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Sample records for excitation fluorescence lifetime

  1. A Compact Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation-Emission Spectrometer (FLEXEMS) for Detecting Trace Organics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort, Leiden Measurement Technology (LMT) proposes to design and build the Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation...

  2. A Compact Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation-Emission Spectrometer (FLEXEMS) for Detecting Trace Organics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort, Leiden Measurement Technology (LMT) proposes to design and build the Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation...

  3. Time gated fluorescence lifetime imaging and micro-volume spectroscopy using two-photon excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sytsma, J.; Vroom, J.M.; de Grauw, C.J.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    A scanning microscope utilizing two-photon excitation in combination with fluorescence lifetime contrast is presented. The microscope makes use of a tunable femtosecond titanium:sapphire laser enabling the two-photon excitation of a broad range of fluorescent molecules, including UV probes.

  4. Parallel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime confocal microscopy for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-05-05

    We present a novel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) method that surpasses current FLIM techniques in multiplexing capability. The method employs Fourier multiplexing to simultaneously acquire confocal fluorescence lifetime images of multiple excitation wavelength and emission color combinations at 44,000 pixels/sec. The system is built with low-cost CW laser sources and standard PMTs with versatile spectral configuration, which can be implemented as an add-on to commercial confocal microscopes. The Fourier lifetime confocal method allows fast multiplexed FLIM imaging, which makes it possible to monitor multiple biological processes in live cells. The low cost and compatibility with commercial systems could also make multiplexed FLIM more accessible to biological research community.

  5. Differentiation of ocular fundus fluorophores by fluorescence lifetime imaging using multiple excitation and emission wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M.; Schweitzer, D.; Schenke, S.; Becker, W.; Bergmann, A.

    2006-10-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently. It is in use for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age - related macular degeneration (AMD). But other fluorophores may be of interest too: The redox pair FAD - FADH II provides information on the retinal energy metabolism, advanced glycation end products (AGE) indicate protein glycation associated with pathologic processes in diabetes as well as AMD, and alterations in the fluorescence of collagen and elastin in connective tissue give us the opportunity to observe fibrosis by fluorescence imaging. This, however, needs techniques able to differentiate particular fluorophores despite limited permissible ocular exposure as well as excitation wavelength (limited by the transmission of the human ocular lens to >400 nm). We present an ophthalmic laser scanning system (SLO), equipped with picosecond laser diodes (FWHM 100 ps, 446 nm or 468 nm respectively) and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) in two emission bands (500 - 560 nm and 560 - 700 nm). The decays were fitted by a bi-exponential model. Fluorescence spectra were measured by a fluorescence spectrometer fluorolog. Upon excitation at 446 nm, the fluorescence of AGE, FAD, and lipofuscin were found to peak at 503 nm, 525 nm, and 600 nm respectively. Accordingly, the statistical distribution of the fluorescence decay times was found to depend on the different excitation wavelengths and emission bands used. The use of multiple excitation and emission wavelengths in conjunction with fluorescence lifetime imaging allows us to discriminate between intrinsic fluorophores of the ocular fundus. Taken together with our knowledge on the anatomical structure of the fundus, these findings suggest an association of the short, middle and long fluorescence decay time to the retinal pigment epithelium, the retina, and connective tissue respectively.

  6. Diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma by two photon excited fluorescence combined with lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shunping; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Liu, Shaoxiong; Lu, Yuan; Qu, Junle

    2014-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of human skin cancer. The traditional diagnostic procedure of BCC is histological examination with haematoxylin and eosin staining of the tissue biopsy. In order to reduce complexity of the diagnosis procedure, a number of noninvasive optical methods have been applied in skin examination, for example, multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this study, we explored two-photon optical tomography of human skin specimens using two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging and FLIM. There are a number of naturally endogenous fluorophores in skin sample, such as keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin, flavin and porphyrin. Confocal microscopy was used to obtain structures of the sample. Properties of epidermic and cancer cells were characterized by fluorescence emission spectra, as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging. Our results show that two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging can provide accurate optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and is potentially a quantitative optical diagnostic method in skin cancer diagnosis.

  7. Multimodal optical coherence tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging with interleaved excitation sources for simultaneous endogenous and exogenous fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sebina; Serafino, Michael J; Rico-Jimenez, Jesus; Park, Jesung; Chen, Xi; Zhaorigetu, Siqin; Walton, Brian L; Jo, Javier A; Applegate, Brian E

    2016-09-01

    Multimodal imaging probes a variety of tissue properties in a single image acquisition by merging complimentary imaging technologies. Exploiting synergies amongst the data, algorithms can be developed that lead to better tissue characterization than could be accomplished by the constituent imaging modalities taken alone. The combination of optical coherence tomography (OCT) with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) provides access to detailed tissue morphology and local biochemistry. The optical system described here merges 1310 nm swept-source OCT with time-domain FLIM having excitation at 355 and 532 nm. The pulses from 355 and 532 nm lasers have been interleaved to enable simultaneous acquisition of endogenous and exogenous fluorescence signals, respectively. The multimodal imaging system was validated using tissue phantoms. Nonspecific tagging with Alexa Flour 532 in a Watanbe rabbit aorta and active tagging of the LOX-1 receptor in human coronary artery, demonstrate the capacity of the system for simultaneous acquisition of OCT, endogenous FLIM, and exogenous FLIM in tissues.

  8. Two-photon excitation with pico-second fluorescence lifetime imaging to detect nuclear association of flavanols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Harvey, Irene, E-mail: i.mueller-harvey@reading.ac.uk [Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory, Food Production and Quality Research Division, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, P O Box 236, Reading RG6 6AT (United Kingdom); Feucht, Walter, E-mail: walter.feucht@gmail.com [Department of Plant Sciences, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Polster, Juergen, E-mail: j.polster@wzw.tum.de [Department of Physical Biochemistry, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Trnkova, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.trnkova@uhk.cz [University of Hradec Kralove, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Rokitanskeho 62, 50003 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Burgos, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.burgos@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Parker, Anthony W., E-mail: tony.parker@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Botchway, Stanley W., E-mail: stan.botchway@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) technique for flavanols overcomes autofluorescence interference in cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plant flavanols differed in their lifetimes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dissolved and bound flavanols revealed contrasting lifetime changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique will allow studying of flavanol trafficking in live cells. - Abstract: Two-photon excitation enabled for the first time the observation and measurement of excited state fluorescence lifetimes from three flavanols in solution, which were {approx}1.0 ns for catechin and epicatechin, but <45 ps for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The shorter lifetime for EGCG is in line with a lower fluorescence quantum yield of 0.003 compared to catechin (0.015) and epicatechin (0.018). In vivo experiments with onion cells demonstrated that tryptophan and quercetin, which tend to be major contributors of background fluorescence in plant cells, have sufficiently low cross sections for two-photon excitation at 630 nm and therefore do not interfere with detection of externally added or endogenous flavanols in Allium cepa or Taxus baccata cells. Applying two-photon excitation to flavanols enabled 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and showed that added EGCG penetrated the whole nucleus of onion cells. Interestingly, EGCG and catechin showed different lifetime behaviour when bound to the nucleus: EGCG lifetime increased from <45 to 200 ps, whilst catechin lifetime decreased from 1.0 ns to 500 ps. Semi-quantitative measurements revealed that the relative ratios of EGCG concentrations in nucleoli associated vesicles: nucleus: cytoplasm were ca. 100:10:1. Solution experiments with catechin, epicatechin and histone proteins provided preliminary evidence, via the appearance of a second lifetime ({tau}{sub 2} = 1.9-3.1 ns), that both flavanols may be interacting with histone proteins. We conclude that there

  9. Mercury effects on Thalassiosira weissflogii: Applications of two-photon excitation chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging and flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yun; Zeng Yan; Qu, Jianan Y.; Wang Wenxiong

    2012-01-01

    The toxic effects of inorganic mercury [Hg(II)] and methylmercury (MeHg) on the photosynthesis and population growth in a marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii were investigated using two methods: two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and flow cytometry (FCM). For photosynthesis, Hg(II) exposure increased the average chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime, whereas such increment was not found under MeHg stress. This may be caused by the inhibitory effect of Hg(II) instead of MeHg on the electron transport chain. For population growth, modeled specific growth rate data showed that the reduction in population growth by Hg(II) mainly resulted from an increased number of injured cells, while the live cells divided at the normal rates. However, MeHg inhibitory effects on population growth were contributed by the reduced division rates of all cells. Furthermore, the cell images and the FCM data reflected the morphological changes of diatom cells under Hg(II)/MeHg exposure vividly and quantitatively. Our results demonstrated that the toxigenicity mechanisms between Hg(II) and MeHg were different in the algal cells.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime measurement of radical ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Nobuyuki; Kinugasa, Jun-ichiro; Hagiri, Masahide; Nakayama, Toshihiro; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Maki; Daido, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    One-photonic excitation of a charge transfer complex of hexamethoxybenzene (HMB) and nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate (NO + BF 4 - ) in acetonitrile afforded fluorescences emission from excited radical cation of HMB (HMB + *). Lifetime of the excited radical ion species was measured to be 7 ps by the pump-probe transient absorption technique. The lifetime was much shorter than that of free radical ion (63 ps), indicating the presence of an interaction between HMB + * and NO in the excited complex. (author)

  11. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  12. Fluorescence lifetime selectivity in excitation-emission matrices for qualitative analysis of a two-component system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millican, D.W.; McGown, L.B.

    1989-01-01

    Steady-state fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and phase-resolved EEMs (PREEMs) collected at modulation frequencies of 6, 18, and 30 MHz, were used for qualitative analysis of mixtures of benzo[k]fluoranthene (τ = 8 ns) and benzo[b]fluoranthene (τ = 29 ns) in ethanol. The EEMs of the individual components were extracted from mixture EEMs by means of wavelength component vector-gram (WCV) analysis. Phase resolution was found to be superior to steady-state measurements for extraction of the component spectra, for mixtures in which the intensity contributions from the two components are unequal

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  14. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores

  15. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Gordon T; Munro, Ian; Poher, Vincent; French, Paul M W; Neil, Mark A A [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Elson, Daniel S [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hares, Jonathan D [Kentech Instruments Ltd, Unit 9, Hall Farm Workshops, South Moreton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 9AG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gordon.kennedy@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-05-07

    We demonstrate flexible use of low cost, high-power light emitting diodes as illumination sources for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques have been implemented at wavelengths spanning the range 450-640 nm. Additionally, we demonstrate optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging by combining structured illumination with frequency-domain FLIM.

  16. Lifetime measurements of excited Co I levels

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, W D; Gobel, L H

    1977-01-01

    In the region of 3500 AA the lifetimes of eight excited Cobalt I levels have been measured by means of the zero field level crossing method. The measured lifetimes belong to the odd configurations 3d/sup 7/4s4p and 3d/sup 8/4p and are of the accuracy of about 5%. The hyperfine structure of levels with I not=J has to be taken into account in evaluating lifetimes from level crossing data, because the nuclear spin of the natural isotope /sup 59/Co is I=7/2. Therefore the influence of the line profile of the exciting resonance lines on the lifetimes has been investigated. The results are compared with those of other authors. Furthermore absolute oscillator strengths were calculated with known branching ratios and a new absolute scale has been established. (23 refs).

  17. Clinical results of fluorescence lifetime imaging in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, D.; Quick, S.; Klemm, M.; Hammer, M.; Jentsch, S.; Dawczynski, J.; Becker, W.

    2009-07-01

    A laser scanner ophthalmoscope was developed for in vivo fluorescence lifetime measurements at the human retina. Measurements were performed in 30 degree fundus images. The fundus was excited by pulses of 75 ps (FWHM). The dynamic fluorescence was detected in two spectral channels K1(490-560nm), K2(560-700 nm) by time-correlated single photon counting. The decay of fluorescence was three-exponentially. Local and global alterations in lifetimes were found between healthy subjects and patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and vessel occlusion. The lifetimes T1, T2, and T3 in both channels are changed to longer values in AMD and diabetic retinopathy in comparison with healthy subjects. The lifetime T2 in K1 is most sensitive to metabolic alterations in branch arterial vessel occlusion.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in dental biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; de Grauw, Cees J.

    2000-12-01

    Dental biofilm consists of micro-colonies of bacteria embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and salivary proteins. pH and oxygen concentration are of great importance in dental biofilm. Both can be measured using fluorescence techniques. The imaging of dental biofilm is complicated by the thickness of the biofilms that can be up to several hundred micrometers thick. Here, we employed a combination of two-photon excitation microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify the oxygen concentration in dental biofilm. Collisional quenching of fluorescent probes by molecular oxygen leads to a reduction of the fluorescence lifetime of the probe. We employed this mechanism to measure the oxygen concentration distribution in dental biofilm by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. Here, TRIS Ruthenium chloride hydrate was used as an oxygen probe. A calibration procedure on buffers was use to measure the lifetime response of this Ruthenium probe. The results are in agreement with the Stern-Volmer equation. A linear relation was found between the ratio of the unquenched and the quenched lifetime and the oxygen concentration. The biofilm fluorescence lifetime imaging results show a strong oxygen gradient at the buffer - biofilm interface and the average oxygen concentration in the biofilm amounted to 50 μM.

  19. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of chemotherapy distribution in solid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Marjorie; Watson, Adrienne L.; Anderson, Leah; Largaespada, David A.; Provenzano, Paolo P.

    2017-11-01

    Doxorubicin is a commonly used chemotherapeutic employed to treat multiple human cancers, including numerous sarcomas and carcinomas. Furthermore, doxorubicin possesses strong fluorescent properties that make it an ideal reagent for modeling drug delivery by examining its distribution in cells and tissues. However, while doxorubicin fluorescence and lifetime have been imaged in live tissue, its behavior in archival samples that frequently result from drug and treatment studies in human and animal patients, and murine models of human cancer, has to date been largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate imaging of doxorubicin intensity and lifetimes in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections from mouse models of human cancer with multiphoton excitation and multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Multiphoton excitation imaging reveals robust doxorubicin emission in tissue sections and captures spatial heterogeneity in cells and tissues. However, quantifying the amount of doxorubicin signal in distinct cell compartments, particularly the nucleus, often remains challenging due to strong signals in multiple compartments. The addition of FLIM analysis to display the spatial distribution of excited state lifetimes clearly distinguishes between signals in distinct compartments such as the cell nuclei versus cytoplasm and allows for quantification of doxorubicin signal in each compartment. Furthermore, we observed a shift in lifetime values in the nuclei of transformed cells versus nontransformed cells, suggesting a possible diagnostic role for doxorubicin lifetime imaging to distinguish normal versus transformed cells. Thus, data here demonstrate that multiphoton FLIM is a highly sensitive platform for imaging doxorubicin distribution in normal and diseased archival tissues.

  20. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver to NASA an innovative, portable, and power efficient Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer...

  1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy using near-infrared contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, R; Sarder, P; Bloch, S; Culver, J; Achilefu, S

    2012-08-01

    Although single-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is widely used to image molecular processes using a wide range of excitation wavelengths, the captured emission of this technique is confined to the visible spectrum. Here, we explore the feasibility of utilizing near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes with emission >700 nm for FLIM of live cells. The confocal microscope is equipped with a 785 nm laser diode, a red-enhanced photomultiplier tube, and a time-correlated single photon counting card. We demonstrate that our system reports the lifetime distributions of NIR fluorescent dyes, cypate and DTTCI, in cells. In cells labelled separately or jointly with these dyes, NIR FLIM successfully distinguishes their lifetimes, providing a method to sort different cell populations. In addition, lifetime distributions of cells co-incubated with these dyes allow estimate of the dyes' relative concentrations in complex cellular microenvironments. With the heightened interest in fluorescence lifetime-based small animal imaging using NIR fluorophores, this technique further serves as a bridge between in vitro spectroscopic characterization of new fluorophore lifetimes and in vivo tissue imaging. © 2012 The Author Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Single photon counting fluorescence lifetime detection of pericellular oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A; Lee, David A; Knight, Martin M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy offers a non-invasive method for quantifying local oxygen concentrations. However, existing methods are either invasive, require custom-made systems, or show limited spatial resolution. Therefore, these methods are unsuitable for investigation of pericellular oxygen concentrations. This study describes an adaptation of commercially available equipment which has been optimized for quantitative extracellular oxygen detection with high lifetime accuracy and spatial resolution while avoiding systematic photon pile-up. The oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye, tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chloride hexahydrate [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+), was excited using a two-photon excitation laser. Lifetime was measured using a Becker & Hickl time-correlated single photon counting, which will be referred to as a TCSPC card. [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+) characterization studies quantified the influences of temperature, pH, cellular culture media and oxygen on the fluorescence lifetime measurements. This provided a precisely calibrated and accurate system for quantification of pericellular oxygen concentration based on measured lifetimes. Using this technique, quantification of oxygen concentrations around isolated viable chondrocytes, seeded in three-dimensional agarose gel, revealed a subpopulation of cells that exhibited significant spatial oxygen gradients such that oxygen concentration reduced with increasing proximity to the cell. This technique provides a powerful tool for quantifying spatial oxygen gradients within three-dimensional cellular models.

  3. Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, R. M.; Drachev, V. P.; Liu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Enhanced fluorescence is observed from dye molecules interacting with optical nanoantenna arrays. Elliptical gold dimers form individual nanoantennae with tunable plasmon resonances depending upon the geometry of the two particles and the size of the gap between them. A fluorescent dye, Rhodamine...... 800, is uniformly embedded in a dielectric host that coats the nanoantennae. The nanoantennae act to enhance the dye absorption. In turn, emission from the dye drives the plasmon resonance of the antennae; the nanoantennae act to enhance the fluorescence signal and change the angular distribution...... of emission. These effects depend upon the overlap of the plasmon resonance with the excitation wavelength and the fluorescence emission band. A decreased fluorescence lifetime is observed along with highly polarized emission that displays the characteristics of the nanoantenna's dipole mode. Being able...

  4. Time variation of fluorescence lifetime in enhanced cyan fluorescence protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soonhyouk; Kim, Soo Yong; Park, Kyoungsook; Jeong, Jinyoung; Chung, Bong Hyun; Kim, Sok Won

    2010-01-01

    The lifetime variations of enhanced cyan fluorescence protein (ECFP) in relatively short integration time bins were studied via time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurement. We observed that minimum photon counts are necessary for the lifetime estimation to achieve a certain range of variance. The conditions to decrease the variance of lifetime were investigated and the channel width of the measurement of TCSPC data was found to be another important factor for the variance of lifetime. Though the lifetime of ECFP is best fit by a double exponential, a mono exponential fit for the same integration time is more stable. The results may be useful in the analysis of photophysical dynamics for ensemble molecules in short measurement time windows.

  5. Control of excitation in the fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, D J; Ward, D J

    1979-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy image brightness and contrast and the rate of fading depend upon the intensity of illumination of the specimen. An iris diaphragm or neutral density filters may be used to reduce fluorescence excitation. Also the excitation bandwidth may be varied by using a broad band exciter filter with a set of interchangeable yellow glass filters at the lamphouse.

  6. Non-invasive imaging of skin cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging using two photon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) using two photon microscopy as a non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of skin lesions is described. Skin contains fluorophores including elastin, keratin, collagen, FAD and NADH. This endogenous contrast allows tissue to be imaged without the addition of exogenous agents and allows the in vivo state of cells and tissues to be studied. A modified DermaInspect® multiphoton tomography system was used to excite autofluorescence at 760 nm in vivo and on freshly excised ex vivo tissue. This instrument simultaneously acquires fluorescence lifetime images in four spectral channels between 360-655 nm using time-correlated single photon counting and can also provide hyperspectral images. The multispectral fluorescence lifetime images were spatially segmented and binned to determine lifetimes for each cell by fitting to a double exponential lifetime model. A comparative analysis between the cellular lifetimes from different diagnoses demonstrates significant diagnostic potential.

  7. Lifetimes for some excited states of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.; Campos, J.

    1979-01-01

    The lifetimes of some s,p and d levels of sodium have been measured by the delayed coincidence method, using a single-photon counting technique. The results are compared with the calculated values of the present work, and with other results. The lifetimes of the ns, np, and levels up to n10; of the nf levels up to n-9;and of the ng, nh,n1 and nk levels up to n-8, have been calculated and the transition probabilities of lines with origin in these levels are given. (Author) 38 refs

  8. An electronically tunable ultrafast laser source applied to fluorescence imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsby, C; Lanigan, P M P; McGinty, J; Elson, D S; Requejo-Isidro, J; Munro, I; Galletly, N; McCann, F; Treanor, B; Oenfelt, B; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; French, P M W

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used widely in microscopy and macroscopic imaging applications for fields ranging from biomedicine to materials science. A critical component for any fluorescence imaging system is the excitation source. Traditionally, wide-field systems use filtered thermal or arc-generated white light sources, while point scanning confocal microscope systems require spatially coherent (point-like) laser sources. Unfortunately, the limited range of visible wavelengths available from conventional laser sources constrains the design and usefulness of fluorescent probes in confocal microscopy. A 'hands-off' laser-like source, electronically tunable across the visible spectrum, would be invaluable for fluorescence imaging and provide new opportunities, e.g. automated excitation fingerprinting and in situ measurement of excitation cross-sections. Yet more information can be obtained using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), which requires that the light source be pulsed or rapidly modulated. We show how a white light continuum, generated by injecting femtosecond optical radiation into a micro-structured optical fibre, coupled with a simple prism-based tunable filter arrangement, can fulfil all these roles as a continuously electronically tunable (435-1150 nm) visible ultrafast light source in confocal, wide-field and FLIM systems

  9. Theoretical lifetimes and fluorescence yields for multiply-ionized fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnell, T.W.; Can, C.; Bhalla, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical lifetimes and multiplet partial fluorescence yields for various fluorine ions with a single K-shell vacancy were calculated. For few-electron systems, the lifetimes and line fluorescence yields were computed in the intermediate coupling scheme with the inclusion of the effects arising from configuration interactions. 6 references

  10. Lifetime measurements of excited states in 196Pt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotin, H.H.; Katayama, Ichiro; Sakai, Hideyuki; Fujita, Yoshitaka; Fujiwara, Mamoru

    1979-01-01

    The lifetimes of six excited states in 196 Pt up to an excitation energy of 1525 keV were measured by the recoil-distance method (RDM). These levels were populated by Coulomb excitation using both 90 MeV 20 Ne and 220 MeV 58 Ni ion beams. The measured lifetimes of the 2 1 + , 4 1 + , 6 1 + , 2 2 + , 4 2 + and 0 2 + states and the B(E2) values inferred for the depopulating transitions from these levels are presented. With the exception of the 2 1 + state, the meanlives of all other levels are the first such direct experimental determinations to be reported. (author)

  11. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence lifetime measurements of the macula using the fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Quellec, Gwénolé; Abegg, Mathias; Menke, Marcel N; Wolf-Schnurrbusch, Ute; Kowal, Jens; Blatz, Johannes; La Schiazza, Olivier; Leichtle, Alexander B; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2014-04-03

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) cannot only be characterized by the intensity or the emission spectrum, but also by its lifetime. As the lifetime of a fluorescent molecule is sensitive to its local microenvironment, this technique may provide more information than fundus autofluorescence imaging. We report here the characteristics and repeatability of FAF lifetime measurements of the human macula using a new fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (FLIO). A total of 31 healthy phakic subjects were included in this study with an age range from 22 to 61 years. For image acquisition, a fluorescence lifetime ophthalmoscope based on a Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system was used. Fluorescence lifetime maps of the retina were recorded in a short- (498-560 nm) and a long- (560-720 nm) spectral channel. For quantification of fluorescence lifetimes a standard ETDRS grid was used. Mean fluorescence lifetimes were shortest in the fovea, with 208 picoseconds for the short-spectral channel and 239 picoseconds for the long-spectral channel, respectively. Fluorescence lifetimes increased from the central area to the outer ring of the ETDRS grid. The test-retest reliability of FLIO was very high for all ETDRS areas (Spearman's ρ = 0.80 for the short- and 0.97 for the long-spectral channel, P macula in healthy subjects. By using a custom-built software, we were able to quantify fluorescence lifetimes within the ETDRS grid. Establishing a clinically accessible standard against which to measure FAF lifetimes within the retina is a prerequisite for future studies in retinal disease.

  12. Fluorescence lifetime assays: current advances and applications in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritz, Stephan; Doering, Klaus; Woelcke, Julian; Hassiepen, Ulrich

    2011-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime assays complement the portfolio of established assay formats available in drug discovery, particularly with the recent advances in microplate readers and the commercial availability of novel fluorescent labels. Fluorescence lifetime assists in lowering complexity of compound screening assays, affording a modular, toolbox-like approach to assay development and yielding robust homogeneous assays. To date, materials and procedures have been reported for biochemical assays on proteases, as well as on protein kinases and phosphatases. This article gives an overview of two assay families, distinguished by the origin of the fluorescence signal modulation. The pharmaceutical industry demands techniques with a robust, integrated compound profiling process and short turnaround times. Fluorescence lifetime assays have already helped the drug discovery field, in this sense, by enhancing productivity during the hit-to-lead and lead optimization phases. Future work will focus on covering other biochemical molecular modifications by investigating the detailed photo-physical mechanisms underlying the fluorescence signal.

  13. Refractive index sensing using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime is a function of the refractive index of the fluorophore's environment, for example in the case of the biologically important green fluorescent protein (GFP). In order to address the question whether this effect can be exploited to image the local environment of specific proteins in cell biology, we need to determine the distance over which the fluorophore's lifetime is sensitive to the refractive index. To this end, we employ Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) of fluorescein in NaOH buffer at an interface. This approach allows us to map the fluorescence lifetime as a function of distance from a buffer/air and buffer/oil interface. Preliminary data show that the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein increases near a buffer/air interface and decreases near a buffer/oil interface. The range over which this fluorescence lifetime change occurs is found to be of the order several μm which is consistent with a theoretical model based on the full width at half maximum of the emission spectrum proposed by Toptygin

  14. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  15. Lifetime measurements of the excited states in {sup 145} Sm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badry, A M; Abdel Samie, Sh; Ahmad, A A [Depatment of Physics, Faculty of Science, ElMinia University, ElMinia, (Egypt); Kuroyanagi, T; Odahara, A; Gono, Y; Morinobu, S [Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kyushu University, (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Lifetime of the excited levels in {sup 145} Sm has been measured through the {sup 139} La ({sup 10} B, 4 n){sup 145} Sm nuclear reaction. The optimal beam energy of 49 MeV was determined from the measurements of the excitation function and Cascade program. With the possibility of studying lifetime of this nucleus a conventional plunger system have been designed and constructed at kyushu University tandem accelerator laboratory. A La target of 0.22 mg/cm{sup 2} thickness which was evaporated onto a Au foil of 2 mg/cm{sup 2} thickness was used. Since the recoil velocity was estimated to be 1.76 mm/ns (beta 0.00585), the measurable time range resulted in the range from 5 Ps to 5 ns. The single spectra measurements were performed at the 20 plunger positions in the range from 10 {mu} to 10 mm. Analyses of the data were carried using hypermet and/or GF2 program to obtain the lifetimes. A new list of lifetimes for 12 excited states up to 3.922 MeV excitations for {sup 145} Sm were determined for the first time. Decay curves of the these transitions are discussed. The new lifetimes of excited states in {sup 145} Sm enabled us to understand the electromagnetic properties. The deduced transition probabilities were established and compared with that of N = 83 isotones and the closed shell nucleus {sup 144} Sm. In addition, a nuclear structure of {sup 145} Sm have been discussed and proposed in framework of the shell model. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Energies and lifetimes of excited states in copperlike Kr VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, A.E.; Curtis, L.J.; Schectman, R.M.; Berry, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    The spectrum of Kr VIII has been observed between 180 and 2000 A by using foil excitation of 2.5--3.5-MeV krypton ions. Twenty new transitions have been classified and eleven new excited-state energies have been determined within the n=4 --7 shells. The ionization potential is derived to be 1 015 800 +- 200 cm -1 . The excited-state energies and fine structures are compared with recent relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations. The 4p-state lifetime has been measured by performing a simultaneous analysis of decay data for the 4p level and for its dominant cascade-repopulating levels. The 4p lifetime is found to be 30% shorter than previously measured values and is in excellent agreement with the result of a recent multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculation. The source of the discrepancy between this result and earlier measurements is discussed

  17. Fluorescence lifetime evaluation of whole soils from the Amazon rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Tadini, Amanda Maria; Nogueira, Marcelo Saito; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Mounier, Stephane; Huaman, Jose Luis Clabel; Dos Santos, Cléber Hilário; Montes, Célia Regina; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira

    2017-08-20

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) is a new tool that can be used to investigate processes of interaction between metal ions and organic matter (OM) in soils, providing a specific analysis of the structure and dynamics of macromolecules. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies in the literature reporting the use of this technique applied to whole/non-fractionated soil samples, making it a potential method for use in future studies. This work describes the use of TRFS to evaluate the fluorescence lifetimes of OM of whole soils from the Amazon region. Analysis was made of pellets of soils from an oxisol-spodosol system, collected in São Gabriel da Cachoeira (Amazonas, Brazil). The fluorescence lifetimes in the oxisol-spodosol system were attributed to two different fluorophores. One was related to complexation of an OM fraction with metals, resulting in a shorter fluorophore lifetime. A short fluorescence lifetime (2-12 ns) could be associated with simpler structures of the OM, while a long lifetime (19-66 ns) was associated with more complex OM structures. This new TRFS technique for analysis of the fluorescence lifetime in whole soil samples complies with the principles of green chemistry.

  18. Single pulse two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (SP-FLIM) with MHz pixel rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Weng, Daniel; Hakert, Hubertus; Pfeiffer, Tom; Kolb, Jan Philip; Huber, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a chemically specific 3-D sensing modality providing valuable information about the microstructure, composition and function of a sample. However, a more widespread application of this technique is hindered by the need for a sophisticated ultra-short pulse laser source and by speed limitations of current FLIM detection systems. To overcome these limitations, we combined a robust sub-nanosecond fiber laser as the excitation source with high analog bandwidth detection. Due to the long pulse length in our configuration, more fluorescence photons are generated per pulse, which allows us to derive the lifetime with a single excitation pulse only. In this paper, we show high quality FLIM images acquired at a pixel rate of 1 MHz. This approach is a promising candidate for an easy-to-use and benchtop FLIM system to make this technique available to a wider research community.

  19. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  20. Fluorescent excitation of interstellar H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Black, J.H.; Dishoeck, van E.F.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared emission spectrum of H2 excited by ultraviolet absorption, followed by fluorescence, was investigated using comprehensive models of interstellar clouds for computing the spectrum and to assess the effects on the intensity to various cloud properties, such as density, size, temperature,

  1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous molecules in live mouse cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindrych, Zdenek; Wang, Tianxiong; Hu, Song; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2017-02-01

    NADH and FAD are important endogenous fluorescent coenzymes participating in key enzymatic reactions of cellular metabolism. While fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD have been used to determine the redox state of cells and tissues, this simple approach breaks down in the case of deep-tissue intravital imaging due to depth- and wavelength-dependent light absorption and scattering. To circumvent this limitation, our research focuses on fluorescence lifetimes of two-photon excited NADH and FAD emission to study the metabolic state of live tissues. In our custom-built scanning microscope we combine tunable femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (operating at 740 nm for NADH excitation and 890 nm for FAD excitation), two GaAsP hybrid detectors for registering individual fluorescence photons and two Becker and Hickl time correlator boards for high precision lifetime measurements. Together with our rigorous FLIM analysis approach (including image segmentation, multi-exponential decay fitting and detailed statistical analysis) we are able to detect metabolic changes in cancer xenografts (human pancreatic cancer MPanc96 cells injected subcutaneously into the ear of an immunodeficient nude mouse), relative to surrounding healthy tissue. Advantageously, with the same instrumentation we can also take high-resolution and high-contrast images of second harmonic signal (SHG) originating from collagen fibers of both the healthy skin and the growing tumor. The combination of metabolic measurements (NADH and FAD lifetime) and morphological information (collagen SHG) allows us to follow the tumor growth in live mouse model and the changes in tumor microenvironment.

  2. Lifetimes of an excited superdeformed band in {sup 192}Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Blumenthal, D.; Carpenter, M.P. [and others

    1995-08-01

    An excited superdeformed band was identified in {sup 192}Hg and the lifetimes of its levels measured with the Doppler-shift attenuation method from data taken with the Eurogam spectrometer. The band is proposed to be based on the two-quasineutron (v[642]3/2 [512]5/2) configuration, which after a band crossing, becomes the (v[642]3/2 [752]5/2) configuration. The transition quadrupole moment Q{sub t} of the excited band is the same as that of the yrast SD band, within experimental errors. This suggests that the deformation of the SD minimum is robust with respect to quasiparticle excitation, despite the occupation of the deformation-driving v[752]5/2 level (from the j{sub 15/2} shell) after the band crossing.

  3. Mesh adaptation technique for Fourier-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.

    2006-01-01

    A novel adaptive mesh technique in the Fourier domain is introduced for problems in fluorescence lifetime imaging. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, while the lifetime reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the method are demonstrated by image reconstruction of two spherical fluorescent objects embedded in a tissue phantom

  4. Lifetime measurements in Crsub(I) by laser excitation from the metastable states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, M.; Micali, G.; Werner, K.; Zimmermann, P.

    1981-01-01

    A combination of collisional and laser excitation was used to measure radiative lifetimes in Cr I. By a discharge an atomic beam of metastable atoms in the 3d 5 4sa 5 S, a 5 G, b 5 D, a 3 I, b 1 I and 3d 4 4s 2 a 5 D terms was produced. Spatially separated from the place of collisional excitation laser radiation selectively populated levels belonging to the 3d 5 4p z 5 P, y 5 P, u 5 F, u 5 D, x 3 I, y 1 I, 3d 5 5pz 5 G and 3d 4 4s4px 5 G terms. Time-resolved observation of the reemitted resonance fluorescence yielded the lifetimes of 28 levels. The values are compared with other experimental and theoretical results. (orig.)

  5. Measuring and sorting cell populations expressing isospectral fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Sands

    Full Text Available Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼ 1.5 ns vs ∼ 3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a "pseudophasor" that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation.

  6. Two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy. 2. Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2013-10-03

    In the preceding article, we introduced the theoretical framework of two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (2D FLCS). In this article, we report the experimental implementation of 2D FLCS. In this method, two-dimensional emission-delay correlation maps are constructed from the photon data obtained with the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and then they are converted to 2D lifetime correlation maps by the inverse Laplace transform. We develop a numerical method to realize reliable transformation, employing the maximum entropy method (MEM). We apply the developed actual 2D FLCS to two real systems, a dye mixture and a DNA hairpin. For the dye mixture, we show that 2D FLCS is experimentally feasible and that it can identify different species in an inhomogeneous sample without any prior knowledge. The application to the DNA hairpin demonstrates that 2D FLCS can disclose microsecond spontaneous dynamics of biological molecules in a visually comprehensible manner, through identifying species as unique lifetime distributions. A FRET pair is attached to the both ends of the DNA hairpin, and the different structures of the DNA hairpin are distinguished as different fluorescence lifetimes in 2D FLCS. By constructing the 2D correlation maps of the fluorescence lifetime of the FRET donor, the equilibrium dynamics between the open and the closed forms of the DNA hairpin is clearly observed as the appearance of the cross peaks between the corresponding fluorescence lifetimes. This equilibrium dynamics of the DNA hairpin is clearly separated from the acceptor-missing DNA that appears as an isolated diagonal peak in the 2D maps. The present study clearly shows that newly developed 2D FLCS can disclose spontaneous structural dynamics of biological molecules with microsecond time resolution.

  7. Lifetime measurements of excited states in 73As

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.P.; Kavakand, T.; Hajivaliei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The excited states of 73 As have been investigated via the 73 Ge(p, nγ) 73 As reaction with proton beam energies from 2.5–4.3 MeV. The lifetimes of the levels at 769.6, 860.5, 1177.8, 1188.7, 1274.9, 1344.1, 1557.1 and 1975.2 keV excitation energies have been measured for the first time using the Doppler shift attenuation method. The angular distributions have been used to assign the spins and the multipole mixing ratios using statistical theory for compound nuclear reactions. The ambiguity in the spin values for the various levels has been removed. The multipole mixing ratios for eight γ-transitions have been newly measured. (author)

  8. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara, Z. E., E-mail: zjguevaram@unal.edu.co; Torres, D. A., E-mail: datorresg@unal.edu.co [Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of {sup 106}Cd to study excited states of {sup 110}Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  9. Fluorescence detection of single molecules using pulsed near-field optical excitation and time correlated photon counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Martin, J.C.; Keller, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Pulsed excitation, time correlated single photon counting and time gated detection are used in near-field optical microscopy to enhance fluorescence images and measure the fluorescence lifetimes of single molecules of Rhodamine 6G on silica surfaces. Time gated detection is used to reject prompt scattered background and to improve the image signal to noise ratio. The excited state lifetime of a single Rhodamine 6G molecule is found to depend on the position of the near-field probe. We attribute the lifetime variations to spontaneous emission rate alterations by the fluorescence reflected from and quenching by the aluminum coated probe

  10. Measurements of fluorescence lifetime of group III metalo-8-quinolinolates and their use in analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Y; Hiraki, K; Morishige, K; Takahashi, K [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology; Shigematsu, T

    1976-07-01

    8-Quinolinolates of aluminum, gallium, and indium in chloroform exhibit strong yellowish green fluorescence with an emission maximum at 510, 526, and 528 nm, respectively. The time resolved fluorescence spectra and the fluorescence lifetime properties of these chelates were measured with a time-resolved spectrofluorometer. The fluorescence intensity of these chelates decays exponentially with time t, and obeys the following equation: F=F/sub 0/e-t/tau=F/sub 0/e-k sub(f).t where F/sub 0/ and F are the fluorescence intensity when the exciting light is irradiating and shut off, respectively; tau and k sub(f) being the lifetime and the rate constant for the process of fluorescence emission. The lifetimes of these chelates in chloroform solution at the ordinary temperature were 17.8, 10.1, and 8.4 ns for Al(C/sub 9/H/sub 6/ON)/sub 3/, Ga(C/sub 9/H/sub 6/ON)/sub 3/, and In(C/sub 9/H/sub 6/ON)/sub 3/, respectively. Thus, 8-quinolinolates of group III metals emit the same type radiation with different lifetimes. Between Al-chelate and In-chelate, there were significant difference in the lifetime by 9.4 ns. Then, the logarithmic plot of the composite fluorescence intensity against time is the overlap of some straight lines with different slopes which indicate k sub(f) of various decay processes. The linear portion of the logarithmic plot of the composite fluorescence intensity corresponded to the longer lifetime component (Al-chelate), and by substracting this component from the whole one, the straight line due to the shorter lifetime component (In-chelate) is obtained. Aluminum and indium contents were then determined by comparing the fluorescence intensity of the sample with that of the standard at a definite time (extrapolated to t=0). By using this composite decay curve, the composition of mixtures of nx10/sup -4/ mol/l of Al and In-chelates in chloroform could be determined.

  11. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy application for ex vivo investigation of ocular fundus samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sven; Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2011-07-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of ocular tissue has recently become a promising tool in ophthalmology for diagnostic and research purposes. The feasibility and the advantages of TPEF imaging, namely deeper tissue penetration and improved high-resolution imaging of microstructures, have been demonstrated lately using human ocular samples. The autofluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ocular fundus tissue are well known from spectrophotometric analysis. But fluorophores, especially when it comes to fluorescence lifetime, typically display a dependence of their fluorescence properties on local environmental parameters. Hence, a more detailed investigation of ocular fundus autofluorescence ideally in vivo is of utmost interest. The aim of this study is to determine space-resolved the stationary and time-resolved fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ex vivo porcine ocular fundus samples by means of two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum and lifetime imaging microscopy (FSIM/FLIM). By our first results, we characterized the autofluorescence of individual anatomical structures of porcine retina samples excited at 760 nm. The fluorescence properties of almost all investigated retinal layers are relatively homogenous. But as previously unknown, ganglion cell bodies show a significantly shorter fluorescence lifetime compared to the adjacent mueller cells. Since all retinal layers exhibit bi-exponential autofluorescence decays, we were able to achieve a more precise characterization of fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores compared to a present in vivo FLIM approach by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO).

  12. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH

  13. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  14. Plunger lifetime measurements after Coulomb excitation at intermediate beam energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackstein, Matthias; Dewald, Alfred; Fransen, Christoph; Ilie, Gabriela; Jolie, Jan; Melon, Barbara; Pissulla, Thomas; Rother, Wolfram; Zell, Karl-Oskar [University of Cologne (Germany); Petkov, Pavel [University of Cologne (Germany); INRNE (Bulgaria); Chester, Aaron; Adrich, Przemyslaw; Bazin, Daniel; Bowen, Matt; Gade, Alexandra; Glasmacher, Thomas; Miller, Dave; Moeller, Victoria; Starosta, Krzysztof; Stolz, Andreas; Vaman, Constantin; Voss, Philip; Weissharr, Dirk [Michigan State Univerity (United States); Moeller, Oliver [TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Two recoil-distance-doppler-shift (RDDS) experiments were performed at the NSCL/MSU using Coulomb excitations of the projectile nuclei {sup 110}Pd, {sup 114}Pd at beam energies of 54 MeV/u in order to investigate the evolution of deformation of neutron rich paladium isotopes. The experimental set-up consisted of a dedicated plunger device, developed at the University of Cologne, the SEGA Ge-array and the S800 spectrometer. Lifetimes of the 2{sub 1}{sup +}-states in {sup 110}Pd and {sup 114}Pd were derived from the analysis of the {gamma}-line-shapes as well as from the measured decay-curves. Special features of the data analysis, e.g. features originating from the very high recoil velocities, are discussed.

