest.

  8. Granulomatous tattoo reaction induced by intense pulse light treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourlaki, Athanasia; Boneschi, Vinicio; Tosi, Diego; Pigatto, Paolo; Brambilla, Lucia

    2010-10-01

    Cosmetic tattooing involves implantation of pigments into the dermis in order to create a permanent makeup. Here, we report a case of sarcoidal granulomatous reaction to old cosmetic tattoos after an intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment for facial skin rejuvenation. We consider this case as a peculiar example of photo-induced reaction to tattoo. In addition, we hypothesize that an underlying immune dysfunction was present, and acted as a predisposing factor for this unusual response, as the patient had suffered from an episode of acute pulmonary sarcoidosis 15 years before. Overall, our observation suggests that IPL treatment should be used cautiously in patients with tattoos, especially when a history of autoimmune disease is present. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Effects of excited state mixing on transient absorption spectra in dimers Application to photosynthetic light-harvesting complex II

    CERN Document Server

    Valkunas, L; Trinkunas, G; Müller, M G; Holzwarth, A R

    1999-01-01

    The excited state mixing effect is taken into account considering the difference spectra of dimers. Both the degenerate (homo) dimer as well as the nondegenerate (hetero) dimer are considered. Due to the higher excited state mixing with the two-exciton states in the homodimer, the excited state absorption (or the difference spectrum) can be strongly affected in comparison with the results obtained in the Heitler-London approximation. The difference spectrum of the heterodimer is influenced by two resonance effects (i) mixing of the ground state optical transitions of both monomers in the dimer and (ii) mixing of the excited state absorption of the excited monomer with the ground state optical transition in the nonexcited monomer. These effects have been tested by simulating the difference absorption spectra of the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC II) experimentally obtained with the 60 fs excitation pulses at zero delay times and various excitation wavelengths. The pairs of coupled chlorophylls...

  10. Metabolic acclimation to excess light intensity in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Maria C; Fiehn, Oliver; Durnford, Dion G

    2013-07-01

    There are several well-described acclimation responses to excess light in green algae but the effect on metabolism has not been thoroughly investigated. This study examines the metabolic changes during photoacclimation to high-light (HL) stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Using principal component analysis, a clear metabolic response to HL intensity was observed on global metabolite pools, with major changes in the levels of amino acids and related nitrogen metabolites. Amino acid pools increased during short-term photoacclimation, but were especially prominent in HL-acclimated cultures. Unexpectedly, we observed an increase in mitochondrial metabolism through downstream photorespiratory pathways. The expression of two genes encoding key enzymes in the photorespiratory pathway, glycolate dehydrogenase and malate synthase, were highly responsive to the HL stress. We propose that this pathway contributes to metabolite pools involved in nitrogen assimilation and may play a direct role in photoacclimation. Our results suggest that primary and secondary metabolism is highly pliable and plays a critical role in coping with the energetic imbalance during HL exposure and a necessary adjustment to support an increased growth rate that is an effective energy sink for the excess reducing power generated during HL stress. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Are home-use intense pulsed light (IPL) devices safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Godfrey; Ash, Caerwyn

    2010-11-01

    The domestic market for home-use hair removal devices is rapidly expanding and there are numerous intense pulsed light (IPL) products now available globally to consumers. Technological challenges for the design of such devices include the need to be cost-effective in mass production, easy to use without training, and most importantly, clinically effective while being eye-safe. However inexpensively these light-based systems are produced, they are designed to cause biological damage to follicular structures, so precautions to prevent both ocular and epidermal damage must be considered. At present, there are no dedicated international standards for IPL devices. This review directly compares three leading domestic IPL hair removal devices: iPulse Personal (CyDen, UK), Silk'n/SensEpil (Home Skinovations, Israel), and SatinLux/Lumea (Philips, Netherlands) for fluence, emitted wavelength spectrum, time-resolved footprint, and spatial distribution of energy. Although each device has a primary mechanical or electrical safety feature to ensure occlusion of the output aperture on the skin to prevent accidental eye exposure, the ocular hazard of each device has been measured to IEC TR 60825-9 standard using an Ocean Optics HR2000+ photo spectrometer for both potential corneal and retinal damage. Using established measurement methods, this review has shown that the measured output parameters were significantly different for the three systems. Using equipment traceable to national standards, one device was judged at its two highest settings to be hazardous for naked eye viewing. This investigation also reports on the significantly different pulse durations of the devices measured and considers the potential impact on safety and efficacy in the light of the theory of selective photothermolysis. Although these devices offer low-cost personal convenience of treatment in the privacy of the home, ocular safety may be inadequate in the event of primary safety mechanism failure.

  12. Red-detuned, high-intensity, short-duration sweet spot for impulsive X-ray Raman excitation in atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ware, Matthew R; Haxton, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Impulsive X-ray Raman excitations of Lithium, Neon, and Sodium are calculated using the Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock method. Using linearly polarized laser pulses without chirp, we determine the optimum central frequency, intensity, and duration for maximum population transfer to valence excited states. We demonstrate the existence of two "sweet spots" for optimum population transfer, either of which, depending on the system, may be superior. The "red-detuned hypothesis" is the proposition that population transfer can be maximized by nonresonant Raman transitions, red-detuned below K-edge, because such detuning minimizes core-excited populations and ionization loss. We find that this hypothesis is verified in the case of Neon -- for Neon, the global optimum for population transfer occurs at high intensity (8 $\\times$ 10$^{19}$ W cm$^{-2}$), short duration (82as full-width-at-half-maximum), and 24eV red-detuned from the K-edge.

  13. [Intensity loss of two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy images of mouse oocyte chromosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng-Ying; Wu, Hong-Xin; Chen, Die-Yan; Ma, Wan-Yun

    2014-07-01

    As an optical microscope with high resolution, two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscope is widely used in noninvasive 3D optical imaging of biological samples. Compared with confocal laser scanning microscope, TPE fluorescence microscope provides a deeper detecting depth. In spite of that, the image quality of sample always declines as the detecting depth increases when a noninvasive 3D optical imaging of thicker samples is performed. Mouse oocytes with a large diameter, which play an important role in clinical and biological fields, have obvious absorption and scattering effects. In the present paper, we performed compensation for two-photon fluorescence images of mouse oocyte chromosomes. Using volume as a parameter, the attenuation degree of these chromosomes was also studied. The result of our data suggested that there exists a severe axial intensity loss in two-photon microscopic images of mouse oocytes due to the absorption and scattering effects. It is necessary to make compensation for these images of mouse oocyte chromosomes obtained from two-photon microscopic system. It will be specially needed in studying the quantitative three-dimensional information of mouse oocytes.

  14. Measurement of light charged particles in the decay channels of medium-mass excited compound nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdré S.

    2014-03-01

    Indeed, in this mass region (A ~ 100 models predict that shape transitions can occur at high spin values and relatively scarce data exist in the literature about coincidence measurements between evaporation residues and light charged particles. Signals of shape transitions can be found in the variations of the lineshape of high energy gamma rays emitted from the de-excitation of GDR states gated on different region of angular momenta. For this purpose it is important to keep under control the FE and FF processes, to regulate the statistical model parameters and to control the onset of possible pre-equilibrium emissions from 300 to 600 MeV bombarding energy.

  15. Carbon dioxide photoconversion driven by visible-light excitation of small carbon nanoparticles in various configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sushant; Cao, Li; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Bunker, Christopher E.; Shiral Fernando, K. A.; Wang, Ping; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-08-01

    In the CO2 sequestration, a desirable yet challenging option is the photocatalytic conversion with solar irradiation. While nanoscale semiconductors have been at the center of attention in the development of suitable photocatalysts for the CO2 conversion, carbon nanoparticles have recently emerged as a new class of photoactive materials for harvesting visible photons to drive photocatalytic processes. Results from this study demonstrate that aqueous suspended bare carbon nanoparticles could be excited with visible light to photocatalytically convert CO2 into formic acid, with the performance competitive to that of widely used semiconductor nanoparticles.

  16. Simple estimates of excitation energy sharing between heavy and light fragments in heavy-ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasso, C.H.; Lozano, M.; Pollarolo, G.

    1985-12-01

    Qualitative arguments are used to estiamte the ratio of excitation energies between heavy and light fragments for asymmetric heavy-ion collisions. The value of this quantity is linked to the relative role played by inelastic and transfer degrees of freedom and thereby to an approximate function of the total kinetic energy loss. A numerical analysis that confirms the trends anticipated by the simple arguments is performed for the reactions /sup 56/Fe+ /sup 238/U and /sup 86/Kr+ /sup 208/Pb at bombarding energies in the laboratory of 476 and 1565 MeV, respectively.

  17. A comparison of intense pulsed light, combination radiofrequency and intense pulsed light, and blue light in photodynamic therapy for acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Amy Forman

    2007-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is an emerging modality for the treatment of acne vulgaris. However, optimal therapeutic protocols have not been established. To compare the efficacies of 3 different light sources for activating ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Twenty-two patients with moderate to severe acne vulgaris were randomly assigned to receive ALA-PDT with photoactivation by intense pulsed light (IPL, 600-850 nm), a combination of IPL (580-980 nm) and bipolar radiofrequency (RF) energies, or blue light (417 nm). Each patient received 3 ALA-PDT sessions at 2-week intervals. Follow-up evaluations were conducted 1 and 3 months after the final treatment. At 1 month and 3 months, median lesion count reduction percentages were highest with IPL activation and lowest with blue light activation, although the differences did not reach statistical significance. At 1 month and 3 months, median investigator-assessed improvements were highest with IPL activation and lowest with blue light activation. The variability of responses was significantly smaller with IPL activation than with either RF-IPL or blue light activation. ALA-PDT with activation by IPL appears to provide greater, longer-lasting, and more consistent improvement than either RF-IPL or blue light activation in the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris.

  18. Sub-thermal to super-thermal light statistics from a disordered lattice via deterministic control of excitation symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kondakci, H E; Abouraddy, A F; Christodoulides, D N; Saleh, B E A

    2016-01-01

    Monochromatic coherent light traversing a disordered photonic medium evolves into a random field whose statistics are dictated by the disorder level. Here we demonstrate experimentally that light statistics can be deterministically tuned in certain disordered lattices, even when the disorder level is held fixed, by controllably breaking the excitation symmetry of the lattice modes. We exploit a lattice endowed with disorder-immune chiral symmetry in which the eigenmodes come in skew-symmetric pairs. If a single lattice site is excited, a "photonic thermalization gap" emerges: the realm of sub-thermal light statistics is inaccessible regardless of the disorder level. However, by exciting two sites with a variable relative phase, as in a traditional two-path interferometer, the chiral symmetry is judiciously broken and interferometric control over the light statistics is exercised, spanning sub-thermal and super-thermal regimes. These results may help develop novel incoherent lighting sources from coherent lase...

  19. Coherent excitation transferring via dark state in light-harvesting process

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, H; Sun, C P

    2011-01-01

    We study the light absorption and energy transferring in a donor-acceptor system with a bionic structure. In the optimal case with uniform couplings, it is found that the quantum dynamics of this seemingly complicated system is reduced as a three-level system of $\\Lambda$-type. With this observation, we show that the dark state based electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) effect could enhance the energy transfer efficiency, through a quantum interference effect suppressing the excited population of the donors. We estimate the optimal parameters of the system to achieve the maximum output power. The splitting behavior of maximum power may be used to explain the phenomenon that the photosynthesis systems mainly absorb two colors of light.

  20. Early Birds by Light at Night: Effects of Light Color and Intensity on Daily Activity Patterns in Blue Tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Maaike; Caro, Samuel P.; Gienapp, Phillip; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Visser, Marcel E.

    2017-01-01

    Artificial light at night disturbs the daily rhythms of many organisms. To what extent this disturbance depends on the intensity and spectral composition of light remain obscure. Here, we measured daily activity patterns of captive blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) exposed to similar intensities of

  1. On the influence of dispersion on the spatial distribution of the intensity of luminescence excited by opposing laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynovich, E. F.; Rudenko, G. V.; Polityko, S. I.

    2009-01-01

    The spatial dynamics of variations in the intensity of the luminescence of quantum systems in crystals of the medium and highest categories of symmetry upon excitation with opposing optical pulses of an arbitrary shape is investigated by numerical simulation methods. It is established that the material dispersion, which is responsible for the dispersion spreading of pulses, has no effect on the shape and width of the envelope of the spatial distribution of the luminescence intensity, as well as on the depth of the luminescence intensity modulation associated with the interference of opposing pulses.

  2. Femtosecond excitations in metallic nanostructures. From ultrafast light confinement to a local electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropers, C.

    2007-07-11

    This thesis contributes to the understanding of optical excitations in metallic nanostructures. In experiments on selected model structures, the dynamics of these excitations and their electromagnetic spatial modes are investigated with femtosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution, respectively. Angle- and time-resolved transmission experiments on metallic thin film gratings demonstrate the dominant role resonant surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) play in the optical properties of such structures. The lifetimes of these excitations are determined, and it is shown that coherent couplings among SPP-resonances result in drastic lifetime modifications. Near the visible part of the spectrum, subradiant SPP lifetimes of up to 200 femtoseconds are observed, which is considerably longer than previously expected for these structures. The spatial SPP mode profiles are imaged using a custom-built near-field optical microscope. The experiments reveal a direct correlation between the spatial mode structure and the dynamics of different SPP resonances. Coupling-induced SPP band gaps are identified as splittings into symmetric and antisymmetric surface modes. These findings allow for an interpretation of the near-field optical image contrast in terms of the contributions of different vectorial components of the electromagnetic near-field. A selective imaging of different electric and magnetic field components is demonstrated for various types of near-field probes. Furthermore, the excitation of SPPs in periodic structures is employed in a novel type of near-field tip. The resonant excitation of SPPs in a nanofabricated grating on the shaft of a sharp metallic tip results in their concentration at the tip apex. The final part of the thesis highlights the importance of optical field enhancements for the local generation of nonlinear optical signals at the apex of sharp metallic tips. Specifically, the observation of intense multiphoton electron emission after femtosecond

  3. [Effects of excess Mn on photosynthesis characteristics in cucumber under different light intensity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qinghua; Zhu, Zhujun; Ying, Quansheng; Qian, Qiongqiu

    2005-06-01

    By a solution culture experiment, this paper studied the effects of excess Mn on the growth, chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and photosynthesis of cucumber under different light intensity. The results indicated that excess Mn inhibited plant growth, which was more obvious under high light intensity than under low light intensity. The primary maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (v/Fm), quantum efficiency of non-cyclic electron transport of PSII (phiPSII), and photochemical quenching (qP) were significantly decreased in excess Mn treatment under high light intensity, while no significant effects on Fv/Fm and qP were observed under low light intensity. Excess Mn, particularly under high light intensity, decreased net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and stomatal conductance (Gs). Excess Mn increased intracellular CO2 (Ci) under high light intensity and decreased Ci under low light intensity, while stomatal limitation value (Ls) was just reverse to Ci. It could be concluded that the decrease of Pn in excess Mn treatment was not resulted from stomatal limitation under high light intensity, but was true under low light intensity.

  4. Measuring key parameters of intense pulsed light (IPL) devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Godfrey; Ash, Caerwyn; Eadie, Ewan; Moseley, Harry

    2007-09-01

    Unlike medical lasers, intense pulsed light (IPL) devices are largely unregulated and unclassified as to degree of safety hazard. With the exception of most of the USA, the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, the Far East and Australia, the sale of IPLs is generally unrestricted, with the majority being sold into the beauty therapy and spa markets. Standards are only imposed on manufacturers for technical performance data and operating tolerances determined by CE-compliance under electrical safety standards or the EU Medical Device Directive. Currently, there is no requirement for measurement of key IPL performance characteristics. To identify the key IPL parameters, emphasize their importance in terms of safe and effective treatment and provide examples of preliminary measurement methods. These measurements can highlight changes in an IPL device's performance, improving patient safety and treatment efficacy. Five key parameters were identified as having an important role to play in the way light interacts with the skin, and therefore an important role in patient safety and effective treatment. Simple methods were devised to measure the parameters, which include fluence, pulse duration, pulse profile, spectral output and time-resolved spectral output. The measurement methods permitted consistent and comparable measurements to be made by two of the authors at working clinic locations on 18 popular IPL devices and allowed assessment of output variations. Results showed discrepancies between the measured IPL device outputs and those values displayed on the system or claimed by the manufacturers. The importance of these discrepancies and their impact is discussed. This study, of 18 popular devices in regular daily use in England and Wales, provides example methods for measuring key IPL device parameters and highlights the need for regular measurement of at least those five key parameters measured in this study. These methods can help service technicians to check

  5. Growth and morphogenesis of sun and shade plants I. The influence of light intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corre, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    A number of herbacious sun and shade plants were grown at different light levels to investigate their adaptations in morphology and growth to light intensity. All species examined respond to low light intensity strongly, but very much the same. It is concluded that shade tolerance is not based on

  6. 14 CFR 25.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 25.1395 Section 25.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 25.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  7. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 27.1395 Section 27.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. 23.1395 Section 23.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. No...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 29.1395 Section 29.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  10. Zinc silicates with tunable morphology by surfactant assisted sonochemical route suitable for NUV excitable white light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraj, R B; Nagabhushana, H; Daruka Prasad, B; Vijayakumar, G R

    2017-01-01

    The cationic surfactants assisted ultrasound route was used to prepare Dy(3+) doped Zn2SiO4 nanophosphors. The final products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence. Orthorhombic phase of Zn2SiO4:Dy(3+) (JCPDS card No. 35-1485) was confirmed from PXRD. It was evident that the morphology of spherical and broom like structures were obtained with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactants respectively. Further the size and agglomeration of the products were varied with surfactants concentration, sonication time, pH and sonication power. The probable formation mechanisms to obtain various micro/nano superstructures were discussed. The characteristic PL peaks were observed at 484, 574 and 666nm due to the electronic transitions (4)F9/2→(6)Hj (j=15/2, 13/2, 11/2) of Dy(3+) ions upon excited at NUV pumping wavelength of 350nm [(6)H15/2→(6)P7/2 ((4)M15/2)]. The Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters and radiative properties were estimated by using PL emission data. The photometric studies indicated that the obtained phosphors could be promising materials in white light emitting diodes (wLED's). The present synthesis route was rapid, environmentally benign, cost-effective and useful for industrial applications such as solid state lighting and display devices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Human wavelength discrimination of monochromatic light explained by optimal wavelength decoding of light of unknown intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhaoping

    Full Text Available We show that human ability to discriminate the wavelength of monochromatic light can be understood as maximum likelihood decoding of the cone absorptions, with a signal processing efficiency that is independent of the wavelength. This work is built on the framework of ideal observer analysis of visual discrimination used in many previous works. A distinctive aspect of our work is that we highlight a perceptual confound that observers should confuse a change in input light wavelength with a change in input intensity. Hence a simple ideal observer model which assumes that an observer has a full knowledge of input intensity should over-estimate human ability in discriminating wavelengths of two inputs of unequal intensity. This confound also makes it difficult to consistently measure human ability in wavelength discrimination by asking observers to distinguish two input colors while matching their brightness. We argue that the best experimental method for reliable measurement of discrimination thresholds is the one of Pokorny and Smith, in which observers only need to distinguish two inputs, regardless of whether they differ in hue or brightness. We mathematically formulate wavelength discrimination under this wavelength-intensity confound and show a good agreement between our theoretical prediction and the behavioral data. Our analysis explains why the discrimination threshold varies with the input wavelength, and shows how sensitively the threshold depends on the relative densities of the three types of cones in the retina (and in particular predict discriminations in dichromats. Our mathematical formulation and solution can be applied to general problems of sensory discrimination when there is a perceptual confound from other sensory feature dimensions.

  12. AFSC/RACE/GAP/Kotwicki: Relative light intensity collected during bottom trawl surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Assessing the effect of light intensity and light penetration on the distributionand behavior of walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) in the eastern Bering Sea and...

  13. Targeted Narrowband Intense Pulsed Light on Cutaneous Vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Wesley J.; Yakel, Joshua D.; Osorio, O. Cecilia; Salvador, Jocelynda; Hayakawa, Carole; Kelly, Kristen M.; Choi, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Laser based therapies are the standard treatment protocol for port wine stain in the United States, but complete removal is infrequently achieved. Intense pulsed light (IPL) offers a broadband light spectrum approach as a viable treatment alternative. Previous studies suggest that IPL can be more effective in treatment of port wine stain by utilizing multiple wavelengths to selectively target different peaks in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin. Our study objectives were to (i) determine a characteristic radiant exposure able to achieve persistent vascular shutdown with narrowband IPL irradiation, (ii) determine the degree to which narrowband IPL irradiation can achieve persistent vascular shutdown, and (iii) compare the effectiveness of narrowband IPL radiation to single wavelength pulsed dye laser (PDL) irradiation in achieving persistent vascular shutdown. Study Design/Materials and Methods We utlized either single pulse or double, stacked pulses in narrowband IPL experiments, with the IPL operating over a 500–600 nm wavelength range on the rodent dorsal window chamber model. We compared the results from our narrowband IPL experiments to acquired PDL data from a previous study and determined that narrowband IPL treatments can also produce persistent vascular shutdown. We ran Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the relationship between absorbed energy, wavelength, and penetration depth. Results For single and double pulse narrowband IPL irradiation we observed (i) little to no change in blood flow, resulting in no persistent vascular shutdown, (ii) marked acute disruption in blood flow and vascular structure, followed by partial to full recovery of blood flow, also resulting in no persistent vascular shutdown, and (iii) immediate changes in blood flow and vascular structure, resulting in prolonged and complete vascular shutdown. Monte Carlo modeling resulted in a 53.2% and 69.0% higher absorbed energy distribution in the top half and the

  14. Successful treatment of pilonidal disease by intense pulsed light device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafigh, Younes; Beheshti, Akram; Charkhchian, Malihe; Rad, Fatemeh Samiee

    2014-01-01

    Pilonidal disease is foreign body reactions accompanied by chronic inflammation that most commonly arises in the hair follicles of the natal cleft or other hair-bearing areas. Today, surgical intervention remains the treatment of choice. But surgical treatment is an invasive method with a high failure rate and recurrence. The authors' objective was to assess the efficacy of intense pulsed light (IPL) device on pilonidal disease. This case series study was carried out between 2008 and 2012 on patients with pilonidal sinus in Qazvin university of Iran. All patients received 6 session treatments with IPL hair removal with 4-6 weeks interval until most of the hair was removed. This was repeated 2.5 ± 0.3 years after treatment. In cases with acute phase pilonidal sinus histopathological examination was done. IPL hair removal procedure was performed on 30 patients with their ages ranging from 16 to 41 years, with a mean (SD) of 23.1 (6.2) years. In this study 13 patients were presented with acute and 6 patients were presented with chronic phase. 11 patients had a positive history of one surgical treatment and presented recurrences. The overall recurrence rate after IPL treatment in this study was seen in 4 (13.3%) patients. The histopathological examination of our study showed that the hair fragments create a foreign body type granulomatous inflammatory reaction. This process could be triggering factor of the disease. IPL hair removal in affected area could be an alternative treatment to surgery or a choice treatment post surgery to decrease recurrence rate.

  15. Diode-pumped solid-state laser for bonding orthodontic brackets: effect of light intensity and light-curing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Oh; Park, Soo-Byung; Son, Woo-Sung; Ko, Ching-Chang; García-Godoy, Franklin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to teeth using a diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) laser of 473 nm with various light intensity and light-curing settings. For the study, a total of 150 extracted human teeth were divided into ten groups. In the control group, the brackets were bonded to the teeth using a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) light with an intensity of 900 mW/cm(2). In the experimental groups, the brackets were bonded using a DPSS laser with three different light intensities and light-curing times. The same bracket type and adhesive were used in all groups throughout the study. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the SBS, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) among the groups. As results, brackets bonded using the DPSS laser with an intensity of 700 mW/cm(2) for 40 s (totally) showed a slightly higher SBS (12.2 ± 1.8 MPa) than that of those bonded using a QTH light (control; 11.6 ± 1.6 MPa). The SBS values linearly increased with increasing energy density (light intensity × light-curing time) of the DPSS laser (R = 0.95, p light-curing conditions. A comparison of the ARI scores among the groups suggested a similar bracket failure mode.

  16. Physiological and molecular responses to variation of light intensity in rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-feng

    2014-01-01

    Light is one of most important factors to plants because it is necessary for photosynthesis. In this study, physiological and gene expression analyses under different light intensities were performed in the seedlings of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) clone GT1. When light intensity increased from 20 to 1000 µmol m(-2) s(-1), there was no effect on the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (Fv/Fm), indicating that high light intensity did not damage the structure and function of PSII reaction center. However, the effective photochemical quantum yield of PSII (Y(II)), photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), electron transfer rate (ETR), and coefficient of photochemical fluorescence quenching assuming interconnected PSII antennae (qL) were increased significantly as the light intensity increased, reached a maximum at 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1), but decreased from 400 µmol m(-2) s(-1). These results suggested that the PSII photochemistry showed an optimum performance at 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity. The chlorophyll content was increased along with the increase of light intensity when it was no more than 400 µmol m(-2) s(-1). Since increasing light intensity caused significant increase in H2O2 content and decreases in the per unit activity of antioxidant enzymes SOD and POD, but the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was preserved at a low level even under high light intensity of 1000 µmol m(-2) s(-1), suggesting that high light irradiation did not induce membrane lipid peroxidation in rubber tree. Moreover, expressions of antioxidant-related genes were significantly up-regulated with the increase of light intensity. They reached the maximum expression at 400 µmol m(-2) s(-1), but decreased at 1000 µmol m(-2) s(-1). In conclusion, rubber tree could endure strong light irradiation via a specific mechanism. Adaptation to high light intensity is a complex process by regulating antioxidant enzymes activities, chloroplast formation, and

  17. Physiological and molecular responses to variation of light intensity in rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-feng Wang

    Full Text Available Light is one of most important factors to plants because it is necessary for photosynthesis. In this study, physiological and gene expression analyses under different light intensities were performed in the seedlings of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis clone GT1. When light intensity increased from 20 to 1000 µmol m(-2 s(-1, there was no effect on the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm, indicating that high light intensity did not damage the structure and function of PSII reaction center. However, the effective photochemical quantum yield of PSII (Y(II, photochemical quenching coefficient (qP, electron transfer rate (ETR, and coefficient of photochemical fluorescence quenching assuming interconnected PSII antennae (qL were increased significantly as the light intensity increased, reached a maximum at 200 µmol m(-2 s(-1, but decreased from 400 µmol m(-2 s(-1. These results suggested that the PSII photochemistry showed an optimum performance at 200 µmol m(-2 s(-1 light intensity. The chlorophyll content was increased along with the increase of light intensity when it was no more than 400 µmol m(-2 s(-1. Since increasing light intensity caused significant increase in H2O2 content and decreases in the per unit activity of antioxidant enzymes SOD and POD, but the malondialdehyde (MDA content was preserved at a low level even under high light intensity of 1000 µmol m(-2 s(-1, suggesting that high light irradiation did not induce membrane lipid peroxidation in rubber tree. Moreover, expressions of antioxidant-related genes were significantly up-regulated with the increase of light intensity. They reached the maximum expression at 400 µmol m(-2 s(-1, but decreased at 1000 µmol m(-2 s(-1. In conclusion, rubber tree could endure strong light irradiation via a specific mechanism. Adaptation to high light intensity is a complex process by regulating antioxidant enzymes activities, chloroplast formation, and related

  18. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  19. Self-Excited Single-Stage Power Factor Correction Driving Circuit for LED Lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Nong Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This pa\tper proposes a self-excited single-stage high power factor LED lighting driving circuit. Being featured with power factor correction capability without needing any control devices, the proposed circuit structure is with low cost and suitable for commercial production. The power factor correction function is accomplished by using inductor in combination with a half-bridge quasi resonant converter to achieve active switching and yield out voltage regulation according to load requirement. Furthermore, the zero-voltage switching in the half-bridge converter can be attained to promote the overall performance efficiency of the proposed circuit. Finally, the validity and production availability of the proposed circuit will be verified as well.

  20. Energy Migration Engineering of Bright Rare-Earth Upconversion Nanoparticles for Excitation by Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yeteng; Rostami, Iman; Wang, Zihua; Dai, Hongjie; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2015-11-04

    A novel Nd(3+) -sensitized upconversion nanoparticle (UCNP) that can be excited by near-infrared 740 nm light-emitting diode (LED) lamps with bright upconversion luminescence is designed. Yb(3+) ion distribution is engineered to increase the energy migration efficiency. The benefit of the novel LED-excited UCNPs is demonstrated by imaging of breast cancer cells and enabling an economic handheld semiquantitative visual measurement device. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Effects of light intensity light quality and air velocity on temperature in plant reproductive organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Y.; Hirai, H.

    Excess temperature increase in plant reproductive organs such as anthers and stigmata could cause fertility impediments and thus produce sterile seeds under artificial lighting conditions in closed plant growth facilities There is a possibility that the aberration was caused by an excess increase in temperatures of reproductive organs in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems under microgravity conditions in space The fundamental study was conducted to know the thermal situation of the plant reproductive organs as affected by light intensity light quality and air velocity on the earth and to estimate the excess temperature increase in the reproductive organs in closed plant growth facilities in space Thermal images of reproductive organs of rice and strawberry were captured using infrared thermography at an air temperature of 10 r C The temperatures in flowers at 300 mu mol m -2 s -1 PPFD under the lights from red LEDs white LEDs blue LEDs fluorescent lamps and incandescent lamps increased by 1 4 1 7 1 9 6 0 and 25 3 r C respectively for rice and by 2 8 3 4 4 1 7 8 and 43 4 r C respectively for strawberry The flower temperatures increased with increasing PPFD levels The temperatures in petals anthers and stigmas of strawberry at 300 mu mol m -2 s -1 PPFD under incandescent lamps increased by 32 7 29 0 and 26 6 r C respectively at 0 1 m s -1 air velocity and by 20 6 18 5 and 15 9 r C respectively at 0 8 m s -1 air velocity The temperatures of reproductive organs decreased with increasing

  2. An intense reddish-orange emitting Eu2SiS4:Er3+ for light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gongguo; Lu, Xifeng; Hu, Ang

    2017-09-01

    An intense reddish-orange phosphor, Eu2SiS4:Er3+, was developed. The photoluminescence excitation and emission spectra, the lifetime, and the concentration effect are investigated. The results show that an efficient energy transfer occurs from Eu2+ to Er3+, and its efficiency is about 81.0%. The phosphors exhibit an efficient broad absorption band and give reddish-orange emitting light with higher color purity. These results demonstrate that Er3+ ion with low 4f - 4f absorption efficiency can play a role of activator in narrow reddish-orange emitting phosphor, potentially useful in n-UV/blue GaN-based LED through efficient energy feeding by a strong excitation band of Eu2+.

  3. Interband electronic excitation-assisted atomic-scale restructuring of metal surfaces by nanosecond pulsed laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst; Charra; Douillard

    1998-01-30

    Interaction of high-power laser light with materials often causes irreversible damage of the near-surface region. It is shown that copper single-crystal surfaces can be patterned by laser light. Irradiation with green light produced adatoms and vacancies, which self-organized into nanoscale pyramids. This restructuring can be removed by annealing. In contrast to green light, infrared laser irradiation at equivalent absorbed energy density did not produce any structural change. This, for metallic systems, unforeseen spectral difference in laser light action points to a concerted process as the source for structural modification, which involves long-lived primary excitation of localized d-electrons through interband transition together with phonon excitation.

  4. Disruptive effects of light pollution on sleep in free-living birds: Season and/or light intensity-dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, Thomas; Sun, Jiachen; Pinxten, Rianne; Eens, Marcel

    2017-11-01

    Light pollution or artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing anthropogenic environmental pollutant posing an important potential threat for wildlife. Evidence of its effects on animal physiology and behaviour is accumulating. However, in order to effectively mitigate light pollution it is important to determine which factors contribute to the severity of effects of ALAN. In this experimental study we explored whether there are seasonal-dependent effects of ALAN on sleep in free-living great tits (Parus major), an important model species. Additionally, we looked at whether light intensity determined the severity of effects of ALAN on sleep. We therefore exposed animals to artificial light inside the nest box (3lx) in December (winter) and February (pre-breeding season). Results from February were compared with the results from a previous study in February, using a lower light intensity (1.6lx). We found little evidence for a season-dependent response. Effects of ALAN hardly differed between high and low light intensity. ALAN disrupted sleep with as main effect a decrease in sleep duration (≈-40min) as animals woke up earlier (≈-24min). However, compared to a natural dark situation sleep onset was delayed by high but not by low light intensity of ALAN. Our study underlines earlier found disruptive effects of ALAN on sleep of free-living animals. While we found no conclusive evidence for seasonal or light intensity-dependent effects of ALAN, additional experimental work using lower light intensities might show such differences. Examining potential management options is crucial in mitigating disruptive effects of light pollution, which will be an important focus for future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hybrid lead halide perovskites for light energy conversion: Excited state properties and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Joseph S.

    travel 220 nm over the course of 2 ns after photoexcitation, with an extrapolated diffusion length greater than one micrometer over the full excited state lifetime. The solution-processability of metal halide perovskites necessarily raises questions as to the properties of the solvated precursors and their connection to the final solid-state perovskite phase. Through structural and steady-state and time-resolved absorption studies, the important link between the excited state properties of the precursor components, composed of solvated and solid-state halometallate complexes, and CH3NH3PbI3 is evinced. This connection provides insight into optical nonlinearities and electronic properties of the perovskite phase. Fundamental studies of CH 3NH3PbI3 ultimately serve as a foundation for application of this and other related materials in high-performance devices. In the final chapter, the operation of CH3NH3PbI 3 solar cells in a tandem architecture is presented. The quest for economic, large scale hydrogen production has motivated the search for new materials and device designs capable of splitting water using only energy from the sun. In light of this, we introduce an all solution-processed tandem water splitting assembly composed of a BiVO4 photoanode and a single-junction CH3NH3PbI3 hybrid perovskite solar cell. This unique configuration allows efficient solar photon management, with the metal oxide photoanode selectively harvesting high energy visible photons and the underlying perovskite solar cell capturing lower energy visible-near IR wavelengths in a single-pass excitation. Operating without external bias under standard terrestrial one sun illumination, the photoanode-photovoltaic architecture, in conjunction with an earthabundant cobalt phosphate catalyst, exhibits a solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 2.5% at neutral pH. The design of low-cost tandem water splitting assemblies employing single-junction hybrid perovskite materials establishes a potentially

  6. Intense pulsed light therapy for aberrant Mongolian spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Makiko; Ozawa, Toshiyuki; Tateishi, Chiharu; Fujii, Naho; Sakahara, Daisuke; Ishii, Masamitsu

    2012-12-01

    Aberrant Mongolian spots (AMS) distal to the lumbosacral region are thought to be more likely to persist than typical sacral Mongolian spots. So far, Q-switched ruby laser (QSRL) has been the treatment of choice for AMS. Intense pulsed light (IPL) is obtained from flashlamp devices that emit wavelengths between 515 and 1200 nm. IPL has documented efficacy for the treatment of irregular pigmentation, telangiectasia, rough skin texture, rhytids, hair removal, and vascular lesions, with several filters being available that can be used to block shorter wavelengths from the skin. As far as we could determine, there have been no clinical and histological studies on the treatment of AMS with IPL. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to assess the clinical and histological efficacy of IPL for AMS. Seven patients (4 males and 3 females) presenting from September 2008 to July 2009 were assessed. Their mean age was 2.0 years, ranging from 0 to 7 years. The IPL device used in this study was a Natulight (Lumenis Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Photographs were taken of all patients with a high-resolution digital camera at baseline and 6 months after treatment. Skin biopsy specimens were taken from 1 patient (case 4) before, immediately after, and 6 months after treatment. According to the 7 family members of the patients, the outcome of IPL was graded as follows: excellent improvement in 1 (14%), good improvement in 4 (57%), and slight improvement in 2 (29%). All families would have liked to continue IPL treatment. Evaluation of the effect of treatment by a physician was less favorable, with excellent improvement in 1 (14%), good improvement in 2 (29%), and slight improvement in 4 (57%). Histopathologic examination of the pigmented region revealed the typical features of a Mongolian spot in the hematoxylin-eosin stained section. Immediately after IPL, there were no changes in the dermis. At 6 months after treatment, however, the number of melanocytes in the middle and upper dermis was

  7. Growth of shredders on leaf litter biofilms: the effect of light intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, R.J.M.; Waluto, B.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Gardeniers, J.J.P.; Beijer, J.A.J.; Scheffer, M.

    2005-01-01

    1. The effect of light intensity on the decomposition of poplar (Populus nigra) leaves and growth of the shredders, Asellus aquaticus and Gammarus pulex, was studied in a laboratory experiment. The response was studied along a gradient of six light intensities of 0, 5, 23, 54, 97 and 156 ¿mol m -2

  8. Energy conservation attenuates the loss of skeletal muscle excitability during intense contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, W A; Ørtenblad, N; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2007-01-01

    changes in muscle metabolites. However, the role of metabolites in the loss of muscle excitability is not clear. The metabolic state of isolated rat extensor digitorum longus muscles at 30 degrees C was manipulated by decreasing energy expenditure and thereby allowed investigation of the effects of energy...... conservation on skeletal muscle excitability. Muscle ATP utilization was reduced using a combination of the cross-bridge cycling blocker N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) and the SR Ca2+ release channel blocker Na-dantrolene, which reduce activity of the myosin ATPase and SR Ca2+-ATPase. Compared...

  9. Laser and intense pulsed light hair removal technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, M; Beerwerth, F; Nash, J F

    2011-01-01

    Light-based hair removal (LHR) is one of the fastest growing, nonsurgical aesthetic cosmetic procedures in the United States and Europe. A variety of light sources including lasers, e.g. alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) and broad-spectrum inten...

  10. A rapid excitation-emission matrix fluorometer utilizing supercontinuum white light and acousto-optic tunable filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenbo [Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, BC Cancer Agency Research Center, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, 835 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E8 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of British Columbia, KAIS 5500, 2332 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Wu, Zhenguo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan, E-mail: hzeng@bccrc.ca [Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, BC Cancer Agency Research Center, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, 835 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E8 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Scanning speed and coupling efficiency of excitation light to optic fibres are two major technical challenges that limit the potential of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectrometer for on-line applications and in vivo studies. In this paper, a novel EEM system, utilizing a supercontinuum white light source and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs), was introduced and evaluated. The supercontinuum white light, generated by pumping a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with an 800 nm femtosecond laser, was efficiently coupled into a bifurcated optic fiber bundle. High speed EEM spectral scanning was achieved using AOTFs both for selecting excitation wavelength and scanning emission spectra. Using calibration lamps (neon and mercury argon), wavelength deviations were determined to vary from 0.18 nm to −0.70 nm within the spectral range of 500–850 nm. Spectral bandwidth for filtered excitation light broadened by twofold compared to that measured with monochromatic light between 650 nm and 750 nm. The EEM spectra for methanol solutions of laser dyes were successfully acquired with this rapid fluorometer using an integration time of 5 s.

  11. Longitudinal intensity distribution near the focus produced by light through scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xuan-Xuan; Wan, Li-Peng; Chen, Zi-Yang; Pu, Ji-Xiong

    2017-08-01

    Speckle pattern is formed when coherent light passes through scattering media. It has been demonstrated that after appropriately optimizing the phase of the incident light, a bright focal spot in the target point can be obtained for the case that the light passes through the scattering medium. However, until now the focused intensity distribution near the focus seems unclear. In this paper we experimentally investigate some factors influencing the longitudinal intensity distribution near the focus in details. It is shown that the desired longitudinal focused intensity distribution can be obtained by optimizing the incident light. The results may have potential applications in particle manipulation and laser processing, etc.

  12. An unexpected negative influence of light intensity on hydrogen production by dark fermentative bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrodnik, R; Laniecki, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of light intensity on biohydrogen production from glucose by Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium acetobutylicum, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied to evaluate the performance and possible application in co-culture fermentation system. The applied source of light had spectrum similar to the solar radiation. The influence of light intensity on hydrogen production in dark process by C. acetobutylicum was negligible. In contrast, dark fermentation by C. beijerinckii bacteria showed a significant decrease (83%) in produced hydrogen at light intensity of 540W/m(2). Here, the redirection of metabolism from acetic and butyric acid formation towards lactic acid was observed. This not yet reported effect was probably caused by irradiation of these bacteria by light within UVA range, which is an important component of the solar radiation. The excessive illumination with light of intensity higher than 200W/m(2) resulted in decrease in hydrogen production with photofermentative bacteria as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Flux of Euglena gracilis Cells Depends on the Gradient of Light Intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuma Ogawa

    Full Text Available We have quantified the photomovement behavior of a suspension of Euglena gracilis representing a behavioral response to a light gradient. Despite recent measurements of phototaxis and photophobicity, the details of macroscopic behavior of cell photomovements under conditions of light intensity gradients, which are critical to understand recent experiments on spatially localized bioconvection patterns, have not been fully understood. In this paper, the flux of cell number density under a light intensity gradient was measured by the following two experiments. In the first experiment, a capillary containing the cell suspension was illuminated with different light intensities in two regions. In the steady state, the differences of the cell numbers in the two regions normalized by the total number were proportional to the light difference, where the light intensity difference ranged from 0.5-2.0 μmol m-2 s-1. The proportional coefficient was positive (i.e., the bright region contained many microorganisms when the mean light intensity was weak (1.25 μmol m-2 s-1, whereas it was negative when the mean intensity was strong (13.75 μmol m-2 s-1. In the second experiment, a shallow rectangular container of the suspension was illuminated with stepwise light intensities. The cell number density distribution exhibited a single peak at the position where the light intensity was about Ic ≃ 3.8 μmol m-2 s-1. These results suggest that the suspension of E. gracilis responded to the light gradient and that the favorable light intensity was Ic.

  14. The Flux of Euglena gracilis Cells Depends on the Gradient of Light Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takuma; Shoji, Erika; Suematsu, Nobuhiko J; Nishimori, Hiraku; Izumi, Shunsuke; Awazu, Akinori; Iima, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We have quantified the photomovement behavior of a suspension of Euglena gracilis representing a behavioral response to a light gradient. Despite recent measurements of phototaxis and photophobicity, the details of macroscopic behavior of cell photomovements under conditions of light intensity gradients, which are critical to understand recent experiments on spatially localized bioconvection patterns, have not been fully understood. In this paper, the flux of cell number density under a light intensity gradient was measured by the following two experiments. In the first experiment, a capillary containing the cell suspension was illuminated with different light intensities in two regions. In the steady state, the differences of the cell numbers in the two regions normalized by the total number were proportional to the light difference, where the light intensity difference ranged from 0.5-2.0 μmol m-2 s-1. The proportional coefficient was positive (i.e., the bright region contained many microorganisms) when the mean light intensity was weak (1.25 μmol m-2 s-1), whereas it was negative when the mean intensity was strong (13.75 μmol m-2 s-1). In the second experiment, a shallow rectangular container of the suspension was illuminated with stepwise light intensities. The cell number density distribution exhibited a single peak at the position where the light intensity was about Ic ≃ 3.8 μmol m-2 s-1. These results suggest that the suspension of E. gracilis responded to the light gradient and that the favorable light intensity was Ic.

  15. Ultrafast dynamics driven by intense light pulses from atoms to solids, from lasers to intense X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Gräfe, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    This book documents the recent vivid developments in the research field of ultrashort intense light pulses for probing and controlling ultrafast dynamics. The recent fascinating results in studying and controlling ultrafast dynamics in ever more complicated systems such as (bio-)molecules and structures of meso- to macroscopic sizes on ever shorter time-scales are presented. The book is written by some of the most eminent experimental and theoretical experts in the field. It covers the new groundbreaking research directions that were opened by the availability of new light sources such as fully controlled intense laser fields with durations down to a single oscillation cycle, short-wavelength laser-driven attosecond pulses and intense X-ray pulses from the upcoming free electron lasers. These light sources allowed the investigation of dynamics in atoms, molecules, clusters, on surfaces and very recently also in nanostructures and solids in new regimes of parameters which, in turn, led to the identification of...

  16. Rare-Earth Free Self-Activated Graphene Quantum Dots and Copper-Cysteamine Phosphors for Enhanced White Light-Emitting-Diodes under Single Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wubin; Lei, Yifeng; Xu, Man; Zhao, Pei; Zhang, Zhanhui; Zhou, Jia

    2017-10-09

    Rare-earth (RE) based phosphors are attractive due to their potential applications. However, owing to the resource issue, these kinds of phosphors are expensive and costly. On the contrary, as for phosphor-convert white light-emitting-diodes (pc-WLEDs), a solution-processed tunable warm white emission LED composite is fabricated in this study under single excitation, with both RE free phosphors graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and Copper-Cysteamine (Cu-Cy). By using microwave-assisted wet-chemical method and with graphite as raw material, cold white fluorescence of the GQDs is obtained. Cu-Cy which shows intense photoluminescence in the red region has the structure where both the thio and amine groups connected with copper and forming cysteamine. Warm white light is achieved by mixing the two self-activated RE free phosphors at the weight ratio of 1: 1.7 under the excitation at 365 nm. The designed optimal LED device has the properties of CIE (x, y) = (0.341, 0.327), T = 4436 K, R = 87.9 EQE = 0.31%. The experimental results demonstrate that RE free phosphor(s) excited under a single chip can open up a new avenue to develop much lower device for warm WLEDs.

  17. The influence of supplementary light on Dorper lambs fed intensively

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADG), backfat thickness (BFT), eye muscle area (EMA), fat thickness (FT) on different body parts, the feed conversion ratio (FCR), body measurements and the weight of internal organs of Dorper lambs exposed to supplemented light. For this ...

  18. Excitation Migration, Quenching, and Regulation of Photosynthetic Light Harvesting in Photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkunas, L.; Chmeliov, J.; Trinkunas, G.; Duffy, C.D.P.; van Grondelle, R.; Ruban, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer and quenching in LHCII aggregates is considered in terms of a coarse-grained model. The model assumes that the excitation energy transfer within a pigment-protein complex is much faster than the intercomplex excitation energy transfer, whereas the quenching ability is

  19. Scattered light modulation cancellation method for sub-ppb-level NO2 detection in a LD-excited QEPAS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huadan; Dong, Lei; Ma, Ying; Wu, Hongpeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Yin, Xukun; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Weiguang; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-05-16

    A sub-ppb-level nitrogen dioxide (NO2) QEPAS sensor is developed by use of a cost-effective wide stripe laser diode (LD) emitting at 450 nm and a novel background noise suppression method called scattered light modulation cancellation method (SL-MOCAM). The SL-MOCAM is a variant of modulation spectroscopy using two light sources: excitation and balance light sources. The background noise caused by the stray light of the excitation light sources can be eliminated by exposing the QEPAS spectrophone to the modulated balance light. The noise in the LD-excited QEPAS system is investigated in detail and the results shows that > ~90% background noise can be effectively eliminated by the SL-MOCAM. For NO2 detection, a 1σ detection limit of ~60 ppb is achieved for 1 s integration time and the detection limit can be improved to 0.6 ppb with an integration time of 360 s. Moreover, the SLMOCAM shows a remote working ability in the preliminary investigation.

  20. CLASSIFICATION OF SEVERAL SKIN CANCER TYPES BASED ON AUTOFLUORESCENCE INTENSITY OF VISIBLE LIGHT TO NEAR INFRARED RATIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryo Tedjo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is a malignant growth on the skin caused by many factors. The most common skin cancers are Basal Cell Cancer (BCC and Squamous Cell Cancer (SCC. This research uses a discriminant analysis to classify some tissues of skin cancer based on criterion number of independent variables. An independent variable is variation of excitation light sources (LED lamp, filters, and sensors to measure Autofluorescence Intensity (IAF of visible light to near infrared (VIS/NIR ratio of paraffin embedded tissue biopsy from BCC, SCC, and Lipoma. From the result of discriminant analysis, it is known that the discriminant function is determined by 4 (four independent variables i.e., Blue LED-Red Filter, Blue LED-Yellow Filter, UV LED-Blue Filter, and UV LED-Yellow Filter. The accuracy of discriminant in classifying the analysis of three skin cancer tissues is 100 %.