  15. Azadioxatriangulenium: exploring the effect of a 20 ns fluorescence lifetime in fluorescence anisotropy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogh, Sidsel A.; Bora, Ilkay; Rosenberg, Martin; Thyrhaug, Erling; Laursen, Bo W.; Just Sørensen, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Azaoxatriangulenium (ADOTA) has been shown to be highly emissive despite a moderate molar absorption coefficient of the primary electronic transition. As a result, the fluorescence lifetime is ~20 ns, longer than all commonly used red fluorescent organic probes. The electronic transitions in ADOTA are highly polarised (r 0  =  0.38), which in combination with the long fluorescence lifetime extents the size-range of biomolecular weights that can be detected in fluorescence polarisation-based experiments. Here, the rotational dynamics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) are monitored with three different ADOTA derivatives, differing only in constitution of the reactive linker. A detailed study of the degree of labelling, the steady-state anisotropy, and the time-resolved anisotropy of the three different ADOTA-BSA conjugates are reported. The fluorescence quantum yields (ϕ fl) of the free dyes in PBS solution are determined to be ~55%, which is reduced to ~20% in the ADOTA-BSA conjugates. Despite the reduction in ϕ fl, a ~20 ns intensity averaged lifetime is maintained, allowing for the rotational dynamics of BSA to be monitored for up to 100 ns. Thus, ADOTA can be used in fluorescence polarisation assays to fill the gap between commonly used organic dyes and the long luminescence lifetime transition metal complexes. This allows for efficient steady-state fluorescence polarisation assays for detecting binding of analytes with molecular weights of up to 100 kDa.

  16. Online multispectral fluorescence lifetime values estimation and overlay onto tissue white-light video frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging has been shown to be a robust technique for biochemical and functional characterization of tissues and to present great potential for intraoperative tissue diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. We report a technique for real-time mapping of fluorescence parameters (i.e. lifetime values) onto the location from where the fluorescence measurements were taken. This is achieved by merging a 450 nm aiming beam generated by a diode laser with the excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and by continuously imaging the region of interest with a color CMOS camera. The interrogated locations are then extracted from the acquired frames via color-based segmentation of the aiming beam. Assuming a Gaussian profile of the imaged aiming beam, the segmentation results are fitted to ellipses that are dynamically scaled at the full width of three automatically estimated thresholds (50%, 75%, 90%) of the Gaussian distribution's maximum value. This enables the dynamic augmentation of the white-light video frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. A fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples were used to evaluate this method with motorized and hand-held scanning measurements. At 640x512 pixels resolution the area of interest augmented with fluorescence decay parameters can be imaged at an average 34 frames per second. The developed method has the potential to become a valuable tool for real-time display of optical spectroscopy data during continuous scanning applications that subsequently can be used for tissue characterization and diagnosis.

  17. Gamma decays, lifetimes and spins of 47V excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.V.; Bell, R.A.I.; Carlson, E.; Najam, M.R.

    1974-11-01

    The nucleus 47 V has been studied using the 47 Ti(p,nγ) 47 V reaction, with isotopically enriched 47 Ti targets, incident proton energies from 4.7 to 5.4 MeV, and Ge(Li) gamma-ray detectors. The previously unreported gamma decay of the second excited state was observed. Energies of the first seven excited states were deduced to be 87.5 +- 0.1, 145.7 +- 0.2, 259.6 +-0.4, 660.1 +- 0.3, 1138.3 +- 0.4, 1272.2 +- 0.4 and 1295.1 +- 0.4 keV. Their gamma-decay branching ratios were measured. The lifetimes of the last four mentioned states were deduced from attenuated Doppler shifts to be [680-340, 680+1400], [960-440, 960+1700], [390-150, 390+390], and > 750 fs respectively. Angular distribution measurements resulted in the assignment of Jsup(π) = 9/2 - to the 1272 keV level and J = 9/2 or 11/2 to the 1295 keV level. The results are discussed in the light of the Coriolis coupling model. (author)

  18. Radiative-lifetime measurements and calculations of odd-parity highly excited levels in Ba i

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Du Shan; Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biemont, Emile; Dai Zhenwen

    2010-01-01

    Natural radiative lifetime measurements have been performed for 70 odd-parity highly excited levels of neutral barium in the energy range from 308 15.512 to 417 59.93 cm -1 by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in a laser-produced plasma. The lifetime values measured in this paper are in the range from 11.3 to 901 ns. They are compared with the published lifetimes of four levels. Two of them are in good agreement, whereas for the other two our measurements are slightly longer than the published data. The reasons for the discrepancies are discussed. Comparisons with theoretical results of the Hartree-Fock method with relativistic corrections illustrate the difficulties associated with the use of Cowan's codes for obtaining accurate branching fractions for transitions depopulating highly excited levels along the Rydberg series of heavy neutral elements. This work will be useful to extend the set of oscillator strengths available in Ba i.

  19. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; Geert Sander de Jong, Jan; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  20. Bessel beam fluorescence lifetime tomography of live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography allows isotropic 3D imaging of embryos. Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for fluorescence imaging of live embryos. We previously reported an imaging system that combines SLOT with a novel Fourier-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) technique named FmFLIM-SLOT. FmFLIM-SLOT performs multiplexed FLIM-FRET readout of multiple FRET sensors in live embryos. Here we report a recent effort on improving the spatial resolution of the FmFLIM-SLOT system in order to image complex biochemical processes in live embryos at the cellular level. Optical tomography has to compromise between resolution and the depth of view. In SLOT, the commonly-used focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focal plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging in a large volume specimen. We thus introduce Bessel beam laser-scanning tomography, which illuminates the sample with a spatial-light-modulator-generated Bessel beam that has an extended focal depth. The Bessel beam is scanned across the whole specimen. Fluorescence projection images are acquired at equal angular intervals as the sample rotates. Reconstruction artifacts due to annular-rings of the Bessel beam are removed by a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm. Furthermore, in combination of Fourier-multiplexing fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) method, the Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT system is capable of perform 3D lifetime imaging of live embryos at cellular resolution. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove that Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT is a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  1. Xanthophyll cycle-dependent quenching of photosystem II chlorophyll a fluorescence: Formation of a quenching complex with a short fluorescence lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, A.M.; Hazlett, T.L.; Govindjee [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Excess light triggers protective nonradiative dissipation of excitation energy in photosystem II through the formation of a trans-thylakoid pH gradient that in turn stimulates formation of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin. These xanthophylls when combined with protonation of antenna pigment-protein complexes may increase nonradiative dissipation and, thus, quench chlorophyll a fluorescence. Here we measured, in parallel, the chlorophyll a fluorescence lifetime and intensity to understand the mechanism of this process. Increasing the xanthophyll concentration in the presence of a pH gradient (quenched conditions) decreases the fractional intensity of a fluorescence lifetime component centered at {approx}2 ns and increases a component at {approx}0.4 ns. Uncoupling the pH gradient (unquenched conditions) eliminates the 0.4-ns component. Changes in the xanthophyll concentration do not significantly affect the fluorescence lifetimes in either the quenched or unquenched sample conditions. However, there are differences in fluorescence lifetimes between the quenched and unquenched states that are due to pH-related, but nonxanthophyll-related, processes. Quenching of the maximal fluorescence intensity correlates with both the xanthophyll concentration and the fractional intensity of the 0.4-ns component. The unchanged fluorescence lifetimes and the proportional quenching of the maximal and dark-level fluorescence intensities indicate that the xanthophyllact on antenna, not reaction center processes. Further, the fluorescence quenching is interpreted as the combined effect of the pH gradient and xanthophyll concentration, resulting in the formation of a quenching complex with a short ({approx}0.4 ns) fluorescence lifetime. 33 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime, dipole orientation and bilayer polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Xuan Long; Chen, Po-Jui; Woon, Wei-Yen; White, Jonathon David

    2017-10-01

    Bilayer films consisting of the optically transparent polymers, polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were spin-cast on glass substrates. The upper 13.5 nm layer (PS) was lightly doped with Rhodamine-6 G (RH6G) or MEH-PPV. While the fluorescence of MEH-PPV was independent of PMMA thickness, the lifetime of RH6G increased 3-fold as the underlying PMMA thickness increased from 0 to 500 nm while the collected flux decreased suggesting a reorientation of the smaller molecule's dipole with respect to the air-polymer interface with PMMA thickness. This suggests lifetime may find application for nondestructive thickness measurements of transparent films with sub-micron lateral resolution and large range.

  3. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging in Stargardt Disease: Potential Marker for Disease Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Dysli Chantal; Wolf Sebastian; Hatz Katja; Zinkernagel Martin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to describe autofluorescence lifetime characteristics in Stargardt disease (STGD) using fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) and to investigate potential prognostic markers for disease activity and progression. METHODS Fluorescence lifetime data of 16 patients with STGD (mean age, 40 years; range, 22-56 years) and 15 age-matched controls were acquired using a fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope based on a Heidelberg Eng...

  4. Excited-state lifetime measurement of silicon vacancy centers in diamond by single-photon frequency upconversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Youying; Ma, Jianhui; Chen, Lingxiao; Liu, Yan; Siyushev, Petr; Wu, Botao; Pan, Haifeng; Jelezko, Fedor; Wu, E.; Zeng, Heping

    2018-05-01

    We report a method with high time resolution to measure the excited-state lifetime of silicon vacancy centers in bulk diamond avoiding timing jitter from the single-photon detectors. Frequency upconversion of the fluorescence emitted from silicon vacancy centers was achieved from 738 nm to 436 nm via sum frequency generation with a short pump pulse. The excited-state lifetime can be obtained by measuring the intensity of upconverted light while the pump delay changes. As a probe, a pump laser with pulse duration of 11 ps provided a high temporal resolution of the measurement. The lifetime extracted from the pump–probe curve was 0.755 ns, which was comparable to the timing jitter of the single-photon detectors.

  5. Quantitative multi-color FRET measurements by Fourier lifetime excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Huang, Run; Peng, Leilei

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) is extensively used to probe macromolecular interactions and conformation changes. The established FRET lifetime analysis method measures the FRET process through its effect on the donor lifetime. In this paper we present a method that directly probes the time-resolved FRET signal with frequency domain Fourier lifetime excitation-emission matrix (FLEEM) measurements. FLEEM separates fluorescent signals by their different phonon energy pathways from excitation to emission. The FRET process generates a unique signal channel that is initiated by donor excitation but ends with acceptor emission. Time-resolved analysis of the FRET EEM channel allows direct measurements on the FRET process, unaffected by free fluorophores that might be present in the sample. Together with time-resolved analysis on non-FRET channels, i.e. donor and acceptor EEM channels, time resolved EEM analysis allows precise quantification of FRET in the presence of free fluorophores. The method is extended to three-color FRET processes, where quantification with traditional methods remains challenging because of the significantly increased complexity in the three-way FRET interactions. We demonstrate the time-resolved EEM analysis method with quantification of three-color FRET in incompletely hybridized triple-labeled DNA oligonucleotides. Quantitative measurements of the three-color FRET process in triple-labeled dsDNA are obtained in the presence of free single-labeled ssDNA and double-labeled dsDNA. The results establish a quantification method for studying multi-color FRET between multiple macromolecules in biochemical equilibrium. PMID:23187535

  6. Refractive Index Sensing of Green Fluorescent Proteins in Living Cells Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91phox, which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91phox are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91phox. By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91phox are ∼1.38 and ∼1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane. PMID:18223002

  7. Lifetime measurements of odd-parity high-excitation levels of Sn I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Yanyan; Xu, Jiaxin; Dai, Zhenwen; Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biemont, Emile

    2010-01-01

    Natural radiative lifetimes of 38 odd-parity highly excited levels in neutral tin in the energy range from 43 682.737 to 56 838.68 cm -1 have been measured by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in an atomic beam produced by laser ablation on a solid tin sample. All the levels were excited from the metastable 3 P 1, 2 and 1 D 2 levels in the ground configuration. The second and third harmonics of a dye laser were adopted as the tunable exciting source (207-250 nm). The lifetime results obtained in this paper are in the range from 4.6 to 292 ns and will be useful in extending the set of oscillator strengths available in Sn I.

  8. Lifetime measurements of odd-parity high-excitation levels of Sn I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Yanyan; Xu, Jiaxin; Dai, Zhenwen [College of Physics, Jilin University and Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Ministry of Education, Changchun 130021 (China); Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biemont, Emile, E-mail: dai@jlu.edu.c [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons-UMONS, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2010-10-28

    Natural radiative lifetimes of 38 odd-parity highly excited levels in neutral tin in the energy range from 43 682.737 to 56 838.68 cm{sup -1} have been measured by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in an atomic beam produced by laser ablation on a solid tin sample. All the levels were excited from the metastable {sup 3}P{sub 1,} {sub 2} and {sup 1}D{sub 2} levels in the ground configuration. The second and third harmonics of a dye laser were adopted as the tunable exciting source (207-250 nm). The lifetime results obtained in this paper are in the range from 4.6 to 292 ns and will be useful in extending the set of oscillator strengths available in Sn I.

  9. The enhanced cyan fluorescent protein: a sensitive pH sensor for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poëa-Guyon, Sandrine; Pasquier, Hélène; Mérola, Fabienne; Morel, Nicolas; Erard, Marie

    2013-05-01

    pH is an important parameter that affects many functions of live cells, from protein structure or function to several crucial steps of their metabolism. Genetically encoded pH sensors based on pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins have been developed and used to monitor the pH of intracellular compartments. The quantitative analysis of pH variations can be performed either by ratiometric or fluorescence lifetime detection. However, most available genetically encoded pH sensors are based on green and yellow fluorescent proteins and are not compatible with multicolor approaches. Taking advantage of the strong pH sensitivity of enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), we demonstrate here its suitability as a sensitive pH sensor using fluorescence lifetime imaging. The intracellular ECFP lifetime undergoes large changes (32 %) in the pH 5 to pH 7 range, which allows accurate pH measurements to better than 0.2 pH units. By fusion of ECFP with the granular chromogranin A, we successfully measured the pH in secretory granules of PC12 cells, and we performed a kinetic analysis of intragranular pH variations in living cells exposed to ammonium chloride.

  10. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence organic dots for two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tingchao; Ren, Can; Li, Zhuohua; Xiao, Shuyu; Li, Junzi; Lin, Xiaodong; Ye, Chuanxiang; Zhang, Junmin; Guo, Lihong; Hu, Wenbo; Chen, Rui

    2018-05-01

    Autofluorescence is a major challenge in complex tissue imaging when molecules present in the biological tissue compete with the fluorophore. This issue may be resolved by designing organic molecules with long fluorescence lifetimes. The present work reports the two-photon absorption (TPA) properties of a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) molecule with carbazole as the electron donor and dicyanobenzene as the electron acceptor (i.e., 4CzIPN). The results indicate that 4CzIPN exhibits a moderate TPA cross-section (˜9 × 10-50 cm4 s photon-1), high fluorescence quantum yield, and a long fluorescence lifetime (˜1.47 μs). 4CzIPN was compactly encapsulated into an amphiphilic copolymer via nanoprecipitation to achieve water-soluble organic dots. Interestingly, 4CzIPN organic dots have been utilized in applications involving two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Our work aptly demonstrates that TADF molecules are promising candidates of nonlinear optical probes for developing next-generation multiphoton FLIM applications.

  11. Carrier Lifetimes in Fluorescent 6H-SiC for LEDs Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivickas, Vytautas; Gulbinas, Karolis; Jokubavičius, Valdas

    Recently it was shown a new approach based on all-semiconductor material technology which is composed with a near ultra-violet GaN LED excitation source and fluorescent silicon carbide (f-6H-SiC) substrate which generates a visible broad spectral light by N and B dopants and an efficient donor...... to acceptor pair recombination [1,2]. This combination can achieve higher electric-light conversion efficiency and high color rendering in comparison with today’s used blue GaN LED based and phosphors. The devices are promising candidates for general lightning applications and may obtain stability...... under co-linear and orthogonal probe geometry was used to measure carrier lifetimes in the layers under variable injection conditions. Same results are shown in Fig. 1 exaggerating the fact that longer electron lifetime responsible for higher emission and n-type doping should prevail the p-type doping...

  12. Community detection for fluorescent lifetime microscopy image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dandan; Sarder, Pinaki; Ronhovde, Peter; Achilefu, Samuel; Nussinov, Zohar

    2014-03-01

    Multiresolution community detection (CD) method has been suggested in a recent work as an efficient method for performing unsupervised segmentation of fluorescence lifetime (FLT) images of live cell images containing fluorescent molecular probes.1 In the current paper, we further explore this method in FLT images of ex vivo tissue slices. The image processing problem is framed as identifying clusters with respective average FLTs against a background or "solvent" in FLT imaging microscopy (FLIM) images derived using NIR fluorescent dyes. We have identified significant multiresolution structures using replica correlations in these images, where such correlations are manifested by information theoretic overlaps of the independent solutions ("replicas") attained using the multiresolution CD method from different starting points. In this paper, our method is found to be more efficient than a current state-of-the-art image segmentation method based on mixture of Gaussian distributions. It offers more than 1:25 times diversity based on Shannon index than the latter method, in selecting clusters with distinct average FLTs in NIR FLIM images.

  13. Lifetime measurement of excited atomic and ionic states of some

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-frequency deflection (HFD) technique with a delayed coincidence single photon counting arrangement is an efficient technique for radiative lifetime measurement. An apparatus for measurement of the radiative lifetime of atoms and molecules has been developed in our laboratory and measurements have been ...

  14. Saturated excitation of Fluorescence to quantify excitation enhancement in aperture antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Aouani, Heykel

    2012-07-23

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used to probe the electromagnetic intensity amplification on optical antennas, yet measuring the excitation intensity amplification is a challenge, as the detected fluorescence signal is an intricate combination of excitation and emission. Here, we describe a novel approach to quantify the electromagnetic amplification in aperture antennas by taking advantage of the intrinsic non linear properties of the fluorescence process. Experimental measurements of the fundamental f and second harmonic 2f amplitudes of the fluorescence signal upon excitation modulation are used to quantify the electromagnetic intensity amplification with plasmonic aperture antennas. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  15. Saturated excitation of Fluorescence to quantify excitation enhancement in aperture antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Aouani, Heykel; Hostein, Richard; Mahboub, Oussama; Devaux, Eloï se; Rigneault, Hervé ; Ebbesen, Thomas W.; Wenger, Jé rô me

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used to probe the electromagnetic intensity amplification on optical antennas, yet measuring the excitation intensity amplification is a challenge, as the detected fluorescence signal is an intricate combination of excitation and emission. Here, we describe a novel approach to quantify the electromagnetic amplification in aperture antennas by taking advantage of the intrinsic non linear properties of the fluorescence process. Experimental measurements of the fundamental f and second harmonic 2f amplitudes of the fluorescence signal upon excitation modulation are used to quantify the electromagnetic intensity amplification with plasmonic aperture antennas. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  16. Two-photon excited UV fluorescence for protein crystal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, Jeremy T.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2011-01-01

    Complementary measurements using SONICC and TPE-UVF allow the sensitive and selective detection of protein crystals. Two-photon excited ultraviolet fluorescence (TPE-UVF) microscopy is explored for sensitive protein-crystal detection as a complement to second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC). Like conventional ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF), TPE-UVF generates image contrast based on the intrinsic fluorescence of aromatic residues, generally producing higher fluorescence emission within crystals than the mother liquor by nature of the higher local protein concentration. However, TPE-UVF has several advantages over conventional UVF, including (i) insensitivity to optical scattering, allowing imaging in turbid matrices, (ii) direct compatibility with conventional optical plates and windows by using visible light for excitation, (iii) elimination of potentially damaging out-of-plane UV excitation, (iv) improved signal to noise through background reduction from out-of-plane excitation and (v) relatively simple integration into instrumentation developed for SONICC

  17. Using non-empirically tuned range-separated functionals with simulated emission bands to model fluorescence lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Z C; Fan, W Y; Chwee, T S; Sullivan, Michael B

    2017-08-09

    Fluorescence lifetimes were evaluated using TD-DFT under different approximations for the emitting molecule and various exchange-correlation functionals, such as B3LYP, BMK, CAM-B3LYP, LC-BLYP, M06, M06-2X, M11, PBE0, ωB97, ωB97X, LC-BLYP*, and ωB97X* where the range-separation parameters in the last two functionals were tuned in a non-empirical fashion. Changes in the optimised molecular geometries between the ground and electronically excited states were found to affect the quality of the calculated lifetimes significantly, while the inclusion of vibronic features led to further improvements over the assumption of a vertical electronic transition. The LC-BLYP* functional was found to return the most accurate fluorescence lifetimes with unsigned errors that are mostly within 1.5 ns of experimental values.

  18. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of Cr sup(3+) in GdA103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helman, J.S.; Caride, A.O.; Basso, H.C.; Terrile, M.C.; Carvalho, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime of Cr sup(3+) in GdA10 sub(3) was measured in the range 1.8 - 4.2 K in magnetic fields up to 6 T. The results show a remarkable dependence of the transition probabilities on magnetic order. A model based on the exchange interaction between Cr sup(3+) in highly excited states and the Gd sup(3+) ions is proposed. (author)

  19. Two-photon excited fluorescence emission from hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiqi; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-03-01

    Hemoglobin, one of the most important proteins in blood, is responsible for oxygen transportation in almost all vertebrates. Recently, we discovered two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence and achieved label-free microvascular imaging based on the hemoglobin fluorescence. However, the mechanism of its fluorescence emission still remains unknown. In this work, we studied the two-photon excited fluorescence properties of the hemoglobin subunits, heme/hemin (iron (II)/(III) protoporphyrin IX) and globin. We first studied the properties of heme and the similar spectral and temporal characteristics of heme and hemoglobin fluorescence provide strong evidence that heme is the fluorophore in hemoglobin. Then we studied the fluorescence properties of hemin, globin and methemoglobin, and found that the hemin may have the main effect on the methemoglobin fluorescence and that globin has tryptophan fluorescence like other proteins. Finally, since heme is a centrosymmetric molecule, that the Soret band fluorescence of heme and hemoglobin was not observed in the single photon process in the previous study may be due to the parity selection rule. The discovery of heme two-photon excited fluorescence may open a new window for heme biology research, since heme as a cofactor of hemoprotein has many functions, including chemical catalysis, electron transfer and diatomic gases transportation.

  20. A portable tube exciting X-ray fluorescence analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qiang; Lai Wanchang; Ge Liangquan

    2009-01-01

    Article introduced a portable tube exciting X-ray fluorescence analysis system which is based on arm architecture. Also, we designed Tube control circuit and finished preliminary application. The energy and the intensity of the photon can be adjusted continuously by using the tube. Experiments show that high excitation efficiency obtained by setting the appropriate parameters of the tube for the various elements. (authors)

  1. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  2. Measurement of the electromagnetic lifetimes of the first four excited states of /sup 192/Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D K; Raoof, M A; Raoof, S A [Birkbeck Coll., London (UK)

    1976-11-01

    Measurements of the electromagnetic lifetimes of the first four excited states of /sup 192/Pt have been made by the self-comparison method using electron-electron coincidences. The partial lifetimes of the gamma transitions involved have been interpreted in terms of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model of Kumar and Baranger.

  3. Effect of xanthophyll composition on the chlorophyll excited state lifetime in plant leaves and isolated LHCII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Zia, Ahmad; Horton, Peter; Ruban, Alexander V.

    2010-01-01

    Xanthophyll excited states have been implicated by transient absorption and two-photon excitation studies in playing a key role in the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting via photoprotective energy dissipation. For any proposed quenching mechanism to be effective it must reduce the chlorophyll excited state lifetime from 2 ns to ∼0.5-0.4 ns. In the presented study the effect of xanthophyll composition on the chlorophyll excited state lifetime in Arabidopsis leaves in the light harvesting (F m ) and photoprotective (NPQ) states was determined. The data was compared to the chlorophyll excited state lifetime of native isolated LHCII and CP26 in detergent micelles with varying xanthophyll composition. It was found that although the differences in xanthophyll composition between LHC complexes from various Arabidopsis mutants were sufficient to explain the varying F m lifetime (and varying PSII efficiency), they were not of a sufficient scale to fully explain the observed differences in the NPQ lifetimes. Only when the LHC complexes were exposed to a low detergent/low pH media, a condition known to mimic the conformational state of LHCII associated with NPQ in vivo, were variations in excited state lifetime large enough to explain the differences observed in leaves. Furthermore, the data reveal that the replacement of lutein by either zeaxanthin or violaxanthin in the internal xanthophyll binding sites of LHCII and CP26 reduces the efficiency of energy dissipation in the photoprotective state in leaves and isolated complexes.

  4. Melanin fluorescence spectra by step-wise three photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2012-03-01

    Melanin is the characteristic chromophore of human skin with various potential biological functions. Kerimo discovered enhanced melanin fluorescence by stepwise three-photon excitation in 2011. In this article, step-wise three-photon excited fluorescence (STPEF) spectrum between 450 nm -700 nm of melanin is reported. The melanin STPEF spectrum exhibited an exponential increase with wavelength. However, there was a probability of about 33% that another kind of step-wise multi-photon excited fluorescence (SMPEF) that peaks at 525 nm, shown by previous research, could also be generated using the same process. Using an excitation source at 920 nm as opposed to 830 nm increased the potential for generating SMPEF peaks at 525 nm. The SMPEF spectrum peaks at 525 nm photo-bleached faster than STPEF spectrum.

  5. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy of organic ligands by europium: Fluorescence quenching and lifetime properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhi, A.; Hajjoul, H.; Redon, R.; Gagné, J. P.; Mounier, S.

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) has proved its usefulness in the fields of biophysics, life science and geochemistry to characterize the fluorescence probe molecule with its chemical environment. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the applicability of this powerful technique combined with Steady-State (S-S) measurements. A multi-mode factor analysis, in particular CP/PARAFAC, was used to analyze the interaction between Europium (Eu) and Humic substances (HSs) extracted from Saint Lawrence Estuary in Canada. The Saint Lawrence system is a semi-enclosed water stream with connections to the Atlantic Ocean and is an excellent natural laboratory. CP/PARAFAC applied to fluorescence S-S data allows introspecting ligands-metal interactions and the one-site 1:1 modeling gives information about the stability constants. From the spectral signatures and decay lifetimes data given by TRLFS, one can deduce the fluorescence quenching which modifies the fluorescence and discuss its mechanisms. Results indicated a relatively strong binding ability between europium and humic substances samples (Log K value varies from 3.38 to 5.08 at pH 7.00). Using the Stern-Volmer plot, it has been concluded that static and dynamic quenching takes places in the case of salicylic acid and europium interaction while for HSs interaction only a static quenching is observed.

  6. Excited-state lifetimes of far-infrared collective modes in proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, A.; van der Meer, L.; Austin, R. H.

    2002-01-01

    Vibrational excitations of low frequency collective modes are essential for functionally important conformational transitions in proteins. Here we report the first direct measurement on the lifetime of vibrational excitations of the collective modes at 87 pm (115 cm(-1)) in bacteriorhodopsin, a

  7. FLIMX: A Software Package to Determine and Analyze the Fluorescence Lifetime in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Data from the Human Eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Klemm

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO is a new technique for measuring the in vivo autofluorescence intensity decays generated by endogenous fluorophores in the ocular fundus. Here, we present a software package called FLIM eXplorer (FLIMX for analyzing FLIO data. Specifically, we introduce a new adaptive binning approach as an optimal tradeoff between the spatial resolution and the number of photons required per pixel. We also expand existing decay models (multi-exponential, stretched exponential, spectral global analysis, incomplete decay to account for the layered structure of the eye and present a method to correct for the influence of the crystalline lens fluorescence on the retina fluorescence. Subsequently, the Holm-Bonferroni method is applied to FLIO measurements to allow for group comparisons between patients and controls on the basis of fluorescence lifetime parameters. The performance of the new approaches was evaluated in five experiments. Specifically, we evaluated static and adaptive binning in a diabetes mellitus patient, we compared the different decay models in a healthy volunteer and performed a group comparison between diabetes patients and controls. An overview of the visualization capabilities and a comparison of static and adaptive binning is shown for a patient with macular hole. FLIMX's applicability to fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is shown in the ganglion cell layer of a porcine retina sample, obtained by a laser scanning microscope using two-photon excitation.

  8. FLIMX: A Software Package to Determine and Analyze the Fluorescence Lifetime in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Data from the Human Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Matthias; Schweitzer, Dietrich; Peters, Sven; Sauer, Lydia; Hammer, Martin; Haueisen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is a new technique for measuring the in vivo autofluorescence intensity decays generated by endogenous fluorophores in the ocular fundus. Here, we present a software package called FLIM eXplorer (FLIMX) for analyzing FLIO data. Specifically, we introduce a new adaptive binning approach as an optimal tradeoff between the spatial resolution and the number of photons required per pixel. We also expand existing decay models (multi-exponential, stretched exponential, spectral global analysis, incomplete decay) to account for the layered structure of the eye and present a method to correct for the influence of the crystalline lens fluorescence on the retina fluorescence. Subsequently, the Holm-Bonferroni method is applied to FLIO measurements to allow for group comparisons between patients and controls on the basis of fluorescence lifetime parameters. The performance of the new approaches was evaluated in five experiments. Specifically, we evaluated static and adaptive binning in a diabetes mellitus patient, we compared the different decay models in a healthy volunteer and performed a group comparison between diabetes patients and controls. An overview of the visualization capabilities and a comparison of static and adaptive binning is shown for a patient with macular hole. FLIMX's applicability to fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is shown in the ganglion cell layer of a porcine retina sample, obtained by a laser scanning microscope using two-photon excitation.

  9. Lifetime of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}Hf and {sup 174}Hf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerst, Rosa-Belle; Stegemann, Simon; Jolie, Jan; Regis, Jean-Marc; Rudigier, Matthias; Saed-Samii, Nima; Zell, Karl Oskar [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Using the {sup 170}Yb(α,2n) and {sup 172}Yb(α,2n) reactions the lifetimes of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}Hf and {sup 174}Hf have been measured in fast-timing experiments using the Cologne Orange-Spectrometer and 6 LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)-Detectors. The lifetimes were obtained analyzing e{sup -}-γ-coincidence time-spectra with the slope method. The new and more precise lifetimes correct existing, outdated lifetimes in nuclear databases. Additionally, the systematics of the B(E2,2{sub 1}{sup +}→0{sub 1}{sup +}) is studied.

  10. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2013-01-01

    ' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2......-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein) and diffusion coefficients of distinct fluorescence probes (raster imaging correlation spectroscopy) can be obtained from different regions of the tissue. Comparative studies of different tissue strata, but also between equivalent regions of normal and abnormal......This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes...

  11. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bixler, Joel N; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU.

  12. Ns-scaled time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging for forensic document examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Yan

    2018-01-01

    A method of ns-scaled time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging (TFLI) is proposed to distinguish different fluorescent substances in forensic document examination. Compared with Video Spectral Comparator (VSC) which can examine fluorescence intensity images only, TFLI can detect questioned documents like falsification or alteration. TFLI system can enhance weak signal by accumulation method. The two fluorescence intensity images of the interval delay time tg are acquired by ICCD and fitted into fluorescence lifetime image. The lifetimes of fluorescence substances are represented by different colors, which make it easy to detect the fluorescent substances and the sequence of handwritings. It proves that TFLI is a powerful tool for forensic document examination. Furthermore, the advantages of TFLI system are ns-scaled precision preservation and powerful capture capability.

  13. The LB Films of Dansyl Chloride Labeled Octadecylamine and Its Fluorescence Lifetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Octadecylamine was derivatized with dansyl chloride (5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl chloride) in order to simplify and understand the LB films of fluorescent probe labeling proteins.Its monolayer and multilayers in the absence and presence of stearic acid were deposited by LB technique.Fluorescence spectra and lifetimes of the fluorescent products were studied to elucidate the microenvironment of molecules in the LB films.

  14. Quantitative fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in turbid media: comparison of theoretical, experimental and computational methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishwanath, Karthik; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Pogue, Brian

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model developed to simulate time-resolved fluorescence propagation in a semi-infinite turbid medium was validated against previously reported theoretical and computational results. Model simulations were compared to experimental measurements of fluorescence spectra and lifetimes on tissue-simulating phantoms for single and dual fibre-optic probe geometries. Experiments and simulations using a single probe revealed that scattering-induced artefacts appeared in fluorescence emission spectra, while fluorescence lifetimes were unchanged. Although fluorescence lifetime measurements are generally more robust to scattering artefacts than are measurements of fluorescence spectra, in the dual-probe geometry scattering-induced changes in apparent lifetime were predicted both from diffusion theory and via Monte Carlo simulation, as well as measured experimentally. In all cases, the recovered apparent lifetime increased with increasing scattering and increasing source-detector separation. Diffusion theory consistently underestimated the magnitude of these increases in apparent lifetime (predicting a maximum increase of ∼15%), while Monte Carlo simulations and experiment were closely matched (showing increases as large as 30%). These results indicate that quantitative simulations of time-resolved fluorescence propagation in turbid media will be important for accurate recovery of fluorophore lifetimes in biological spectroscopy and imaging applications. (author)

  15. Standard reference for instrument response function in fluorescence lifetime measurements in visible and near infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chib, Rahul; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Fudala, Rafal; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Zelent, Bogumil; Corradini, Maria G; Ludescher, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Allura red (AR) fluorophore, a common dye in the food industry, displays a broad emission spectrum in water (visible-to-near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum) and has a remarkably short fluorescence lifetime of about 10 ps. This short lifetime does not depend on the emission (observation) wavelength. We examined time responses of AR fluorescence across emission wavelengths from 550 nm to 750 nm and found that it is an ideal candidate for impulse response functions in fluorescence lifetime measurements. (technical note)

  16. Light emitting diode excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sean J; JiJi, Renée D

    2002-12-01

    An excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence instrument has been developed using a linear array of light emitting diodes (LED). The wavelengths covered extend from the upper UV through the visible spectrum: 370-640 nm. Using an LED array to excite fluorescence emission at multiple excitation wavelengths is a low-cost alternative to an expensive high power lamp and imaging spectrograph. The LED-EEM system is a departure from other EEM spectroscopy systems in that LEDs often have broad excitation ranges which may overlap with neighboring channels. The LED array can be considered a hybrid between a spectroscopic and sensor system, as the broad LED excitation range produces a partially selective optical measurement. The instrument has been tested and characterized using fluorescent dyes: limits of detection (LOD) for 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)-anthracene and rhodamine B were in the mid parts-per-trillion range; detection limits for the other compounds were in the low parts-per-billion range (LED-EEMs were analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), which allowed the mathematical resolution of the individual contributions of the mono- and dianion fluorescein tautomers a priori. Correct identification and quantitation of six fluorescent dyes in two to six component mixtures (concentrations between 12.5 and 500 ppb) has been achieved with root mean squared errors of prediction (RMSEP) of less than 4.0 ppb for all components.

  17. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies

  18. Fluorescence study of some xanthine dyes under stepped laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkova, L.V.; Ketsle, G.A.; Ermagambetov, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Paper is devoted to definition of triplet state in molecules of xanthine dyes and study of intramolecular energy circulation. Stepped two-quanta excitation of dyes has been carried out with help of experimental unit. Intensive luminescence activated by excitation of triplet molecules of dyes within triplet-triplet band with wave length of 1060 nm was registered for eosin. Given luminescence spectrally coincides with fast fluorescence. 5 refs., 6 figs

  19. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-01-01

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup

  20. Continuous excitation chlorophyll fluorescence parameters: a review for practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    This review introduces, defines and critically reviews a number of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters with specific reference to those derived from continuous excitation chlorophyll fluorescence. A number of common issues and criticisms are addressed. The parameters fluorescence origin (F0) and the performance indices (PI) are discussed as examples. This review attempts to unify definitions for the wide range of parameters available for measuring plant vitality, facilitating their calculation and use. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Radiative and nonradiative lifetimes in excited states of Ar, Kr and Xe atoms in Ne matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, U.; Schwentner, N.

    1979-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation with its intense continuum and its excellent time structure has been exploited for time resolved luminescence spectroscopy in the solid state. By selective excitation of n = 1, n' = 1 and n = 2 exciton states of Xe, Kr and Ar atoms in Ne matrix we were able to identify the emitting states involved. Lifetimes within the cascade of radiative and radiationless relaxation between excited states as well as the radiative lifetimes for transitions to the ground state have been derived from the decay curves. Energy positions and radiative lifetimes of the emitting states correspond quite well with those of the free atoms. Radiative and radiationless relaxation processes take place within the manifold of excited states of the guest atoms. The rate constants for radiationless decay confirm an energy gap law. The order of the radiationless processes reaches in some cases extremely high values. Selection rules for spin and angular momentum are essential to understand the observed radiationless transition rates. (orig.)

  2. Chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging provides new insight into the chlorosis induced by plant virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Rong; Jiang, Hongshan; Hu, Fan; Yan, Jin; Zhu, Shuifang

    2017-02-01

    Leaf chlorosis induced by plant virus infection has a short fluorescence lifetime, which reflects damaged photosynthetic complexes and degraded chloroplasts. Plant viruses often induce chlorosis and necrosis, which are intimately related to photosynthetic functions. Chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime measurement is a valuable noninvasive tool for analyzing photosynthetic processes and is a sensitive indicator of the environment surrounding the fluorescent molecules. In this study, our central goal was to explore the effect of viral infection on photosynthesis by employing chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), steady-state fluorescence, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and pigment analysis. The data indicated that the chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime of chlorotic leaves was significantly shorter than that of healthy control leaves, and the fitted short lifetime component of chlorophyll fluorescence of chlorotic leaves was dominant. This dominant short lifetime component may result from damage to the structure of thylakoid, which was confirmed by TEM. The NPQ value of chlorotic leaves was slightly higher than that of healthy green leaves, which can be explained by increased neoxanthin, lutein and violaxanthin content relative to chlorophyll a. The difference in NPQ is slight, but FLIM can provide simple and direct characterization of PSII structure and photosynthetic function. Therefore, this technique shows great potential as a simple and rapid method for studying mechanisms of plant virus infection.

  3. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gredel, R.; Dishoeck, van E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination

  4. A Fast Global Fitting Algorithm for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy Based on Image Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Pelet, S.; Previte, M.J.R.; Laiho, L.H.; So, P.T. C.

    2004-01-01

    Global fitting algorithms have been shown to improve effectively the accuracy and precision of the analysis of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy data. Global analysis performs better than unconstrained data fitting when prior information exists, such as the spatial invariance of the lifetimes of individual fluorescent species. The highly coupled nature of global analysis often results in a significantly slower convergence of the data fitting algorithm as compared with unconstrained ana...

  5. Excited-state absorption and fluorescence dynamics of Er3+:KY3F10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, C.; Doualan, J. L.; Moncorgé, R.; Braud, A.; Camy, P.

    2018-05-01

    We report here on a complete investigation of the excited-state absorption and fluorescence dynamics of Er3+ doped KY3F10 single crystals versus dopant concentrations and optical excitation conditions. Radiative and effective (including non-radiative relaxations) emission lifetimes and branching ratios are determined from a Judd-Ofelt analysis of the absorption spectra and via specific fluorescence experiments using wavelength selective laser excitations. Excited-state absorption and emission spectra are registered within seven spectral domains, i.e. 560 nm, 650 nm, 710 nm, 810 nm, 970 nm, 1550 nm and 2750 nm. A maximum gain cross-section of 0.93 × 10-21 cm2 is determined at the potential laser wavelength of 2.801 μm for a population ratio of 0.48. Saturation of fluorescence intensities and variations of population ratios versus pumping rates are registered and confronted with a rate equation model to derive the rates of the most important up-conversion and cross-relaxation energy transfers occurring at high dopant concentrations.

  6. Choice of excitation source for determination of rare earth elements with radioisotope excited X ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Quanshi; Chang Yongfu

    2000-01-01

    The comparisons of two radioisotope source ( 241 Am and 238 Pu) which are the most available in the radioisotope excited X Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis technique and two characteristic X ray series (KX and LX) analyzed for the determination of the rare-earth (RE) elements were investigated in detail. According to the principle of emission and detection of X ray , the relative excitation efficiencies were calculated by the some fundamental physical parameters including the photoelectric mass attenuation coefficient, the fluorescent yield, the absorption jump factor, the emission probability of the detected fluorescent line with reference to other liens of the same series etc., The advantages and disadvantages of the two conditions are discussed. These results may determine the optimal excitation and detection conditions for different rare-earth elements. The experimental results with nine rare-earth elements (Ce, Nd, Sm, Tb, Tm, Ho, Er, Yb and Lu) are in agreement with the results of theoretical calculations

  7. Investigation of in-vivo skin autofluorescence lifetimes under long-term cw optical excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lihachev, A; Ferulova, I; Vasiljeva, K; Spigulis, J

    2014-01-01

    The main results obtained during the last five years in the field of laser-excited in-vivo human skin photobleaching effects are presented. The main achievements and results obtained, as well as methods and experimental devices are briefly described. In addition, the impact of long-term 405-nm cw low-power laser excitation on the skin autofluorescence lifetime is experimentally investigated. (laser biophotonics)

  8. Second-harmonic generation and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy through a rodent mammary imaging window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Pamela A.; Nazir, Muhammad; Szulczewski, Michael J.; Keely, Patricia J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2012-03-01

    Tumor-Associated Collagen Signatures (TACS) have been identified that manifest in specific ways during breast tumor progression and that correspond to patient outcome. There are also compelling metabolic changes associated with carcinoma invasion and progression. We have characterized the difference in the autofluorescent properties of metabolic co-factors, NADH and FAD, between normal and carcinoma breast cell lines. Also, we have shown in vitro that increased collagen density alters metabolic genes which are associated with glycolysis and leads to a more invasive phenotype. Establishing the relationship between collagen density, cellular metabolism, and metastasis in physiologically relevant cancer models is crucial for developing cancer therapies. To study cellular metabolism with respect to collagen density in vivo, we use multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy (MPM) in conjunction with a rodent mammary imaging window implanted in defined mouse cancer models. These models are ideal for the study of collagen changes in vivo, allowing determination of corresponding metabolic changes in breast cancer invasion and progression. To measure cellular metabolism, we collect fluorescence lifetime (FLIM) signatures of NADH and FAD, which are known to change based on the microenvironment of the cells. Additionally, MPM systems are capable of collecting second harmonic generation (SHG) signals which are a nonlinear optical property of collagen. Therefore, MPM, SHG, and FLIM are powerful tools with great potential for characterizing key features of breast carcinoma in vivo. Below we present the current efforts of our collaborative group to develop intravital approaches based on these imaging techniques to look at defined mouse mammary models.