  1. Radioprotective Action of Low-Intensity Light into the Red Absorption Band of Endogenous Molecular Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. V.; Mashalov, A. A.; Zakharov, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    Application of ionizing radiation in oncology (radiation therapy) is a widespread way to eliminate malignant tumors. Normal tissues are inevitable included in any radiation field, and their reliable protection is actual till now. All attempts to solve the problem are based on search of effective radioprotectors, i.e. chemical compounds of various classes, which should be entered into the patient. To date about 50,000 compounds with some radioprotection properties had been tested, but the most effective of them have been simultaneously the most toxic. Here the preliminary results of researches devoted to development of an optical technique on basis of the light-oxygen effect for the protection of women with breast cancer from side effects of the radiation therapy are presented. A low intensity emission of the semiconductor laser in a red spectral interval was used to excite a very small quantity of endogenous molecular oxygen in O2(1Δg) state. It is shown, that application of the method at occurrence of earliest signs of radiation injury allows notably reducing dangerous breaks in radiation therapy course.

  2. Effects of day-time exposure to different light intensities on light-induced melatonin suppression at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Tomoaki; Kubokawa, Ayaka; Taketomi, Ryunosuke; Hatae, Keisuke

    2015-07-04

    Bright nocturnal light has been known to suppress melatonin secretion. However, bright light exposure during the day-time might reduce light-induced melatonin suppression (LIMS) at night. The effective proportion of day-time light to night-time light is unclear; however, only a few studies on accurately controlling both day- and night-time conditions have been conducted. This study aims to evaluate the effect of different day-time light intensities on LIMS. Twelve male subjects between the ages of 19 and 23 years (mean ± S.D., 20.8 ± 1.1) gave informed consent to participate in this study. They were exposed to various light conditions (light conditions). They were then exposed to bright light (300 lx) again between 01:00 and 02:30 (night-time light exposure). They provided saliva samples before (00:55) and after night-time light exposure (02:30). A one-tailed paired t test yielded significant decrements of melatonin concentration after night-time light exposure under day-time dim, 100- and 300-lx light conditions. No significant differences exist in melatonin concentration between pre- and post-night-time light exposure under day-time 900- and 2700-lx light conditions. Present findings suggest the amount of light exposure needed to prevent LIMS caused by ordinary nocturnal light in individuals who have a general life rhythm (sleep/wake schedule). These findings may be useful in implementing artificial light environments for humans in, for example, hospitals and underground shopping malls.

  3. Effect of the light spectrum of various substrates for inkjet printed conductive structures sintered with intense pulsed light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weise, Dana, E-mail: dana.weise@mb.tu-chemnitz.de; Mitra, Kalyan Yoti, E-mail: dana.weise@mb.tu-chemnitz.de; Ueberfuhr, Peter, E-mail: dana.weise@mb.tu-chemnitz.de [Institute for Print and Media Technology, Department of Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz (Germany); Baumann, Reinhard R. [Institute for Print and Media Technology, Department of Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz, Germany and Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Department Printed Functionalities (Germany)

    2015-02-17

    In this work, the novel method of intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering of a nanoparticle silver ink is presented. Various patterns are printed with the Inkjet technology on two flexible foils with different light spectra. One is a clear Polyethylenterephthalat [PET] foil and the second is a light brownish Polyimide [PI] foil. The samples are flashed with different parameters regarding to pulse intensity and pulse length. Microscopic images are indicating the impact of the flashing parameters and the different light spectra of the substrates on the sintered structures. Sheet and line resistance are measured and the conductivity is calculated. A high influence of the property of the substrate with respect to light absorption and thermal conductivity on the functionality of printed conductive structures could be presented. With this new method of IPL sintering, highly conductive inkjet printed silver patterns could be manufactured within milliseconds on flexible polymeric foils without damaging the substrate.

  4. Effects of light intensity on components and topographical structures of extracellular polysaccharides from the cyanobacteria Nostoc sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hongmei; Xia, Ling; Zhou, Xuping; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2014-02-01

    A study on the effects of light intensity (40 and 80 μE/m(2)/sec) on the components and topographical structures of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) was carried out in cyanobacteria Nostoc sp.. EPS yield increased with light intensity. However, light intensity did not significantly affect the EPS fractions and monosaccharide composition. Higher light intensity generally resulted in higher protein content of EPS in similar fractions. The topographical structure of EPS, investigated by atomic force microscopy, appeared as spherical lumps, chains and networks. The long chains were observed at higher light intensity. Thus, light intensity affected the yield and nature of EPS.

  5. Photosensitivity control of an isotropic medium through polarization of light pulses with tilted intensity front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazansky, Peter G; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Beresna, Martynas; Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Svirko, Yuri; Akturk, Selcuk; Qiu, Jianrong; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2011-10-10

    We present the first experimental evidence of anisotropic photosensitivity of an isotropic homogeneous medium under uniform illumination. Our experiments reveal fundamentally new type of light induced anisotropy originated from the hidden asymmetry of pulsed light beam with a finite tilt of intensity front. We anticipate that the observed phenomenon, which enables employing mutual orientation of a light polarization plane and pulse front tilt to control interaction of matter with ultrashort light pulses, will open new opportunities in material processing.

  6. Effect of light intensities on the photosynthetic characteristics of Abies holophylla seedlings from different provenances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The photosynthetic characteristics of Abies holophylla seedlings from six provenances under four artificial light intensities in a greenhouse (full light, 75.08%, 55.42%, and 30.38% of full light were studied to explore the underlying genetic differences in foliar photosynthesis. Varying light intensities significantly affected the foliar photosynthetic parameters of A. holophylla seedlings from six provenances. As the light intensity dropped, the foliar CO2 assimilation capacity of A. holophylla seedlings sharply decreased, and the foliar light utilization capacity significantly increased. Analysis of genetic variation showed highly significant differences in terms of CO2 assimilation capacity, light utilization capacity, and respiration depletion of A. holophylla seedlings among different provenances under different light intensities. The variations were mainly controlled by the genetic factors of the provenance itself. The obtained results revealed that different sensitivities of A. holophylla seedlings from different provenances in response to changed light intensities elicited significant differences in foliar photosynthesis among different provenances. The relationships between sensitivities and annual temperature difference, mean temperature in January, and mean annual evaporation of provenance were found to be the most closely related, which indicated that temperature range and effective precipitation of provenance were the main factors that affected photosynthetic plasticity of A. holophylla seedlings. 

  7. The influence of reduced light intensity on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-09-01

    Herbicide pollution events in aquatic ecosystems often coincide with increased turbidity and reduced light intensity. It is therefore important to determine whether reduced light intensity can influence herbicide toxicity, especially to primary producers such as benthic diatoms. Benthic diatoms collected from 4 rivers were exposed to herbicides in 48 h rapid toxicity tests under high light (100 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) and low light (20 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) intensities. The effects of 2 herbicides (atrazine and glyphosate) were assessed on 26 freshwater benthic diatom taxa. There was no significant interaction of light and herbicide effects at the community level or on the majority (22 of 26) of benthic diatom taxa. This indicates that low light levels will likely have only a minor influence on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicides. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2252-2260. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  8. Quality of pork loin stored under different light intensity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marcinkowska-Lesiak, Monika; Poławska, Ewa; Stelmasiak, Adrian; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    .... Meat slices were packed in modified atmosphere packs (MAP: 80% O 2 and 20% CO 2 ) and stored in the darkness or displayed under fluorescent light (1000 lx and 2000 lx, respectively) for 12 days...

  9. The effect of temperature and light intensity on hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eroglu, Inci [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Sevinc, Pelin [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biotechnology; Guenduez, Ufuk; Yucel, Meral [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus is a purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium which can produce hydrogen by photofermentation on acetate and lactate. Hydrogen productivity depends on several parameters such as medium composition, pH, light intensity and temperature. In the present study, the effects of temperature and light intensity on hydrogen production were investigated. The cell growth curve has been fitted to the logistic model and hydrogen productivity was interpreted by Modified Gompertz Equation. The maximum productivity was obtained at 30 C and light intensity of 4000 lux. (orig.)

  10. Influence of light intensity on growth and physiological characteristics of common sage (Salvia officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Zervoudakis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of four different light intensities on the growth characteristics, physiological parameters and leaf photosynthetic pigments of Salvia officinalis L. The plant's dry mass, number of the leaves and physiological parameters indicated a strong positive correlation with the light intensity. On the other hand, the plant's height and leaf photosynthetic pigments were increased at low light treated plants. These results suggest that the aromatic herb Salvia officinalis L. is adaptable to different light environments.

  11. The effect of intensity of excitation on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: Opportunities in luminescence sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Jens U.; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2011-01-01

    We report changes in the photophysical properties of core-shell type CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) under optical irradiation. QDs either in aqueous solution or immobilized in a silica sol gel matrix have been excited at different wavelengths and fluxes. Illumination of the sample with 140 fs 700 nm Ti:sapphire laser pulses of the peak power of the order of 4 GW/cm2 caused gradual increase in the luminescence lifetime from an initial value of 3.5 increasing to 4.5 ns and an increase in luminescence intensity by ˜8%. Using about 16 GW/cm2 peak power resulted in a shortening of the luminescence lifetime to 3 ns and a decrease in intensity by ˜75%. Both photobrightening and photodarkening were fully reversible. We discuss the kinetics of photobrightening and photodarkening and investigate the suitability of QDs as luminescence lifetime sensors with tunable parameters.

  12. Visible-near-infrared luminescent lanthanide ternary complexes based on beta-diketonate using visible-light excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lining; Qiu, Yannan; Liu, Tao; Feng, Jing; Deng, Wei; Shi, Liyi

    2015-11-01

    We used the synthesized dinaphthylmethane (Hdnm) ligand whose absorption extends to the visible-light wavelength, to prepare a family of ternary lanthanide complexes, named as [Ln(dnm)3 phen] (Ln = Sm, Nd, Yb, Er, Tm, Pr). The properties of these complexes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and excitation and emission spectroscopy. Generally, excitation with visible light is much more advantageous than UV excitation. Importantly, upon excitation with visible light (401-460 nm), the complexes show characteristic visible (Sm(3+)) as well as near-infrared (Sm(3+), Nd(3+), Yb(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+), Pr(3+)) luminescence of the corresponding lanthanide ions, attributed to the energy transfer from the ligands to the lanthanide ions, an antenna effect. Now, using these near-infrared luminescent lanthanide complexes, the luminescent spectral region from 800 to 1650 nm, can be covered completely, which is of particular interest for biomedical imaging applications, laser systems, and optical amplification applications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Luminescence Color Tuning by Regulating Electrostatic Interaction in Light-Emitting Devices and Two-Photon Excited Information Decryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun; Liu, Shujuan; Yang, Huiran; Zeng, Yi; She, Pengfei; Zhu, Nianyong; Ho, Cheuk-Lam; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2017-03-06

    It is well-known that the variation of noncovalent interactions of luminophores, such as π-π interaction, metal-to-metal interaction, and hydrogen-bonding interaction, can regulate their emission colors. Electrostatic interaction is also an important noncovalent interaction. However, very few examples of luminescence color tuning induced by electrostatic interaction were reported. Herein, a series of Zn(II)-bis(terpyridine) complexes (Zn-AcO, Zn-BF4, Zn-ClO4, and Zn-PF6) containing different anionic counterions were reported, which exhibit counterion-dependent emission colors from green-yellow to orange-red (549 to 622 nm) in CH2Cl2 solution. More importantly, it was found that the excited states of these Zn(II) complexes can be regulated by changing the electrostatic interaction between Zn2+ and counterions. On the basis of this controllable excited state, white light emission has been achieved by a single molecule, and a white light-emitting device has been fabricated. Moreover, a novel type of data decryption system with Zn-PF6 as the optical recording medium has been developed by the two-photon excitation technique. Our results suggest that rationally controlled excited states of these Zn(II) complexes by regulating electrostatic interaction have promising applications in various optoelectronic fields, such as light-emitting devices, information recording, security protection, and so on.

  14. Some light-ion excitation-function measurements on titanium, yttrium, and europium, and associated results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, H.I. Jr. [ed.; Lanier, R.G.; Mustafa, M.G.; Nuckolls, R.M.; Nagle, R.J.; O`Brien, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Frehaut, J.; Adam, A.; Philis, C. [Service de Physique et Techniques Nucleaires, Centre d`Etudes Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Boite Postale 12 (France)

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses: Fabrication of Plastic-Matrix-Encapsulated Accelerator Targets and Their Use in Measuring Nuclear Excitation Functions; Correcting Excitation Function Data in the Low Energy Region for Finite Thickness of the Target Foils, Including Effects of Straggling; Excitation Functions for the Nuclear Reactions on Titanium Leading to the Production {sup 48}V, {sup 44}Sc and {sup 47}Sc by Proton, Deuteron and Triton Irradiations at 0--35 MeV; Some Excitation Functions of Proton and Deuteron Induced Reactions on {sup 89}Y; Measurements of the Excitation Functions of the Isobaric Chain {sup 87}Y, {sup 87}Y{sup m}, {sup 87}Y{sup g} and {sup 87}Sr{sup m}; Levels in {sup 87}Y Observed in the Decay of {sup 87}Zr; and Nuclear Reaction Excitation Functions from the Irradiation of {sup 151,153}Eu with Protons And deuterons up to 35 MeV.

  15. Sound intensity probe for ultrasonic field in water using light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2017-12-01

    The sound intensity vector provides useful information on the state of an ultrasonic field in water, since sound intensity is a vector quantity expressing the direction and magnitude of the sound field. In the previous studies on sound intensity measurement in water, conventional piezoelectric sensors and metal cables were used, and the transmission distance was limited. A new configuration of a sound intensity probe suitable for ultrasonic measurement in water is proposed and constructed for trial in this study. The probe consists of light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements, and the output signals are transmitted through fiber optic cables as intensity-modulated light. Sound intensity measurements of a 26 kHz ultrasonic field in water are demonstrated. The difference in the intensity vector state between the water tank with and without sound-absorbing material on its walls was successfully observed.

  16. Association of Light-Intensity Physical Activity With Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk Burden in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Samannaaz S; Almeida, Gustavo J; Chester Wasko, Mary; Terhorst, Lauren; Piva, Sara R

    2016-04-01

    To characterize physical activity (PA) in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to determine the associations between PA participation at light to moderate intensities and cardiovascular disease risk factors, disability, and disease activity. The cross-sectional study used data from 2 RA cohorts. PA was measured using an accelerometry-based activity monitor, recording minutes/day spent in sedentary (≤1 metabolic equivalent [MET]), very light (1.1-1.9 METs), light (2-2.9 METs), and moderate activities (≥3 METs). Cardiovascular markers included body mass index, blood pressure, insulin resistance, and lipid profile. Disability and disease activity were measured using the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), respectively. Associations between PA at each intensity level and health markers were assessed by multiple linear regression models, adjusted for age, sex, and cohort. Ninety-eight subjects (mean ± SD age 58 ± 9 years, 85% female) were included. Subjects spent 9.8 hours/day being sedentary, 3.5 hours/day engaged in very light PA, 2.1 hours/day engaged in light PA, and 35 minutes/day engaged in moderate PA. Only 17% were physically active (≥150 minutes/week of moderate PA in 10-minute bouts). Regression models showed that very light, light, and moderate PA were inversely associated with most cardiovascular disease risk factors and HAQ and DAS28 scores (R(2) Δ range 0.04-0.52, P cardiovascular disease markers were either equivalent or stronger at very light and light intensities, as compared to moderate intensity. Individuals with RA are mostly active at very light and light intensities. PA at these intensity levels associates favorably with cardiovascular markers and lower disability and disease activity in RA. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Intense pulsed light in treatment of nevus spilus: brief report of a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Houshang Ehsani

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Intense pulsed light is seemed an effective and safe treatment for nevus spilus Treatment; however randomized control trials with longer follow-up periods are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety.

  18. Light-emitting-diode Lambertian light sources as low-radiant-flux standards applicable to quantitative luminescence-intensity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshita, Masahiro; Kubota, Hidehiro; Shimogawara, Masahiro; Mori, Kaneo; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi

    2017-09-01

    Planar-type Lambertian light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a circular aperture of several tens of μ m to a few mm in diameter were developed for use as radiant-flux standard light sources, which have been in strong demand for applications such as quantitative or absolute intensity measurements of weak luminescence from solid-state materials and devices. Via pulse-width modulation, time-averaged emission intensity of the LED devices was controlled linearly to cover a wide dynamic range of about nine orders of magnitude, from 10 μ W down to 10 fW. The developed planar LED devices were applied as the radiant-flux standards to quantitative measurements and analyses of photoluminescence (PL) intensity and PL quantum efficiency of a GaAs quantum-well sample. The results demonstrated the utility and applicability of the LED standards in quantitative luminescence-intensity measurements in Lambertian-type low radiant-flux level sources.

  19. Hair removal using intense pulsed light (EpiLight): patient satisfaction, our experience, and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Lucian; Menachem, Meital; Ramon, Ytzhack; Shoshani, Oren; Rissin, Yaron; Eldor, Liron; Egozi, Dana; Peled, Isaac J; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2005-01-01

    Applications for intense pulsed light (IPL) for hair removal are gaining favor among other methods, including lasers, because of its noninvasive nature, versatility regarding different skin and hair types, safety, and ease of use. Hair removal using IPL was performed from January 2002 to December 2003 on 108 consecutive patients. Eighty of these patients answered a questionnaire and were enrolled in the study group. The investigated parameters were hair and skin type, number of pulses, fluence, pulse duration, pulse delay, the filters used, and the treated area. The patient assessment of improvement (satisfaction) rate was graded from 1 to 5 points: 1, worse; 2, no improvement; 3, mild improvement; 4, good result; and 5, excellent result. The patients had between 1 and 13 treatments most of them during 2 to 6 sessions. Sixty-seven percent of the patients reported no complications. Prolonged erythema for more than 7 days was reported by 16.25%, blisters by 6.25%, temporary hyperpigmentation by 8.75%, leukotrichia was present in 1 case, and 1 case of persistent hypopigmentation was noted in a young girl. An increased number of complications and a decreased satisfaction rate were noted with higher skin types, but it was not statistically significant. Patients who underwent fewer treatments (1-3 treatments) were more satisfied compared with those who had more than 7 treatments (P hair removal cannot be guaranteed and it is not possible to predict the improvement rate. Nevertheless, based on patient satisfaction rate in this study, the authors recommend using IPL for hair removal.

  20. High intensity Discharge lighting; Alumbrado de alta intensidad de descarga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza E, Ernesto J. [Manufacturera de Reactores, S. A., Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1993-12-31

    This paper gets into contact with some fundamentals in the operation of high discharge intensity lamps. There are useful definitions, as well as the study of the operation of high pressure sodium lamps and of metallic additives operating at less than nominal power. [Espanol] Este trabajo pone al lector en contacto con algunos fundamentos de la operacion de las lamparas de alta intensidad de descarga (HID). Se encuentra con definiciones utiles, asi como el estudio de la operacion de las lamparas de sodio en alta presion y de aditivos metalicos operando a una potencia menor que la nominal.

  1. Measurement of Light Intensity Based on a Flip-flop Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kollár

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new type of system for measuring light intensity with the use of a flip-flop sensor controlled by a so-called slow-rise voltage control pulse. A photodiode was used for quantification of the measured light intensity in the structure of the flip-flop. The theoretical considerations are compared with experimental results, and good agreement is reported.

  2. Exotic behavior of molecules in intense laser light fields. New research directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru [Tokyo Univ., Department of Chemistry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    The recent investigation of the dynamical behavior of molecules and clusters in intense laser fields has afforded us invaluable opportunities to understand fundamentals of the interaction between molecular species and light fields as well as to manipulate molecules and their dynamical pathways by taking advantage of characteristics of coherent ultrashort laser light fields. In the present report, new directions of this rapidly growing interdisciplinary research fields called molecular science in intense laser fields are discussed by referring to our recent studies. (author)

  3. Vapor deposition of polystyrene thin films by intense laser vibrational excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubb, D.M.; Papantonakis, M.R.; Horwitz, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    -induced damage to the target can be seen. RIR-PLD is a fundamentally new approach to polymer thin film growth as the absorption of radiation resonant with vibrational modes allow the energy to be deposited into the polymer and transfers between macromolecules in such a way as to promote efficient, non......Polystyrene films were deposited using resonant infrared pulsed laser depositions (RIR-PLD). Thin films were grown on Si(1 1 1) wafers and NaCl substrates and analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The depositions were carried out...... in vacuum (10(-4)-10(-5) Torr) at wavelengths 3.28, 3.30, 3.42 and 3.48 mum which are resonant with CH2 stretching modes in the polymer. We also attempted to deposit a films using non-resonant infrared (RIR) excitation (2.90 mum). At this wavelength no films were deposited, and evidence for laser...

  4. Lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) association with cancerous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Caerwyn; Town, Godfrey; Whittall, Rebecca; Tooze, Louise; Phillips, Jaymie

    2017-11-01

    The development and use of light and lasers for medical and cosmetic procedures has increased exponentially over the past decade. This review article focuses on the incidence of reported cases of skin cancer post laser or IPL treatment. The existing evidence base of over 25 years of laser and IPL use to date has not raised any concerns regarding its long-term safety with only a few anecdotal cases of melanoma post treatment over two decades of use; therefore, there is no evidence to suggest that there is a credible cancer risk. Although laser and IPL technology has not been known to cause skin cancer, this does not mean that laser and IPL therapies are without long-term risks. Light therapies and lasers to treat existing lesions and CO2 laser resurfacing can be a preventative measure against BCC and SCC tumour formation by removing photo-damaged keratinocytes and encouraged re-epithelisation from stem cells located deeper in the epidermis. A review of the relevant literature has been performed to address the issue of long-term IPL safety, focussing on DNA damage, oxidative stress induction and the impact of adverse events.

  5. Morphology of seedling lentil (Lens culinaris Medic., Fabaceae) as influenced by light intensity and heredity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozzolillo, C

    1986-01-01

    Lentil seedlings (Lens culinaris Medic.) were grown out-of-doors, in a shaded greenhouse or in a controlled environment chamber (15 degrees C, 14 hr day under a bank of incandescent and fluorescent lights). Bright light promoted branching of seedlings and inhibited internode elongation. Internodes formed after transfer of plants from high to low or from low to high light intensity were like those grown in continuous high or low light intensity. Branching was enhanced following transfer from high to low light intensity. Transfer from low to high light intensity resulted in stimulation of lateral bud development only if irradiance was very high (full sun). Third generation lines from single seed selections exhibited segregation of internode lengths. F4 hybrids of a cross between a "tall" and a "short" plant showed a similar segregation. Number of leaflets per leaf increased from two at nodes 3 and 4 to four at node 7 in the species of lentils examined (L. culinaris, L. orientalis, L. ervoides, L. nigricans) regardless of light intensity.

  6. High light intensity mediates a shift from allochthonous to autochthonous carbon use in phototrophic stream biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karoline; Bengtsson, Mia M.; Findlay, Robert H.; Battin, Tom J.; Ulseth, Amber J.

    2017-07-01

    Changes in the riparian vegetation along stream channels, diurnal light availability, and longitudinal fluctuations in the local light regime in streams influence primary production and carbon (C) cycling in benthic stream biofilms. To investigate the influence of light availability on the uptake dynamics of autochthonous and allochthonous dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in benthic biofilms, we experimentally added 13C-labeled allochthonous DOC to biofilms grown under light intensities ranging from 5 to 152 μmol photons m-2 s-1. We calculated the net C flux, which showed that benthic biofilms released autochthonous DOC across the entire light gradient. Light availability and diurnal light patterns influenced C uptake by benthic biofilms. More allochthonous DOC was respired under low light availability and at night, whereas under high light availability and during the day mainly autochthonous C was respired by the benthic biofilm community. Furthermore, phenol oxidase activity (indicative of allochthonous DOC uptake) was more elevated under low light availability, whereas beta-glucosidase activity (indicative of autochthonous DOC use) increased with light intensity. Collectively, our results suggest that biofilms exposed to high light inputs preferentially used autochthonous DOC, whereas biofilms incubated at attenuated levels showed greater use of allochthonous DOC. This has implications for the spatial dynamics of DOC uptake in streams and speaks against the occurrence of priming effects in algal-dominated stream biofilms.

  7. Pulse-Width Modulation of Optogenetic Photo-Stimulation Intensity for Application to Full-Implantable Light Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-Yu Beverly; Budgett, David M; Sun, Yuhui; Malpas, Simon; McCormick, Daniel; Freestone, Peter S

    2017-02-01

    Optogenetics allows control of neuronal activity with unprecedented spatiotemporal precision, and has enabled both significant advances in neuroscience and promising clinical prospects for some neurological, cardiac, and sensory disorders. The ability to chronically stimulate light-sensitive excitable cells is crucial for developing useful research tools and viable long-term treatment strategies. Popular optogenetic stimulation devices often rely on bench-top light-sources tethered via an optical fibre to the research animal, or significant componentry protruding externally from animal. These approaches are prone to infection, vulnerable to damage and restrict the experimental approaches that can be conducted. An ideal optogenetic stimulator would be contained entirely within the animal and provide precisely controlled optical output. However, existing prototypes of fully implantable devices rely on amplitude tuning of wireless power, which can vary strongly with environmental conditions. Here we show that pulse-width modulation (PWM) of the intensity of a light-emitting diode (LED) can enable control of photo-stimulation intensity equivalent to direct amplitude modulation. This result has significant implications for fully implantable light delivery tools, as PWM can be implemented with simple and miniaturized circuit architectures. We have modified a telemeter device previously developed by our group to include a small form-factor LED capable of generating sufficient optical power with manageable electrical power requirements and minimal heat generation. We have tested key device components in an in vitro mouse brain slice preparation and shown that pulse-width-modulation is an alternative method to modulate photo-stimulation intensity using a miniature circuit and providing easy control.

  8. Light-intensity physical activity and cardiometabolic biomarkers in US adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Carson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The minimal physical activity intensity that would confer health benefits among adolescents is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of accelerometer-derived light-intensity (split into low and high physical activity, and moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity with cardiometabolic biomarkers in a large population-based sample. METHODS: The study is based on 1,731 adolescents, aged 12-19 years from the 2003/04 and 2005/06 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Low light-intensity activity (100-799 counts/min, high light-intensity activity (800 counts/min to <4 METs and moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity (≥ 4 METs, Freedson age-specific equation were accelerometer-derived. Cardiometabolic biomarkers, including waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol, and C-reactive protein were measured. Triglycerides, LDL- cholesterol, insulin, glucose, and homeostatic model assessments of β-cell function (HOMA-%B and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-%S were also measured in a fasting sub-sample (n=807. RESULTS: Adjusted for confounders, each additional hour/day of low light-intensity activity was associated with 0.59 (95% CI: 1.18-0.01 mmHG lower diastolic blood pressure. Each additional hour/day of high light-intensity activity was associated with 1.67 (2.94-0.39 mmHG lower diastolic blood pressure and 0.04 (0.001-0.07 mmol/L higher HDL-cholesterol. Each additional hour/day of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity was associated with 3.54 (5.73-1.35 mmHG lower systolic blood pressure, 5.49 (1.11-9.77% lower waist circumference, 25.87 (6.08-49.34% lower insulin, and 16.18 (4.92-28.53% higher HOMA-%S. CONCLUSIONS: Time spent in low light-intensity physical activity and high light-intensity physical activity had some favorable associations with biomarkers. Consistent with current physical activity recommendations for adolescents, moderate- to

  9. Position Detection Based on Intensities of Reflected Infrared Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Vie

    This thesis focuses on development of methods for using infrared sensors for position detection. There exist various methods where optical sensors are used to give position estimates, many utilizing multiple cameras. The overall approach in this thesis is to base a position detection sensor system...... on inputs from an array of infrared emitters and receivers. The signals from the emitters are reflected by an object and captured by the receivers. The attenuation from each emitter via the object to the receivers obviously depends on position, geometrical, and optical properties of the object. The main...... with success. Furthermore some investigation in using similar array of infrared emitters and receivers for a navigation sensor for a mobile robot has been made. Promising results with this approach has been obtained for modeled light reflections....

  10. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C

    2006-01-01

    IPL treatments at 2-week intervals. Simulated solar radiation was administered preoperatively [six standard erythema doses (SED) four times weekly for 11 weeks] as well as pre- and postoperatively (six SED four times weekly up to 26 weeks). Skin tumors were assessed weekly during a 12-month...... observation period. Side effects were evaluated clinically. No tumors appeared in untreated control mice or in just IPL-treated mice. Skin tumors developed in UV-exposed mice independently of IPL treatments. The time it took for 50% of the mice to first develop skin tumor ranged from 47 to 49 weeks...... in preoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.94) and from 22 to 23 weeks in pre- and postoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.11). IPL rejuvenation of lightly pigmented skin did not induce pigmentary changes (p=1.00). IPL rejuvenation of UV-pigmented skin resulted in an immediate increased skin pigmentation and a subsequent...

  11. Light Intensity is Important for Hydrogen Production in NaHSO3-Treated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lanzhen; Yi, Jing; Wang, Lianjun; Huang, Tingting; Gao, Fudan; Wang, Quanxi; Ma, Weimin

    2017-03-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga that can use light energy to produce H2 from H2O in the background of NaHSO3 treatment. However, the role of light intensity in such H2 production remains elusive. Here, light intensity significantly affected the yield of H2 production in NaHSO3-treated C. reinhardtii, which was consistent with its effects on the content of O2 and the expression and activity of hydrogenase. Further, NaHSO3 was found to be able to remove O2 via a reaction of bisulfite with superoxide anion produced at the acceptor side of PSI, and light intensity affected the reaction rate significantly. Accordingly, high light and strong light but not low light can create an anaerobic environment, which is important to activate hydrogenase and produce H2. Based on the above results, we conclude that light intensity plays an important role in removing O2 and consequently activating hydrogenase and producing H2 in NaHSO3-treated C. reinhardtii. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Intensity-dependent change in polarization state of light in normal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These equations clearly show the intensity dependence of polarization state of the reflected and transmitted light beams. From eqs (13) and (14) it is clear that when incident light is plane polarized (pinc = p∗ inc) or circularly polarized (pinc = ±i), then pref = pinc and ptra = pinc, i.e., there is no change in polarization state of.

  13. Effect of light intensity and irradiation time on the polymerization process of a dental composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Discacciati José Augusto César

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymerization shrinkage is a critical factor affecting the longevity and acceptability of dental composite resins. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of light intensity and irradiation time on the polymerization process of a photo cured dental composite resin by measuring the Vickers hardness number (VHN and the volumetric polymerization shrinkage. Samples were prepared using a dental manual light-curing unit. The samples were submitted to irradiation times of 5, 10, 20 and 40 s, using 200 and 400 mW.cm-2 light intensities. Vickers hardness number was obtained at four different moments after photoactivation (immediate, 1 h, 24 h and 168 h. After this, volumetric polymerization shrinkage values were obtained through a specific density method. The values were analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan's (p = 0.05. Results showed increase in hardness values from the immediate reading to 1 h and 24 h readings. After 24 h no changes were observed regardless the light intensities or activation times. The hardness values were always smaller for the 200 mW.cm-2 light intensity, except for the 40 s irradiation time. No significant differences were detected in volumetric polymerization shrinkage considering the light intensity (p = 0.539 and the activation time (p = 0.637 factors. In conclusion the polymerization of the material does not terminate immediately after photoactivation and the increase of irradiation time can compensate a lower light intensity. Different combinations between light intensity and irradiation time, i.e., different amounts of energy given to the system, have not affected the polymerization shrinkage.

  14. Observation of Electronic Excitation Transfer Through Light Harvesting Complex II Using Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, NHC; Gruenke, NL; Oliver, TAA; Ballottari, M; Bassi, R; Fleming, GR

    2016-10-05

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) serves a central role in light harvesting for oxygenic photosynthesis and is arguably the most important photosynthetic antenna complex. In this article, we present two-dimensional electronic–vibrational (2DEV) spectra of LHCII isolated from spinach, demonstrating the possibility of using this technique to track the transfer of electronic excitation energy between specific pigments within the complex. We assign the spectral bands via comparison with the 2DEV spectra of the isolated chromophores, chlorophyll a and b, and present evidence that excitation energy between the pigments of the complex are observed in these spectra. Lastly, we analyze the essential components of the 2DEV spectra using singular value decomposition, which makes it possible to reveal the relaxation pathways within this complex.

  15. Evaluation of excitation energy and spin from light charged particles multiplicities in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Steckmeyer, J C; Grotowski, K; Pawowski, P; Aiello, S; Anzalone, A; Bini, M; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Cardella, G; Casini, G; Cavallaro, S; Charvet, J L; Dayras, R; De Filippo, E; Durand, D; Femin, S; Frankland, J D; Galíchet, E; Geraci, M; Giustolisi, F; Guazzoni, P; Iacono-Manno, M; Lanzalone, G; Lanzan, G; Le Neindre, N; Lo Nigro, S; Lo Piano, F; Olmi, A; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Pârlog, M; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Rivet, M F; Rizzo, F; Rosato, E; Roy, R; Sambataro, S; Sperduto, M L; Stefanini, A A; Sutera, C; Tamain, B; Vient, E; Volant, C; Wieleczko, J P; Zetta, L

    2005-01-01

    A simple procedure for evaluating the excitation energy and the spin transfer in heavy-ion dissipative collisions is proposed. It is based on a prediction of the GEMINI evaporation code : for a nucleus with a given excitation energy, the average number of emitted protons decreases with increasing spin, whereas the average number of alpha particles increases. Using that procedure for the reaction 107Ag+58Ni at 52 MeV/nucleon, the excitation energy and spin of quasi-projectiles have been evaluated. The results obtained in this way have been compared with the predictions of a model describing the primary dynamic stage of heavy-ion collisions.

  16. Accelerometer-assessed light-intensity physical activity and mortality among those with mobility limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Emily; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2017-08-31

    Emerging research demonstrates that light-intensity physical activity is favorably associated with numerous health outcomes among the general population, even independent of high-intensity physical activity. To examine the association between accelerometer-assessed light-intensity physical activity and mortality in a national sample of American adults with mobility limitations. Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were utilized. Participants were followed through 2011. Based on self-report, analyzed participants included those with mobility limitations (N = 1369). Light-intensity physical activity was assessed via waist-mounted accelerometry. For the sample, 108,010 person-months occurred with an all-cause mortality rate of 2.07 per 1000 person-months. After adjustments, for every 60 min/day increase in light-intensity physical activity, participants with mobility limitations had a 14% reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HR = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.75-0.98; P = 0.03). These findings underscore the importance of promoting light-intensity physical activity to those with mobility limitations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Light intensity affects the uptake and metabolism of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingxu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Feng, Ying

    2016-02-01

    The uptake of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.), when supplied as single N-source or in a mixture of glycine and inorganic N, was studied at different light intensities under sterile conditions. At the optimal intensity (414 μmol m-2 s-1) for plant growth, glycine, nitrate, and ammonium contributed 29.4%, 39.5%, and 31.1% shoot N, respectively, and light intensity altered the preferential absorption of N sources. The lower 15N-nitrate in root but higher in shoot and the higher 15N-glycine in root but lower in shoot suggested that most 15N-nitrate uptake by root transported to shoot rapidly, with the shoot being important for nitrate assimilation, and the N contribution of glycine was limited by post-uptake metabolism. The amount of glycine that was taken up by the plant was likely limited by root uptake at low light intensities and by the metabolism of ammonium produced by glycine at high light intensities. These results indicate that pakchoi has the ability to uptake a large quantity of glycine, but that uptake is strongly regulated by light intensity, with metabolism in the root inhibiting its N contribution.

  18. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Z

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Zain Husain,1 Tina S Alster1,2 1Department of Dermatology, Georgetown University Hospital, 2Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. Keywords: laser, intense pulsed light, treatment, dermatology, technology

  19. A portable smart phone-based plasmonic nanosensor readout platform that measures transmitted light intensities of nanosubstrates using an ambient light sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiangqiang; Wu, Ze; Xu, Fangxiang; Li, Xiuqing; Yao, Cuize; Xu, Meng; Sheng, Liangrong; Yu, Shiting; Tang, Yong

    2016-05-21

    Plasmonic nanosensors may be used as tools for diagnostic testing in the field of medicine. However, quantification of plasmonic nanosensors often requires complex and bulky readout instruments. Here, we report the development of a portable smart phone-based plasmonic nanosensor readout platform (PNRP) for accurate quantification of plasmonic nanosensors. This device operates by transmitting excitation light from a LED through a nanosubstrate and measuring the intensity of the transmitted light using the ambient light sensor of a smart phone. The device is a cylinder with a diameter of 14 mm, a length of 38 mm, and a gross weight of 3.5 g. We demonstrated the utility of this smart phone-based PNRP by measuring two well-established plasmonic nanosensors with this system. In the first experiment, the device measured the morphology changes of triangular silver nanoprisms (AgNPRs) in an immunoassay for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In the second experiment, the device measured the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in an aptamer-based assay for the detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The results from the smart phone-based PNRP were consistent with those from commercial spectrophotometers, demonstrating that the smart phone-based PNRP enables accurate quantification of plasmonic nanosensors.

  20. Evaluation of light intensity output of QTH and LED curing devices in various governmental health institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shaafi, Mm; Maawadh, Am; Al Qahtani, Mq

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the light intensity output of quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) and light emitting diode (LED) curing devices located at governmental health institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.Eight governmental institutions were involved in the study. The total number of evaluated curing devices was 210 (120 were QTH and 90 were LED). The reading of the light intensity output for each curing unit was achieved using a digital spectrometer; (Model USB4000 Spectrometer, Ocean Optics Inc, Dunedin, FL, USA). The reading procedure was performed by a single investigator; any recording of light intensity below 300 mW/cm2 was considered unsatisfactory.The result found that the recorded mean values of light intensity output for QTH and LED devices were 260 mW/cm2 and 598 mW/cm2, respectively. The percentage of QTH devices and LED devices considered unsatisfactory was 67.5% and 15.6%, respectively. Overall, the regular assessment of light curing devices using light meters is recommended to assure adequate output for clinical use.

  1. Simultaneous effects of light intensity and phosphorus supply on the sterol content of phytoplankton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike Piepho

    Full Text Available Sterol profiles of microalgae and their change with environmental conditions are of great interest in ecological food web research and taxonomic studies alike. Here, we investigated effects of light intensity and phosphorus supply on the sterol content of phytoplankton and assessed potential interactive effects of these important environmental factors on the sterol composition of algae. We identified sterol contents of four common phytoplankton genera, Scenedesmus, Chlamydomonas, Cryptomonas and Cyclotella, and analysed the change in sterol content with varying light intensities in both a high-phosphorus and a low-phosphorus approach. Sterol contents increased significantly with increasing light in three out of four species. Phosphorus-limitation reversed the change of sterol content with light intensity, i.e., sterol content decreased with increasing light at low phosphorus supply. Generally sterol contents were lower in low-phosphorus cultures. In conclusion, both light and phosphorus conditions strongly affect the sterol composition of algae and hence should be considered in ecological and taxonomic studies investigating the biochemical composition of algae. Data suggest a possible sterol limitation of growth and reproduction of herbivorous crustacean zooplankton during summer when high light intensities and low phosphorus supply decrease sterol contents of algae.

  2. Using radiation intensity dependence on excitation level for the analysis of surface plasmon resonance effect on ZnO luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, S. I.; Tarasov, A. P.; Briskina, C. M.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Markushev, V. M.; Lotin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    For the analysis of ZnO luminescence the system of rate equations (SRE) was proposed. It contains a set of parameters that characterizes processes participating in luminescence: zone-zone excitation, excitons formation and recombination, formation and disappearance of photons and surface plasmons (SP). It is shown that experimental ZnO microstructure radiation intensity dependence on photoexcitation level can be approximated by using SRE. Thus, the values of these parameters can be estimated and used for luminescence analysis. This approach was applied for the analysis of ZnO microfilms radiation with different thickness of Ag island film covering. It was revealed that the increase of cover thickness leads to the increase of losses and decrease of probability of photons to SP conversion. In order to take into account visible emission, rate equations for levels populations in band-gap and for corresponding photons and SP were added to SRE. By using such SRE it is demonstrated that the form of visible luminescence intensity dependence on excitation level (P) like P1/3, as obtained elsewhere [1], is possible only in case of donor-acceptor pairs existence. The proposed approach was applied for consideration of experimental results obtained in [5-8] taking into account their interpretation of these results based on assumption about transfer of electrons from defect level in ZnO band-gap to metal and then to conduction band in ZnO. Results of performed calculations using modified SRE revealed that effects observed in these papers can exist under only low pumping level. This result will be experimentally checked later.

  3. Effect of Light Intensity on Initial Survival of Fat Snook (Centropomus parallelus, Pisces: Centropomidae Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerqueira Vinicius Ronzani

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Different light intensities were tested during the larval rearing of fat snook (Centropomus parallelus to evaluate its influence on survival and functional swim bladder rate. Newly-hatched larvae were obtained by stripping of hormonally induced broodstock, and were stocked in 32-liter tanks at densities from 30 to 50 L-1. Four experiments were carried out testing six light intensities: 50, 100, 200, 500, 1500, and 2500 lx, and total darkness as a control. Mean survival ranged from 0.06 to 16.0% and were significantly influenced by light intensity. Complete darkness resulted in 100% mortality after one week, larvae appeared to have starved since they had empty stomachs. The species has the characteristics of a visual-feeder. Survival was the highest at 200 lx, while at 500 lx was higher than at 50, 100, and 2500 lx. Frequency of functional swim bladder ranged from 36.8 to 100%, but it was not significantly correlated with light intensity. Based on this study, a medium light intensity, 200 to 1500 lx, is recommended for rearing fat snook larvae. Extreme values must be avoided, mainly in the first two weeks after hatching.

  4. Alterations of the lipid content and fatty acid profile of Chlorella protothecoides under different light intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Piasecka, Agata; Nosalewicz, Artur; Simionato, Diana; Wawrzykowski, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Chlorella protothecoides is a valuable source of lipids that may be used for biodiesel production. The present work shows analysis of the potential of photoheterotrophic cultivation of C. protothecoides under various light intensities aiming to identify the conditions with maximal biomass and lipid content. An increase in light intensity was associated with an increased specific growth rate and a shortened doubling time. Also, the relative total lipid content increased from 24.8% to 37.5% with increase of light intensity. The composition of fatty acid methyl esters was affected by light intensity with the C16-18 fatty acids increased from 76.97% to 90.24% of total fatty acids. However, the content of linolenic acids decreased with the increase of the culture irradiance. These studies indicate that cultures irradiated with high light intensities achieve the minimal specifications for biodiesel quality on linolenic acids and thus are suitable for biodiesel production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Detection of light intensity in the frog retina: evidence from dark and light adaptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmaĭlov, Ch A; Zimachev, M M

    2010-01-01

    The frog retina was stimulated with light flashes homogeneous in space but not time. The time heterogeneity of stimulation was created by abrupt change of a referent stimulus for a stimulus with different luminance. Such changes form a time pattern, as well as sharp borders of luminance between the neighbor areas of the visual field form a spatial pattern. The electroretinogram recorded in response to presentation of a triad of stimuli: the onset of a short flash of homogeneous light after long dark (or light) adaptation of a retina, brief sequence of the referent and test light flashes varied in luminance, and the offset, with returning to the initial level of adaptation. It was shown that responses of the retina under conditions of time heterogeneity of stimulation could be divided in two types as well as under conditions of spatial heterogeneity. Such a dual change in amplitude confirms our earlier hypothesis on the existence of two mechanisms of luminance coding in the frog retina. The first mechanism encodes power characteristics of light, it forms the information on the absolute level of the environmental luminance. Its activity is connected basically with receptors and cells of the external plexiform layer of the frog's retina. It is responsible for the b-wave of the electroretinogram. The other mechanism associated with RERG is based on a vector code of stimuli. This mechanism forms the information on spatial and time differentiation of the light flow in the visual field and is connected basically with cells of the internal plexiform layer. The results suggest that the frog retina has the individual mechanism for time pattern detection, distinguishing it from the homogeneous light flow in a similar way as in case of spatial light pattern detection. It is possible that the first mechanism is responsible for the detection of any new stimulus in general, irrespective of its specificity, whereas the second mechanism serves for the measurement of suprathreshold

  6. Photolysis of Caged-GABA Rapidly Terminates Seizures In Vivo: Concentration and Light Intensity Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The therapy of focal epilepsy remains unsatisfactory for as many as 25% of patients. The photolysis of caged-γ-aminobutyric acid (caged-GABA represents a novel and alternative option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Our previous experimental results have demonstrated that the use of blue light produced by light-emitting diode to uncage ruthenium-bipyridine-triphenylphosphine-c-GABA (RuBi-GABA can rapidly terminate paroxysmal seizure activity both in vitro and in vivo. However, the optimal concentration of RuBi-GABA, and the intensity of illumination to abort seizures, remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the optimal anti-seizure effects of RuBi-GABA by using implantable fibers to introduce blue light into the neocortex of a 4-aminopyridine-induced acute seizure model in rats. We then investigated the effects of different combinations of RuBi-GABA concentrations and light intensity upon seizure. Our results show that the anti-seizure effect of RuBi-GABA has obvious concentration and light intensity dependence. This is the first example of using an implantable device for the photolysis of RuBi-GABA in the therapy of neocortical seizure, and an optimal combination of RuBi-GABA concentration and light intensity was explored. These results provide important experimental data for future clinical translational studies.

  7. Morpho-physiological responses of a subtropical strain of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Cyanobacteria to different light intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Wojciechowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The toxigenic cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii previously restricted to tropical latitudes, has been increasingly reported in temperate lakes in recent decades. The causes of its biogeographical expansion are under investigation, but efficient physiological adaptation to changes in temperature and light regimes are likely to be involved. The present study evaluated the morpho-physiological responses of a strain of C. raciborskii from southern Brazil to nine light intensities, from 9 to 250 µmol photons m-2 s-1. Blooms of this cyanobacterium are regularly recorded in the region. Morpho-physiological responses were measured based on growth rate and trichome length. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii showed slow growth at low light intensities, 9 and 20 µmol photons m-2 s-1, and responded morphologically by increasing the length of trichomes. In turn, the strain displayed constant maximum growth rates at light intensities higher than 50 µmol photons m-2 s-1. These results support the hypothesis that C. raciborskii can survive under low light conditions and continue to produce viable trichomes. Moreover, the strain achieved high growth rates under a relatively wide range of light intensities, a physiological adaptation that can potentially be a competitive advantage in the phytoplankton community.

  8. [Effects of light intensity on the phenotypic plasticity of invasive species Ambrosia trifida].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Sun, Bei; Li, Jian-Dong; Wang, Guo-Jiao; Sun, Jia-Nan; Wang, Xin-Ruo; Zhong, Ri-Ting

    2012-07-01

    Through artificial shading, this paper studied the phenotypic plasticity of invasive species Ambrosia trifida in its morphology, biomass allocation, and photosynthesis characteristics in response to different light intensities. As compared with the control, shading increased the stem height, crown width, leaf area, specific leaf area, and the proportion of leaf biomass in total biomass of A. trifida significantly, but decreased the total biomass, biomass per unit leaf area, and root to shoot ratio. Under natural light condition, the crown width and leaf area were smaller and the root to shoot ratio was larger, which benefited the decrease of water loss under high temperature and high light intensity and manifested the stronger phenotypic plasticity of A. trifida in its morphology and biomass allocation in response to different light intensities. Under shading, the mean daily net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance decreased, while the stomatal CO2 concentration increased. At noon when the light intensity was the highest, the photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance under low shading reached the maximum. Under moderate shading and high shading, the chlorophyll content increased significantly, and the chlorophyll a/b had a significant decrease, which could improve the utilization of light energy by A. trifida under shading environment.