  9. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining.

  10. Fluorophore:dendrimer ratio impacts cellular uptake and intracellular fluorescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Casey A; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2015-02-18

    G5-NH2-TAMRAn (n = 1-4, 5+, and 1.5(avg)) were prepared with n = 1-4 as a precise dye:dendrimer ratio, 5+ as a mixture of dendrimers with 5 or more dye per dendrimer, and 1.5(avg) as a Poisson distribution of dye:dendrimer ratios with a mean of 1.5 dye per dendrimer. The absorption intensity increased sublinearly with n whereas the fluorescence emission and lifetime decreased with an increasing number of dyes per dendrimer. Flow cytometry was employed to quantify uptake into HEK293A cells. Dendrimers with 2-4 dyes were found to have greater uptake than dendrimer with a single dye. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) showed that the different dye:dendrimer ratio alone was sufficient to change the fluorescence lifetime of the material observed inside cells. We also observed that the lifetime of G5-NH2-TAMRA5+ increased when present in the cell as compared to solution. However, cells treated with G5-NH2-TAMRA1.5(avg) did not exhibit the high lifetime components present in G5-NH2-TAMRA1 and G5-NH2-TAMRA5+. In general, the effects of the dye:dendrimer ratio on fluorescence lifetime were of similar magnitude to environmentally induced lifetime shifts.

  11. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS): Concepts, Applications and Outlook

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapusta, Peter; Macháň, Radek; Benda, A.; Hof, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 10 (2012), s. 12890-12910 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) * time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) * fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.464, year: 2012

  12. Scanless multitarget-matching multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junpeng Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the combination of a reflective blazed grating and a reflective phase-only diffractive spatial light modulator (SLM, scanless multitarget-matching multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy (SMTM-MPM was achieved. The SLM shaped an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:sapphire laser beam into an excitation pattern with addressable shapes and sizes that matched the samples of interest in the field of view. Temporal and spatial focusing were simultaneously realized by combining an objective lens and a blazed grating. The fluorescence signal from illuminated areas was recorded by a two-dimensional sCMOS camera. Compared with a conventional temporal focusing multiphoton microscope, our microscope achieved effective use of the laser power and decreased photodamage with higher axial resolution.

  13. Fluorescence excitation studies of molecular photoionization in external electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliakoff, E.D.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Leroi, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Using molecular nitrogen as an example, we show that fluorescence excitation spectroscopy can be used to measure partial photoionization cross sections of free molecules in external electric fields. The production of the N 2 + (B 2 Σ/sub u/ + ) state was studied and the threshold for this process was found to shift linearly with the square root of the applied field. This behavior is compared with the hydrogenic case and with previously studied systems

  14. Lettuce flavonoids screening and phenotyping by chlorophyll fluorescence excitation ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivcak, Marek; Brückova, Klaudia; Sytar, Oksana; Brestic, Marian; Olsovska, Katarina; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2017-06-01

    Environmentally induced variation and the genotypic differences in flavonoid and phenolic content in lettuce can be reliably detected using the appropriate parameters derived from the records of rapid non-invasive fluorescence technique. The chlorophyll fluorescence excitation ratio method was designed as a rapid and non-invasive tool to estimate the content of UV-absorbing phenolic compounds in plants. Using this technique, we have assessed the dynamics of accumulation of flavonoids related to developmental changes and environmental effects. Moreover, we have tested appropriateness of the method to identify the genotypic differences and fluctuations in total phenolics and flavonoid content in lettuce. Six green and two red genotypes of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) grown in pots were exposed to two different environments for 50 days: direct sunlight (UV-exposed) and greenhouse conditions (low UV). The indices based on the measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence after red, green and UV excitation indicated increase of the content of UV-absorbing compounds and anthocyanins in the epidermis of lettuce leaves. In similar, the biochemical analyses performed at the end of the experiment confirmed significantly higher total phenolic and flavonoid content in lettuce plants exposed to direct sun compared to greenhouse conditions and in red compared to green genotypes. As the correlation between the standard fluorescence indices and the biochemical records was negatively influenced by the presence of red genotypes, we proposed the use of a new parameter named Modified Flavonoid Index (MFI) taking into an account both absorbance changes due to flavonol and anthocyanin content, for which the correlation with flavonoid and phenolic content was relatively good. Thus, our results confirmed that the fluorescence excitation ratio method is useful for identifying the major differences in phenolic and flavonoid content in lettuce plants and it can be used for high-throughput pre

  15. Miniaturized side-viewing imaging probe for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM): validation with fluorescence dyes, tissue structural proteins and tissue specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Elson, DS; Jo, JA; Marcu, L

    2007-01-01

    We report a side viewing fibre-based endoscope that is compatible with intravascular imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The instrument has been validated through testing with fluorescent dyes and collagen and elastin powders using the Laguerre expansion deconvolution technique to calculate the fluorescence lifetimes. The instrument has also been tested on freshly excised unstained animal vascular tissues.

  16. Distribution of diffusion times determined by fluorescence (lifetime) correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánek, Jiří; Loukotová, Lenka; Hrubý, Martin; Štěpánek, Petr

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 8 (2018), s. 2796-2804 ISSN 0024-9297 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer solution * fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * diffusion time distribution Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 5.835, year: 2016

  17. In vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging for monitoring the efficacy of the cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Chernomordik, Victor; Hassan, Moinuddin; Zielinski, Rafal; Capala, Jacek; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2014-07-01

    Advances in tumor biology created a foundation for targeted therapy aimed at inactivation of specific molecular mechanisms responsible for cell malignancy. In this paper, we used in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging with HER2-targeted fluorescent probes as an alternative imaging method to investigate the efficacy of targeted therapy with 17-DMAG (an HSP90 inhibitor) on tumors with high expression of HER2 receptors. HER2-specific Affibody, conjugated to Alexafluor 750, was injected into nude mice bearing HER2-positive tumor xenograft. The fluorescence lifetime was measured before treatment and monitored after the probe injections at 12 hours after the last treatment dose, when the response to the 17-DMAG therapy was the most pronounced as well as a week after the last treatment when the tumors grew back almost to their pretreatment size. Imaging results showed significant difference between the fluorescence lifetimes at the tumor and the contralateral site (∼0.13 ns) in the control group (before treatment) and 7 days after the last treatment when the tumors grew back to their pretreatment dimensions. However, at the time frame that the treatment had its maximum effect (12 hours after the last treatment), the difference between the fluorescence lifetime at the tumor and contralateral site decreased to 0.03 ns. The results showed a good correlation between fluorescence lifetime and the efficacy of the treatment. These findings show that in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used as a promising molecular imaging tool for monitoring the treatment outcome in preclinical models and potentially in patients. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. In-vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging for monitoring the efficacy of the cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Chernomordik, Victor; Hassan, Moinuddin; Zielinski, Rafal; Capala, Jacek; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advances in tumor biology created a foundation for targeted therapy aimed at inactivation of specific molecular mechanisms responsible for cell malignancy. In this paper, we used in-vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging with HER2 targeted fluorescent probes as an alternative imaging method to investigate the efficacy of targeted therapy with 17-DMAG (an HSP90 inhibitor) on tumors with high expression of HER2 receptors. Experimental Design HER2-specific Affibody, conjugated to Alexafluor 750, was injected into nude mice, bearing HER2-positive tumor xenograft. The fluorescence lifetime was measured before treatment and monitored after the probe injections at 12 hours after the last treatment dose, when the response to the 17-DMAG therapy was the most pronounced as well as a week after the last treatment when the tumors grew back almost to their pre-treatment size. Results Imaging results showed significant difference between the fluorescence lifetimes at the tumor and the contralateral site (~0.13ns) in the control group (before treatment) and 7 days after the last treatment when the tumors grew back to their pretreatment dimensions. However, at the time frame that the treatment had its maximum effect (12 hours after the last treatment) the difference between the fluorescence lifetime at the tumor and contralateral site decreased to 0.03ns. Conclusions The results showed a good correlation between fluorescence lifetime and the efficacy of the treatment. These findings show that in-vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used as a promising molecular imaging tool for monitoring the treatment outcome in preclinical models and potentially in patients. PMID:24671949

  19. Portable fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for in-situ interrogation of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Teixeira Rosa, Ramon Gabriel; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Kurachi, Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime techniques are potential methods for optical diagnosis and characterization of biological tissues with an in-situ, fast, and noninvasive interrogation. Several diseases may be diagnosed due to differences in the fluorescence spectra of targeted fluorophores, when, these spectra are similar, considering steady-state fluorescence, others may be detected by monitoring their fluorescence lifetime. Despite this complementarity, most of the current fluorescence lifetime systems are not robust and portable, and not being feasible for clinical applications. We describe the assembly of a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system in a suitcase, its characterization, and validation with clinical measurements of skin lesions. The assembled system is all encased and robust, maintaining its mechanical, electrical, and optical stability during transportation, and is feasible for clinical measurements. The instrument response function measured was about 300 ps, and the system is properly calibrated. At the clinical study, the system showed to be reliable, and the achieved spectroscopy results support its potential use as an auxiliary tool for skin diagnostics.

  20. Portable fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for in-situ interrogation of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Teixeira Rosa, Ramon Gabriel; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Kurachi, Cristina

    2017-10-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime techniques are potential methods for optical diagnosis and characterization of biological tissues with an in-situ, fast, and noninvasive interrogation. Several diseases may be diagnosed due to differences in the fluorescence spectra of targeted fluorophores, when, these spectra are similar, considering steady-state fluorescence, others may be detected by monitoring their fluorescence lifetime. Despite this complementarity, most of the current fluorescence lifetime systems are not robust and portable, and not being feasible for clinical applications. We describe the assembly of a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system in a suitcase, its characterization, and validation with clinical measurements of skin lesions. The assembled system is all encased and robust, maintaining its mechanical, electrical, and optical stability during transportation, and is feasible for clinical measurements. The instrument response function measured was about 300 ps, and the system is properly calibrated. At the clinical study, the system showed to be reliable, and the achieved spectroscopy results support its potential use as an auxiliary tool for skin diagnostics. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  1. Use of multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate skin pigmentation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancik, Yuri; Favre, Amandine; Loy, Chong Jin; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-02-01

    There is a growing body of literature showing the usefulness of multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in situ characterization of skin constituents and the ensuing development of noninvasive diagnostic tools against skin diseases. Melanin and pigmentation-associated skin cancers constitute some of the major applications. We show that MPT and fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to measure changes in cutaneous melanin concentration and that these can be related to the visible skin color. Melanin in the skin of African, Indian, Caucasian, and Asian volunteers is detected on the basis of its emission wavelength and fluorescence lifetimes in solution and in a melanocyte-keratinocyte cell culture. Fluorescence intensity is used to characterize the melanin content and distribution as a function of skin type and depth into the skin (stratum granulosum and stratum basale). The measured fluorescence intensities in given skin types agree with melanin amounts reported by others using biopsies. Our results suggest that spatial distribution of melanin in skin can be studied using MPT and fluorescence lifetime imaging, but further studies are needed to ascertain that the method can resolve melanin amount in smaller depth intervals.

  2. Characterization of a pulsed x-ray source for fluorescent lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankespoor, S.C.; Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.; Rossington, C.S.; Ito, M.; Oba, K.

    1994-01-01

    To search for new, fast, inorganic scintillators, the authors have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray source for determining fluorescent lifetimes and wavelengths of compounds in crystal or powdered form. This source uses a light-excited x-ray tube which produces x-rays when light from a laser diode strikes its photocathode. The x-ray tube has a tungsten anode, a beryllium exit window, a 30 kV maximum tube bias, and a 50 μA maximum average cathode current. The laser produces 3 x 10 7 photons at 650 nm per ∼100 ps pulse, with up to 10 7 pulses/sec. The time spread for the laser diode, x-ray tube, and a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is less than 120 ps fwhm. The mean x-ray energy at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV is 9.4, 10.3, and 11.1 keV, respectively. The authors measured 140, 230, and 330 x-ray photons per laser diode pulse per steradian, at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, respectively. Background x-rays due to dark current occur at a rate of 1 x 10 6 and 3 x 10 6 photons/sec/steradian at biases of 25 and 30 kV, respectively. Data characterizing the x-ray output with an aluminum filter in the x-ray beam are also presented

  3. Lifetime measurements of excited states in 17C: Possible interplay between collectivity and halo effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Ong, H.J.; Imai, N.; Sakurai, H.; Nakao, T.; Aoi, N.; Baba, H.; Bishop, S.; Ichikawa, Y.; Ishihara, M.; Kondo, Y.; Kubo, T.; Kurita, K.; Motobayashi, T.; Nakamura, T.; Okumura, T.; Onishi, T.K.; Ota, S.; Suzuki, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    Lifetime measurements were performed on low-lying excited states of the neutron-rich isotope 17 C using the recoil shadow method. The γ-decay mean lifetimes were determined to be 583±21(stat)±35(syst) ps for the first excited state at 212 keV and 18.9±0.6(stat)±4.7(syst) ps for the second excited state at 333 keV. Based on a comparison with the empirical upper limits for the electromagnetic transition strengths, these decays are concluded to be predominantly M1 transitions. The reduced M1 transition probabilities to the ground state were deduced to be (1.0±0.1)x10 -2 μ N 2 and (8.2 -1.8 +3.2 )x10 -2 μ N 2 , respectively, for the first and second excited states. The strongly hindered M1 strength as well as the lowered excitation energy represents unique nature of the 212-keV state

  4. Plasmonic-based instrument response function for time-resolved fluorescence: toward proper lifetime analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szlazak, Radoslaw; Tutaj, Krzysztof; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I.; Luchowski, Rafal, E-mail: rafal.luchowski@umcs.pl [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Department of Biophysics, Institute of Physics (Poland)

    2013-06-15

    In this report, we investigated the so-called plasmonic platforms prepared to target ultra-short fluorescence and accurate instrumental response function in a time-domain spectroscopy and microscopy. The interaction of metallic nanoparticles with nearby fluorophores results in the increase of the dye fluorescence quantum yield, photostability and decrease of the lifetime parameter. The mentioned properties of platforms were applied to achieve a picosecond fluorescence lifetime (21 ps) of erythrosin B, used later as a better choice for deconvolution of fluorescence decays measured with 'color' sensitive photo-detectors. The ultra-short fluorescence standard based on combination of thin layers of silver film, silver colloidal nanoparticles (about 60 nm in diameter), and top layer of erythrosin B embedded in 0.2 % poly(vinyl) alcohol. The response functions were monitored on two photo-detectors; microchannel plate photomultiplier and single photon avalanche photodiode as a Rayleigh scattering and ultra-short fluorescence. We demonstrated that use of the plasmonic base fluorescence standard as an instrumental response function results in the absence of systematic error in lifetime measurements and analysis.

  5. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy combined with lifetime tuning: New perspectives in supported phospholipid bilayer research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, Aleš; Fagulová, Veronika; Deyneka, Alexander; Enderlain, J.; Hof, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 23 (2006), s. 9580-9585 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2308; GA MŠk LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : spectroscopy * fluorescence * FLCS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2006

  6. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  7. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreham, Alexander; Brodwolf, Robert; Walker, Karolina; Haag, Rainer; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2016-12-24

    The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  8. Effect of calcinations temperature on the luminescence intensity and fluorescent lifetime of Tb3+-doped hydroxyapatite (Tb-HA nanocrystallines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairong Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite luminescent nanocrystallines doped with 6 mol.% Tb3+ (Tb-HA were prepared via chemical deposition method and calcined at different temperature, and the effects of calcinations temperature on the luminescence intensity and fluorescent lifetime were studied. TEM image of Tb-HA revealed that the shape of nanocrystallines changed from needle-like to short rod-like and sphere-like with the increase of calcinations temperature; while the particles sizes decreased from 190 nm to 110 nm. The crystallinity degree increased. The typical emission peaks attributed to Tb3+ ions were observed in emission spectra of 6 mol.% Tb-HA under 378 nm excitation. The luminescent intensity of Tb-HA, which showed the fluorescence quenching, firstly enhanced and then decreased at 700 °C; while the fluorescent lifetime increased firstly and then decreased after 600 °C. Furthermore, the ratio of intensity between 545 nm and 490 nm corresponding to electric-dipole and magnetic-dipole transition (IR: IO increases firstly and then decreases, which revealed that the proportion of substitute type and site of Ca2+ ions by Tb3+ ions were helpful to realize the substitute process and functional structure design.

  9. A method of measurement of lifetimes of excited ion levels, using orientation transfer by Penning collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, J.; Barrat, J.-P.

    1978-01-01

    A method for measuring the lifetimes of ionic excited levels is described. This method uses the transfer of coherence in a Penning collision using metastable optically oriented He 2 3 S 1 atoms. If R.F. transitions are induced in the (2 3 S 1 )He level, a transverse component of the magnetic moment of this level is created, which precesses coherently at the angular frequency ω of the R.F. field. The helium transverse orientation is partially transferred to the ions produced by Penning collisions. After the collision, the orientation transferred precesses around the external magnetic field at the Larmor frequency ω 0 ' of the ion excited level. The degree of orientation of the excited ion level depends, in the stationary state, on the average phase shift, during the lifetime tau prime of this level, between the Larmor precession at angular frequency ω 0 ' and the forced precession of helium (at angular frequency ω). The orientation of the ions is monitored by the modulation of the light emitted during their radiative decay. It is possible to determine the lifetime tau prime by measuring the degree of modulation of the reemitted light as a function of ω [fr

  10. Multiphoton Laser Microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging for the Evaluation of the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Seidenari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiphoton laser microscopy is a new, non-invasive technique providing access to the skin at a cellular and subcellular level, which is based both on autofluorescence and fluorescence lifetime imaging. Whereas the former considers fluorescence intensity emitted by epidermal and dermal fluorophores and by the extra-cellular matrix, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM, is generated by the fluorescence decay rate. This innovative technique can be applied to the study of living skin, cell cultures and ex vivo samples. Although still limited to the clinical research field, the development of multiphoton laser microscopy is thought to become suitable for a practical application in the next few years: in this paper, we performed an accurate review of the studies published so far, considering the possible fields of application of this imaging method and providing high quality images acquired in the Department of Dermatology of the University of Modena.

  11. Laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing was applied to investigate the local fields and interactions of paramagnetic ions in oxide glasses. Studies included the site dependence of energy levels, radiative and nonradiative transition probabilities, homogeneous line broadening, and ion--ion energy transfer of rare earth ions. These results and the experimental techniques are reviewed briefly; the use of paramagnetic ions other than the rare earths is also considered. Recently, laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy was used to investigate modifications in the local structure of lithium borate glass caused by compositional changes and phase separation and the site dependence of nonradiative relaxation of paramagnetic ions by multiphonon processes. These results and their implications are discussed. 6 figures

  12. Polymer filters for ultraviolet-excited integrated fluorescence sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandin, Marc; Abshire, Pamela; Smela, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Optical filters for blocking ultraviolet (UV) light were fabricated by doping various polymer hosts with a UV absorbing chromophore. The polymers were polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a silicone elastomer frequently used in microfluidics, SU-8, a photopatternable epoxy, and Humiseal 1B66, an acrylic coating used for moisture protection of integrated circuits. The chromophore was 2-(2′-hydroxy-5′-methylphenyl) benzotriazole (BTA), which has a high extinction coefficient between 300 nm and 400 nm. We demonstrate filters 5 µm thick that exhibit high ultraviolet rejection (nearly −40 dB at 342 nm) yet pass visible light (near 0 dB above 400 nm), making them ideal for ultraviolet-excited fluorescence sensing within microsystems. The absorbance of the BTA depended on the host polymer. These filters are promising for integrated fluorescence spectroscopy in bioanalytical platforms because they can be patterned by dry etching, molding or exposure to ultraviolet light. (paper)

  13. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gredel, R.; Van Dishoeck, E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles. 70 references

  14. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredel, Roland; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Black, John H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles.

  15. Colorectal cancer detection by hyperspectral imaging using fluorescence excitation scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Deal, Joshua; Hill, Shante; Martin, Will A.; Lall, Malvika; Lopez, Carmen; Rider, Paul F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technologies have shown great promise for biomedical applications. These techniques have been especially useful for detection of molecular events and characterization of cell, tissue, and biomaterial composition. Unfortunately, hyperspectral imaging technologies have been slow to translate to clinical devices - likely due to increased cost and complexity of the technology as well as long acquisition times often required to sample a spectral image. We have demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging approaches which scan the fluorescence excitation spectrum can provide increased signal strength and faster imaging, compared to traditional emission-scanning approaches. We have also demonstrated that excitation-scanning approaches may be able to detect spectral differences between colonic adenomas and adenocarcinomas and normal mucosa in flash-frozen tissues. Here, we report feasibility results from using excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging to screen pairs of fresh tumoral and nontumoral colorectal tissues. Tissues were imaged using a novel hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning microscope, sampling a wavelength range of 360-550 nm, at 5 nm increments. Image data were corrected to achieve a NIST-traceable flat spectral response. Image data were then analyzed using a range of supervised and unsupervised classification approaches within ENVI software (Harris Geospatial Solutions). Supervised classification resulted in >99% accuracy for single-patient image data, but only 64% accuracy for multi-patient classification (n=9 to date), with the drop in accuracy due to increased false-positive detection rates. Hence, initial data indicate that this approach may be a viable detection approach, but that larger patient sample sizes need to be evaluated and the effects of inter-patient variability studied.

  16. Protein Structural Deformation Induced Lifetime Shortening of Photosynthetic Bacteria Light-Harvesting Complex LH2 Excited State

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xing-Hai; Zhang, Lei; Weng, Yu-Xiang; Du, Lu-Chao; Ye, Man-Ping; Yang, Guo-Zhen; Fujii, Ritsuko; Rondonuwu, Ferdy S.; Koyama, Yasushi; Wu, Yi-Shi; Zhang, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting antenna complex LH2 was immobilized on the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles in the colloidal solution. The LH2/TiO2 assembly was investigated by the time-resolved spectroscopic methods. The excited-state lifetimes for carotenoid-containing and carotenoidless LH2 have been measured, showing a decrease in the excited-state lifetime of B850 when LH2 was immobilized on TiO2. The possibility that the decrease of the LH2 excited-state lifetime being caused by ...

  17. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of lipids during 3T3-L1 cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Sik; Won, Young Jae; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kim, Dug Young

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is becoming a big health problem in these days. Since increased body weight is due to increased number and size of the triglyceride-storing adipocytes, many researchers are working on differentiation conditions and processes of adipocytes. Adipocytes also work as regulators of whole-body energy homeostasis by secreting several proteins that regulate processes as diverse as haemostasis, blood pressure, immune function, angiogenesis and energy balance. 3T3-L1 cells are widely used cell line for studying adipogenesis because it can differentiate into an adipocyte-like phenotype under appropriate conditions. In this paper, we propose an effective fluorescence lifetime imaging technique which can easily distinguish lipids in membrane and those in lipid droplets. Nile red dyes are attached to lipids in 3T3-L1 cells. Fluorescence lifetime images were taken for 2 week during differentiation procedure of 3T3-L1 cells into adipocytes. We used 488 nm pulsed laser with 5MHz repetition rate and emission wavelength is 520 nm of Nile Red fluorescent dye. Results clearly show that the lifetime of Nile red in lipid droplets are smaller than those in cell membrane. Our results suggest that fluorescence lifetime imaging can be a very powerful tool to monitor lipid droplet formation in adipocytes from 3T3-L1 cells.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime of emitters with broad homogeneous linewidths modified in opal photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad...

  19. Towards sensitive, high-throughput, biomolecular assays based on fluorescence lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanna Skilitsi, Anastasia; Turko, Timothé; Cianfarani, Damien; Barre, Sophie; Uhring, Wilfried; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Léonard, Jérémie

    2017-09-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence detection for robust sensing of biomolecular interactions is developed by implementing time-correlated single photon counting in high-throughput conditions. Droplet microfluidics is used as a promising platform for the very fast handling of low-volume samples. We illustrate the potential of this very sensitive and cost-effective technology in the context of an enzymatic activity assay based on fluorescently-labeled biomolecules. Fluorescence lifetime detection by time-correlated single photon counting is shown to enable reliable discrimination between positive and negative control samples at a throughput as high as several hundred samples per second.

  20. Time-Domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Techniques Suitable for Solid-State Imaging Sensor Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Henderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully demonstrated video-rate CMOS single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD-based cameras for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM by applying innovative FLIM algorithms. We also review and compare several time-domain techniques and solid-state FLIM systems, and adapt the proposed algorithms for massive CMOS SPAD-based arrays and hardware implementations. The theoretical error equations are derived and their performances are demonstrated on the data obtained from 0.13 μm CMOS SPAD arrays and the multiple-decay data obtained from scanning PMT systems. In vivo two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging data of FITC-albumin labeled vasculature of a P22 rat carcinosarcoma (BD9 rat window chamber are used to test how different algorithms perform on bi-decay data. The proposed techniques are capable of producing lifetime images with enough contrast.

  1. Enhancement of early cervical cancer diagnosis with epithelial layer analysis of fluorescence lifetime images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Gu

    Full Text Available This work reports the use of layer analysis to aid the fluorescence lifetime diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN from H&E stained cervical tissue sections. The mean and standard deviation of lifetimes in single region of interest (ROI of cervical epithelium were previously shown to correlate to the gold standard histopathological classification of early cervical cancer. These previously defined single ROIs were evenly divided into layers for analysis. A 10-layer model revealed a steady increase in fluorescence lifetime from the inner to the outer epithelial layers of healthy tissue sections, suggesting a close association with cellular maturity. The shorter lifetime and minimal lifetime increase towards the epithelial surface of CIN-affected regions are in good agreement with the absence of cellular maturation in CIN. Mean layer lifetimes in the top-half cervical epithelium were used as feature vectors for extreme learning machine (ELM classifier discriminations. It was found that the proposed layer analysis technique greatly improves the sensitivity and specificity to 94.6% and 84.3%, respectively, which can better supplement the traditional gold standard cervical histopathological examinations.

  2. The fluorescence lifetime of BRI1-GFP as probe for the noninvasive determination of the membrane potential in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgass, K.; Caesar, K.; Schleifenbaum, F.; Meixner, A. J.; Harter, K.

    2010-02-01

    As the excited state lifetime of a fluorescent molecule depends on its environment, it is possible to use it as a probe for physico-chemical parameters of the surrounding medium. Whereas this is well known for many solid guest/host systems, only few reports of quantitative, temporal resolved in vivo studies to monitor the nano-environment for a protein-coupled chromophore such as GFP are known from literature. Here we present a novel approach to determine the membrane potential of living (plant) cells based on the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) analysis of membrane-located GFP. By using confocal sample scanning microscopy (CSSM) combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we recently showed that the phytohormone brassinolide (BL) induces cell wall expansion and a decrease in the FLT of the BRI1-GFP in living cells of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. BRI1 is the dominant functional receptor for BL in Arabidopsis and locates to the plasma membrane. Although the dependence of the FLT of GFP on its physico-chemical environment such as pH-value, refractive index and pressure has been reported, the observed FLT decrease of BRI1-GFP in response to BL application could not be explained by these parameters. However, our in vivo FLT and CSSM analyses indicate that the BLinduced change in the FLT of BRI1-GFP is caused by hyperpolarisation of the plasma membrane (Em). Thus, our results indicate that BRI1-GFP serves as sensitive and non-invasive probe for recording the Em of the plasma membrane in living plant cells with high spatio-temporal resolution.

  3. Azadioxatriangulenium: a long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Luchowski, Rafal; Laursen, Bo W

    2013-01-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy has great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation, as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is on the order of 20–200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatic dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecule assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red-emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immunoglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time of more than 75%, and an increase in the steady-state anisotropy of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay to detect binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with most other red-emitting organic dyes. (paper)

  4. Azadioxatriangulenium: a long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just Sørensen, Thomas; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Laursen, Bo W.

    2013-06-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy has great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation, as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is on the order of 20-200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatic dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecule assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red-emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immunoglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time of more than 75%, and an increase in the steady-state anisotropy of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay to detect binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with most other red-emitting organic dyes.

  5. Azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA+): A long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Laursen, Bo W.

    2013-01-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy have great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is in the order of 20–200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatics dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecules assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immuniglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time by more than 75 %, and a change in the steady-state anisotropy increase of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay for detecting binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with the other red emitting organic dyes. PMID:24058730

  6. Lifetime measurements of highly excited Rydberg states of strontium. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunze, S.; Hohmann, R.; Kluge, H.J.; Lantzsch, J.; Monz, L.; Stenner, J.; Stratmann, K.; Wendt, K.; Zimmer, K. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik)

    1993-06-01

    Lifetimes of Rydberg states of triplet-series 5s ns[sup 3]S[sub 1] with n=19-23, 35 and 5s nd[sup 3]D[sub 3] with n=18-20, 23-28 in the spectrum of neutral strontium have been determined. Observation of the exponential decay after excitation by a pulsed laser in a fast atomic beam and subsequent state-selective field ionization was employed. The lifetimes of the states of the [sup 3]S[sub 1]-series show the expected n*[sup 3] dependence on the effective principal quantum number, while the [sup 3]D[sub 3]-series is disturbed by configuration mixing. Furthermore, state re-populations induced by black-body radiation have been observed. (orig.).

  7. Lifetime measurements of highly excited Rydberg states of strontium. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.; Hohmann, R.; Kluge, H.J.; Lantzsch, J.; Monz, L.; Stenner, J.; Stratmann, K.; Wendt, K.; Zimmer, K.

    1993-01-01

    Lifetimes of Rydberg states of triplet-series 5s ns 3 S 1 with n=19-23, 35 and 5s nd 3 D 3 with n=18-20, 23-28 in the spectrum of neutral strontium have been determined. Observation of the exponential decay after excitation by a pulsed laser in a fast atomic beam and subsequent state-selective field ionization was employed. The lifetimes of the states of the 3 S 1 -series show the expected n* 3 dependence on the effective principal quantum number, while the 3 D 3 -series is disturbed by configuration mixing. Furthermore, state re-populations induced by black-body radiation have been observed. (orig.)

  8. Gamma-ray induced Doppler broadening and the determination of lifetimes of excited nuclear states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, H.G.; Jolie, J.; Robinson, S.J.; Kessler, E.G.; Dewey, S.M.; Greene, G.; Deslattes, R.; Ulbig, S.; Lieb, K.P.; Casten, R.F.; Krusche, B.; Cizewski, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of lifetimes of excited states in nuclei yield crucial information for sensitive tests of nuclear models. Here a novel method will be discussed which involves the GRID (Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening) technique, in which Doppler broadening is observed in a transition from a nucleus recoiling from the emission of a previous gamma ray. As the recoil energy is extremely small, ultra-high energy resolving power has to be used. To date all such experiments have been carried out at ILL using the GAMS4 double flat crystal spectrometer which is operated in a NIST-ILL collaboration. The method can be used for all lifetimes below a few picoseconds. The wide range of applicability, together with the very exhaustive set of data often obtained, is an advantage with respect to many other methods. The characteristic features of GRID will be discussed using some selected examples. 21 refs., 8 figs

  9. Excitation and deexcitation of N2 molecular levels. Induced fluorescence by electrons and laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Fernandez-Mayoralas, A.

    1989-01-01

    The electron impact excitation followed by fluorescence induced by N 2 -laser absorption was used to study the lifetime of the lowest vibrational level of the B 3 π g electronic state of N 2 . The experimental result of this work is 13 + 1 μs. To measure the lifetime of B 3 π g (v=2,3,5,6,7,8) levels the delayed coincidence method by electron impact was use. The lifetime values were compared with recent experimental and theoretical results. The relative intensi-ties of 3 π g --- A 3 Σ Ω + system bands, in the range (6540-10500 A o ) was measured using a hollow cathode lamp as spectral source. The relative transition moments and its dependence versus the r-centroid was obtained. Total cross sections for electron scattering by N molecules in the range 600 - 5000 eV have been obtained from measurements of the attenuation of a linear electron beam. The results have been compared with available experimental cross sections and with theoretical calculations based on the first Born approximation. (Author)

  10. Lifetimes of low-lying excited states in 50 36 86Kr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J.; Chester, A.; Ball, G. C.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Domingo, T.; Drake, T. E.; Evitts, L. J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Hallam, S.; Moukaddam, M.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Smallcombe, J.; Smith, J. K.; Starosta, K.; Svensson, C. E.; Williams, J.

    2018-04-01

    Background: The evolution of nuclear magic numbers at extremes of isospin is a topic at the forefront of contemporary nuclear physics. N =50 is a prime example, with increasing experimental data coming to light on potentially doubly magic 100Sn and 78Ni at the proton-rich and proton-deficient extremes, respectively; however, experimental discrepancies exist in the data for less exotic systems. Purpose: In 86Kr the B (E 2 ;21+→01+) value—a key indicator of shell evolution—has been experimentally determined by two different methodologies, with the results deviating by 3 σ . Here, we report on a new high-precision measurement of this value, as well as the first measured lifetimes and hence transition strengths for the 22+ and 3(2) - states in the nucleus. Methods: The Doppler-shift attenuation method was implemented using the TRIUMF-ISAC γ -ray escape-suppressed spectrometer (TIGRESS) γ -ray spectrometer and the TIGRESS integrated plunger device. High-statistics Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to extract lifetimes in accordance with state-of-the-art methodologies. Results: Lifetimes of τ (21+)=336 ±4 (stat.)±20 (sys.) fs, τ (22+)=263 ±9 (stat.)±19 (sys.) fs, and τ (3(2) -)=73 ±6 (stat.)±32 (sys.) fs were extracted. This yields a transition strength for the first-excited state of B (E 2 ;21+→01+)=259 ±3 (stat.)±16 (sys.) e2 fm4. Conclusions: The measured lifetime disagrees with the previous Doppler-shift attenuation method measurement by more than 3 σ , while agreeing well with a previous value extracted from Coulomb excitation. The newly extracted B (E 2 ;21+→01+) value indicates a more significant reduction in the N =50 isotones approaching Z =40 .

  11. From morphology to clinical pathophysiology: multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging at patients' bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mess, Christian; Zens, Katharina; Gorzelanny, Christian; Metze, Dieter; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of skin diseases. By means of multiphoton excitation, endogenous biomolecules like NADH, collagen or elastin show autofluorescence or second harmonic generation. Thus, these molecules provide information about the subcellular morphology, epidermal architecture and physiological condition of the skin. To gain a deeper understanding of the linkage between cellular structure and physiological processes, non-invasive multiphotonbased intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) were combined within the scopes of inflammatory skin, chronic wounds and drug delivery in clinical application. The optical biopsies generated via MPT were morphologically analyzed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed a perinuclear accumulation in lesional skin in contrast to an even distribution in healthy skin. Confirmatively, MPT-FLIM showed an obvious metabolic shift in lesions. Moreover, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. The feasibility of primary in vivo tracking of applied therapeutic agents further broadened our scope: We examined the permeation and subsequent distribution of agents directly visualized in patientś skin in short-term repetitive measurements. Furthermore, we performed MPT-FLIM follow-up investigations in the long-term course of therapy. Therefore, clinical MPT-FLIM application offers new insights into the pathophysiology and the individual therapeutic course of skin diseases, facilitating a better understanding of the processes of inflammation and wound healing.

  12. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J; Jarvis, Lesley A; Pogue, Brian W

    2016-05-21

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600-900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  13. Rotational multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound: bimodal system for intravascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marcu, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report the development and validation of a hybrid intravascular diagnostic system combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for cardiovascular imaging applications. A prototype FLIm system based on fluorescence pulse sampling technique providing information on artery biochemical composition was integrated with a commercial IVUS system providing information on artery morphology. A customized 3-Fr bimodal catheter combining a rotational side-view fiberoptic and a 40-MHz IVUS transducer was constructed for sequential helical scanning (rotation and pullback) of tubular structures. Validation of this bimodal approach was conducted in pig heart coronary arteries. Spatial resolution, fluorescence detection efficiency, pulse broadening effect, and lifetime measurement variability of the FLIm system were systematically evaluated. Current results show that this system is capable of temporarily resolving the fluorescence emission simultaneously in multiple spectral channels in a single pullback sequence. Accurate measurements of fluorescence decay characteristics from arterial segments can be obtained rapidly (e.g., 20 mm in 5 s), and accurate co-registration of fluorescence and ultrasound features can be achieved. The current finding demonstrates the compatibility of FLIm instrumentation with in vivo clinical investigations and its potential to complement conventional IVUS during catheterization procedures. PMID:24898604

  14. Lifetime Reliability Estimate and Extreme Permanent Deformations of Randomly Excited Elasto-Plastic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1983-01-01

    plastic deformation during several loadings can be modelled as a filtered Poisson process. Using the Markov property of this quantity the considered first-passage problem as well as the related extreme distribution problems are then solved numerically, and the results are compared to simulation studies.......A method is presented for life-time reliability' estimates of randomly excited yielding systems, assuming the structure to be safe, when the plastic deformations are confined below certain limits. The accumulated plastic deformations during any single significant loading history are considered...

  15. A fast global fitting algorithm for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy based on image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelet, S; Previte, M J R; Laiho, L H; So, P T C

    2004-10-01

    Global fitting algorithms have been shown to improve effectively the accuracy and precision of the analysis of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy data. Global analysis performs better than unconstrained data fitting when prior information exists, such as the spatial invariance of the lifetimes of individual fluorescent species. The highly coupled nature of global analysis often results in a significantly slower convergence of the data fitting algorithm as compared with unconstrained analysis. Convergence speed can be greatly accelerated by providing appropriate initial guesses. Realizing that the image morphology often correlates with fluorophore distribution, a global fitting algorithm has been developed to assign initial guesses throughout an image based on a segmentation analysis. This algorithm was tested on both simulated data sets and time-domain lifetime measurements. We have successfully measured fluorophore distribution in fibroblasts stained with Hoechst and calcein. This method further allows second harmonic generation from collagen and elastin autofluorescence to be differentiated in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy images of ex vivo human skin. On our experimental measurement, this algorithm increased convergence speed by over two orders of magnitude and achieved significantly better fits. Copyright 2004 Biophysical Society

  16. Plunger lifetime measurements in {sup 128}Xe using Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rother, Wolfram; Dewald, Alfred; Ilie, Gabriela; Pissulla, Thomas; Melon, Barbara; Jolie, Jan; Pascovici, Gheorghe; Zell, Karl-Oskar [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Julin, Rauno; Jones, Peter; Greenless, Paul; Rahkila, Panu; Scholey, Cath [JYFL, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Harissopulos, Sotirios; Lagoyannis, Anastasios; Konstantinopoulos, T. [INP, N.C.S.R. ' ' Demokritos' ' , Athens (Greece); Grahn, Tuomas [JYFL, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)]|[Oliver Lodge Lab., University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Balabanski, Dimiter [INRNE, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2008-07-01

    We report on an experiment using Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics in combination with the plunger technique for measuring lifetimes of excited states of the projectile. Aside from the investigation of E(2) features in {sup 128}Xe, the aim was to explore the special features of such experiments which are also suited to be used with radioactive beams. The measurement was performed at the JYFL with the Koeln coincidence plunger device and the JuroGam spectrometer using a {sup 128}Xe beam impinging on a {sup nat}Fe target at a beam energy of 525 MeV. Recoils were detected by means of 32 solar cells placed at extrem forward angles. Recoil-gated {gamma}-singles and {gamma}{gamma}-coincidences were measured at different target-degrader distances. Details of the experiment and first results are presented.