  9. Methodology for assessing the lighting of pedestrian crossings based on light intensity parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomczuk Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the possible preventive measures that could improve safety at crossings is to assess the state of illumination of the lighting installation located in the transition area for pedestrians. The City of Warsaw has undertaken to comprehensively assess the pedestrian crossings to determine the level of road safety and the condition of lighting. The lighting conditions related to pedestrian crossings without traffic lights in three central districts of the city were investigated. The conducted field research and the work of the team of experts lead to the development of tools to assess the level of risk due to the lighting conditions measured at night. The newly developed and used method of assessment and the experience gained should provide a valuable contribution to the development of uniform risk assessment rules for pedestrian crossings in Poland. The authors of this paper have attempted to systematize the description of the method of evaluation of the lighting installed in the area of pedestrian crossings.

  10. [Effects of light intensity on growth and photosynthetic characteristics of Tulipa edulis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongjian; Zhu, Zaibiao; Guo, Qiaosheng; Wu, Zhengjun; Ma, Hongliang; Miao, Yuanyuan

    2012-02-01

    Present study was conducted to explore the growth and photosynthetic characteristics of Tulipa edulis under different light conditions (23%, 45%, 63%, 78%, 100% of full sunlight) and to determine the optimum light intensity for growth of T. edulis. The leaf area and biomass indicators as well as reproductive characteristics were measured. The photosynthetic basic parameters and light response curve were determined by a LI-6400XT portable photosynthesis system, and the light response curve characteristic parameters was determined. Additionally, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters were determined by assorted fluorescence leaf chamber of LI-6400XT. The lowest biomass yield was observed in the 23% and 100% of full sunlight treatments while the highest value was found under the 78% of full sunlight conditions. With the reduction of light availability, the success rate of sexual reproduction, light saturation point (LSP) and light compensation point (LCP) reduced, while apparent quantum yield (AQY) increased. 23% and 45% of full sunlight treatments led to lower photosynthesis rate (Pn) and higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) in comparison with other treatents. The highest photosynthesis rate was observed in the 78% and 100% of full sunlight treatments. In addition, 78% of full sunlight treatments led to highest Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', PhiPS II, ETR, and qP. T. edulis was able to adapt in a wide range of light intensity, and 78% of full sunlinght was the most suitable light condition for growth of T. edulis.

  11. Comparison of intensive light-emitting diode and intensive compact fluorescent phototherapy in non-hemolytic jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takcı, Sahin; Yiğit, Sule; Bayram, Gülperi; Korkmaz, Ayşe; Yurdakök, Murat

    2013-01-01

    In severe and rapidly increasing jaundice, the use of intensive phototherapy provides greater effectiveness and a faster decrement in bilirubin levels compared to conventional phototherapy. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two types of intensive phototherapy: intensive compact fluorescent tube (CFT) and intensive light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy. Forty-three infants over 35 weeks of gestation with severe non-hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled in the prospective study. All infants received multidirectional (circular-shaped) intensive phototherapy. Of these, 20 infants received CFT while 23 infants received LED phototherapy. Bilirubin levels and body temperatures were measured periodically, and the rates of bilirubin decrement were calculated. Mean serum bilirubin level of the 43 infants was 20.5±1.5 mg/dl at the beginning of the therapy and mean duration of phototherapy was 20.6±1.1 hours. The rate of mean bilirubin decline was 47.2% and the decrease was more prominent in the first four hours (0.84 ± 0.41 mg/dl/h). The rates of bilirubin decrement were comparable between the LED and CFT groups. Slightly elevated mean body temperature (37.1ºC) was determined in the CFT group (p<0.05). Intensive phototherapy units with both LED and CFT were effective, showing a decline of half the initial value of bilirubin during the study period in infants with non-hemolytic jaundice. This study shows that intensive phototherapy with either CFT or LED can provide rapid decrease in bilirubin levels in the first few hours. This rapid decline is important in cases that have high risk of bilirubin encephalopathy.

  12. Effect of light intensities on reproductive performance, nursing behaviour and preference of rabbit does

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zs. Matics

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the experiment was to compare the reproductive performance and nursing behaviour of rabbit does reared under 2 different light intensities and observe the preference of does among cages with different light intensities. Female rabbits were randomly housed in 2 identical rooms, under the same housing conditions in wire-net cages. The 2 rooms only differed in the light intensity; group L: 150-200 lux (n=54 does, 230 inseminations, group D: 10-20 lux (n=54 does, 232 inseminations. Reproduction data from the first 5 consecutive reproductive cycles were evaluated. Nursing behaviour of the does (n = 24 was observed at the 2nd or 4th lactation. The preference of does (n=8 among 4 cages with different light intensities (10, 35, 75 or 155 lux  as examined. There were 6-7% difference between the 2 groups in the number of kits born in total and those born alive (born total: 11.25 vs. 10.59 kits, P<0.1; liveborn: 10.75 vs. 10.00 kits, P<0.05; in groups L and D, respectively. Suckling mortality was nearly 2% higher in group D (L: 8.1, D: 10.0%; P<0.1, and in consequence the litter size of this group at 35 d of age was lower than that of the L rabbits (L: 8.75, D: 8.45 kits; P<0.05. The light intensity did not affect litter and individual weights at 35 d of age. The average numbers of daily nursing events (L: 1.23/d, D: 1.32/d, the length (L: 208±49, D: 213±43 s and the daily distribution of nursing events were not affected by high light intensity. During the light period of the day, the darkest cage (10 lux was the most preferred by the does (44.0, 18.6, 17.9 and 19.5% in 10, 35, 75 and 155 lux cages, respectively; P<0.001. The lower light intensity had no unambiguously unfavourable effect on the reproductive performance and nursing behaviour of the does. Based on the preference test, a lower light intensity may be advantageous from the point of view of animal welfare.

  13. Effectiveness of photodynamic therapy with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid and intense pulsed light versus intense pulsed light alone in the treatment of acne vulgaris: comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Arianee V; Belo, Victoria G; Santos, Guada

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the activation of a photosensitizing agent by light to produce oxygen intermediates that destroy target tissues. Topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is converted to protoporphyrin IX, a very potent photosensitizer, which accumulates in human skin, particularly in the epidermis and its appendages. To study the effect of PDT in acne vulgaris using topical ALA and intense pulsed light (IPL). Thirteen individuals with varying degrees of acne were treated after a 3-week washout period. Twenty percent ALA hydrochloride (DUSA Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, MA, USA) was applied to half of the face, and after 3 hours, the whole face was exposed to intense pulsed light (Quantum SR, Lumenis, Santa Clara, CA, USA) using a 560 nm cutoff filter starting at a fluence of 26 J/cm. The procedure was done twice at 2-week intervals, and the patients were clinically evaluated on the second, fourth, and eighth weeks. All patients had no apparent improvement on the second week on both facial halves. In fact, some of the patients developed acute acneiform eruptions on the side treated with ALA. By the fourth week, however, most of the patients had visible improvement of facial acne that was more significant on the ALA-treated side of the face. This persisted until the eighth week post-treatment. On the other hand, the facial half treated with intense pulsed light only showed a return to baseline of their facial acne. ALA-IPL are beneficial in the management of acne vulgaris and may be used in combination with other forms of acne treatment or may be an alternative treatment for patients who do not want to take systemic retinoids.

  14. A light intensity function suitable for multimode fiber-optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    Intensity distribution functions on the image plane are derived under the assumption that a multimode optic fiber is illuminated by a light source which can be approximated by infinite uniangular beams carrying equal power. The application of the theory to a Lambertian source is discussed. Experimental results, based on the observation of the light intensity distribution imaged on an opaque screen and collected by a digital camera, are presented. The theoretical and experimental data are compared to verify that the intensity function is an accurate model for describing the realistic approach to sensor design. The limitations of the uniangular and uniform intensity distribution models are discussed on the basis of theoretical and experimental results.

  15. Light intensity of 5 or 20 lux on broiler behavior, welfare and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Jean-Loup; Clark, Katie; Groves, Peter J; Cronin, Greg M

    2017-04-01

    Light intensity can influence broiler behavior, but discrepancies in the scientific literature remain. Furthermore, few studies have investigated the welfare implications induced by varying light intensity. We investigated the effects of providing 5 or 20 lux light intensity on broiler behavior, welfare and productivity. A total of 1,872 Ross 308 broilers of mixed sex were studied across 2 replicates. Treatments began on d 8 with one of 2 light intensity levels: 5 lux or 20 lux, using LED lights on a 16L:8D photoperiod with 30 min sunrise and sunset periods. Production data, behavioral activity, and plasma samples for corticosterone concentration analysis were collected weekly from 8 to 46 d of age. Eye weight was collected at 42 d of age. Leg strength was assessed at 35, 42 and 45 d of age using the latency to lie test and leg and foot conditions (foot pad dermatitis, hock burn, leg straightness) were assessed at 46 d. Live weight differed between light treatments, with broilers kept at 20 lux being lighter than broilers kept at 5 lux at 46 d of age (males: -5.1%, females: -2.8%, P light intensity on other measures of broiler welfare: mortality and culls, plasma corticosterone concentrations, or latency to lie reflective of leg strength. Hence, broilers kept at 20 lux compared to 5 lux were found to be more active, had slower growth, and had lighter eye weight, but other welfare measures reflective of biological functioning or leg health did not show significant changes. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Joshua J., E-mail: joshuat@slac.stanford.edu; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Hwang, Harold Y. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Staub, Urs [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Johnson, Steven [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 16, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mitra, Ankush; Swiggers, Michele; Noonan, Peter; Curiel, G. Ivan; Holmes, Michael [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-11

    This paper describes new instrumentation developments at the LCLS for materials studies using THz laser excitation and resonant soft X-ray scattering. This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm{sup −1} electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  17. Dissociation cross sections of ground-state and excited charmonia with light mesons in the quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Barnes; E.S. Swanson; C.-Y. Wong; X.-M. Xu

    2003-07-29

    We present numerical results for the dissociation cross sections of ground-state, orbitally- and radially-excited charmonia in collisions with light mesons. Our results are derived using the nonrelativistic quark model, so all parameters are determined by fits to the experimental meson spectrum. Examples of dissociation into both exclusive and inclusive final states are considered. The dissociation cross sections of several C=(+) charmonia may be of considerable importance for the study of heavy ion collisions, since these states are expected to be produced more copiously than the J/{psi}. The relative importance of the productions of ground-state and orbitally-excited charmed mesons in a pion-charmonium collision is demonstrated through the {radical}s-dependent charmonium dissociation cross sections.

  18. GPC light shaper for speckle-free one- and two-photon contiguous pattern excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    2014-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is an efficient method for generating speckle-free contiguous optical distributions useful in diverse applications such as static beam shaping, optical manipulation and recently, for excitation in two-photon optogenetics. To fully utilize typical Gaussian lasers...

  19. Light intensity dependence of open-circuit voltage of polymer: fullerene solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, LJA; Mihailetchi, VD; Blom, PWM

    2005-01-01

    The open-circuit voltage V-oc of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells is investigated as a function of light intensity for different temperatures. Devices consisted of a blend of a poly(p-phenylene vinylene) derivative as the hole conductor and 6,6-phenyl C-61-butyric acid methyl ester as the electron conductor. The observed photogenerated current and V-oc are at variance with classical p-n junction-based models. The influence of light intensity and recombination strength on V-oc...

  20. Fractional CO2laser versus intense pulsed light in treating striae distensae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Adam El Taieb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Striae distensae are linear atrophic dermal scars covered with flat atrophic epidermis. They may cause disfigurement, especially in females. Many factors may cause striae distensae such as steroids, obesity, and pregnancy. Although there is no standard treatment for striae; many topical applications, peeling, and light and laser systems have been tried. Aims: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of fractional CO2laser with intense pulse light in treating striae distensae. Subjects and Methods: Forty patients with striae distensae were recruited. Twenty of them were treated by fractional CO2laser and 20 were treated with intense pulse light. Length and width of the largest striae were measured pre- and post-treatment. Patient satisfaction was also evaluated and graded. Patients were photographed after each treatment session and photos were examined by a blinded physician who had no knowledge about the cases. Results: Both groups showed significant improvement after treatments (P 0.05. Conclusions: The current study has provided supportive evidence to the effectiveness of both fractional CO2laser and intense pulse light as treatments for striae distensae. Fractional CO2laser was found to be more effective in the treatment of striae distensae compared with intense pulse light.

  1. Fractional CO2 Laser Versus Intense Pulsed Light in Treating Striae Distensae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Taieb, Moustafa Adam; Ibrahim, Ahmed Khair

    2016-01-01

    Striae distensae are linear atrophic dermal scars covered with flat atrophic epidermis. They may cause disfigurement, especially in females. Many factors may cause striae distensae such as steroids, obesity, and pregnancy. Although there is no standard treatment for striae; many topical applications, peeling, and light and laser systems have been tried. To evaluate and compare the efficacy of fractional CO2 laser with intense pulse light in treating striae distensae. Forty patients with striae distensae were recruited. Twenty of them were treated by fractional CO2 laser and 20 were treated with intense pulse light. Length and width of the largest striae were measured pre- and post-treatment. Patient satisfaction was also evaluated and graded. Patients were photographed after each treatment session and photos were examined by a blinded physician who had no knowledge about the cases. Both groups showed significant improvement after treatments (P 0.05). The current study has provided supportive evidence to the effectiveness of both fractional CO2 laser and intense pulse light as treatments for striae distensae. Fractional CO2 laser was found to be more effective in the treatment of striae distensae compared with intense pulse light.

  2. High light intensity protects photosynthetic apparatus of pea plants against exposure to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowska, E; Wróblewska, B; Drozak, A; Siedlecka, M

    2006-01-01

    The electron transport rates and coupling factor activity in the chloroplasts; adenylate contents, rates of photosynthesis and respiration in the leaves as well as activity of isolated mitochondria were investigated in Pisum sativum L. leaves of plants grown under low or high light intensity and exposed after detachment to 5 mM Pb(NO(3))(2). The presence of Pb(2+) reduced rate of photosynthesis in the leaves from plants grown under the high light (HL) and low light (LL) conditions, whereas the respiration was enhanced in the leaves from HL plants. Mitochondria from Pb(2+) treated HL-leaves oxidized glycine at a higher rate than those isolated from LL leaves. ATP content in the Pb-treated leaves increased to a greater extend in the HL than LL grown plants. Similarly ATP synthase activity increased markedly when chloroplasts isolated from control and Pb-treated leaves of HL and LL grown plants were subjected to high intensity light. The presence of Pb ions was found inhibit ATP synthase activity only in chloroplasts from LL grown plants or those illuminated with low intensity light. Low light intensity during growth also lowered PSI electron transport rates and the Pb(2+) induced changes in photochemical activity of this photosystem were visible only in the chloroplasts isolated from LL grown plants. The activity of PSII was influenced by Pb ions on similar manner in both light conditions. This study demonstrates that leaves from plants grown under HL conditions were more resistant to lead toxicity than those obtained from the LL grown plants. The data indicate that light conditions during growth might play a role in regulation of photosynthetic and respiratory energy conservation in heavy metal stressed plants by increasing the flexibility of the stoichiometry of ATP to ADP production.

  3. Effects of light intensity on the morphology and CAM photosynthesis of Vanilla planifolia Andrews

    OpenAIRE

    María Claudia Díez; Flavio Moreno; Edison Gantiva

    2017-01-01

    Vanilla planifolia is a neotropical orchid, whose fruits produce the natural vanilla, a fundamental ingredient for the food and cosmetic industry. Because of its importance in the world market, it is cultivated in many tropical countries and recently its cultivation has started in Colombia. This species requires shade for its development; however, the optimal of light conditions are unknown. This work evaluates the effect of different light intensities on CAM photosynthesis, physiology, morph...

  4. Effects of plant size, temperature, and light intensity on flowering of Phalaenopsis hybrids in Mediterranean greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Roberta; De Pascale, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Mediterranean greenhouses for cultivation of Phalaenopsis orchids reproduce the warm, humid, and shaded environment of tropical underbrush. Heating represents the highest production cost, due to the high thermal requirements and the long unproductive phase of juvenility, in which plants attain the critical size for flowering. Our researches aimed to investigate the effect of plant size, temperature, and light intensity, during the phase of flower induction, on flowering of modern genotypes selected for Mediterranean greenhouses. Three experiments were carried out to compare (i) plant size: reduced size versus size considered optimal for flowering (hybrids "Sogo Yukidian," "Chain Xen Diamond," and "Pinlong"); (ii) temperature: moderate reduction of temperature versus standard thermal regime (hybrid "Premium"); (iii) light intensity: supplemental lighting versus reference light intensity (hybrid "Premium"). The premature exposure of plants to the inductive treatment delayed the beginning of flowering and reduced the flower stem quality, in all the tested hybrids. In "Premium," the lower temperature did not affect flowering earliness and commercial quality of flower stems compared to the standard regime, whereas it promoted stem branching. In the same hybrid, supplemental lighting anticipated flowering and promoted the emission of the second stem and the stem branching, compared to the reference light regime.

  5. [Effects of light intensity on growth and photosynthetic characteristics of Chrysanthemum morifolium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanru; Guo, Qiaosheng; Jin, Miao

    2009-07-01

    To investigate the effect of light intensity on growth and photosynthetic of Chrysanthemum morifolium. The growth characteristics of C. morifolium were measured under different treatments (100%, 80%, 60%, 40% and 20% of full sunlight). The photosynthetic characteristics and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of leaves under different light intensity were determined by a LI-6400 photosynthesis system and a PAM-2100 chlorophyll fluorescence system. With the reduction of irradiance, the diameter of the stem reduced, plant height, leaf length, leaf width and length/width raised, assimilation product increased; Content of photosynthetic pigment increased between light intensity 100%-40% reduced under 20% treatment, chlorophyll a/b decreased. Light compensation point (LCP), apparent quantum yield (AQY) increased first and reduced later, photosynthesis rate (P(n)), stomatal conductance (G(s)), intercellular CO2 concentration (C(i)) and transpiration rate (T(r)) decreased, stomatal limitation value (L(s)) rose. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters F(v)/F(m) increased, phiPS II, F(v)'/F(m)', ETR and qP increased between irradiance 100%-60%, NPQ decreased, such as phiPS II decreased and NPQ increased when irradiance was lower than 40%. Weak light condition was unfavorable to the growth of C. morifolium and the light conditions of culture should be control between 80%-60% of full sunlight.

  6. Tuning excitation laser wavelength for secondary resonance in low-intensity phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in-situ analytical measurement of nanoaerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Gang; Li, Shuiqing; Tse, Stephen D.

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, a novel low-intensity phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (PS-LIBS) technique has been developed for unique elemental-composition identification of aerosolized nanoparticles, where only the solid-phase nanoparticles break down, forming nanoplasmas, without any surrounding gas-phase breakdown. Additional work has demonstrated that PS-LIBS emissions can be greatly enhanced with secondary resonant excitation by matching the excitation laser wavelength with an atomic transition line in the formed nanoplasma, thereby achieving low limits of detection. In this work, a tunable dye laser is employed to investigate the effects of excitation wavelength and irradiance on in-situ PS-LIBS measurements of TiO2 nanoaerosols. The enhancement factor by resonant excitation can be 220 times greater than that for non-resonant cases under similar conditions. Moreover, the emitted spectra are unique for the selected resonant transition lines for a given element, suggesting the potential to make precise phase-selective and analyte-selective measurements of nanoparticles in a multicomponent multiphase system. The enhancement factor by resonant excitation is highly sensitive to excitation laser wavelength, with narrow excitation spectral windows, i.e., 0.012 to 0.023 nm (FWHM, full width at half maximum) for Ti (I) neutral atomic lines, and 0.051 to 0.139 nm (FWHM) for Ti (II) single-ionized atomic lines. Boltzmann analysis of the emission intensities, temporal response of emissions, and emission dependence on excitation irradiance are investigated to understand aspects of the generated nanoplasmas such as temperature, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and excitation mechanism.

  7. Evidence for coherent mixing of excited and charge-transfer states in the major plant light-harvesting antenna, LHCII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Charusheela; Ferretti, Marco; van Roon, Henny; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2017-08-30

    LHCII, the major light harvesting antenna from plants, plays a dual role in photosynthesis. In low light it is a light-harvester, while in high light it is a quencher that protects the organism from photodamage. The switching mechanism between these two orthogonal conditions is mediated by protein dynamic disorder and photoprotective energy dissipation. The latter in particular is thought to occur in part via spectroscopically 'dark' states. We searched for such states in LHCII trimers from spinach, at both room temperature and at 77 K. Using 2D electronic spectroscopy, we explored coherent interactions between chlorophylls absorbing on the low-energy side of LHCII, which is the region that is responsible for both light-harvesting and photoprotection. 2D beating frequency maps allow us to identify four frequencies with strong excitonic character. In particular, our results show the presence of a low-lying state that is coupled to a low-energy excitonic state. We assign this to a mixed excitonic-charge transfer state involving the state with charge separation within the Chl a603-b609 heterodimer, borrowing some dipole strength from the Chl a602-a603 excited states. Such a state may play a role in photoprotection, in conjunction with specific and environmentally controlled realizations of protein dynamic disorder. Our identification and assignment of the coherences observed in the 2D frequency maps suggests that the structure of exciton states as well as a mixing of the excited and charge-transfer states is affected by coupling of these states to resonant vibrations in LHCII.

  8. Exploring coherence of individual excitons in InAs quantum dots embedded in natural photonic defects: Influence of the excitation intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigger, D.; Mermillod, Q.; Jakubczyk, T.; Fras, F.; Le-Denmat, S.; Reiter, D. E.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Nogues, G.; Schneider, C.; Kuhn, T.; Kasprzak, J.

    2017-10-01

    The exact optical response of quantum few-level systems depends crucially on the exact choice of the incoming pulse areas. We use four-wave mixing (FWM) spectroscopy to infer the coherent response and dynamics of single InAs quantum dots (QDs) and study their pulse area dependence. By combining atomic force microscopy with FWM hyperspectral imaging, we show that the retrieved FWM signals originate from individual QDs enclosed in natural photonic defects. The optimized light-matter coupling in these defects allows us to perform our studies in a wide range of driving field amplitudes. When varying the pulse areas of the exciting laser pulses, Rabi rotations of microscopic interband coherences can be resolved by the two-pulse FWM technique. We investigate these Rabi coherence rotations within two- and three-level systems, both theoretically and experimentally, and explain their damping by the coupling to acoustic phonons. To highlight the importance of the pulse area influence, we show that the phonon-induced dephasing of QD excitons depends on the pulse intensity.

  9. Red Color Light at Different Intensities Affects the Performance, Behavioral Activities and Welfare of Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Senaratna

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Red light (RL marked higher weight gain (WG and preference of broilers compared to other light colors. This study aimed to investigate how different intensities of RL affect the performance, behavior and welfare of broilers. RL treatments were T1 = high intensity (320 lux, T2 = medium intensity (20 lux; T3 = dim intensity (5 lux, T4 = control/white light at (20 lux provided on 20L:4D schedule and T5 = negative control; 12 hours dark: 12 hours day light. Cobb strain broilers were used in a Complete Randomize Design with 6 replicates. WG, water/feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR, mortality, behavior and welfare were assessed. At 35 d, significantly (p<0.05 highest body weight (2,147.06 g±99 was recorded by T3. Lowest body weight (1,640.55 g±56 and FCR (1.34 were recorded by T5. Skin weight was the only carcass parameter showed a significant (p<0.05 influence giving the highest (56.2 g and the lowest (12.6 g values for T5 and T1 respectively. Reduced welfare status indicated by significantly (p<0.05 higher foot pad lesions, hock burns and breast blisters was found under T3, due to reduced expression of behavior. Highest walking (2.08%±1% was performed under T1 in the evening during 29 to 35 days. Highest dust bathing (3.01%±2% was performed in the morning during 22 to 28 days and highest bird interaction (BI (4.87%±4% was observed in the evening by T5 during 14 to 21 days. Light intensity×day session×age interaction was significantly (p<0.05 affected walking, dust bathing and BI. Light intensity significantly (p<0.05 affected certain behaviors such as lying, eating, drinking, standing, walking, preening while lying, wing/leg stretching, sleeping, dozing, BI, vocalization, idling. In conclusion, birds essentially required provision of light in the night for better performance. Exposed to 5 lux contributed to higher WG, potentially indicating compromised welfare status. Further researches are suggested to investigate RL intensity based

  10. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joshua J; Dakovski, Georgi L; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Hwang, Harold Y; Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Staub, Urs; Johnson, Steven; Mitra, Ankush; Swiggers, Michele; Noonan, Peter; Curiel, G Ivan; Holmes, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm(-1) electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  11. Molecular bases and photobiological consequences of light intensity adaptation in photosynthetic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y-B.; Durnford, D.; Koblizek, M.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2003-02-10

    By applying a combination of light transitions, uncouplers, and inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport inhibitors we modulate the redox poise of many components in the plastid and examine the pattern of expression of cab1 gene. This gene encodes the major light harvesting protein that services photosystem II. While our results have confirmed our own previous finding that light intensity regulation of cab1 gene expression is signaled by the redox state of the PQ pool, we have also identified additional sensor(s) located in the PET chain.

  12. CULTURE CONDITIONS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC MECHANISM : IV. INFLUENCE OF LIGHT INTENSITY ON PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CHLORELLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J

    1946-07-20

    1. Chlorella pyrenoidosa has been grown in a continuous-culture apparatus under various light intensities provided by incandescent lamps, other conditions of culture being maintained constant. Light intensity curves for cells immersed in the No. 11 Warburg buffer and in Knop's solution + 4.4 per cent CO(2) at a saturating light intensity were determined as characteristics of the photosynthetic mechanism. These characteristics were referred to the centrifuged cell volume as an index of quantity of cellular material. 2. Cells grown at intensities in the range of about 35 f.-c. develop a capacity for a high rate of photosynthesis (c.mm. O(2)/hour/c.mm. cells). At culture intensities above or below this range the cells produced have a lower capacity for photosynthesis. A similar effect is observed for rate of photosynthesis per unit dry weight or rate per unit cell nitrogen. 3. The rate of photosynthesis per cell or rate per unit chlorophyll shows no maximum at any light intensity of culture but increases continuously throughout the range of light intensities studied. 4. Maximum rate of growth is attained at a light intensity of about 100 f.-c. The hypothesis is advanced that at culture intensities above that needed to give maximum rate of growth (100 f.-c.) a mechanism is developed which opposes the photosynthetic process and removes the photosynthetic products. 5. The low capacity for photosynthesis shown by cells grown at culture intensities below 35 f.-c. finds no immediate explanation. 6. The shape of the light intensity curve is markedly affected by the light intensity at which the cells have been cultured. Cells grown at lower intensities give light intensity curves approaching the Blackman type with a short transitional region between light limitation and light saturation.

  13. The influence of light intensity and photoperiod on duckweed biomass and starch accumulation for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yehu; Yu, Changjiang; Yu, Li; Zhao, Jinshan; Sun, Changjiang; Ma, Yubin; Zhou, Gongke

    2015-01-01

    Duckweed has been considered as a valuable feedstock for bioethanol production due to its high biomass and starch production. To investigate the effects of light conditions on duckweed biomass and starch production, Lemna aequinoctialis 6000 was cultivated at different photoperiods (12:12, 16:8 and 24:0h) and light intensities (20, 50, 80, 110, 200 and 400μmolm(-2)s(-1)). The results showed that the duckweed biomass and starch production was increased with increasing light intensity and photoperiod except at 200 and 400μmolm(-2)s(-1). Considering the light cost, 110μmolm(-2)s(-1) was optimum light condition for starch accumulation with the highest maximum growth rate, biomass and starch production of 8.90gm(-2)day(-1), 233.25gm(-2) and 98.70gm(-2), respectively. Moreover, the results suggested that high light induction was a promising method for duckweed starch accumulation. This study provides optimized light conditions for future industrial large-scale duckweed cultivation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Effects of light intensity on photosynthesis and dry matter production of flue-cured tobacco at its seedling stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Guo-Shun; Chen, Guo-Hua; Xiang, De-En; Wu, Yun-Ping

    2010-08-01

    Taking flue-cured tobacco Yunyan 87 as test material, this paper studied its photosynthesis and dry matter production at seedling stage under 100%, 88%, 72%, and 62% natural light intensities. At noon of sunny days, 100% natural light intensity inhibited the photosynthesis, while proper shading (88% natural light intensity) could eliminate the inhibition, and the daily photosynthesis was significantly higher than other treatments. Shading reduced the light saturation point and compensation point, enhanced the apparent quantum yield of photosynthesis and the net photosynthetic rate under weak light, increased the chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b contents, but decreased the chlorophyll a/b and cartenoids contents. Under 88% natural light intensity, tobacco seedlings had higher light saturation point, lower compensation point, higher suitability to the change of light intensity, and higher photosynthetic potentiality. 100% natural light intensity was more advantageous to the transfer of dry matter and soluble sugar to stem, while 88% natural light intensity was more beneficial to the transfer of dry matter and soluble sugar to root. Under the conditions of this experiment, proper shading (88% natural light intensity treatment) could improve the seedling quality of flue-cured tobacco.

  15. Enhancement of the intensity ratio of ultraviolet to visible luminescence with increased excitation in ZnO nanoparticles deposited on porous anodic alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousslama, Wiem; Sieber, Brigitte; Elhouichet, Habib; Gelloz, Bernard; Addad, Ahmed; Férid, Mokhtar

    2013-12-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA), with large pore diameters (up to 100 nm), was used as a substrate for the growth of ZnO nanostructures. Almost unstrained ZnO nanoparticles of less than 8 nm in size were prepared by the spin-on method and annealed at 500 °C. Excitonic recombination is found to dominate the ultraviolet band. The ZnO nanoparticles have a high deep level emission at low excitation which becomes negligible at high excitation, as deduced from photoluminescence measurements. This large increase of the ultraviolet to visible luminescence ratio with excitation is ascribed to the variation of the ultraviolet and of the visible luminescence with excitation intensity. Non-radiative Auger recombination becomes dominant at high excitation. It is also shown that the PAA substrate improves the internal quantum efficiency of the ZnO nanoparticles achieved by the sol-gel method. At low excitation, the luminescence intensity drops by a factor of 3 between 13 and 300 K, leading to an estimate of the internal quantum efficiency as high as 30%.

  16. Light Intensity and Carbon Dioxide Availability Impact Antioxidant Activity in Green Onions (Allium fistulosumm L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lanfang; Bisbee, Patricia; Pare, Paul

    The prospect of long-duration manned space missions poses many challenges, including the development of a sustainable life support system and effective methods of space-radiation protection. To mitigate the risk of increased space-radiation, functional foods rich in antioxidant properties such as green onions are of particular interest. However it has yet to be established whether antioxidant properties can be preserved or enhanced in space environment where carbon dioxide, lighting intensity, gravity and pressure differ from which plants have acclimated to on earth. In this study, green onions (Allium fistulosumm L. cultivar Kinka) rich in antioxidant flavonoids are used as a model system to investigate variations in antioxidant capacity with plants grown under varying light intensities and CO2 concentrations. The antioxidant potential is determined using both radical cation scavenging and oxygen radical absorbance assays. For all light intensities assayed, antioxidant potential in water extract of green onions per gram biomass declined with CO2 increases up to 1200 ppm, and then leveled off with further CO2 increase to 4000 ppm. This inverse carbon dioxide versus antioxidant activity correlation suggests lower accumulation rates for water soluble antioxidant compounds compared to total biomass under increasing CO2 concentrations. The effect of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration on antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts were light intensity dependent. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of traditional plant antioxidants including vitamin C and the major onion flavonoid quercetin.

  17. An evaluation of light intensity functions for determination of shaded reference stream metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Chris; Hubbart, Jason A

    2012-04-30

    The performance of three single-station whole stream metabolism models were evaluated within three shaded, seasonally hypoxic, Missouri reference streams using high resolution (15-minute) dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature, and light intensity data collected during the summers (July-September) of 2006-2008. The model incorporating light intensity data consistently achieved a lower root mean square error (median RMSE = 0.20 mg L(-1)) relative to models assuming sinusoidal light intensity functions (median RMSE = 0.28 mg L(-1)) and constant diel temperature (median RMSE = 0.53 mg L(-1)). Incorporation of site-specific light intensity into metabolism models better predicted morning DO concentrations and exposure to hypoxic conditions in shaded study streams. Model choice significantly affected (p rate estimates for daily average photosynthesis. Low reaeration (pooled site mean 1.1 day(-1) at 20 °C) coupled with summer temperatures (pooled site mean = 25.8 °C) and low to moderate community respiration (site median 1.0-3.0 g O(2) m(-2) day(-1)) yielded diel dissolved oxygen concentrations near or below critical aquatic life thresholds in studied reference streams. Quantifying these process combinations in best-available or least-disturbed (i.e., reference) systems advances our understanding of regional dissolved oxygen expectations and informs environmental management policy. Additional research is warranted to better link landscape processes with distributed sources that contribute to community respiration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preferency of soil macrofauna to crops residue at different light intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUGIYARTO

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Every species of soil macrofauna prefer specific food and environment to be establish in it's habitat. Their diversity depend on variation of food and environmental condition. The aim of this research was to study the effect of different crop residue and light intensity on population of several soil macrofauna specieses. Mycrocosmos experiment was arranged in split-plot design with two treatments factor, i.e.: (1 crop residue (albizia, papaya, elephant grass, maize, sweet potato and without crop residue input, and (2 light intensities (0, 5, 15 and 25 Watt/day. The soil macrofauna were earthworms, millipedes, scarabids larvae and cocroachs. Results of the study showed that: (1 crop residues apllication increased soil macrofauna population, especially maize residue ( by 113%, respectively, compare to control tretment, (2 on higher light intensity, population of earthworms, scarabids larvae and cocroach decreased, but population of millipedes increased, (3 the highest macrofauna population was on maize residue and 5 Watt/day light intensity treatment.

  19. 3D Study of Bifacial Silicon Solar Cell under Intense Light ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work presents a three-dimensional study of bifacial silicon solar cell under intense light concentration and under constant magnetic field. This approach is based on the resolution of the minority continuity equation, taking into account the distribution of the electric field in the bulk evaluated as a function of both majority ...

  20. 3d study of bifacial silicon solar cell under intense light ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    situated at z = H. Because of the light intensity, carrier concentration in the base is not uniform. So, we take into account the electric field E(z) due to the difference of carrier concentration on z axis (Pelanchon et al., 1992). To investigate the magnetic field influence on carrier behaviour and photocurrent, we applied a variable ...

  1. Light intensity dependence of open-circuit voltage of polymer : fullerene solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, LJA; Mihailetchi, VD; Blom, PWM

    2005-01-01

    The open-circuit voltage V-oc of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells is investigated as a function of light intensity for different temperatures. Devices consisted of a blend of a poly(p-phenylene vinylene) derivative as the hole conductor and 6,6-phenyl C-61-butyric acid methyl ester

  2. Effect of light intensity on the performance of silicon solar cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work, presents the intense light effect on electrical parameters of silicon solar such as short circuit current, open circuit voltage, series and shunt resistances, maximum power, conversion efficiency, fill factor. After the resolution of the continuity equation which leads to the solar cell photocurrent and photovoltage ...

  3. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  4. The intense pulsed light systems : new treatment possibilities for vascular, pigmented lesions and hair removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Schroeter (Careen)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGiven all of the differences in between laser and IPLS devices and the need for additional information in IPLS treatment applications, the aim of this study was to evaluate new treatment possibilities using Intense Pulsed Light Sources and to address the following questions: 1. What

  5. Cone photoreceptor oil droplet pigmentation is affected by ambient light intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Nathan S; Lisney, Thomas J; Collin, Shaun P

    2006-12-01

    The cone photoreceptors of many vertebrates contain spherical organelles called oil droplets. In birds, turtles, lizards and some lungfish the oil droplets are heavily pigmented and function to filter the spectrum of light incident upon the visual pigment within the outer segment. Pigmented oil droplets are beneficial for colour discrimination in bright light, but at lower light levels the reduction in sensitivity caused by the pigmentation increasingly outweighs the benefits generated by spectral tuning. Consequently, it is expected that species with pigmented oil droplets should modulate the density of pigment in response to ambient light intensity and thereby regulate the amount of light transmitted to the outer segment. In this study, microspectrophotometry was used to measure the absorption spectra of cone oil droplets in chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) reared under bright (unfiltered) or dim (filtered) sunlight. Oil droplet pigmentation was found to be dependent on the intensity of the ambient light and the duration of exposure to the different lighting treatments. In adult chickens reared in bright light, the oil droplets of all cone types (except the violet-sensitive single cones, whose oil droplet is always non-pigmented) were more densely pigmented than those in chickens reared in dim light. Calculations show that the reduced levels of oil droplet pigmentation in chickens reared in dim light would increase the sensitivity and spectral bandwidth of the outer segment significantly. The density of pigmentation in the oil droplets presumably represents a trade-off between the need for good colour discrimination and absolute sensitivity. This might also explain why nocturnal animals, or those that underwent a nocturnal phase during their evolution, have evolved oil droplets with low pigment densities or no pigmentation or have lost their oil droplets altogether.

  6. Nonlinear δf particle simulations of collective excitations and energy-anisotropy instabilities in high-intensity bunched beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Collective effects with strong coupling between the longitudinal and transverse dynamics are of fundamental importance for applications of high-intensity bunched beams. The self-consistent Vlasov-Maxwell equations are applied to high-intensity finite-length charge bunches, and a generalized δf particle simulation algorithm is developed for bunched beams with or without energy anisotropy. The nonlinear δf method exhibits minimal noise and accuracy problems in comparison with standard particle-in-cell simulations. Systematic studies are carried out under conditions corresponding to strong 3D nonlinear space-charge forces in the beam frame. For charge bunches with isotropic energy, finite bunch-length effects are clearly evident by the fact that the spectra for an infinitely long coasting beam and a nearly spherical charge bunch have strong similarities, whereas the spectra have distinctly different features when the bunch length is varied between these two limiting cases. For bunched beams with anisotropic energy, there exists no exact kinetic equilibrium because the particle dynamics do not conserve transverse energy and longitudinal energy separately. A reference state in approximate dynamic equilibrium has been constructed theoretically, and a quasi-steady state has been established in the simulations for the anisotropic case. Collective excitations relative to the reference state have been simulated using the generalized δf algorithm. In particular, the electrostatic Harris instability driven by strong energy anisotropy is investigated for a finite-length charge bunch. The observed growth rates are larger than those obtained for infinitely long coasting beams. However, the growth rate decreases for increasing bunch length to a value similar to the case of a long coasting beam. For long bunches, the instability is axially localized symmetrically relative to the beam center, and the characteristic wavelength in the longitudinal direction is

  7. The impact of morning light intensity and environmental temperature on body temperatures and alertness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Kulve, Marije; Schlangen, Luc J M; Schellen, Lisje; Frijns, Arjan J H; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2017-06-01

    Indoor temperature and light exposure are known to affect body temperature, productivity and alertness of building occupants. However, not much is known about the interaction between light and temperature exposure and the relationship between morning light induced alertness and its effect on body temperature. Light intensity and room temperature during morning office hours were investigated under strictly controlled conditions. In a randomized crossover study, two white light conditions (4000K, either bright 1200lx or dim 5lx) under three different room temperatures (26, 29 and 32°C) were investigated. A lower room temperature increased the core body temperature (CBT) and lowered skin temperature and the distal-proximal temperature gradient (DPG). Moreover, a lower room temperature reduced the subjective sleepiness and reaction time on an auditory psychomotor vigilance task (PVT), irrespective of the light condition. Interestingly, the morning bright light exposure did affect thermophysiological parameters, i.e. it decreased plasma cortisol, CBT and proximal skin temperature and increased the DPG, irrespective of the room temperature. During the bright light session, subjective sleepiness decreased irrespective of the room temperature. However, the change in sleepiness due to the light exposure was not related to these physiological changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. MRT letter: Two-photon excitation-based 2pi light-sheet system for nano-lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Kavya; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2015-01-01

    We propose two-photon excitation-based light-sheet technique for nano-lithography. The system consists of 2π-configured cylindrical lens system with a common geometrical focus. Upon superposition, the phase-matched counter-propagating light-sheets result in the generation of identical and equi spaced nano-bump pattern. Study shows a feature size of as small as few tens of nanometers with a inter-bump distance of few hundred nanometers. This technique overcomes some of the limitations of existing nano-lithography techniques, thereby, may pave the way for mass-production of nano-structures. Potential applications can also be found in optical microscopy, plasmonics, and nano-electronics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Image quality in double- and triple-intensity ghost imaging with classical partially polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellock, Henri; Setälä, Tero; Shirai, Tomohiro; Friberg, Ari T

    2012-11-01

    Classical ghost imaging is a correlation-imaging technique in which the image of the object is found through intensity correlations of light. We analyze three different quality parameters, namely the visibility, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), to assess the performance of double- and triple-intensity correlation-imaging setups. The source is a random partially polarized beam of light obeying Gaussian statistics, and the image quality is evaluated as a function of the degree of polarization (DoP). We show that the visibility improves when the DoP and the order of imaging increase, while the SNR behaves oppositely. The CNR is for the most part independent of DoP and the imaging order. The results are important for the development of new imaging devices using partially polarized light.

  10. A photo-auxiliary approach - enabling excited state classical phototransformations with metal free visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Akila; Jockusch, Steffen; Sivaguru, Jayaraman

    2017-02-04

    Most traditional photoreactions require UV light to yield the desired product. To address this issue, photoreaction of hydrazide based chromophores was evaluated with visible light using a metal free photocatalyst to afford photoproducts in high yields. This hydrazide functionality itself may be removed/modified after the photoreaction, highlighting its role as a "photo-auxiliary". A preliminary mechanistic model based on photophysical experiments is provided to highlight the generality of the strategy.

  11. Combined effects of light intensity and NH{4/+}-enrichment on growth, pigmentation, and photosynthetic performance of Ulva prolifera (Chlorophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiguang; Wu, Haiyi; Zhan, Dongmei; Sun, Fuxin; Sun, Jianzhang; Wang, Guangce

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of light intensity and enhanced nitrogen supply on the growth and photosynthesis of the green-tide macroalga, Ulva prolifera. Thalli of U. prolifera were grown in natural or NH{4/+}-enriched seawater under two different light intensities for 7 days, and then the growth rate, pigmentation, and photosynthetic performance of the thalli were evaluated. The results show that the relative growth rate (RGR) was markedly higher under the high light level than under the low light level. Enrichment with NH{4/+} enhanced the RGR under high light intensity, but did not affect RGR under low light intensity. In low light conditions, NH{4/+} -enrichment resulted in a marked decrease in the maximal photosynthetic rate ( P m) and the maximum carbon fixation rate ( V max), but it did not affect the half saturation constant for carbon ( K 0.5) or the ratio of V max to K 0.5, which reflects the carbon acquisition efficiency. In high light conditions, P m, K 0.5, and the dark respiration rate ( R d) increased under NH{4/+} enrichment, but V max and the V max / K 0.5 ratio decreased. Regardless of the light intensity, NH{4/+}-enrichment did not affect the apparent photosynthetic efficiency ( α), which reflects the ability of the alga to use light energy at low light levels. Under both low and high light intensities, the chlorophyll a (Chl a), chlorophyll b (Chl b), and carotenoids (Car) contents in thalli were higher in NH{4/+}-enriched than in natural seawater, except that there was a decrease in the Chl b content of thalli in NH{4/+}-enriched seawater under low light intensity. Therefore, NH{4/+} enrichment improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of U. prolifera under high light intensity, but not under low light intensity. We discuss the possible mechanisms underlying these physiological responses.

  12. Visible-light-excited and europium-emissive nanoparticles for highly-luminescent bioimaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongquan; Shi, Mei; Zhao, Lingzhi; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou; Huang, Chunhui

    2014-07-01

    Europium(III)-based material showing special milliseconds photoluminescence lifetime has been considered as an ideal time-gated luminescence probe for bioimaging, but is still limited in application in luminescent small-animal bioimaging in vivo. Here, a water-soluble, stable, highly-luminescent nanosystem, Ir-Eu-MSN (MSN = mesoporous silica nanoparticles, Ir-Eu = [Ir(dfppy)2(pic-OH)]3Eu·2H2O, dfppy = 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine, pic-OH = 3-hydroxy-2-carboxypyridine), was developed by an in situ coordination reaction to form an insoluble dinuclear iridium(III) complex-sensitized-europium(III) emissive complex within mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) which had high loading efficiency. Compared with the usual approach of physical adsorption, this in-situ reaction strategy provided 20-fold the loading efficiency (43.2%) of the insoluble Ir-Eu complex in MSNs. These nanoparticles in solid state showed bright red luminescence with high quantum yield of 55.2%, and the excitation window extended up to 470 nm. These Ir-Eu-MSN nanoparticles were used for luminescence imaging in living cells under excitation at 458 nm with confocal microscopy, which was confirmed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the Ir-Eu-MSN nanoparticles were successfully applied into high-contrast luminescent lymphatic imaging in vivo under low power density excitation of 5 mW cm(-2). This synthetic method provides a universal strategy of combining hydrophobic complexes with hydrophilic MSNs for in vivo bioimaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Photophysical study of blue-light excitable ternary Eu(III) complexes and their encapsulation into polystyrene nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Räsänen, Markus, E-mail: mpvras@utu.fi [Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku (Finland); Takalo, Harri [DHR Finland Oy, Innotrac Diagnostics, Biolinja 12, FIN-20750 Turku (Finland); Soukka, Tero [Department of Biochemistry/Biotechnology, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku (Finland); Haapakka, Keijo; Kankare, Jouko [Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku (Finland)

    2015-04-15

    In this work, 14 ternary Eu(III) complexes were studied by means of spectroscopy. The studied Eu(III) complexes consisted of Lewis bases (4′-(4-diethylaminophenyl)-2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine (L{sup 8}) or 1,10-phenanthroline (L{sup 9})) and differently substituted β-diketones. The ternary complexes with L{sup 8} show the excitation peak at 405 nm and the quantum yield even 76%. The brightest ternary complex at the 405 nm excitation was Eu(L{sup 3}){sub 3}L{sup 8} while Eu(L{sup 7}){sub 3}L{sup 8} (HL{sup 3}=4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-thienyl)-1,3-butanedione, HL{sup 7}=1-(9-ethyl-9H-carbazol-3-yl)-4,4,5,5,5-pentafluoro-1,3-pentanedione) was found to be the brightest at the ligand-centred excitation maximum. The ternary complexes were studied mainly in toluene as the model environment for the polystyrene nanoparticle cavities. The complexes were successfully loaded into the polystyrene nanoparticles enabling their bioanalytical application in aqueous environment. The encapsulation of the complexes preserved, or even enhanced, their good photophysical features. - Highlights: • Ternary Eu{sup 3+} complexes with some β-diketone and substituted terpyridine were studied. • Ternary complexes with substituted terpyridine showed blue-light excitability. • Ternary complexes were successfully loaded into the polystyrene nanoparticles. • Encapsulation of the complexes preserved their good photophysical features.

  14. Effects of light intensity and temperature on Cryptomonas ovata (Cryptophyceae) growth and nutrient uptake rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.