  17. Using multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging to characterize liver damage and fluorescein disposition in liver in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Studier, Hauke; Crawford, Darrell; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Liver disease is the fifth most common cause of death and unlike many other major causes of mortality, liver disease rates are increasing rather than decreasing. There is no ideal measurement of liver disease and although biopsies are the gold standard, this only allows for a spot examination and cannot follow dynamic processes of the liver. Intravital imaging has the potential to extract detailed information over a larger sampling area continuously. The aim of this project was to investigate whether multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy could detect early liver damage and to assess whether it could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein in normal and diseased livers. Four experimental groups were used in this study: 1) control; 2) ischemia reperfusion injury; 3) steatosis and 4) steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. Results showed that multiphoton microscopy could visualize morphological changes such as decreased fluorescence of endogenous fluorophores and the presence of lipid droplets, characteristic of steatosis. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy showed increase in NADPH in steatosis with and without ischemia reperfusion injury and could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein to fluorescein monoglurcuronide, which was impaired in steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. These results concluded that the combination of multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging is a promising method of assessing early stage liver damage and that it can be used to study changes in drug metabolism in the liver as an indication of liver disease and has the potential to replace the traditional static liver biopsy currently used.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  19. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.; Elshenawy, M. M.; Takahashi, Masateru; Whitman, B. H.; Walter, N. G.; Hamdan, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation

  20. In Vivo Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Monitors Binding of Specific Probes to Cancer Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Chernomordik, Victor; Zielinski, Rafal; Capala, Jacek; Griffiths, Gary; Vasalatiy, Olga; Smirnov, Aleksandr V.; Knutson, Jay R.; Lyakhov, Ilya; Achilefu, Samuel; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Hassan, Moinuddin

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important factors in choosing a treatment strategy for cancer is characterization of biomarkers in cancer cells. Particularly, recent advances in Monoclonal Antibodies (MAB) as primary-specific drugs targeting tumor receptors show that their efficacy depends strongly on characterization of tumor biomarkers. Assessment of their status in individual patients would facilitate selection of an optimal treatment strategy, and the continuous monitoring of those biomarkers and their binding process to the therapy would provide a means for early evaluation of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time in live animals that the fluorescence lifetime can be used to detect the binding of targeted optical probes to the extracellular receptors on tumor cells in vivo. The rationale was that fluorescence lifetime of a specific probe is sensitive to local environment and/or affinity to other molecules. We attached Near-InfraRed (NIR) fluorescent probes to Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 (HER2/neu)-specific Affibody molecules and used our time-resolved optical system to compare the fluorescence lifetime of the optical probes that were bound and unbound to tumor cells in live mice. Our results show that the fluorescence lifetime changes in our model system delineate HER2 receptor bound from the unbound probe in vivo. Thus, this method is useful as a specific marker of the receptor binding process, which can open a new paradigm in the “image and treat” concept, especially for early evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy. PMID:22384092

  1. In vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging monitors binding of specific probes to cancer biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Ardeshirpour

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in choosing a treatment strategy for cancer is characterization of biomarkers in cancer cells. Particularly, recent advances in Monoclonal Antibodies (MAB as primary-specific drugs targeting tumor receptors show that their efficacy depends strongly on characterization of tumor biomarkers. Assessment of their status in individual patients would facilitate selection of an optimal treatment strategy, and the continuous monitoring of those biomarkers and their binding process to the therapy would provide a means for early evaluation of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time in live animals that the fluorescence lifetime can be used to detect the binding of targeted optical probes to the extracellular receptors on tumor cells in vivo. The rationale was that fluorescence lifetime of a specific probe is sensitive to local environment and/or affinity to other molecules. We attached Near-InfraRed (NIR fluorescent probes to Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 (HER2/neu-specific Affibody molecules and used our time-resolved optical system to compare the fluorescence lifetime of the optical probes that were bound and unbound to tumor cells in live mice. Our results show that the fluorescence lifetime changes in our model system delineate HER2 receptor bound from the unbound probe in vivo. Thus, this method is useful as a specific marker of the receptor binding process, which can open a new paradigm in the "image and treat" concept, especially for early evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime measurements to determine the core-shell nanostructure of FITC-doped silica nanoparticles: An optical approach to evaluate nanoparticle photostability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santra, Swadeshmukul; Liesenfeld, Bernd; Bertolino, Chiara; Dutta, Debamitra; Cao Zehui; Tan Weihong; Moudgil, Brij M.; Mericle, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we described a novel fluorescence lifetime-based approach to determine the core-shell nanostructure of FITC-(fluorescein isothiocyanate, isomer I) doped fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). Because of phase homogeneity between the core and the shell, electron microscopic technique could not be used to characterize such core-shell nanostructure. Our optical approach not only revealed the core-shell nanostructure of FSNPs but also evaluated photobleaching of FSNPs both in the solvated and non-solvated (dry) states. The FSNPs were produced via Stoeber's method by hydrolysis and co-condensation reaction of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and fluorescein linked (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (FITC-APTS conjugate) in the presence of ammonium hydroxide catalyst. To obtain a pure silica surface coating, FSNPs were then post-coated with TEOS. The average particle size was 135 nm as determined by TEM (transmission electron microscope) measurements. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectral data demonstrated successful doping of FITC dye molecules in FSNPs. Fluorescence lifetime data revealed that approximately 62% of dye molecules remained in the solvated silica shell, while 38% of dye molecules remained in the non-solvated (dry) silica core. Photobleaching experiments of FSNPs were conducted both in DI water (solution state) and in air (dry state). Severe photobleaching of FSNPs was observed in air. However, FSNPs were moderately photostable in the solution state. Photostability of FSNPs in both solution and dry states was explained on the basis of fluorescence lifetime data

  3. Fluorescence of Bacteria, Pollens, and Naturally Occurring Airborne Particles: Excitation/Emission Spectra

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven C; Mayo, Michael W; Chang, Richard K

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence intensity as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths (EEM spectra) was measured for different species of bacteria, biochemical constituents of cells, pollens, and vegetation...

  4. Quantitative determination of localized tissue oxygen concentration in vivo by two-photon excitation phosphorescence lifetime measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mik, Egbert G.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Raat, Nicolaas J.; Ince, Can

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the use of two-photon excitation phosphorescence lifetime measurements for quantitative oxygen determination in vivo. Doubling the excitation wavelength of Pd-porphyrin from visible light to the infrared allows for deeper tissue penetration and a more precise and confined

  5. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy against larvae of Aedes aegypti: confocal microscopy and fluorescence-lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, L. M.; Pratavieira, S.; Inada, N. M.; Kurachi, C.; Corbi, J.; Guimarães, F. E. G.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    Recently a few demonstration on the use of Photodynamic Reaction as possibility to eliminate larvae that transmit diseases for men has been successfully demonstrated. This promising tool cannot be vastly used due to many problems, including the lake of investigation concerning the mechanisms of larvae killing as well as security concerning the use of photosensitizers in open environment. In this study, we investigate some of the mechanisms in which porphyrin (Photogem) is incorporated on the Aedes aegypti larvae previously to illumination and killing. Larvae at second instar were exposed to the photosensitizer and after 30 minutes imaged by a confocal fluorescence microscope. It was observed the presence of photosensitizer in the gut and at the digestive tract of the larva. Fluorescence-Lifetime Imaging showed greater photosensitizer concentration in the intestinal wall of the samples, which produces a strong decrease of the Photogem fluorescence lifetime. For Photodynamic Therapy exposition to different light doses and concentrations of porphyrin were employed. Three different light sources (LED, Fluorescent lamp, Sun light) also were tested. Sun light and fluorescent lamp shows close to 100% of mortality after 24 hrs. of illumination. These results indicate the potential use of photodynamic effect against the LARVAE of Aedes aegypti.

  6. In vivo imaging of cerebral energy metabolism with two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Sakadžić, Sava; Wu, Weicheng; Becker, Wolfgang; Kasischke, Karl A; Boas, David A

    2013-02-01

    Minimally invasive, specific measurement of cellular energy metabolism is crucial for understanding cerebral pathophysiology. Here, we present high-resolution, in vivo observations of autofluorescence lifetime as a biomarker of cerebral energy metabolism in exposed rat cortices. We describe a customized two-photon imaging system with time correlated single photon counting detection and specialized software for modeling multiple-component fits of fluorescence decay and monitoring their transient behaviors. In vivo cerebral NADH fluorescence suggests the presence of four distinct components, which respond differently to brief periods of anoxia and likely indicate different enzymatic formulations. Individual components show potential as indicators of specific molecular pathways involved in oxidative metabolism.

  7. Fluorescence anisotropy of tyrosinate anion using one-, two- and three-photon excitation: tyrosinate anion fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdaszuk, Borys

    2013-03-01

    We examined the emission spectra and steady-state anisotropy of tyrosinate anion fluorescence with one-photon (250-310 nm), two-photon (570-620 nm) and three-photon (750-930 nm) excitation. Similar emission spectra of the neutral (pH 7.2) and anionic (pH 13) forms of N-acetyl-L-tyrosinamide (NATyrA) (pKa 10.6) were observed for all modes of excitation, with the maxima at 302 and 352 nm, respectively. Two-photon excitation (2PE) and three-photon excitation (3PE) spectra of the anionic form were the same as that for one-photon excitation (1PE). In contrast, 2PE spectrum from the neutral form showed ~30-nm shift to shorter wavelengths relative to 1PE spectrum (λmax 275 nm) at two-photon energy (550 nm), the latter being overlapped with 3PE spectrum, both at two-photon energy (550 nm). Two-photon cross-sections for NATyrA anion at 565-580 nm were 10 % of that for N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATrpA), and increased to 90 % at 610 nm, while for the neutral form of NATyrA decreased from 2 % of that for NATrpA at 570 nm to near zero at 585 nm. Surprisingly, the fundamental anisotropy of NATyrA anion in vitrified solution at -60 °C was ~0.05 for 2PE at 610 nm as compared to near 0.3 for 1PE at 305 nm, and wavelength-dependence appears to be a basic feature of its anisotropy. In contrast, the 3PE anisotropy at 900 nm was about 0.5, and 3PE and 1PE anisotropy values appear to be related by the cos(6) θ to cos(2) θ photoselection factor (approx. 10/6) independently of excitation wavelength. Attention is drawn to the possible effect of tyrosinate anions in proteins on their multi-photon induced fluorescence emission and excitation spectra as well as excitation anisotropy spectra.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime measurement with confocal endomicroscopy for direct analysis of tissue biochemistry in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjae Won

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Confocal endomicroscopy is a powerful tool for in vivo real-time imaging at cellular resolution inside a living body without tissue resection. Microscopic fluorescence lifetime measurement can provide information about localized biochemical conditions such as pH and the concentrations of oxygen and calcium. We hypothesized that combining these techniques could assist accurate cancer discrimination by providing both biochemical and morphological information. We designed a dual-mode experimental setup for confocal endomicroscopic imaging and fluorescence lifetime measurement and applied it to a mouse xenograft model of activated human pancreatic cancer generated by subcutaneous injection of AsPC-1 tumor cells. Using this method with pH-sensitive sodium fluorescein injection, we demonstrated discrimination between normal and cancerous tissues in a living mouse. With further development, this method may be useful for clinical cancer detection.

  9. Label-free identification of macrophage phenotype by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Smith, Tim D.; Datta, Rupsa; Luu, Thuy U.; Gratton, Enrico; Potma, Eric O.; Liu, Wendy F.

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages adopt a variety of phenotypes that are a reflection of the many functions they perform as part of the immune system. In particular, metabolism is a phenotypic trait that differs between classically activated, proinflammatory macrophages, and alternatively activated, prohealing macrophages. Inflammatory macrophages have a metabolism based on glycolysis while alternatively activated macrophages generally rely on oxidative phosphorylation to generate chemical energy. We employ this shift in metabolism as an endogenous marker to identify the phenotype of individual macrophages via live-cell fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We demonstrate that polarized macrophages can be readily discriminated with the aid of a phasor approach to FLIM, which provides a fast and model-free method for analyzing fluorescence lifetime images.

  10. Nonlinear excitation fluorescence microscopy: source considerations for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokosin, David L.

    2008-02-01

    Ultra-short-pulse solid-state laser sources have improved contrast within fluorescence imaging and also opened new windows of investigation in biological imaging applications. Additionally, the pulsed illumination enables harmonic scattering microscopy which yields intrinsic structure, symmetry and contrast from viable embryos, cells and tissues. Numerous human diseases are being investigated by the combination of (more) intact dynamic tissue imaging of cellular function with gene-targeted specificity and electrophysiology context. The major limitation to more widespread use of multi-photon microscopy has been the complete system cost and added complexity above and beyond commercial camera and confocal systems. The current status of all-solid-state ultrafast lasers as excitation sources will be reviewed since these lasers offer tremendous potential for affordable, reliable, "turnkey" multiphoton imaging systems. This effort highlights the single box laser systems currently commercially available, with defined suggestions for the ranges for individual laser parameters as derived from a biological and fluorophore limited perspective. The standard two-photon dose is defined by 800nm, 10mW, 200fs, and 80Mhz - at the sample plane for tissue culture cells, i.e. after the full scanning microscope system. Selected application-derived excitation wavelengths are well represented by 700nm, 780nm, ~830nm, ~960nm, 1050nm, and 1250nm. Many of the one-box lasers have fixed or very limited excitation wavelengths available, so the lasers will be lumped near 780nm, 800nm, 900nm, 1050nm, and 1250nm. The following laser parameter ranges are discussed: average power from 200mW to 2W, pulse duration from 70fs to 700fs, pulse repetition rate from 20MHz to 200MHz, with the laser output linearly polarized with an extinction ratio at least 100:1.

  11. Exciton-polaron quenching in organic thin-film transistors studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Leißner, Till; Osadnik, Andreas

    Organic semiconductors show great potential in electronic and optical applications. However, a major challenge is the degradation of the semiconductor materials that cause a reduction in device performance. Here, we present our investigations of Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) based...... that correlates with the local charge density indicates a pronounced exciton quenching by the injected charges. Subsequent FLIM measurements on previously biased OTFT devices show a general decrease in fluorescence lifetime suggesting degradation of the organic semiconductor. This is correlated with the results...

  12. Assessment of post-implantation integration of engineered tissues using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Sakib F.; Lee, Seung Y.; Lloyd, William R.; Chen, Leng-Chun; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Zhou, Ying; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Kennedy, Robert; Marcelo, Cynthia; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2018-02-01

    Clinical translation of engineered tissue constructs requires noninvasive methods to assess construct health and viability after implantation in patients. However, current practices to monitor post-implantation construct integration are either qualitative (visual assessment) or destructive (tissue histology). As label-free fluorescence lifetime sensing can noninvasively characterize pre-implantation construct viability, we employed a handheld fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy probe to quantitatively and noninvasively assess tissue constructs that were implanted in a murine model. We designed the system to be suitable for intravital measurements: portability, localization with precise maneuverability, and rapid data acquisition. Our model tissue constructs were manufactured from primary human cells to simulate patient variability and were stressed to create a range of health states. Secreted amounts of three cytokines that relate to cellular viability were measured in vitro to assess pre-implantation construct health. In vivo optical sensing assessed tissue integration of constructs at one-week and three-weeks post-implantation. At one-week post-implantation, optical parameters correlated with in vitro pre-implantation secretion levels of all three cytokines (p clinical optical diagnostic tools based on label-free fluorescence lifetime sensing of endogenous tissue fluorophores could noninvasively monitor post-implantation integration of engineered tissues.

  13. Fluorescence intensity and lifetime-based cyanide sensitive probes for physiological safeguard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2004-01-01

    We characterize six new fluorescent probes that show both intensity and lifetime changes in the presence of free uncomplexed aqueous cyanide, allowing for fluorescence based cyanide sensing up to physiological safeguard levels, i.e. 2 to the anionic R-B - (CN) 3 form, a new cyanide binding mechanism which we have recently reported. The presence of an electron deficient quaternary heterocyclic nitrogen nucleus, and the electron rich cyanide bound form, provides for the intensity changes observed. We have determined the disassociation constants of the probes to be in the range ∼15-84 μM 3 . In addition we have synthesized control compounds which do not contain the boronic acid moiety, allowing for a rationale of the cyanide responses between the probe isomers to be made. The lifetime of the cyanide bound probes are significantly shorter than the free R-B(OH) 2 probe forms, providing for the opportunity of lifetime based cyanide sensing up to physiologically lethal levels. Finally, while fluorescent probes containing the boronic acid moiety have earned a well-deserved reputation for monosaccharide sensing, we show that strong bases such as CN - and OH - preferentially bind as compared to glucose, enabling the potential use of these probes for cyanide safeguard and determination in physiological fluids, especially given that physiologies do not experience any notable changes in pH

  14. Fluorescence lifetime studies of MeV erbium implanted silica glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidgard, A.; Polman, A.; Jacobsen, D.C.; Blonder, G.E.; Kistler, R.; Poate, J.M.; Becker, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    MeV erbium ion implantation into various SiO 2 glasses has been studied with the aim of incorporating the rare-earth dopant as an optically active ion in the silica network. The lifetime of the excited state ranges from 1.6 to 12.8 ms, depending on base material and implantation fluence. These results have positive implications for silica-based integrated optical technology. (Author)

  15. Fluorescence lifetime studies of MeV erbium implanted silica glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidgard, A.; Polman, A.; Jacobsen, D.C.; Blonder, G.E.; Kistler, R.; Poate, J.M.; Becker, P.C. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (USA))

    1991-05-23

    MeV erbium ion implantation into various SiO{sub 2} glasses has been studied with the aim of incorporating the rare-earth dopant as an optically active ion in the silica network. The lifetime of the excited state ranges from 1.6 to 12.8 ms, depending on base material and implantation fluence. These results have positive implications for silica-based integrated optical technology. (Author).

  16. Lifetime of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}W and {sup 178}W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudigier, M., E-mail: rudigier@ikp.uni-koeln.d [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Regis, J.-M.; Jolie, J.; Zell, K.O.; Fransen, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2010-12-01

    The lifetime of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}W and {sup 178}W has been measured in fast timing experiments using the Cologne Double Orange Spectrometer for conversion electron spectroscopy. The B(E2,2{sub 1}{sup +{yields}}0{sub 1}{sup +}) values of the isotopes {sup 170-178}W are compared to calculations in the Interacting Boson Model (IBM) employing the consistent Q formalism. An analysis of the B(E2) value systematics in the rare earth nuclei around mass A=170 using the N{sub p}N{sub n}-scheme shows signatures of a structural change in the tungsten isotopes which is not reflected in the energy systematics.

  17. Lifetime measurement of the cesium 6P3/2 state using ultrafast laser-pulse excitation and ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sell, J. F.; Patterson, B. M.; Ehrenreich, T.; Brooke, G.; Scoville, J.; Knize, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We report a precision measurement of the cesium 6P 3/2 excited-state lifetime. Two collimated, counterpropagating thermal Cs beams cross perpendicularly to femtosecond pulsed laser beams. High timing accuracy is achieved from having excitation and ionization laser pulses which originate from the same mode-locked laser. Using pulse selection we vary the separation in time between excitation and ionization laser pulses while counting the ions produced. We obtain a Cs 6P 3/2 lifetime of 30.460(38) ns, which is a factor of two improvement from previous measurements and with an uncertainty of 0.12%, is one of the most accurate lifetime measurements on record.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy for monitoring cell adhesion using metal induced energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wonsang; Seo, JinWon; Song, Jun ho; Kim, DongEun; Won, YoungJae; Choi, In-Hong; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Dug Young

    2018-02-01

    A precise control and a reliable monitoring tool for the adhesion properties of a cell are very important in atherosclerosis studies. If endothelial cells in contact with the intracellular membrane are not attached securely, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles can enter into the inner membrane. It is therefore necessary to measure conditions under which endothelial cell detachment occurs. When a cell is attached to a metal thin film, the lifetime of a fluorescence probe attached to the membrane of the cell is reduced by the metal-induced energy transfer (MIET). Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is used to monitor the attachment condition of a cell to a metal surface using FRET. However, this requires high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens because axial confocal resolution must be smaller than the cell thickness. This requirement limits the field of view of the measurement specimen. In this study we provides a new method which can measure adhesion properties of endothelial cells even with a low NA objective lens by resolving two lifetime components in FLIM.

  19. Radiative charge-transfer lifetime of the excited state of (NaCa)+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Oleg P.; Cote, R.; Michels, H.; Smith, W.W.

    2003-01-01

    New experiments were proposed recently to investigate the regime of cold atomic and molecular ion-atom collision processes in a special hybrid neutral-atom-ion trap under high-vacuum conditions. We study the collisional cooling of laser precooled Ca + ions by ultracold Na atoms. Modeling this process requires knowledge of the radiative lifetime of the excited singlet A 1 Σ + state of the (NaCa) + molecular system. We calculate the rate coefficient for radiative charge transfer using a semiclassical approach. The dipole radial matrix elements between the ground and the excited states, and the potential curves were calculated using complete active space self-consistent field and Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory with an extended Gaussian basis, 6-311+G (3df). The semiclassical charge-transfer rate coefficient was averaged over a thermal Maxwellian distribution. In addition, we also present elastic collision cross sections and the spin-exchange cross section. The rate coefficient for charge transfer was found to be 2.3x10 -16 cm 3 /sec, while those for the elastic and spin-exchange cross sections were found to be several orders of magnitude higher (1.1x10 -8 cm 3 /sec and 2.3x10 -9 cm 3 /sec, respectively). This confirms our assumption that the milli-Kelvin regime of collisional cooling of calcium ions by sodium atoms is favorable with the respect to low loss of calcium ions due to the charge transfer

  20. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH distinguishes alterations in cerebral metabolism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Sutin, Jason; Wu, Weicheng; Fu, Buyin; Uhlirova, Hana; Devor, Anna; Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava

    2017-05-01

    Evaluating cerebral energy metabolism at microscopic resolution is important for comprehensively understanding healthy brain function and its pathological alterations. Here, we resolve specific alterations in cerebral metabolism in vivo in Sprague Dawley rats utilizing minimally-invasive 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (2P-FLIM) measurements of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence. Time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements enable distinction of different components contributing to NADH autofluorescence. Ostensibly, these components indicate different enzyme-bound formulations of NADH. We observed distinct variations in the relative proportions of these components before and after pharmacological-induced impairments to several reactions involved in glycolytic and oxidative metabolism. Classification models were developed with the experimental data and used to predict the metabolic impairments induced during separate experiments involving bicuculline-induced seizures. The models consistently predicted that prolonged focal seizure activity results in impaired activity in the electron transport chain, likely the consequence of inadequate oxygen supply. 2P-FLIM observations of cerebral NADH will help advance our understanding of cerebral energetics at a microscopic scale. Such knowledge will aid in our evaluation of healthy and diseased cerebral physiology and guide diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that target cerebral energetics.

  1. Demonstration of the lack of cytotoxicity of unmodified and folic acid modified graphene oxide quantum dots, and their application to fluorescence lifetime imaging of HaCaT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreham, Renee V; Schroeder, Kathryn L; Holmes, Amy; Bradley, Siobhan J; Nann, Thomas

    2018-01-24

    The authors describe the synthesis of water-soluble and fluorescent graphene oxide quantum dots via acid exfoliation of graphite nanoparticles. The resultant graphene oxide quantum dots (GoQDs) were then modified with folic acid. Folic acid receptors are overexpressed in cancer cells and hence can bind to functionalized graphene oxide quantum dots. On excitation at 305 nm, the GoQDs display green fluorescence with a peak wavelength at ~520 nm. The modified GoQDs are non-toxic to macrophage cells even after prolonged exposure and high concentrations. Fluorescence lifetime imaging and multiphoton microscopy was used (in combination) to image HeCaT cells exposed to GoQDs, resulting in a superior method for bioimaging. Graphical abstract Schematic representation of graphene oxide quantum dots, folic acid modified graphene oxide quantum dots (red), and the use of fluorescence lifetime to discriminate against green auto-fluorescence of HeCaT cells.

  2. Lifetimes of some 4p levels of Ne I obtained by two-step (electron-photon) excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M.; Garcia, G.; Blanco, F.; Campos, J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes of some levels belonging to 2p 5 4p configuration of Ne I have been determined using electron excitation followed by selective laser excitation. The experimental results of this work are 123.8±3.6 ns, 120.3±2.8 ns and 135.9±4.5 ns for the 4p'(3/2) 1 , 4p'(1/2) 1 and 4p(5/2) 2 levels respectively. (orig.)

  3. Monitoring macular pigment changes in macular holes using fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Lydia; Peters, Sven; Schmidt, Johanna; Schweitzer, Dietrich; Klemm, Matthias; Ramm, Lisa; Augsten, Regine; Hammer, Martin

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the impact of macular pigment (MP) on fundus autofluorescence (FAF) lifetimes in vivo by characterizing full-thickness idiopathic macular holes (MH) and macular pseudo-holes (MPH). A total of 37 patients with MH and 52 with MPH were included. Using the fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (FLIO), based on a Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system, a 30° retinal field was investigated. FAF decays were detected in a short (498-560 nm; ch1) and long (560-720 nm; ch2) wavelength channel. τ m , the mean fluorescence lifetime, was calculated from a three-exponential approximation of the FAF decays. Macular coherence tomography scans were recorded, and macular pigment's optical density (MPOD) was measured (one-wavelength reflectometry). Two MH subgroups were analysed according to the presence or absence of an operculum above the MH. A total of 17 healthy fellow eyes were included. A longitudinal FAF decay examination was conducted in nine patients, which were followed up after surgery and showed a closed MH. In MH without opercula, significant τ m differences (p hole area (MHa) and surrounding areas (MHb) (ch1: MHa 238 ± 64 ps, MHb 181 ± 78 ps; ch2: MHa 275 ± 49 ps, MHb 223 ± 48 ps), as well as between MHa and healthy eyes or closed MH. Shorter τ m , adjacent to the hole, can be assigned to areas with equivalently higher MPOD. Opercula containing MP also show short τ m . In MPH, the intactness of the Hele fibre layer is associated with shortest τ m . Shortest τ m originates from MP-containing retinal layers, especially from the Henle fibre layer. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (FLIO) provides information on the MP distribution, the pathogenesis and topology of MH. Macular pigment (MP) fluorescence may provide a biomarker for monitoring pathological changes in retinal diseases. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  5. Optimization of tube parameters in a tube excited X-ray fluorescence (TEXRF) system using secondary fluorescers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, A.; Biswas, S.K.

    1995-12-01

    A study of the optimization of excitation parameters in a tube excited X-ray fluorescence system (TEXRF) having Mo as the primary target has been carried out for biological matrix. Fe, Zn and Mo were used as the secondary fluorecers. For the present investigation a cellulose based synthetic standard containing K, Cr, Ni, Zn, Se and Y was excited with the TEXRF system. All experiments were carried out under the same experimental conditions except the tube potential. For each fluorescer the minimum detection limits (MDL) of excited elements were calculated for the corresponding tube voltage. The MDLs were found to be increasing with decreasing atomic number and it was also observed that the maximum sensitivity with Fe and Zn secondary fluorescers for elements analyzed occurred around 35 kV of the excitation potential. For Mo secondary fluorescer maximum sensitivity was found at higher excitation potential. In most cases MDLs were minimum at 40-45 kV of the excitation potential. 5 refs., 12 figs

  6. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of microviscosity changes during ER autophagy in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Samanta, Soham; Gong, Wanjun; Liu, Wufan; Pan, Wenhui; Yang, Zhigang; Qu, Junle

    2018-02-01

    Unfolded or misfolded protein accumulation inside Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) will cause ER stress and subsequently will activate cellular autophagy to release ER stress, which would ultimately result in microviscosity changes. However, even though, it is highly significant to gain a quantitative assessment of microviscosity changes during ER autophagy to study ER stress and autophagy behaviors related diseases, it has rarely been reported yet. In this work, we have reported a BODIPY based fluorescent molecular rotor that can covalently bind with vicinal dithiols containing nascent proteins in ER and hence can result in ER stress through the inhibition of the folding of nascent proteins. The change in local viscosity, caused by the release of the stress in cells through autophagy, was quantified by the probe using fluorescence lifetime imaging. This work basically demonstrates the possibility of introducing synthetic chemical probe as a promising tool to diagnose ER-viscosity-related diseases.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime components reveal kinetic intermediate states upon equilibrium denaturation of carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtseva, Elena V; Lashchuk, Olesya O; Gerasimova, Marina A; Melnik, Tatiana N; Nagibina, Galina S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2017-12-21

    In most cases, intermediate states of multistage folding proteins are not 'visible' under equilibrium conditions but are revealed in kinetic experiments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used in equilibrium denaturation studies. The technique allows for detecting changes in the conformation and environment of tryptophan residues in different structural elements of carbonic anhydrase II which in its turn has made it possible to study the intermediate states of carbonic anhydrase II under equilibrium conditions. The results of equilibrium and kinetic experiments using wild-type bovine carbonic anhydrase II and its mutant form with the substitution of leucine for alanine at position 139 (L139A) were compared. The obtained lifetime components of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence allowed for revealing that, the same as in kinetic experiments, under equilibrium conditions the unfolding of carbonic anhydrase II ensues through formation of intermediate states.

  9. vuv fluorescence from selective high-order multiphoton excitation of N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffee, Ryan N.; Gibson, George N.

    2004-01-01

    Recent fluorescence studies suggest that ultrashort pulse laser excitation may be highly selective. Selective high-intensity laser excitation holds important consequences for the physics of multiphoton processes. To establish the extent of this selectivity, we performed a detailed comparative study of the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence resulting from the interaction of N 2 and Ar with high-intensity infrared ultrashort laser pulses. Both N 2 and Ar reveal two classes of transitions, inner-valence ns ' l ' . From their pressure dependence, we associate each transition with either plasma or direct laser excitation. Furthermore, we qualitatively confirm such associations with the time dependence of the fluorescence signal. Remarkably, only N 2 presents evidence of direct laser excitation. This direct excitation produces ionic nitrogen fragments with inner-valence (2s) holes, two unidentified transitions, and one molecular transition, the N 2 + :X 2 Σ g + 2 Σ u + . We discuss these results in the light of a recently proposed model for multiphoton excitation

  10. Study on excitation and fluorescence spectrums of Japanese citruses to construct machine vision systems for acquiring fluorescent images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Md. Abdul; Kondo, Naoshi; Kuramoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Yuichi; Shigi, Tomoo

    2011-06-01

    Research was conducted to acquire knowledge of the ultraviolet and visible spectrums from 300 -800 nm of some common varieties of Japanese citrus, to investigate the best wave-lengths for fluorescence excitation and the resulting fluorescence wave-lengths and to provide a scientific background for the best quality fluorescent imaging technique for detecting surface defects of citrus. A Hitachi U-4000 PC-based microprocessor controlled spectrophotometer was used to measure the absorption spectrum and a Hitachi F-4500 spectrophotometer was used for the fluorescence and excitation spectrums. We analyzed the spectrums and the selected varieties of citrus were categorized into four groups of known fluorescence level, namely strong, medium, weak and no fluorescence.The level of fluorescence of each variety was also examined by using machine vision system. We found that around 340-380 nm LEDs or UV lamps are appropriate as lighting devices for acquiring the best quality fluorescent image of the citrus varieties to examine their fluorescence intensity. Therefore an image acquisition device was constructed with three different lighting panels with UV LED at peak 365 nm, Blacklight blue lamps (BLB) peak at 350 nm and UV-B lamps at peak 306 nm. The results from fluorescent images also revealed that the findings of the measured spectrums worked properly and can be used for practical applications such as for detecting rotten, injured or damaged parts of a wide variety of citrus.

  11. CVD grown 2D MoS{sub 2} layers: A photoluminescence and fluorescence lifetime imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezden, Ayberk; Madenoglu, Buesra [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Sar, Hueseyin; Ay, Feridun; Perkgoez, Nihan Kosku [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Yeltik, Aydan [Department of Physics, UNAM Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara (Turkey); Sevik, Cem [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2016-11-15

    In this letter, we report on the fluorescence lifetime imaging and accompanying photoluminescence properties of a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown atomically thin material, MoS{sub 2}. μ-Raman, μ-photoluminescence (PL) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) are utilized to probe the fluorescence lifetime and photoluminescence properties of individual flakes of MoS{sub 2} films. Usage of these three techniques allows identification of the grown layers, grain boundaries, structural defects and their relative effects on the PL and fluorescence lifetime spectra. Our investigation on individual monolayer flakes reveals a clear increase of the fluorescence lifetime from 0.3 ns to 0.45 ns at the edges with respect to interior region. On the other hand, investigation of the film layer reveals quenching of PL intensity and lifetime at the grain boundaries. These results could be important for applications where the activity of edges is important such as in photocatalytic water splitting. Finally, it has been demonstrated that PL mapping and FLIM are viable techniques for the investigation of the grain-boundaries. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Long-lived visible luminescence of UV LEDs and impact on LED excited time-resolved fluorescence applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, D; Connally, R; Piper, J

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of a detailed study of the spectral and temporal properties of visible emission from three different GaN-based ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (UV LEDs). The primary UV emission in the 360-380 nm band decays rapidly (less than 1 μs) following switch-off; however, visible luminescence (470-750 nm) with a decay lifetime of tens of microseconds was observed at approximately 10 -4 of the UV intensity. For applications of UV LEDs in time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) employing lanthanide chelates, the visible luminescence from the LEDs competes with the target Eu 3+ or Tb 3+ fluorescence in both spectral and temporal domains. A UV band-pass filter (Schott UG11 glass) was therefore used to reduce the visible luminescence of the UV LEDs by three orders of magnitude relative to UV output to yield a practical excitation source for TRF

  13. Optical chromatography using a photonic crystal fiber with on-chip fluorescence excitation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ashok, AC

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the realization of integrated optical chromatography, in conjunction with on-chip fluorescence excitation, in a monolithically fabricated poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip. The unique endlessly-single-mode guiding...

  14. Fluorescence image excited by a scanning UV-LED light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    An optical scanning system using UV-LED light to induced fluorescence technology can enhance a fluorescence image significantly in a short period. It has several advantages such as lower power consumption, no scattering effect in skins, and multilayer images can be obtained to analyze skin disease. From the experiment results, the light intensity increases with increase spot size and decrease scanning speed, but the image resolution is oppositely. Moreover, the system could be widely used in clinical diagnosis and photodynamic therapy for skin disease because even the irradiated time of fluorescence substance is short but it will provide accurately positioning of fluorescence object.

  15. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana eBurdikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g. pH, redox potential due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM. In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  16. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D; Wilkinson, Martin G; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A E; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  17. Generation of a new spectral format, the lifetime synchronous spectrum (LiSS), using phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaver, J.M.; McGown, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A new fluorescence spectral format is introduced in which fluorescence lifetime is shown as a function of synchronously scanned wavelength to generate a Lifetime Synchronous Spectrum (LiSS). Lifetimes are determined in the frequency domain with the use of Phase-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy (PRFS) to obtain the phase of the fluorescence signal. Theory and construction of the LiSS are presented and experimental results are shown for solutions of single components and simple binary and ternary mixtures. These results show how the lifetime information in the LiSS augments the steady-state intensity information of a standard synchronous spectrum, providing unique information for identification of components and resolution of overlapping spectral peaks. The LiSS technique takes advantage of noise reduction inherent in the extraction of lifetime from PRFS in addition to standard spectral smoothing techniques. The precision of phase determination through PRFS is found to be comparable to that of direct phase measurements at normal fluorescence intensities and superior for low-intensity signals

  18. Fission lifetime measured by the blocking technique as a function of excitation energy in the 24 A.MeV 238U+28Si reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morjean, M.; Galin, J.; Goldenbaum, F.; Lienard, E.; Chevallier, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Kirsch, R.; Jacquet, D.; and others.

    1997-01-01

    The blocking technique was used to infer fission lifetimes as a function of excitation energy for uranium-like nuclei formed in the U+Si reactions at 24 MeV/nucleon. The fission lifetimes are found larger than 10 -19 s for excitation energies up to about 250 MeV. (K.A.)

  19. Induction of the 'in vivo' chlorophyll fluorescence excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhidov, Eh.A.; Zakhidov, M.A.; Kasymdzhanov, M.A.; Khabibullaev, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    Inductional changes of fluorescence of the native chlorophyll molecules in plant leaves excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation are studied. The opportunity of controlling of the photosynthesis efficiency through fluorescence response at different rates of the electron flow in charge transfer chain of the photosynthetic apparatus of plant is shown. (author). 13 refs.; 4 refs

  20. Combined Raman and continuous-wave-excited two-photon fluorescence cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uzunbajakava, N.; Otto, Cornelis

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a confocal optical microscope that combines cw two-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy with confocal Raman microscopy. With this microscope fast image acquisition with fluorescence imaging can be used to select areas of interest for subsequent chemical analysis with spontaneous

  1. A reagentless enzymatic fluorescent biosensor for glucose based on upconverting glasses, as excitation source, and chemically modified glucose oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Barrio, Melisa; Cases, Rafael; Cebolla, Vicente; Hirsch, Thomas; de Marcos, Susana; Wilhelm, Stefan; Galbán, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Upon near-infrared excitation Tm(3+)+Yb(3+) doped fluorohafnate glasses present upconversion properties and emit visible light. This property permits to use these glasses (UCG) as excitation sources for fluorescent optical biosensors. Taking this into account, in this work a fluorescent biosensor for glucose determination is designed and evaluated. The biosensor combines the UCG and the fluorescence of the enzyme glucose oxidase chemically modified with a fluorescein derivative (GOx-FS), whose intensity is modified during the enzymatic reaction with glucose. Optical parameters have been optimized and a mathematical model describing the behavior of the analytical signal is suggested. Working in FIA mode, the biosensor responds to glucose concentrations up to, at least, 15mM with a limit of detection of 1.9mM. The biosensor has a minimum lifetime of 9 days and has been applied to glucose determination in drinks. The applicability of the sensor was tested by glucose determination in two fruit juices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Laser excited fluorescence spectrum of Ho3+:SrF2 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Bansi; Ramachandra Rao, D.

    1980-01-01

    The fluorescence spectrum of Ho 3+ : SrF 2 single crystal excited by the various lines of an Ar + laser, is reported. The three fluorescence groups recorded in the region 5300-7700 A, correspond to the transitions from ( 5 F 4 , 5 S 2 ) to 5 I 8 , 5 F 5 to 5 I 8 , 5 F 3 to 5 I 7 and ( 5 F 4 , 5 S 2 ) to 5 I 7 . Marked changes in the total integrated intensity of the various fluorescence groups with the change in the exciting wavelength are observed. (author)

  3. Distinct roles of the photosystem II protein PsbS and zeaxanthin in the regulation of light harvesting in plants revealed by fluorescence lifetime snapshots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylak-Glassman, Emily J; Malnoë, Alizée; De Re, Eleonora; Brooks, Matthew D; Fischer, Alexandra Lee; Niyogi, Krishna K; Fleming, Graham R

    2014-12-09

    The photosystem II (PSII) protein PsbS and the enzyme violaxanthin deepoxidase (VDE) are known to influence the dynamics of energy-dependent quenching (qE), the component of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) that allows plants to respond to fast fluctuations in light intensity. Although the absence of PsbS and VDE has been shown to change the amount of quenching, there have not been any measurements that can detect whether the presence of these proteins alters the type of quenching that occurs. The chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime probes the excited-state chlorophyll relaxation dynamics and can be used to determine the amount of quenching as well as whether two different genotypes with the same amount of NPQ have similar dynamics of excited-state chlorophyll relaxation. We measured the fluorescence lifetimes on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana throughout the induction and relaxation of NPQ for wild type and the qE mutants, npq4, which lacks PsbS; npq1, which lacks VDE and cannot convert violaxanthin to zeaxanthin; and npq1 npq4, which lacks both VDE and PsbS. These measurements show that although PsbS changes the amount of quenching and the rate at which quenching turns on, it does not affect the relaxation dynamics of excited chlorophyll during quenching. In addition, the data suggest that PsbS responds not only to ΔpH but also to the Δψ across the thylakoid membrane. In contrast, the presence of VDE, which is necessary for the accumulation of zeaxanthin, affects the excited-state chlorophyll relaxation dynamics.

  4. GPU accelerated real-time confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) based on the analog mean-delay (AMD) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungyeon; Park, Byungjun; Lee, Seungrag; Won, Youngjae

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated GPU accelerated real-time confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) based on the analog mean-delay (AMD) method. Our algorithm was verified for various fluorescence lifetimes and photon numbers. The GPU processing time was faster than the physical scanning time for images up to 800 × 800, and more than 149 times faster than a single core CPU. The frame rate of our system was demonstrated to be 13 fps for a 200 × 200 pixel image when observing maize vascular tissue. This system can be utilized for observing dynamic biological reactions, medical diagnosis, and real-time industrial inspection. PMID:28018724

  5. Plant Cell Imaging Based on Nanodiamonds with Excitation-Dependent Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-Xia; Lou, Qing; Jiao, Zhen; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Despite extensive work on fluorescence behavior stemming from color centers of diamond, reports on the excitation-dependent fluorescence of nanodiamonds (NDs) with a large-scale redshift from 400 to 620 nm under different excitation wavelengths are so far much fewer, especially in biological applications. The fluorescence can be attributed to the combined effects of the fraction of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms among the surface of the fine diamond nanoparticles and the defect energy trapping states on the surface of the diamond. The excitation-dependent fluorescent NDs have been applied in plant cell imaging for the first time. The results reported in this paper may provide a promising route to multiple-color bioimaging using NDs.

  6. Plant Cell Imaging Based on Nanodiamonds with Excitation-Dependent Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-Xia; Lou, Qing; Jiao, Zhen; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Despite extensive work on fluorescence behavior stemming from color centers of diamond, reports on the excitation-dependent fluorescence of nanodiamonds (NDs) with a large-scale redshift from 400 to 620 nm under different excitation wavelengths are so far much fewer, especially in biological applications. The fluorescence can be attributed to the combined effects of the fraction of sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms among the surface of the fine diamond nanoparticles and the defect energy trapping states on the surface of the diamond. The excitation-dependent fluorescent NDs have been applied in plant cell imaging for the first time. The results reported in this paper may provide a promising route to multiple-color bioimaging using NDs.

  7. Lifetimes of excited states in 196198Pt; application of interacting bason approximation model to even Pt isotopes systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotin, H.H.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Morrison, I.; Kennedy, D.L.; Ryan, C.G.; Sie, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The lifetimes and lifetime limits of the low-lying excited states up to and including the 6 1 + levels in 196 198 Pt were determined by the rcoil-distance method (RDM). Gamma-ray angular distributions in 198 Pt were also measured. These states were populated by multiple Coulomb excitation using 220-MeV 58 Ni ion beams and the measurements carried out in coincidence with backscattered projectiles. The measured mean lives of the states and B(E2) values inferred for the transitions between levels are presented. These specific findings, and the observed structure systematics obtained from the combination of the present results and those of prior workers for the even 194 - 198 Pt isotopes, are critically compared with our structure calculations employing the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) model incorporating a symmetry-breaking quadrupole force. Evaluative comparisons are also made with Boson Expansion Theory (BET) calculations

  8. Lifetimes of excited states in 196, 198Pt; Application of interacting boson approximation model to even Pt isotopes systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotin, H. H.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Morrison, I.; Kennedy, D. L.; Ryan, C. G.; Sie, S. H.