    1977-01-01

    Specific growth rate of Cryptomonas ovata var. palustris Pringsheim was measured in batch culture at 14 light-temperature combinations. Both the maximum growth rate (μm) and optimum light intensity (Iopt) fit an empirical function that increases exponentially with temperature up to an optimum (Topt), then declines rapidly as temperature exceeds Topt. Incorporation of these functions into Steele's growth equation gives a good estimate of specific growth rate over a wide range of temperature and light intensity. Rates of phosphate, ammonium and nitrate uptake were measured separately at 16 combinations of irradiance and temperature and following a spike addition of all starved cells initially took up nutrient at a rapid rate. This transitory surge was followed by a period of steady, substrate-saturated uptake that persisted until external nutrient concentration fell. Substrate-saturated NO3−-uptake proceeded at very slow rates in the dark and was stimulated by both increased temperature and irradiance; NH4+-uptake apparently proceeded at a basal rate at 8 and l4 C and was also stimulated by increased temperature and irradiance. Rates of NH4−-uptake were much higher than NO3−-uptake at all light-temperature combinations. Below 20 C, PO4−3-uptake was more rapid in dark than in light, but was light enhanced at 26 C.

  15. Conventional and high intensity halogen light effects on water sorption and microhardness of orthodontic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Tancan; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Sener, Yagmur; Botsali, Murat Selim; Demir, Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    To test the null hypothesis that when the equivalent total light energy is irradiated to three orthodontic adhesive resins, there is no difference between the microhardness and water sorption values regardless of the curing light sources. Samples were divided into six groups according to the combination of three orthodontic adhesives (Kurasper F, Light-Bond, Transbond XT) and two light intensities (quartz tungsten halogen [QTH] and high intensity quartz tungsten halogen [HQTH]). One half of each of the 40 samples of three adhesive pastes was polymerized for 20 seconds by a QTH light source, and the other half was polymerized for 10 seconds by a HQTH light source. Water sorption was determined and Vickers hardness was established with three measurements per sample at the top, center, and bottom. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with multiple comparisons (Tukey-HSD). Statistically significant differences were found among all adhesives for water sorption and hardness values cured with QTH and HQTH. The HQTH curing unit resulted in higher values than did the QTH. The highest water sorption values were observed for Kurasper F cured with HQTH and the lowest value was observed for Transbond XT cured with QTH. For microhardness Light-Bond cured with HQTH produced the highest values, and Transbond XT cured with QTH produced the lowest. When the equivalent total light energy is irradiated to three orthodontic adhesive resins, there are significant differences between the microhardness and water sorption values cured with the QTH and HQTH light source. The null hypothesis is rejected.

  16. [Effects of light intensity on Quercus liaotungensis seed germination and seedling growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xing-fu; Wang, Jian-li; Zhou, Li-biao

    2011-07-01

    This paper studied the effects of different shading (55.4%, 18.9%, 5.5%, 2.2%, 0.5% , and 0.3% natural sunlight) on the seed germination and seedling growth of Quercus liaotungensis. The seed germination rate and germination index were the highest (72.5% and 0.22, respectively) at 55.4% natural sunlight, declined with decreasing light intensity, and were the lowest (42.5% and 0.11, respectively) at 0.3% natural sunlight. Strong light had definite delaying effect on the germination. The index of germination vigor increased with decreasing light intensity, being the maximum at 0.5% natural sunlight. The delay of seed germination under strong light could be the selective tradeoff on varied seed fates. Strong light benefited the basal stem diameter and root system growth and dry mass accumulation of Q. liaotunensis seedling, but resulted in the minimum seedlings height (6.06 cm). Greater morphological plasticity was observed for the seedlings under different shading, which lent support to the higher adaptability of the seedlings to light environment. For example, the specific leaf area, specific shoot length, specific root length, and chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll contents were the maximum at 0.5% natural sunlight, being 142.57 cm2 x g(-1), 156.86 cm x g(-1), 271.87 cm x g(-1), 0.07 g x cm(-2), and 0.24 g x cm(-2), respectively, and the minimum at 55.4% natural sunlight, being 44.89 cm2 x g(-1), 52.84 cm x g(-1), 101.98 cm x g(-1), 0.04 g x cm(-2), and 0.15 g x cm(-2), respectively. The variation of the root/shoot ratio of Q. liaotungensis seedlings under different shading could be the effects of the combination of light intensity and water availability.

  17. Preparation and characterization of SrTiO3-Ag/AgCl hybrid composite with promoted plasmonic visible light excited photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hongfang; Wei, Hongyu; Pan, Zhidong; Lu, Youjun; Wang, Yanmin

    2017-11-01

    An efficient visible light responsive photocatalyst hybrid composite SrTiO3-Ag/AgCl was prepared via hydrothermal method and subsequent chemical precipitation/in-situ photoreduction at room temperature. The phase structure, morphology, element mapping distribution, surface chemical composition, specific surface area, and light absorption ability of the samples were characterized. The transient photocurrent response and electrochemical impedance under visible light illumination indicate that SrTiO3-Ag/AgCl composite possesses a more intense photocurrent response and a smaller surface resistance than SrTiO3 and Ag/AgCl due to the lower electrons-holes recombination. SrTiO3-Ag/AgCl composite exhibits an obvious promoted visible light excited photovcatalytic activity in photodecomposition of methyl orange, rhodamine B and phenol, compared to SrTiO3 and Ag/AgCl. A possible photocatalytic mechanism was proposed, indicating that the synergistic effect of surface plasmonic resonance of Ag0 photoreduced from AgCl and decreased the recombination rate of photogenerated carriers through transferring electrons from the surface of Ag0 to SrTiO3 promote the excellent photocatalytic activity of SrTiO3-Ag/AgCl. Moreover, the photodegradation reaction process of methyl orange, rhodamine B and phenol on SrTiO3-Ag/AgCl follows the pseudo-first-order kinetic model, and the reaction rate constants are approximately 10 times greater than those on Ag/AgCl. Four-recycling photocatalytic process of methyl orange on SrTiO3-Ag/AgCl also indicates a superior stability and durability.

  18. The effects of light intensity on the growth of Japanese Gambierdiscus spp. (Dinophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, Takamichi; Tie, Chaoyu; Yamaguchi, Haruo; Funaki, Hiroshi; Honma, Chiho; Tanaka, Kouki; Adachi, Masao

    2016-12-01

    Marine toxic dinoflagellates of the genus Gambierdiscus are the causative agents of ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), a form of seafood poisoning that is widespread in tropical, subtropical and temperate regions worldwide. The distributions of Gambierdiscus australes, Gambierdiscus scabrosus and two phylotypes of Gambierdiscus spp. type 2 and type 3 have been reported for the waters surrounding the main island of Japan. To explore the bloom dynamics and the vertical distribution of these Japanese species and phylotypes of Gambierdiscus, the effects of light intensity on their growth were tested, using a photoirradiation-culture system. The relationship between the observed growth rates and light intensity conditions for the four species/phylotypes were formulated at R>0.92 (pphotosynthesis-light intensity (P-L) model. Based on this equation, the optimum light intensity (Lmax) and the semi-optimum light intensity range (Ls-opt) that resulted in the maximum growth rate (μmax) and ≥80% μmax values of the four species/phylotypes, respectively, were as follows: (1) the Lmax and Ls-opt of G. australes were 208μmol photons m(-2)s(-1) and 91-422μmol photons m(-2)s(-1), respectively; (2) those of G. scabrosus were 252 and 120-421μmol photons m(-2)s(-1), respectively; (3) those of Gambierdiscus sp. type 2 were 192 and 75-430μmol photons m(-2)s(-1), respectively; and (4) those of Gambierdiscus sp. type 3 were ≥427 and 73-427μmol photons m(-2)s(-1), respectively. All four Gambierdiscus species/phylotypes required approximately 10μmol photons m(-2)s(-1) to maintain growth. The light intensities in coastal waters at a site in Tosa Bay were measured vertically at 1m intervals once per season. The relationships between the observed light intensity and depth were formulated using Beer's Law. Based on these equations, the range of the attenuation coefficients at Tosa Bay site was determined to be 0.058-0.119m(-1). The values 1700μmol photons m(-2)s(-1), 500μmol photons m

  19. Photodynamic Therapy Activated by Intense Pulsed Light in the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Piccolo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA or methyl aminolevulinate (MAL has proven to be a highly effective conservative method for the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK, Bowen’s disease (BD, and superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC. PDT is traditionally performed in association with broad-spectrum continuous-wave light sources, such as red or blue light. Recently, intense pulsed light (IPL devices have been investigated as an alternative light source for PDT in the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC. We herein report our observational findings in a cohort of patients with a diagnosis of AK, sBCC, and BD that is treated with MAL-PDT using IPL, as well as we review published data on the use of IPL-PDT in NMSC.

  20. [Effects of light intensity on physiological and biochemical characteristics of Chrysanthemum morifolium at vegetative stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaosheng; Wang, Yanru; Zhang, Xianxiu; Jin, Miao

    2010-03-01

    To study the effect of light intensity on physiological and biochemical characteristics of Chrysanthemum morifolium at the vegetative stage. The dynamic response of physiological and biochemical indexes of Ch. morifolium were measured under different treatments (100%, 80%, 60%, 40% and 20% of the full sunlight) at the vegetative stage. The physiological and biochemical indexes of Ch. morifolium showed dynamic changes with the progress of growth and the increase of the treatment time. The soluble sugar content decreased when the light intensity reduced, and had a significant positive correlation with the light intensity. Soluble protein content rose firstly and fell later, malondialdehyde content increased, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity decreased initially and increased afterwards. Proper shading benefits the nitrogen accumulation of Ch. morifolium at the vegetative stage, and reduces the strength of stress condition. The suitable light environment for growth of Ch. morifolium at the vegetative stage is about 80%-60% of full sunlight and the optimum treatment time is 20-40 days.

  1. On the nature of the oxygen uptake in the light by Chondrus crispus. Effects of inhibitors, temperature and light intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechignac, F; Furbank, R T

    1987-01-01

    The nature of the different processes of O2 uptake involved in the light in the red macroalga Chondrus crispus Stackhouse (Rhodophyta, Gigartinales) was investigated. At limiting CO2, INH (2.5 mM) did not alter the O2 uptake rate. Glycolate was not excreted and did not accumulate within the cells. KCN reduced the rate of O2 uptake in the light by 76% at limiting CO2 and by 43% at saturating CO2, but caused > 95% inhibition of O2 evolution. DCMU (5 μM) totally blocked the photosynthetic electron transport chain, but allowed a residual O2 uptake of 3.0±0.6 μmol O2 .h(-1).g(-1) FW, irrespective of the CO2 concentration. In saturating CO2, a high light intensity pretreatment significantly stimulated the rate of O2 uptake compared to net O2 evolution, suggesting the persistence, in the light, of mitochondrial respiration. Irrespective of the CO2 concentration, the optimum temperature for O2 evolution was 17°C whereas dark O2 uptake increased linearly with temperature. In contrast, O2 uptake in the light showed an optimum at 17°C in limiting CO2, and 21-25° C in saturating CO2; its Q10 was 2.4 at limiting CO2, a value close to that of RuBP oxygenase, and 3.1 at saturating CO2, a value close to that of dark respiration. It is concluded that: 1) mitochondrial respiration and Mehler reaction are both involved at all CO2 concentrations, 2) RuBP oxygenase activity cannot account for more than 45%, and Mehler reaction for less than 20%, of the total O2 uptake observed in the light at limiting CO2.

  2. Multireference excitation energies for bacteriochlorophylls A within light harvesting system 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anda, Andre; Hansen, Thorsten; De Vico, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria is one of the most popular antenna complexes used to study Nature's way of collecting and channeling solar energy. The dynamics of the absorbed energy is probed by ultrafast spectroscopy. Simulation of these experiments relies on fitting a range ...

  3. Intense Upconverted White Light Emission from Tm3+ - Er3+ - Yb3+ Doped Zinc Tungsten Tellurite Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan BİLİR

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The different amount of rare earth ions doped zinc tungsten tellurite glasses with the compositions (70-x-y-zTeO2 – 20ZnO – 10WO3 – xEr2O3 – yTm2O3 – zYb2O3 (x = 0.3, 0.5; y = 0.3, 0.5; z = 3 have been synthesized using melt quenching technique. Blue, green, red and infrared luminescence via energy transfer and frequency upconversion mechanisms in Tm3+/Er3+/Yb3+ triply-doped zinc tungsten tellurite glasses were investigated under single 975 nm diode laser excitation. Intense blue (Tm3+: 1D2→3F4, 1G4→3H6; 477 nm, green (2H11/2, 4S3/2→4I15/2 ; 525 nm and 549 nm, red (Er3+: 4F9/2→4I15/2, Tm3+: 1G4→3F4; 659 nm and infrared (Tm3+: 1G4→3H5, 3H4→3H6 ; 807 nm emissions were observed simultaneously at room temperature. Intense white light emission from all samples was observed with CCT values higher than 6500 K and CRI values lower than 80. The CIE coordinates of the emitted white light were found to shift to yellowish-greenish region with increasing pumping power. The possible energy transfer and upconversion mechanisms are discussed and plausible explanations are made.

  4. Measurement of home-use laser and intense pulsed light systems for hair removal: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Godfrey; Ash, Caerwyn

    2009-09-01

    Laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) devices are used routinely by healthcare professionals for hair removal, but laser and light technology devices intended for home use have so far had little impact in the consumer market. However, as multinational companies enter this market, there will be an explosion in the use of such devices by the consumer. This investigation focuses on the technical performance of the devices tested and although no clinical data are presented, the measured parameters are those that will directly impact efficacy in hair reduction, efficient coverage of skin, and safety in terms of unintentional eye exposure to the light source or incorrect settings for a given skin type. Consumers will consult healthcare professionals with experience of light-based therapies for guidance and this study provides useful reference information on available home-use devices. Previously published standard test methods were used to evaluate the devices tested. Some of the devices measured in this study showed significant discrepancies between claims made by the manufacturers and the parameters measured. There is an urgent need for early ratification of the draft international IEC 60601-1 intense light standard, which will encompass manufacturing standards for both professional and home-use hair removal devices.

  5. Light intensity and SNR improvement for high-resolution optical imaging via time multiplexed pinhole arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ariel; Shemer, Amir; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-07-10

    In this paper, we present a novel method for pinhole optics with variable pinhole arrays. The imaging system is based on a time multiplexing method using variable and moving pinhole arrays. The improved resolution and signal-to-noise ratio are achieved with improved light intensity in the same exposure time, compared with that of a one-pinhole system. This new configuration preserves the advantages of pinhole optics while solving the resolution limitation problem and the long exposure time of such systems. The system also can be used as an addition to several existing optical systems, which use visible and invisible light and x-ray systems.

  6. Ratiometric two-photon excited photoluminescence of quantum dots triggered by near-infrared-light for real-time detection of nitric oxide release in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hui [Shandong Sino-Japanese Center for Collaborative Research of Carbon Nanomaterials, Collaborative Innovation Center for Marine Biomass Fiber Materials and Textiles, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Shandong 266071 (China); Gui, Rijun, E-mail: guirijun@qdu.edu.cn [Shandong Sino-Japanese Center for Collaborative Research of Carbon Nanomaterials, Collaborative Innovation Center for Marine Biomass Fiber Materials and Textiles, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Shandong 266071 (China); Sun, Jie; Wang, Yanfeng [Institute of Materia Medica, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250062 (China)

    2016-05-30

    Probe-donor integrated nanocomposites were developed from conjugating silica-coated Mn{sup 2+}:ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with MoS{sub 2} QDs and photosensitive nitric oxide (NO) donors (Fe{sub 4}S{sub 3}(NO){sub 7}{sup −}, RBS). Under excitation with near-infrared (NIR) light at 808 nm, the Mn{sup 2+}:ZnS@SiO{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2}-RBS nanocomposites showed the dual-emissive two-photon excited photoluminescence (TPEPL) that induced RBS photolysis to release NO in situ. NO caused TPEPL quenching of Mn{sup 2+}:ZnS QDs, but it produced almost no impact on the TPEPL of MoS{sub 2} QDs. Hence, the nanocomposites were developed as a novel QDs-based ratiometric TPEPL probe for real-time detection of NO release in situ. The ratiometric TPEPL intensity is nearly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.9901) with NO concentration in the range of 0.01∼0.8 μM, which corresponds to the range of NO release time (0∼15 min). The detection limit was calculated to be approximately 4 nM of NO. Experimental results confirmed that this novel ratiometric TPEPL probe possessed high selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of NO against potential competitors, and especially showed high detection performance for NIR-light triggered NO release in tumor intracellular microenvironments. These results would promote the development of versatile probe-donor integrated systems, also providing a facile and efficient strategy to real-time detect the highly controllable drug release in situ, especially in physiological microenvironments. - Highlights: • Mn{sup 2+}:ZnS@SiO{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2}-RBS nanocomposites were developed as a novel ratiometric two-photon excited fluorescence probe. • This probe could conduct real-time detection of nitric oxide release in situ. • High feasibility of this probe was confirmed in tumor intracellular microenvironments.

  7. Relationship between caffeine content and flavor with light intensity of several coffee Robusta clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novie Pranata Erdiansyah

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is a refreshing beverage product and its price is determined by physical quality and flavor. An excellent coffee flavor is resulted only from qualified coffee beans, produced by well managed plantation. The objective of this experiment was to study the effect of sunlight intensity entering coffee farm on flavor profiles and caffeine content of Robusta coffee. The experiment was conducted at the field experimental Kaliwining Estate of Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute (ICCRI during 2009–2011. Treatments were Robusta coffee clones and sunlight intensity. Experimental design was split plot design with three replications. Robusta clones used were BP 409, BP 534, BP 936 and BP 939, planted in 2002. The sunligt intensity treatments were 100% (without shade tree, 50—60% (Leucaena leucocephala shade, and 20—30% (Hibiscus macrophyllus and Melia azedarach L. shades. Only red coffee cherries were harvested for flavor and caffeine analysis. Coffee cherries were washed, depulped and sundried until moisture content of less than 12%. The green coffee bean samples were roasted at medium level (Agtron Scale at 65# for cupping test which involved five expert panelists by using ICCRI protocol. Caffeine content was determined by spectrophotometric method. The experiment result indicated that high sunlight intensity resulted in strong aroma of Robusta coffee, while good flavor coffee need medium light intensity. Cafein content had positive correlation with light intensity entering the coffee farm, whereas cafein content had no direct effect on Robusta coffee flavor.Key words: Coffea canephora, clone, sunlight intensity, flavor, caffeine. 

  8. Light-intensity physical activity is associated with insulin resistance in elderly Japanese women independent of moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gando, Yuko; Murakami, Haruka; Kawakami, Ryoko; Tanaka, Noriko; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Tabata, Izumi; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Miyachi, Motohiko

    2014-02-01

    It is unclear whether light physical activity is beneficially associated with insulin resistance, similar to moderate and/or vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study was performed to determine the relationship between the amount of light physical activity, as determined with a triaxial accelerometer, and insulin resistance. A total of 807 healthy men and women participated in this study. Physical activity was measured using a triaxial accelerometer worn for 28 days and summarized as light intensity (1.1-2.9 METs) or moderate to vigorous intensity (≥ 3.0 METs). Insulin resistance was evaluated by HOMA_R (FPG [mg/dL] × IRI [μU/mL]/405). The daily time spent in light physical activity was inversely associated with HOMA_R (r = -0.173, P women. These cross-sectional data suggest that light-intensity physical activity is beneficially associated with insulin resistance in elderly Japanese women.

  9. ICD and its exploration by short, intense and coherent light pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederbaum, Lorenz

    2014-05-01

    How does a microscopic system like an atom or a small molecule get rid of the excess electronic energy it has acquired, for instance, by absorbing a photon? If this microscopic system is isolated, the issue has been much investigated and the answer to this question is more or less well known. But what happens if our system has neighbors as is usually the case in nature or in the laboratory? In a human society, if our stress is large, we would like to pass it over to our neighbors. Indeed, this is in brief what happens also to the sufficiently excited microscopic system. A new mechanism of energy transfer has been theoretically predicted and verified in several exciting experiments. This mechanism seems to prevail ``everywhere'' from the extreme quantum system of the He dimer to water and even to quantum dots. The transfer is ultrafast and typically dominates other relaxation pathways. To exploit the high intensity of laser radiation, we propose to select frequencies at which single-photon absorption is of too low energy and two or more photons are needed to produce states of an atom that can undergo interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) with its neighbors. ICD is an extremely efficient decay mechanism for excited systems which are embedded in environment. For the Ne2 dimer it is explicitly demonstrated that the proposed multiphoton absorption scheme is much more efficient than schemes used until now, which rely on single-photon absorption. Extensive calculations on Ne2 show how the low-energy ICD electrons and Ne + pairs are produced for different laser intensities and pulse durations. At higher intensities the production of Ne + pairs by successive ionization of the two atoms becomes competitive and the respective emitted electrons interfere with the ICD electrons. It is also shown that a measurement after a time delay can be used to determine the contribution of ICD even at high laser intensity. The study can provide a hint how the energy deposited by a FEL on one

  10. Evaluation of different pre-slaughter light intensities and fasting duration in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IB Ramão

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different levels of light intensity (0, 5 or 20 lx and different pre-slaughter feed fasting duration (3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 hours on the parameters body weight loss, carcass yield, commercial cuts yield, water carcass retention, bacterial counts and breast meat pH. A number of 72 broiler chickens at 45 days of age (Cobb 500 strain was distributed in three chambers, in a total of 24 broilers per chamber. The results showed that feed fasting significantly influenced (p0.05. The presence of feed in the crop and gizzard did not depend on light intensity, but was affected by pre-slaughter feed fasting duration. Bacterial counts decreased with feed fasting duration (p<0.05.

  11. Diffusion of intensity-modulated near-infrared light in turbid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishkin, Joshua B.; Gratton, Enrico; vandeVen, Martin J.; Mantulin, William W.

    1991-05-01

    Light propagation in turbid media can be described by photon diffusion. In the frequency domain, sinusoidally intensity-modulated light gives rise to diffusive waves which have a coherent front. In a homogeneous medium, the wave front propagates with a constant phase velocity and the amplitude attenuates exponentially as the diffusional wave advances. We have studied the diffusion approximation to the one-speed linear transport equation with a sinusoidally intensity modulated point source of particles and performed experiments using frequency domain detection methods on homogeneous scattering and absorbing media to test the applicability of the above mentioned transport equation to photon migration in turbid media. We have used the analytical solutions of the linear transport equation in homogeneous, infinite media to determine via a simple analysis of our frequency domain data the linear scattering and absorption coefficients.

  12. Correlation of Red Blood Cell Aggregate Size with Transmitted Light Intensity Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Darren L.

    1998-11-01

    Under sufficiently low shear rates, such as those encountered in the microcirculation, human red blood cells are known to form aggregate structures (`rouleaux'). These aggregates may range in size from a simple chain containing only a few cells to complex three-dimensional structures containing tens of cells. Previous studies have attempted to characterize the aggregate size by examining the spatial distribution of transmitted light intensity resulting from transillumination of the blood flow. For experiments performed in vitro and in vivo, spectral analysis of the transmitted light intensities has shown that the presence of aggregates in the flow can linked with an increase in the spectral power at small wavenumbers. The magnitudes of the affected wavenumbers correspond to structures considerably larger than individual cells. A precise numerical correlation, however, is difficult to establish. In this work, computer simulations of aggregating blood flow are used along with statistical considerations in an attempt to better correlate the observed spectral trends with actual aggregate size.

  13. A comparative study of hair removal at an NHS hospital: Luminette intense pulsed light versus electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Karen; Ferguson, Janice; Hills, Samantha

    2014-04-01

    Twenty-five women, referred for hair removal by electrolysis, were enrolled in a split face study to treat facial hirsutism. Each patient was treated on six occasions: one-half of the face with electrolysis and the other side with an intense pulsed light source. Patients were evaluated with respect to reduction in hair counts, side effects and discomfort during treatment. Re-growth was assessed at 3, 6 and 9 months following treatment. All patients, except one with very sparse, fair hair growth, preferred treatment with the Intense Pulsed Light and rated their average hair reduction with this method as 77% after five treatments. The overall patient satisfaction rates as determined by visual analogue scales were 8.3 out of 10 for IPL and 5.4 out of 10 for electrolysis.

  14. Chronic neuropathic facial pain after intense pulsed light hair removal. Clinical features and pharmacological management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Escoda, Cosme; Párraga-Manzol, Gabriela; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Moreno-Arias, Gerardo

    2015-10-01

    Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) photodepilation is usually performed as a hair removal method. The treatment is recommended to be indicated by a physician, depending on each patient and on its characteristics. However, the use of laser devices by medical laypersons is frequent and it can suppose a risk of damage for the patients. Most side effects associated to IPL photodepilation are transient, minimal and disappear without sequelae. However, permanent side effects can occur. Some of the complications are laser related but many of them are caused by an operator error or mismanagement. In this work, we report a clinical case of a patient that developed a chronic neuropathic facial pain following IPL hair removal for unwanted hair in the upper lip. The specific diagnosis was painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy, reference 13.1.2.3 according to the International Headache Society (IHS). Neuropathic facial pain, photodepilation, intense pulse light.

  15. Investigator-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized comparative study on combined vacuum and intense pulsed light versus intense pulsed light devices in both comedonal and papulopustular acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianosi, Simona; Neagoe, Daniela; Calbureanu, Madalina; Ianosi, Gabriel

    2013-10-01

    The aim was to compare the treatment effectiveness of intense pulsed light (IPL) and vacuum versus IPL with placebo for mild to moderate comedonal and inflammatory acne. We randomized 180 patients with mild to moderate comedonal and inflammatory acne into three groups: Group A - 60 patients treated with vacuum and IPL, Group V - 60 patients treated with IPL, and Group 0 (control group) - 60 patients who received topical treatment with Sebium H2O Micellaire Solution. We evaluated the results using the Leeds revised acne-grading system and Cardiff Acne Disability Index. There was a significant reduction in the number of papules, pustules, and comedones in Groups A and V compared with those in the control group (p vacuum and IPL representing a therapeutic option for the comedonal acne.

  16. Effect of Light Intensity and Photoperiod on Growth and Biochemical Composition of a Local Isolate of Nostoc calcicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajepour, Fateme; Hosseini, Seyed Abbas; Ghorbani Nasrabadi, Rasoul; Markou, Giorgos

    2015-08-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of light intensity (21, 42, and 63 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) and photoperiod (8:16, 12:12, and 16:8 h light/dark) on the biomass production and its biochemical composition (total carotenoids, chlorophyll a, phycoerythrin (PE), phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC), total protein, and carbohydrates) of a local isolate of Nostoc calcicola. The results revealed that N. calcicola prefers dim light; however, the most of the levels of light intensity and photoperiod investigated did not have a significant impact on biomass production. Increasing light intensity biomass content of chlorophyll a, PE, PC, APC, and total protein decreased, while total carotenoids and carbohydrate increased. The same behavior was observed also when light duration (photoperiod) increased. The interaction effect of increasing light intensity and photoperiod resulted in an increase of carbohydrate and total carotenoids, and to the decrease of chlorophyll a, PE, PC, APC, and total protein content. The results indicate that varying the light regime, it is capable to manipulate the biochemical composition of the local isolate of N. calcicola, producing either valuable phycobiliproteins or proteins under low light intensity and shorter photoperiods, or producing carbohydrates and carotenoids under higher light intensities and longer photoperiods.

  17. [Effects of grafting on photosynthesis of sweet pepper seedlings under low temperature and weak light intensity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan; Wang, Mei-ling; Wang, Hong-tao; Ai, Xi-zhen

    2009-03-01

    Sweet pepper 'Chifengtexuan' seedlings were grafted onto 'Weishi' and 'Buyeding' rootstocks, treated with low temperature (8 degrees C/ 5 degrees C) and weak light intensity (100 micromol x m(-2) s(-1)) for 7 days, and then recovered under normal conditions (25 degrees C/ 18 degrees C, PFD 550-600 micromol x s(-1)) for 3 days to study the variations of their gas exchange parameters, carboxylation efficiency, and fluorescence parameters, with the own-rooted 'Chifengtexuan' seedlings as the control. The results showed that on the 3rd day of low temperature and weak light intensity stress, the photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and carboxylation efficiency (CE) of both own-rooted and grafted seedling leaves decreased more than 50%, and after then, the Pn and Gs tended to stable while CE decreased continually. The intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) declined first, but enhanced after the 4th day of the stress. Low temperature and weak light intensity decreased the maximal photochemical efficiency of PS II in darkness (Fv/Fm), actual photochemical efficiency of PS II during illumination (phi (PS II)) and electron transport rate (ETR), but increased the initial fluorescence (Fo), which implied that the stress caused definite damage of photosynthetic apparatus. However, the damage diminished after 3 days of recovery. Comparing with those of own-rooted seedlings, the Pn, Gs, CE, phi(PS II), and Fv/Fm of grafted seedlings increased to various degrees, and Fo decreased markedly during the stress. It was concluded that grafting could promote the photosynthetic function, and alleviate the effects of low temperature and weak light intensity on the photosynthesis of sweet pepper seedlings.

  18. Effect of oxygen at low and high light intensities on the growth of Neochloris oleoabundans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, C.A.; Compadre, A.; Vermuë, M.H.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of partial oxygen pressure on growth of Neochloris oleoabundans was studied at near-saturating light intensity in a fully-controlled photobioreactor. At the partial oxygen pressures tested (PO2=0.24; 0.42; 0.63; 0.84 bar), the specific growth rate was 1.36; 1.16; 0.93 and 0.68 day-1,

  19. Reversible tuning luminescent color and emission intensity: a dipeptide-based light-emitting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ming-Jun; Jia, Xin-Ru; Yang, Shuang; Chen, Xiao-Fang; Wei, Yen

    2012-03-02

    A smart luminescent material whose emission color and emission intensity can be separately modulated by external force is demonstrated. The rational manipulation of rich noncovalent interactions and fluorophore packing style promotes an in-depth understanding between supramolecular structure and photophysical property and offers an effective strategy to modulate the light-emitting property in a predicative way. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Chronic neuropathic facial pain after intense pulsed light hair removal. Clinical features and pharmacological management

    OpenAIRE

    Gay Escoda, Cosme; Párraga Manzol, Gabriela; Sánchez Torres, Alba; Moreno Arias, Gerardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) photodepilation is usually performed as a hair removal method. The treatment is recommended to be indicated by a physician, depending on each patient and on its characteristics. However, the use of laser devices by medical laypersons is frequent and it can suppose a risk of damage for the patients. Most side effects associated to IPL photodepilation are transient, minimal and disappear without sequelae. However, permanent side effects can occur. Some of the complica...

  1. Comparison of laser and intense pulsed light sintering (IPL) for inkjet-printed copper nanoparticle layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niittynen, Juha; Sowade, Enrico; Kang, Hyunkyoo; Baumann, Reinhard R.; Mäntysalo, Matti

    2015-03-01

    In this contribution we discuss the sintering of an inkjet-printed copper nanoparticle ink based on electrical performance and microstructure analysis. Laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering are employed in order to compare the different techniques and their feasibility for electronics manufacturing. A conductivity of more than 20% of that of bulk copper material has been obtained with both sintering methods. Laser and IPL sintering techniques are considered to be complementary techniques and are highly suitable in different application fields.

  2. Intense pulsed light therapy (IPL) induced iritis following treatment for a medial canthal capillary malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, Matthew; Chan, Weng Onn; Taranath, Deepa; Huilgol, Shyamala C

    2014-11-01

    The popularity of intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy continues to increase due to its relative safety, high skin coverage rate and ability to treat both vascular and pigmented lesions. An often-overlooked risk is the potential for IPL-induced ocular damage. The damage sustained can cause significant, persistent morbidity and can occur even with very limited IPL exposure to the eye. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  3. Search for excited quarks of light and heavy flavor in $ \\gamma $+jet final states in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Marchesini, Ivan; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Seva, Tomislav; Starling, Elizabeth; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; Caudron, Adrien; David, Pieter; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Saggio, Alessia; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Zobec, Joze; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Coelho, Eduardo; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Sanchez Rosas, Luis Junior; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Thiel, Mauricio; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Sijing; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Jing; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Segura Delgado, Manuel Alejandro; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; El-khateeb, Esraa; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Kirschenmann, Henning; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Havukainen, Joona; Heikkilä, Jaana Kristiina; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Laurila, Santeri; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Siikonen, Hannu; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Leloup, Clément; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Amendola, Chiara; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Khvedelidze, Arsen; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Guthoff, Moritz; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Aggleton, Robin; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Malte; Karavdina, Anastasia; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Lapsien, Tobias; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baselga, Marta; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Faltermann, Nils; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Harrendorf, Marco Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Karathanasis, George; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Gianneios, Paraskevas; Katsoulis, Panagiotis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Tsitsonis, Dimitrios; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Surányi, Olivér; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Borgonovi, Lisa; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Ravera, Fabio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Beschi, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lujan, Paul; Margoni, Martino; Maron, Gaetano; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Torassa, Ezio; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Reyes-Almanza, Rogelio; Ramirez-Sanchez, Gabriel; Duran-Osuna, Cecilia; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Eysermans, Jan; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Alexakhin, Vadim; Bunin, Pavel; Golunov, Alexander; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbounov, Nikolai; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sosnov, Dmitry; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Godizov, Anton; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Bachiller, Irene; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Curras, Esteban; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Akgun, Bora; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bendavid, Joshua; Bianco, Michele; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Deelen, Nikkie; Dobson, Marc; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fallavollita, Francesco; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gilbert, Andrew; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jafari, Abideh; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Rabady, Dinyar; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Stakia, Anna; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Verweij, Marta; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Backhaus, Malte; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dorfer, Christian; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Reichmann, Michael; Sanz Becerra, Diego Alejandro; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Del Burgo, Riccardo; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Schweiger, Korbinian; Seitz, Claudia; Takahashi, Yuta; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Cheng, Kai-yu; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Steen, Arnaud; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Bat, Ayse; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Tok, Ufuk Guney; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Nazlim Agaras, Merve; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Köseoglu, Ilknur; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Linacre, Jacob; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Auzinger, Georg; Bainbridge, Robert; Borg, Johan; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Elwood, Adam; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wardle, Nicholas; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Zahid, Sema; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hadley, Mary; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Lee, Jangbae; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Pazzini, Jacopo; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Breedon, Richard; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Stolp, Dustin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Regnard, Simon; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Santra, Arka; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Trauger, Hallie; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Hiltbrand, Joshua; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Freer, Chad; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wamorkar, Tanvi; Wang, Bingran; Wisecarver, Andrew; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Bucci, Rachael; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Li, Wenzhao; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Siddireddy, Prasanna; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wightman, Andrew; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Das, Souvik; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Qiu, Hao; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xiao, Rui; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Freed, Sarah; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Kilpatrick, Matthew; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Shi, Wei; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Zhang, Aobo; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Mengke, Tielige; Muthumuni, Samila; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Padeken, Klaas; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Joyce, Matthew; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Poudyal, Nabin; Sturdy, Jared; Thapa, Prakash; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    A search is presented for excited quarks of light and heavy flavor that decay to $ \\gamma $+jet final states. The analysis is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV at the LHC. A signal would appear as a resonant contribution to the invariant mass spectrum of the $ \\gamma $+jet system, above the background expected from standard model processes. No resonant excess is found, and upper limits are set on the product of the excited quark cross section and its branching fraction as a function of its mass. These are the most stringent limits to date in the $ \\gamma $+jet final state, and exclude excited light quarks with masses below 5.5 TeV and excited b quarks with masses below 1.8 TeV, assuming standard model couplings.

  4. Local response to light excitation in the charge-ordered phase of (EDO-TTF ) 2Sb F6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servol, Marina; Moisan, Nicolas; Collet, Eric; Cailleau, Hervé; Kaszub, Wawrzyniec; Toupet, Loïc; Boschetto, Davide; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Moréac, Alain; Koshihara, Shinya; Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Uruichi, Mikio; Shao, Xiangfeng; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lorenc, Maciej

    2015-07-01

    The family of materials (EDO-TTF ) 2X F6 represents quasi-one-dimensional quarter filled systems exhibiting insulator-to-metal (I-M) phase transition at thermal equilibrium. (EDO-TTF ) 2P F6 is known to undergo a photoinduced I-M conversion with cooperative response to light excitation. Here we use femtosecond pump-probe experiments to study the photoresponse of (EDO-TTF ) 2Sb F6 made of a larger counteranion Sb F6 compared to the well studied (EDO-TTF ) 2P F6 . In the early stage of the photoinduced process, we reveal a multicomponent coherent oscillating feature. The evolution of this feature with excitation density and temperature points to the local nature of the photoswitching in (EDO-TTF ) 2Sb F6 . At longer time scale, we did not detect the features associated with the transformation to the M phase, albeit observed in the P F6 derivative. We propose a scenario whereby the bigger size of the counteranion in (EDO-TTF ) 2Sb F6 hinders the establishment of this transformation at macroscopic scale.

  5. Communication: Orientational structure manipulation in nematic liquid crystal droplets induced by light excitation of azodendrimer dopant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov, Sergey A.; Emelyanenko, Alexander V.; Boiko, Natalia I.; Liu, Jui-Hsiang; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2017-06-01

    Reversible orientational transitions in the droplets of a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) caused by the change of boundary conditions under the low intensity diode illumination are investigated. Photosensitivity of NLC is achieved by the addition of the dendrimer compound with azobenzene terminal groups. Two types of NLC droplets in glycerol are considered: the spherical droplets in the bulk of glycerol and the droplets laid-down onto the solid substrate. In the second case, the first order phase transition is revealed. The effects described can be useful for the development of highly sensitive chemical detectors and microsized photo-tunable optical devices.

  6. Low light intensity and nitrogen starvation modulate the chlorophyll content of Scenedesmus dimorphus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, V S; Pinto, R F; Sant'Anna, C

    2016-03-01

    Chlorophyll is a photosynthetic pigment found in plants and algal organisms and is a bioproduct with human health benefits and a great potential for use in the food industry. The chlorophyll content in microalgae strains varies in response to environmental factors. In this work, we assessed the effect of nitrogen depletion and low light intensity on the chlorophyll content of the Scenedesmus dimorphus microalga. The growth of S. dimorphus under low light intensity led to a reduction in cell growth and volume as well as increased cellular chlorophyll content. Nitrogen starvation led to a reduction in cell growth and the chlorophyll content, changes in the yield and productivity of chlorophylls a and b. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the ultrastructural changes in the S. dimorphus exposed to nitrogen and light deficiency. In contrast to nitrogen depletion, low light availability was an effective mean for increasing the total chlorophyll content of green microalga S. dimorphus. The findings acquired in this work are of great biotechnological importance to extend knowledge of choosing the right culture condition to stimulate the effectiveness of microalgae strains for chlorophyll production purposes. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. INDUCTION OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME MACROMYCETES BY LOW-INTENSITY LIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Poyedinok

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to study the induction of antimicrobial activity of macromycetes by low-intensity light of different wavelengths and coherence. The objects of investigation were the strains of Flammulina velutipes 3923, Pleurotus ostreatus 531, Ganoderma lucidum 1908 and G. applanatum 1552 from Mushrooms Collection of the Kholodny Institute of Botany of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, the test-cultures from Cultural Collections of the Gause Institute of New Antibiotics, All-Union Research Institute of Antibiotics and the All-Russian Collection of Industrial microorganisms. Helium-neon laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm and an argon ion laser with wavelengths of 488.0 nm and 514.5 nm were used as a source of coherent visible light lasers. For obtaining incoherent light LEDs with emission at a wavelength of 490.0, 520.0 and 634.0 nm were used. It was found that short-term exposure of sowing mycelium by low intensity light with the energy density of 230 MJ/cm2 in the red and blue wavelength ranges reduced the cultivation period before the appearance of antimicrobial activity and induced the increasing of the culture fluid inhibitory activity against different test-cultures from 20 to 238%. Selected modes of antimicrobial activity photostimulation could be used in biotechnology of submerged cultivation of macromycetes for intensification of technological stages and increasing the yield of the final product.

  8. The effect of intense light pulses on the sensory quality and instrumental color of meat from different animal breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Tomašević I.

    2015-01-01

    Intense light pulses (ILP) are an emerging processing technology, which has a potential to decontaminate food products. The light generated by ILP lamps consists of a continuum broadband spectrum from deep UV to the infrared, especially rich in UV range below 400 nm, which is germicidal. Evaluation of the effect of intense light pulses (ILP) on sensory quality of meat, game and poultry was performed using two kinds of red meat (beef and pork), two kinds of ...

  9. Strategies to enhance the excitation energy-transfer efficiency in a light-harvesting system using the intra-molecular charge transfer character of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihira, Nao [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Sugai, Yuko [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Fujiwara, Masazumi [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Kosumi, Daisuke [Institute of Pulsed Power Science; Kumamoto University; Kumamoto; Japan; Iha, Masahiko [South Product Co. Ltd.; Uruma-shi; Japan; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry; Graduate School of Science; Osaka City University; Osaka 558-8585; Japan; Katsumura, Shigeo [Department of Chemistry; Graduate School of Science; Osaka City University; Osaka 558-8585; Japan; Gardiner, Alastair T. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre; University of Glasgow; 126 University Place; Glasgow, G12 8QQ; UK; Cogdell, Richard J. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre; University of Glasgow; 126 University Place; Glasgow, G12 8QQ; UK; Hashimoto, Hideki [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan

    2017-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is a carotenoid that is mainly found in light-harvesting complexes from brown algae and diatoms. Due to the presence of a carbonyl group attached to polyene chains in polar environments, excitation produces an excited intra-molecular charge transfer. This intra-molecular charge transfer state plays a key role in the highly efficient (~95%) energy-transfer from fucoxanthin to chlorophyllain the light-harvesting complexes from brown algae. In purple bacterial light-harvesting systems the efficiency of excitation energy-transfer from carotenoids to bacteriochlorophylls depends on the extent of conjugation of the carotenoids. In this study we were successful, for the first time, in incorporating fucoxanthin into a light-harvesting complex 1 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium,Rhodospirillum rubrumG9+ (a carotenoidless strain). Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy was applied to this reconstituted light-harvesting complex in order to determine the efficiency of excitation energy-transfer from fucoxanthin to bacteriochlorophyllawhen they are bound to the light-harvesting 1 apo-proteins.

  10. Effects of Light Intensity on the Growth, Photosynthetic Characteristics, and Flavonoid Content of Epimedium pseudowushanense B.L.Guo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqian Pan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epimedium pseudowushanense B.L.Guo is used in traditional medicine as an aphrodisiac and to strengthen muscles and bones. Several recent reports have shown that flavonoids from Epimedium also significantly affect the treatment of breast cancer, liver cancer, and leukemia. However, few studies have examined the medicinal-ingredient yield of Epimedium, a light-demanding shade herb, under different light intensities. To investigate the effects of light intensity on medicinal-ingredient yields, Epimedium was exposed to five levels of light intensity until harvest time. Leaf dry biomass under L4 was the highest among different light treatments. L4 was also associated with the highest net photosynthetic rate. Quantification of epimedin A, epimedin B, epimedin C, and icariin showed that L3 produced the highest amount of epimedin C, and that flavonoid content responded to light levels differently. Results indicated that L3 and L4 were the optimal light levels for medicinal-ingredient yield.

  11. Effects of Light Intensity on the Growth, Photosynthetic Characteristics, and Flavonoid Content of Epimedium pseudowushanense B.L.Guo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Junqian; Guo, Baolin

    2016-11-04

    Epimedium pseudowushanense B.L.Guo is used in traditional medicine as an aphrodisiac and to strengthen muscles and bones. Several recent reports have shown that flavonoids from Epimedium also significantly affect the treatment of breast cancer, liver cancer, and leukemia. However, few studies have examined the medicinal-ingredient yield of Epimedium, a light-demanding shade herb, under different light intensities. To investigate the effects of light intensity on medicinal-ingredient yields, Epimedium was exposed to five levels of light intensity until harvest time. Leaf dry biomass under L4 was the highest among different light treatments. L4 was also associated with the highest net photosynthetic rate. Quantification of epimedin A, epimedin B, epimedin C, and icariin showed that L3 produced the highest amount of epimedin C, and that flavonoid content responded to light levels differently. Results indicated that L3 and L4 were the optimal light levels for medicinal-ingredient yield.

  12. Intensity and wavelength dependence of bimolecular recombination in P3HT:PCBM solar cells: A white-light biased external quantum efficiency study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Sarah R.; Wang, Jian; Yi, Juan; Lee, Yun-Ju; Olson, Dana C.; Hsu, Julia W. P.

    2013-04-01

    Bimolecular recombination is often a major photogenerated charge carrier loss mechanism in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, resulting in lower fill factor (FF) compared to inorganic devices. The recombination parameter α can be obtained from the power law fitting of short-circuit current (Jsc) on illumination intensity (I), Jsc∝Iα, with α values less than unity taken as an indication of reduced photon-to-electron extraction efficiency and the presence of bimolecular recombination in OPV. Here, we show that this intensity-averaged measurement is inadequate. An external quantum efficiency (EQE) apparatus under constant white-light bias can be used to measure the recombination parameter (αEQE*) as a function of wavelength and carrier density (white-light intensity). Examining the dependence of α on background white-light bias intensity and excitation wavelength provides further understanding of photon-to-electron conversion loss mechanisms in P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction devices in standard and inverted architectures. In order to compare EQE and current-voltage (JV) measurements, we discuss the special case of devices exhibiting sub-linear intensity response (α method of measuring bimolecular recombination compared to existing methods, including sensitivity in probing intensity-dependent recombination compared to steady-state JV measurements, the correlation of αEQE* and FF in devices, elucidation of recombination mechanisms through spectral dependence of carrier loss, and the robustness of αEQE* obtained via integration over the entire absorption region. Furthermore, this technique for measuring recombination is immediately accessible to the vast majority of researchers as the EQE apparatus is ubiquitous in PV research laboratories.

  13. Inhibition of enteric pathogens and surrogates using integrated, high intensity 405nm led light on the surface of almonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The disinfecting properties of 405 nm light were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and their non-pathogenic surrogate bacteria on the surface of almonds. High intensity monochromatic blue light (MBL) was generated from an array of narrow-band 405 nm light-emitting diodes (LE...

  14. Oxygen vacancies and intense luminescence in manganese loaded Zno microflowers for visible light water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Balaji; Michael, Robin Jude Vimal; Manoharan, Periakaruppan T.

    2015-08-01

    ZnO nanorods and Mn/ZnO microflowers with nano-sized petals exhibit singly ionized oxygen vacancies, V+O. This is strongly supported by a green photoluminescence emission at 2.22 eV and an EPR g value of 1.953, both of which are suppressed greatly after annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. A strong red emission observed during exposure to X-rays reveals the presence of F+ centres as a consequence of the V+O. Mn/ZnO displayed enhanced H2 generation with visible light exposure, when compared to pure ZnO and annealed Mn/ZnO in the visible region, which directly correlated with the oxygen vacancy concentration. There is an interesting correlation between the intensities of the EPR lines at the g-value of 1.953 due to the oxygen vacancies, the intensity of light emitted from the exposure to X-rays, the intensity of the photoluminescence due to oxygen vacancies and the quantity of H2 produced by the photocatalytic effect when comparing the three different nanomaterials, viz. pure ZnO, Mn/ZnO before and after annealing, all having been made exactly by the same methodologies.ZnO nanorods and Mn/ZnO microflowers with nano-sized petals exhibit singly ionized oxygen vacancies, V+O. This is strongly supported by a green photoluminescence emission at 2.22 eV and an EPR g value of 1.953, both of which are suppressed greatly after annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. A strong red emission observed during exposure to X-rays reveals the presence of F+ centres as a consequence of the V+O. Mn/ZnO displayed enhanced H2 generation with visible light exposure, when compared to pure ZnO and annealed Mn/ZnO in the visible region, which directly correlated with the oxygen vacancy concentration. There is an interesting correlation between the intensities of the EPR lines at the g-value of 1.953 due to the oxygen vacancies, the intensity of light emitted from the exposure to X-rays, the intensity of the photoluminescence due to oxygen vacancies and the quantity of H2 produced by the

  15. Role of delocalized exciton states of light-harvesting pigments in excitation energy transfer in natural photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetisova, Zoya; Mauring, Koit; Taisova, Alexandra

    1995-02-01

    Photosynthesis is an extremely efficient converter of light into chemical energy, with an observed quantum yield for primary photochemistry approximately 90%. To achieve this the photosynthetic apparatus must be highly optimized, and some of the design principles that may be involved have been suggested. The role of delocalized exciton states of light-harvesting pigments in the energy transfer process has been considered by mathematical simulation of the light-harvesting process in model systems. Namely, it has been shown that aggregation of antenna pigments (allowing to consider each aggregate as a supermolecule) is biologically expedient, as an efficient strategy for light harvesting in photosynthesis. The question of whether this design principle is realized in a natural antenna has been examined for the 3D chlorosomal superantenna of green bacteria with the hole-burning spectroscopy. Spectral hole burning studies of intact cells of green bacteria Chlorobium phaeovibriodes. Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium limicola have proven that the Qy- absorption system of antenna bacteriochlorophylls e or c (BChl e or BChl c) should be interpreted in terms of the delocalized exciton level structure of an aggregate. For the first time the 0-0 transition band of the lowest exciton state of BChl e and BChl c aggregates has been directly detected as the lowest energy inhomogeneously broadened band of the 1.8 K near-infrared excitation spectrum. These lowest energy bands have different spectral position of their maximums: approximately 739 nm in C.phaeovibriodes (BChl e band), approximately 752 nm in C.aurantiacus (BChl c band) and approximately 774 nm in C.limicola (BChl c band) cells. However, these bands display a number of fundamentally similar spectral features: (1) The magnitude of inhomogeneous broadening of these bands is 90 - 100 cm-1; (2) The width of each band is 2 - 3 times less than that of the monomeric BChl c (or BChl e) in vitro at 5 K; (3) Each band

  16. The efficiency, energy intensity and visual impact of the accent lighting in the retail grocery stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Nagyová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, topics of displaying, presentation, lighting, energy saving and issues related to the environment while selling the fresh food (fruits, vegetable, bakery products, meat are becoming an important matter among traders. However, just bigger companies with transnational capital have devoted their attention to this issue yet. Generally, the energy costs make up 70% of operating costs in retail stores where the cooling system and lighting are the most energy consuming. Accent lighting in modern retails is largely involved in the overall design and atmosphere in shops and plays a crucial role in presenting the goods as well. Using of accent lighting can draw the customer's attention to a specific part of the sales area and achieve the overall harmonization in the store. With the rational using of combination of energy saving and effective accent lighting retailers can achieve not only attractive presentation of displayed products but also appreciable savings in the operation of their stores. It is the only factor that can be exactly measured and controlled. Using a Colour and Lux Meters we found out the intensity and color temperature of accent lighting used in domestic and foreign retail chains for the different kinds of fresh food products. Based on the obtained values we have compiled graphs, which are showing visual comfort. We also identified different types of accent lighting, which we assigned to their impact on emotional involvement of consumers. The starting points were the tests we conducted in simulated laboratory conditions. While searching of a compromise between effective and energy efficient accent lighting we take into consideration consumers' emotional response as well as the annual electricity consumption of different types of light sources. At the end we recommend options for energy-efficient, effective and spectacular lighting while using the optimal number of light sources and their logical organization

  17. Effect of photoperiod length and light intensity on some welfare criteria, carcass, and meat quality characteristics in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Dereli Fidan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of photoperiod length and light intensity on leg and eye health, tonic immobility, some blood parameters, carcass, and meat quality characteristics in broilers. A total of 272 one-day-old male broiler chicks (Ross 308 were randomly assigned to four treatment groups based on the photoperiod length (23L:1D or increasing duration of light and light intensity (20 lux vs. dim light with four replicates. In this study, photoperiod lenght had no effect on incidence of foot pad and hock burn. On the other hand, the effect of photoperiod lenght had significant influence on the gait score. The incidences of gait score (3 + 4 + 5 in bright and dim light groups was found as 21.4 and 41.0% in broilers, respectively. In addition, the effect of light intensity had statistical significance on gait score. The tonic immobility duration in 20 lux and dim light groups were 271.53 and 226.78 s, respectively, and tonic immobility duration was unaffected by light intensity. All the blood parameters, except for triglyceride, were not affected by light intensity. The dim light had a negative effect on broiler welfare as demonstrated by increased eye weight and dimensions. Cold carcass yield and whole breast and wing yields were lower in the dim light group than in 20 lux light intensity. The broilers kept with dim light had lower breast meat ultimate pH (6.19 and L* values (54.30 than those reared with 20 lux. These findings have a lot of implications on the use of increasing photoperiod and bright light to improve leg an eye health benefits for the broiler welfare in broilers.

  18. The influence of low intensities of light pollution on bat communities in a semi-natural context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoeuilhe, Aurelie; Machon, Nathalie; Julien, Jean-François; Le Bocq, Agathe; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasingly significant issue worldwide. Over the past century, the use of artificial lighting has increased in association with human activity. Artificial lights are suspected to have substantial effects on the ecology of many species, e.g., by producing discontinuities in the territories of nocturnal animals. We analyzed the potential influence of the intensity and type of artificial light on bat activity in a semi-natural landscape in France. We used a species approach, followed by a trait-based approach, to light sensitivity. We also investigated whether the effect of light could be related to foraging traits. We performed acoustic surveys at sites located along a gradient of light intensities to assess the activity of 15 species of bats. We identified 2 functional response groups of species: one group that was light-tolerant and one group that was light-intolerant. Among the species in the latter group that appear to be disadvantaged by lighting conditions, many are rare and threatened in Europe, whereas the species from the former group are better able to thrive in disturbed habitats such as lighted areas and may actually benefit from artificial lighting. Finally, several methods of controlling light pollution are suggested for the conservation of bat communities. Recommendations for light management and the creation of dim-light corridors are proposed; these strategies may play an important role in protecting against the impact of light pollution on nocturnal animals.

  19. The influence of low intensities of light pollution on bat communities in a semi-natural context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie Lacoeuilhe

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasingly significant issue worldwide. Over the past century, the use of artificial lighting has increased in association with human activity. Artificial lights are suspected to have substantial effects on the ecology of many species, e.g., by producing discontinuities in the territories of nocturnal animals. We analyzed the potential influence of the intensity and type of artificial light on bat activity in a semi-natural landscape in France. We used a species approach, followed by a trait-based approach, to light sensitivity. We also investigated whether the effect of light could be related to foraging traits. We performed acoustic surveys at sites located along a gradient of light intensities to assess the activity of 15 species of bats. We identified 2 functional response groups of species: one group that was light-tolerant and one group that was light-intolerant. Among the species in the latter group that appear to be disadvantaged by lighting conditions, many are rare and threatened in Europe, whereas the species from the former group are better able to thrive in disturbed habitats such as lighted areas and may actually benefit from artificial lighting. Finally, several methods of controlling light pollution are suggested for the conservation of bat communities. Recommendations for light management and the creation of dim-light corridors are proposed; these strategies may play an important role in protecting against the impact of light pollution on nocturnal animals.

  20. Widely wavelength tunable fast intensity-modulated light source for biophotonic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Feng; Tseng, Sheng-Hao; Wang, Hsien-Yi; Chan, Ming-Che

    2017-07-15

    High modulation depth, fast (megahertz to gigahertz), intensity-modulated light sources of various wavelengths within the 0.7-1.35 μm bio-penetration window are highly desirable for many biophotonic diagnosis systems. In this Letter, we present a novel scheme of a wavelength tunable, ultra-broadband light source which simply consists of a pump laser, a nonlinear fiber, and demodulation circuits. The working wavelength range of the light source is from 0.7 to 1.35 μm which covers a vast part of the bio-penetration window, and its modulation frequencies extends from tens of megahertz to gigahertz. The performances of the proposed light source in either working wavelength range or modulation frequency bandwidth are much superior to any typical laser diodes or solid state lasers currently employed in the frequency-domain or other biophotonic utilization. The wide applicability of this novel light source in diverse biophotonic applications can be observed from our carefully designed diffused optical spectroscopy phantom measurement.

  1. Light-intensity physical activities and mortality in the United States general population and CKD subpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddhu, Srinivasan; Wei, Guo; Marcus, Robin L; Chonchol, Michel; Greene, Tom

    2015-07-07

    Sedentary behavior is associated with increased mortality in the general population. Whether replacing sedentary behavior with low- or light-intensity activities confers a survival benefit in the general or CKD populations is unknown. This observational analysis of the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey examined the associations of low- and light-intensity activities with mortality. On the basis of the number of counts/min recorded by an accelerometer, durations of sedentary (activity were defined and normalized to 60 minutes. The mortality associations of 2 min/hr less sedentary duration in conjunction with 2 min/hr more (tradeoff) spent in one of the low, light, or moderate/vigorous activity durations while controlling for the other two activity durations were examined in multivariable Cox regression models in the entire cohort and in the CKD subgroup. Of the 3626 participants included, 383 had CKD. The mean sedentary duration was 34.4±7.9 min/hr in the entire cohort and 40.8±6.8 in the CKD subgroup. Tradeoff of sedentary duration with low activity duration was not associated with mortality in the entire cohort or the CKD subgroup. Tradeoff of sedentary duration with light activity duration was associated with a lower hazard of death in the entire cohort (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.48 to 0.93) and CKD subgroup (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.35 to 0.98). Tradeoff of sedentary duration with moderate/vigorous activity duration had a nonsignificant lower hazard in the entire cohort and CKD subgroup. Patients with CKD are sedentary nearly two thirds of the time. Interventions that replace sedentary duration with an increase in light activity duration might confer a survival benefit. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Parameter study for polymer solar modules based on various cell lengths and light intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slooff, L.H.; Burgers, A.R.; Bende, E.E.; Kroon, J.M. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Veenstra, S.C. [ECN Solar Energy, Solliance, High Tech Campus 5, P63, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Polymer solar cells may be applied in portable electronic devices, where light intensity and spectral distribution of the illuminating source can be very different compared to outdoor applications. As the power output of solar cells depends on temperature, light intensity and spectrum, the design of the module must be optimized for the specific illumination conditions in the different applications. The interconnection area between cells in a module must be as narrow as possible to maximize the active area, also called geometrical fill factor, of the module. Laser scribing has the potential to realize this. The optimal width of the interconnection zone depends both on technological limitations, e.g. laser scribe width and the minimal distance between scribes, and electrical limitations like resistive losses. The latter depends on the generated current in the cell and thus also on illumination intensity. Besides that, also the type of junction, i.e. a single or tandem junction, will influence the optimal geometry. In this paper a calculation model is presented that can be used for electrical modeling of polymer cells and modules in order to optimize the performance for the specific illumination conditions.

  3. Oxygen vacancies and intense luminescence in manganese loaded Zno microflowers for visible light water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Balaji; Michael, Robin Jude Vimal; Manoharan, Periakaruppan T

    2015-09-07

    ZnO nanorods and Mn/ZnO microflowers with nano-sized petals exhibit singly ionized oxygen vacancies, V. This is strongly supported by a green photoluminescence emission at 2.22 eV and an EPR g value of 1.953, both of which are suppressed greatly after annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. A strong red emission observed during exposure to X-rays reveals the presence of F(+) centres as a consequence of the V. Mn/ZnO displayed enhanced H2 generation with visible light exposure, when compared to pure ZnO and annealed Mn/ZnO in the visible region, which directly correlated with the oxygen vacancy concentration. There is an interesting correlation between the intensities of the EPR lines at the g-value of 1.953 due to the oxygen vacancies, the intensity of light emitted from the exposure to X-rays, the intensity of the photoluminescence due to oxygen vacancies and the quantity of H2 produced by the photocatalytic effect when comparing the three different nanomaterials, viz. pure ZnO, Mn/ZnO before and after annealing, all having been made exactly by the same methodologies.

  4. The Effect of Curing Light Intensity on Free Volume Size in Some Dental Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazinia, Mahdieh; Mehmandoost-Khajeh-Dad, Ali Akbar; Dehghani, Vahid; Mehmandoost-Khajeh-Dad, Jamshid; Khaghani, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Dental composite resins - reinforced polymers - are types of synthetic resins that are used in dentistry as restorative material or adhesives. The effect of curing-light intensity on free volume sizes of 4 commercial dental composites has been studied by means of the well-known positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy technique. The aim of the study was to compare the photosensitivity of 4 commercial dimethacrylate-based dental composites. Positron lifetime spectra were collected using a slow-fast coincidence lifetime spectrometer with a time resolution of 365 ps. The positron source was a ~20 μCi 22Na beta emitter between two 7 μm thick stainless steel foils. The positron source was sandwiched between two identical samples under investigation. The 1st group of samples was polymerized by a 20-second photo-exposure, and the 2nd group of samples was irradiated by the blue curing light for 40 s. The positron annihilation lifetime spectrums were separated into components using the PAScual Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy data analysis program. The results showed that the lifetime component associated with free volumes differed in the different composites and depended on the irradiation time. The results indicated that the Coltene composite has higher photosensitivity than the other samples; the Denfil composite exhibited the lowest photosensitivity of the 4. The appropriate light-curing intensity depends on the thickness of the composite, which in turn is proportional to the depth of the hole in the tooth undergoing repair.

  5. Hair removal using a combination radio-frequency and intense pulsed light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmai, Dina; Garden, Jerome M; Bakus, Aboneal D; Spenceri, Elizabeth A; Hruza, George J; Kilmer, Suzanne L

    2004-12-01

    The long-term removal of unwanted hair is achieved by many laser and intense pulse light sources. One limitation is the treatment of individuals with dark skin. The light energy with the current systems has to penetrate through the epidermis before being absorbed by the hair follicle. In individuals with dark skin the high melanin concentration in the epidermis absorbs high energies that can lead to complications. The objective of our study was to study a new system that combines optical energy, intense pulsed light (IPL), with radio frequency (RF). This allows for the use of less optical energy due to the addition of RF energy. The lower optical fluence allows for safer treatment of darker skin types. This was a multicenter study, in which 87 patients were enrolled. A single treatment was performed on a specified body site. Twenty-one of the 69 subjects that completed the study had skin types IV-VI. Each subject was evaluated at 1, 7, 30, and 90 days after the treatment session. Hair counts were significantly reduced from baseline after one treatment by an average of 46%. Individual patient data showed that the percentage in hair count reduction achieved ranged from 0 to 100%, with 43% of the patients having a 50% or greater decrease. The combination of optical energy and RF when delivered simultaneously achieves effective hair reduction with the use of less optical energy, allowing for the safe treatment of all skin types.

  6. Effects of light intensity and quality on phycobiliprotein accumulation in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sphaeroides Kützing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Lu, Fan; Bi, Yonghong; Hu, Zhengyu

    2015-08-01

    To assess the effects of light intensity and quality on the growth and phycobiliproteins (PBP) accumulation in Nostoc sphaeroides Kützing (N. sphaeroides). Dry weights, dry matter, protein, chlorophyll and PBP contents were higher under 90 μmol m(-2) s(-1) than under other intensities (both higher and lower). Phycocyanin and allophycocyanin increased with light intensity while phycoerythrin decreased. Fresh weights, protein and PBP contents increased at the highest rates under blue light. Red light resulted in higher values of dry matter, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a. White light at 90 μmol m(-2) s(-1) or blue light 30 μmol m(-2) s(-1) were optimal for the growth and phycobiliprotein accumulation in N. sphaeroides.

  7. Generation of multiwavelength light in the region of the biological windows in Tm3+-doped fiber excited at 1.064 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia-Neto, A. S.; Silva, J. F.; Vermelho, M. V. D.; Gomes, A. S. L.; Jacinto, C.

    2016-12-01

    Multiple wavelength infrared light generated within both "optical transmission windows" of biological tissues and blue light triggering photochemical reactions is produced, in Tm3+-doped fiber multi-excited in a single-pass configuration by a single fundamental source at 1.064 μm. In the process, amplified spontaneous emission at 810 nm (˜8 nm bandwidth) and blue emission at 480 nm are generated through frequency upconversion multiwavelength excitation using a single pump source at 1.064 μm and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) Stokes emissions around 1115 nm, 1173 nm, 1226 nm, 1284 nm, and a continuum up to 1400 nm and beyond. The proposed excitation mechanism for 810 nm and 480 nm thulium emissions is assigned to a multiphonon-assisted multiwavelength excitation from the 3H6 ground-state to the 3H5 excited-state, a rapid relaxation to the 3F4 level followed by a excited-state absorption of the pump and SRS Stokes photons mediated by multiphonons connecting the 3F4 level to the 3H4 and 1G4 main emitting levels.

  8. White noise analysis of Phycomyces light growth response system. I. Normal intensity range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, E D

    1975-10-01

    The Wiener-Lee-Schetzen method for the identification of a nonlinear system through white gaussian noise stimulation was applied to the transient light growth response of the sporangiophore of Phycomyces. In order to cover a moderate dynamic range of light intensity I, the imput variable was defined to be log I. The experiments were performed in the normal range of light intensity, centered about I0 = 10(-6) W/cm2. The kernels of the Wierner functionals were computed up to second order. Within the range of a few decades the system is reasonably linear with log I. The main nonlinear feature of the second-order kernel corresponds to the property of rectification. Power spectral analysis reveals that the slow dynamics of the system are of at least fifth order. The system can be represented approximately by a linear transfer function, including a first-order high-pass (adaptation) filter with a 4 min time constant and an underdamped fourth-order low-pass filter. Accordingly a linear electronic circuit was constructed to simulate the small scale response characteristics. In terms of the adaptation model of Delbrück and Reichardt (1956, in Cellular Mechanisms in Differentiation and Growth, Princeton University Press), kernels were deduced for the dynamic dependence of the growth velocity (output) on the "subjective intensity", a presumed internal variable. Finally the linear electronic simulator above was generalized to accommodate the large scale nonlinearity of the adaptation model and to serve as a tool for deeper test of the model.

  9. Effects of various LED light wavelengths and light intensity supply strategies on synthetic high-strength wastewater purification by Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Cheng; Zhao, Yongjun; Zheng, Zheng; Luo, Xingzhang

    2013-09-01

    Chemical fertilizer agricultural wastewater is a typical high-strength wastewater that has dramatically triggered numerous environmental problems in China. The Chlorella vulgaris microalgae biological wastewater treatment system used in this study can effectively decontaminate the high-strength carbon and nitrogen wastewater under an optimum light wavelength and light intensity supply strategy. The descending order of both the dry weight for C. vulgaris reproduction and wastewater nutrient removal efficiency is red > white > yellow > purple > blue > green, which indicates that red light is the optimum light wavelength. Furthermore, rather than constant light, optimal light intensity is used for the incremental light intensity strategy. The phases for the optimal light intensity supply strategy are as follows: Phase 1 from 0 to 48 h at 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1); Phase 2 from 48 to 96 h at 1,200 μmol m(-2) s(-1); and Phase 3 from 96 to 144 h at 1,600 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Additionally, the optimal cultivation time is 144 h.

  10. Photodynamic therapy with intralesional 5-aminolevulinic acid and intense pulsed light versus intense pulsed light alone in the treatment of acne vulgaris: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Dalia; Abdel-Samad, Zeinab; El-Khalawany, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Despite the availability of many treatment modalities for acne vulgaris (AV), few of which provide excellent results. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was shown to be an effective treatment especially when used with topical 5-aminolevulenic acid (ALA). We compared the efficacy and safety of PDT using intralesional ALA (IL-ALA) with intense pulsed light (IPL) and IPL alone in the treatment of AV. This study was carried on 30 patients with nodulocystic and inflammatory AV on the face and back. The right side of the body was treated with IL-ALA plus IPL, while the left side was treated with IPL alone. All patients experienced a reduction in number of acne lesions on both sides of the body, but the reduction was significantly more in PDT side than IPL only side. Recurrence of the lesions was significantly more likely in the IPL only side. There was no statistically significant difference between the face and back lesions in drug side effects and recurrence of the lesions. We concluded that photodynamic therapy in this cohort is effective in the treatment of AV when combined with IL-ALA. It gives superior results compared with IPL alone with minimal and tolerable side effects and less recurrence rates. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Influence of temperature and light intensity on Ru(II) complex based organic-inorganic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asubay, Sezai [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, 21280 (Turkey); Durap, Feyyaz; Aydemir, Murat; Baysal, Akin [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, 21280 (Turkey); Ocak, Yusuf Selim [Department of Science, Faculty of Education, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, 21280 (Turkey); Tombak, Ahmet, E-mail: tahmet@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Batman University, Batman (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    An organic-inorganic junction was fabricated by forming [Ru(Cy{sub 2}PNHCH{sub 2}-C{sub 4}H{sub 3}O)(η{sup 6}-p-cymene)Cl{sub 2}] complex thin film using spin coating technique on n-Si and evaporating Au metal on the film. It was seen that the structure had perfect rectification property. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements were carried out in dark and under various illumination conditions (between 50-100 mW/cm{sup 2}) and with the temperature range from 303 to 380 K. The structure showed unusually forward and reverse bias temperature and light sensing behaviors. It was seen that the current both in forward and reverse bias increased with the increase in light intensity and temperature.

  12. Case Histories of Intense Pulsed Light Phototherapy in Dermatology - the HPPL™ and IFL(™) Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, Alessandro; Raichi, Mauro

    2017-03-13

    The intense pulsed light (IPL) and laser technologies are widely used for skin rejuvenation and for treating several dermatological disorders such as skin dyschromia and acne, and for non-ablative dermal remodeling of rhytides and hypertrophic scars. Technological evolution is rapid. The High Power Pulsed Light™ [HPPL™] and Incoherent Fast Light™ technologies [IFL™, Novavision Group S.p.A., 20826 Misinto (MB), Italy] are recent innovations in the field of IPL technologies; IFL™ is a further evolution of the already advanced HPPL™ system. The paper presents a selection of case histories of dermatological lesions treated with the HPPL™ and IFL™ technologies. All study materials were appropriately peer-reviewed for ethical problems.

  13. The Retrospective Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of IPL (Intense Pulse Light) in Hair Removal

    OpenAIRE

    İlgen Ertam; Ezgi Erçal; İdil Ünal; Sibel Alper

    2012-01-01

    Background and Design: There are numerous therapeutic methods for hair removal with various success rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Intense Pulse Light (IPL) method for hair removal.Materials and Methods: Ninety patients, who applied for their unwanted hair, were included in the study. IPL was applied to the face, neck, axillary areas, bikini line, sternal area, periareolar areas, and upper and lower extremities. An IPL device (L900 A&M, France) was used for hair ...

  14. Detection of internal structure by scattered light intensity: Application to kidney cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby, C. L.; Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered light measurements in flow cytometry were sucessfully used to distinguish cells on the basis of differing morphology and internal structure. Differences in scattered light patterns due to changes in internal structure would be expected to occur at large scattering angles. Practically, the results of these calculations suggest that in experimental situations an array of detectors would be useful. Although in general the detection of the scattered light intensity at several intervals within the 10 to 60 region would be sufficient, there are many examples where increased sensitivity could be acheived at other angles. The ability to measure at many different angular intervals would allow the experimenter to empirically select the optimum intervals for the varying conditions of cell size, N/C ratio, granule size and internal structure from sample to sample. The feasibility of making scattered light measurements at many different intervals in flow cytometry was demonstrated. The implementation of simplified versions of these techniques in conjunction with independant measurements of cell size could potentially improve the usefulness of flow cytometry in the study of the internal structure of cells.

  15. Effects of light intensity on the morphology and CAM photosynthesis of Vanilla planifolia Andrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Claudia Díez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanilla planifolia is a neotropical orchid, whose fruits produce the natural vanilla, a fundamental ingredient for the food and cosmetic industry. Because of its importance in the world market, it is cultivated in many tropical countries and recently its cultivation has started in Colombia. This species requires shade for its development; however, the optimal of light conditions are unknown. This work evaluates the effect of different light intensities on CAM photosynthesis, physiology, morphology, and growth of this species. For this, vanilla seedlings were subjected to four treatments of relative illumination (RI (T1=8%, T2=17%, T3=31% and T4=67%. Most CO2 assimilation occurred along night in all treatments, which confirms that vanilla is a strong CAM species. Plants grown under high lighting (67% RI had almost half of the photosynthesis in treatments of intermediate lighting (17 and 31%, which is consistent with the lower nocturnal acid accumulation in that treatment. Likewise, the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv / Fm showed that in plants of the 67% RI occurred high radiation stress. On the other hand, vanilla plants reached greater length, leaf area, and total biomass when grown under intermediate radiation (17 and 31% RI. These results suggest that high radiation alters the functioning of vanilla plants, inhibiting photosynthesis and growth, and that highly shaded environments not significantly affected the CAM photosynthesis of vanilla; however, in the long-term this species showed higher photosynthesis and growth under intermediate levels of radiation

  16. Effect of blue LED light intensity on carotenoid accumulation in citrus juice sacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Kato, Masaya

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the effects of blue LED light intensity on carotenoid accumulation and expression of genes related to carotenoid biosynthesis were investigated in the juice sacs of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) and Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) in vitro. The results showed that 100 μmol m(-2)s(-1) blue LED light (100B) was effective for increasing carotenoid content, especially β-cryptoxanthin, in Satsuma mandarin after cultured in vitro for four weeks. In Valencia orange, in contrast, 50 μmol m(-2)s(-1) blue LED light (50B) treatment was effective for inducing carotenoid accumulation through increasing the contents of two major carotenoids, all-trans-violaxanthin and 9-cis-violaxanthin. In addition, gene expression results showed that the simultaneous increases in the expression of genes (CitPSY, CitPDS, CitZDS, CitLCYb2, and CitHYb) involved in producing β,β-xanthophylls were well consistent with the accumulation of β-cryptoxanthin in Satsuma mandarin under 100B, and violaxanthin in Valencia orange under 50B. The results presented herein contribute to further elucidating the regulatory mechanism of carotenoid accumulation by blue LED light. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Phenotypic plasticity of Neonotonia wightii and Pueraria phaseoloidesgrown under different light intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEONARDO D.T. SANTOS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants have the ability to undergo morphophysiological changes based on availability of light. The present study evaluated biomass accumulation, leaf morphoanatomy and physiology of Neonotonia wightii andPueraria phaseoloides grown in full sunlight, as well as in 30% and 50% shade. Two assays were performed, one for each species, using a randomized block design with 10 replicates. A higher accumulation of fresh mass in the shoot of the plants was observed for both species under cultivation in 50% shade, while no differences were detected between the full sunlight and 30% shade. N. wightii and P. phaseoloides showed increase in area and reduction in thickness leaf when cultivated in 50% shade. There were no changes in photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, water use efficiency and evapotranspiration of P. phaseoloidesplants because growth environment. However, the shade treatments caused alterations in physiological parameters of N. wightii. In both species, structural changes in the mesophyll occurred depending on the availability of light; however, the amount of leaf blade tissue remained unaltered. Despite the influence of light intensity variation on the morphophysiological plasticity ofN. wightiiand P. phaseoloides, no effects on biomass accumulation were observed in response to light.

  18. Leukotrichia developed following application of intense pulsed light for hair removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmanesh, Mohammed; Mostaghimi, Mehran; Yousefi, Ismail; Mousavi, Zahra Beigum; Rasai, Sima; Esmaili, Hamid Reza; Khadivi, Heshmat A

    2002-07-01

    Lasers and light sources are now used worldwide for permanent or prolonged hair removal. Patients now prefer lasers and light sources for hair removal because of their noninvasiveness and fewer reported side effects. To study and report on leukotrichia that developed following application of intense pulsed light (IPL). From February 9, 2001 to February 14, 2002 a total of 821 patients were treated for unwanted hair. The system used was a noncoherent IPL system, with a 650 nm flashlamp filter; the parameters used varied with different Fitzpatrick skin types. The patients were treated monthly, with the rate of hair loss, measured by hair counts, and possible side effects recorded. Twenty-nine of 821 patients treated developed leukotrichia. Thirteen patients had no white or gray hairs before IPL therapy; the remaining 16 patients, who had few white hairs before treatment reported accelerated development of new white hairs starting after the first or second IPL therapy. Restoration of hair color occurred in 9 patients and the remaining 20 patients had no improvement or worsening of the condition within the next 2-6 months. Temporary or permanent leukotrichia may develop following IPL and laser hair removal therapy. This finding may be explained by the difference in the thermal relaxation times of melanocytes and germinative cells. The light absorbed and the heat produced by melanin may be sufficient enough to destroy or impair the function of melanocytes but insufficient to damage the hair follicle cells.

  19. The effects of intense pulsed light (IPL) on blood vessels investigated by mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumler, Wolfgang; Vural, Emre; Landthaler, Michael; Muzzi, Francesco; Shafirstein, Gal

    2007-02-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) sources have been successfully used for coagulation of blood vessels in clinical practice. However, the broadband emission of IPL hampers the clinical evaluation of optimal light parameters. We describe a mathematical model in order to visualize the thermal effects of IPL on skin vessels, which was not available, so far. One IPL spectrum was shifted towards the near infrared range (near IR shifted spectrum: NIRSS) and the other was heavily shifted toward the visible range (visible shifted spectrum: VSS). The broadband emission was separated in distinct wavelengths with the respective relative light intensity. For each wavelength, the light and heat diffusion equations were simultaneously solved with the finite element method. The thermal effects of all wavelengths at the given radiant exposure (15 or 30 J/cm2) were added and the temperature in the vessels of varying diameters (60, 150, 300, 500 microm) was calculated for the entire pulse duration of 30 milliseconds. VSS and NIRSS both provided homogeneous heating in the entire vessel. With the exception of the small vessels (60 microm), which showed only a moderate temperature increase, all vessels exhibited a temperature raise within the vessel sufficient for coagulation with each IPL parameter. The time interval for effective temperature raise in larger vessels (diameter >60 microm) was clearly shorter than the pulse duration. In most instances, the vessel temperature was higher for VSS when compared to NIRSS. We presented a mathematical model capable of calculating the photon distribution and the thermal effects of the broadband IPL emission within cutaneous blood vessels. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Quantifying the effects of light intensity on bioproduction and maintenance energy during photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Saheed; Fitzgerald, Colin M; Cook, Emily M; Donohue, Timothy J; Noguera, Daniel R

    2015-02-01

    Obtaining a better understanding of the physiology and bioenergetics of photosynthetic microbes is an important step toward optimizing these systems for light energy capture or production of valuable commodities. In this work, we analyzed the effect of light intensity on bioproduction, biomass formation, and maintenance energy during photoheterotrophic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Using data obtained from steady-state bioreactors operated at varying dilution rates and light intensities, we found that irradiance had a significant impact on biomass yield and composition, with significant changes in photopigment, phospholipid, and biopolymer storage contents. We also observed a linear relationship between incident light intensity and H2 production rate between 3 and 10 W m(-2), with saturation observed at 100 W m(-2). The light conversion efficiency to H2 was also higher at lower light intensities. Photosynthetic maintenance energy requirements were also significantly affected by light intensity, with links to differences in biomass composition and the need to maintain redox homeostasis. Inclusion of the measured condition-dependent biomass and maintenance energy parameters and the measured photon uptake rate into a genome-scale metabolic model for R. sphaeroides (iRsp1140) significantly improved its predictive performance. We discuss how our analyses provide new insights into the light-dependent changes in bioenergetic requirements and physiology during photosynthetic growth of R. sphaeroides and potentially other photosynthetic organisms.

  1. Rare-Earth Free Self-Activated Graphene Quantum Dots and Copper-Cysteamine Phosphors for Enhanced White Light-Emitting-Diodes under Single Excitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wubin Dai; Yifeng Lei; Man Xu; Pei Zhao; Zhanhui Zhang; Jia Zhou

    2017-01-01

    .... On the contrary, as for phosphor-convert white light-emitting-diodes (pc-WLEDs), a solution-processed tunable warm white emission LED composite is fabricated in this study under single excitation, with both RE free phosphors graphene quantum dots (GQDs...

  2. Intensity of blue LED light: a potential stimulus for biomass and lipid content in fresh water microalgae Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Madiha; Idris, Ani; Bukhari, Ataullah; Wahidin, Suzana

    2013-11-01

    Light quality and the intensity are key factors which render microalgae as a potential source of biodiesel. In this study the effects of various intensities of blue light and its photoperiods on the growth and lipid content of Chlorella vulgaris were investigated by using LED (Light Emitting Diode) in batch culture. C. vulgaris was grown for 13 days at three different light intensities (100, 200 and 300 μmol m(-2)s(-1)). Effect of three different light and dark regimes (12:12, 16:08 and 24:00 h Light:Dark) were investigated for each light intensity at 25°C culture temperature. Maximum lipid content (23.5%) was obtained due to high efficiency and deep penetration of 200 μmol m(-2)s(-1) of blue light (12:12 L:D) with improved specific growth (1.26 d(-1)) within reduced cultivation time of 8 days. White light could produce 20.9% lipid content in 10 days at 16:08 h L:D. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fundamental study for scattering suppression in biological tissue using digital phase-conjugate light with intensity modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Sogo; Kato, Yuji; Kudo, Nobuki; Shimizu, Koichi

    2017-04-01

    For transillumination imaging of an animal body, we have attempted to suppress the scattering effect in a turbid medium. It is possible to restore the optical image before scattering using phase-conjugate light. We examined the effect of intensity information as well as the phase information for the restoration of the original light distribution. In an experimental analysis using animal tissue, the contributions of the phase- and the intensity-information to the image restoration through turbid medium were demonstrated.

  4. Effect of intense pulsed light on immature burn scars: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As intense pulsed light (IPL is widely used to treat cutaneous vascular malformations and also used as non-ablative skin rejunuvation to remodel the skin collagen. A study has been undertaken to gauze the effect of IPL on immature burn scars with regard to vascularity, pliability and height. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted between June 2013 and May 2014, among patients with immature burn scars that healed conservatively within 2 months. Photographic evidence of appearance of scars and grading and rating was done with Vancouver Scar Scale parameters. Ratings were done for both case and control scar after the completion of four IPL treatment sessions and were compared. Results: Out of the 19 cases, vascularity, pliability and height improved significantly (P < 0.05 in 13, 14 and 11 scars respectively following IPL treatment. Conclusions: Intense pulsed light was well-tolerated by patients, caused good improvement in terms of vascularity, pliability, and height of immature burn scar.

  5. Productivity of duckweed (Lemna minor as alternative forage feed for livestock in different light intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uti Nopriani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Duckweed (Lemna minor is a small aquatic plant that grow and float in water and spread extensively. Lemna minor is potential as a source of high quality forage. This study aimed to determine optimal light intensity on Lemna minor to generate maximum productivity. Parameters observed were physical-biological and chemical characteristics of the media (pH value, temperature, cover area, decreased of media volume, BOD, COD, nitrate, nitrite and phosphate, plant growth acceleration (number of shoots, leaf diameter and chlorophyll-a, biomass production, doubling time of cover area and the number of daughters. This study was done based on a completely randomized design with 4 levels of shading. While treatment was: without shading, shading 30%, shading 50% and shading 70% using paranet shade. Each treatment consisted of 4 replications. Result showed that the productivity of Lemna minor included the number of daughters, chlorophyll-a, biomass production, cover area, absorbed phosphate and doubling time the number of daughters reached the highest level without shading treatment (1007,21-2813,57 lux. The decrease of intensity of light, the increase the diameter of leaf. Decrease of media volume was positively correlated to size of cover area. Biomass production influenced by a wide doubling time of cover area and number of daughters.

  6. Curing efficiency of high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahiotis, Christos; Patsouri, Katerina; Silikas, Nick; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the curing efficiency of 4 high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) devices by assessing percentage of residual C=C (%RDB), surface microhardness (SM), depth of cure (DC), percentage of linear shrinkage-strain (%LS), and percentage of wall-to-wall contraction (%WWC). The light-curing units tested were a QTH light, the Elipar TriLight (3M/ESPE), and 4 LED devices - the Allegro (Denmat), the Bluephase (Ivoclar/Vivadent), the FreeLight2 (3M/ESPE), and The Cure TC-01 (Spring Health Products). The %RDB was measured by microFTIR spectroscopy. Microhardness measurements (Vickers) were performed at the surface (H0) and at depths of 3 mm (H3) and 5 mm (H5) of cylindrical specimens. Depth of cure was expressed as the ratio of microhardness at each depth, relative to the corresponding surface value (H3/H0 and H5/H0). The bonded disc method was used to evaluate %LS. For the %WWC evaluation, cylindrical resin restorations were imaged by high resolution micro-CT and the %WWC was calculated at depths of 0 mm and 2 mm. There were no statistical differences among the LEDs in %RDB or %LS. The Bluephase and Allegro had the highest SM values. As compared with the other LEDs, the Bluephase and The Cure TC-01 had lower values for depth of cure at depths of 3 mm and 5 mm. There were no significant differences in %WWC among the LEDs at either depth, and the QTH had the lowest %WWC at both depths.

  7. Influence of iron precipitated condition and light intensity on microalgae activated sludge based wastewater remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbalagan, Anbarasan; Schwede, Sebastian; Lindberg, Carl-Fredrik; Nehrenheim, Emma

    2017-02-01

    The indigenous microalgae-activated sludge (MAAS) process during remediation of municipal wastewater was investigated by studying the influence of iron flocculation step and light intensity. In addition, availability of total phosphorous (P) and photosynthetic activity was examined in fed-batch and batch mode under northern climatic conditions and limited lighting. This was followed by a semi-continuous operation with 4 d of hydraulic retention time and mean cell residence time of 6.75 d in a photo-bioreactor (PBR) with varying P availability. The fed-batch condition showed that P concentrations of 3-4 mg L-1 were effective for photosynthetic chl. a development in iron flocculated conditions. In the PBR, the oxygen evolution rate increased with increase in the concentration of MAAS (from 258 to 573 mg TSS L-1) at higher surface photosynthetic active radiation (250 and 500 μmol m-2 s-1). Additionally, the rate approached a saturation phase at low MAAS (110 mg L-1) with higher light intensities. Semi-continuous operation with luxury P uptake and effective P condition showed stable average total nitrogen removal of 88 and 92% respectively, with residual concentrations of 3.77 and 2.21 mg L-1. The corresponding average P removal was 68 and 59% with residual concentrations of 2.32 and 1.75 mg L-1. The semi-continuous operation produced a rapidly settleable MAAS under iron flocculated condition with a settling velocity of 92-106 m h-1 and sludge volume index of 31-43 ml g-1 in the studied cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Conventional and high-intensity halogen light effects on polymerization shrinkage of orthodontic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Yagmur; Uysal, Tancan; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Demir, Abdullah; Botsali, Murat Selim

    2006-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the polymerization shrinkage of three orthodontic adhesives. In addition we wanted to determine the effectiveness of the high-intensity quartz tungsten halogen (HQTH) in curing orthodontic adhesives on polymerization shrinkage with that of the quartz tungsten halogen (QTH). A total of 120 glass ring molds were prepared using a low-speed saw. The internal surface of the glass rings were roughened and etched. Adhesive pastes were placed into the glass molds, which were sandwiched between two glass slides. Samples were divided into six groups according to the combination of three orthodontic adhesives (Kurasper F, Light Bond, and Transbond XT) and two light intensities. One half of each 40 samples of three adhesive pastes was polymerized for 20 seconds by a QTH (Hilux 350), and the other half was polymerized for 10 seconds by a HQTH (Optilux 501). The volumetric polymerization shrinkage for each system was measured through the specific density method modified by Puckett and Smith. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way analysis of variance for intergroup comparisons. The HQTH-curing unit resulted in a more polymerization shrinkage than did the QTH for all investigated adhesives. However, no statistically significant differences were found. The highest shrinkage was observed for Light Bond cured with HQTH (1.59 +/- 0.82%), and the lowest value was observed for Transbond XT cured with QTH (1.23 +/- 0.60%). There are no significant differences in polymerization shrinkage of the three investigated orthodontic adhesives when polymerized with a QTH or a HQTH.

  9. Pressure dependence of emission intensity of rare-gas excimer light produced by silent discharge; Teikiatsu ryoiki ni okeru musei hoden reiki ki gas excimer hikari shutsuryoku no atsuryoku izonsei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Yukimura, K. [Doshisha University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-09-20

    To establish the pressure dependence of silent discharge excited rare gas excimer light emission, a vacua ultraviolet light was subjected to spectroscopic analysis at a pressure lower than 20kPa. Researches are under way to apply the discharge excited rare gas excimer lamp as a vacuum ultraviolet light source for the development of new materials and for the conservation of environments. When the pressure is as low as 1.8kPa or 4.4kPa, the emission has peaks at wavelengths centering on 147nm and 149nm, both of which are the resonance lines of the xenon atom. Excimer generation becomes prominent as the pressure increases, with the second continuum of light growing dominant at 35kPa to weaken relatively the resonance lines and the first continuum of light. In the first continuum, emission increases only at a suppressed rate, as compared with emission in the second continuum, due for instance to a collision caused relaxation process in which excimers are lost. In the case of xenon in the vicinity of 10-11kPa, the first continuum of light and the second continuum of light are approximately equal in emission intensity, producing a vacuum ultraviolet light source with a bandwidth relatively large for a single gas spectrum. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  10. Second-degree burn within a tattoo after intense-pulsed-light epilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riml, Stefan; Larcher, Lorenz; Grohmann, Martin; Kompatscher, Peter

    2013-08-01

    The use of high energy light sources [laser, intense pulsed light (IPL)] is booming in aesthetic surgery. A trend, especially concerning usage of photoepilation in cosmetic institutes, is detectable. Photoepilation works through selective photothermolysis, by heating the chromophore melanin within the hair follicles. We present a case impressionably demonstrating that high-energy light demands profound knowledge of its mechanism of action, and can cause severe harm in absence of basic knowledge. Photoepilation is a balancing act between maximal therapeutic effect and minimal side effect risk. Nevertheless, complications have to be clearly distinguished from professional errors. The latter are rising especially with IPL devices, mainly because its use depicts a legal grey area in most of the countries and is not bound to physicians' supervision. Due to its worse risk-benefit profile as compared with that of laser therapy, we advise against the use of IPL devices and claim for stricter regulation of its use, similar to laser devices. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Laser and intense pulsed light hair removal technologies: from professional to home use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedersdal, M; Beerwerth, F; Nash, J F

    2011-12-01

    Light-based hair removal (LHR) is one of the fastest growing, nonsurgical aesthetic cosmetic procedures in the United States and Europe. A variety of light sources including lasers, e.g. alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) and broad-spectrum intense pulsed light (IPL, 590-1200 nm), are available and used widely for such procedures in dermatological/clinical settings under proper supervision. Patient selection and appropriate fluence settings are managed by professionals to maximize efficacy while minimizing adverse events. In the past 5 years, LHR devices have been sold directly to consumers for treatment in the home. In this review, we outline the principles underlying laser and IPL technologies and undertake an evidence-based assessment of the short- and long-term efficacy of the different devices available to the practising dermatologist and discuss the efficacy and human safety implications of home-use devices. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. Profiling of Indoor Plant to Deteriorate Carbon Dioxide Using Low Light Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaimi Shamsuri Mohd Mahathir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reasonable grounds that human needs the plants because their abilities reduce carbon dioxide (CO2. However, it is not constantly human with the plants, especially in the building. This paper intends to study the abilities of seven plants (Anthurium, Dumb Cane, Golden Pothos, Prayer Plants, Spider Plant, and Syngonium to absorb CO2 gas. The research was conducted in chambers (one cubic meter with temperature, lux intensity and CO2 concentration at 25±10C, 300 lux, and 450±10 ppm. Before experimental were carried out, all plants selected should be assimilated with an indoor setting for performance purpose, and the experiment was conducted during daytime (9 am-5 pm. The experiments run in triplicate. Based on the results that are using extremely low light that ever conducted on plants, only Spider Plants are not capable to absorb CO2, instead turn up the CO2 rate during respiration. Meanwhile, Prayer Plant is the most plant performed with CO2 reduction is 7.62%, and this plant also has equivalent results in triplicate study based on an ANOVA test with significant value at 0.072. The conclusions of this research, only Spider Plant cannot survive at indoor condition with extremely low light for plants live and reduce CO2 concentration for indoor air quality (IAQ. The rate of 300 lux is a minimum light at indoor that are set by the Department of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH, Malaysia.

  13. Effects of Light Intensity on Development and Chlorophyll Content in the Arabidopsis Mutant Plants with Defects in Photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yu. Garnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The developmental stages and adaptability to different light intensity (150 µmol*m-2*s-1 and 100 µmol*m-2*s-1 in Arabidopsis mutant lines with defects of photosynthetic apparatus were analyzed. Plant development in the mutant lines depended on the light intensity to varying degrees. Lines ch1-1 (lack of the chlorophyllide a oxygenase and rtn16 (decreased chlorophyll a and b amounts were the most susceptible to the light decrease. No one of the investigated lines demonstrated chlorophyll a/b rate alteration under the different light conditions. The depleted chlorophyll content has had the major effect on the mutant plants development under the different light conditions. The different chlorophyll a/b rate correlated with the different adaptability of mutant plants to low light.

  14. Effects of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency depend on the response of stomatal conductance to dynamic light intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Tao; Heuvelink, E.; Noort, van F.R.; Kaiser, M.E.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2016-01-01

    The stimulating effect of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency (RUE) of crops is often explained by the more homogeneous spatial light distribution, while rarely considering differences in temporal light distribution at leaf level. This study investigated whether diffuse light effects on crop

  15. Effect of light intensity on Sekiguchi lesion development in lesion mimic mutant of rice inoculated with Magnaporthe grisea

    OpenAIRE

    Ueno, Makoto; Imaoka, Atsuko; Kihara, Junichi; Arase, Sakae

    2006-01-01

    The effect of light intensity on Sekiguchi lesion formation and tryptamine accumulation involved in light-induced resistance of rice(cv. Sekiguchi-asahi)inoculated with Magnaporthe grisea was determined by using neutral density filters(ND). When the M. griseainoculated leaves were irradiated by ND-filtered lights from daylight fluorescent lamps, there was no difference in number of Sekiguchi lesions among attenuation rates0,20,50,75and90%. However Sekiguchi lesion development and tryptamine a...

  16. Effects of Light Intensity on Development and Chlorophyll Content in the Arabidopsis Mutant Plants with Defects in Photosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    E.Yu. Garnik; D.V. Deeva; V.I. Belkov; V.I. Tarasenko; Yu.M. Konstantinov

    2015-01-01

    The developmental stages and adaptability to different light intensity (150 µmol*m-2*s-1 and 100 µmol*m-2*s-1) in Arabidopsis mutant lines with defects of photosynthetic apparatus were analyzed. Plant development in the mutant lines depended on the light intensity to varying degrees. Lines ch1-1 (lack of the chlorophyllide a oxygenase) and rtn16 (decreased chlorophyll a and b amounts) were the most susceptible to the light decrease. No one of the investigated lines demonstrated chlorophyll a/...