    1981-11-01

    The lifetimes and lifetime limits of the low-lying excited states up to and including the 6 1+ levels in 196, 198Pt were determined by the recoil-distance method (RDM). Gamma-ray angular distributions in 198Pt were also measured. These states were populated by multiple Coulomb excitation using 220 MeV 58Ni ion beams and the measurements were carried out in coincidence with back-scattered projectiles. The measured mean lives of the states and B(E2) values inferred for the transitions between levels are presented. These specific findings, and the observed structure systematics obtained from the combination of the present results and those of prior workers for the even 194-198Pt isotopes, are critically compared with our structure calculations employing the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model incorporating a symmetry-breaking quadrupole force; evaluative comparisons are also made with boson expansion theory (BET) calculations.

  9. Lifetimes of excited states in 196,198Pt; application of interacting boson approximation model to even Pt isotopes systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotin, H.H.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Morrison, I.; Kennedy, D.L.; Ryan, C.G.; Sie, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The lifetimes and lifetime limits of the low-lying excited states up to and including the 6 + 1 levels in sup(196, 198)Pt were determined by the recoil-distance method (RDM). Gamma-ray angular distributions in 198 Pt were also measured. These states were populated by multiple Coulomb excitation using 220 MeV 58 Ni ion beams and the measurements were carried out in coincidence with backscattering projectiles. The measured mean lives of the states and B(E2) values inferred for the transitions between levels are presented. These specific findings, and the observed structure systematics obtained from the combination of the present results and those of prior workers for the even sup(194-198)Pt isotopes, are critically compared with our structure calculations employing the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model incorporating a symmetry-breaking quadrupole force; evaluative comparisons are also made with boson expansion theory (BET) calculations. (orig.)

  10. Direct Vpr-Vpr Interaction in Cells monitored by two Photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mély Yves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes several regulatory proteins, notably Vpr which influences the survival of the infected cells by causing a G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Such an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 disease progression has fuelled a large number of studies, from its 3D structure to the characterization of specific cellular partners. However, no direct imaging and quantification of Vpr-Vpr interaction in living cells has yet been reported. To address this issue, eGFP- and mCherry proteins were tagged by Vpr, expressed in HeLa cells and their interaction was studied by two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Results Results show that Vpr forms homo-oligomers at or close to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, Vpr dimers and trimers were found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Point mutations in the three α helices of Vpr drastically impaired Vpr oligomerization and localization at the nuclear envelope while point mutations outside the helical regions had no effect. Theoretical structures of Vpr mutants reveal that mutations within the α-helices could perturb the leucine zipper like motifs. The ΔQ44 mutation has the most drastic effect since it likely disrupts the second helix. Finally, all Vpr point mutants caused cell apoptosis suggesting that Vpr-mediated apoptosis functions independently from Vpr oligomerization. Conclusion We report that Vpr oligomerization in HeLa cells relies on the hydrophobic core formed by the three α helices. This oligomerization is required for Vpr localization at the nuclear envelope but not for Vpr-mediated apoptosis.

  11. The TRIple PLunger for EXotic beams TRIPLEX for excited-state lifetime measurement studies on rare isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, H., E-mail: iwasaki@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Dewald, A.; Braunroth, T.; Fransen, C. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Smalley, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Lemasson, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Morse, C.; Whitmore, K.; Loelius, C. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2016-01-11

    A new device, the TRIple PLunger for EXotic beams (TRIPLEX), has been developed for lifetime measurement studies with rare isotope beams. This plunger device holds up to three metal foils in the beam path and facilitates the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique to measure lifetimes of nuclear excited states in the range of 1 ps to 1 ns. The unique design allows independent movement of the target and the second degrader with respect to a fixed first degrader in between, enabling advanced experimental approaches, such as the differential recoil distance method and the double recoil distance method. The design and control of the device are presented in this paper, together with simulated performances of the new applications. As an example of actual experiments, results from the lifetime measurement of the neutron-rich {sup 17}C isotope performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory are shown.

  12. In vivo multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of the healthy and cholestatic liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Daria S.; Dudenkova, Varvara V.; Rodimova, Svetlana A.; Bobrov, Nikolai V.; Zagainov, Vladimir E.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2018-02-01

    A cholestatic liver disease presents one of the most common liver diseases and can potentially progress to cirrhosis or even cholangiocarcinoma. Conventional techniques are insufficient to precisely describe the complex internal structure, heterogeneous cell populations and the dynamics of biological processes of the liver. Currently, the methods of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy are actively introducing to biomedical research. Those methods are extremely informative and non-destructive that allows studying of a large number of processes occurring inside cells and tissues, analyzing molecular cellular composition, as well as evaluating the state of connective tissue fibers due to their ability to generate a second optical harmonic. Multiphoton and FLIM microscopy do not need additional staining of samples or the incorporation of any markers to study metabolism, lipid composition, microstructure analysis, evaluation of fibrous structures. These parameters have pronounced changes in hepatocytes of liver with common pathological diseases. Thereby in this study we investigated metabolic changes in the healthy and cholestatic liver based on the fluorescence of the metabolic co-factors NAD(P)H and FAD by multiphoton microscopy combined with FLIM. To estimate the contribution of energy metabolism and lipogenesis in the observed changes of the metabolic profile, a separate analysis of NADH and NADPH was presented. The data can be used to develop new criteria for the identification of hepatic pathology at the level of hepatocyte changes directed to personalized medicine in the future.

  13. Protein structural deformation induced lifetime shortening of photosynthetic bacteria light-harvesting complex LH2 excited state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing-Hai; Zhang, Lei; Weng, Yu-Xiang; Du, Lu-Chao; Ye, Man-Ping; Yang, Guo-Zhen; Fujii, Ritsuko; Rondonuwu, Ferdy S; Koyama, Yasushi; Wu, Yi-Shi; Zhang, J P

    2005-06-01

    Photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting antenna complex LH2 was immobilized on the surface of TiO(2) nanoparticles in the colloidal solution. The LH2/TiO(2) assembly was investigated by the time-resolved spectroscopic methods. The excited-state lifetimes for carotenoid-containing and carotenoidless LH2 have been measured, showing a decrease in the excited-state lifetime of B850 when LH2 was immobilized on TiO(2). The possibility that the decrease of the LH2 excited-state lifetime being caused by an interfacial electron transfer reaction between B850 and the TiO(2) nanoparticle was precluded experimentally. We proposed that the observed change in the photophysical properties of LH2 when assembled onto TiO(2) nanoparticles is arising from the interfacial-interaction-induced structural deformation of the LH2 complex deviating from an ellipse of less eccentric to a more eccentric ellipse, and the observed phenomenon can be accounted by an elliptical exciton model. Experiment by using photoinactive SiO(2) nanoparticle in place of TiO(2) and core complex LH1 instead of LH2 provide further evidence to the proposed mechanism.

  14. Gating circuit for single photon-counting fluorescence lifetime instruments using high repetition pulsed light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laws, W.R.; Potter, D.W.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    We have constructed a circuit that permits conventional timing electronics to be used in single photon-counting fluorimeters with high repetition rate excitation sources (synchrotrons and mode-locked lasers). Most commercial time-to-amplitude and time-to-digital converters introduce errors when processing very short time intervals and when subjected to high-frequency signals. This circuit reduces the frequency of signals representing the pulsed light source (stops) to the rate of detected fluorescence events (starts). Precise timing between the start/stop pair is accomplished by using the second stop pulse after a start pulse. Important features of our design are that the circuit is insensitive to the simultaneous occurrence of start and stop signals and that the reduction in the stop frequency allows the start/stop time interval to be placed in linear regions of the response functions of commercial timing electronics

  15. Long-term fluorescence lifetime imaging of a genetically encoded sensor for caspase-3 activity in mouse tumor xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherdeva, Victoria; Kazachkina, Natalia I.; Shcheslavskiy, Vladislav; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2018-03-01

    Caspase-3 is known for its role in apoptosis and programmed cell death regulation. We detected caspase-3 activation in vivo in tumor xenografts via shift of mean fluorescence lifetimes of a caspase-3 sensor. We used the genetically encoded sensor TR23K based on the red fluorescent protein TagRFP and chromoprotein KFP linked by 23 amino acid residues (TagRFP-23-KFP) containing a specific caspase cleavage DEVD motif to monitor the activity of caspase-3 in tumor xenografts by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging-Forster resonance energy transfer. Apoptosis was induced by injection of paclitaxel for A549 lung adenocarcinoma and etoposide and cisplatin for HEp-2 pharynx adenocarcinoma. We observed a shift in lifetime distribution from 1.6 to 1.9 ns to 2.1 to 2.4 ns, which indicated the activation of caspase-3. Even within the same tumor, the lifetime varied presumably due to the tumor heterogeneity and the different depth of tumor invasion. Thus, processing time-resolved fluorescence images allows detection of both the cleaved and noncleaved states of the TR23K sensor in real-time mode during the course of several weeks noninvasively. This approach can be used in drug screening, facilitating the development of new anticancer agents as well as improvement of chemotherapy efficiency and its adaptation for personal treatment.

  16. Cine: Line excitation by infrared fluorescence in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-03-01

    CINE is a Python module for calculating infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. Excitation by solar radiation of vibrational bands followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state is one of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets. This code calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Line transitions are queried from the latest version of the HITRAN spectroscopic repository using the astroquery affiliated package of astropy. Molecular data are obtained from the LAMDA database. These coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  17. Spectrum of acetylene fluorescence excited by single XUV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The spectrum of visible emission from photofragments of acetylene excited by single 16.85 eV photons has been recorded for the first time. The spectrum is dominated by the Swan and Deslandres-d'Azambuja bands of C 2 and the 431.5 nm band of CH. The yields of these emissions are of the order 10 -3 photons per absorbed incident photon. The experimental conditions suggest that the emission results from primary C* 2 and CH* photofragments

  18. Actin cytoskeleton-dependent Rab GTPase-regulated angiotensin type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Sun, Yuansheng; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic regulation of the cellular trafficking of human angiotensin (Ang) type 1 receptor (AT1R) is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the cellular trafficking of AT1R-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (AT1R-EGFP) heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells by determining the change in donor lifetime (AT1R-EGFP) in the presence or absence of acceptor(s) using fluorescence lifetime imaging-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy. The average lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in our donor-alone samples was ~2.33 ns. The basal state lifetime was shortened slightly in the presence of Rab5 (2.01+/-0.10 ns) or Rab7 (2.11+/-0.11 ns) labeled with Alexa 555, as the acceptor fluorophore. A 5-min Ang II treatment markedly shortened the lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in the presence of Rab5-Alexa 555 (1.78+/-0.31 ns) but was affected minimally in the presence of Rab7-Alexa 555 (2.09+/-0.37 ns). A 30-min Ang II treatment further decreased the AT1R-EGFP lifetime in the presence of both Rab5- and Rab7-Alexa 555. Latrunculin A but not nocodazole pretreatment blocked the ability of Ang II to shorten the AT1R-EGFP lifetime. The occurrence of FRET between AT1R-EGFP (donor) and LAMP1-Alexa 555 (acceptor) with Ang II stimulation was impaired by photobleaching the acceptor. These studies demonstrate that Ang II-induced AT1R lysosomal degradation through its association with LAMP1 is regulated by Rab5/7 via mechanisms that are dependent on intact actin cytoskeletons.

  19. Diagnostics of MCF plasmas using Lyman-α fluorescence excited by one or two photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1998-11-01

    Laser-induced Lyman-α fluorescence of the hydrogen isotopes is investigated with regard to diagnostic applications in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. A formal analysis is presented for two excitation schemes: one-photon and Doppler-free two-photon excitation. The analysis includes estimates of the expected experimental errors arising from the photon noise and from the sensitivity of the observed fluorescence signals to variations of the plasma and laser parameters. Both excitation schemes are suitable primarily for application in the plasma edge, but even in the plasma bulk of large machines they can still be applied in combination with a diagnostic neutral beam. The two-photon excitation scheme is particularly attractive because it involves absorption spectra that are resolved within the Doppler width. This implies a large diagnostic potential and in particular offers a way to measure the deuterium-tritium fuel mix in fusion reactors. (author)

  20. Fluorescence enhancing under UV-NIR simultaneous-excitation in ZnS:Cu,Mn phosphors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Xie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescence properties of a long-lasting phosphor, ZnS:Cu,Mn was studied for the first time under simultaneously excitation of both UV and NIR light. Up to 20% fluorescence enhancement of the phosphor was observed. In the present simultaneously-excitation process, broad-band NIR light was absorbed and converted to visible photons via a single-photon upconversion path. We propose that a novel kind of spectral-conversion material with the unique ability to simultaneously convert both UV and NIR photons can be developed and is promising in the application of enhancing the EQE of solar cells.

  1. Study on the effect of deposition rate and concentration of Eu on the fluorescent lifetime of CsI: Tl thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yijun; Guo, Lina [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, Chengdu 610054 (China); Liu, Shuang, E-mail: shuangliu@uestc.edu.cn [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, Chengdu 610054 (China); Wang, Qianfeng; Zhang, Shangjian; Liu, Yong [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhong, Zhiyong [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2017-06-21

    Although there are many new scintillators being developed recently, CsI: Tl is still very efficient among them. The fluorescent lifetime is a very important parameter of CsI: Tl thin film and two series of experiments have been conducted to learn about it. Our experiments, however, have demonstrated that the deposition rate and the codoping of Eu{sup 2+} will significantly influence its fluorescent lifetime. In order to increase the efficiency of the imaging system, we intend to obtain a higher fluorescent lifetime for CsI: Tl thin film by controlling these two conditions. - Highlights: • We used vacuum vapor deposition method to grow the high-quality thin films. • The relationship between the deposition rate and the fluorescent lifetime of CsI: Tl thin film was tested. • Concentration of Eu on fluorescent lifetime of the CsI: Tl thin film was studied.

  2. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  3. Measured lifetimes of states in 197Au and a critical comparison with the weak-coupling core-excitation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotin, H.H.; Kennedy, D.L.; Linard, B.J.; Stuchbery, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    The lifetimes of five excited states in 197 Au up to an excitation energy of 885 keV were measured by the recoil-distance method (RDM). These levels were populated by Coulomb excitation using both 90 MeV 20 Ne and 120 MeV 35 Cl ion beams. The experimentally determined spectroscopy of the low-lying levels 3/2 + (ground state) and 1/2 + , (3/2) + 2 , 5/2 + and 7/2 + at 77.3, 268.8, 278.9, and 547.5 keV excitation energy, respectively, has been critically compared with the detailed predictions of the de-Shalit weak-coupling core-excitation model. When the model is taken to represent the case of a dsub(3/2) proton hole coupled to a 198 Hg core, the model parameters obtained are in accord with the criteria implicit for weak core coupling and, at the same time, are in remarkably good agreement with virtually all measured E2 and M1 transition rates. (Auth.)

  4. Automated detection of breast cancer in resected specimens with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Unger, Jakob; Darrow, Morgan; Bold, Richard J.; Marcu, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Re-excision rates for breast cancer lumpectomy procedures are currently nearly 25% due to surgeons relying on inaccurate or incomplete methods of evaluating specimen margins. The objective of this study was to determine if cancer could be automatically detected in breast specimens from mastectomy and lumpectomy procedures by a classification algorithm that incorporated parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm). This study generated a database of co-registered histologic sections and FLIm data from breast cancer specimens (N  =  20) and a support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm able to automatically detect cancerous, fibrous, and adipose breast tissue. Classification accuracies were greater than 97% for automated detection of cancerous, fibrous, and adipose tissue from breast cancer specimens. The classification worked equally well for specimens scanned by hand or with a mechanical stage, demonstrating that the system could be used during surgery or on excised specimens. The ability of this technique to simply discriminate between cancerous and normal breast tissue, in particular to distinguish fibrous breast tissue from tumor, which is notoriously challenging for optical techniques, leads to the conclusion that FLIm has great potential to assess breast cancer margins. Identification of positive margins before waiting for complete histologic analysis could significantly reduce breast cancer re-excision rates.

  5. From morphology to biochemical state - intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  7. Bulky Counterions: Enhancing the Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence of Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertorelle, Franck; Moulin, Christophe; Soleilhac, Antonin; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Dugourd, Philippe; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Brevet, Pierre-François; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-01-19

    Increasing fluorescence quantum yields of ligand-protected gold nanoclusters has attracted wide research interest. The strategy consisting in using bulky counterions has been found to dramatically enhance the fluorescence. In this Communication, we push forward this concept to the nonlinear optical regime. We show that by an appropriate choice of bulky counterions and of solvent, a 30-fold increase in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal at ≈600 nm for gold nanoclusters can be obtained. This would correspond to a TPEF cross-section in the range of 0.1 to 1 GM. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Alterations in cerebral metabolism observed in living rodents using fluorescence lifetime microscopy of intrinsic NADH (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Sakadžić, Sava; Sutin, Jason; Wu, Weicheng; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring cerebral energy metabolism at a cellular level is essential to improve our understanding of healthy brain function and its pathological alterations. In this study, we resolve specific alterations in cerebral metabolism utilizing minimally-invasive 2-Photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (2P-FLIM) measurements of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence, collected in vivo from anesthetized rats and mice. Time-resolved lifetime measurements enables distinction of different components contributing to NADH autofluorescence. These components reportedly represent different enzyme-bound formulations of NADH. Our observations from this study confirm the hypothesis that NADH FLIM can identify specific alterations in cerebral metabolism. Using time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) equipment and a custom-built multimodal imaging system, 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) was performed in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. Multi-exponential fits for NADH fluorescence lifetimes indicate 4 distinct components, or 'species.' We observed distinct variations in the relative proportions of these components before and after pharmacological-induced impairments to several reactions involved in anaerobic glycolysis and aerobic oxidative metabolism. Classification models developed with experimental data correctly predict the metabolic impairments associated with bicuculline-induced focal seizures in separate experiments. Compared to traditional intensity-based NADH measurements, lifetime imaging of NADH is less susceptible to the adverse effects of overlying blood vessels. Evaluating NADH measurements will ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of cerebral energetics and its pathology-related alterations. Such knowledge will likely aid development of therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke.

  9. Lifetimes for some excited states of sodium; Vidas medias de niveles excitados del atomo del sodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P; Campos, J

    1979-07-01

    The lifetimes of some s,p and d levels of sodium have been measured by the delayed coincidence method, using a single-photon counting technique. The results are compared with the calculated values of the present work, and with other results. The lifetimes of the ns, np, and levels up to n10; of the nf levels up to n-9;and of the ng, nh,n1 and nk levels up to n-8, have been calculated and the transition probabilities of lines with origin in these levels are given. (Author) 38 refs.

  10. Dual fluorescence excitation spectra of methyl salicylate in a free jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbrook, Lou Ann; Kenny, Jonathan E.; Kohler, Bryan E.; Scott, Gary W.

    1981-11-01

    Separate fluorescence excitation spectra of the blue- and UV-emitting forms of methyl salicylate cooled in a free-jet expansion are reported. This study represents the first observation of the detailed vibrational structure of these transitions. The two excitation spectra have no features in common, and their intensity patterns are very different. Many individual lines are ˜2 cm-1 wide (nearly laser limited), although in the excitation spectrum of the UV emission, spectral congestion persists at high energies despite the high degree of cooling. (AIP)

  11. Oral cancer detection based on fluorescence polarization of blood plasma at excitation wavelength 405 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Manoharan, Yuvaraj; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    During metabolism the metabolites such as hormones, proteins and enzymes were released in to the blood stream by the cells. These metabolites reflect any change that occurs due to any disturbances in normal metabolic function of the human system. This was well observed with the altered spectral signatures observed with fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Previously many have reported on the significance of native fluorescence spectroscopic method in the diagnosis of cancer. As fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive and simple, it has complementary techniques such as excitation-emission matrix, synchronous and polarization. The fluorescence polarization measurement provides details about any association or binding reactions and denaturing effects that occurs due to change in the micro environment of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt in the diagnosis of oral cancer at 405 nm excitation using fluorescence polarization measurement. The fluorescence anisotropic values calculated from polarized fluorescence spectral data of normal and oral cancer subjects yielded a good accuracy when analyzed with linear discriminant analysis based artificial neural network. The results will be discussed in detail.

  12. CONSTRAINING THE LIFETIME AND OPENING ANGLE OF QUASARS USING FLUORESCENT Ly α EMISSION: THE CASE OF Q0420–388

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, Elena; Lilly, Simon J.; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Rakic, Olivera; Worseck, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    A toy model is developed to understand how the spatial distribution of fluorescent emitters in the vicinity of bright quasars could be affected by the geometry of the quasar bi-conical radiation field and by its lifetime. The model is then applied to the distribution of high-equivalent-width Ly α emitters (with rest-frame equivalent widths above 100 Å, threshold used in, e.g., Trainor and Steidel) identified in a deep narrow-band 36 × 36 arcmin 2 image centered on the luminous quasar Q0420–388. These emitters are found near the edge of the field and show some evidence of an azimuthal asymmetry on the sky of the type expected if the quasar is radiating in a bipolar cone. If these sources are being fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, the two most distant objects require a lifetime of at least 15 Myr for an opening angle of 60° or more, increasing to more than 40 Myr if the opening angle is reduced to a minimum of 30°. However, some other expected signatures of boosted fluorescence are not seen at the current survey limits, e.g., a fall off in Ly α brightness, or equivalent width, with distance. Furthermore, to have most of the Ly α emission of the two distant sources to be fluorescently boosted would require the quasar to have been significantly brighter in the past. This suggests that these particular sources may not be fluorescent, invalidating the above lifetime constraints. This would cast doubt on the use of this relatively low equivalent width threshold and thus also on the lifetime analysis in Trainor and Steidel.

  13. CONSTRAINING THE LIFETIME AND OPENING ANGLE OF QUASARS USING FLUORESCENT Ly α EMISSION: THE CASE OF Q0420–388

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisova, Elena; Lilly, Simon J.; Cantalupo, Sebastiano [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Zurich, CH-8093 (Switzerland); Prochaska, J. Xavier [UCO/Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rakic, Olivera; Worseck, Gabor, E-mail: borisova@phys.ethz.ch [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg, D-69117 (Germany)

    2016-10-20

    A toy model is developed to understand how the spatial distribution of fluorescent emitters in the vicinity of bright quasars could be affected by the geometry of the quasar bi-conical radiation field and by its lifetime. The model is then applied to the distribution of high-equivalent-width Ly α emitters (with rest-frame equivalent widths above 100 Å, threshold used in, e.g., Trainor and Steidel) identified in a deep narrow-band 36 × 36 arcmin{sup 2} image centered on the luminous quasar Q0420–388. These emitters are found near the edge of the field and show some evidence of an azimuthal asymmetry on the sky of the type expected if the quasar is radiating in a bipolar cone. If these sources are being fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, the two most distant objects require a lifetime of at least 15 Myr for an opening angle of 60° or more, increasing to more than 40 Myr if the opening angle is reduced to a minimum of 30°. However, some other expected signatures of boosted fluorescence are not seen at the current survey limits, e.g., a fall off in Ly α brightness, or equivalent width, with distance. Furthermore, to have most of the Ly α emission of the two distant sources to be fluorescently boosted would require the quasar to have been significantly brighter in the past. This suggests that these particular sources may not be fluorescent, invalidating the above lifetime constraints. This would cast doubt on the use of this relatively low equivalent width threshold and thus also on the lifetime analysis in Trainor and Steidel.

  14. Excited-state lifetime measurements: Linearization of the Foerster equation by the phase-plane method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, J.C.; Demas, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Foerster equation describes excited-state decay curves involving resonance intermolecular energy transfer. A linearized solution based on the phase-plane method has been developed. The new method is quick, insensitive to the fitting region, accurate, and precise

  15. Analysis of River sediments from the Tigre river (Venezuela) by radioisotope excited x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Rosales, P.A.; Schorin, H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes qualitative elemental scans by both energy dispersive (radioisotope excited) and conventional wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence of different grain size fractions of river sediments. An internal standard thin-film technique was used. The precision of Rb, Sr, Y and Zr determination for SY-3 standard reference rock and one real sample for five independently prepared samples is demonstrated

  16. Determination of uranium in geologic materials by laser-excited fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    A laser-excited fluorescence method is described for the determination of trace amounts of uranium in rocks and soils. The limit of detection is less than 1 ppm, and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2.6 to 12.5%. The method was evaluated by using known geological reference samples

  17. Fluorescence, Absorption, and Excitation Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Figueroa, A. M.; Ramazan, K. A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative and qualitative study of the interplay between absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is conducted. The study of five PAH displays the correlation of the above-mentioned properties along with the associated molecular changes.

  18. Determination of heavy metals in polar snow and ice by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshov, M.A.; Boutron, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    The new laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry technique offers unrivalled sensitivity for the determination of trace metals in a wide variety of samples. This has allowed the direct determination of Pb, Cd and Bi in Antarctic and Greenland snow and ice down to the sub pg/g level. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  19. Excitation of fluorescent nanoparticles by channel plasmon polaritons propagating in V-grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Irene Fernandez; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been proven that light can be squeezed into metallic channels with subwavelength lateral dimensions. Here, we present the study of the propagation of channel plasmon polaritons confined in gold V-grooves, filled with fluorescent particles. In this way, channel plasmon polaritons......-diameter beads, we show the possibility of individual excitation, what may have applications to develop very sensitive biosensors....

  20. Contribution to the analysis of light elements using x fluorescence excited by radio-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, A.

    1964-01-01

    In order to study the possibilities of using radioactive sources for the X-fluorescence analysis of light elements, the principle is given, after a brief description of X-fluorescence, of the excitation of this phenomenon by X, β and α emission from radio-elements. The operation and use of the proportional gas counter for X-ray detection is described. A device has been studied for analysing the elements of the 2. and 3. periods of the Mendeleev table. It makes it possible to excite the fluorescence with a radioactive source emitting X-rays or a particles; the X-ray fluorescence penetrates into a window-less proportional counter, this being made possible by the use of an auxiliary electric field in the neighbourhood of the sample. The gas detection pressure leading to the maximum detection yield is given. The spectra are given for the K α lines of 3. period elements excited by 55 Fe, 3 H/Zr and 210 Po sources; for the 2. period the K α spectra of carbon and of fluorine excited by the α particles of 210 Po. (author) [fr

  1. Ultratrace determination of lead in whole blood using electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, E P; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1996-09-15

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence has been used to detect lead that was electrothermally atomized from whole blood in a graphite furnace. A 9 kHz repetition rate copper vapor laser pumped dye laser was used to excite the lead at 283.3 nm, and the resulting atomic fluorescence was detected at 405.8 nm. No matrix modification was used other than a 1:21 dilution of the whole blood with high-purity water. Using the atomic fluorescence peak area as the analytical measure and a background correction technique based upon a simultaneous measurement of the transmitted laser intensity, excellent agreement for NIST and CDC certified whole blood reference samples was obtained with aqueous standards. A limit of detection in blood of 10 fg/mL (100 ag absolute) was achieved.

  2. Fluorescence life-time imaging and steady state polarization for examining binding of fluorophores to gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Shmulik; Fixler, Dror; Popovtzer, Rachela; Shefi, Orit

    2015-11-01

    Nanocomposites as multifunctional agents are capable of combing imaging and cell biology technologies. The conventional methods used for validation of the conjugation process of nanoparticles (NPs) to fluorescent molecules such as spectroscopy analysis and surface potential measurements, are not sufficient. In this paper we present a new and highly sensitive procedure that uses the combination of (1) fluorescence spectrum, (2) fluorescence lifetime, and (3) steady state fluorescence polarization measurements. We characterize and analyze gold NPs with Lucifer yellow (LY) surface coating as a model. We demonstrate the ability to differentiate between LY-GNP (the conjugated complex) and a mixture of coated NP and free dyes. We suggest the approach for neuroscience applications where LY is used for detecting and labeling cells, studying morphology and intracellular communications. Histograms of Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of free LY dye (Left) in comparison to the conjugated dye to gold nanoparticles, LY-GNP (Middle) enable the differentiation between LY-GNP (the conjugated complex) and a mixture of coated NP and free dyes (Right). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  4. Ergodicity, configurational entropy and free energy in pigment solutions and plant photosystems: influence of excited state lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Robert C; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We examine ergodicity and configurational entropy for a dilute pigment solution and for a suspension of plant photosystem particles in which both ground and excited state pigments are present. It is concluded that the pigment solution, due to the extreme brevity of the excited state lifetime, is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. Conversely, due to the rapid energy transfer among pigments, each photosystem is ergodic and the configurational entropy is positive. This decreases the free energy of the single photosystem pigment array by a small amount. On the other hand, the suspension of photosystems is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. The overall configurational entropy which, in principle, includes contributions from both the single excited photosystems and the suspension which contains excited photosystems, also approaches zero. Thus the configurational entropy upon photon absorption by either a pigment solution or a suspension of photosystem particles is approximately zero. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Imaging Amyloid Tissues Stained with Luminescent Conjugated Oligothiophenes by Hyperspectral Confocal Microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Sofie; Bäck, Marcus; Nilsson, K Peter R; Hammarström, Per

    2017-10-20

    Proteins that deposit as amyloid in tissues throughout the body can be the cause or consequence of a large number of diseases. Among these we find neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease afflicting primarily the central nervous system, and systemic amyloidosis where serum amyloid A, transthyretin and IgG light chains deposit as amyloid in liver, carpal tunnel, spleen, kidney, heart, and other peripheral tissues. Amyloid has been known and studied for more than a century, often using amyloid specific dyes such as Congo red and Thioflavin T (ThT) or Thioflavin (ThS). In this paper, we present heptamer-formyl thiophene acetic acid (hFTAA) as an example of recently developed complements to these dyes called luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs). hFTAA is easy to use and is compatible with co-staining in immunofluorescence or with other cellular markers. Extensive research has proven that hFTAA detects a wider range of disease associated protein aggregates than conventional amyloid dyes. In addition, hFTAA can also be applied for optical assignment of distinct aggregated morphotypes to allow studies of amyloid fibril polymorphism. While the imaging methodology applied is optional, we here demonstrate hyperspectral imaging (HIS), laser scanning confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). These examples show some of the imaging techniques where LCOs can be used as tools to gain more detailed knowledge of the formation and structural properties of amyloids. An important limitation to the technique is, as for all conventional optical microscopy techniques, the requirement for microscopic size of aggregates to allow detection. Furthermore, the aggregate should comprise a repetitive β-sheet structure to allow for hFTAA binding. Excessive fixation and/or epitope exposure that modify the aggregate structure or conformation can render poor hFTAA binding and hence pose limitations to accurate imaging.

  6. Gentamicin differentially alters cellular metabolism of cochlear hair cells as revealed by NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholudeva, Lyandysha V.; Ward, Kristina G.; Nichols, Michael G.; Smith, Heather Jensen

    2015-05-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are implicated as culprits of hearing loss in more than 120,000 individuals annually. Research has shown that the sensory cells, but not supporting cells, of the cochlea are readily damaged and/or lost after use of such antibiotics. High-frequency outer hair cells (OHCs) show a greater sensitivity to antibiotics than high- and low-frequency inner hair cells (IHCs). We hypothesize that variations in mitochondrial metabolism account for differences in susceptibility. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy was used to quantify changes in NAD(P)H in sensory and supporting cells from explanted murine cochleae exposed to mitochondrial uncouplers, inhibitors, and an ototoxic antibiotic, gentamicin (GM). Changes in metabolic state resulted in a redistribution of NAD(P)H between subcellular fluorescence lifetime pools. Supporting cells had a significantly longer lifetime than sensory cells. Pretreatment with GM increased NAD(P)H intensity in high-frequency sensory cells, as well as the NAD(P)H lifetime within IHCs. GM specifically increased NAD(P)H concentration in high-frequency OHCs, but not in IHCs or pillar cells. Variations in NAD(P)H intensity in response to mitochondrial toxins and GM were greatest in high-frequency OHCs. These results demonstrate that GM rapidly alters mitochondrial metabolism, differentially modulates cell metabolism, and provides evidence that GM-induced changes in metabolism are significant and greatest in high-frequency OHCs.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime FRET imaging of receptor-ligand complexes in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkouskaya, Alena; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E.; Barroso, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    To guide the development of targeted therapies with improved efficacy and accelerated clinical acceptance, novel imaging methodologies need to be established. Toward this goal, fluorescence lifetime Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) imaging assays capitalize on the ability of antibodies or protein ligands to bind dimerized membrane bound receptors to measure their target engagement levels in cancer cells. Conventional FLIM FRET microscopy has been widely applied at visible wavelengths to detect protein-protein interactions in vitro. However, operation at these wavelengths restricts imaging quality and ability to quantitate lifetime changes in in vivo small animal optical imaging due to high auto-fluorescence and light scattering. Here, we have analyzed the uptake of iron-bound transferrin (Tf) probes into human breast cancer cells using FLIM-FRET microscopy in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) range. The development of NIR FLIM FRET microscopy allows for the use of quantitative lifetime-based molecular assays to measure drug-target engagement levels at multiple scales: from in vitro microscopy to in vivo small animal optical imaging (macroscopy). This novel approach can be extended to other receptors, currently targeted in oncology. Hence, lifetime-based molecular imaging can find numerous applications in drug delivery and targeted therapy assessment and optimization.

  8. Study of lifetimes of fluorescence levels of tetravalent uranium in the incommensurate phase of thorium tetrabromide and tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milicic, A.

    1989-01-01

    The lifetimes of radiative levels of tetravalent uranium in the incommensurate phase of thorium tetrahalides have been measured as a function of different parameters: site symmetry, temperature and concentration. The incommensurate phase of thorium tetrabromide and tetrachloride is characterized by a continuous distribution of site symmetries induced by a continuous and weak displacement of the halides around the thorium (uranium) ions. At low temperature, 4.2 K, the lifetime variation as a function of excited classes of symmetry is governed by the radiative process probability as well as the energy transfer between uranium ions in different sites. At higher temperature, a model based on a Boltzmann equilibrium between closed energy levels is able to reproduce the experimental lifetime variation as a function of the temperature, for a given class of symmetry. For the variation of lifetime as a function of uranium ion concentrations, at high dilution and in the case of U 4+ : ThBr 4 , there is a competition between the energy transfer and thermal population of excited states [fr

  9. Test and Control System for Chlorophyll Fluorescence Parameters Using LED as Excitation Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Qiuying

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme on test and control system for chlorophyll fluorescence is presented in this work, which uses light-emitting diode (LED excitation by means of measuring the fluorescence parameter fpsII. The system takes programmable power supply as LEDs illumination drive power with high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. MINIPAM is used to measure fluorescence parameter fpsII and keeps communication with upper PC by serial port. The upper PC can control the power supply and process the data received from MINIPAM by software which is programmed in VB6. The results show that the system has a lot of advantages such as high accuracy and convenience. The effect of environmental factors on fluorescence parameters is analyzed comprehensively. It will be a practical measurement and control system for photosynthetic ability and have wide application foreground.

  10. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał; Kijak, Michał; Piwonski, Hubert Marek; Herbich, Jerzy; Waluk, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  11. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał

    2017-02-03

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  12. A high-throughput direct fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for analyzing apoptotic proteases using flow cytometry and fluorescence lifetime measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Miho; Sakata, Ichiro; Sakai, Takafumi; Tomioka, Hiroaki; Nishigaki, Koichi; Tramier, Marc; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté

    2015-12-15

    Cytometry is a versatile and powerful method applicable to different fields, particularly pharmacology and biomedical studies. Based on the data obtained, cytometric studies are classified into high-throughput (HTP) or high-content screening (HCS) groups. However, assays combining the advantages of both are required to facilitate research. In this study, we developed a high-throughput system to profile cellular populations in terms of time- or dose-dependent responses to apoptotic stimulations because apoptotic inducers are potent anticancer drugs. We previously established assay systems involving protease to monitor live cells for apoptosis using tunable fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based bioprobes. These assays can be used for microscopic analyses or fluorescence-activated cell sorting. In this study, we developed FRET-based bioprobes to detect the activity of the apoptotic markers caspase-3 and caspase-9 via changes in bioprobe fluorescence lifetimes using a flow cytometer for direct estimation of FRET efficiencies. Different patterns of changes in the fluorescence lifetimes of these markers during apoptosis were observed, indicating a relationship between discrete steps in the apoptosis process. The findings demonstrate the feasibility of evaluating collective cellular dynamics during apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of fluorescence excitation geometry on the accuracy of DNA fragment sizing by flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Larson, Erica J. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Goodwin, Peter M. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Ambrose, W. Patrick [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Keller, Richard A. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)

    2000-06-01

    We report on various excitation geometries used in ultrasensitive flow cytometry that yield a linear relation between the fluorescence intensity measured from individual strained DNA fragments and the lengths of the fragments (in base pairs). This linearity holds for DNA samples that exhibit a wide range of conformations. The variety of DNA conformations leads to a distribution of dipole moment orientations for the dye molecules intercalated into the DNA. It is consequently important to use an excitation geometry such that all dye molecules are detected with similar efficiency. To estimate the conformation and the extent of elongation of the strained fragments in the flow, fluorescence polarization anisotropy and autocorrelation measurements were performed. Significant extension was observed for DNA fragments under the flow conditions frequently used for DNA fragment sizing. Classical calculations of the fluorescence emission collected over a finite solid angle are in agreement with the experimental measurements and have confirmed the relative insensitivity to DNA conformation of an orthogonal excitation geometry. Furthermore, the calculations suggested a modified excitation geometry that has increased our sizing resolution. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  14. Effects of fluorescence excitation geometry on the accuracy of DNA fragment sizing by flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, James H.; Larson, Erica J.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Keller, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    We report on various excitation geometries used in ultrasensitive flow cytometry that yield a linear relation between the fluorescence intensity measured from individual strained DNA fragments and the lengths of the fragments (in base pairs). This linearity holds for DNA samples that exhibit a wide range of conformations. The variety of DNA conformations leads to a distribution of dipole moment orientations for the dye molecules intercalated into the DNA. It is consequently important to use an excitation geometry such that all dye molecules are detected with similar efficiency. To estimate the conformation and the extent of elongation of the strained fragments in the flow, fluorescence polarization anisotropy and autocorrelation measurements were performed. Significant extension was observed for DNA fragments under the flow conditions frequently used for DNA fragment sizing. Classical calculations of the fluorescence emission collected over a finite solid angle are in agreement with the experimental measurements and have confirmed the relative insensitivity to DNA conformation of an orthogonal excitation geometry. Furthermore, the calculations suggested a modified excitation geometry that has increased our sizing resolution. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America

  15. Role of excited state solvent fluctuations on time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tanping, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu; Kumar, Revati, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    We explore the connection between the solvation dynamics of a chromophore upon photon excitation and equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent. Using molecular dynamics simulations, fluorescence Stokes shift for the tryptophan in Staphylococcus nuclease was examined using both nonequilibrium calculations and linear response theory. When the perturbed and unperturbed surfaces exhibit different solvent equilibrium fluctuations, the linear response approach on the former surface shows agreement with the nonequilibrium process. This agreement is excellent when the perturbed surface exhibits Gaussian statistics and qualitative in the case of an isomerization induced non-Gaussian statistics. However, the linear response theory on the unperturbed surface breaks down even in the presence of Gaussian fluctuations. Experiments also provide evidence of the connection between the excited state solvent fluctuations and the total fluorescence shift. These observations indicate that the equilibrium statistics on the excited state surface characterize the relaxation dynamics of the fluorescence Stokes shift. Our studies specifically analyze the Gaussian fluctuations of the solvent in the complex protein environment and further confirm the role of solvent fluctuations on the excited state surface. The results are consistent with previous investigations, found in the literature, of solutes dissolved in liquids.

  16. Multiphoton-Excited Fluorescence of Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higbie, J. M.; Perreault, J. D.; Acosta, V. M.; Belthangady, C.; Lebel, P.; Kim, M. H.; Nguyen, K.; Demas, V.; Bajaj, V.; Santori, C.

    2017-05-01

    Silicon-vacancy color centers in nanodiamonds are promising as fluorescent labels for biological applications, with a narrow, nonbleaching emission line at 738 nm. Two-photon excitation of this fluorescence offers the possibility of low-background detection at significant tissue depth with high three-dimensional spatial resolution. We measure the two-photon fluorescence cross section of a negatively charged silicon vacancy (Si -V- ) in ion-implanted bulk diamond to be 0.74 (19 )×10-50 cm4 s /photon at an excitation wavelength of 1040 nm. Compared to the diamond nitrogen-vacancy center, the expected detection threshold of a two-photon excited Si -V center is more than an order of magnitude lower, largely due to its much narrower linewidth. We also present measurements of two- and three-photon excitation spectra, finding an increase in the two-photon cross section with decreasing wavelength, and we discuss the physical interpretation of the spectra in the context of existing models of the Si -V energy-level structure.

  17. Comparison of conventional and total reflection excitation geometry for fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy on droplet samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkenberg, G.; Pepponi, G.; Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments in fluorescence mode have been performed in total reflection excitation geometry and conventional 45 deg. /45 deg. excitation/detection geometry for comparison. The experimental results have shown that XAFS measurements are feasible under normal total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) conditions, i.e. on droplet samples, with excitation in grazing incidence and using a TXRF experimental chamber. The application of the total reflection excitation geometry for XAFS measurements increases the sensitivity compared to the conventional geometry leading to lower accessible concentration ranges. However, XAFS under total reflection excitation condition fails for highly concentrated samples because of the self-absorption effect

  18. Subnanosecond lifetime measurements of excited states in nuclei far from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nettles, W.G.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hamilton, J.H.; Avignone, F.T. III; Carter, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    A system was developed to measure the lifetimes of nuclear states in the range of 0.05 to 1 nanosecond in nuclei far from stability. A Gerholm magnetic lens was placed on-line with the UNISOR mass separator to observe conversion electrons in coincidence with γ rays detected in a plastic scintillator. With this system, the half-life of the 522 keV, O + level in 186 Hg was measured to be 155 +- 70 picoseconds. Improvements in this system should make possible on-line measurements of half-lives as short as approx. = 50 picoseconds. 12 references

  19. Subnanosecond lifetime measurements of excited states in nuclei far from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nettles, W.G.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hamilton, J.H.; Avignone, F.T. III; Carter, H.K.