  17. Modeling the interaction of light intensity, nutrient concentration and uranium toxicity in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, E.; Horemans, N.; Vandenhove, H. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Cedergreen, N. [University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jager, T. [Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-01

    Radioecology aims at assessing the effect of radionuclides and radiation on the environment. Since we cannot test every possible environmental situation in the laboratory, we need modeling approaches to extrapolate the results of toxicity assays to environmentally relevant scenarios. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to understand the effect of relevant environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light on the toxicity of the test. Radionuclides are often found to induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In plants, an overload of ROS can lead to disturbances of the photosynthetic system. Since the light intensity determines the efficiency of the photo-systems in plants, it can be expected to interact with the effect of radionuclides. The nutrient concentration of the test medium determines the physiological state of the plant, affecting in turn the plant's capability of dealing with stress and hence influences the toxicity of the contaminant. To study the interaction of stressors with environmental conditions, mechanistic effect modeling is promoted widely in ecotoxicology. In principle, the modelling aims at a mechanistic understanding of the different processes causing the stress individually, and integrating them in one framework to study their joint effect and possible interaction. We here present a mechanistic effect model for Lemna minor (common duckweed), which is based on Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory. Models based on DEB have been used widely to study the effects of compounds on animals. Due to its general applicability to all types of organisms, it holds potential to be used for comparison of species and compounds in a broad context. Energy uptake from the environment is modeled explicitly, and metabolic rates are set to depend on temperature in DEB models. Therefore, they can be used to extrapolate effects to a wide range of environmentally relevant scenarios. Until now, the DEB research in ecotoxicology has

  18. Interactions between light intensity and phosphorus nutrition affect the phosphate-mining capacity of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lingyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Vance, Carroll P; White, Philip J; Zhang, Fusuo; Shen, Jianbo

    2014-07-01

    Light intensity affects photosynthetic carbon (C) fixation and the supply of carbon to roots. To evaluate interactions between carbon supply and phosphorus (P) supply, effects of light intensity on sucrose accumulation, root growth, cluster root formation, carboxylate exudation, and P uptake capacity were studied in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown hydroponically with either 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) or 600 µmol m(-2) s(-1) light and a sufficient (50 µM P) or deficient (1 µM P) P supply. Plant biomass and root:shoot ratio increased with increasing light intensity, particularly when plants were supplied with sufficient P. Both low P supply and increasing light intensity increased the production of cluster roots and citrate exudation. Transcripts of a phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase gene (LaPEPC3) in cluster roots (which is related to the exudation of citrate), transcripts of a phosphate transporter gene (LaPT1), and P uptake all increased with increasing light intensity, under both P-sufficient and P-deficient conditions. Across all four experimental treatments, increased cluster root formation and carboxylate exudation were associated with lower P concentration in the shoot and greater sucrose concentration in the roots. It is suggested that C in excess of shoot growth capabilities is translocated to the roots as sucrose, which serves as both a nutritional signal and a C-substrate for carboxylate exudation and cluster root formation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  19. Membrane development in purple photosynthetic bacteria in response to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    Studies on membrane development in purple bacteria during adaptation to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension are reviewed. Anoxygenic phototrophic such as the purple α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have served as simple, dynamic, and experimentally accessible model organisms for studies of the photosynthetic apparatus. A major landmark in photosynthesis research, which dramatically illustrates this point, was provided by the determination of the X-ray structure of the reaction center (RC) in Blastochloris viridis (Deisenhofer and Michel, EMBO J 8:2149-2170, 1989), once it was realized that this represented the general structure for the photosystem II RC present in all oxygenic phototrophs. This seminal advance, together with a considerable body of subsequent research on the light-harvesting (LH) and electron transfer components of the photosynthetic apparatus has provided a firm basis for the current understanding of how phototrophs acclimate to alterations in light intensity and quality. Oxygenic phototrophs adapt to these changes by extensive thylakoid membrane remodeling, which results in a dramatic supramolecular reordering to assure that an appropriate flow of quinone redox species occurs within the membrane bilayer for efficient and rapid electron transfer. Despite the high level of photosynthetic unit organization in Rba. sphaeroides as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence induction/relaxation measurements have demonstrated that the addition of the peripheral LH2 antenna complex in cells adapting to low-intensity illumination results in a slowing of the rate of electron transfer turnover by the RC of up to an order of magnitude. This is ascribed to constraints in quinone redox species diffusion between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complexes arising from the increased packing density as the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) bilayer becomes crowded with LH2 rings. In addition to downshifts in light intensity as a paradigm

  20. Shape coexistence in krypton and selenium light isotopes studied through Coulomb excitation of radioactive ions beams; Etude de la coexistence de formes dans les isotopes legers du krypton et du selenium par excitation Coulombienne de faisceaux radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, E

    2006-06-15

    The light krypton isotopes show two minima in their potential energy corresponding to elongated (prolate) and compressed (oblate) quadrupole deformation. Both configuration are almost equally bound and occur within an energy range of less than 1 MeV. Such phenomenon is called shape coexistence. An inversion of the ground state deformation from prolate in Kr{sup 78} to oblate in Kr{sup 72} with strong mixing of the configurations in Kr{sup 74} and Kr{sup 76} was proposed based on the systematic of isotopic chain. Coulomb excitation experiments are sensitive to the quadrupole moment. Coulomb excitation experiments of radioactive Kr{sup 74} and Kr{sup 76} beam were performed at GANIL using the SPIRAL facility and the EXOGAM spectrometer. The analysis of these experiments resulted in a complete description of the transition strength and quadrupole moments of the low-lying states. They establish the prolate character of the ground state and an oblate excited state. A complementary lifetime measurement using a 'plunger' device was also performed. Transition strength in neighboring nuclei were measured using the technique of intermediate energy Coulomb excitation at GANIL. The results on the Se{sup 68} nucleus show a sharp change in structure with respects to heavier neighboring nuclei. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the contribution of the renal capsule and cortex to kidney autofluorescence intensity under ultraviolet excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, R N; Pivetti, C D; Rubenchik, A M; Matthews, D L; Troppmann, C; Demos, S G

    2008-12-12

    The use of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence to gain metabolic information on kidneys in response to an alteration in oxygen availability has previously been experimentally demonstrated, but signal quantification has not to date been addressed. In this work the relative contribution to rat kidney autofluorescence of the capsule vs. cortex under ultraviolet excitation is determined from experimental results obtained using autofluorescence microscopy and a suitable mathematical model. The results allow for a quantitative assessment of the relative contribution of the signal originating in the metabolically active cortex as a function of capsule thickness for different wavelengths.

  2. Low-intensity blue-enriched white light (750 lux and standard bright light (10 000 lux are equally effective in treating SAD. A randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bos Elske H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photoreceptor cells containing melanopsin play a role in the phase-shifting effects of short-wavelength light. In a previous study, we compared the standard light treatment (SLT of SAD with treatment using short-wavelength blue-enriched white light (BLT. Both treatments used the same illuminance (10 000 lux and were equally highly effective. It is still possible, however, that neither the newly-discovered photoreceptor cells, nor the biological clock play a major role in the therapeutic effects of light on SAD. Alternatively, these effects may at least be partly mediated by these receptor cells, which may have become saturated as a result of the high illuminances used in the therapy. This randomized controlled study compares the effects of low-intensity BLT to those of high-intensity SLT. Method In a 22-day design, 22 patients suffering from a major depression with a seasonal pattern (SAD were given light treatment (10 000 lux for two weeks on workdays. Subjects were randomly assigned to either of the two conditions, with gender and age evenly distributed over the groups. Light treatment either consisted of 30 minutes SLT (5000°K with the EnergyLight® (Philips, Consumer Lifestyle with a vertical illuminance of 10 000 lux at eye position or BLT (17 000°K with a vertical illuminance of 750 lux using a prototype of the EnergyLight® which emitted a higher proportion of short-wavelengths. All participants completed questionnaires concerning mood, activation and sleep quality on a daily basis. Mood and energy levels were also assessed on a weekly basis by means of the SIGH-SAD and other assessment tools. Results On day 22, SIGH-SAD ratings were significantly lower than on day 1 (SLT 65.2% and BLT 76.4%. On the basis of all assessments no statistically significant differences were found between the two conditions. Conclusion With sample size being small, conclusions can only be preliminary. Both treatment conditions were found

  3. Low-intensity blue-enriched white light (750 lux) and standard bright light (10,000 lux) are equally effective in treating SAD. A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Ybe; Dekker, Vera; Schlangen, Luc J M; Bos, Elske H; Ruiter, Martine J

    2011-01-28

    Photoreceptor cells containing melanopsin play a role in the phase-shifting effects of short-wavelength light. In a previous study, we compared the standard light treatment (SLT) of SAD with treatment using short-wavelength blue-enriched white light (BLT). Both treatments used the same illuminance (10,000 lux) and were equally highly effective. It is still possible, however, that neither the newly-discovered photoreceptor cells, nor the biological clock play a major role in the therapeutic effects of light on SAD. Alternatively, these effects may at least be partly mediated by these receptor cells, which may have become saturated as a result of the high illuminances used in the therapy. This randomized controlled study compares the effects of low-intensity BLT to those of high-intensity SLT. In a 22-day design, 22 patients suffering from a major depression with a seasonal pattern (SAD) were given light treatment (10,000 lux) for two weeks on workdays. Subjects were randomly assigned to either of the two conditions, with gender and age evenly distributed over the groups. Light treatment either consisted of 30 minutes SLT (5000 °K) with the EnergyLight® (Philips, Consumer Lifestyle) with a vertical illuminance of 10,000 lux at eye position or BLT (17,000 °K) with a vertical illuminance of 750 lux using a prototype of the EnergyLight® which emitted a higher proportion of short-wavelengths. All participants completed questionnaires concerning mood, activation and sleep quality on a daily basis. Mood and energy levels were also assessed on a weekly basis by means of the SIGH-SAD and other assessment tools. On day 22, SIGH-SAD ratings were significantly lower than on day 1 (SLT 65.2% and BLT 76.4%). On the basis of all assessments no statistically significant differences were found between the two conditions. With sample size being small, conclusions can only be preliminary. Both treatment conditions were found to be highly effective. The therapeutic effects of low-intensity

  4. Recent Developments in UV Optics for Ultra-Short, Ultra-Intense Coherent Light Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cocco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of Free Electron Lasers and general UV ultra-short, ultra-intense sources, optics needed to transport such radiation have evolved significantly to standard UV optics. Problems like surface damage, wavefront preservation, beam splitting, beam shaping, beam elongation (temporal stretching pose new challenges for the design of beam transport systems. These problems lead to a new way to specify optics, a new way to use diffraction gratings, a search for new optical coatings, to tighter and tighter polishing requirements for mirrors, and to an increased use of adaptive optics. All these topics will be described in this review article, to show how optics could really be the limiting factor for future development of these new light sources.

  5. Light intensity simulation in real space by viewing locations for autostereoscopic display design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jungguen; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Lee, Dong-Su; Park, Min-Chul; Son, Jung-Young; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2013-05-01

    Autostereoscopy is a common method for providing 3D perception to viewers without glasses. They produce 3D images with a wide perspective, and can achieve the effect of observing different images visible on the same plane from difference point of view. In autostereoscopic displays, crosstalk occurs when incomplete isolation of the left and right images so that one leakage into the other. This paper addresses a light intensity simulator that can calculate crosstalk according to variable viewing positions by automatically tracking heads of viewers. In doing so, we utilize head tracking technique based on infrared laser sensors to detect the observers' viewing positions. Preliminary results show that the proposed system was appropriate to be operated in designing the autostereoscopic displays ensuring human safety.

  6. Laser-induced photo emission detection: data acquisition based on light intensity counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, N.; Yudasari, N.; Putri, K. Y.

    2017-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Detection (LIBD) is one of the quantification techniques for colloids. There are two ways of detection in LIBD: optical detection and acoustic detection. LIBD is based on the detection of plasma emission due to the interaction between particle and laser beam. In this research, the changing of light intensity during plasma formations was detected by a photodiode sensor. A photo emission data acquisition system was built to collect and transform them into digital counts. The real-time system used data acquisition device National Instrument DAQ 6009 and LABVIEW software. The system has been tested on distilled water and tap water samples. The result showed 99.8% accuracy by using counting technique in comparison to the acoustic detection with sample rate of 10 Hz, thus the acquisition system can be applied as an alternative method to the existing LIBD acquisition system.

  7. Electromagnetic Coupling Between High Intensity LHC Beams and the Synchrotron Radiation Monitor Light Extraction System

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, W; Bravin, E; Caspers, F; Garlasch`e, M; Gras, J; Goldblatt, A; Lefevre, T; Jones, R; Metral, E; Nosych, A; Roncarolo_, F; Salvant, B; Trad, G; Veness, R; Vollinger, C; Wendt, M

    2013-01-01

    The CERN LHC is equipped with two Synchrotron Radiation Monitor (BSRT) systems used to characterise transverse and longitudinal beam distributions. Since the end of the 2011 LHC run the light extraction system, based on a retractable mirror, has suffered deformation and mechanical failure that is correlated to the increase in beam intensity. Temperature probes have associated these observations to a strong heating of the mirror support with a dependence on the longitudinal bunch length and shape, indicating the origin as electromagnetic coupling between the beam and the structure. This paper combines all this information with the aim of characterising and improving the system in view of its upgrade during the current LHC shutdown. Beam-based observations are presented along with electromagnetic and thermomechanical simulations and complemented by laboratory measurements, including the study of the RF properties of different mirror bulk and coating materials.

  8. Optoelectrofluidic field separation based on light-intensity gradients and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jinsung; Lee, Sanghyun; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2010-11-01

    Optoelectrofluidic field separation (OEFS) of particles under light-intensity gradient (LIG) is reported, where the LIG illumination on the photoconductive layer converts the short-ranged dielectrophoresis (DEP) force to the long-ranged one. The long-ranged DEP force can compete with the hydrodynamic force by alternating current electro-osmosis (ACEO) over the entire illumination area for realizing effective field separation of particles. Results of the field separation and concentration of diverse particle pairs (0.82--16 μm) are well demonstrated, and conditions determining the critical radius and effective particle manipulation are discussed. In addition, expanding the OEFS to biological applications such as rapid cell manipulation and separation will be discussed. The OEFS with LIG strategy could be a promising manipulation method of particles including biological cells in many applications where a rapid manipulation of particles over the entire working area is of interest.

  9. Investigation of super-resolution processing algorithm by target light-intensity search in digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Atsushi; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Digital holography is expected to be useful in the analysis of moving three-dimensional (3D) image measurement. In this technique, a two-dimensional interference fringe recorded using a 3D image is captured with an image sensor, and the 3D image is reproduced on a computer. To obtain the reproduced 3D images with high spatial resolution, a high-performance image sensor is required, which increases the system cost. We propose an algorithm for super-resolution processing in digital holography that does not require a high-performance image sensor. The proposed algorithm wherein 3D images are considered as the aggregation of object points improves spatial resolution by performing a light-intensity search of the reproduced image and the object points.

  10. Quantum and classical correlations of intense beams of light investigated via joint photodetection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agliati, Andrea [Quanta System S.p.A., Via IV Novembre, 116-21058, Solbiate Olona (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy); Bondani, Maria [INFM/CNR, Unita di Como (Italy); Andreoni, Alessandra [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); Cillis, Giovanni De [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Milano (Italy); Paris, Matteo G A [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Milano (Italy)

    2005-12-01

    We address joint photodetection as a method for discriminating between the classical correlations of a thermal beam divided by a beam splitter and the quantum entanglement of a twin beam obtained by parametric down-conversion. We show that for intense beams of light the detection of the difference photocurrent may be used, in principle, in order to reveal entanglement, while the simple measurement of the correlation coefficient is not sufficient. We have experimentally measured the correlation coefficient and the variance of the difference photocurrent for several classical and quantum states. Results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions taking into account the extra noise in the generated fields that is due to the pump laser fluctuations.

  11. Use of intense pulse light for acne vulgaris in Indian skin--a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Saritha; Parveen, Basheerahmed; Annie Malathy, Priyavathani; Gomathi, Nellainayagam

    2012-04-01

    Intense pulse light (IPL) has become extremely popular in Indian cosmetology circles. Yet, literature is silent on its effect in heavily melanized skin. A descriptive study to gauge the effect of IPL on acne vulgaris in Indian patients done in a tertiary care center in south India. Patients with moderate to severe acne vulgaris were given a maximum of five sittings of IPL treatment. Lesion counts were performed and photographs compared before and after treatment. IPL was offered to 10 patients with acne vulgaris. Two patients dropped out, seven patients had a good response after a mean of 3.4 sittings; 87.5% patients expressed satisfaction with the procedure. No adverse effects were noted. IPL serves a useful role in the treatment of acne vulgaris and could reduce treatment costs and pill burden. There is no increased risk of side effects with IPL on Indian skin with standard care. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. Clinical therapeutic effect of intense pulse light PhotoDerm for vascular dermatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Li-Jun; Xu, Li-Wei; Li, Ying-Yi; Yang, Ji-Qing; Qi, Jia-Xue

    2008-12-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical therapeutic effect of intense pulsed light PhotoDerm (IPL PhotoDerm) for vascular dermatosis and analysis the possible factors affecting the therapeutic effect. Methods: Treat all blank kinds of vascular dermatosis 85 cases with IPL PhotoDerm, observe the therapeutic effect and no obvious side-effects of vascular dermatosis. Results: The cure rate of telangiectasis, arterial spider nevus, strawberry nevus, avermrus uemongioma and nevus flammeus with IPL PhotoDerm is respective 76.5%, 91.7%, 88.9%, 27.8%, 15%, and the cure rate in three times is respective 35.3%, 91.7%, 66.7%, 5.6% and 5%. 6 eases appear pigmentation, pigment subsidence or atrophic scar. Conclusion: The therapeutic effect of vascular dermatosis with IPL PhotoDerm is satisfying, and the no obvious side-effects is less.

  13. Hair removal with a novel, low fluence, home-use intense pulsed light device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Russell; Town, Godfrey

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the reduction in unwanted body and facial hair at various body sites of Fitzpatrick skin types I-III and the efficacy, comfort and safety of this treatment intended for home-use by the general public. In this non-randomized study, 29 individuals were given three sequential weekly treatments on a total of 31 body and facial areas including the axilla, bikini area, abdomen, neck, chin and upper lip using a novel intense pulsed light device. All participants completed a simple self-assessment questionnaire, as well as an evaluation of pain/discomfort. The mean reduction in terminal hair counts was 47% at 4 weeks' follow-up and 41% at 6 months' follow-up after completing three sequential weekly treatments. Overall, 84% of participants showed a significant percentage of hair reduction (pIPL demonstrated a significant, quantifiable and sustainable reduction in unwanted body and facial hair with minimal side effects.

  14. Breaking Up Sitting with Light-Intensity Physical Activity: Implications for Shift-Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Sarah M.; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Ferguson, Sally A.

    2017-01-01

    Prolonged sitting, restricted sleep, and circadian disruption are all independent risk factors for non-communicable diseases. Previous research has demonstrated that breaking up sitting with light-intensity physical activity has clear benefits for the health of day workers, but these findings may not apply in the presence of sleep restriction and/or circadian disruption—both of which are commonly experienced by shift-workers. Specifically, sleep restriction, and circadian disruption result in acute physiological changes that may offset the benefits of breaking up sitting. This commentary will explore the potential benefits of breaking up sitting for health, work performance, and subsequent sleep in shift-workers. Future areas of research designed to understand the mechanisms by which prolonged sitting and shift work impact worker health and safety and to support the design of effective occupational health and safety interventions are proposed. PMID:29035315

  15. Case histories of intense pulsed light phototherapy in dermatology - the HPPL™ and IFL™ technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Martella

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The intense pulsed light (IPL and laser technologies are widely used for skin rejuvenation and for treating several dermatological disorders such as skin dyschromia and acne, and for non-ablative dermal remodeling of rhytides and hypertrophic scars. Technological evolution is rapid. The High Power Pulsed Light™ [HPPL™] and Incoherent Fast Light™ technologies [IFL™, Novavision Group S.p.A., 20826 Misinto (MB, Italy] are recent innovations in the field of IPL technologies; IFL™ is a further evolution of the already advanced HPPL™ system. The paper presents a selection of case histories of dermatological lesions treated with the HPPL™ and IFL™ technologies. All study materials were appropriately peer-reviewed for ethical problems.

  16. High Precision Stokes Polarimetry for Scattering Light using Wide Dynamic Range Intensity Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibata Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a Stokes polarimetry for scattering light from a sample surface. To achieve a high accuracy measurement two approaches of an intensity detector and analysis algorism of a Stokes parameter were proposed. The dynamic range of this detector can achieve up to 1010 by combination of change of neutral-density (ND filters having different density and photon counting units. Stokes parameters can be measured by dual rotating of a retarder and an analyzer. The algorism of dual rotating polarimeter can be calibrated small linear diattenuation and linear retardance error of the retarder. This system can measured Stokes parameters from −20° to 70° of its scattering angle. It is possible to measure Stokes parameters of scattering of dust and scratch of optical device with high precision. This paper shows accuracy of this system, checking the polarization change of scattering angle and influence of beam size.

  17. Breaking Up Sitting with Light-Intensity Physical Activity: Implications for Shift-Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E. Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged sitting, restricted sleep, and circadian disruption are all independent risk factors for non-communicable diseases. Previous research has demonstrated that breaking up sitting with light-intensity physical activity has clear benefits for the health of day workers, but these findings may not apply in the presence of sleep restriction and/or circadian disruption—both of which are commonly experienced by shift-workers. Specifically, sleep restriction, and circadian disruption result in acute physiological changes that may offset the benefits of breaking up sitting. This commentary will explore the potential benefits of breaking up sitting for health, work performance, and subsequent sleep in shift-workers. Future areas of research designed to understand the mechanisms by which prolonged sitting and shift work impact worker health and safety and to support the design of effective occupational health and safety interventions are proposed.

  18. Pigment Deposition of Cosmetic Contact Lenses on the Cornea after Intense Pulsed-Light Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sojin; Lee, Jong Rak

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of corneal deposition of pigments from cosmetic contact lenses after intense pulsed-light (IPL) therapy. A 30-year-old female visited our outpatient clinic with ocular pain and epiphora in both eyes; these symptoms developed soon after she had undergone facial IPL treatment. She was wearing cosmetic contact lenses throughout the IPL procedure. At presentation, her uncorrected visual acuity was 2/20 in both eyes, and the slit-lamp examination revealed deposition of the color pigment of the cosmetic contact lens onto the corneal epithelium. We scraped the corneal epithelium along with the deposited pigments using a no. 15 blade; seven days after the procedure, the corneal epithelium had healed without any complications. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of ocular complications during IPL treatment, particularly in individuals using contact lenses. To prevent ocular damage, IPL procedures should be performed only after removing the lenses and applying eyeshields. PMID:21165237

  19. The influence of photoperiod and light intensity on the growth and photosynthesis of Dunaliella salina (chlorophyta) CCAP 19/30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanan; Ibrahim, Iskander M; Harvey, Patricia J

    2016-09-01

    The green microalga Dunaliella salina survives in a wide range of salinities via mechanisms involving glycerol synthesis and degradation and is exploited for large amounts of nutraceutical carotenoids produced under stressed conditions. In this study, D. salina CCAP 19/30 was cultured in varying photoperiods and light intensities to study the relationship of light with different growth measurement parameters, with cellular contents of glycerol, starch and carotenoids, and with photosynthesis and respiration. Results show CCAP 19/30 regulated cell volume when growing under light/dark cycles: cell volume increased in the light and decreased in the dark, and these changes corresponded to changes in cellular glycerol content. The decrease in cell volume in the dark was independent of cell division and biological clock and was regulated by the photoperiod of the light/dark cycle. When the light intensity was increased to above 1000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), cells displayed evidence of photodamage. However, these cells also maintained the maximum level of photosynthesis efficiency and respiration possible, and the growth rate increased as light intensity increased. Significantly, the intracellular glycerol content also increased, >2-fold compared to the content in light intensity of 500 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), but there was no commensurate increase in the pool size of carotenoids. These data suggest that in CCAP 19/30 glycerol stabilized the photosynthetic apparatus for maximum performance in high light intensities, a role normally attributed to carotenoids. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-term failure rate of brackets bonded with plasma and high-intensity light-emitting diode curing lights:a clinical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Strigou, Sophia; Eliades, Theodore

    2007-07-01

    To comparatively assess the long-term failure rate of brackets bonded with a plasma or a high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) curing light. Twenty-five patients with complete permanent dentitions with similar treatment planning and mechanotherapy were selected for the study. Brackets were bonded according to a split-mouth design with the 3M Ortholite Plasma or the high-power Satelec mini LED Ortho curing light. Irradiation with the two curing lights was performed for 9 seconds at an alternate quadrant sequence so that the bonded brackets cured with either light were equally distributed on the maxillary and mandibular right and left quadrants. First-time bracket failures were recorded for a mean period of 15 months (range 13-18 months) and the results were analyzed with the chi-square test and binary logistic regression. The failure rate for brackets was 2.8% for the plasma light and 6.7% for the LED light source. Although significantly more failures were found for the mandibular arch, no difference was identified in failure rate between anterior and posterior teeth. High-intensity LED curing lights present a 2.5 times higher failure rate relative to plasma lamps for nominally identical irradiation time. Mandibular teeth show almost 150% higher failure incidence compared with maxillary teeth. No effect from the arch side (right vs left) and location (anterior vs posterior) was identified in this study.

  1. Emotion differentiation and intensity during acute tobacco abstinence: A comparison of heavy and light smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Erin S; Bujarski, Spencer; Leventhal, Adam M; Ray, Lara A

    2015-08-01

    The ability to recognize and label discrete emotions, termed emotion differentiation, is particularly pertinent to overall emotion regulation abilities. Patterns of deficient emotion differentiation have been associated with mood and anxiety disorders but have yet to be examined in relation to nicotine dependence. This study employed ecological momentary assessment to examine smokers' subjective experience of discrete emotions during 24-h of forced tobacco abstinence. Thirty daily smokers rated their emotions up to 23 times over the 24-hour period, and smoking abstinence was biologically verified. From these data, we computed individual difference measures of emotion differentiation, overall emotion intensity, and emotional variability. As hypothesized, heavy smokers reported poorer negative emotion differentiation than light smokers (d=0.55), along with more intense negative emotion (d=0.97) and greater negative emotion variability (d=0.97). No differences were observed in positive emotion differentiation. Across the sample, poorer negative emotion differentiation was associated with greater endorsement of psychological motives to smoke, including negative and positive reinforcement motives, while positive emotion differentiation was not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Picosecond fluorescence of cryptomonad biliproteins. Effects of excitation intensity and the fluorescence decay times of phycocyanin 612, phycocyanin 645, and phycoerythrin 545.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guard-Friar, D; MacColl, R; Berns, D S; Wittmershaus, B; Knox, R S

    1985-01-01

    The fluorescence of purified biliproteins (phycocyanin 645, phycocyanin 612, and phycoerythrin 545) from three cryptomonads, Chroomonas species, Hemiselmis virescens, and Rhodomonas lens, and C-phycocyanin from Anacystis nidulans has been time resolved in the picosecond region with a streak camera system having less than or equal to 2-ps jitter. The fluorescence lifetimes of phycocyanins from Chroomonas species and Hemiselmis virescens are 1.5 +/- 0.2 ns and 2.3 +/- 0.2 ns, respectively, regardless of the fluence of the 30 ps, 532-nm excitation pulse. (Fluence [or photons/cm2] = f intensity [photons/cm2s]dt.). In contrast, that of C-phycocyanin is 2.3 +/- 0.2 ns when the excitation fluence is 8.2 X 10(11) photons/cm2 and decreases to a decay approximated by an exponential decay time of 0.65 +/- 0.1 ns at 7.2 X 10(16) photons/cm2. The cryptomonad phycoerythrin fluorescence decay lifetime is also dependent on intensity, having a decay time of 1.5 +/- 0.1 ns at low fluences and becoming clearly biphasic at higher fluences (greater than 10(15) photons/cm2). We interpret the shortening of decay times for C-phycocyanin and phycoerythrin 545 in terms of exciton annihilation, and have discussed the applicability of exciton annihilation theories to the high fluence effects. PMID:3926017

  3. Use of radiation intensity dependence on excitation level for the analysis of surface plasmon resonance effect on ZnO luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Stepan; Tarasov, Andrey; Briskina, Charus; Ryzhkov, Mikhail; Markushev, Valery; Lotin, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    For the analysis of ZnO luminescence, a set of rate equations (SRE) is proposed. It contains a set of parameters that characterize processes participating in luminescence: zone-zone excitation, excitons formation and recombination, formation and disappearance of photons, surface plasmons (SP), and phonons. It is shown that experimental ZnO microstructure radiation intensity dependence on photoexcitation levels can be approximated by using SRE. This approach was applied for the analysis of ZnO microfilm radiation with different thicknesses of Ag island film covering. It was revealed that the increase of cover thickness leads to an increase of losses and a decrease of the probability of photon-to-SP conversion. In order to take into account visible emission, rate equations for level populations in the bandgap and for corresponding photons and SPs were added to the SRE. By using such an SRE, it is demonstrated that the form of visible luminescence intensity dependence on excitation level (P) like P, as obtained elsewhere, is possible only if donor-acceptor pairs exist. The proposed approach was also applied for consideration of experimental results obtained in several papers taking into account the interpretation of these results based on assumptions about the transfer of electrons from the defect level in the ZnO bandgap to metal and then to the conduction band.

  4. Atmospheric Processing of Perovskite Solar Cells Using Intense Pulsed Light Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankireddy, Krishnamraju; Lavery, Brandon W.; Druffel, Thad

    2018-02-01

    Atmospheric processing of metal-organic halide perovskite materials is highly desirable for large-scale manufacturing of solar cells. Atmospheric deposition and thermal processing of perovskite thin films for photovoltaic applications facilitated via rapid intense pulsed light (IPL) processing have been carried out. The interplay between the deposition chemistry, process, and IPL parameters to produce a functional photoactive thin film is discussed. Further addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as functional surfactant is explored to influence grain growth during the IPL process. Structural analysis by x-ray diffraction revealed formation of mixed-phase perovskite crystals from methylammonium chloride and lead iodide precursors. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy indicated that the light absorption by the perovskite films lay within a narrow band of the visible spectrum with bandgap of 2.9 eV. Scanning electron microscopy characterization of the surface morphology of the perovskite films revealed that addition of PVP to the ink chemistry assisted the IPL process in forming a fully covered surface with clearly defined grains. Functional devices with perovskite thin film processed by IPL under fully atmospheric conditions were demonstrated.

  5. Increased soil nutrition and decreased light intensity drive species loss after eight years grassland enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingpeng; Zheng, Zhirong; Xie, Hongtao; Zhao, Nianxi; Gao, Yubao

    2017-03-27

    Enclosures (fenced, grazing or clipping) within a certain period of years are the most common tools for restoration of degraded grasslands in temperate regions. Short-term enclosures can improve biodiversity and productivity by effectively relieving grazing pressure, while long-term enclosures can reduce species diversity. We therefore carried out a field experiment to investigate the specific causes of the reduced species diversity in Hulunbeier grassland of northern China. After eight years of enclosure, the significantly increased soil available nitrogen (AN) and available phosphorus (AvP) in enclosure community reduced nitrogen (N) limitation but most vegetation was still N limited. Many environmental factors led to decreased species richness, but increased soil AN and decreased light intensity at the community bottom were the most significant ones. Community density decreased independently of soil nutrition but significantly related to decreased species richness. Density of dominant canopy species increased, while dominant understory species decreased during assemblage-level thinning; therefore, the random-loss hypothesis was not supported. The dominant understory species responded to lower light availability by increasing their height, leaf area, and chlorophyll content. Moreover, our results were expected to provide some specific guidance for the restoration mode selection of degraded grasslands in northern China.

  6. Intense Pulsed Light Pulse Configuration Manipulation Can Resolve the Classic Conflict Between Safety and Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenky, Inna; Tagger, Cruzy; Bingham, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    The widely used intense pulse light (IPL) technology was first commercially launched to the medical market in 1994 and similar to lasers, is based on the basic principle of selective photothermolysis. The main conflict during treatments with light-based technologies is between safety and efficacy of the treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate new IPL technology, which integrates three different pulse configurations, with specific attention on the safety and efficacy of the treatment. 101 volunteers (with Fitzpatrick skin types I-VI) were treated as follows: 9 patients underwent 8 bi-weekly acne clearance treatments, 51 patients underwent 6-12 hair removal treatments, 11 patients were treated for general skin rejuvenation, 15 patients were treated for pigmentation lesions, and 15 patients were treated for vascular lesions. No serious adverse events were recorded. All patients that were treated for hair removal achieved significant hair clearance. The patients with facial rosacea responded the fastest to the treatment. Eight of nine patients that were treated for acne clearance achieved significant reduction in acne appearance. The results represented in this study support the approach that when taking into consideration both efficacy of the treatment and safety of the patients, the system should be "flexible" enough to allow exact treatment settings profile for each patient, according to their skin type and the symptom's biophysical characteristics. <

  7. Atmospheric Processing of Perovskite Solar Cells Using Intense Pulsed Light Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankireddy, Krishnamraju; Lavery, Brandon W.; Druffel, Thad

    2017-11-01

    Atmospheric processing of metal-organic halide perovskite materials is highly desirable for large-scale manufacturing of solar cells. Atmospheric deposition and thermal processing of perovskite thin films for photovoltaic applications facilitated via rapid intense pulsed light (IPL) processing have been carried out. The interplay between the deposition chemistry, process, and IPL parameters to produce a functional photoactive thin film is discussed. Further addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as functional surfactant is explored to influence grain growth during the IPL process. Structural analysis by x-ray diffraction revealed formation of mixed-phase perovskite crystals from methylammonium chloride and lead iodide precursors. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy indicated that the light absorption by the perovskite films lay within a narrow band of the visible spectrum with bandgap of 2.9 eV. Scanning electron microscopy characterization of the surface morphology of the perovskite films revealed that addition of PVP to the ink chemistry assisted the IPL process in forming a fully covered surface with clearly defined grains. Functional devices with perovskite thin film processed by IPL under fully atmospheric conditions were demonstrated.

  8. Intense pulsed light: A promising therapy in treatment of acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunatha Puttaiah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical treatment of acne vulgaris includes a variety of topical and oral medications. Poor compliance, lack of durable remission, potential side effects are common drawbacks to these treatment. Therefore, there is a growing demand for a fast, safe and side effect free novel therapy. Light-based therapies are an attractive alternative acne therapy because they potentially offer more rapid onset and better patient compliance with a low incidence of adverse events. Aim: To study the efficacy of intense pulsed light in treatment of acne vulgaris. Materials and Methods: Twenty five patients with acne vulgaris were subjected to IPL. Baseline grading of acne was done. IPL was administered every 2weeks for 4 sessions. Grading was done after the end of treatment. Clinical photographs were taken for evaluation. Results: All patients showed a reduction in the number of acne lesions after 4 sessions of IPL. No significant side effects were noted. Patients also noted an improvement in skin texture. Conclusion: IPL showed beneficial effects in the treatment of acne.

  9. Influence of light intensity on surface free energy and dentin bond strength of core build-up resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y; Tsujimoto, A; Furuichi, T; Suzuki, T; Tsubota, K; Miyazaki, M; Platt, J A

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influence of light intensity on surface free energy characteristics and dentin bond strength of dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems. Two commercially available dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems, Clearfil DC Core Automix with Clearfil Bond SE One and UniFil Core EM with Self-Etching Bond, were studied. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in acrylic resin and the facial dentin surfaces were wet ground on 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Adhesives were applied to dentin surfaces and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). The surface free energy of the adhesives (five samples per group) was determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. To determine the strength of the dentin bond, the core build-up resin pastes were condensed into the mold on the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces according to the methods described for the surface free energy measurement. The resin pastes were cured with the same light intensities as those used for the adhesives. Ten specimens per group were stored in water maintained at 37°C for 24 hours, after which they were shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute in a universal testing machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a Tukey-Kramer test were performed, with the significance level set at 0.05. The surface free energies of the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces decreased with an increase in the light intensity of the curing unit. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the type of core build-up system and the light intensity significantly influence the bond strength, although there was no significant interaction between the two factors. The highest bond strengths were achieved when the resin pastes were cured with the strongest light intensity for all the core build-up systems. When polymerized with a light intensity of 200 mW/cm(2) or less, significantly lower bond strengths were observed. CONClUSIONS: The

  10. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and intensive occupational therapy on motor neuron excitability in poststroke hemiparetic patients: a neurophysiological investigation using F-wave parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Takahiro; Kakuda, Wataru; Yamada, Naoki; Shimizu, Masato; Abo, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    The combination protocol of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (RTMS) and intensive occupational therapy (OT) improves motor function of the paretic upper limb in poststroke patients. However, the effect of RTMS/OT on motor neuron excitability remains to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 15-day application of RTMS/OT on motor neuron excitability in such patients using neurophysiological studies including F-wave parameter measurements. Ten poststroke patients with spastic upper limb hemiparesis were studied (mean age: 57.4 ± 8.1 years, ± SD). Patients were hospitalized for 15 days to receive RTMS/OT. One session of 40-min low-frequency RTMS and two sessions of 120-min intensive OT were provided daily. Neurophysiological studies including F-wave parameters measurements were performed on the days of admission/discharge. Motor function and spasticity of the affected upper limb were evaluated on the same time points. RTMS/OT significantly improved motor function of the affected upper limb. RTMS/OT decreased the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) in the affected upper limb (p < 0.05), but did not change F-wave frequency in either upper limb. However, both F-mean/M ratio and F-max/M ratio significantly decreased in the affected upper limb (all p < 0.05). The 15-day protocol of LF-RTMS/OT produced significant reduction of motor neuron excitability. RTMS/OT can potentially produce significant reduction in upper limb spasticity in the affected upper limb, although this finding should be confirmed in a larger number of patients.

  11. Conversion of aesthetic lasers and intense pulsed light sources into inherently eye-safe units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatkine, Michael; Elman, Monica

    2003-12-01

    Laser systems used in aesthetic treatments pose a serious risk to the eyes of bystanders and equipment operators. Although much safer than lasers, intense pulsed light (IPL) sources are also not without risk. To present a technology that can convert most lasers and IPL units used in aesthetic clinics into inherently eye-safe devices not requiring the use of protective eyeglasses, thus making them Class I devices. With the exception of Q-switched lasers, this new technology also dramatically reduces the potential hazards of lasers that do not attain Class I level to below that attributed to flashlamps. A device that eliminates the annoying glare generated by the reflection of pulsed light from the skin is also presented. The new eye-safe technology is based on the attachment of a highly efficient wide-angle forward scattering optical diffuser to the distal end of the laser delivery handpiece. This device is used in contact with the treated area without modification of the conventional treatment parameters and preserves clinical efficacy. The handpiece is designed to act as an eye-safe, extended diffusing light source complying with Class I eye safety standards in most laser types. The technology also makes IPL devices safer by reducing the radiance of the flashlamp, which is hazardous when viewed directly by operators or bystanders. Skin glare is also eliminated by a liquid crystal, glare-free window activated in synchronization with the treatment pulses. Clinical hair removal results with an 80 degree diffuser did not reveal any difference when compared with results obtained with the original laser source. The incorporation of a diffuser in an IPL unit has not modified its clinical efficacy. With the exclusion of Q-switched lasers, it is possible to convert a large number of lasers and IPL units utilized in aesthetic treatments into inherently eye-safe units, thereby considerably enhancing the comfort and safety of aesthetic clinics without sacrificing clinical

  12. A visible-light-excited europium(III) complex-based luminescent probe for visualizing copper ions and hydrogen sulfide in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiren; Wang, Huan; Yang, Mei; Yuan, Jingli; Wu, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Development of visible-light-excited lanthanide (III) complex-based luminescent probes is highly appealing due to their superiority of less damage to the living biosystems over the conventional UV-light-excited ones. In this work, a visible-light-excited europium (III) complex-based luminescent probe, BPED-BHHCT-Eu3+-BPT, has been designed and synthesized by conjugating the Cu2+-binding N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethanediamine (BPED) to a tetradentate β-diketone ligand 4,4‧-bis(1″,1″,1″,2″,2″,3″,3″-heptafluoro-4″,6″-hexanedione-6″-yl)chlorosulfo-o-terphenyl (BHHCT) and coordinating with a coligand 2-(N,N-diethylanilin-4-yl)-4,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine) (BPT) for the time-gated luminescence detection of Cu2+ ions and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in living cells. BPED-BHHCT-Eu3+-BPT exhibited a sharp excitation peak at 407 nm and a wide excitation window extending to beyond 460 nm. Upon its reaction with Cu2+ ions, the luminescence of BPED-BHHCT-Eu3+-BPT was efficiently quenched, which could be reversibly restored by the addition of H2S due to the strong affinity between Cu2+ ions and H2S. The "on-off-on" type luminescence behavior of BPED-BHHCT-Eu3+-BPT towards Cu2+ ions and H2S enabled the sensing of the two species with high sensitivity and selectivity. The performances of BPED-BHHCT-Eu3+-BPT for visualizing intracellular Cu2+ ions and H2S were investigated, and the results have demonstrated the practical applicability of the probe for molecular imaging of cells.

  13. Use of the product of mean intensity ratio (PMIR) technique for discriminant analysis of lycopene-rich vegetable juice using a portable NIR-excited Raman spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Risa; Ishigaki, Mika; Kitahama, Yasutaka; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Genkawa, Takuma

    2018-02-15

    In this study, a lycopene-content-based discriminant analysis was performed using a portable near-infrared-excited Raman spectrometer. In the vegetable-juice Raman spectra, the peak intensity of the lycopene band increased with increasing lycopene concentration, but scattering decreased the repeatability of the peak intensity. Consequently, developing a lycopene-concentration regression model using peak intensity is not straightforward. Therefore, a new method known as the product of mean intensity ratio (PMIR) analysis was developed to rapidly identify lycopene-rich samples on-site. In the PMIR analysis, Raman spectra are measured with short exposure times, confirming only the peaks of carotenoids with high concentrations, and thus the lycopene concentrations of vegetable juice samples could be determined successfully. Exposure times of 20ms and 100ms could detect lycopene concentrations of ≥5mg/100g and ≥2mg/100g with 93.2% and 97.7% accuracy, respectively; thus, lycopene-content-based discriminant analysis using the PMIR and a portable Raman spectrometer is feasible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Acne phototherapy using UV-free high-intensity narrow-band blue light: a three-center clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalita, Alan R.; Harth, Yoram; Elman, Monica; Slatkine, Michael; Talpalariu, Gerry; Rosenberg, Yitzhak; Korman, Avner; Klein, Arieh

    2001-05-01

    Propionibacterium. acnes is a Gram positive, microaerophilic bacterium which takes a part in the pathogenesis of inflammatory acne. P. acnes is capable to produce high amounts endogenic porphyrins with no need of any trigger molecules. Light in the violet-blue range (407-420 nm) has been shown to exhibit a phototoxic effect on Propionibacterium acnes when irradiated in vitro. The purpose of our study was to test the clinical effects of a high intensity narrowband blue light source on papulo pustular acne. A total of 35 patients in 3 centers were treated twice a week with a high intensity metal halide lamp illuminating the entire face (20x20 cm2) or the back with visible light in the 407-420 nm range at an intensity of 90 mW/cm2 (CureLight Ltd.) for a total of 4 weeks. UV is totally cut off. In each treatment the patient was exposed to light for 8-15 minutes. After 8 treatments, 80% of the patients with mild to moderate papulo-pustular acne showed significant improvement at reducing the numbers of non- inflammatory, inflammatory and total facial lesions. Inflammatory lesion count decrease by a mean of 68%. No side effects to the treatment were noticed. In conclusion, full face or back illumination with the high intensity pure blue light we used exhibits a rapid significant decrease in acne lesions counts in 8 biweekly treatments.

  15. Purifying Synthetic High-Strength Wastewater by Microalgae Chlorella Vulgaris Under Various Light Emitting Diode Wavelengths and Intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Ge

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The high-strength wastewater is now well known as a threat to the natural water since it is highly possible to arouse water eutrophication or algal blooms. The effects of various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities on the microalgae biological wastewater treatment system was studied in this research. The various nutrient removals and economic efficiencies represented similar variation trends, and these variations under both high C and N loading treatments were similar too. The order for microalgae C. vulgaris reproduction in terms of dry weight and nutrient removal efficiency both were red > white > yellow > blue, under high carbon and nitrogen loading treatments, indicating that the red light was the optimum light wavelength. Furthermore, considering the optimal light intensity in terms of nutrient removal efficiency was 2500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s, while in terms of economic efficiency was 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s. Therefore, the optimum light intensity was found to be 2000 μmol/m2•s. In addition, the optimal experimental illumination time was determined as 120 h. The Chlorella vulgaris microalgae biological wastewater treatment system utilized in this research was able to purify the high-strength carbon and nitrogen wastewater effectively under optimum light wavelength and intensity.

  16. Purifying synthetic high-strength wastewater by microalgae chlorella vulgaris under various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The high-strength wastewater is now well known as a threat to the natural water since it is highly possible to arouse water eutrophication or algal blooms. The effects of various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities on the microalgae biological wastewater treatment system was studied in this research. The various nutrient removals and economic efficiencies represented similar variation trends, and these variations under both high C and N loading treatments were similar too. The order for microalgae C. vulgaris reproduction in terms of dry weight and nutrient removal efficiency both were red > white > yellow > blue, under high carbon and nitrogen loading treatments, indicating that the red light was the optimum light wavelength. Furthermore, considering the optimal light intensity in terms of nutrient removal efficiency was 2500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s, while in terms of economic efficiency was 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s. Therefore, the optimum light intensity was found to be 2000 μmol/m2•s. In addition, the optimal experimental illumination time was determined as 120 h. The Chlorella vulgaris microalgae biological wastewater treatment system utilized in this research was able to purify the high-strength carbon and nitrogen wastewater effectively under optimum light wavelength and intensity. PMID:24499586

  17. Commendable Eu2+-Doped Oxide-Matrix-Based LiBa12(BO3)7F4Red Broad Emission Phosphor Excited by NUV Light: Electronic and Crystal Structures, Luminescence Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xin; Wang, Yuhua

    2017-07-19

    In this work, we synthesized a new Eu 2+ -doped oxide-matrix-based LiBa 12 (BO 3 ) 7 F 4 broad red emission phosphor. It can emit red light peaking at ∼644 nm under NUV excitation with the coordinate at (0.6350, 0.3586) and a sensitive color gamut for eyes. This phosphor with a special kind of tunnel crystal structure and layered distribution of Ba 2+ is contributed to longer wavelength emission. By theoretical calculation and analysis using local state density energy band structure simulation of Eu 2+ doped in different site, the origin of the observed emission center was distinguished. Furthermore, decay curves analysis also indicated there are three possible Ba 2+ sites for Eu 2+ to occupy. Temperature-dependent PL spectra appeared anomalous phenomena that the intensity increases first and then decreases, which is due to the traps energy level's contribution of electron's transition. The phosphor also has cathodoluminescence (CL) property which the spectra take on typical current saturation phenomenon. The CL curves indicated that this phosphor has a very good stability under much electron beam bombardment time. After fabricated combining with BAM, (Sr, Ba) 2 SiO 4 and our red phosphor excited under 405-nm NUV chips, warm light LED was obtained. Its CIE coordinate is (0.3475, 0.3416) and the CCT, Ra, and luminous efficiency are 4856 K, 84.1, and 72.6 lm/W, respectively.

  18. [Effects of forest gap size and light intensity on herbaceous plants in Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wen-Biao; Wang, Li-Xia; Chen, Li-Xin; Du, Shan; Wei, Quan-Shuai; Zhao, Jian-Hui

    2013-03-01

    1 m x 1 m fixed quadrats were parallelly arranged with a space of 2 m in each of six forest gaps in Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest, taking the gap center as the starting point and along east-west and south-north directions. In each quadrat, the coverage and abundance of herbaceous plants at different height levels were investigated by estimation method in June and September 2011, and the matrix characteristics within the quadrats were recorded. Canopy analyzer was used to take fish-eye photos in the selected overcast days in each month from June to September, 2011, and the relative light intensity was calculated by using Gap Light Analyzer 2.0 software. The differences in the relative light intensity and herbaceous plants coverage and richness between different gaps as well as the correlations between the coverage of each species and the direct light, diffuse light, and matrix were analyzed. The results showed that in opening areas and under canopy, the relative light intensity in large gaps was higher than that in small gaps, and the variation ranges of diffuse light and direct light from gap center to gap edge were bigger in large gaps than in small gaps. The direct light reaching at the ground both in large gaps and in small gaps was higher in the north than in the south direction. In the Z1, Z2, Z3, and Z4 zones, both the coverage and the richness of herbaceous plants were larger in large gaps than in small gaps, and the differences of species richness between large and small gaps reached significant level. The coverage of the majority of the herbaceous plants had significant correlations with diffuse light and matrix, and only the coverage of a few herbaceous plants was correlated with direct light.

  19. Effect of light-tip distance on the shear bond strengths of resin-modified glass ionomer cured with high-intensity halogen, light-emitting diode, and plasma arc lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Cacciafesta, Vittorio; Scribante, Andrea; Boehme, Andreas; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of light-tip distance on the shear bond strength and the failure site of brackets cured with 3 light-curing units (high-intensity halogen, light-emitting diode, and plasma arc). One hundred thirty-five bovine mandibular permanent incisors were randomly allocated to 9 groups of 15 specimens each. Stainless steel brackets (Victory Series, Unitek/3M, Monrovia, Calif) were bonded with a resin-modified glass-ionomer (Fuji Ortho LC, GC Europe, Leuven, Belgium) to the teeth, and each curing light was tested at 3 distances from the bracket: 0, 3, and 6 mm. After bonding, all samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours and subsequently tested for shear bond strength. When the 3 light-curing units were compared at a light-tip distance of 0mm, they showed no significantly different shear bond strengths. At a light-tip distance of 3 mm, no significant differences were found between the halogen and plasma arc lights, but both lights showed significantly higher shear bond strengths than the light-emitting diode light. At a light-tip distance of 6 mm, no significant differences were found between the halogen and light-emitting diode lights, but both showed significantly lower bond strengths than the plasma arc light. When the effect of the light-tip distance on each light-curing unit was evaluated, the halogen and light-emitting diode lights showed no significant differences among the 3 distances. However, the plasma arc light produced significantly higher shear bond strengths at a greater light-tip distance. No significant differences were found among the adhesive remnant index scores of the various groups, except with the LED light at a distance of 3 mm. In hard-to-reach areas, the plasma arc curing light is suggested for optimal curing efficiency.

  20. Altitude and intensity characteristics of parametric instability excited by an HF pump wave near the fifth electron harmonic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, WU; Jian, WU; M, T. RIETVELD; I, HAGGSTROM; Haisheng, ZHAO; Zhengwen, XU

    2017-12-01

    An ionospheric heating experiment involving an O mode pump wave was carried out at European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association site in Tromsø. The observation of the ultra high frequency radar illustrates the systematic variations of the enhanced ion line and plasma line in altitude and intensity as a function of the pump frequency. The analysis shows that those altitude variations are due to the thermal effect, and the intensity variations of the enhanced ion line are dependent on whether or not the enhanced ion acoustic wave satisfy the Bragg condition of radar. Moreover, a prediction that if the enhancement in electron temperature is suppressed, those systematic variations will be absent, is given.

  1. Chemical Excitation and Inactivation in Photoreceptors of the Fly Mutants trp and nss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suss, E.; Barash, S.; Stavenga, D.G.; Stieve, H.; Selinger, Z.; Minke, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Drosophila and Lucilia photoreceptor mutants, trp and nss, respond like wild-type flies to a short pulse of intense light or prolonged dim light; however, upon continuous intense illumination, the trp and nss mutants are unable to maintain persistent excitation. This defect manifests itself by a

  2. Light-harvesting Complexes (LHCs) Cluster Spontaneously in Membrane Environment Leading to Shortening of Their Excited State Lifetimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natali, Alberto; Gruber, J. Michael; Dietzel, Lars; Stuart, Marc C. A.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Croce, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The light reactions of photosynthesis, which include light-harvesting and charge separation, take place in the amphiphilic environment of the thylakoid membrane. The light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is the main responsible for light absorption in plants and green algae and is involved in

  3. Surface Plasmon Excitation and Localization by Metal-Coated Axicon Prism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Ono

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Collimated Gaussian beams are efficiently localized at the apex of a metal-coated axicon prism by surface plasmon excitations. We observed the light scattered at the apex and the light reflected by the prism. Intense scattered light was observed with the radial polarization incidence. Further, each incidence of the radial, azimuthal, and linear polarizations provided field distributions of bright and dark intensities in the reflected images according to the surface plasmon excitation. We have demonstrated that surface plasmon waves are excited at the sides of the prism in the Kretschmann configuration and that they converge to its apex.

  4. [Effects of light intensity on associated enzyme activity and gene expression during callus formation of Vitis vinifera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Yang, Guowei; Wu, Yueyan; Rao, Huiyun; Li, Xuefu; Li, Meiqin; Qian, Pingxian

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the best light intensity for callus induction and maintenance in Vitis vinifera and explored the mechanism of grape callus browning. Tender stem segments of grape cultivar "gold finger" were used to study the effects of different light intensities (0, 500, 1 000, 1 500, 2 000, 2 500, 3 000 and 4 000 Lx) on the induction rate, browning rate and associated enzyme activity and gene expression during Vitis vinifera callus formation. The callus induction rate under 0, 500, 1 000 and 1 500 Lx was more than 92%, significantly higher than in other treatments (P Vitis vinifera was 1 000-1 500 Lx, higher or lower light intensities significantly impaired normal callus growth.

  5. Estimation of Lighting Energy Consumption Required for Red Leaf Lettuce Production under Different Blue/Red Ratios and Light Intensity Conditions in a Plant Factory with Artificial Lighting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shinichi FURUYAMA; Yasuhiro ISHIGAMI; Shoko HIKOSAKA; Eiji GOTO

    2017-01-01

    .... The lighting energy consumption per plant required for the test period was calculated from summing the daily value multiplied by the amount of light received to the whole plant by the lighting...

  6. Effects of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency depend on the response of stomatal conductance to dynamic light intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eLi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The stimulating effect of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency (RUE of crops is often explained by the more homogeneous spatial light distribution, while rarely considering differences in temporal light distribution at leaf level. This study investigated whether diffuse light effects on crop RUE can be explained by dynamic responses of leaf photosynthesis to temporal changes of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD.Two Anthurium andreanum cultivars (‘Pink Champion’ and ‘Royal Champion’ were grown in two glasshouses covered by clear (control and diffuse glass, with similar light transmission. On clear days, diffusing the light resulted in less temporal fluctuations of PPFD. Stomatal conductance (gs varied strongly in response to transient PPFD in ‘Royal Champion’, whereas it remained relatively constant in ‘Pink Champion’. Instantaneous net leaf photosynthesis (Pn in both cultivars approached steady state Pn in diffuse light treatment. In control treatment this only occurred in ‘Pink Champion’. These cultivar differences were reflected by a higher RUE (8% in ‘Royal Champion’ in diffuse light treatment compared with control, whereas no effect on RUE was observed in ‘Pink Champion’. We conclude that the stimulating effect of diffuse light on RUE depends on the stomatal response to temporal PPFD fluctuations, which response is cultivar dependent.

  7. Light illumination intensity dependence of photovoltaic parameter in polymer solar cells with ammonium heptamolybdate as hole extraction layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyong; Niu, Shengli; Wang, Ning

    2018-01-01

    A low-temperature, solution-processed molybdenum oxide (MoOX) layer and a facile method for polymer solar cells (PSCs) is developed. The PSCs based on a MoOX layer as the hole extraction layer (HEL) is a significant advance for achieving higher photovoltaic performance, especially under weaker light illumination intensity. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show that the (NH4)6Mo7O24 molecule decomposes and forms the molybdenum oxide (MoOX) molecule when undergoing thermal annealing treatment. In this study, PSCs with the MoOX layer as the HEL exhibited better photovoltaic performance, especially under weak light illumination intensity (from 100 to 10mWcm(-2)) compared to poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)-based PSCs. Analysis of the current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics at various light intensities provides information on the different recombination mechanisms in the PSCs with a MoOX and PEDOT:PSS layer as the HEL. That the slopes of the open-circuit voltage (VOC) versus light illumination intensity plots are close to 1 unity (kT/q) reveals that bimolecular recombination is the dominant and weaker monomolecular recombination mechanism in open-circuit conditions. That the slopes of the short-circuit current density (JSC) versus light illumination intensity plots are close to 1 reveals that the effective charge carrier transport and collection mechanism of the MoOX/indium tin oxide (ITO) anode is the weaker bimolecular recombination in short-circuit conditions. Our results indicate that MoOX is an alternative candidate for high-performance PSCs, especially under weak light illumination intensity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. LM-OSL signals from some insulators: an analysis of the dependency of the detrapping probability on stimulation light intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulur, E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    is not always correct. The initial decay rates of the blue (similar to 470 nm) light stimulated constant power OSL decay curves were examined to test the relation between the detrapping rates and the stimulation light intensity. In SiO2, Al2O3 : C and BeO a linear relation between the detrapping rates......Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signals from various insulators including quartz, Al2O3 : C, BeO and NaCl have been studied using the linear modulation OSL (LM-OSL) technique. LM-OSL is based on the linear increase of the stimulation light power from zero to a maximum during the measurement....... The resultant OSL curve initially increases and then decays after reaching a maximum, The analysis of LM-OSL data usually assumes a linear relationship between the detrapping rate and the stimulation light intensity. However, experiments carried out using various insulators have shown that this assumption...

  9. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELD ON THE EFFICIENCY OF A SILICON SOLAR CELL UNDER AN INTENSE LIGHT CONCENTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoungrana Martial

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work put in evidence, magnetic field effect the electrical parameters of a silicon solar cell illuminated by an intense light concentration: external load electric power, conversion efficiency, fill factor, external optimal charge load. Due to the high photogeneration of carrier in intense light illumination mode, in addition of magnetic field, we took into account the carrier gradient electric field in the base of the solar cell. Taking into account this electric field and the applied magnetic field in our model led to new analytical expressions of the continuity equation, the photocurrent and the photovoltage.

  10. Light intensity as major factor to maximize biomass and lipid productivity of Ettlia sp. in CO2-controlled photoautotrophic chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seong-Hyun; Ha, Ji-San; Yoo, Chan; Srivastava, Ankita; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Cho, Dae-Hyun; La, Hyun-Joon; Han, Myung-Soo; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2017-11-01

    The optimal culture conditions are critical factors for high microalgal biomass and lipid productivity. To optimize the photoautotrophic culture conditions, combination of the pH (regulated by CO2 supply), dilution rate, and light intensity was systematically investigated for Ettlia sp. YC001 cultivation in a chemostat during 143days. The biomass productivity increased with the increase in dilution rate and light intensity, but decreased with increasing pH. The average lipid content was 19.8% and statistically non-variable among the tested conditions. The highest biomass and lipid productivities were 1.48gL-1d-1 and 291.4mgL-1d-1 with a pH of 6.5, dilution rate of 0.78d-1, and light intensity of 1500μmolphotonsm-2s-1. With a sufficient supply of CO2 and nutrients, the light intensity was the main determinant of the photosynthetic rate. Therefore, the surface-to-volume ratio of a photobioreactor should enable efficient light distribution to enhance microalgal growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy and safety of intense pulsed light in the treatment of mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Waheed Zaman Khan; Ghazala Butt; Faria Altaf

    2017-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common chronic inflammatory disease of pilosebaceous units. It can be associated with considerable loss of self-esteem and psychological morbidity when left untreated. With the emergence of lasers and intense pulsed light, long-term reduction of acne lesions is now possible. The success of these optical devices depends on the selected parameters and biologic variables of patient. The objective of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of intense pulsed ligh...

  12. Differential response of Scots pine seedlings to variable intensity and ratio of red and far-red light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzak, Abdur; Ranade, Sonali Sachin; Strand, Åsa; García-Gil, M R

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the response to increasing intensity of red (R) and far-R (FR) light and to a decrease in R:FR ratio in Pinus sylvestris L. (Scots pine) seedling. The results showed that FR high-irradiance response for hypocotyl elongation may be present in Scots pine and that this response is enhanced by increasing light intensity. However, both hypocotyl inhibition and pigment accumulation were more strongly affected by the R light compared with FR light. This is in contrast to previous reports in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. In the angiosperm, A. thaliana R light shows an overall milder effect on inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and on pigment biosynthesis compared with FR suggesting conifers and angiosperms respond very differently to the different light regimes. Scots pine shade avoidance syndrome with longer hypocotyls, shorter cotyledons and lower chlorophyll content in response to shade conditions resembles the response observed in A. thaliana. However, anthocyanin accumulation increased with shade in Scots pine, which again differs from what is known in angiosperms. Overall, the response of seedling development and physiology to R and FR light in Scots pine indicates that the regulatory mechanism for light response may differ between gymnosperms and angiosperms. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Intense light pulses decontamination of minimally processed vegetables and their shelf-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-López, V M; Devlieghere, F; Bonduelle, V; Debevere, J

    2005-08-15

    Intense light pulses (ILP) is a new method intended for decontamination of food surfaces by killing microorganisms using short time high frequency pulses of an intense broad spectrum, rich in UV-C light. This work studied in a first step the effect of food components on the killing efficiency of ILP. In a second step, the decontamination of eight minimally processed (MP) vegetables by ILP was evaluated, and thirdly, the effect of this treatment on the shelf-life of MP cabbage and lettuce stored at 7 degrees C in equilibrium modified atmosphere packages was assessed by monitoring headspace gas concentrations, microbial populations and sensory attributes. Proteins and oil decreased the decontamination effect of ILP, whilst carbohydrates and water showed variable results depending on the microorganism. For this reason, high protein and fat containing food products have little potential to be efficiently treated by ILP. Vegetables, on the other hand, do not contain high concentrations of both compounds and could therefore be suitable for ILP treatment. For the eight tested MP vegetables, log reductions up to 2.04 were achieved on aerobic mesophilic counts. For the shelf-life studies, respiration rates at 3% O2 and 7 degrees C were 14.63, 17.89, 9.17 and 16.83 ml O2/h kg produce for control and treated cabbage, and control and treated lettuce respectively; used packaging configurations prevented anoxic conditions during the storage times. Log reductions of 0.54 and 0.46 for aerobic psychrothrophic count (APC) were achieved after flashing MP cabbage and lettuce respectively. APC of treated cabbage became equal than that from control at day 2, and higher at day 7, when the tolerance limit (8 log) was reached and the panel detected the presence of unacceptable levels of off-odours. Control never reached 8 log in APC and were sensory acceptable until the end of the experiment (9 days). In MP lettuce, APC of controls reached rejectable levels at day 2, whilst that of treated

  14. THE CYTOTOXIC EFFECTS OF LOW INTENSITY VISIBLE AND INFRARED LIGHT ON HUMAN BREAST CANCER (MCF7 CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Peidaee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A concept of using low intensity light therapy (LILT as an alternative approach to cancer treatment is at early stages of development; while the therapeutic effects of LILT as a non-invasive treatment modality for localized joint and soft tissue wound healing are widely corroborated. The LEDs-based exposure system was designed and constructed to irradiate the selected cancer and normal cells and evaluate the biological effects induced by light exposures in visible and infrared light range. In this study, human breast cancer (MCF7 cells and human epidermal melanocytes (HEM cells (control were exposed to selected far infrared light (3400nm, 3600nm, 3800nm, 3900nm, 4100nm and 4300nm and visible and near infrared wavelengths (466nm, 585nm, 626nm, 810nm, 850nm and 950nm. The optical intensities of LEDs used for exposures were in the range of 15µW to 30µW. Cellular morphological changes of exposed and sham-exposed cells were evaluated using light microscopy. The cytotoxic effects of these low intensity light exposures on human cancer and normal cell lines were quantitatively determined by Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH cytotoxic activity and PrestoBlueTM cell viability assays. Findings reveal that far-infrared exposures were able to reduce cell viability of MCF7 cells as measured by increased LDH release activity and PrestoBlueTM assays. Further investigation of the effects of light irradiation on different types of cancer cells, study of possible signaling pathways affected by electromagnetic radiation (EMR and in vivo experimentation are required in order to draw a firm conclusion about the efficacy of low intensity light as an alternative non-invasive cancer treatment.

  15. The influence of photoperiod and light intensity on the growth and photosynthesis of Dunaliella salina (chlorophyta) CCAP 19/30

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yanan; Ibrahim, Iskander M.; Harvey, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    The green microalga Dunaliella salina survives in a wide range of salinities via mechanisms involving glycerol synthesis and degradation and is exploited for large amounts of nutraceutical carotenoids produced under stressed conditions. In this study, D. salina CCAP 19/30 was cultured in varying photoperiods and light intensities to study the relationship of light with different growth measurement parameters, with cellular contents of glycerol, starch and carotenoids, and with photosynthesis ...

  16. Intense blue light therapy during the night-time does not suppress the rhythmic melatonin biosynthesis in a young boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stebelova K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Melatonin is a hormone predominantly synthesized and secreted during the night by the pineal gland. Artificial light at night, especially its blue part, acutely suppresses the melatonin production. Th e aim of the present study was to find out, whether an intense blue light phototherapy of severe hyperbilirubinemia, may suppress the melatonin production during the night when the eyes will be properly protected by a sleep mask.

  17. Efficacy of intense pulsed light therapy in the treatment of facial acne vulgaris: Comparison of two different fluences

    OpenAIRE

    Patidar, Monika V; Ashish Ramchandra Deshmukh; Maruti Yadav Khedkar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris is the most common disease of the skin affecting adolescents and young adults causing psychological distress. The combination of antibiotic resistance, adverse effects of topical and systemic anti acne medications and desire for high tech approaches have all led to new enthusiasm for light based acne treatment. Intense pulse light (IPL) therapy has three modes of action in acne vulgaris i.e., photochemical, photo thermal and photo immunological. Aims: (1) to study ef...

  18. 1,213 Cases of Treatment of Facial Acne Using Indocyanine Green and Intense Pulsed Light in Asian Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Kui Young Park; Ji Young Kim; Moo Yeol Hyun; Won Jong Oh; Se Yeong Jeong; Tae Young Han; Ji Young Ahn; Beom Joon Kim; Myeung Nam Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for acne, with various combinations of photosensitizers and light sources. Objective. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of indocyanine green (ICG) and intense pulsed light (IPL) in the treatment of acne. Materials and Methods. A total of 1,213 patients with facial acne were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received three or five treatments of ICG and IPL at two-week intervals. Clinical response to treatment was assessed by compar...

  19. The Cytotoxic Effects of Low Intensity Visible and Infrared Light on Human Breast Cancer (MCF7) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peidaee, P; Almansour, N; Shukla, R; Pirogova, E

    2013-01-01

    A concept of using low intensity light therapy (LILT) as an alternative approach to cancer treatment is at early stages of development; while the therapeutic effects of LILT as a non-invasive treatment modality for localized joint and soft tissue wound healing are widely corroborated. The LEDs-based exposure system was designed and constructed to irradiate the selected cancer and normal cells and evaluate the biological effects induced by light exposures in visible and infrared light range. In this study, human breast cancer (MCF7) cells and human epidermal melanocytes (HEM) cells (control) were exposed to selected far infrared light (3400nm, 3600nm, 3800nm, 3900nm, 4100nm and 4300nm) and visible and near infrared wavelengths (466nm, 585nm, 626nm, 810nm, 850nm and 950nm). The optical intensities of LEDs used for exposures were in the range of 15µW to 30µW. Cellular morphological changes of exposed and sham-exposed cells were evaluated using light microscopy. The cytotoxic effects of these low intensity light exposures on human cancer and normal cell lines were quantitatively determined by Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxic activity and PrestoBlue™ cell viability assays. Findings reveal that far-infrared exposures were able to reduce cell viability of MCF7 cells as measured by increased LDH release activity and PrestoBlue™ assays. Further investigation of the effects of light irradiation on different types of cancer cells, study of possible signaling pathways affected by electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and in vivo experimentation are required in order to draw a firm conclusion about the efficacy of low intensity light as an alternative non-invasive cancer treatment.

  20. Intense blue light therapy during the night-time does not suppress the rhythmic melatonin biosynthesis in a young boy

    OpenAIRE

    Stebelova K.; Kosnacova J.; Zeman M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Melatonin is a hormone predominantly synthesized and secreted during the night by the pineal gland. Artificial light at night, especially its blue part, acutely suppresses the melatonin production. Th e aim of the present study was to find out, whether an intense blue light phototherapy of severe hyperbilirubinemia, may suppress the melatonin production during the night when the eyes will be properly protected by a sleep mask.

  1. Optical diffraction tomography microscopy with transport of intensity equation using a light-emitting diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaji; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Jialin; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an effective label-free technique for quantitatively refractive index imaging, which enables long-term monitoring of the internal three-dimensional (3D) structures and molecular composition of biological cells with minimal perturbation. However, existing optical tomographic methods generally rely on interferometric configuration for phase measurement and sophisticated mechanical systems for sample rotation or beam scanning. Thereby, the measurement is suspect to phase error coming from the coherent speckle, environmental vibrations, and mechanical error during data acquisition process. To overcome these limitations, we present a new ODT technique based on non-interferometric phase retrieval and programmable illumination emitting from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. The experimental system is built based on a traditional bright field microscope, with the light source replaced by a programmable LED array, which provides angle-variable quasi-monochromatic illumination with an angular coverage of ±37 degrees in both x and y directions (corresponding to an illumination numerical aperture of ∼0.6). Transport of intensity equation (TIE) is utilized to recover the phase at different illumination angles, and the refractive index distribution is reconstructed based on the ODT framework under first Rytov approximation. The missing-cone problem in ODT is addressed by using the iterative non-negative constraint algorithm, and the misalignment of the LED array is further numerically corrected to improve the accuracy of refractive index quantification. Experiments on polystyrene beads and thick biological specimens show that the proposed approach allows accurate refractive index reconstruction while greatly reduced the system complexity and environmental sensitivity compared to conventional interferometric ODT approaches.

  2. Computational diffraction tomographic microscopy with transport of intensity equation using a light-emitting diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaji; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Jialin; Zuo, Chao

    2017-10-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an effective label-free technique for quantitatively refractive index imaging, which enables long-term monitoring of the internal three-dimensional (3D) structures and molecular composition of biological cells with minimal perturbation. However, existing optical tomographic methods generally rely on interferometric configuration for phase measurement and sophisticated mechanical systems for sample rotation or beam scanning. Thereby, the measurement is suspect to phase error coming from the coherent speckle, environmental vibrations, and mechanical error during data acquisition process. To overcome these limitations, we present a new ODT technique based on non-interferometric phase retrieval and programmable illumination emitting from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. The experimental system is built based on a traditional bright field microscope, with the light source replaced by a programmable LED array, which provides angle-variable quasi-monochromatic illumination with an angular coverage of +/-37 degrees in both x and y directions (corresponding to an illumination numerical aperture of ˜ 0.6). Transport of intensity equation (TIE) is utilized to recover the phase at different illumination angles, and the refractive index distribution is reconstructed based on the ODT framework under first Rytov approximation. The missing-cone problem in ODT is addressed by using the iterative non-negative constraint algorithm, and the misalignment of the LED array is further numerically corrected to improve the accuracy of refractive index quantification. Experiments on polystyrene beads and thick biological specimens show that the proposed approach allows accurate refractive index reconstruction while greatly reduced the system complexity and environmental sensitivity compared to conventional interferometric ODT approaches.

  3. Cu ion ink for a flexible substrate and highly conductive patterning by intensive pulsed light sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Byung-Yong; Yoo, Tae-Hee; Song, Yong-Won; Lim, Dae-Soon; Oh, Young-Jei

    2013-05-22

    Direct printing techniques that utilize nanoparticles to mitigate environmental pollution and reduce the processing time of the routing and formation of electrodes have received much attention lately. In particular, copper (Cu) nanoink using Cu nanoparticles offers high conductivity and can be prepared at low cost. However, it is difficult to produce homogeneous nanoparticles and ensure good dispersion within the ink. Moreover, Cu particles require a sintering process over an extended time at a high temperature due to high melting temperature of Cu. During this process, the nanoparticles oxidize quickly in air. To address these problems, the authors developed a Cu ion ink that is free of Cu particles or any other impurities. It consequently does not require separate dispersion stability. In addition, the developed ink is environmentally friendly and can be sintered even at low temperatures. The Cu ion ink was sintered on a flexible substrate using intense pulsed light (IPL), which facilitates large-area, high-speed calcination at room temperature and at atmospheric pressures. As the applied light energy increases, the Cu2O phase diminishes, leaving only the Cu phase. This is attributed to the influence of formic acid (HCOOH) on the Cu ion ink. Only the Cu phase was observed above 40 J cm(-2). The Cu-patterned film after sintering showed outstanding electrical resistivity in a range of 3.21-5.27 μΩ·cm at an IPL energy of 40-60 J cm(-2). A spiral-type micropattern with a line width of 160 μm on a PI substrate was formed without line bulges or coffee ring effects. The electrical resistivity was 5.27 μΩ·cm at an energy level of 40.6 J cm(-2).

  4. Assessment of the optical radiation hazard from a home-use intense pulsed light (IPL) source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, Ewan; Miller, Paul; Goodman, Teresa; Moseley, Harry

    2009-09-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) systems have evolved and crossed over from the clinic to the home. Studies have shown home-use IPLs to be clinically effective but there has been no published data on ocular safety. It was our aim to measure the spectral and temporal optical radiation output from a home-use IPL and assess the ocular hazard. The iPulse Personal is a new home-use IPL hair reduction system. We measured its optical radiation spectral output using a calibrated diode array spectrometer that was traceable to national standards. Pulse duration was determined by measurement with a fast photodiode. The results from these measurements were used to assess the optical radiation hazard to the human eye. Retinal thermal hazard (RTH), blue light hazard (BLH), and infrared radiation hazard to the cornea and lens were assessed in accordance with IEC TR 60825-9 and the International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Guidelines on Limits of Exposure to Broad-band Incoherent Optical Radiation, as there are no specific international IPL standards. Neither the BLH radiance dose nor the infrared radiation hazard to the cornea and lens irradiance exceeded the exposure limit values (ELVs) set by the ICNIRP. The RTH radiance, however, was exceeded at a fluence of 11 J cm(-2) and pulse duration of 16 milliseconds. Following these results the settings on the IPL were adjusted and the RTH was no longer exceeded at a new fluence of 10 J cm(-2) and pulse duration of 26 milliseconds. The home-use device that we assessed does not present an optical hazard according to currently available international standards.

  5. Intense pulsed light versus benzoyl peroxide 5% gel in treatment of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Latif, Azmy Ahmed Abd; Hassan, Faisal Abdel Aziz; Elshahed, Ahmed Rashad; Mohamed, Amr Ghareeb; Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2014-05-01

    Acne is a common disorder affecting the pilosebaceous unit. Despite many advances in the treatments of acne vulgaris the best option is still controversial as the pathogenesis of acne is rather complex, necessitating various combination therapies. The objective of this study is to compare the clinical efficacy of intense pulsed light therapy (IPL) versus benzoyl peroxide 5% for the treatment of inflammatory acne. Fifty patients of both sexes, (15 males and 35 females) aged (18-27 years), with mild-to-severe acne and Fitzpatrick skin phototype IV were enrolled in this study. The patients were equally divided into two groups. The first group was treated by benzoyl peroxide while the second group was treated by IPL. For both therapies, patients experienced a significant reduction in the mean of the inflammatory lesion counts over the treatment period. Comparing the effects of both therapies, BP produced better results than IPL. The difference in the results was statistically significant at the midpoint of the study. However, this difference was insignificant at the end of study. Treatment with both benzoyl peroxide and IPL resulted in considerable improvement of the acne after 5 weeks of treatment. Comparing the effects of both therapies, BP produced better results than IPL. The difference in the results was statistically significant at the midpoint of the study. However, this difference was insignificant at the end of study.

  6. Reconstructing the fractal dimension of granular aggregates from light intensity spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fiona H M; Maggi, Federico

    2015-12-21

    There has been growing interest in using the fractal dimension to study the hierarchical structures of soft materials after realising that fractality is an important property of natural and engineered materials. This work presents a method to quantify the internal architecture and the space-filling capacity of granular fractal aggregates by reconstructing the three-dimensional capacity dimension from their two-dimensional optical projections. Use is made of the light intensity of the two-dimensional aggregate images to describe the aggregate surface asperities (quantified by the perimeter-based fractal dimension) and the internal architecture (quantified by the capacity dimension) within a mathematical framework. This method was tested on control aggregates of diffusion-limited (DLA), cluster-cluster (CCA) and self-correlated (SCA) types, stereolithographically-fabricated aggregates, and experimentally-acquired natural sedimentary aggregates. Statistics of the reconstructed capacity dimension featured correlation coefficients R ≥ 98%, residuals NRMSE ≤ 10% and percent errors PE ≤ 4% as compared to controls, and improved earlier approaches by up to 50%.

  7. Polishing of anaerobic secondary effluent by Chlorella vulgaris under low light intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tuoyuan; Wei, Chun-Hai; Leiknes, TorOve

    2017-10-01

    To investigate anaerobic secondary effluent polishing by microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) under low light intensity (14μmol/m2/s), bubbling column reactors were operated in batches of 8 d with initial ammonium nitrogen 10-50mg/L, initial phosphate phosphorus 2-10mg/L and microalgal seed 40mg/L. Maximum microalgal biomass and minimum generation time were 370.9mg/L and 2.5d, respectively. Nitrogen removal (maximum 99.6%) was mainly attributed to microalgal growth rate, while phosphorus removal (maximum 49.8%) was related to microalgal growth rate, cell phosphorus content (maximum 1.5%) and initial nutrients ratio. Dissolved microalgal organics release in terms of chemical oxygen demand (maximum 63.2mg/L) and hexane extractable material (i.e., oil and grease, maximum 8.5mg/L) was firstly reported and mainly affected by nitrogen deficiency and deteriorated effluent quality. Ultrafiltration critical flux (16.6-39.5L/m2/h) showed negative linear correlation to microalgal biomass. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor effluent polishing showed similar results with slight inhibition to synthetic effluent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence to support including lifestyle light-intensity recommendations in physical activity guidelines for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Lee, Hyo; Cardinal, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of objectively measured lifestyle light-intensity physical activity (LLPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with various biological markers and chronic diseases among a nationally representative sample of U.S. older adults (65+ years). A cross-sectional design was used for this study. Data were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2006. Subjects were 1,496 older U.S. adults. Participants wore an accelerometer for at least 4 days and completed questionnaires to assess sociodemographics and chronic disease information. Blood samples were taken to assess biological markers. Adjusted Wald tests and Poisson regression were used to examine the association of LLPA and MVPA with biological markers and chronic disease. Older adults engaging in ≥300 min/wk of LLPA had lower observed values for body mass index, waist circumference, C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance compared to those engaging in engaging in engaging in ≥300 min/wk of LLPA. In this national sample of older U.S. adults, participation in at least 300 min/wk of LLPA was associated with more favorable health outcomes. Future experimental studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  9. Polishing of anaerobic secondary effluent by Chlorella vulgaris under low light intensity

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Tuoyuan

    2017-05-29

    To investigate anaerobic secondary effluent polishing by microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) under low light intensity (14 μmol/m2/s), bubbling column reactors were operated in batches of 8 d with initial ammonium nitrogen 10-50 mg/L, initial phosphate phosphorus 2-10 mg/L and microalgal seed 40 mg/L. Maximum microalgal biomass and minimum generation time were 370.9 mg/L and 2.5 d, respectively. Nitrogen removal (maximum 99.6%) was mainly attributed to microalgal growth rate, while phosphorus removal (maximum 49.8%) was related to microalgal growth rate, cell phosphorus content (maximum 1.5%) and initial nutrients ratio. Dissolved microalgal organics release in terms of chemical oxygen demand (maximum 63.2 mg/L) and hexane extractable material (i.e., oil and grease, maximum 8.5 mg/L) was firstly reported and mainly affected by nitrogen deficiency and deteriorated effluent quality. Ultrafiltration critical flux (16.6-39.5 L/m2/h) showed negative linear correlation to microalgal biomass. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor effluent polishing showed similar results with slight inhibition to synthetic effluent.

  10. Hair reduction using a new intense pulsed light irradiator and a normal mode ruby laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerring, P; Cramers, M; Egekvist, H; Christiansen, K; Troilius, A

    2000-06-01

    The main purpose of this clinical study was to compare the effectiveness of an intense pulsed light irradiator system (IPL) and a normal mode ruby laser for hair removal. Thirty-one patients were treated 3 times with a new IPL system on one side of the chin and neck and with a normal mode ruby laser on the other side. After 6 months, nine of the patients received 3 additional IPL treatments and 11 patients received 3 additional ruby laser treatments. All treatment intervals were 2 months. Hair reduction was measured by hair counts on close-up photographs. Hair reduction was obtained by 93.5% of the patients after 3 IPL treatments and by 54.8% after 3 ruby laser treatments. The average hair count was reduced by 49.3% after IPL treatments and by 21.3% after ruby laser treatments. Three additional IPL treatments following 3 IPL treatments resulted in only 6.6% further hair reduction--in total 55.9%, whereas 3 IPL treatments following 3 ruby laser treatments resulted in an additional 35.5% hair reduction--in total 56.8%. The IPL was found to be 3.94 times more effective than the ruby laser for hair removal. In the chin and neck region, more than 3 treatments with the IPL did not improve the therapeutic result significantly.

  11. Comparison of the effect of diode laser versus intense pulsed light in axillary hair removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiga, Patricia; Ishida, Cleide Eiko; Boechat, Alvaro; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2014-10-01

    Devices such as diode laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) are in constant development aiming at permanent hair removal, but there are few comparative studies between these technologies. The objective was to comparatively assess axillary hair removal performed by diode laser and IPL and to obtain parameters of referred pain and evolution response for each method. A comparative prospective, double-blind, and randomized study of axillary hair removal performed by the diode laser and IPL was conducted in 21 females. Six sessions were held with application of the diode laser in one axilla and the IPL in the other, with intervals of 30 days and follow-up of 6 months after the last session. Clinical photographs and digital dermoscopy for hair counts in predefined and fixed fields of the treated areas were performed before, 2 weeks after the sixth session, and 6 months after the end of treatment. A questionnaire to assess the pain was applied. The number of hair shafts was significantly reduced with the diode laser and IPL. The diode laser was more effective, although more painful than the IPL. No serious, adverse, or permanent effects were observed with both technologies. Both diode laser and the IPL are effective, safe, and able to produce lasting results in axillary hair removal.

  12. Paradoxical hypertrichosis and terminal hair change after intense pulsed light hair removal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmanesh, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Although complications such as blister formation, erosion, and post-inflammatory hypo- and hyperpigmentation are well-known side effects of intense pulsed light (IPL) photoepilation, little is known about the paradoxical hypertrichosis after therapy. To report the paradoxically increased hair density and coarseness after IPL photoepilation. Within a period of 23 months, a total of 991 hirsute female patients were treated with IPL for photoepilation. The IPL system used was the Vasculight-SR, a multifunctional laser and IPL system (Lumenis Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA). The cut-off filters frequently used were 695, 755 and 645 nm. Paradoxical hypertrichosis and terminal hair change were detected after a few sessions of IPL therapy among 51 out of 991 patients. Our serial digital photographs, schematic diagrams, and hair counts before and after treatment confirmed the patients' claims. The other more commonly seen complications were epidermal burning with blisters, erosion, and crust formation followed by post-inflammatory hypo- and/or hyperpigmentation. Paradoxical hypertrichosis and terminal hair change is a common complication of IPL photoepilation.

  13. Hair removal with a non-coherent filtered flashlamp intense pulsed light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R A; Weiss, M A; Marwaha, S; Harrington, A C

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effects on disruption of hair growth of the non-coherent filtered flashlamp intense pulsed light (IPL) source. Twenty-eight sites on 23 patients with Fitzpatrick type I-III were enrolled using a single treatment IPL followed for three months post-treatment. Another 56 on 48 patients with Fitzpatrick skin types I-V randomly enrolled for two treatments one month apart and followed for six months. Prior to beginning treatment and at each follow-up visit hair counts were obtained by averaging three 1-cm2 areas on a clear acetate template placed over the skin. Repeat hair counts and photographs were obtained at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks for the single treatment protocol and at additional 4, 5, and 6 months for the double treatment protocol. Parameters utilized were a 2.8-3.2 millisecond pulse duration typically for three pulses with thermal relaxation intervals of 20-30 milliseconds with a total fluence of 40-42 J/cm2. For the double treatment protocol hair clearance of 64% was achieved immediately following the second treatment. By week 8 reduction of hair counts was 42%. At 6 months, hair counts were reduced by 33%. Non-coherent IPL is an effective modality for long-term hair removal. IPL is safe with minimal side effects of epidermal injury or pigmentation change.

  14. Development of evaluation methods for the approval and review of Intense pulsed light (IPL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung-Youl Lee; Cho-Long Ju; Tae-Hee Lee; Hyeon-Su Na; In-Su Lee; Chang-Won Park

    2017-07-01

    This Intense pulsed light (IPL) is skin therapy medical device to remove infection and lesion. The market size of IPL has increased because of increasing device users such as doctors, nurses, engineers, patients. Thus, the number of IPL approvals by Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS) has increased. However, since there are no standard and guideline for evaluation of IPL performance and safety, it is need to develop the evaluation method of IPL performance and safety for petitioners and examiners who are having difficulties in approval and review. In this study, the criteria and methods for scientific evaluation of safety and performance of IPL are proposed to support approval and review, and it is expected to enhance the international competitiveness of domestic medical device industry and patient safety. To develop the evaluation methods of IPL, first, the types and information of IPL have been collected and analyzed, and relative international and domestic standard and FDA guidance have been studied. Second, drawn test items, criteria and methods were verified at medical device testing institute. Finally, the guideline for evaluation of IPL performance and safety was reviewed through a consultative body composed of academic, industrial, institute, and government experts.

  15. The Retrospective Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of IPL (Intense Pulse Light in Hair Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlgen Ertam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: There are numerous therapeutic methods for hair removal with various success rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Intense Pulse Light (IPL method for hair removal.Materials and Methods: Ninety patients, who applied for their unwanted hair, were included in the study. IPL was applied to the face, neck, axillary areas, bikini line, sternal area, periareolar areas, and upper and lower extremities. An IPL device (L900 A&M, France was used for hair removal. The results were evaluated according to the clinical improvement (0-25%, 25-50%, 50-75%, 75% and more and patients? satisfaction (very satisfied, satisfied, less satisfied, not satisfied. All results were analyzed using Chi-square test and statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 15.0 for Windows. Results: There were eighty-eight female (97.8% and two male (2.2% patients. The mean age of the patients was 33.62±11.11 (15- 55 years. 13.3% of patients had polycystic ovary syndrome. The mean number of treatments was 6.5 (min-max= 2-11. 53.2% of patients had 50-75% clinical response and 53.2% of patients were satisfied. There were no side effects except mild erythema. Conclusion: We observed that IPL for hair removal was safe and moderately effective in our patients.

  16. Treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids using intense pulsed light (IPL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, O Onur; Gurlek, Ali; Agaoglu, Galip; Topcuoglu, Ela; Oz, Hayat

    2008-11-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are extremely disturbing to patients, both physically and psychologically. This study prospectively assessed the safety and efficacy of intense pulsed light (IPL) on scars originating from burns, trauma, surgery, and acne. Hypertrophic scars in 109 patients, originating from surgical incisions (n = 55), traumatic cuts (traffic accidents) (n = 24), acne scars (n = 6), keloids (n = 5), and burns (n = 19), were treated using an IPL Quantum device. Treatment was administered at 2-4-week intervals, and patients received an average of 8 treatments (range = 6-24). Using digital photographs, Changes in scar appearance were assessed by two physicians who were blinded to the study patients and treatments. The photographs were graded on a scale of 0 to 4 (none, minimal, moderate, good, excellent) for improvement in overall clinical appearance and reduction in height, erythema, and hardness. An overall clinical improvement in the appearance of scars and reductions in height, erythema, and hardness were seen in the majority of the patients (92.5%). Improvement was excellent in 31.2% of the patients, good in 25.7%, moderate in 34%, and minimal in 9.1%. Over half the patients had good or excellent improvement. In the preventive IPL treatment group, 65% had good to excellent improvement in clinical appearance. Patient satisfaction was very high. This study suggests that IPL is effective not only in improving the appearance of hypertrophic scars and keloids regardless of their origin, but also in reducing the height, redness, and hardness of scars.

  17. Effects of genetic strain and light intensity on blood physiological variables of broilers grown to heavy weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanrewaju, H A; Purswell, J L; Collier, S D; Branton, S L

    2014-04-01

    The effects of genetic strain, light intensity, and their interaction were examined on blood physiological variables of broilers maintained in environmentally controlled rooms in each of 5 trials. The study consisted of a 2 × 5 factorial arranged in a randomized complete block design with 10 treatments of 2 strains (Ross × Ross 308 and 708) and exposure to 5 light intensities (25, 10, 5, 2.5, and 0.2 lx) with chicks equally and randomly distributed at 1 d of age. The 5 light intensities were randomly assigned from 22 to 56 d of age. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. Venous blood samples were collected on d 21 (base line), 28, 42, and 56 of age. Main effects indicate that Ross × Ross 308 significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased BW, partial pressure of CO2, Ca(2+), Na(+), Cl(-), and thyroxine, along with significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced pH level, partial pressure of O2, HCO3(-), and triiodothyronine in comparison with Ross × Ross 708. No main effect of light intensity was observed on all examined variables. In addition, no significant main effects were observed for strain, light intensity, or their interaction on saturated O2, hematocrit, hemoglobin, K(+), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, glucose, osmolality, and anion gap. Physiologically, although Ross × Ross 308 had a significantly increased BW in comparison with Ross × Ross 708, Ross × Ross 708 showed a significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in partial pressure of O2 and triiodothyronine along with lower blood partial pressure of CO2 and thyroxine. The results of this study supplement current knowledge of physiological response to differing lighting levels and may be used to establish the normal blood values for commercial broilers grown to heavy weights. Plasma corticosterone was not affected by either treatments or strain, indicating that the treatments did not induce physiological stress in broilers.

  18. Dataset of the absorption, emission and excitation spectra and fluorescence intensity graphs of fluorescent cyanine dyes for the quantification of low amounts of dsDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Bruijns

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes data related to a research article entitled “Fluorescent cyanine dyes for the quantification of low amounts of dsDNA” (B. Bruijns, R. Tiggelaar, J. Gardeniers, 2016 [1]. Six cyanine dsDNA dyes - EvaGreen, SYBR Green, PicoGreen, AccuClear, AccuBlue NextGen and YOYO-1 – are investigated and in this article the absorption spectra, as well as excitation and emission spectra, for all six researched cyanine dyes are given, all recorded under exactly identical experimental conditions. The intensity graphs, with the relative fluorescence in the presence of low amounts of dsDNA, are also provided.

  19. Light-activation through indirect ceramic restorations: does the overexposure compensate for the attenuation in light intensity during resin cement polymerization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Luis Novaes Bueno

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of light exposure through simulated indirect ceramic restorations (SICR on hardness (KHN of dual-cured resin cements (RCs, immediately after light-activation and 24 h later. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three dual-cured RCs were evaluated: Eco-Link (Ivoclar Vivadent, Rely X ARC (3M ESPE, and Panavia F (Kuraray Medical Inc.. The RCs were manipulated in accordance to the manufacturers' instructions and were placed into cylindrical acrylic matrixes (1-mm-thick and 4-mm diameter. The RC light-activation (Optilux 501; Demetron Kerr was performed through a glass slide for 120 s (control group, or through 2-mm or 4-mm thick SICRs (IPS Empress II; Ivoclar Vivadent. The specimens were submitted to KHN analysis immediately and 24 h after light-activation. The data obtained at the 2 evaluation intervals were submitted to 2-way ANOVA repeated measures and post-hoc Tukey's test (pre-set alpha of 5%. RESULTS: Lower KHN was observed when light-activation was performed through SICRs for Eco-Link at all evaluation intervals and for Rely X ARC 24 h later. For Panavia F, no significant difference in KHN was observed between control and experimental groups, regardless of evaluation interval. Most groups exhibited higher KHN after 24 h than immediately after light-activation, with the exception of Rely X ARC light-activated through SICR, as no significant difference in KHN was found between evaluation intervals. CONCLUSIONS: Light overexposure did not compensate for light intensity attenuation due to the presence of SICR when Rely X and Eco-Link were used. Although hardness of such RCs increased over a 24-h interval, the RCs subjected to light overexposure did not reach the hardness values exhibited after direct light exposure.

  20. Spatial resolution and cathodoluminescence intensity dependence on acceleration voltage in electron beam excitation assisted optical microscopy using Y2O3:Eu3+ film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yu; Kamiya, Masashi; Sugita, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Kominami, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yoichiro

    2017-11-01

    This study presents relationship between acceleration voltage and spatial resolution of electron-beam assisted (EXA) optical microscope. The nanometric illumination light sources of the present EXA microscope was red-emitting cathodoluminescence (CL) in the Y2O3:Eu3+ thin film excited by focused electron beam. Our experimental results demonstrated that the spatial resolutions of the EXA microscope were higher as the acceleration voltage was higher. We managed to make images of the scattered gold particles with approximately 90 nm-resolutions at the voltages higher than 20 kV. The dependence of the spatial resolution on the acceleration voltage was explained by the distribution of simulated electron scattering trajectories in the luminescent thin film. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A flexible wide-field FLIM endoscope utilising blue excitation light for label-free contrast of tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Hugh; Warren, Sean; Guedes, Joana; Yoshida, Nagisa; Charn, Tze Choong; Guerra, Nadia; Tatla, Taranjit; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has previously been shown to provide contrast between normal and diseased tissue. Here we present progress towards clinical and preclinical FLIM endoscopy of tissue autofluorescence, demonstrating a flexible wide-field endoscope that utilised a low average power blue picosecond laser diode excitation source and was able to acquire ∼mm-scale spatial maps of autofluorescence lifetimes from fresh ex vivo diseased human larynx biopsies in ∼8 seconds using an average excitation power of ∼0.5 mW at the specimen. To illustrate its potential for FLIM at higher acquisition rates, a higher power mode-locked frequency doubled Ti:Sapphire laser was used to demonstrate FLIM of ex vivo mouse bowel at up to 2.5 Hz using 10 mW of average excitation power at the specimen. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Origin of the light intensity dependence of the short-circuit current of polymer/fullerene solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, LJA; Mihailetchi, VD; Xie, H; Blom, PWM

    2005-01-01

    A typical feature of polymer/fullerene based solar cells is that the current density under short-circuit conditions (J(sc)) does not scale exactly linearly with light intensity (I). Instead, a power law relationship is found given by J(sc)proportional to I-alpha, where alpha ranges from 0.85 to 1.

  3. Growth of the microalgae Neochloris oleoabundans at high partial oxygen pressures and sub-saturating light intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, C.A.; Winter, de L.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Vermue, M.H.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of partial oxygen pressure on growth of Neochloris oleoabundans was studied at sub-saturating light intensity in a fully-controlled stirred tank photobioreactor. At the three partial oxygen pressures tested (PO2=0.24; 0.63; 0.84 bar), the specific growth rate was 1.38; 1.36 and 1.06

  4. Interactive effects of photoperiod and light intensity on blood physiological and biochemical reactions of broilers grown to heavy weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of photoperiod, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. The experiment was consisted of a factorial arrangement of treatments in a randomize...

  5. Proteomic study related to vascular connections in watermelon scions grafted onto bottle-gourd rootstock under different light intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowbiya Muneer

    Full Text Available Although grafting is broadly used in the production of crops, no information is available about the proteins involved in vascular connections between rootstock and scion. Similarly, proteome changes under the light intensities widely used for grafted seedlings are of practical use. The objective of this study was to determine the proteome of vascular connections using watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. 'Sambok Honey' and 'Speed' as the scion and bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria Stanld. 'RS Dongjanggun' as the rootstock grown under different light intensities (25, 50, 75 and 100 μmol m-2 s-1. Our proteomic analysis revealed 24 and 27 differentially expressed proteins in 'Sambok Honey' and 'Speed', respectively, under different light intensities. The identified proteins were largely involved in ion binding, amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulation and defense response. The enhancement of ion-binding, transcriptional regulation, amino acid metabolism, and defense response proteins suggests a strengthening of the connection between the rootstock and scion under high light intensity. Indeed, the accumulation of key enzymes in the biological processes described above appears to play an important role in the vascular connections of grafted seedlings. Moreover, it appears that 100 μmol m-2 s-1 results in better protein expression responses in grafted seedlings.