    1980-01-01

    A system has been developed to measure the lifetimes of nuclear states in the range of 0.05 to 1 nanosecond in nuclei far from stability. A Gerholm magnetic lens was placed on-line with the UNISOR mass separator to observe conversion electrons in coincidence with γ rays detected in a plastic scintillator. With this system, the half-life of the 522 keV, 0 + level in 186 Hg was measured to be 155 +- 70 picoseconds. Improvements in this system should make possible on-line measurements of half-lives as short as approximately 50 picoseconds. (Auth.)

  20. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomin, Vladimir I.; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  1. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomin, Vladimir I., E-mail: tomin@apsl.edu.pl; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-10-15

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  2. Fluorescence fluctuation of Rhodamine 6G dye for high repetition rate laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Patel, Hemant K.; Dixit, S.K.; Vora, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fluorescence from Rhodamine 6G dye for stationary and flowing liquid medium, excited by copper vapor laser, operating at 6 kHz pulse repetition frequency, was investigated. Large fluctuations in spectral width (about 5 nm) and spectral intensity in the fluorescence from stationary dye solution were observed, while fluctuations in the spectral width diminish in a flowing dye medium. However, this increases spectral intensity and slightly red shifts the fluorescence peak emission wavelength. Theoretical analysis was carried out to explain the observed results by incorporating the temperature induced refractive index, beam deflection and spectral variation in stationary dye solution. Numerical analysis of thermal load and contour of temperature in the optical pumped region inside the dye cell in stationary, 0.2 and 1.5 m/s flow velocity was also investigated to support our analysis. - Highlights: ► High repetition rate excitation generates inhomogeneity in the gain medium. ► Fluorescence of Rhodamine 6G in stationary and flowing medium was carried out. ► Fluorescence fluctuations lessen in flowing medium in contrast to stationary medium. ► Our theoretical and numerical analysis enlightens the experimented outcome trend.

  3. Sensitive lifetime measurement of excited states of {sup 98}Ru via the (p,p{sup '}γ) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vielmetter, Vera; Hennig, Andreas; Derya, Vera; Pickstone, Simon G.; Prill, Sarah; Spieker, Mark; Zilges, Andreas [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Petkov, Pavel [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); INRNE, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2016-07-01

    The one-phonon mixed-symmetry quadrupole excitation 2{sup +}{sub ms} is a well established excitation mode in near-spherical nuclei, especially in the A ∼ 100 mass region. However, it is largely unknown how mixed-symmetry states evolve along shape-transitional paths, e.g. from spherical to deformed shapes. The chain of stable ruthenium isotopes is well suited for this study since it exhibits a smooth transition from spherical ({sup 96,98}Ru) to deformed shapes ({sup 104}Ru). To identify the 2{sup +}{sub ms} state of {sup 98}Ru on the basis of absolute M1 and E2 transition strengths, we performed a proton-scattering experiment on {sup 98}Ru using the SONIC rate at HORUS setup at the University of Cologne. Lifetimes of excited states were measured via the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM), which benefits from the acquired pγ-coincidence data. First results of this experiment are presented and compared to the neighbouring nuclei {sup 96}Ru and {sup 100}Ru.

  4. Comparison of sensitivities and detection limits between direct excitation and secondary excitation modes in energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artz, B.E.; Short, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison was made between the direct tube excitation mode and the secondary target excitation mode using a Kevex 0810 energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence system. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined with two system configurations. The first configuration used a standard, high power, x-ray fluorescence tube to directly excite the specimen. Several x-ray tubes, including chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten, both filtered and not filtered, were employed. The second configuration consisted of using the x-ray tube to excite a secondary target which in turn excited the specimen. Appropriate targets were compared to the direct excitation results. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined for K-series lines for elements from magnesium to barium contained in a low atomic number matrix and in a high atomic number matrix

  5. Spatial distribution of fluorescent light emitted from neon and nitrogen excited by low energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wieser, J.

    2006-01-01

    Side-view intensity profiles of fluorescent light were measured for neon and nitrogen excited with 12 keV electron beams at gas pressures from 250 to 1400 hPa. The intensity profiles were compared with theoretical profiles calculated using the CASINO program which performs Monte Carlo simulations of electron scattering. It was assumed that the spatial distribution of fluorescent intensity is directly proportional to the spatial distribution of energy loss by primary electrons. The comparison shows good correlation of experimental data and the results of numeric simulations

  6. Theoretical study on X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis: Contribution of the self-excitation phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAKOTONDRAJAONA, H.N.J.L.

    1999-01-01

    This work consist in setting up, firstly, fluorescence intensities due to the contribution of secondary and tertiary excitation phenomena which settle among the elements of the same sample during the analysis through X fluorescence, inspired by Sherman calculations. Secondly, we have experimentally checked these expression from the analysis of twelve samples; containing all the following elements: Iron, Copper and Zinc. The difference between the theoretical results and the experimental results has been valued from the formula of the test of χ 2 . We consider that this difference is noticeable compared to other errors due to analysis method. [fr

  7. Fluorescence excited in a thunderstorm atmosphere by relativistic runaway electron avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.

    2017-05-01

    The spectrum and spatiotemporal evolution of the fluorescence of an atmospheric discharge developing in the regime of relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) generation have been calculated without involving the relativistic feedback. The discharges generating narrow bipolar pulses, along with the discharges responsible for terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, are shown to be relatively dark. Nevertheless, the fluorescence excited by a discharge involving RREAs can be recorded with cameras used to record high-altitude optical phenomena. A possible connection between a certain class of optical phenomena observed at the tops of thunderclouds and RREA emission is pointed out.

  8. Studies of the fluorescent excited state of impurities in ionic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romestain, Robert

    1972-01-01

    The author of this research thesis first presents experimental methods used in this research: principles (recall on the optical spectrum of an impurity in a solid, use of fluorescence polarization) and techniques (sample preparation, liquid helium cryostat, application of a disturbance, optical detection). Then, he reports the study of the Mn ++ ion in a tetrahedron crystalline field, the study of the Jahn Teller effect on the excited state of the F + centre in CaO, and the study by double resonance of a specific excited state of this same centre in CaO

  9. Excited-state lifetimes in neutron-rich Ce isotopes from EXILL and FATIMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseoglou, P.; Pietralla, N.; Stoyanka, I.; Kroell, T. [IKP, TU-Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Werner, V. [IKP, TU-Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Yale University (United States); Bernards, C.; Cooper, N. [Yale University (United States); Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Koester, U.; Mutti, P.; Soldner, T.; Urban, W. [ILL Grenoble (France); Bruce, A.M.; Roberts, O.J. [University of Brighton (United Kingdom); Cakirli, R.B. [MPIK Heidelberg (Germany); France, G. de [GANIL Caen (France); Humby, P.; Patel, Z.; Podolyak, Zs.; Regan, P.H.; Wilson, E. [University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Jolie, J.; Regis, J.-M.; Saed-Samii, N.; Wilmsen, D. [KP, University of Cologne (Germany); Paziy, V. [Universidad Complutense (Spain); Simpson, G.S. [PSC Grenoble (France); Ur, C.A. [INFN Legnaro (Italy)

    2016-07-01

    {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu fission fragments were measured by a mixed spectrometer consisting of high-resolution Ge and fast LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)-scintillator detectors at the high-flux reactor of the ILL. Prompt γ-ray cascades from the nuclei of interest are selected via Ge-Ge-LaBr{sub 3}-LaBr{sub 3} coincidences. The good energy resolution of the Ge allow precise gates to be set, selecting the cascade, hence, the nucleus of interest. The excellent timing performance of the LaBr{sub 3} detectors in combination with the General Centroid Difference method allows the measurement of lifetimes in the ps range in preparation for the FATIMA experiment at FAIR. The first results on neutron-rich Ce isotopes are presented.

  10. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  11. Plastic lab-on-a-chip for fluorescence excitation with integrated organic semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Klinkhammer, Sönke; Lemmer, Uli; Mappes, Timo

    2011-04-25

    Laser light excitation of fluorescent markers offers highly sensitive and specific analysis for bio-medical or chemical analysis. To profit from these advantages for applications in the field or at the point-of-care, a plastic lab-on-a-chip with integrated organic semiconductor lasers is presented here. First order distributed feedback lasers based on the organic semiconductor tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) doped with the laser dye 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyril)-4H-pyrane (DCM), deep ultraviolet induced waveguides, and a nanostructured microfluidic channel are integrated into a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate. A simple and parallel fabrication process is used comprising thermal imprint, DUV exposure, evaporation of the laser material, and sealing by thermal bonding. The excitation of two fluorescent marker model systems including labeled antibodies with light emitted by integrated lasers is demonstrated.

  12. Increased fluorescence of PbS quantum dots in photonic crystals by excitation enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Carlo; Roder, Sebastian; Brodoceanu, Daniel; Kraus, Tobias; Hammerschmidt, Martin; Burger, Sven; Becker, Christiane

    2017-07-01

    We report on the enhanced fluorescence of lead sulfide quantum dots interacting with leaky modes of slab-type silicon photonic crystals. The photonic crystal slabs were fabricated, supporting leaky modes in the near infrared wavelength range. Lead sulfite quantum dots which are resonant in the same spectral range were prepared in a thin layer above the slab. We selectively excited the leaky modes by tuning the wavelength and angle of incidence of the laser source and measured distinct resonances of enhanced fluorescence. By an appropriate experiment design, we ruled out directional light extraction effects and determined the impact of enhanced excitation. Three-dimensional numerical simulations consistently explain the experimental findings by strong near-field enhancements in the vicinity of the photonic crystal surface. Our study provides a basis for systematic tailoring of photonic crystals used in biological applications such as biosensing and single molecule detection, as well as quantum dot solar cells and spectral conversion applications.

  13. Analysis of Spectral Features of Seawaterbiooptical Components Fluorescence from the Excitation-emission Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyuk, P. A.; Nagorny, I. G.

    The paper presents the method for processing of excitation-emission matrix of sea water and the allocation of the spectral characteristics of different types of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and phytoplankton cells in seawater. The method consists of identification of regularly observed fluorescence peaks of CDOM in marine waters of different type and definition of the spectral ranges, where the predominant influence of these peaks are observed.

  14. Determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method in combination with magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doncel, M. [Universidad de Salamanca, Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Salamanca (Spain); Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gadea, A. [CSIC-University of Valencia, Istituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Valiente-Dobon, J.J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Quintana, B. [Universidad de Salamanca, Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Salamanca (Spain); Modamio, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Mengoni, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Moeller, O.; Pietralla, N. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Dewald, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    The current work presents the determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method, in combination with spectrometers for ion identification, normalizing the intensity of the peaks by the ions detected in the spectrometer as a valid technique that produces results comparable to the ones obtained by the conventional shifted-to-unshifted peak ratio method. The technique has been validated using data measured with the γ-ray array AGATA, the PRISMA spectrometer and the Cologne plunger setup. In this paper a test performed with the AGATA-PRISMA setup at LNL and the advantages of this new approach with respect to the conventional Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Influence of different environments on the excited-state proton transfer and dual fluorescence of fisetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, Jayanti; Dennison, S. Moses; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    1999-05-01

    The influence of different protic and aprotic solvent environments on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) leading to a dual fluorescence behaviour of a biologically important, naturally occurring, polyhydroxyflavone, fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), has been investigated. The normal fluorescence band, in particular, is extremely sensitive to solvent polarity with νmax shifting from 24 510 cm -1 in dioxane ( ET(30)=36.0) to 20 790 cm -1 in methanol ( ET(30)=55.5). This is rationalized in terms of solvent dipolar relaxation process, which also accounts for the red edge excitation shifts (REES) observed in viscous environments such as glycerol at low temperatures. Significant solvent dependence of the tautomer fluorescence properties ( νmax, yield and decay kinetics) reveals the influence of external hydrogen bonding perturbation on the internal hydrogen bond of the molecule. These excited-state relaxation phenomena and their relevant parameters have been used to probe the microenvironment of fisetin in a membrane mimetic system, namely AOT reverse micelles in n-heptane at different water/surfactant molar ratio ( w0).

  16. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  17. Fluorescence detection of glutathione and oxidized glutathione in blood with a NIR-excitable cyanine probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-hui; Qi, Feng-pei; Wen, Fu-bin; Long, Li-ping; Liu, Ai-juan; Yang, Rong-hua

    2018-04-01

    Cyanine has been widely utilized as a near infrared (NIR) fluorophore for detection of glutathione (GSH). However, the excitation of most of the reported cyanine-based probes was less than 800 nm, which inevitably induce biological background absorption and lower the sensitivity, limiting their use for detection of GSH in blood samples. To address this issue, here, a heptamethine cyanine probe (DNIR), with a NIR excitation wavelength at 804 nm and a NIR emission wavelength at 832 nm, is employed for the detection of GSH and its oxidized form (GSSG) in blood. The probe displays excellent selectivity for GSH over GSSG and other amino acids, and rapid response to GSH, in particular a good property for indirect detection of GSSG in the presence of enzyme glutathione reductase and the reducing agent nicotinamideadenine dinucleotide phosphate, without further separation prior to fluorescent measurement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to explore NIR fluorescent approach for the simultaneous assay of GSH and GSSG in blood. As such, we expect that our fluorescence sensors with both NIR excitation and NIR emission make this strategy suitable for the application in complex physiological systems.

  18. Simulation of Far-Field Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging with Two-Color One-Photon Excitation of Reversible Photoactivatable Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chen; Qiao Ling-Ling; Mao Zheng-Le

    2011-01-01

    We propose to achieve far-field super-resolution imaging by using offset two-color one-photon (2C1P) excitation of reversible photoactivatable fluorescence proteins. Due to the distinctive photoswitching performance of the proteins, such as dronpa, the fluorescence emission will only come from the overlapped region of activation beam and excitation beam. The analysis solution of rate equation shows that the resolution of offset 2C1P microscope is 'engineered' by laser power of excitation and activation beams and the power ratio between them. Superior lateral and transverse resolution is theoretically demonstrated compared with conventional fluorescence scanning microscopy. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  19. Excited state fluorescence quenching of the U O2++ ion by monovalent anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarine, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The reactions of the Uranyl ion U O 2 ++ in the excited state with the monovalent inorganic ions N O 3 - and I O 3 - in aqueous solutions at normal temperature were studied, using three techniques: Fluorescence in the steady state - Flash photolysis - Fluorescence decay after excitation. With increasing concentration of these ions it was observed a decrease in the normalized intensity and a decrease in the decay time of the fluorescence of the Uranyl ion in the solution and a corresponding appearance of the radicals N O 3 . or I O 3 . . In each case the radical was identified by its optical absorption spectrum. These results suggest that the quenching of fluorescence of the Uranyl ion in each case is owing to an electron transfer reaction. In the case of the Nitrate ion the transfer may occur after the formation of an ionic par (U O 2 + ...N O 3 ) in the ground state. Evidence for static quenching in the system Uranyl iodate was not forthcoming. A mechanism for the determination of the velocity constant (probability per ion pair per unit time) is proposed for each of the systems. (author)

  20. Excited state hydrogen bonding fluorescent probe: Role of structure and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Debarati, E-mail: debaratidey07@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Vidyasagar College, 39 Sankar Ghosh Lane, Kolkata 700006 (India); Sarangi, Manas Kumar [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ray, Angana; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay [Computational Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Maity, Dilip Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University College of Science and Technology, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2016-05-15

    An environment sensitive fluorescent probe, 11-benzoyl-dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (BDBPZ), has been synthesized and characterized that acts via excited state hydrogen bonding (ESHB). On interaction with hydrogen bond donating solvents the fluorescence intensity of BDBPZ increases abruptly with a concomitant bathochromic shift. The extent of fluorescence increment and the red-shift of λ{sub max} depend on hydrogen bond donating ability of the solvent associated. ESHB restricts the free rotation of the benzoyl group and hence blocks the non-radiative deactivation pathway. BDBPZ forms an exciplex with organic amine in nonpolar medium that readily disappears on increasing the polarity of the solvent. In polar environment the fluorescence of both the free molecule and excited state hydrogen bonded species are quenched on addition of amine unlike its parent dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (DBPZ), that remains very much inaccessible towards the solvent as well as quencher molecules due to its structure. This newly synthesized derivative BDBPZ is much more interactive due to the benzoyl group that is flanked outside the skeletal aromatic rings of DBPZ, which helps to sense the environment properly and thus shows better ESHB capacity than DBPZ.

  1. Two photon versus one photon fluorescence excitation in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M.-Pilar; Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Pasquardini, Laura; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Daldosso, Nicola; Farnesi, Daniele; Berneschi, Simone; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Quercioli, Franco; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of both one photon and two photon fluorescence excitation using whispering gallery mode microresonators. We report the linear and non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a silica whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also investigate the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are dylight800, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate, rhodamine 6G and fluorescein. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope. - Highlights: • One photon fluorescence overlaps with the semiconductor pump laser gain bandwidth. • We report on the feasibility to excite two photon fluorescence in microbubble resonators. • Our functionalization process maintains a good quality factor of the microresonator.

  2. Two photon versus one photon fluorescence excitation in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M.-Pilar [Nanobiotechnology for Diagnostics Group (Nb4Dg), IQAC-CSIC, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo [ICFO-Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Castelldefels, 08860 Barcelona (Spain); Pasquardini, Laura [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Lunelli, Lorenzo [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); IBF-CNR, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Pederzolli, Cecilia [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Daldosso, Nicola [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Farnesi, Daniele [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, 00184 Roma (Italy); Berneschi, Simone [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Righini, Giancarlo C. [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, 00184 Roma (Italy); Quercioli, Franco [CNR-INO National Institute of Optics, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Soria, Silvia, E-mail: s.soria@ifac.cnr.it [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We investigate the feasibility of both one photon and two photon fluorescence excitation using whispering gallery mode microresonators. We report the linear and non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a silica whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also investigate the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are dylight800, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate, rhodamine 6G and fluorescein. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope. - Highlights: • One photon fluorescence overlaps with the semiconductor pump laser gain bandwidth. • We report on the feasibility to excite two photon fluorescence in microbubble resonators. • Our functionalization process maintains a good quality factor of the microresonator.

  3. Design, construction, and validation of a rotary multifunctional intravascular diagnostic catheter combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego R; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph; Marcu, Laura

    2012-10-01

    We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter for bimodal interrogation of arterial pathologies. This is based on a point-spectroscopy scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy technique enabling reconstruction of fluorescence lifetime images (FLIm) and providing information on arterial intima composition and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) providing information on arterial wall morphology. The catheter design allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In the current configuration, the two channels consist of (a) a standard 3 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (40 MHz) and (b) a side-viewing fiber optic (400 μm core). Experiments conducted in tissue phantoms showed the ability of the catheter to operate in an intraluminal setting and to generate coregistered FLIm and IVUS in one pull-back scan. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the catheter for simultaneous bimodal interrogation of arterial lumen and for generation of robust fluorescence lifetime data under IVUS guidance. These results facilitate further development of a FLIm-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques.

  4. Сomparative Analysis of 0.266 and 0.355 µm Fluorescence Excitation Wavelengths for Laser Fluores-Cence Monitoring of Oil Pollution Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Belov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The on-line detection of pipeline spillage is really essential for the fast oil spill response to the ecological and economical consequences. However existing on-line pipelines spillage detection systems have a sensibility of 0.2 – 1 % of pipe flow and do not detect the smaller-sized spillages.For unpeopled or sparsely populated regions an advanced technique for detection of pipeline spillages (including low-intensity ones is to monitor oil pollution (petroleum spills on the earth surface along the pipeline using, for example, an air drone.The laser remote sensing method is an effective method to detect the pipelines spillage.The paper is dedicated to development of laser fluorescence detection method of oil pollution. The remote sensing laser method to monitor oil pollution is based on the fluorescence excitation of oil in UV spectral band and on the data record of the earth surface laser-induced fluorescence radiation.For laser fluorescence method of monitoring oil pollution the paper presents a comparative analysis  of 0.266 and 0.355 µm wavelengths of the fluorescence excitation in terms of earth atmosphere propagation, eye-safety, laser characteristics, and petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency.It is shown that in terms of eye-safety, laser characteristics, and propagation in the earth atmosphere a 0.355 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has a sure advantage.In the context of petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency a 0.266 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has the advantage, but this advantage depends heavily on the petroleum base. For low-sulfur (sweet oil for instance,  it is not that big.At large, in solving the task of oil pollution detection because of the oil pipeline spillages the 0.355 µm wavelength of fluorescence excitation ought to be preferable. However, when creating a monitoring system for the pipeline with a specific petroleum base the irreversible decision depends on the

  5. Segmented frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime measurements: minimizing the effects of photobleaching within a multi-component system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwani, Hadi M; Lowry, Mark; Keating, Patrick; Warner, Isiah M; Cook, Robert L

    2007-11-01

    This study introduces a newly developed frequency segmentation and recombination method for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime measurements to address the effects of changing fractional contributions over time and minimize the effects of photobleaching within multi-component systems. Frequency segmentation and recombination experiments were evaluated using a two component system consisting of fluorescein and rhodamine B. Comparison of experimental data collected in traditional and segmented fashion with simulated data, generated using different changing fractional contributions, demonstrated the validity of the technique. Frequency segmentation and recombination was also applied to a more complex system consisting of pyrene with Suwannee River fulvic acid reference and was shown to improve recovered lifetimes and fractional intensity contributions. It was observed that photobleaching in both systems led to errors in recovered lifetimes which can complicate the interpretation of lifetime results. Results showed clear evidence that the frequency segmentation and recombination method reduced errors resulting from a changing fractional contribution in a multi-component system, and allowed photobleaching issues to be addressed by commercially available instrumentation.

  6. Fluorescence Intrinsic Characterization of Excitation-Emission Matrix Using Multi-Dimensional Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chien Hsiao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-emission matrix (EEM fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive method for tissue diagnosis and has become important in clinical use. However, the intrinsic characterization of EEM fluorescence remains unclear. Photobleaching and the complexity of the chemical compounds make it difficult to distinguish individual compounds due to overlapping features. Conventional studies use principal component analysis (PCA for EEM fluorescence analysis, and the relationship between the EEM features extracted by PCA and diseases has been examined. The spectral features of different tissue constituents are not fully separable or clearly defined. Recently, a non-stationary method called multi-dimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition (MEEMD was introduced; this method can extract the intrinsic oscillations on multiple spatial scales without loss of information. The aim of this study was to propose a fluorescence spectroscopy system for EEM measurements and to describe a method for extracting the intrinsic characteristics of EEM by MEEMD. The results indicate that, although PCA provides the principal factor for the spectral features associated with chemical compounds, MEEMD can provide additional intrinsic features with more reliable mapping of the chemical compounds. MEEMD has the potential to extract intrinsic fluorescence features and improve the detection of biochemical changes.

  7. Comparison of fluorescence rejection methods of baseline correction and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhijian; Zou, Wenlong; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been extensively used in biochemical tests, explosive detection, food additive and environmental pollutants. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to the applications of portable Raman spectrometer. Currently, baseline correction and shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) methods are the most prevailing fluorescence suppressing methods. In this paper, we compared the performances of baseline correction and SERDS methods, experimentally and simulatively. Through the comparison, it demonstrates that the baseline correction can get acceptable fluorescence-removed Raman spectrum if the original Raman signal has good signal-to-noise ratio, but it cannot recover the small Raman signals out of large noise background. By using SERDS method, the Raman signals, even very weak compared to fluorescence intensity and noise level, can be clearly extracted, and the fluorescence background can be completely rejected. The Raman spectrum recovered by SERDS has good signal to noise ratio. It's proved that baseline correction is more suitable for large bench-top Raman system with better quality or signal-to-noise ratio, while the SERDS method is more suitable for noisy devices, especially the portable Raman spectrometers.

  8. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge with excitation of high current and microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp: Ca atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhen-bin; Liang, Feng; Yang, Peng-yuan; Jin, Qin-han; Huang, Ben-li

    2002-02-01

    A system of atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch (MPT) discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL) has been developed. The operation conditions for Ca atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry have been optimized. Compared with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) in argon microwave induced plasma (MIP) and MPT with the excitation of direct current and conventional pulsed HCL, the system with HCMP HCL excitation can improve AFS and ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) detection limits in MPT atomizer and ionizer. Detection limits (3 sigma) with HCMP HCL-MPT-AFS/IFS are 10.1 ng.mL-1 for Ca I 422.7 nm, 14.6 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 393.4 nm, and 37.4 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 396.8 nm, respectively.

  9. Comment on ’Single Pentacene Molecules Detected by Fluorescence Excitation in a P-Terphenyl Crystal’

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-10

    8217 NO 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Comment on "Single Pentacene Molecules Detected by Fluorescence Excitation in a p-Terphenyl Crystal" 12...8217 {Continue on reverse it necessary and identify by block numboer) Using h--,Ihly efficient Fluorescence excitation spectroscov of individual pentacene ...molecular impurities in p-terphenvl crystals, we have observed that some pentacene defects exhibit spcntaneous spectral jumps in their resonance frequency at

  10. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in fogwater by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, J.E.; Valsaraj, K.T.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in fogwater samples collected in southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of the study was to illustrate the utility of fluorescence for obtaining information on the large fraction of organic carbon in fogwaters (typically >40% by weight) that defies characterization in terms of specific chemical compounds without the difficulty inherent in obtaining sufficient fogwater volume to isolate DOM for assessment using other spectroscopic and chemical analyses. Based on the findings of previous studies using other characterization methods, it was anticipated that the unidentified organic carbon fraction would have characteristic peaks associated with humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Both humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices for the fogwater had similar values to those of soil and sediment porewater. Greater biological character was observed in samples with higher organic carbon concentrations. Fogwaters are shown to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived fluorescent organic material, which is expected to be derived from an array of different sources, such as suspended soil and dust particles, biogenic emissions and organic substances generated by atmospheric processes. The fluorescence results indicate that much of the unidentified organic carbon present in fogwater can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems, though it should be noted that fluorescent signatures representative of DOM produced by atmospheric processing of organic aerosols may be contributing to or masked by humic-like fluorophores. ?? 2010.

  11. Sampling system for pulsed signals. Study of the radioactive lifetimes of excited 32P1/2 and 32P3/2 states of Na, excited by a tunable dye laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.; Campos, J.

    1979-01-01

    A system for sampling and averaging repetitive signals in the order of nanoseconds is discussed. The system uses as storage memory a multichannel analyzer operating in multi scaling mode. This instrument is employed for the measurement of atomic level lifetimes using a dye laser to excite the atoms and is applied to the study of lifetimes of the 3 2 P1/2 and 3 2 P3/2 states of sodium. (Author) 32 refs

  12. FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE LIFETIMES AND CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Berger, Lieselotte; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2017-11-01

    To quantify retinal fluorescence lifetimes in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) and to identify disease specific lifetime characteristics over the course of disease. Forty-seven participants were included in this study. Patients with central serous chorioretinopathy were imaged with fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) and compared with age-matched controls. Retinal autofluorescence was excited using a 473-nm blue laser light and emitted fluorescence light was detected in 2 distinct wavelengths channels (498-560 nm and 560-720 nm). Clinical features, mean retinal autofluorescence lifetimes, autofluorescence intensity, and corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT) images were further analyzed. Thirty-five central serous chorioretinopathy patients with a mean visual acuity of 78 ETDRS letters (range, 50-90; mean Snellen equivalent: 20/32) and 12 age-matched controls were included. In the acute stage of central serous chorioretinopathy, retinal fluorescence lifetimes were shortened by 15% and 17% in the respective wavelength channels. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that fluorescence lifetimes were significantly influenced by the disease duration (P autofluorescence lifetimes, particularly in eyes with retinal pigment epithelial atrophy, were associated with poor visual acuity. This study establishes that autofluorescence lifetime changes occurring in central serous chorioretinopathy exhibit explicit patterns which can be used to estimate perturbations of the outer retinal layers with a high degree of statistical significance.

  13. Adapting a compact confocal microscope system to a two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaspro, A; Corosu, M; Ramoino, P; Robello, M

    1999-11-01

    Within the framework of a national National Institute of Physics of Matter (INFM) project, we have realised a two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscope based on a new generation commercial confocal scanning head. The core of the architecture is a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser (Tsunami 3960, Spectra Physics Inc., Mountain View, CA) pumped by a high-power (5 W, 532 nm) laser (Millennia V, Spectra Physics Inc.) and an ultracompact confocal scanning head, Nikon PCM2000 (Nikon Instruments, Florence, Italy) using a single-pinhole design. Three-dimensional point-spread function has been measured to define spatial resolution performances. The TPE microscope has been used with a wide range of excitable fluorescent molecules (DAPI, Fura-2, Indo-1, DiOC(6)(3), fluoresceine, Texas red) covering a single photon spectral range from UV to green. An example is reported on 3D imaging of the helical structure of the sperm head of the Octopus Eledone cirrhosa labelled with an UV excitable dye, i.e., DAPI. The system can be easily switched for operating both in conventional and two-photon mode. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Lifetime-based optical sensor for high-level pCO2 detection employing fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueltzingsloewen, Christoph von; McEvoy, Aisling K.; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D.

    2003-01-01

    An optical sensor for the measurement of high levels of carbon dioxide in gas phase has been developed. It is based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a long-lifetime ruthenium polypyridyl complex and the pH-active disazo dye Sudan III. The donor luminophore and the acceptor dye are both immobilised in a hydrophobic silica sol-gel/ethyl cellulose hybrid matrix material. Tetraoctylammonium hydroxide (TOA-OH) is used as an internal buffering system. Fluorescence lifetime is measured in the frequency domain, using low-cost phase modulation measurement technology. The use of Sudan III as an acceptor dye has enabled the sensor to have a dynamic range up to 100% carbon dioxide. The sensor displays 11.2 deg. phase shift between the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.06 and 100% CO 2 with a resolution of better than 2%. The encapsulation in the silica/polymer hybrid material has provided the sensor with good mechanical and chemical stability. The effect of molecular oxygen, humidity and temperature on the sensor performance was studied in detail

  15. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vankan, P.J.W.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Döbele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has

  16. Single excitation-emission fluorescence spectrum (EEF) for determination of cetane improver in diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insausti, Matías; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2015-04-05

    A highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate in diesel fuel. Usually, this compound is used as an additive in order to improve cetane number. The analytical method consists in building the chemometric model as a first step. Then, it is possible to quantify the analyte with only recording a single excitation-emission fluorescence spectrum (EEF), whose data are introduced in the chemometric model above mentioned. Another important characteristic of this method is that the fuel sample was used without any pre-treatment for EEF. This work provides an interest improvement to fluorescence techniques using the rapid and easily applicable EEF approach to analyze such complex matrices. Exploding EEF was the key to a successful determination, obtaining a detection limit of 0.00434% (v/v) and a limit of quantification of 0.01446% (v/v). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Thin coating thickness determination using radioisotope-excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Castillo, Lorena A.; Calix, Virginia S.

    2001-01-01

    Three different approaches on thin coating thickness determination using a radioisotope-excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometry were demonstrated and results were compared. A standard of thin layer of gold (Au) on a nickel (Ni) substrate from the US National Bureau of Standards (with a nominal thickness of 0.300505 microns of at least 99.9% Au electrodeposited over 2 nils of Ni) on low carbon steel (1010) was analyzed using a Cd 109-excited XRF system. Au thickness computations were done using the (a) thin standard approach, (b) thick standard approach, and (c) x-ray absorption method (ASTM A754-79 1982). These three methods yielded results within the limit set by the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), which is +/-3%. Of the three methods, the thick standard yielded the best result with 0.124% error. (Author)

  18. Portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer of high sensitivity using X-ray tube excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatai, E.; Ando, L.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the three main methods of X-ray fluorescence analysis and their problems is given. The attainable accuracy and effectiveness of each method are discussed. The main properties of portable X-ray analyzers required by the industry are described. The results and experiences of R and D activities in ATOMKI (Debrecen, Hungary) for developing portable X-ray analyzers are presented. The only way for increasing the accuracy and decreasing the measuring time is the application of X-ray tube excitation instead of radioactive sources. The new ATOMKI equipment presently under construction and patenting uses X-ray tube excitation; it will increase the accuracy of concentration determination by one order of magnitude. (D.Gy.)

  19. Laser-excited atomic-fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal tube atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, J A; Leong, M B; Stevenson, C L; Petrucci, G; Winefordner, J D

    1989-12-01

    The performance of graphite-tube electrothermal atomizers is evaluated for laser-excited atomic-fluorescence spectrometry for several elements. Three pulsed laser systems are used to pump tunable dye lasers which subsequently are used to excite Pb, Ga, In, Fe, Ir, and Tl atoms in the hot graphite tube. The dye laser systems used are pumped by nitrogen, copper vapour and Nd:YAG lasers. Detection limits in the femtogram and subfemtogram range are typically obtained for all elements. A commercial graphite-tube furnace is important for the successful utilization of the laser-based method when the determination of trace elements is intended, especially when complicated matrices may be present.

  20. Fluorescence-based calculus detection using a 405-nm excitation wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, O.; Schelle, F.; Krueger, S.; Oehme, B.; Dehn, C.; Frentzen, M.; Braun, A.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the difference of fluorescence signals of cement and calculus using a 405 nm excitation wavelength. A total number of 20 freshly extracted teeth was used. The light source used for this study was a blue LED with a wavelength of 405nm. For each tooth the spectra of calculus and cementum were measured separately. Fluorescence light was collimated into an optical fibre and spectrally analyzed using an echelle spectrometer (aryelle 200, Lasertechnik Berlin, Germany) with an additionally bandpass (fgb 67, Edmund Industrial Optics, Karlsruhe, Germany). From these 40 measurements the median values were calculated over the whole spectrum, leading to two different median spectra, one for calculus and one for cementum. For further statistical analysis we defined 8 areas of interest (AOI) in wavelength regions, showing remarkable differences in signal strength. In 7 AOIs the intensity of the calculus spectrum differed statistically significant from the intensity of the cementum spectrum (p calculus and cement between 600nm and 700nm. Thus, we can conclude that fluorescence of calculus shows a significant difference to the fluorescence of cement. A differentiation over the intensity is possible as well as over the spectrum. Using a wavelength of 405nm, it is possible to distinguish between calculus and cement. These results could be used for further devices to develop a method for feedback controlled calculus removal.

  1. Mapping the local organization of cell membranes using excitation-polarization-resolved confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Alla; Wang, Xiao; Ranchon, Hubert; Savatier, Julien; Rigneault, Hervé; Ferrand, Patrick; Brasselet, Sophie

    2013-07-02

    Fluorescence anisotropy and linear dichroism imaging have been widely used for imaging biomolecular orientational distributions in protein aggregates, fibrillar structures of cells, and cell membranes. However, these techniques do not give access to complete orientational order information in a whole image, because their use is limited to parts of the sample where the average orientation of molecules is known a priori. Fluorescence anisotropy is also highly sensitive to depolarization mechanisms such as those induced by fluorescence energy transfer. A fully excitation-polarization-resolved fluorescence microscopy imaging that relies on the use of a tunable incident polarization and a nonpolarized detection is able to circumvent these limitations. We have developed such a technique in confocal epifluorescence microscopy, giving access to new regions of study in the complex and heterogeneous molecular organization of cell membranes. Using this technique, we demonstrate morphological changes at the subdiffraction scale in labeled COS-7 cell membranes whose cytoskeleton is perturbed. Molecular orientational order is also seen to be affected by cholesterol depletion, reflecting the strong interplay between lipid-packing regions and their nearby cytoskeleton. This noninvasive optical technique can reveal local organization in cell membranes when used as a complement to existing methods such as generalized polarization. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Laser-excited Fluorescence And Electron-spin Resonance Of Er3+ In Polycrystalline Alcl3

    OpenAIRE

    Ceotto G.; Pires M.A.; Sanjurjo J.A.; Rettori C.; Barberis G.E.

    1990-01-01

    The green fluorescence transitions among the levels corresponding to the 4S3/2 and 4I15/2 configurations of Er3+ diluted in AlCl3 have been measured using laser excitation. The data allow us to determine the crystalline-field splittings of these levels and, in turn, the spin-Hamiltonian parameters. The electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectrum observed at low temperatures is in good agreement with that expected from these parameters. © 1990 The American Physical Society.

  3. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy for degradation monitoring of machinery lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovski, Oleg; Suresh, Pooja; Dudelzak, Alexander E.; Green, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    Lubrication oil is a vital component of heavy rotating machinery defining the machine's health, operational safety and effectiveness. Recently, the focus has been on developing sensors that provide real-time/online monitoring of oil condition/lubricity. Industrial practices and standards for assessing oil condition involve various analytical methods. Most these techniques are unsuitable for online applications. The paper presents the results of studying degradation of antioxidant additives in machinery lubricants using Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) Spectroscopy and Machine Learning techniques. EEM Spectroscopy is capable of rapid and even standoff sensing; it is potentially applicable to real-time online monitoring.

  4. Simple fibre based dispersion management for two-photon excited fluorescence imaging through an endoscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Marti, Dominik; Andersen, Peter E.

    2018-01-01

    We want to implement two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) into endoscopes, since TPEFM can provide relevant biomarkers for cancer staging and grading in hollow organs, endoscopically accessible through natural orifices. However, many obstacles must be overcome, among others...... the delivery of short laser pulses to the distal end of the endoscope. To this avail, we present imaging results using an all-fibre dispersion management scheme in a TPEFM setup. The scheme has been conceived by Jespersen et al. in 20101 and relies on the combination of a single mode fibre with normal...

  5. Multi-color imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds in living HeLa cells using direct electron-beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu; Fang, Chia-Yi; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-03-17

    Multi-color, high spatial resolution imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in living HeLa cells has been performed with a direct electron-beam excitation-assisted fluorescence (D-EXA) microscope. In this technique, fluorescent materials are directly excited with a focused electron beam and the resulting cathodoluminescence (CL) is detected with nanoscale resolution. Green- and red-light-emitting FNDs were employed for two-color imaging, which were observed simultaneously in the cells with high spatial resolution. This technique could be applied generally for multi-color immunostaining to reveal various cell functions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe using photonic crystal fiber for nanoscale thermometry based on fluorescence-lifetime measurement of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takuro; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Saiki, Toshiharu; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called fluorescence near-field optics thermal nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN). Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se quantum dots (QDs). For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF). The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  7. Temperature effect on life-time of electron-excited uranyl ion. III. Effect of deuteration of solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotnik, S.V.; Khamidullina, L.A.; Kazakov, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of deuteration of solvent was detected. The effect appeared in significant difference of shape of curves of uranyl ion (UO 2 2+ )* life-time temperature dependences in electron-excited state (τ). The curves were plotted during heating of frozen up to 77 K H 2 SO 4 solutions in H 2 O and D 2 SO 4 solutions in D 2 O. It was shown that in the case of D 2 SO 4 τ value in glass-like solution was lower then in polycrystalline sample, whereas in frozen H 2 SO 4 solutions there was opposite picture. Detected isotope effect was explained just as different proceeding of phase transition in H 2 SO 4 and D 2 SO 4 solutions so significant decrease of probability of nonradiating deactivation of (UO 2 2+ )* absorbed on D 2 SO 4 ·4D 2 O crystallohydrate surface in comparison with (UO 2 2+ )* absorbed on H 2 SO 4 ·4H 2 O and H 2 SO 4 ·6.5H 2 O crystallohydrate surfaces [ru

  8. A study of the fluorescence of the rare gases excited by nuclear particles. Use of the principle for the detection of nuclear radiation by scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.

    1959-12-01

    In the first part is studied the properties of atoms excited by the passage of α particles through the various rare gases at atmospheric pressure. A spectral analysis of the emitted light showed that certain impurities play an important part in producing the fluorescence, and it has led to the conclusion that the light emission contains at least two components - one very short - lived due to the direct deexcitation of the rare gas, the other relatively slower due to the energy transfers to the impurity. The measurement of the life-time of the excited states has confirmed this foregoing hypothesis, the rapid part of the impulse is extremely short: less than 2,25.10 -9 s in the case of xenon; the slower part has a life-time depending directly on the nitrogen concentration, nitrogen being the impurity giving the largest effect in all cases. The study of rare gases under the influence of an electric field has made it possible to show that the amount of light produced by an α particle can be multiplied (by 60, for example, in a field of 600 V:cm) so that the luminescent efficiency is greater than in the case of INaTI. In the second part the characteristics of the rare gases acting as scintillators is examined, the most important property being the absence of fluorescence saturation when the intensity of the excitation incident on the gas is very large. This, together with the very short time of scintillation has made it possible to study a certain number of nuclear physical applications (heavy particle energy-measurements, kinetic studies on nuclear reactors, neutron spectroscopy). (author) [fr

  9. Impact of laser excitation intensity on deep UV fluorescence detection in microchip electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Philipp; Ludwig, Martin; Belder, Detlev

    2008-12-01

    A high intensity 266 nm continuous wave (cw-) laser developed for material processing was utilised as an excitation source for sensitive native fluorescence detection of unlabelled compounds in MCE. This 120 mW laser was attached via an optical fibre into a commercial epifluorescence microscope. With this MCE set-up we evaluated the impact of laser power on the S/N of aromatic compounds as well as of proteins. Compared with a previous work which used a 4 mW pulsed laser for excitation, improved S/N for small aromatics and to a lesser extent for proteins could be attained. The LOD of the system was determined down to 24 ng/mL for serotonin (113 nM), 24 ng/mL for propranolol (81 nM), 80 ng/mL for tryptophan (392 nM) and 80 ng/mL for an aromatic diol (475 nM). Sensitive protein detection was obtained at concentrations of 5 microg/mL for lysocyme, trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen (340, 208 and 195 nM, respectively). Finally, a comparison of the cw- with a pulsed 266 nm laser, operating at the same average power, showed a higher attainable sensitivity of the cw-laser. This can be attributed to fluorescence saturation and photobleaching effects of the pulsed laser at high pulse energies.