  6. [PS II photochemical efficiency in flag leaf of wheat varieties and its adaptation to strong sun- light intensity on farmland of Xiangride in Qinghai Province, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sheng-Bo; Chen, Wen-Jie; Shi, Rui; Li, Miao; Zhang, Huai-Gang; Sun, Ya-Nan

    2014-09-01

    Taking four wheat varieties developed by Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, as test materials, with the measurement of content of photosynthetic pigments, leaf area, fresh and dry mass of flag leaf, the PS II photochemistry efficiency of abaxial and adaxial surface of flag leaf and its adaptation to strong solar radiation during the period of heading stage in Xiangride region were investigated with the pulse-modulated in-vivo chlorophyll fluorescence technique. The results indicated that flag leaf angle mainly grew in horizontal state in Gaoyuan 314, Gaoyuan 363 and Gaoyuan 584, and mainly in vertical state in Gaoyuan 913 because of its smaller leaf area and larger width. Photosynthetic pigments were different among the 4 varieties, and positively correlated with intrinsic PS II photochemistry efficiencies (Fv/Fm). In clear days, especially at noon, the photosynthetic photoinhibition was more serious in abaxial surface of flag leaf due to directly facing the solar radiation, but it could recover after reduction of sunlight intensity in the afternoon, which meant that no inactive damage happened in PS II reaction centers. There were significant differences of PS II actual and maximum photochemical efficiencies at the actinic light intensity (ΦPS II and Fv'/Fm') between abaxial and adaxial surface, and their relative variation trends were on the contrary. The photochemical and non-photochemical quenching coefficients (qP and NPQ) had a similar tendency in both abaxial and adaxial surfaces. Although ΦPS II and qP were lower in adaxial surface of flag leaf, the Fv'/Fm' was significantly higher, which indicated that the potential PS II capture efficiency of excited energy was higher. The results demonstrated that process of photochemical and non-photochemical quenching could effectively dissipate excited energy caused by strong solar radiation, and there were higher adaptation capacities in wheat varieties natively cultivated in

  7. Intense pulsed light annealing of copper zinc tin sulfide nanocrystal coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Bryce A.; Smeaton, Michelle A.; Holgate, Collin S.; Trejo, Nancy D.; Francis, Lorraine F., E-mail: francis@umn.edu; Aydil, Eray S., E-mail: aydil@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 151 Amundson Hall, 421 Washington Avenue SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A promising method for forming the absorber layer in copper zinc tin sulfide [Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS)] thin film solar cells is thermal annealing of coatings cast from dispersions of CZTS nanocrystals. Intense pulsed light (IPL) annealing utilizing xenon flash lamps is a potential high-throughput, low-cost, roll-to-roll manufacturing compatible alternative to thermal annealing in conventional furnaces. The authors studied the effects of flash energy density (3.9–11.6 J/cm{sup 2}) and number of flashes (1–400) during IPL annealing on the microstructure of CZTS nanocrystal coatings cast on molybdenum-coated soda lime glass substrates (Mo-coated SLG). The annealed coatings exhibited cracks with two distinct linear crack densities, 0.01 and 0.2 μm{sup −1}, depending on the flash intensity and total number of flashes. Low density cracking (0.01 μm{sup −1}, ∼1 crack per 100 μm) is caused by decomposition of CZTS at the Mo-coating interface. Vapor decomposition products at the interface cause blisters as they escape the coating. Residual decomposition products within the blisters were imaged using confocal Raman spectroscopy. In support of this hypothesis, replacing the Mo-coated SLG substrate with quartz eliminated blistering and low-density cracking. High density cracking is caused by rapid thermal expansion and contraction of the coating constricted on the substrate as it is heated and cooled during IPL annealing. Finite element modeling showed that CZTS coatings on low thermal diffusivity materials (i.e., SLG) underwent significant differential heating with respect to the substrate with rapid rises and falls of the coating temperature as the flash is turned on and off, possibly causing a build-up of tensile stress within the coating prompting cracking. Use of a high thermal diffusivity substrate, such as a molybdenum foil (Mo foil), reduces this differential heating and eliminates the high-density cracking. IPL annealing in presence of sulfur

  8. Effectiveness of Intense Pulsed Light treatment in solar lentigo: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlgen Ertam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intense Pulsed Light (IPL; is a light system of 500-1200 nm wavelength which is used for the treatment of hair removal, hyperpigmentation, non-ablative skin resurfacing and superficial vascular lesions. The mechanism of action is thought to be the focal epidermal coagulation due to selective photothermolysis in the epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. A variety of laser systems can be used in the treatment of lsolar entigo. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of IPL in solar lentigo. Materials and Methods: The archives of Cosmetology Unit retrospectively reviewed for the patients with the diagnosis of solar lentigo from March 2007 to November 2010. There were 139 files of patients who were diagnosed as solar lentigo clinically and dermoscopically and treated by IPL (L900 a & m IPL. Informed consent was taken from all patients. Among them, 42 patients who had come to controls regularly and had photographed before and after treatment included into the study. Results: A total of 52 lesions of 42 female and 1 male patient included into the study. Patients’ mean age was 42±9.6 years, ranging between 33 to 88. Of the lesions, 27 lesions(51.9% were on cheek, 7 lesions (13.5% were on zygoma, 6 lesions (11.5% were on chin, 4 lesions (7.7% were on hands, 4 lesions (7.7% were on forehead, 2 lesions(3.8% were on nose, 2 lesions (3.8% were on forearm. The mean number of sessions was 3.28 ranging between 1 and 7. After treatment, improvement was over 75% in 57,7% lesions, 50-75% in 17.3% of the lesions, 25-50% in 17.3% of the lesions, under 25% in 7.7% of the lesions. Conclusion: According to the results of our work, IPL can be accepted as an effective, cheap and safety method in terms of its side effects in treatment of solar lentigo.

  9. Application of intense pulsed light in the treatment of dermatologic disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Heidi; Wu, Douglas C; Rao, Jaggi; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2014-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved intense pulsed light (IPL) devices for the treatment of a variety of benign pigmentary and vascular lesions, but the range of disease amenable to IPL treatment continues to expand, and there are no evidence-based clinical guidelines for its use in FDA-approved and off-label indications. To provide evidence-based recommendations to guide physicians in the application of IPL for the treatment of dermatologic disease. A literature search of the CENTRAL (1991 to May 6, 2013), EMBASE (1974 to May 6, 2013), and MEDLINE in-process and nonindexed citations and MEDLINE (1964 to present) databases was conducted. Studies that examined the role of IPL in primary dermatologic disease were identified, and multiple independent investigators extracted and synthesized data. Recommendations were based on the highest level of evidence available. Level 1 evidence was found for the use of IPL for the treatment of melasma, acne vulgaris, and telangiectasia. Level 2 evidence was found for the treatment of lentiginous disease, rosacea, capillary malformations, actinic keratoses, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Level 3 or lower evidence was found for the treatment of poikiloderma of Civatte, venous malformations, infantile hemangioma, hypertrophic scars, superficial basal cell carcinoma, and Bowen's disease. IPL is an effective treatment modality for a growing range of dermatologic disease and in some cases may represent a treatment of choice. It is typically well tolerated. Further high-quality studies are required. © 2014 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hand rejuvenation using standard Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) in Asian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Seiichi

    2016-03-31

    In recent years, facial rejuvenation using Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) is in demand and there have been many reports. However, hand rejuvenation, which aims to treat lentigines on the dorsal hand and wrinkles, is in demand but with few reports. In this study, hand rejuvenation was attempted using two wavelengths of a standard IPL system. It focuses mainly on improvement of lentigines, and efficacy on wrinkles on the dorsal hand will be discussed as well. The subjects were 128 Japanese patients (average age 58.1) who had lentigines and wrinkles on the dorsa of both hands, and the wavelength spectra of 560 - 1200 nm and 515 - 1200 nm were applied. In general, the number of treatments was not fixed, and further treatments beyond the first treatment were added only when asked for by the patient. Lentigines were assessed on 4 levels and wrinkles on 3 levels. The results in lentigines were graded "Excellent" in 45.3%, "Good" in 14.8%, "Unchanged" in 37.5% and "Bad" in 2.3% of the patients. Dark-toned lentigines in particular improved after one treatment. On the other hand, the results in wrinkles were graded as "Effective" in 25.0%, "Hard to tell" in 39.1% and "Ineffective" in 35.9% of the patients after the first treatment, but there was increased improvement in some cases after multiple treatments. By using appropriate IPL parameters with specific cut-off filters, dark-toned and flat senile lentigines could be treated effectively with a small number of treatments. On the other hand, improvement of fine dorsal wrinkles was noticed but more finesse is needed as to how to apply IPL and to decide on the number of treatments. Further study is necessary, but overall it can be said that IPL is an effective choice for hand rejuvenation.

  11. Successful white hair removal with combined coloring and intense pulsed Light (IPL): a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijanpoor, Robabeh; Poorsattar BejehMir, Arash; Mokmeli, Soheila

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce adjunct therapy to intense pulsed light (IPL) and to assess it in terms of safety, expense, feasibility, and efficacy. Currently there is no satisfactory, efficient method for long-term white hair removal. We conducted a randomized clinical trial of hirsute patients with excessive white hair on the chin and cheeks. In addition to IPL, the patients were randomly assigned to have their white hair colored with either black eyeliner or black hair dye as an adjunct to IPL aided for of six sessions (with a 4-week interval between sessions). The primary efficacy outcome, which was defined as the outcome after six sessions of therapy, was scored as poor (60%) response to white hair removal in predefined areas. The secondary outcome was recurrence 6 months after the final therapy session. In the eyeliner group (n=31), 15 (48.4%) individuals showed a fair response, and 16 (51.6%) individuals showed a good response. In the color-dye group (n=31), 1 (3.2%), 17 (54.8%) and 13 (41.9%) participants scored poor, fair, and good, respectively. There were no differences in clinician judgment of the treatment success between the eyeliner and color-dye groups after the six therapy sessions (p=0.895). Thirty-one patients had 6 months of visits (11 in the hair dye and 20 in the eyeliner group). Three participants in the color-dye group and five participants in the eyeliner group failed to show improvement 6 months after the laser surgery. There was no distinguishable pattern of failure between the two study groups (p=1). This study supports that hair coloring is an efficient and feasible technique that can be combined with IPL to eliminate white facial hair.

  12. Facial photo rejuvenation using two different intense pulsed light (IPL) wavelength bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerring, Peter; Christiansen, Kåre; Troilius, Agneta; Dierickx, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) systems are increasingly used for treatment of photo damaged skin. In the present study, we investigated the clinical efficacy and safety of two different wavelength bands generated by the same IPL device. An IPL device was equipped with either a 555-950 nm filter (VL), or a 530-750 nm filter (PR). Fair, good or excellent clearance of visible telangiectasias was obtained in 81.8% of the patients (PR) and in 58.8% (VL). In the treatment of diffuse erythema, fair, good or excellent clearance was obtained in 72.7% (PR) and in 35.0% (VL). The PR filter was more efficient (P = 0.025) in reduction of diffuse erythema. The average number of treatments was 1.75 (PR) and 1.82 (VL). For the treatment of irregular pigmentation, fair, good or excellent clearance was obtained in 54.5% (PR) and in 61.9% (VL). Multiple treatments of irregular pigmentation were also evaluated. Using the VL filter more than two treatments did not induce further clinical improvement. The patients also scored their over-all satisfaction. Either fair, good or excellent results were reported by 66.7% (PR) and by 76.2% (VL). No skin atrophy, scarring or pigment disturbances were noted after the treatments. Swelling and erythema were registered by 2/3 (PR) and 1/3 (VL) of the patients. The two IPL wavelength bands were both found to be effective in the treatment of photo damaged facial skin. The clinical efficacy and safety of the two different treatment procedures were comparable to those reported in earlier studies, and finally treatment with these filter combinations required less than half the fluence, no active cooling and fewer treatments. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. The success of the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii in freshwaters is enhanced by the combined effects of light intensity and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Bonilla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters are thought to be a consequence of the combined effects of anthropogenic eutrophication and climate change. It is expected that climate change will affect water mixing regimes that alter the water transparency and ultimately the light environment for phytoplankton. Blooms of the potentially toxic cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii are expanding from tropical towards temperate regions. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this expansion, including an increase in water temperature due to climate change and the high phenotypic plasticity of the species that allows it to exploit different light environments. We performed an analysis based on eight lakes in tropical, subtropical and temperate regions to examine the distribution and abundance of C. raciborskii in relation to water temperature and transparency. We then conducted a series of short-term factorial experiments that combined three temperatures and two light intensity levels using C. raciborskii cultures alone and in interaction with another cyanobacterium to identify its growth capacity. Our results from the field, in contrast to predictions, showed no differences in dominance (>40% to the total biovolume of C. raciborskii between climate regions. C. raciborskii was able to dominate the phytoplankton in a wide range of light environments (euphotic zone = 1.5 to 5 m, euphotic zone/mixing zone ratio <0.5 to >1.5. Moreover, C. raciborskii was capable of dominating the phytoplankton at low temperatures (<15°C. Our experimental results showed that C. raciborskii growing in interaction was enhanced by the increase of the temperature and light intensity. C. raciborskii growth in high light intensities and at a wide range of temperatures, suggests that any advantage that this species may derive from climate change that favors its dominance in the phytoplankton is likely due to changes in the light environment rather than changes in

  14. Effects of light sources and intensity on broilers grown to heavy weights: Hematophysiological and biochemical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most governments around the world including the USA have passed measures to phase out incandescent light bulbs in favor of more energy-efficient lighting alternatives. Research is limited on blood physiological variables of broilers grown to heavy weights (> 3 kg) under these new light sources to en...

  15. Rare-Earth Free Self-Activated Graphene Quantum Dots and Copper-Cysteamine Phosphors for Enhanced White Light-Emitting-Diodes under Single Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Wubin; Lei, Yifeng; Xu, Man; Zhao, Pei; Zhang, Zhanhui; Zhou, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Rare-earth (RE) based phosphors are attractive due to their potential applications. However, owing to the resource issue, these kinds of phosphors are expensive and costly. On the contrary, as for phosphor-convert white light-emitting-diodes (pc-WLEDs), a solution-processed tunable warm white emission LED composite is fabricated in this study under single excitation, with both RE free phosphors graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and Copper-Cysteamine (Cu-Cy). By using microwave-assisted wet-chemica...

  16. Topical 5-aminolevulinic photodynamic therapy with red light vs intense pulsed light for the treatment of acne vulgaris: A spilit face, randomized, prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linglin; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Yunfeng; Liu, Xiaojing; Wang, Bo; Wang, Peiru; Zhang, Guolong; Wang, Xiuli

    2017-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) has been an effective method for treating acne vulgaris. Red light is the most widely used light source while Intense pulsed lights (IPL) is reported effective and well-tolerated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and adverse reactions of ALA-PDT with red light on acne compared with ALA-PDT with IPL.12 patients were recruited in the randomized, prospective and split-face study. 5% ALA cream were applied on the whole face with 2 hours' incubation before narrow band LED(633 ± 10 nm, 36 ∼ 108J/cm2) on one side of face and IPL(590∼1200 nm, 15∼17J/cm2) on the other side. Three treatment sessions were administered with 2-week interval each time and 8 weeks' follow up. The number of the total acne lesions and inflammatory lesions of the side treated by red light-PDT showed a relatively higher reduction rate that that by IPL-PDT (P acne vulgaris. ALA-PDT with red light may achieve better efficacy by more effective photobleaching of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), whereas IPL may accomplish less adverse reactions and better tolerance.

  17. Formation of the angular dependence of intensity of the light scattered on the optically dense atomic ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay V. Larionov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The probe light scattering on the cold optically dense atomic ensemble is studied theoretically in the paper. In order to describe multiple scattering of light in the context of quantum electrodynamics, the Konstantinov–Perel–Keldysh diagram technique has been used. This technique allows to rewrite the considered case of light scattering in terms of diagram series where each term describes incoherent scattering of certain order. Decoding these terms allowed us to obtain the explicit analytical expression for the cross-section of multiple incoherent scattering for the case of stationary two-level atoms (transition Jg = 0 → Je = 1. The numerical analysis of this expression carried out by applying the Monte-Carlo simulation made it possible to find an influence of different orders of scattering on forming the angular dependence of scattered light intensity.

  18. Pentoses and light intensity increase the growth and carbohydrate production and alter the protein profile of Chlorella minutissima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, B C B; Cassuriaga, A P A; Morais, M G; Costa, J A V

    2017-08-01

    High concentrations of carbon, which is considered a necessary element, are required for microalgal growth. Therefore, the identification of alternative carbon sources available in large quantities is increasingly important. This study evaluated the effects of light variation and pentose addition on the carbohydrate content and protein profile of Chlorella minutissima grown in a raceway photobioreactor. The kinetic parameters, carbohydrate content, and protein profile of Chlorella minutissima and its theoretical potential for ethanol production were estimated. The highest cellular concentrations were obtained with a light intensity of 33.75µmol.m-2.s-1. Arabinose addition combined with a light intensity of 33.75µmol.m-2.s-1 increased the carbohydrate content by 53.8% and theoretically produced 39.1mL·100g-1 ethanol. All of the assays showed that a lower light availability altered the protein profile. The luminous intensity affects xylose and arabinose assimilation and augments the carbohydrate content in C. minutissima, making this microalga appropriate for bioethanol production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Origin of the S* Excited State Feature of Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting Complex 1 from Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Swainsbury, David J K; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Blankenship, Robert E

    2017-08-17

    This spectroscopic study investigates the origin of the transient feature of the S* excited state of carotenoids bound in LH1 complexes from purple bacteria. The studies were performed on two RC-LH1 complexes from Rba. sphaeroides strains that bound carotenoids with different carbon-carbon double bond conjugation N, neurosporene (N = 9) and spirilloxanthin (N = 13). The S* transient spectral feature, originally associated with an elusive and optically silent excited state of spirilloxanthin in the LH1 complex, may be successfully explained and mimicked without involving any unknown electronic state. The spectral and temporal characteristics of the S* feature suggest that it is associated with triplet-triplet annihilation of carotenoid triplets formed after direct excitation of the molecule via a singlet fission mechanism. Depending on pigment homogeneity and carotenoid assembly in the LH1 complex, the spectro-temporal component associated with triplet-triplet annihilation may simply resolve a pure T-S spectrum of a carotenoid. In some cases (like spirilloxanthin), the T-S feature will also be accompanied by a carotenoid Stark spectrum and/or residual transient absorption of minor carotenoid species bound into LH1 antenna complex.

  20. Light at night acutely impairs glucose tolerance in a time-, intensity- and wavelength-dependent manner in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opperhuizen, Anne-Loes; Stenvers, Dirk J; Jansen, Remi D; Foppen, Ewout; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2017-07-01

    Exposure to light at night (LAN) has increased dramatically in recent decades. Animal studies have shown that chronic dim LAN induced obesity and glucose intolerance. Furthermore, several studies in humans have demonstrated that chronic exposure to artificial LAN may have adverse health effects with an increased risk of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes. It is well-known that acute exposure to LAN affects biological clock function, hormone secretion and the activity of the autonomic nervous system, but data on the effects of LAN on glucose homeostasis are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of LAN on glucose metabolism. Male Wistar rats were subjected to i.v. glucose or insulin tolerance tests while exposed to 2 h of LAN in the early or late dark phase. In subsequent experiments, different light intensities and wavelengths were used. LAN exposure early in the dark phase at ZT15 caused increased glucose responses during the first 20 min after glucose infusion (p effect of LAN was both intensity- and wavelength-dependent. White light of 50 and 150 lx induced greater glucose responses than 5 and 20 lx, whereas all intensities other than 5 lx reduced locomotor activity. Green light induced glucose intolerance, but red and blue light did not, suggesting the involvement of a specific retina-brain pathway. Together, these data show that exposure to LAN has acute adverse effects on glucose metabolism in a time-, intensity- and wavelength-dependent manner.

  1. The effect of cycled lighting in the intensive care unit on sleep, activity and physiological parameters: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwall, Marie; Fridh, Isabell; Jutengren, Göran; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Sterner, Anders; Lindahl, Berit

    2017-08-01

    Patients in intensive care suffer from severe illnesses or injuries and from symptoms related to care and treatments. Environmental factors, such as lighting at night, can disturb patients' circadian rhythms. The aim was to investigate whether patients displayed circadian rhythms and whether a cycled lighting intervention would impact it. In this pilot study (N=60), a cycled lighting intervention in a two-bed patient room was conducted. An ordinary hospital room functioned as the control. Patient activity, heart rate, mean arterial pressure and body temperature were recorded. All data were collected during the patients' final 24h in the intensive care unit. There was a significant difference between day and night patient activity within but not between conditions. Heart rates differed between day and night significantly for patients in the ordinary room but not in the intervention room or between conditions. Body temperature was lowest at night for all patients with no significant difference between conditions. Patients in both conditions had a natural circadian rhythm; and the cycled lighting intervention showed no significant impact. As the sample size was small, a larger repeated measures study should be conducted to determine if other types of lighting or environmental factors can impact patients' well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Can Increasing the Manufacturer's Recommended Shortest Curing Time of High-intensity Light-emitting Diodes Adequately Cure Sealants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchal, Caroline F; Wells, Martha H; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2015-01-01

    To investigate sealant depth of cure after increasing the curing times of high-intensity light-emitting diode units (LEDs). Three sealants (opaque-unfilled, opaque-filled, and clear-filled) were light cured in a covered-slot mold with: (a) three LEDs (VALO, SmartLite, Fusion) for six to 15 seconds; and (b) a quartz-tungsten halogen (QTH) light for 40 seconds as a control (N=10). Twenty-four hours after light curing, microhardness was measured at the sealant surface and through the depth at 0.5 mm increments. Results were analyzed via analysis of variance followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls test (significance level 0.05). The opaque-filled and clear-filled sealants cured with VALO for six or nine seconds had hardness values that were statistically equivalent to or better than the QTH to a depth of 1.5 mm. Using Fusion for 10 seconds (exposure limit) did not adequately cure the three sealants beyond one mm. SmartLite at 15 seconds (maximum exposure period without overheating) did not adequately cure the sealants beyond 0.5 mm. Among the tested high-intensity LEDs, only VALO at double or triple the manufacturers' shortest curing time (six or nine seconds) provided adequate curing of opaque-filled and clear-filled sealants at 1.5 mm depth compared to the 40-second QTH light.

  3. Settlement and cell division of diatom Navicula can be influenced by light of various qualities and intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shan; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong

    2013-11-01

    Diatom settlement and cell division is important in two major aspects. Firstly, biofouling is a costly problem in the shipping industry that necessitates the effective inhibition of diatom settlement and proliferation. Secondly, biological coatings on the basis of ordered and densely packed cell lawns of diatom are useful for nano- and biotechnology. This study demonstrated that the settlement and cell division of the marine unicellular diatom Navicula sp. can be influenced by light-emitting diodes of various light qualities and intensities. Except for blue light, the settlement of diatoms was reduced by weak (approx. 0.14-6 µE m(-2) s(-1)) green, yellow or red light. When the irradiance intensity, however, was higher than 8-9 µE m(-2) s(-1), the settlement was stimulated. This phenomenon could be explained by the hypothesis of spatial interference between a chloroplast and a holdfast-like structure. Densely packed lawn of diatoms with uniform distribution can be fabricated for nanotechnologies, using blue light that stimulates diatom cell division. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Scattering Intensity and Directionality Probed Along Individual Zinc Oxide Nanorods with Precisely Controlled Light Polarization and Nanorod Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Choi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We elucidated the light-matter interaction of individual ZnO NRs with a monochromatic beam of linearly polarized light that scatters elastically from the ZnO NRs by performing forward scattering and back-aperture imaging in a dark-field setting. We precisely controlled the electric field vector of the incident light and the NR orientation within the plane of light interaction during both modes of measurement, and spatially resolved the scattering response from different interaction points along the NR long axis. We then discerned, for the first time, the effects of light polarization, analyzer angle, and NR orientation on the intensity and directionality of the optical responses both qualitatively and quantitatively along the length of the single ZnO NRs. We identified distinctive scattering profiles from individual ZnO NRs subject to incident light polarization with controlled NR orientation from the forward dark-field scattering and back-aperture imaging modes. The fundamental light interaction behavior of ZnO NRs is likely to govern their functional outcomes in photonics, optoelectronics, and sensor devices. Hence, our efforts provided much needed insight into unique optical responses from individual 1D ZnO nanomaterials, which could be highly beneficial in developing next-generation optoelectronic systems and optical biodetectors with improved device efficiency and sensitivity.

  5. Chlorophyll fluorescence in the leaves of Tradescantia species of different ecological groups: induction events at different intensities of actinic light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptushenko, Vasily V; Ptushenko, Elena A; Samoilova, Olga P; Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2013-11-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis is one of the most convenient and widespread techniques used to monitor photosynthesis performance in plants. In this work, after a brief overview of the mechanisms of regulation of photosynthetic electron transport and protection of photosynthetic apparatus against photodamage, we describe results of our study of the effects of actinic light intensity on photosynthetic performance in Tradescantia species of different ecological groups. Using the chlorophyll fluorescence as a probe of photosynthetic activity, we have found that the shade-tolerant species Tradescantia fluminensis shows a higher sensitivity to short-term illumination (≤20min) with low and moderate light (≤200μEm(-2)s(-1)) as compared with the light-resistant species Tradescantia sillamontana. In T. fluminensis, non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ) and photosystem II operational efficiency (parameter ΦPSII) saturate as soon as actinic light reaches ≈200μEm(-2)s(-1). Otherwise, T. sillamontana revealed a higher capacity for NPQ at strong light (≥800μEm(-2)s(-1)). The post-illumination adaptation of shade-tolerant plants occurs slower than in the light-resistant species. The data obtained are discussed in terms of reactivity of photosynthetic apparatus to short-term variations of the environment light. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intensity of bitterness of processed yerba mate leaves originated in two contrasted light environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Rakocevic

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The bitterness intensity of beverage prepared from the leaves produced on the males and females of yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis, grown in the forest understory and monoculture, was evaluated. The leaves were grouped by their position (in the crown and on the branch tips and by the leaf age. The leaf gas exchange, leaf temperature and photosynthetic photon flux density were observed. Inter and intra-specific competition for light and self-shading showed the same effect on yerba mate beverage taste. All the shading types resulted in bitterer taste of the processed yerba mate leaves compared to the leaves originated under the direct sun exposure. The leaves from the plants grown in the monoculture showed less bitterness than those grown in the forest understory. This conclusion was completely opposite to the conventionally accepted paradigm of the yerba mate industries. The leaves from the tips (younger leaves of the plants grown in the monoculture resulted a beverage of softer taste; the males produced less bitter leaves in any light environment (forest understory or in the crown in monoculture. The taste was related to the photosynthetic and transpiration rate, and leaf temperature. Stronger bitterness of the leaves provided from the shade conditions was related to the decreased leaf temperature and transpiration in the diurnal scale.Mediu-se a intensidade de amargor da bebida preparada a partir de folhas da erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis de diversas idades, situadas em duas posições na copa (interior e ponteiras, produzidas por plantas masculinas e femininas cultivadas na floresta antropizada e em monocultura. As trocas gasosas foliares, a temperatura de folhas e a densidade de fluxo de fótons fotossinteticamente ativos também foram medidas. Com isso verificou-se que a idéia corrente de que o sombreamento está diretamente relacionado ao sabor suave do chimarrão é completamente equivocada, já que as competições inter- e intra

  7. Hair removal using a new intense pulsed light source in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu-Miao; Zhou, Zhan-Chao; Gold, Michael H

    2009-06-01

    Unwanted hair is a widespread cosmetic problem. Several lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) have been utilized for this purpose. A new IPL device (Lumenis One) with OPT is one of the newer modalities to be studied in Chinese patients. This study evaluates the short-term efficacy and side effects of the new IPL device for epilation in Chinese patients. Eighteen Chinese women with Fitzpatrick skin types III-V and black hair, were treated four times at 4 to 6-week intervals using IPL (Lumenis One) on the axillae (n=13) and the upper lip (n=5). The energy density for treatment ranged from 14 to 22 J/cm(2). Parameters utilized were 695-/755-nm filters, triple pulse for patients on the axillae, and 640-/695-nm filters, double pulse for patients on the upper lip (3.5- to 7-ms pulse, 30- to 90-ms pulse delay, 15x35 mm spot size). Hair reduction was assessed at baseline, immediately before each treatment session, and at 4 weeks after the fourth treatment. Patient's satisfaction on a 5-point scale was also evaluated. The average hair reduction for all sites was 49.9% after one session, 58.6% after two sessions, 79.3% after three sessions, and 83.8% after four sessions (p=0.001). The hair reduction of 44.1%, 52.1%, 81.1%, and 86.0% were achieved after each treatment for axillae, with 65.1%, 75.7%, 74.6%, and 78.0% for upper lip. Patients got more satisfaction after four sessions (score 3.1) than that after two sessions (2.0) (p=0.001). In both the assessments, upper lip appeared to show a better response than axillae after two IPL treatments, which reversed after four treatments. No significant complications or adverse events were reported. The new IPL device provides a safe and effective means of hair removal for Chinese patients. Treatment efficacy varies with the anatomic location and number of treatments. However, further study is necessary to determine the long-term clinical efficacy in Chinese patients.

  8. Intensive Monitoring Survey of Nearby Galaxies (IMSNG): Catching Early Light Curves of Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Myungshin; IMSNG Team

    2018-01-01

    SNe light curves have been used to study the expansion history of the universe, and a lot of efforts have gone into understanding the overall shape of the radioactively powered light curve. However, we still have little direct observational evidence for the theorized SN progenitor systems. Recent studies suggest that the light curve of a supernova shortly after its explosion (world. Through this survey, we expect to catch the very early precursor emission as faint as R=21 mag (~0.1 Rsun for the progenitor). This poster outlines this project, and present a few scientific highlights, such as the early light curve of SN 2015F in NGC 2442.

  9. Relevance of the structure of time-resolved spectral output to light-tissue interaction using intense pulsed light (IPL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Caerwyn; Town, Godfrey; Bjerring, Peter

    2008-02-01

    High quality IPLs can offer simple, safe and effective treatments for long-term hair removal, removal of benign vascular and pigmented skin abnormalities, skin rejuvenation and acne treatments. Significant differences in clinical outcome have been recorded among different free-discharge and constant current IPLs despite identical settings. We investigated the differences in optical output of 19 IPLs in normal clinical use in the UK to evaluate spectral output, energy density values and pulse structure and propose a correlation between light-tissue interaction and spectral output as measured by time-resolved photo-spectrometry. Using a fast spectrometer, generating 1,000 full spectral scans per second, time resolved spectral data of IPL outputs was captured with a resolution of 0.035 nm. IPL spectral outputs were calculated and graphically modelled using MathCAD software for comparison. Several IPLs, which professed matching of pulse durations to the thermal relaxation times of specific follicular or vascular targets were shown to have effective pulse durations that were vastly shorter than those claimed. Some IPLs claiming 'square pulse' characteristics failed to show constant spectral output across the duration of the pulse or sub-pulses. This study provides a suitable method to determine accurately key parameters of the emitted light pulses from IPLs and confirms the direct correlation between the electrical discharge current profile and the output energy profile. The differences measured between first generation free discharge systems and modern square pulse systems may have important clinical consequences in terms of different light-tissue interactions and hence clinical efficacy and safety. IPL manufacturers should provide time-resolved spectroscopy graphs to users.

  10. Dynamic light application therapy to reduce the incidence and duration of delirium in intensive-care patients: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, K.S.; Laheij, R.J.; Boogaard, M. van den; Moviat, M.A.; Paling, A.J.; Polderman, F.N.; Rozendaal, F.W.; Salet, G.A.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.; Jager, C.P. de

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disturbed circadian rhythm is a potentially modifiable cause of delirium among patients in intensive-care units (ICUs). Bright-light therapy in the daytime can realign circadian rhythm and reduce the incidence of delirium. We investigated whether a high-intensity dynamic light

  11. Probing ultra-fast processes with high dynamic range at 4th-generation light sources: Arrival time and intensity binning at unprecedented repetition rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kovalev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding dynamics on ultrafast timescales enables unique and new insights into important processes in the materials and life sciences. In this respect, the fundamental pump-probe approach based on ultra-short photon pulses aims at the creation of stroboscopic movies. Performing such experiments at one of the many recently established accelerator-based 4th-generation light sources such as free-electron lasers or superradiant THz sources allows an enormous widening of the accessible parameter space for the excitation and/or probing light pulses. Compared to table-top devices, critical issues of this type of experiment are fluctuations of the timing between the accelerator and external laser systems and intensity instabilities of the accelerator-based photon sources. Existing solutions have so far been only demonstrated at low repetition rates and/or achieved a limited dynamic range in comparison to table-top experiments, while the 4th generation of accelerator-based light sources is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology, which enables operation at MHz or even GHz repetition rates. In this article, we present the successful demonstration of ultra-fast accelerator-laser pump-probe experiments performed at an unprecedentedly high repetition rate in the few-hundred-kHz regime and with a currently achievable optimal time resolution of 13 fs (rms. Our scheme, based on the pulse-resolved detection of multiple beam parameters relevant for the experiment, allows us to achieve an excellent sensitivity in real-world ultra-fast experiments, as demonstrated for the example of THz-field-driven coherent spin precession.

  12. The Sensory Quality of Meat, Game, Poultry, Seafood and Meat Products as Affected by Intense Light Pulses: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasevic, Igor; Rajkovic, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The effect of intense light pulses (ILP) on sensory quality of 16 different varieties of meat, meat products, game, poultry and seafood are reviewed. Changes induced by ILP are animal species, type of meat product and fluences applied dependent. ILP significantly deteriorates sensory quality of cooked meat products. It causes less change in the sensory properties of dry cured than cooked meat products while fermented sausage is least affected. The higher fluence applied significantly changes ...

  13. Effect of Light Intensity for Optimum Biomass and Lipid Production from Scenedesmus dimorphus (Turpin) Kützing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawati, F. N.; Mahajoeno, E.; Sunarto; Sari, S. L. A.

    2017-07-01

    One source of alternative energy substitute for petroleum raw materials is renewable vegetable oils known as biodiesel. Biodiesel can be produced from microalgae, since it was more efficient and environmentally friendly. Scenedesmus dimorphus (Turpin) Kützing was developed as a source of biodiesel since it had potential of high lipid production. The aims of this research were to know the rate of growth of Scenedesmus dimorphus in different lighting and the optimimum light intensity for biomass and lipid production. This research used a completely randomized design consisting of 3 treatments with 3 replications. Treatments in this research were the light intensity, i.e. 7,500, 10,000, and 12,500 lux. Scenedesmus dimorphus was grew in Bold’s Basal Medium (BBM). Parameters observed in this research were the cell number, biomass and lipid production of S. dimorphus. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by DMRT 5%. The results showed that the optimum growth rate of S. dimorphus was in the intensity of 12,500 lux that was 100.80 x 106 cells.ml-1. The optimum production of biomass and lipids was in treatment 12,500 lux i.e; 1.1407 g.L-1 and 0.2520 g.L-1 (22.28% dry weight).

  14. Removal of Low-Molecular Weight Aldehydes by Selected Houseplants under Different Light Intensities and CO2 Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The removal of five low-molecular weight aldehydes by two houseplants (Schefflera octophylla (Lour. Harms and Chamaedorea elegans were investigated in a laboratory simulation environment with short-term exposure to different low light intensities and CO2 concentrations. Under normal circumstances, the C1–C5 aldehyde removal rates of Schefflera octophylla (Lour. Harms and Chamaedorea elegans (Lour. Harms ranged from 0.311 μmol/m2/h for valeraldehyde to 0.677 μmol/m2/h for formaldehyde, and 0.526 μmol/m2/h for propionaldehyde to 1.440 μmol/m2/h for formaldehyde, respectively. However, when the light intensities varied from 0 to 600 lx, a significant correlation between the aldehyde removal rate and the light intensity was found. Moreover, the CO2 experiments showed that the total aldehyde removal rates of Schefflera octophylla (Lour. Harms and Chamaedorea elegans (Lour. Harms decreased 32.0% and 43.2%, respectively, with increasing CO2 concentrations from 350 ppmv to 1400 ppmv. This might be explained by the fact that the excessive CO2 concentration decreased the stomatal conductance which limited the carbonyl uptake from the stomata.

  15. Silica-Coated Mn-Doped CsPb(Cl/Br)3 Inorganic Perovskite Quantum Dots: Exciton-to-Mn Energy Transfer and Blue-Excitable Solid-State Lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daqin; Fang, Gaoliang; Chen, Xiao

    2017-11-22

    Tunability of emitting colors of perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) was generally realized via composition/size modulation. Due to their bandgap absorption and ionic crystal features, the mixing of multiple PQDs inevitably suffers from reabsorption and anion-exchange effects. Herein, we address these issues with high-content Mn2+-doped CsPbCl3 PQDs that can yield blue-excitable orange Mn2+ emission benefited from exciton-to-Mn energy transfer and Cl-to-Br anion exchange. Silica-coating was applied to improve air stability of PQDs, suppress the loss of Mn2+, and avoid anion-exchange between different PQDs. As a direct benefit of intense multicolor emissions from Mn2+-doped PQD@SiO2 solid phosphors, a prototype white light-emitting diode with excellent optical performance and superior light stability was constructed using green CsPbBr3@SiO2 and orange Mn: CsPb(Cl/Br)3@SiO2 composites as color converters, verifying their potential applications in the field of optoelectronics.

  16. Three-photon Gaussian–Gaussian–Laguerre–Gaussian excitation of a localized atom to a highly excited Rydberg state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhadi, L.

    2017-12-01

    Optical vortices are currently one of the most intensively studied topics in light–matter interaction. In this work, a three-step axial Doppler- and recoil-free Gaussian–Gaussian-Laguerre–Gaussian (GGLG) excitation of a localized atom to the highly excited Rydberg state is presented. By assuming a large detuning for intermediate states, an effective quadrupole excitation related to the Laguerre–Gaussian (LG) excitation to the highly excited Rydberg state is obtained. This special excitation system radially confines the single highly excited Rydberg atom independently of the trapping system into a sharp potential landscape into the so-called ‘far-off-resonance optical dipole-quadrupole trap’ (FORDQT). The key parameters of the Rydberg excitation to the highly excited state, namely the effective Rabi frequency and the effective detuning including a position-dependent AC Stark shift, are calculated in terms of the basic parameters of the LG beam and of the polarization of the excitation lasers. It is shown that the obtained parameters can be tuned to have a precise excitation of a single atom to the desired Rydberg state as well. The features of transferring the optical orbital and spin angular momentum of the polarized LG beam to the atom via quadrupole Rydberg excitation offer a long-lived and controllable qudit quantum memory. In addition, in contrast to the Gaussian laser beam, the doughnut-shaped LG beam makes it possible to use a high intensity laser beam to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in quadrupole excitation with minimized perturbations coming from stray light broadening in the last Rydberg excitation process.

  17. Individual-based measurements of light intensity provide new insights into the effects of artificial light at night on daily rhythms of urban-dwelling songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominoni, Davide M; Carmona-Wagner, Esther O; Hofmann, Michaela; Kranstauber, Bart; Partecke, Jesko

    2014-05-01

    The growing interest in the effects of light pollution on daily and seasonal cycles of animals has led to a boost of research in recent years. In birds, it has been hypothesized that artificial light at night can affect daily aspects of behaviour, but one caveat is the lack of knowledge about the light intensity that wild animals, such as birds, are exposed to during the night. Organisms have naturally evolved daily rhythms to adapt to the 24-h cycle of day and night, thus, it is important to investigate the potential shifts in daily cycles due to global anthropogenic processes such as urbanization. We captured adult male European blackbirds (Turdus merula) in one rural forest and two urban sites differing in the degree of anthropogenic disturbance. We tagged these birds with light loggers and simultaneously recorded changes in activity status (active/non-active) through an automated telemetry system. We first analysed the relationship between light at night, weather conditions and date with daily activity onset and end. We then compared activity, light at night exposure and noise levels between weekdays and weekends. Onset of daily activity was significantly advanced in both urban sites compared to the rural population, while end of daily activity did not vary either among sites. Birds exposed to higher amounts of light in the late night showed earlier onset of activity in the morning, but light at night did not influence end of daily activity. Light exposure at night and onset/end of daily activity timing was not different between weekdays and weekends, but all noise variables were. A strong seasonal effect was detected in both urban and rural populations, such as birds tended to be active earlier in the morning and later in the evening (relative to civil twilight) in the early breeding season than at later stages. Our results point at artificial light at night as a major driver of change in timing of daily activity. Future research should focus on the costs and

  18. Light alters nociceptive effects of magnetic field shielding in mice: intensity and wavelength considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Prato, Frank S.; Desjardins-Holmes, Dawn; Keenliside, Lynn D; McKay, Julia C; Robertson, John A; Thomas, Alex W.

    2008-01-01

    Previous experiments with mice have shown that repeated 1 hour daily exposure to an ambient magnetic field-shielded environment induces analgesia (antinociception). The exposures were carried out in the dark (less than 2.0×1016 photons s−1 m−2) during the mid-light phase of the diurnal cycle. However, if the mice were exposed in the presence of visible light (2.0×1018 photons s−1 m−2, 400–750 nm), then the analgesic effects of shielding were eliminated. Here, we show that this effect of light...

  19. Volatile metabolites of higher plants cenoses as photosynthesizing LSS component under optimum conditions and temperature stress at different light intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelson, J.; Tikhomirov, A.; Parshina, O.; Ushakova, S.; Kalacheva, G.

    One of major yet still poorly known functions of the photosynthesizing component in life support system (LSS) is to improve the quality of air through volatile emissions (VE) of plants capable of accumulating in closed volumes, interacting between themselves and having favorable or adverse impact on humans. In all likelihood, the effect of stress changing the functional condition of plants is to be accompanied with alteration in composition and quantity of VE. There are practically no works dealing with effect of such environmental factors as light intensity and elevated air temperature on qualitative and quantitative composition of VE by higher plants' cenoses. Meanwhile experimental modeling and investigation of stability of man-made human life support systems make this problem of very important. The aim of this work is to experimentally evaluate relationship between qualitative and quantitative composition of VE and the functional condition of wheat cenoses as the basic culture of LSS photosynthesizing component under normal conditions and under temperature stress against light of different intensity. Effect of elevated temperature 35 and 45°C (with the light intensity of 70, 150 or 240 W/m2 PAR) on photosynthesis, respiration, qualitative and quantitative composition of VE of wheat (Triticum aestuvi L., variety 232) cenoses was studied in the atmosphere of growth chambers. More than 20 volatile compounds (terpenoids - a pinene, +3 carene, limonene, benzene, a - and trans-caryophylene, a - and ?-terpinene, their derivatives, aromatic hydrocarbons, etc.) were qualitatively and quantitatively estimated by chromatomassspectroscopy (GC-MS). The light intensity of 240 W/m2 PAR at 35° increase, and at 45° - decrease of thermal stability of photosynthesis and respiration. Elevated temperatures resulted in non- uniform variation of the rate and direction of VE synthesis. VE was highest at irradiance 70 W/m 2 and lowest at 240 W/m2 and 35° . During the reparation

  20. Impact of intense pulse light on quality of life in patients with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Iskandarli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: It has been shown that acne rosacea (AR seriously affects quality of life (QoL. Various options are available for the treatment of AR. There are many studies in the literature demonstrating that QoL of patients have improved after these treatments. Positive outcomes have been attained with intense pulsed light (IPL in the treatment of AR and erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR in particular. However, although there are studies in the literature showing the effectiveness of IPL in ETR, no studies have been conducted at either international or national level showing to what extent it has positive impact on QoL. Materials and Methods: Our goal in this study was to reveal to what extent IPL affects QoL positively. To this end, 30 patients who were diagnosed with ETR and met the inclusion criteria were included in the study. In this open-label, prospective, uncontrolled cohort study, visual analog scale (VAS, Physician’s Global Assessment (PGA, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 were administered before and after the IPL therapy, which was planned to be administered to the patients once in four weeks in a total of three sessions. Results: The data collected before the first session and after the last session were evaluated with the SPSS statistics software and statistically significant p values were obtained. The difference in VAS score between before and after treatment was -3.13±1.46 (p<0.01, -1.6±0.6 in PGA (p<0.01, and -11.63±3.13 in DLQI (p<0.01. The SF-36 was assessed in 8 subscales; physical functioning (PF, role-physical (RP, social functioning (SF, role-emotional (RE, bodily pain (BP, vitality (VT, mental health (MH, and general health (GH. The statistical analysis of the SF-36 showed that the difference was 35±16.24 in SF (p<0.01, 61±20 in RE (p<0.01, 8±16.9 in VT (p<0.05, 38±11.03 in MH (p<0.01, and 47.03±12.74 in GH (p<0.01. A comparison of the data obtained

  1. Breaking the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy at low light intensities by using reversibly photoswitchable proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, M.; Eggeling, C.; Jakobs, S.; Hell, S.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is indispensable in many areas of science, but until recently, diffraction has limited the resolution of its lens-based variant. The diffraction barrier has been broken by a saturated depletion of the marker's fluorescent state by stimulated emission, but this approach requires picosecond laser pulses of GW/cm2 intensity. Here, we demonstrate the surpassing of the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy with illumination intensities that are eight orders of magn...

  2. Energy transfer, excited-state deactivation, and exciplex formation in artificial caroteno-phthalocyanine light-harvesting antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berera, R.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Kodis, G.; Keirstead, A.E.; Pillai, S.; Herrero, C.; Palacios, R.E.; Vengris, M.; van Grondelle, R.; Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present results from transient absorption spectroscopy on a series of artificial light-harvesting dyads made up of a zinc phthalocyanine (Pc) covalently linked to carotenoids with 9, 10, or 11 conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, referred to as dyads 1, 2, and 3, respectively. We assessed the

  3. Development Of Beam Position And Profile Monitor Based On Light Radiation Of Atoms Excited By The Beam Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Balalykin, N I; Brovko, O I; Bykovsky, V F; Dietrich, J; Kamerdzhiev, V; Meshkov, I N; Mohos, I; Parfenov, A N

    2004-01-01

    Particle beam position and profile monitor based on registration of the light radiated by residual gas atoms is being developed by collaboration JINR-Forschungszentrum Jülich. Proposed device and first experiments have been performed at Nuclotron (JINR) and COSY (FZJ) accelerators are presented in this report.

  4. From atomistic modeling to excitation transfer and two-dimensional spectra of the FMO light-harvesting complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbrich, C.; Jansen, T.L.Th.A.; Liebers, J.; Aghtar, M.; Strumpfer, J.; Schulten, K.; Knoester, J.; Kleinekathofer, U.

    2011-01-01

    The experimental observation of long-lived quantum coherences in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex at low temperatures has challenged general intuition in the field of complex molecular systems and provoked considerable theoretical effort in search of explanations. Here we

  5. Dynamic compartment specific changes in glutathione and ascorbate levels in Arabidopsis plants exposed to different light intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Excess light conditions induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) directly in the chloroplasts but also cause an accumulation and production of ROS in peroxisomes, cytosol and vacuoles. Antioxidants such as ascorbate and glutathione occur in all cell compartments where they detoxify ROS. In this study compartment specific changes in antioxidant levels and related enzymes were monitored among Arabidopsis wildtype plants and ascorbate and glutathione deficient mutants (vtc2-1 and pad2-1, respectively) exposed to different light intensities (50, 150 which was considered as control condition, 300, 700 and 1,500 μmol m-2 s-1) for 4 h and 14 d. Results The results revealed that wildtype plants reacted to short term exposure to excess light conditions with the accumulation of ascorbate and glutathione in chloroplasts, peroxisomes and the cy