  10. Polarized X-ray excitation for scatter reduction in X-ray fluorescence computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernekohl, Don; Tzoumas, Stratis; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Lei

    2018-05-25

    X-ray fluorescence computer tomography (XFCT) is a new molecular imaging modality which uses X-ray excitation to stimulate the emission of fluorescent photons in high atomic number contrast agents. Scatter contamination is one of the main challenges in XFCT imaging which limits the molecular sensitivity. When polarized X-rays are used, it is possible to reduce the scatter contamination significantly by placing detectors perpendicular to the polarization direction. This study quantifies scatter contamination for polarized and unpolarized X-ray excitation and determines the advantages of scatter reduction. The amount of scatter in preclinical XFCT is quantified in Monte Carlo simulations. The fluorescent X-rays are emitted isotropically, while scattered X-rays propagate in polarization direction. The magnitude of scatter contamination is studied in XFCT simulations of a mouse phantom. In this study, the contrast agent gold is examined as an example but a scatter reduction from polarized excitation is also expected for other elements. The scatter reduction capability is examined for different polarization intensities with a monoenergetic X-ray excitation energy of 82 keV. The study evaluates two different geometrical shapes of CZT detectors which are modeled with an energy resolution of 1 keV FWHM at an X-ray energy of 80 keV. Benefits of a detector placement perpendicular to the polarization direction are shown in iterative and analytic image reconstruction including scatter correction. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and the normalized mean square error (NMSE) are analyzed and compared for the reconstructed images. A substantial scatter reduction for common detector sizes was achieved for 100% and 80% linear polarization while lower polarization intensities provide a decreased scatter reduction. By placing the detector perpendicular to the polarization direction, a scatter reduction by factor up to 5.5 can be achieved for common detector sizes. The image

  11. Compact 3D printed module for fluorescence and label-free imaging using evanescent excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vikas; Gupta, Shalini; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is widely used for selective excitation and high-resolution imaging of fluorophores, and more recently label-free nanosized objects, with high vertical confinement near a liquid-solid interface. Traditionally, high numerical aperture objectives (>1.4) are used to simultaneously generate evanescent waves and collect fluorescence emission signals which limits their use to small area imaging (filters to prevent specular reflection within the objective lenses. We have developed a compact 3D module called cTIRF that can generate evanescent waves in microscope glass slides via a planar waveguide illumination. The module can be attached as a fixture to any existing optical microscope, converting it into a TIRF and enabling high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) fluorescence imaging using any magnification objective. As the incidence optics is perpendicular to the detector, label-free evanescent scattering-based imaging of submicron objects can also be performed without using emission filters. SNR is significantly enhanced in this case as compared to cTIRF alone, as seen through our model experiments performed on latex beads and mammalian cells. Extreme flexibility and the low cost of our approach makes it scalable for limited resource settings.

  12. An excited-state intramolecular photon transfer fluorescence probe for localizable live cell imaging of cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Wen; Liu, Si-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2017-03-01

    Small molecule probes suitable for selective and specific fluorescence imaging of some important but low-concentration intracellular reactive sulfur species such as cysteine (Cys) pose a challenge in chemical biology. We present a readily available, fast-response fluorescence probe CHCQ-Ac, with 2-(5‧-chloro-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)-6-chloro-4(3 H)-quinazolinone (CHCQ) as the fluorophore and acrylate group as the functional moiety, that enables high-selectivity and high-sensitivity for detecting Cys in both solution and biological system. After specifically reacted with Cys, the probe undergoes a seven-membered intramolecular cyclization and released the fluorophore CHCQ with excited-state intramolecular photon transfer effect. A highly fluorescent, insoluble aggregate was then formed to facilitate high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging. The results showed that probe CHCQ-Ac affords a remarkably large Stokes shift and can detect Cys under physiological pH condition with no interference from other analytes. Moreover, this probe was proved to have excellent chemical stability, low cytotoxicity and good cell permeability. Our design of this probe provides a novel potential tool to visualize and localize cysteine in bioimaging of live cells that would greatly help to explore various Cys-related physiological and pathological cellular processes in cell biology and diagnostics.

  13. Application of radionuclide sources for excitation in energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is in broad application in many fields of science where elemental determinations are necessary. Solid and liquid samples are analyzed by this method. Solids are introduced in thin or thick samples as melted glass, pellets, powders or as original specimen. The excitation of X-ray spectra can be performed by specific and polychromic radiation of X-ray tubes, by protons, deuterons, α-particles, heavy ions and synchrotron radiation from accelerators and by α-particles, X- and γ-rays and by bremsstrahlung generated by β - -particles from radionuclide sources. The radionuclides are devided into groups with respect to their decay mode and the energy of the emitted radiation. The broad application of radionuclides in XRF excitation is shown in examples as semi-quantitative analysis of glasses, as quantitative analysis of coarse ceramics and as quantitative determination of heavy elements (mainly actinides) in solutions. The advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide excitation in XRF analysis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  14. Precision lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes provide important information necessary for testing atomic theory. The authors employ resonant laser excitation of a fast atomic beam to measure excited state lifetimes by observing the decay-in-flight of the emitted fluorescence. A similar technique was used by Gaupp, et al., who reported measurements with precisions of less than 0.2%. Their program includes lifetime measurements of the low lying p states in alkali and alkali like systems. Motivation for this work comes from a need to test the atomic many-body-perturbation theory (MBPT) that is necessary for interpretation of parity nonconservation experiments in atomic cesium. The authors have measured the cesium 6p 2 P 1/2 and 6p 2 P 3/2 state lifetimes to be 34.934±0.094 ns and 30.499±0.070 ns respectively. With minor changes to the apparatus, they have extended their measurements to include the lithium 2p 2 P 1/2 and 2p 2 P 3/2 states

  15. Correlation between excited d-orbital electron lifetime in polaron dynamics and coloration of WO3 upon ultraviolet exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Ahn; Han, Seung-Ik; Rhee, Hanju; Seo, Hyungtak

    2018-05-01

    Polarons have been suggested to explain the mechanism of the coloration of WO3 induced by UV light. However, despite the many experimental results that support small polarons as a key mechanism, direct observation of the carrier dynamics of polarons have yet to be reported. Here, we investigate the correlation between the electronic structure and the coloration of WO3 upon exposure to UV light in 5% H2/N2 gas and, more importantly, reveal photon-induced excited d-electron generation/relaxation via the W5+ oxidation state. The WO3 is fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction patterns show that prepared WO3 is amorphous. Optical bandgap of 3.1 eV is measured by UV-vis before and after UV light. The results of Fourier transform infrared and Raman exhibit pristine WO3 is formed with surface H2O. The colored WO3 shows reduced state of W5+ state (34.3 eV) by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The valence band maximum of WO3 after UV light in H2 is shifted from mid gap to shallow donor by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. During the exploration of the carrier dynamics, pump (700 nm)-probe (1000 nm) spectroscopy at the femtosecond scale was used. The results indicated that electron-phonon relaxation of UV-irradiated WO3, which is the origin of the polaron-induced local surface plasmonic effect, is dominant, resulting in slow decay (within a few picoseconds); in contrast, pristine WO3 shows fast decay (less than a picosecond). Accordingly, the long photoinduced carrier relaxation is ascribed to the prolonged hot-carrier lifetime in reduced oxides resulting in a greater number of free d-electrons and, therefore, more interactions with the W5+ sub-gap states.

  16. The increase of NADH fluorescence lifetime is associated with the metabolic change during osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Han Wen; Yu, Jia Sin; Hsu, Shu Han; Wei, Yau Huei; Lee, Oscar K.; Wang, Hsing Wen

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime of NADH had been used as an optical marker for monitoring cellular metabolism. In our pervious studies, we have demonstrated that NADH lifetime of hMSCs increase gradually with time of osteogenic differentiation. In this study, we measured NADH lifetime of hMSCs from a different donor as well as the corresponding metabolic indices such as ATP level, oxygen consumption and lactate release. We also measure the quantity of Complex I, III, IV and V. The results show that during differentiation more oxygen consumed, higher ATP level expressed and less lactate released, and the increase of NADH lifetime was associated with ATP level. Higher expression of the total Complex protein was observed at 3 and 4 weeks after differentiation than controls. However, Complex I expression did not show significant correlation with the increase of NADH fluorescence lifetime. In summary, we demonstrated that the change of NADH lifetime was associated with the metabolic change during osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The increase of NADH lifetime was in part due to the increased Complex protein interaction in mitochondria after differentiation.

  17. Visible to near-IR fluorescence from single-digit detonation nanodiamonds: excitation wavelength and pH dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineck, Philipp; Lau, Desmond W M; Wilson, Emma R; Nunn, Nicholas; Shenderova, Olga A; Gibson, Brant C

    2018-02-06

    Detonation nanodiamonds are of vital significance to many areas of science and technology. However, their fluorescence properties have rarely been explored for applications and remain poorly understood. We demonstrate significant fluorescence from the visible to near-infrared spectral regions from deaggregated, single-digit detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water produced via post-synthesis oxidation. The excitation wavelength dependence of this fluorescence is analyzed in the spectral region from 400 nm to 700 nm as well as the particles' absorption characteristics. We report a strong pH dependence of the fluorescence and compare our results to the pH dependent fluorescence of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results significantly contribute to the current understanding of the fluorescence of carbon-based nanomaterials in general and detonation nanodiamonds in particular.

  18. Study on discrimination of oral cancer from normal using blood plasma based on fluorescence steady and excited state at excitation wavelength 280 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, Pachaiappan; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Many research works based on fluorescence spectroscopy have proven its potential in the diagnosis of various diseases using the spectral signatures of the native key fluorophores such as tryptophan, tyrosine, collagen, NADH, FAD and porphyrin. These fluorophores distribution, concentration and their conformation may be changed depending upon the pathological and metabolic conditions of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt to characterize the blood plasma of normal subject and oral cancer patients by native fluorescence spectroscopy at 280 nm excitation. Further, the fluorescence data were analyzed by employing the multivariate statistical method - linear discriminant analyses (LDA) using leaves one out cross validation method. The results illustrate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy technique in the diagnosis of oral cancer using blood plasma.

  19. Probing the photoluminescence properties of gold nanoclusters by fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C. T.; Lin, T. N.; Shen, J. L.; Lin, C. A.; Chang, W. H.; Cheng, H. W.; Tang, J.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) have attracted much attention for promising applications in biological imaging owing to their tiny sizes and biocompatibility. So far, most efforts have been focused on the strategies for fabricating high-quality Au NCs and then characterized by conventional ensemble measurement. Here, a fusion single-molecule technique combining fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-correlated single-photon counting can be successfully applied to probe the photoluminescence (PL) properties for sparse Au NCs. In this case, the triplet-state dynamics and diffusion process can be observed simultaneously and the relevant time constants can be derived. This work provides a complementary insight into the PL mechanism at the molecular levels for Au NCs in solution

  20. Determination of rare-earth elements in rocks by isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated ......-ray spectrometric scan of a longitudinally sliced drill core showed a close correlation between rare-earth abundances and appropriate minerals.......Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated...

  1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy in type 2 diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Deutsch, Lydia; Klemm, Matthias; Jentsch, Susanne; Hammer, Martin; Peters, Sven; Haueisen, Jens; Müller, Ulrich A.; Dawczynski, Jens

    2015-06-01

    The time-resolved autofluorescence of the eye is used for the detection of metabolic alteration in diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy. One eye from 37 phakic and 11 pseudophakic patients with type 2 diabetes, and one eye from 25 phakic and 23 pseudophakic healthy subjects were included in the study. After a three-exponential fit of the decay of autofluorescence, histograms of lifetimes τi, amplitudes αi, and relative contributions Qi were statistically compared between corresponding groups in two spectral channels (490diabetic patients and age-matched controls (p450 ps, and the shift of τ3 from ˜3000 to 3700 ps in ch1 of diabetic patients when compared with healthy subjects indicate an increased production of free flavin adenine dinucleotide, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), and, probably, a change from free to protein-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide at the fundus. AGE also accumulated in the crystalline lens.

  2. Study on germ toxicity of exciting energy resource 147Pm of fluorescent paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Lun Minyue; Tao Feng

    1993-02-01

    The germ toxicity of exciting energy resource 147 Pm of fluorescent paint was studied. It was shown that the placenta was a barrier for 147 Pm entering into the fetus. The retention T 1/2 was 105 days in testes. The retention value of 147 Pm in testis was high and hardly to excrete. The results showed that 147 Pm can induce abnormal sperms, most of them were non-hock sperms. The chromosome aberrations in germ cells also can be induced. Among the type of chromosome aberrations of spermatogonia, chromatid breakage was predominant. The 147 Pm can cause the chromosome fragment and translocations of primary spermatocytes, and increasing of lethality. The dominant skeletal aberrations in offspring is proportional to the accumulated radioactivity of 147 Pm in tests

  3. Determination of rare-earth elements in rocks by isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated......-ray spectrometric scan of a longitudinally sliced drill core showed a close correlation between rare-earth abundances and appropriate minerals....

  4. Sensitive lifetime measurement of excited states of low-abundant isotopes via the (p,p{sup '}γ) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, Andreas; Derya, Vera; Pickstone, Simon G.; Spieker, Mark; Zilges, Andreas [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Mineva, Milena N. [INRNE, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Petkov, Pavel [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); INRNE, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-07-01

    Absolute transition matrix elements are valuable observables in nuclear-structure physics since they are directly related to the nuclear wave functions. A key ingredient to determine transition matrix elements is the measurement of lifetimes of excited states. In a recent experiment, we extracted the lifetimes of 30 excited states of the low-abundant isotope {sup 96}Ru utilizing the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) in an inelastic proton-scattering experiment and taking advantage of the proton-γ coincidence technique. In contrast to the DSAM technique following inelastic neutron scattering, which was frequently performed to extract comprehensive lifetime information in the sub-picosecond regime, the (p,p{sup '}γ) reaction requires a much less amount of target material and is thus especially suited to investigate low-abundant isotopes. In this contribution, the (p,p{sup '}γ) method for lifetime measurements is presented and the results of recent experiments on {sup 96}Ru, {sup 94}Zr, and {sup 112,114}Sn are shown.

  5. Investigation of the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence of gaseous xenon under optical excitation in an extended wavelength region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodmann, R.; Zimmerer, G.; Hamburg Univ.; Hahn, U.

    1976-02-01

    The fluorescence of Xe at a pressure of 10 Torr has been excited by monochromatic light in the wavelength region from 1,040 A to 1,500 A. Besides the well known first and second continuum additional emission bands appear at 1,192 A and 1,300 A. They are ascribed to an atomic transition 5d(3/2) 1 → 1 S 0 and a molecular transition O + sub(u)(6s'(1/2) + 1 S 0 ) → O + sub(g)( 1 S 0 + 1 S 0 ). The excitation spectra of the first and second continuum yield high fluorescence efficiency if higher Rydberg states are excited. Excitation of the first resonance line of Xe results in a low fluorescence intensity. Obviously the formation of highly excited molecules Xe** and intramolecular relaxation play an important role for the population of the vibrationally relaxed excited states (O + sub(u), 1sub(u)) of the Xe* 2 molecule. (orig.) [de

  6. Comparitive study of fluorescence lifetime quenching of rhodamine 6G by MoS2 and Au-MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Jyoti; Kasana, Parath; Mohanty, T.

    2018-04-01

    Time resolved fluorescence study of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in the presence of Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets and gold doped MoS2 (Au-MoS2) have been carried out and discussed. We have analyzed the fluorescence decay curves of R6G and it is observed that Au-MoS2 is a better fluorescence lifetime quencher as compare to MoS2 nanosheets. Also, the energy transfer efficiency and energy transfer rate from R6G to MoS2 and Au-MoS2 has been calculated and found higher for Au-MoS2.

  7. Effect of Solvation on Electron Detachment and Excitation Energies of a Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Samik; Chakrabarty, Suman; Ghosh, Debashree

    2016-05-19

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is applied to the fluorinated green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore (DFHBDI) in its deprotonated form to understand the solvatochromic shifts in its vertical detachment energy (VDE) and vertical excitation energy (VEE). This variant of the GFP chromophore becomes fluorescent in an RNA environment and has a wide range of applications in biomedical and biochemical fields. From microsolvation studies, we benchmark (with respect to full QM) the accuracy of our QM/MM calculations with effective fragment potential (EFP) as the MM method of choice. We show that while the solvatochromic shift in the VEE is minimal (0.1 eV blue shift) and its polarization component is only 0.03 eV, the effect of the solvent on the VDE is quite large (3.85 eV). We also show by accurate calculations on the solvatochromic shift of the VDE that polarization accounts for ∼0.23 eV and therefore cannot be neglected. The effect of the counterions on the VDE of the deprotonated chromophore in solvation is studied in detail, and a charge-smearing scheme is suggested for charged chromophores.

  8. Electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aucelio, R.Q.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A dye laser pumped by a high-repetition-rate copper vapor laser was used as the excitation source to determine indium at parts-per-trillion level by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS). A comparison was made between wall atomization, in pyrolytic and nonpyrolytic graphite tubes, and platform atomization. The influence of several chemical modifiers either in solution or precoated in the graphite tube was evaluated. The influence of several acids and NaOH in the analyte solution was also studied. Optimization of the analytical conditions was carried out to achieve the best signal-to-background ratio and consequently an absolute limit of detection of 1 fg. Some possible interferents of the method were evaluated. The method was evaluated by determining indium in blood, urine, soil, and urban dust samples. Recoveries between 99.17 and 109.17% are reported. A precision of 4.1% at the 10 ng g -1 level in water standards was achieved. copyright 1998 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  9. Preparation and properties of Nd{sup 3+}:SrAlF{sub 5} nanocrystals embedded fluorophosphate transparent glass-ceramic with long fluorescence lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruilin; Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Liaolin; Liu, Chunxiao; Wei, Wei [Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, School of Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-07-15

    Nd{sup 3+}:SrAlF{sub 5} nanocrystals embedded fluorophosphate glass-ceramics were prepared by the melt quenching and subsequent thermal treatment method. The formation of SrAlF{sub 5} nanocrystals in the glass was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the glass-ceramics increased with the increase of size of nanocrystals. Importantly, by controlling growth of nanocrystals, an obvious enhancement of lifetime (725 μs) emerged in the glass-ceramics heat-treated at 510 C and the transmittance can reach to 72.2 % at 1049 nm. The enhanced fluorescence intensity and lifetime were ascribed to the comfortable local environment to the Nd{sup 3+} ion and scattering of the nanoparticle embedded into the glass matrix. (orig.)

  10. X-ray fluorescence in some medium-Z elements excited by 59.5 keV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, I.; Shahin, M.; Demir, L.; Narmanli, E.

    2010-01-01

    K X-ray fluorescence parameters cross sections and average shell fluorescence yields) for selected ten elements in the atomic range 42 ≤ Z ≤ 66 have been experimentally determined at photon excitation energy of 59.5 keV. K X-rays emitted from the samples have been counted by a Si (Li) detector. The K spectra for investigated elements have been derived from the measured K shell X-ray spectra by peak fitting process. Experimental results of K X-ray fluorescence parameters have been compared with theory. In general there is an agreement within the standard uncertainties of the experimental and theoretical values

  11. Fluorescence Lifetime Readouts of Troponin-C-Based Calcium FRET Sensors: A Quantitative Comparison of CFP and mTFP1 as Donor Fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Romain; Stuckey, Daniel W.; Manning, Hugh; Warren, Sean C.; Kennedy, Gordon; Carling, David

    2012-01-01

    We have compared the performance of two Troponin-C-based calcium FRET sensors using fluorescence lifetime read-outs. The first sensor, TN-L15, consists of a Troponin-C fragment inserted between CFP and Citrine while the second sensor, called mTFP-TnC-Cit, was realized by replacing CFP in TN-L15 with monomeric Teal Fluorescent Protein (mTFP1). Using cytosol preparations of transiently transfected mammalian cells, we have measured the fluorescence decay profiles of these sensors at controlled concentrations of calcium using time-correlated single photon counting. These data were fitted to discrete exponential decay models using global analysis to determine the FRET efficiency, fraction of donor molecules undergoing FRET and calcium affinity of these sensors. We have also studied the decay profiles of the donor fluorescent proteins alone and determined the sensitivity of the donor lifetime to temperature and emission wavelength. Live-cell fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of HEK293T cells expressing each of these sensors was also undertaken. We confirmed that donor fluorescence of mTFP-TnC-Cit fits well to a two-component decay model, while the TN-L15 lifetime data was best fitted to a constrained four-component model, which was supported by phasor analysis of the measured lifetime data. If the constrained global fitting is employed, the TN-L15 sensor can provide a larger dynamic range of lifetime readout than the mTFP-TnC-Cit sensor but the CFP donor is significantly more sensitive to changes in temperature and emission wavelength compared to mTFP and, while the mTFP-TnC-Cit solution phase data broadly agreed with measurements in live cells, this was not the case for the TN-L15 sensor. Our titration experiment also indicates that a similar precision in determination of calcium concentration can be achieved with both FRET biosensors when fitting a single exponential donor fluorescence decay model to the fluorescence decay profiles. We therefore suggest that m

  12. Silver content determination in mining and ore dressing using radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, B.; George, R.; Ratnikow, W.

    1989-01-01

    A laborsaving method based on radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence is described for the determination of silver in mining and ore dressing. Detection limits reached under operation conditions and measuring errors are discussed and compared with results from chemical analyses

  13. Environment-sensitive quinolone demonstrating long-lived fluorescence and unusually slow excited-state intramolecular proton transfer kinetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zamotaiev, O. M.; Shvadchak, Volodymyr; Sych, T. P.; Melnychuk, N. A.; Yushchenko, Dmytro A.; Mely, Y.; Pivovarenko, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2016), č. článku 034004. ISSN 2050-6120 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : quinolone * fluorescent probes * local polarity * hydration * excited-state intramolecular proton transfer * kinetics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2016

  14. Stratum corneum lipid organization as observed by atomic force, confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlén, Lars; Plasencia Gil, Maria Inés; Bagatolli, Luis

    2008-01-01

    -related biophysical techniques (e.g. atomic force microscopy and confocal/two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy), it was recently shown that reconstituted membranes composed of extracted decontaminated human stratum corneum lipids do not form a fluid phase, but exclusively a single-gel phase that segregates...

  15. The reactivities of furocoumarin excited states with DNA in solution. A laser flash photolysis and fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, P C; Parsons, B J; Navaratnam, S; Phillips, G O; Allen, J C

    1980-07-29

    The effect of DNA on both the fluorescence emission spectra and yields and lifetimes of the triplet stae of psoralen and 8-methoxypsoralen in aqueous solution has been determined. The changes in the fluorescence spectra are similar in nature for both of these furocoumarins and are attributed to binding of the drug to DNA. The yield of the 8-methoxypsoralen triplet state when bound to DNA was found to be similar, if not identical, to that measured in the absence of DNA. This contrasts sharply with data obtained for psoralen from which it is concluded that either the yield of bound psoralen triplet states is very low, if not zero, or that the lifetime of such species is less than 50 ns. The relevance of this data to the molecular basis of skin photosensitisation by furocoumarins is discussed.

  16. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankan, P.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D.C.; Doebele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has a bandwith of 0.15 cm -1 . The wavelength of the laser radiation is calibrated by simultaneous recording of the two-photon laser induced fluorescence spectrum of nitric oxide. The excited hydrogen populations are calibrated on the basis of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements. A population distribution is measured in the shock region of a pure hydrogen plasma expansion. The higher rotational levels (J>5) show overpopulation compared to a Boltzmann distribution determined from the lower rotational levels (J≤5)

  17. Intramolecular evolution from a locally excited state to an excimer-like state in a multichromophoric dendrimer evidenced by a femtosecond fluorescence upconversion study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karni, Y.; Jordens, S.; Belder, G. De; Schweitzer, G.; Hofkens, J.; Gensch, T.; Maus, M.; Schryver, F.C. De; Herrmann, A.; Müllen, K.

    1999-01-01

    A time-resolved fluorescence upconversion study on a polyphenylene dendrimer with eight peryleneimide chromophores on the surface and on a monochromophoric model compound is reported. The time-dependent fluorescence spectra of the dendrimer show that the initial excitation is into a locally excited

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence with an OPO system. Part II: direct determination of lead content in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, A; Lijour, Y; Giamarchi, P; Burel-Deschamps, L; Stephan, L

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence was induced by coupling a laser with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to develop an analytical method for the direct determination of lead content, at ultra-trace level, in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF). The optimization of atomization conditions, laser pulse energy, and mainly temporal parameters allowed us to reach a 3 fg detection limit (0.3 ng L(-1)) despite the low repetition rate of the device. The expected error on predicted concentrations of lead, at trace levels, in seawater was below 15%.

  19. Automatic Segmentation of Fluorescence Lifetime Microscopy Images of Cells Using Multi-Resolution Community Detection -A First Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dandan; Sarder, Pinaki; Ronhovde, Peter; Orthaus, Sandra; Achilefu, Samuel; Nussinov, Zohar

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by a multi-resolution community detection (MCD) based network segmentation method, we suggest an automatic method for segmenting fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging microscopy (FLIM) images of cells in a first pilot investigation on two selected images. The image processing problem is framed as identifying segments with respective average FLTs against the background in FLIM images. The proposed method segments a FLIM image for a given resolution of the network defined using image pixels as the nodes and similarity between the FLTs of the pixels as the edges. In the resulting segmentation, low network resolution leads to larger segments, and high network resolution leads to smaller segments. Further, using the proposed method, the mean-square error (MSE) in estimating the FLT segments in a FLIM image was found to consistently decrease with increasing resolution of the corresponding network. The MCD method appeared to perform better than a popular spectral clustering based method in performing FLIM image segmentation. At high resolution, the spectral segmentation method introduced noisy segments in its output, and it was unable to achieve a consistent decrease in MSE with increasing resolution. PMID:24251410

  20. Automatic segmentation of fluorescence lifetime microscopy images of cells using multiresolution community detection--a first study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, D; Sarder, P; Ronhovde, P; Orthaus, S; Achilefu, S; Nussinov, Z

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by a multiresolution community detection based network segmentation method, we suggest an automatic method for segmenting fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging microscopy (FLIM) images of cells in a first pilot investigation on two selected images. The image processing problem is framed as identifying segments with respective average FLTs against the background in FLIM images. The proposed method segments a FLIM image for a given resolution of the network defined using image pixels as the nodes and similarity between the FLTs of the pixels as the edges. In the resulting segmentation, low network resolution leads to larger segments, and high network resolution leads to smaller segments. Furthermore, using the proposed method, the mean-square error in estimating the FLT segments in a FLIM image was found to consistently decrease with increasing resolution of the corresponding network. The multiresolution community detection method appeared to perform better than a popular spectral clustering-based method in performing FLIM image segmentation. At high resolution, the spectral segmentation method introduced noisy segments in its output, and it was unable to achieve a consistent decrease in mean-square error with increasing resolution. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. In vivo detection of oral epithelial cancer using endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging: a pilot human study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Javier A.; Hwang, Dae Yon; Palma, Jorge; Cheng, Shuna; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Malik, Bilal; Jabbour, Joey; Cheng, Lisa; Wright, John; Maitland, Kristen

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) provides direct access to the concomitant functional and biochemical changes accompanying tissue transition from benign to precancerous and cancerous. Since FLIM can noninvasively measure different and complementary biomarkers of precancer and cancer, we hypothesize that it will aid in clinically detecting early oral epithelial cancer. Our group has recently demonstrated the detection of benign from premalignant and malignant lesions based on endogenous multispectral FLIM in the hamster cheek-pouch model. Encouraged by these positive preliminary results, we have developed a handheld endoscope capable of acquiring multispectral FLIM images in real time from the oral mucosa. This novel FLIM endoscope is being used for imaging clinically suspicious pre-malignant and malignant lesions from patients before undergoing tissue biopsy for histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial cancer. Our preliminary results thus far are already suggesting the potential of endogenous FLIM for distinguishing a variety of benign lesions from advanced dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To the best of out knowledge, this is the first in vivo human study aiming to demonstrate the ability to predict the true malignancy of clinically suspicious lesions using endogenous FLIM. If successful, the resulting clinical tool will allow noninvasive real-time detection of epithelial precancerous and cancerous lesions in the oral mucosa and could potentially be used to assist at every step involved on the clinical management of oral cancer patients, from early screening and diagnosis, to treatment and monitoring of recurrence.

  2. The modifier effects of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distribution of "N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide-bovine serum albumin" complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyiğit, İbrahim Ethem; Karakuş, Emine; Pekcan, Önder

    2016-02-05

    Chymotrypsin and trypsin are the well known proteolytic enzymes, both of which are synthesized in the pancreas as their precursors - the inactive forms; chymotrypsinogen and trypsinogen - and then are released into the duodenum to cut proteins into smaller peptides. In this paper, the effects of activities of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distributions of the substrat bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified with N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide (PM) were examined. In the labeling study of BSA with PM, it is aimed to attach PM to the single free thiol (Cys34) and to all the free amine groups in accessible positions in order to produce excimers of pyrene planes of the possible highest amount to form the lifetime distributions in the widest range, that may show specifically distinguishing changes resulting from the activities of the proteases. The time resolved spectrofluorometer was used to monitor fluorescence decays, which were analyzed by using the exponential series method (ESM) to obtain the changes of lifetime distributions. After the exposure of the synthesized substrat PM-BSA to the enzymes, the fluorescence lifetime distributions exhibited different structures which were attributed to the different activities of the proteases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The modifier effects of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distribution of "N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide-bovine serum albumin" complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyiğit, İbrahim Ethem; Karakuş, Emine; Pekcan, Önder

    2016-02-01

    Chymotrypsin and trypsin are the well known proteolytic enzymes, both of which are synthesized in the pancreas as their precursors - the inactive forms; chymotrypsinogen and trypsinogen - and then are released into the duodenum to cut proteins into smaller peptides. In this paper, the effects of activities of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distributions of the substrat bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified with N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide (PM) were examined. In the labeling study of BSA with PM, it is aimed to attach PM to the single free thiol (Cys34) and to all the free amine groups in accessible positions in order to produce excimers of pyrene planes of the possible highest amount to form the lifetime distributions in the widest range, that may show specifically distinguishing changes resulting from the activities of the proteases. The time resolved spectrofluorometer was used to monitor fluorescence decays, which were analyzed by using the exponential series method (ESM) to obtain the changes of lifetime distributions. After the exposure of the synthesized substrat PM-BSA to the enzymes, the fluorescence lifetime distributions exhibited different structures which were attributed to the different activities of the proteases.

  4. Lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, A.R.

    1976-01-01

    Recent developments in experimental methods of measuring the lifetimes of excited nuclear states is reviewed in three main areas. (a) Doppler Shift Attenuation Measurements (DSAM) Times: 10 -14 - 10 -11 sec.; (b) Recoil Distance Measurements (RDM) Times: 10 -9 - 10 -12 sec.; (c) Direct Electronic Timing Times: down to 10 -10 sec.; A measurement of an excited state lifetime can answer a large number of different questions. Two examples are discussed: (a) The determination of the lifetime of an isomeric transition in 93 Tc and its use in determining an upper limit for the magnitude of the parity non-conserving matrix element - /Hsub(PN)/17/2 + >. (b) The dependence of the strength of M2 transitions on isospin in nuclei in the 1dsub(3/2) -1fsub(7/2) region. (author)

  5. Two-photon excited fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging of melanin in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to detect early melanoma non-invasively would improve clinical outcome and reduce mortality. Recent advances in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in vivo microscopy offer a powerful tool in early malignant melanoma diagnostics. The goal of this work was to develop a TPEF optical index for measuring relative concentrations of eumelanin and pheomelanin since ex vivo studies show that changes in this ratio have been associated with malignant transformation. We acquired TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000 nm) of melanin from several specimens, including human hair, malignant melanoma cell lines, and normal melanocytes and keratinocytes in different skin layers (epidermis, papillary dermis) in five healthy volunteers in vivo. We found that the pheomelanin emission peaks at around 620 nm and is blue-shifted from the eumelanin with broad maximum at 640-680nm. We defined "optical melanin index" (OMI) as a ratio of fluorescence signal intensities measured at 645 nm and 615nm. The measured OMI for a melanoma cell line MNT-1 was 1.6+/-0.2. The MNT-46 and MNT-62 lines (Mc1R gene knockdown) showed an anticipated change in melanins production ratio and had OMI of 0.55+/-0.05 and 0.17+/-0.02, respectively, which strongly correlated with HPLC data obtained for these lines. Average OMI measured for basal cells layers (melanocytes and keratinocytes) in normal human skin type I, II-III (not tanned and tanned) in vivo was 0.5, 1.05 and 1.16 respectively. We could not dependably detect the presence of pheomelanin in highly pigmented skin type V-VI. These data suggest that a non-invasive TPEF index could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo, including pigmented lesions.

  6. Some secrets of fluorescent proteins: distinct bleaching in various mounting fluids and photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at YFP-excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkani, Naila; Schmid, Johannes A

    2011-04-07

    The use of spectrally distinct variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) such as cyan or yellow mutants (CFP and YFP, respectively) is very common in all different fields of life sciences, e.g. for marking specific proteins or cells or to determine protein interactions. In the latter case, the quantum physical phenomenon of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is exploited by specific microscopy techniques to visualize proximity of proteins. When we applied a commonly used FRET microscopy technique--the increase in donor (CFP)-fluorescence after bleaching of acceptor fluorophores (YFP), we obtained good signals in live cells, but very weak signals for the same samples after fixation and mounting in commercial microscopy mounting fluids. This observation could be traced back to much faster bleaching of CFP in these mounting media. Strikingly, the opposite effect of the mounting fluid was observed for YFP and also for other proteins such as Cerulean, TFP or Venus. The changes in photostability of CFP and YFP were not caused by the fixation but directly dependent on the mounting fluid. Furthermore we made the interesting observation that the CFP-fluorescence intensity increases by about 10-15% after illumination at the YFP-excitation wavelength--a phenomenon, which was also observed for Cerulean. This photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at the YFP-excitation can cause false-positive signals in the FRET-microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of a yellow FRET acceptor. Our results show that photostability of fluorescent proteins differs significantly for various media and that CFP bleaches significantly faster in commercial mounting fluids, while the opposite is observed for YFP and some other proteins. Moreover, we show that the FRET microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of the YFP is prone to artifacts due to photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins under these conditions.

  7. Selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) with time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for volumetric measurement of cleared mouse brain samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funane, Tsukasa; Hou, Steven S.; Zoltowska, Katarzyna Marta; van Veluw, Susanne J.; Berezovska, Oksana; Kumar, Anand T. N.; Bacskai, Brian J.

    2018-05-01

    We have developed an imaging technique which combines selective plane illumination microscopy with time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (SPIM-FLIM) for three-dimensional volumetric imaging of cleared mouse brains with micro- to mesoscopic resolution. The main features of the microscope include a wavelength-adjustable pulsed laser source (Ti:sapphire) (near-infrared) laser, a BiBO frequency-doubling photonic crystal, a liquid chamber, an electrically focus-tunable lens, a cuvette based sample holder, and an air (dry) objective lens. The performance of the system was evaluated with a lifetime reference dye and micro-bead phantom measurements. Intensity and lifetime maps of three-dimensional human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell culture samples and cleared mouse brain samples expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) (donor only) and green and red fluorescent protein [positive Förster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer] were acquired. The results show that the SPIM-FLIM system can be used for sample sizes ranging from single cells to whole mouse organs and can serve as a powerful tool for medical and biological research.

  8. System and method for controlling depth of imaging in tissues using fluorescence microscopy under ultraviolet excitation following staining with fluorescing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Richard; Demos, Stavros

    2018-05-08

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a thin tissue sample and adapted to be supported on a slide. The tissue sample may be placed on a slide and exposed to one or more different exogenous fluorophores excitable in a range of about 300 nm-200 nm, and having a useful emission band from about 350 nm-900 nm, and including one or more fluorescent dyes or fluorescently labeled molecular probes that accumulate in tissue or cellular components. The fluorophores may be excited with a first wavelength of UV light between about 200 nm-290 nm. An optical system collects emissions from the fluorophores at a second wavelength, different from the first wavelength, which are generated in response to the first wavelength of UV light, to produce an image for analysis.

  9. Focused fluorescence excitation with time-reversed ultrasonically encoded light and imaging in thick scattering media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Puxiang; Suzuki, Yuta; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-01-01

    Scattering dominates light propagation in biological tissue, and therefore restricts both resolution and penetration depth in optical imaging within thick tissue. As photons travel into the diffusive regime, typically 1 mm beneath human skin, their trajectories transition from ballistic to diffusive due to the increased number of scattering events, which makes it impossible to focus, much less track, photon paths. Consequently, imaging methods that rely on controlled light illumination are ineffective in deep tissue. This problem has recently been addressed by a novel method capable of dynamically focusing light in thick scattering media via time reversal of ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) diffused light. Here, using photorefractive materials as phase conjugate mirrors, we show a direct visualization and dynamic control of optical focusing with this light delivery method, and demonstrate its application for focused fluorescence excitation and imaging in thick turbid media. These abilities are increasingly critical for understanding the dynamic interactions of light with biological matter and processes at different system levels, as well as their applications for biomedical diagnosis and therapy. (letter)

  10. High sensitivity detection of selenium by laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry using electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, U.; Hese, A.; Schoknecht, G.; Gries, W.

    1995-01-01

    The high sensitivity detection of the trace element selenium is reported. The analytical method applied is Laser Excited Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry using Electrothermal Atomization within a graphite furnace atomizer. For the production of tunable laser radiation in the VUV spectral region a laser system was developed which consists of two dye lasers pumped by a Nd:YAG laser. The laser radiations are subsequently frequency doubled and sum frequency mixed by nonlinear optical KDP or BBO crystals, respectively. The system works with a repetition rate of 20 Hz and provides output energies of up to 100 μJ in the VUV at a pulse duration of 5 ns. The analytical investigations were focused on the detection of selenium in aqueous solutions and samples of human whole blood. From measurements on aqueous standards detection limits of 1.5 ng/l for selenium were obtained, with corresponding absolute detected masses of only 15 fg. The linear dynamic range spanned six orders of magnitude and good precision was achieved. In case of human whole blood samples the recovery was found to be within the range of 96% to 104%. The determination of the selenium content yielded medians of [119.5 ± 17.3] μg/l for 200 frozen blood samples taken in 1988 and [109.1 ± 15.6] μg/l for 103 fresh blood samples. (author)

  11. Sub-threshold excited Cl Kβ (K-V) x-ray fluorescence from CF3Cl molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Cowan, P.L.; Lindle, D.W.; LaVilla, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    With the availability of tunable synchrotron radiation sources, unoccupied molecular orbits (below vacuum level) can be selectively populated producing highly excited neutral molecules. X-ray fluorescence spectra from molecules were obtained with excitation below the ionization threshold and were observed to have significant intensity changes, absolute and relative energy position shifts and line width changes as compared to fluorescence spectra excited above the threshold. As an example, the Cl Kβ (K-V) emission spectra from CF 3 Cl vapor are presented. The energy shifts and intensity changes are explained in terms of perturbation effects due to the presence of an electron in an unoccupied molecular orbital. The narrow line widths obtained in the spectra excited below threshold are explained in terms of the ''effective'' hole production region in a core state limited by the broadening of the unoccupied level. The change in line widths as a function of below-threshold excitation energy is proposed as a novel technique to study the localized properties and reorganization effects of a hole in a core level. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  13. Mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon-tetrachloride mixtures II: excited state hydrogen bonding structure and dynamics, infrared emission spectrum, and excited state lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2012-03-08

    We present a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics of a vibrationally excited hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon-tetrachloride mixtures. The adiabatic Hamiltonian of the quantum-mechanical hydroxyl is diagonalized on-the-fly to obtain the ground and first-excited adiabatic energy levels and wave functions which depend parametrically on the instantaneous configuration of the classical degrees of freedom. The dynamics of the classical degrees of freedom are determined by Hellmann-Feynman forces obtained by taking the expectation value of the force with respect to the ground or excited vibrational wave functions. Polarizable force fields are used which were previously shown to reproduce the experimental infrared absorption spectrum rather well, for different isotopomers and over a wide composition range [Kwac, K.; Geva, E. J. Phys. Chem. B 2011, 115, 9184]. We show that the agreement of the absorption spectra with experiment can be further improved by accounting for the dependence of the dipole moment derivatives on the configuration of the classical degrees of freedom. We find that the propensity of a methanol molecule to form hydrogen bonds increases upon photoexcitation of its hydroxyl stretch, thereby leading to a sizable red-shift of the corresponding emission spectrum relative to the absorption spectrum. Treating the relaxation from the first excited to the ground state as a nonadiabatic process, and calculating its rate within the framework of Fermi's golden rule and the harmonic-Schofield quantum correction factor, we were able to predict a lifetime which is of the same order of magnitude as the experimental value. The experimental dependence of the lifetime on the transition frequency is also reproduced. Nonlinear mapping relations between the hydroxyl transition frequency and bond length in the excited state and the electric field along the hydroxyl bond axis are established. These mapping relations

  14. Manipulating the Electronic Excited State Energies of Pyrimidine-Based Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitters To Realize Efficient Deep-Blue Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Ryutaro; Ohsawa, Tatsuya; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Nakao, Kohei; Hayasaka, Yuya; Kido, Junji

    2017-02-08

    The development of efficient and robust deep-blue emitters is one of the key issues in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) for environmentally friendly, large-area displays or general lighting. As a promising technology that realizes 100% conversion from electrons to photons, thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters have attracted considerable attention. However, only a handful of examples of deep-blue TADF emitters have been reported to date, and the emitters generally show large efficiency roll-off at practical luminance over several hundreds to thousands of cd m -2 , most likely because of the long delayed fluorescent lifetime (τ d ). To overcome this problem, we molecularly manipulated the electronic excited state energies of pyrimidine-based TADF emitters to realize deep-blue emission and reduced τ d . We then systematically investigated the relationships among the chemical structure, properties, and device performances. The resultant novel pyrimidine emitters, called Ac-XMHPMs (X = 1, 2, and 3), contain different numbers of bulky methyl substituents at acceptor moieties, increasing the excited singlet (E S ) and triplet state (E T ) energies. Among them, Ac-3MHPM, with a high E T of 2.95 eV, exhibited a high external quantum efficiency (η ext,max ) of 18% and an η ext of 10% at 100 cd m -2 with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.16, 0.15). These efficiencies are among the highest values to date for deep-blue TADF OLEDs. Our molecular design strategy provides fundamental guidance to design novel deep-blue TADF emitters.

  15. Fluorescence and Auger Decay Properties of the Core-Excited F-Like Ions from Ne to Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiang-Li; Dong Chen-Zhong; Su Mao-Gen; Koike Fumihiro

    2012-01-01

    We systematically study the decay properties of the K-shell excited F-like ions with 10≤Z≤36 based on the multiconfiguration Dirac—Fock method. The Breit interaction, the QED corrections and the nuclear finite mass effects are also considered as perturbation. Auger transition rates, radiative, Auger and natural widths, as well as fluorescence and Auger yields for K-shell excited F-like ions are presented. It is shown by means of concrete figures that the decay properties change significantly with the increase of the atomic number Z; the Auger rate is overtaken at Z = 30 by the radiative decay rate. Several fitting formulae for the radiative and Auger widths and the fluorescence yields have been evaluated which is expected to be useful in plasma analysis and plasma modeling. (atomic and molecular physics)

  16. Excited-level lifetimes and hyperfine-structure measurements on ions using collinear laser--ion-beam spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, J.; Church, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The mean lifetimes τ of the Ca II 4p 2 P 1/2 and 4p 2 P 3/2 levels, and the 35 Cl II 4p' 1 F 3 level, have been measured by a variant of the collinear laser--ion-beam lifetime technique applied previously to the Ar II 4p' 2 F 7/2 o level [Jian Jin and D. A. Church, Phys. Rev. A 47, 132 (1993)]. The present results are τ(Ca II, 4p 2 P 1/2 )=7.098(0.020) ns, τ(Ca II, 4p 2 P 3/2 )=6.924(0.019) ns, and τ(Cl II, 4p' 1 F 3 ) =11.17(0.06) ns. The experimental lifetimes of these, plus the Ar II 4p' 2 F 7/2 level, are compared with available recent many-electron calculations. Typically 1%--3% differences between measurement and ab initio theory are found, while certain semiempirical calculations are in better agreement with experiment. Data for other precise lifetime measurements on alkali-metal systems are compared with recent ab initio and semiempirical calculations to provide perspective on the Ca II results. The hyperfine structure of the 35 Cl II 3d' 1 G 4 --4p' 1 F 3 transition was also measured and analyzed in the course of the measurements, with the resulting hyperfine-structure constants: A( 1 F 3 )=301.9(0.5) MHz, B( 1 F 3 )=-6.7(0.8) MHz, A( 1 G 4 )=205.1(0.5) MHz, and B( 1 G 4 )=-3.9(2.4) MHz

  17. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    OpenAIRE

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on ...

  18. Fluorescence from colours used for japanese painting under N_2 laser excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Tadaki

    1988-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra have been measured for various colours used for Japanese painting in order to identify the pigments in paintings. Fluorescence was observed in various natural and synthetic colours. The fluorescence intensities of these colours are generally weaker than those of oil colours.

  19. Fluorescence and picosecond induced absorption from the lowest singlet excited states of quercetin in solutions and polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, S. L.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Buganov, O. V.; Knyukshto, V. N.; Raichenok, T. F.

    2017-03-01

    The spectroscopic and photophysical properties of the biologically important plant antioxidant quercetin in organic solvents, polymer films of polyvinyl alcohol, and a buffer solution at pH 7.0 are studied by stationary luminescence and femtosecond laser spectroscopy at room temperature and 77 K. The large magnitude of the dipole moment of the quercetin molecule in the excited Franck-Condon state μ e FC = 52.8 C m indicates the dipolar nature of quercetin in this excited state. The transient induced absorption spectra S 1→ S n in all solvents are characterized by a short-wave band at λ abs max = 460 nm with exponential decay times in the range of 10.0-20.0 ps. In the entire spectral range at times of >100 ps, no residual induced absorption was observed that could be attributed to the triplet-triplet transitions T 1 → T k in quercetin. In polar solvents, two-band fluorescence was also recorded at room temperature, which is due to the luminescence of the initial enol form of quercetin ( 415 nm) and its keto form with a transferred proton (550 nm). The short-wave band is absent in nonpolar 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF). The spectra of fluorescence and fluorescence excitation exhibit a low dependence on the wavelength of excitation and detection, which may be related to the solvation and conformational changes in the quercetin molecule. Decreasing the temperature of a glassy-like freezing quercetin solution in ethanol and 2-MTHF to 77 K leads to a strong increase in the intensity (by a factor of 100) of both bands. The energy circuits for the proton transfer process are proposed depending on the polarity of the medium. The main channel for the exchange of electronic excitation energy in the quercetin molecule at room temperature is the internal conversion S 1 ⇝ S 0, induced by the state with a proton transfer.

  20. A study of the fluorescence of the rare gases excited by nuclear particles. Use of the principle for the detection of nuclear radiation by scintillation; Etude de la fluorescence des gaz rares excites par des particules nucleaires. Utilisation pour la detection des rayonnements nucleaires par scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-12-15

    In the first part is studied the properties of atoms excited by the passage of {alpha} particles through the various rare gases at atmospheric pressure. A spectral analysis of the emitted light showed that certain impurities play an important part in producing the fluorescence, and it has led to the conclusion that the light emission contains at least two components - one very short - lived due to the direct deexcitation of the rare gas, the other relatively slower due to the energy transfers to the impurity. The measurement of the life-time of the excited states has confirmed this foregoing hypothesis, the rapid part of the impulse is extremely short: less than 2,25.10{sup -9} s in the case of xenon; the slower part has a life-time depending directly on the nitrogen concentration, nitrogen being the impurity giving the largest effect in all cases. The study of rare gases under the influence of an electric field has made it possible to show that the amount of light produced by an {alpha} particle can be multiplied (by 60, for example, in a field of 600 V:cm) so that the luminescent efficiency is greater than in the case of INaTI. In the second part the characteristics of the rare gases acting as scintillators is examined, the most important property being the absence of fluorescence saturation when the intensity of the excitation incident on the gas is very large. This, together with the very short time of scintillation has made it possible to study a certain number of nuclear physical applications (heavy particle energy-measurements, kinetic studies on nuclear reactors, neutron spectroscopy). (author) [French] On etudie dans la premiere partie les proprietes des atomes excites par le passage de particules {alpha} dans les differents gaz rares a la pression atmospherique. L'etude spectrale de la lumiere emise a montre que certaines impuretes jouent un role considerable dans la fluorescence et on a ete amene a penser que l'emission de lumiere comporte au moins deux

  1. Water-Soluble Triarylborane Chromophores for One- and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Imaging of Mitochondria in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbeck, Stefanie; Zhang, Zuolun; Gutmann, Marcus; Lühmann, Tessa; Edkins, Robert M; Clermont, Guillaume; Lazar, Adina N; Haehnel, Martin; Edkins, Katharina; Eichhorn, Antonius; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Meinel, Lorenz; Marder, Todd B

    2016-10-04

    Three water-soluble tetracationic quadrupolar chromophores comprising two three-coordinate boron π-acceptor groups bridged by thiophene-containing moieties were synthesised for biological imaging applications. Compound 3 containing the bulkier 5-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 )-2,2'-(C4 H2 S)2 -5'-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 ) bridge is stable over a long period of time, exhibits a high fluorescence quantum yield and strong one- and two-photon absorption (TPA), and has a TPA cross section of 268 GM at 800 nm in water. Confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy studies in live cells indicated localisation of the chromophore at the mitochondria; moreover, cytotoxicity measurements proved biocompatibility. Thus, chromophore 3 has excellent potential for one- and two-photon-excited fluorescence imaging of mitochondrial function in cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione studied by ultrafast absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Verma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We employ transient absorption from the deep-UV to the visible region and fluorescence upconversion to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer dynamics in a biologically relevant drug molecule, 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione. The molecule is a ß-diketone which in the electronic ground state exists as exocyclic enol with an intramolecular H-bond. Upon electronic excitation at 300 nm, the first excited state of the exocyclic enol is initially populated, followed by ultrafast proton transfer (≈160 fs to form the vibrationally hot endocyclic enol. Subsequently, solvent-induced vibrational relaxation takes place (≈10 ps followed by decay (≈390 ps to the corresponding ground state.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy: potential for in-vivo estimation of skin fluorophores changes after low power laser treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferulova, Inesa; Lihachev, Alexey; Spigulis, Janis

    2013-11-01

    The impact of visible cwlaser irradiation on skin autofluorescence lifetimes was investigated in spectral range from 450 nm to 600 nm. Skin optical provocations were performed during 1 min by 405 nm low power cw laser with power density up to 20 mW/cm2. Autofluorescence lifetimes were measured before and immediately after the optical provocation.

  4. The generalized centroid difference method for picosecond sensitive determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using large fast-timing arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Régis, J.-M., E-mail: regis@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Mach, H. [Departamento de Física Atómica y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Simpson, G.S. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie Grenoble, 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Jolie, J.; Pascovici, G.; Saed-Samii, N.; Warr, N. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Bruce, A. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Degenkolb, J. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Fraile, L.M. [Departamento de Física Atómica y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fransen, C. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Ghita, D.G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 77125 Bucharest (Romania); and others

    2013-10-21

    A novel method for direct electronic “fast-timing” lifetime measurements of nuclear excited states via γ–γ coincidences using an array equipped with N∈N equally shaped very fast high-resolution LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator detectors is presented. Analogous to the mirror symmetric centroid difference method, the generalized centroid difference method provides two independent “start” and “stop” time spectra obtained by a superposition of the N(N−1)γ–γ time difference spectra of the N detector fast-timing system. The two fast-timing array time spectra correspond to a forward and reverse gating of a specific γ–γ cascade. Provided that the energy response and the electronic time pick-off of the detectors are almost equal, a mean prompt response difference between start and stop events is calibrated and used as a single correction for lifetime determination. These combined fast-timing arrays mean γ–γ time-walk characteristics can be determined for 40keVlifetime determination limit of the method over the total dynamic range is mainly determined by the statistics. The setup of an N=4 detector fast-timing array delivered an absolute time resolving power of 3 ps for 10 000 γ–γ events per total fast timing array start and stop time spectrum. The new method is tested over the total dynamic range by the measurements of known picosecond lifetimes in standard γ-ray sources.

  5. Gated Detection Measurements of Phosphorescence Lifetimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yordan Kostov

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost, gated system for measurements of phosphorescence lifetimes is presented. An extensive description of the system operating principles and metrological characteristics is given. Remarkably, the system operates without optical filtering of the LED excitation source. A description of a practical system is also given and its performance is discussed. Because the device effectively suppresses high-level background fluorescence and scattered light, it is expected to find wide-spread application in bioprocess, environmental and biomedical fields.

  6. The fluorescence action spectra of some saturated hydrocarbon liquids for excitation energies above and below their ionization thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostafin, A.E.; Lipsky, S.

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence action spectra have been obtained for the neat liquids, cis-decalin, trans-decalin, bicyclohexyl, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, isobutylcyclohexane, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, 3-methylhexane, 3-methylpentane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane at excitation energies, ε, ranging from their absorption onsets (at ca. 7 eV) to 10.3 eV. For all compounds, with the exception of cis-decalin, the fluorescence quantum yield is observed to monotonically decline with increasing ε, reaching a minimum value at an energy, ε m (a few tenths of an eV above the liquid phase ionization threshold, ε l ) followed by a slow increase. In the case of cis-decalin, the fluorescence quantum yield remains constant over the entire range of excitation energies studied, permitting its use as a quantum counter replacing the standard sodium salicylate, at least over a spectral range from 185 to 120 nm. The recovery of the fluorescence quantum yield for ε>ε m is attributed to an increasing probability for electron ejection followed by e - +RH + geminate recombination, to produce an excited state of RH with energy less than ε l . From a simple analysis of the action spectrum, a lower bound estimate of the electron ejection probability, φ ± , is obtained as a function of ε. In the case of cyclohexane, where φ ± has been obtained by other techniques at ε congruent 10 eV, the lower bound estimate agrees with the experimental value. From this agreement, arguments are presented to make plausible the conjecture that in all these liquids, the initially produced e - +RH + geminate ion pair first rapidly internally converts to an ion-pair state ca

  7. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting.

  8. Laser induced fluorescence lifetime characterization of Bacillus endospore species using time correlated single photon counting analysis with the multi-exponential fit method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clint; Edwards, Jarrod; Fisher, Andmorgan

    2010-04-01

    Rapid detection of biological material is critical for determining presence/absence of bacterial endospores within various investigative programs. Even more critical is that if select material tests positive for bacillus endospores then tests should provide data at the species level. Optical detection of microbial endospore formers such as Bacillus sp. can be heavy, cumbersome, and may only identify at the genus level. Data provided from this study will aid in characterization needed by future detection systems for further rapid breakdown analysis to gain insight into a more positive signature collection of Bacillus sp. Literature has shown that fluorescence spectroscopy of endospores could be statistically separated from other vegetative genera, but could not be separated among one another. Results of this study showed endospore species separation is possible using laser-induce fluorescence with lifetime decay analysis for Bacillus endospores. Lifetime decays of B. subtilis, B. megaterium, B. coagulans, and B. anthracis Sterne strain were investigated. Using the Multi-Exponential fit method data showed three distinct lifetimes for each species within the following ranges, 0.2-1.3 ns; 2.5-7.0 ns; 7.5-15.0 ns, when laser induced at 307 nm. The four endospore species were individually separated using principle component analysis (95% CI).

  9. Non-Euclidean phasor analysis for quantification of oxidative stress in ex vivo human skin exposed to sun filters using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseiran, Sam; Roider, Elisabeth M.; Wang, Hequn; Suita, Yusuke; Murphy, Michael; Fisher, David E.; Evans, Conor L.

    2017-12-01

    Chemical sun filters are commonly used as active ingredients in sunscreens due to their efficient absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Yet, it is known that these compounds can photochemically react with UV light and generate reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in vitro, though this has yet to be validated in vivo. One label-free approach to probe oxidative stress is to measure and compare the relative endogenous fluorescence generated by cellular coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides and flavin adenine dinucleotides. However, chemical sun filters are fluorescent, with emissive properties that contaminate endogenous fluorescent signals. To accurately distinguish the source of fluorescence in ex vivo skin samples treated with chemical sun filters, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy data were processed on a pixel-by-pixel basis using a non-Euclidean separation algorithm based on Mahalanobis distance and validated on simulated data. Applying this method, ex vivo samples exhibited a small oxidative shift when exposed to sun filters alone, though this shift was much smaller than that imparted by UV irradiation. Given the need for investigative tools to further study the clinical impact of chemical sun filters in patients, the reported methodology may be applied to visualize chemical sun filters and measure oxidative stress in patients' skin.

  10. In situ detection of atomic and molecular iodine using Resonance and Off-Resonance Fluorescence by Lamp Excitation: ROFLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Gómez Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a new instrument for in situ detection of atmospheric iodine atoms and molecules based on atomic and molecular resonance and off-resonance ultraviolet fluorescence excited by lamp emission. The instrument combines the robustness, light weight, low power consumption and efficient excitation of radio-frequency discharge light sources with the high sensitivity of the photon counting technique. Calibration of I2 fluorescence is achieved via quantitative detection of the molecule by Incoherent Broad Band Cavity-enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy. Atomic iodine fluorescence signal is calibrated by controlled broad band photolysis of known I2 concentrations in the visible spectral range at atmospheric pressure. The instrument has been optimised in laboratory experiments to reach detection limits of 1.2 pptv for I atoms and 13 pptv for I2, for S/N = 1 and 10 min of integration time. The ROFLEX system has been deployed in a field campaign in northern Spain, representing the first concurrent observation of ambient mixing ratios of iodine atoms and molecules in the 1–350 pptv range.

  11. Analysis of Indium Tin Oxide Film Using Argon Fluroide (ArF) Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence of Ablated Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sut Kam; Garcia, Dario Machado

    2017-04-01

    A two-pulse laser-excited atomic fluorescence (LEAF) technique at 193 nm wavelength was applied to the analysis of indium tin oxide (ITO) layer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. Fluorescence emissions from analytes were induced from plumes generated by first laser pulse. Using this approach, non-selective LEAF can be accomplished for simultaneous multi-element analysis and it overcomes the handicap of strict requirement for laser excitation wavelength. In this study, experimental conditions including laser fluences, times for gating and time delay between pulses were optimized to reveal high sensitivity with minimal sample destruction and penetration. With weak laser fluences of 100 and 125 mJ/cm 2 for 355 and 193 nm pulses, detection limits were estimated to be 0.10% and 0.43% for Sn and In, respectively. In addition, the relation between fluorescence emissions and number of laser shots was investigated; reproducible results were obtained for Sn and In. It shows the feasibility of depth profiling by this technique. Morphologies of samples were characterized at various laser fluences and number of shots to examine the accurate penetration. Images of craters were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate the imperceptible destructiveness of film after laser shot. With such weak laser fluences and minimal destructiveness, this LEAF technique is suitable for thin-film analysis.

  12. Evaluation of an inductively-coupled plasma with an extended-sleeve torch as an atomization cell for laser-excited fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski, M A; Uchida, H; Winefordner, J D

    1983-05-01

    An inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) with an extended-sleeve torch has been evaluated as an atomization cell for laser-excited fluorescence spectrometry. Limits of detection for 20 lines are given. The detection power is almost equivalent to that obtained by excitation with a hollow-cathode lamp. Interelement effects and spectral interferences are discussed.

  13. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum......, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based...... on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved...

  14. Quantitative time domain analysis of lifetime-based Förster resonant energy transfer measurements with fluorescent proteins: Static random isotropic fluorophore orientation distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandrov, Yuriy; Nikolic, Dino Solar; Dunsby, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) measurements are widely used to obtain information about molecular interactions and conformations through the dependence of FRET efficiency on the proximity of donor and acceptor fluorophores. Fluorescence lifetime measurements can provide quantitative...... into new software for fitting donor emission decay profiles. Calculated FRET parameters, including molar population fractions, are compared for the analysis of simulated and experimental FRET data under the assumption of static and dynamic fluorophores and the intermediate regimes between fully dynamic...... analysis of FRET efficiency and interacting population fraction. Many FRET experiments exploit the highly specific labelling of genetically expressed fluorescent proteins, applicable in live cells and organisms. Unfortunately, the typical assumption of fast randomization of fluorophore orientations...

  15. Application of laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation into atomic hydrogen density measurement in reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiwara, Toshinori; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Hee Je; Park, Won Zoo; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Density profiles of hydrogen atoms in reactive plasmas of hydrogen and methane gases were measured, for the first time, using the laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation of Lyman beta transition and observation at the Balmer alpha radiation. Absolute density determinations showed atomic densities of around 3 x 10 17 m -3 , or the degree of dissociation to be 10 -4 . Densities along the axis perpendicular to the RF electrode showed peaked profiles, which were due to the balance of atomic hydrogen production by electron impact on molecules against diffusion loss to the walls. (author)

  16. Mapping the Local Organization of Cell Membranes Using Excitation-Polarization-Resolved Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kress, Alla; Wang, Xiao; Ranchon, Hubert; Savatier, Julien; Rigneault, Hervé; Ferrand, Patrick; Brasselet, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Fluorescence anisotropy and linear dichroism imaging have been widely used for imaging biomolecular orientational distributions in protein aggregates, fibrillar structures of cells, and cell membranes. However, these techniques do not give access to complete orientational order information in a whole image, because their use is limited to parts of the sample where the average orientation of molecules is known a priori. Fluorescence anisotropy is also highly sensitive t...

  17. Magnetic-Field Induced Enhancement in the Fluorescence Yield Spectrum of Doubly Excited States in Helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroem, Magnus; Saathe, Conny; Agaaker, Marcus; Soederstroem, Johan; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Stranges, Stefano; Richter, Robert; Alagia, Michele; Gorczyca, T. W.; Robicheaux, F.

    2006-01-01

    An influence of static magnetic fields on the fluorescence yield spectrum of He in the vicinity of the N=2 thresholds has been observed. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with predictions based on multichannel quantum defect theory, and it is demonstrated that the Rydberg electron l mixing due to the diamagnetic interaction is essential for the description of the observed fluorescence yield intensity enhancement

  18. Polar plot representation of time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorst, John Paul; Wen Teng, Kai; Clegg, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring changes in a molecule's fluorescence emission is a common technique to study complex biological systems such as cells and tissues. Although the steady-state fluorescence intensity is frequently used, measuring the average amount of time that a molecule spends in the excited state (the fluorescence lifetime) reveals more detailed information about its local environment. The lifetime is measured in the time domain by detecting directly the decay of fluorescence following excitation by short pulse of light. The lifetime can also be measured in the frequency domain by recording the phase and amplitude of oscillation in the emitted fluorescence of the sample in response to repetitively modulated excitation light. In either the time or frequency domain, the analysis of data to extract lifetimes can be computationally intensive. For example, a variety of iterative fitting algorithms already exist to determine lifetimes from samples that contain multiple fluorescing species. However, recently a method of analysis referred to as the polar plot (or phasor plot) is a graphical tool that projects the time-dependent features of the sample's fluorescence in either the time or frequency domain into the Cartesian plane to characterize the sample's lifetime. The coordinate transformations of the polar plot require only the raw data, and hence, there are no uncertainties from extensive corrections or time-consuming fitting in this analysis. In this chapter, the history and mathematical background of the polar plot will be presented along with examples that highlight how it can be used in both cuvette-based and imaging applications.

  19. Precision measurement of sub-nanosecond lifetimes of excited nuclear states using fast-timing coincidences with LaBr3(Ce) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Precision measurements of electromagnetic (EM) transition rates enable tests of models of internal nuclear structure. Measurements of transition rates can be used to infer the spin and parity differences between the initial and final discrete nuclear excited states via which the EM transition takes place. This short conference paper reports on developments of detection systems for the identification of discrete energy gamma-ray decays using arrays of halide-scintillation detectors acting in coincidence mode, which can be used to determine electromagnetic transition rates between excited nuclear states in the sub-nanosecond temporal regime. Ongoing development of a new multi-detector LaBr 3 (Ce) array for studies of exotic nuclei produced at the upcoming Facility for Anti-Proton and Ion Research (FAIR) as part of the NUSTAR–DESPEC project are presented, together with initial results from pre-NUSTAR implementations of this array for nuclear structure studies of neutron-rich fission fragment radionuclides at ILL-Grenoble, France and RIBF at RIKEN, Japan. - Highlights: • This paper reports on new detection systems for identification of gamma decays. • It focusses on using arrays of halide-scintillation detectors in coincidence mode. • These can determine lifetimes of nuclear states at the sub-ns level. • Plans for new LaBr3(Ce) arrays for studies of exotic nuclei are presented.

  20. Excitation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons by Fluorescent Light from Organic Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Jozefowski, Leszek; Kawalec, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    -coherent excitation indicates its prospect for future integrated systems. To support our experimental results, we investigate the proposed geometries by analytical calculations and finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) modelling. The experimentally obtained angular leakage radiation peak positions can readily...... be predicted by our analytical calculations. Nevertheless, the experimental results exhibit a distinct asymmetry in the peak intensities. In agreement with our FDTD calculations, we address this asymmetrical SPP excitation to the nanofiber molecular orientation. The proposed structure’s high flexibility...

  1. Fluorescence enhancement and quenching of Eu(TTFA)3 by Ag nanoparticles at different excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qingru; Shi, Qiang; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Wenjun; Zheng, Shiling

    2015-01-01

    The luminescence properties of Eu(TTFA) 3 complex in presence of silver nanoparticles were investigated at three excitation wavelengths of 350 nm, 383 nm and 463 nm, respectively. Luminescence quenching and enhancement were both observed at three different excitation and emission wavelengths. Luminescence at 612 nm, 578 nm, 590 nm and 650 nm were enhanced at excitation wavelength of 350 nm, and quenched at excitation wavelength of 383 nm. The enhancement factor reached to 1.6 and the quench factor was about 0.65. For 463 nm excitation, the luminescence at 612 nm was quenched, and the quench factor reached to 0.85. Luminescence at other three emission wavelengths (578 nm, 590 nm, and 650 nm) was enhanced, with the greatest enhancement factor of ∼5. - Highlights: • The luminescence enhancement and quenching were both obtained by using the Ag nanoparticles. • The luminescence enhancement and quenching highly depends on the excitation and emission wavelengths. • The enhancement factor of luminescence also has a great relationship with the intrinsic quantum yield

  2. Spatial discrimination against background with different optical systems for collection of fluorescence in laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with a graphite tube electrothermal atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzefovsky, A I; Lonardo, R F; Michel, R G

    1995-07-01

    A single 90 degrees off-axis ellipsoidal mirror fragment was used in a dispersive detection system for electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The performance of the new optical arrangement was compared with those of optical arrangements that employed a plane mirror in combination with biconvex or plano-convex lenses. All the optical arrangements collected fluorescence in a scheme called front surface illustration. BEAM-4, an optical ray tracing program, was used for calculations of spatial ray distributions and optical collection efficiency for the various optical configurations. Experimentally, the best collection efficiency was obtained by use of the ellipsoidal mirror, in qualitative agreement with simulations done by use of the BEAM-4 software. The best detection limit for cobalt with the new optical arrangement was 20 fg, which was a factor of 5 better than that obtained with conventional optical arrangements with otherwise the same instrumentation. The signal-to-background ratio and the fluorescence collection efficiency were also studied as a function of position of the optical components for the various optical arrangements. For both cobalt and phosphorus, the signal-to-background ratio with the new optical arrangement remained stable within 10-20% during +/- 8 mm shifts in the position of the detection system from the focal plane of the optics. Overall, the new optical arrangement offered high collection efficiency, excellent sensitivity, and facile optical alignment due to efficient spatial separation between the fluorescence signal and the background radiation. The advantages of the new optical arrangement were particularly important during measurements in the presence of high levels of blackbody radiation.

  3. Fluorescence excitation analysis by two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy: a new method to identify fluorescent nanoparticles on histological tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn E

    2012-10-01

    spectra unmixing to localize fluorescent nanoparticles in tissue samples.Keywords: FAMIS, spectral excitation sequences, Texas Red, tunable excitation, unmixing

  4. Characterization of CDOM of river waters in China using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and regional integration techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Shang, Yingxin; Shao, Tiantian; Wen, Zhidan; Lv, Lili

    2017-08-01

    The spatial characteristics of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) components in river waters in China were first examined by excitation-emission matrix spectra and fluorescence regional integration (FRI) with the data collected during September to November between 2013 and 2015. One tyrosine-like (R1), one tryptophan-like (R2), one fulvic-like (R3), one microbial protein-like (R4), and one humic-like (R5) components have been identified by FRI method. Principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted to assess variations in the five FDOM components (FRί (ί = 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5)) and the humification index for all 194 river water samples. The average fluorescence intensities of the five fluorescent components and the total fluorescence intensities FSUM differed under spatial variation among the seven major river basins (Songhua, Liao, Hai, Yellow and Huai, Yangtze, Pearl, and Inflow Rivers) in China. When all the river water samples were pooled together, the fulvic-like FR3 and the humic-like FR5 showed a strong positive linear relationship (R2 = 0.90, n = 194), indicating that the two allochthonous FDOM components R3 and R5 may originate from similar sources. There is a moderate strong positive correlation between the tryptophan-like FR2 and the microbial protein-like FR4 (R2 = 0.71, n = 194), suggesting that parts of two autochthonous FDOM components R2 and R4 are likely from some common sources. However, the total allochthonous substance FR(3+5) and the total autochthonous substances FR(1+2+4) exhibited a weak correlation (R2 = 0.40, n = 194). Significant positive linear relationships between FR3 (R2 = 0.69, n = 194), FR5 (R2 = 0.79, n = 194), and chromophoric DOM (CDOM) absorption coefficient a(254) were observed, which demonstrated that the CDOM absorption was dominated by the allochthonous FDOM components R3 and R5.

  5. Time-resolved UV-excited microarray reader for fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Adelina; Hokkanen, Ari P.; Pastinen, Tomi; Takkinen, Kristina; Soderlund, Hans

    2001-05-01

    Analytical systems based on immunochemistry are largely used in medical diagnostics and in biotechnology. There is a significant pressure to develop the present assay formats to become easier to use, faster, and less reagent consuming. Further developments towards high density array--like multianalyte measurement systems would be valuable. To this aim we have studied the applicability of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer in immunoassays on microspots and in microwells. We have used engineered recombinant antibodies detecting the pentameric protein CRP as a model analyte system, and tested different assay formats. We describe also the construction of a time-resolved scanning epifluorometer with which we could measure the FRET interaction between the slow fluorescence decay from europium chelates and its energy transfer to the rapidly decaying fluorophore Cy5.

  6. Determination of mercury in microwave-digested soil by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, S T; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1994-12-01

    A sample digestion procedure was developed which employs microwave heating of soil and sediment in concentrated nitric acid in a high-pressure closed vessel. Complete dissolution of mercury into the sample solution occurs within 5 min at 59 W/vessel without loss of analyte through overpressurization. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization (LEAFS-ETA) was used as the detection method. The scheme uses a two-step excitation, with lambda(1) = 253.7 nm and lambda(2) = 435.8 nm. Direct line fluorescence was measured at 546.2 nm. The absolute instrumental limit of detection was 14 fg; 1.4 pg/ml with a 10 mul sample injection. The recoveries of mercury in two spiked samples were 94 and 98%. The SRM 8406 (Mercury in River Sediment) was digested and analyzed for mercury, and the results (58.4 +/- 1.8 ng/g) agreed well with the reference value of 60 ng/g. The results obtained by LEAFS-ETA with microwave sample digestion are in good agreement with those found by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with EPA Series Method 245.5 sample digestion, which is one of the most commonly used methods for the determination of mercury in soil.

  7. Imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry for determination of mercury in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Alain; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-06-15

    In this study, direct determination of mercury at the nanogram per liter level in the complex seawater matrix by imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ITR-ETA-LEAFS) is described. In the case of mercury, the use of a nonresonant line for fluorescence detection with only one laser excitation is not possible. For measurements at the 253.652 nm resonant line, scattering phenomena have been minimized by eliminating the simultaneous vaporization of salts and by using temporal resolution and the imaging mode of the camera. Electrothermal conditions (0.1 M oxalic acid as matrix modifier, low atomization temperature) have been optimized in order to suppress chemical interferences and to obtain a good separation of specific signal and seawater background signal. For ETA-LEAFS, a specific response has been obtained for Hg with the use of time resolution. Moreover, an important improvement of the detection limit has been obtained by selecting, from the furnace image, pixels collecting the lowest number of scattered photons. Using optimal experimental conditions, a detection limit of 10 ng L(-1) for 10 μL of sample, close to the lowest concentration level of total Hg in the open ocean, has been obtained.

  8. Development of an electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry procedure for direct measurements of arsenic in diluted serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, D J; Simeonsson, J B

    1999-11-01

    A procedure for the direct determination of arsenic in diluted serum by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS) is reported. Laser radiation needed to excite As at 193.696 and 197.197 nm is generated as the second anti-Stokes stimulated Raman scattering output of a frequency-doubled dye laser operating near 230.5 and 235.5 nm, respectively. Two different LEAFS schemes have been utilized and provide limits of detection of 200-300 fg for As in aqueous standards. When measurements of serum samples diluted 1:10 with deionized water are performed, a stable background signal is observed that can be accounted for by taking measurements with the laser tuned off-wavelength. No As is detected in any of the bovine or human serum samples analyzed. Measurements of 100 pg/mL standard additions of As to a diluted bovine serum sample utilizing either inorganic or organic As species demonstrate a linear relationship of the fluorescence signal to As spike concentration, but exhibit a sensitivity of approximately half that observed in pure aqueous standards. The limit of detection for As in 1:10 diluted serum samples is 65 pg/mL or 650 fg absolute mass, which corresponds to 0.65 ng/mL As in undiluted serum. To our knowledge, the ETA-LEAFS procedure is currently the only one capable of directly measuring As in diluted serum at these levels.

  9. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp-europium atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Z; Liang, F; Yang, P; Jin, Q; Huang, B

    1999-06-01

    Eu atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL-MPT AFS/IFS) was studied. Operating conditions were optimized. The best detection limits for AFS and IFS obtained with a desolvated ultrasonic nebulization system were 42.0 ng/mL for Eu I 462.7 nm and 21.8 ng/mL for Eu II 381.97 nm, respectively, both were better than those given by the instruction manual of a Baird ICP AFS-2000 spectrometer using pneumatic concentric nebulizer with desolvation for AFS, but were significantly higher than those obtained by using the Baird spectrometer with a mini-monochromator and a ultrasonic nebulzer system.

  10. Ultrafast excited and ground-state dynamics of the green fluorescent protein chromophore in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vengris, M.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; He, X.; Bell, A.F.; Tonge, P.J.; van Grondelle, R.; Larsen, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    Ultrafast dispersed pump-dump-probe spectroscopy was applied to HBDI (4′-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone), a model green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore in solution with different protonation states. The measured three-dimensional data was analyzed using a global analysis method

  11. X-ray fluorescence in some rare earth and high Z elements excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    section and X-ray fluorescence yield values for different elements at various photoion- ization energies ... In the present method, the K-shell vacancies are created by photons and filled by outer electrons leading to ... The well type detector pro-.

  12. TRACE ANALYSIS BY LASER-EXCITED ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE WITH ATOMIZATION IN A PULSED PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Lunyov , O.; Oshemkov , S.; Petrov , A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of plasma atomization for laser fluorescence trace analysis are discussed. Pulsed hot hollow cathode discharge was used for analysis of solutions and powdered samples. The high voltage spark and laser-induced breakdown (laser spark) were used as atomizers of metal-containing atmospheric aerosols. Detection limits were improved by means of temporal background selection.

  13. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence determination of cadmium in uranium matrix using Cd Kα line excited by continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhara, Sangita; Misra, N.L.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Venugopal, V.

    2010-01-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for determination of cadmium (Cd) in uranium (U) matrix using continuum source of excitation was developed. Calibration and sample solutions of cadmium, with and without uranium were prepared by mixing different volumes of standard solutions of cadmium and uranyl nitrate, both prepared in suprapure nitric acid. The concentration of Cd in calibration solutions and samples was in the range of 6 to 90 μg/mL whereas the concentration of Cd with respect to U ranged from 90 to 700 μg/g of U. From the calibration solutions and samples containing uranium, the major matrix uranium was selectively extracted using 30% tri-n-butyl phosphate in dodecane. Fixed volumes (1.5 mL) of aqueous phases thus obtained were taken directly in specially designed in-house fabricated leak proof Perspex sample cells for the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence measurements and calibration plots were made by plotting Cd Kα intensity against respective Cd concentration. For the calibration solutions not having uranium, the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra were measured without any extraction and Cd calibration plots were made accordingly. The results obtained showed a precision of 2% (1σ) and the results deviated from the expected values by < 4% on average.

  14. Fano Description of Single-Hydrocarbon Fluorescence Excited by a Scanning Tunneling Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Jörg; Doppagne, Benjamin; Scheurer, Fabrice; Schull, Guillaume

    2018-06-13

    The detection of fluorescence with submolecular resolution enables the exploration of spatially varying photon yields and vibronic properties at the single-molecule level. By placing individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules into the plasmon cavity formed by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a NaCl-covered Ag(111) surface, molecular light emission spectra are obtained that unravel vibrational progression. In addition, light spectra unveil a signature of the molecule even when the tunneling current is injected well separated from the molecular emitter. This signature exhibits a distance-dependent Fano profile that reflects the subtle interplay between inelastic tunneling electrons, the molecular exciton and localized plasmons in at-distance as well as on-molecule fluorescence. The presented findings open the path to luminescence of a different class of molecules than investigated before and contribute to the understanding of single-molecule luminescence at surfaces in a unified picture.

  15. Some dispersive X-ray fluorescence applications in energies with radioisotopic excitation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelfang, P.; Vazquez, C.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this work is based on the use of interelemental correction coefficients which are calculated through fundamental parameters. To this purpose, it is necessary to know about the physical constants for each element including the absorption coefficient values and fluorescence yield, the incidence radiation energy, geometric and instrumental parameters. Besides, a special application of the program for the determination of a Nd-La mixed crystal formula is included. (Author) [es

  16. Acetone photophysics at 282 nm excitation at elevated pressure and temperature. II: Fluorescence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason; Raju, Mandhapati; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2017-07-01

    This is the second in a series of two papers that presents an updated fluorescence model and compares with the new experimental data reported in the first paper, as well as the available literature data, to extend the range of acetone photophysics to elevated pressure and temperature conditions. This work elucidates the complete acetone photophysical model in terms of each and every competing radiative and non-radiative rate. The acetone fluorescence model is then thoroughly examined and optimized based on disparity with recently conducted elevated pressure and temperature photophysical calibration experiments. The current work offers insight into the competition between non-radiative and vibrational energy decay rates at elevated temperature and pressure and proposes a global optimization of model parameters from the photophysical model developed by Thurber (Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence for Temperature and Multiparameter Imaging in Gaseous Flows. PhD thesis, Stanford University Mechanical Engineering Department, 1999). The collisional constants of proportionality, which govern vibrational relaxation, are shown to be temperature dependent at elevated pressures. A new oxygen quenching rate is proposed which takes into account collisions with oxygen as well as the oxygen-assisted intersystem crossing component. Additionally, global trends in ketone photophysics are presented and discussed.

  17. An Automated System for the Control of, and Data Acquisition from Multiphoton Ionization and Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    Quanta- Ray company , which also supplied the laser used for the multiphoton work. The, burner was mounted on a translator stage from Velmex, Inc...and no longer exists as a process in the system. When the user analysis program has completed, the lifetime program is again automatically re-started...KCHAR) RETURN 100 FORMAT(I3) 101 FORMAT(F7.2) END SUBROUTINE LAB4 FODA SE"oteD C This routine puts the label "INTEGRAL FROM DATA SET" on the MDP C screen

  18. Detection and Interpretation of Fluorescence Signals Generated by Excitable Cells and Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Anthony J.

    Part 1: High-Sensitivity Amplifiers for Detecting Fluorescence . Monitoring electrical activity and Cai 2+ transients in biological tissues and individual cells increasingly utilizes optical sensors based on voltage-dependent and Cai 2+-dependent fluorescent dyes. However, achieving satisfactory signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) often requires increased illumination intensities and/or dye concentrations, which results in photo-toxicity, photo-bleaching and other adverse effects limiting the utility of optical recordings. The most challenging are the recordings from individual cardiac myocytes and neurons. Here we demonstrate that by optimizing a conventional transimpedance topology one can achieve a 10-20 fold increase of sensitivity with photodiode-based recording systems (dependent on application). We provide a detailed comparative analysis of the dynamic and noise characteristics of different transimpedance amplifier topologies as well as the example(s) of their practical implementation. Part 2: Light-Scattering Models for Interpretation of Fluorescence Data. Current interest in understanding light transport in cardiac tissue has been motivated in part by increased use of voltage-sensitive and Ca i2+-sensitive fluorescent probes to map electrical impulse propagation and Cai2+-transients in the heart. The fluorescent signals are recorded using such probes represent contributions from different layers of myocardial tissue and are greatly affected by light scattering. The interpretation of these signals thus requires deconvolution which would not be possible without detailed models of light transport in the respective tissue. Which involves the experimental measurements of the absorption, scattering, and anisotropy coefficients, mua, mu s, and g respectively. The aim of the second part of our thesis was to derive a new method for deriving these parameters from high spatial resolution measurements of forward-directed flux (FDF). To this end, we carried out high spatial

  19. Excited-state relaxation of some aminoquinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and fluorescence rate constants ( k f of 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzoxazolylquinoline (I, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylquinoline (II, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -methoxybenzothiazolyl-quinoline (III, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylbenzoquinoline (IV at different temperatures have been measured. The shortwavelength shift of fluorescence spectra of compounds studied (23–49 nm in ethanol as the temperature decreases (the solvent viscosity increases points out that the excited-state relaxation process takes place. The rate of this process depends essentially on the solvent viscosity, but not the solvent polarity. The essential increasing of fluorescence rate constant k f (up to about 7 times as the solvent viscosity increases proves the existence of excited-state structural relaxation consisting in the mutual internal rotation of molecular fragments of aminoquinolines studied, followed by the solvent orientational relaxation.

  20. In-focal-plane characterization of excitation distribution for quantitative fluorescence microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Klaus; Brülisauer, Martina; ćaǧin, Emine; Bertsch, Dietmar; Lüthi, Stefan; Heeb, Peter; Stärker, Ulrich; Bernard, André

    2017-06-01

    The applications of fluorescence microscopy span medical diagnostics, bioengineering and biomaterial analytics. Full exploitation of fluorescent microscopy is hampered by imperfections in illumination, detection and filtering. Mainly, errors stem from deviations induced by real-world components inducing spatial or angular variations of propagation properties along the optical path, and they can be addressed through consistent and accurate calibration. For many applications, uniform signal to noise ratio (SNR) over the imaging area is required. Homogeneous SNR can be achieved by quantifying and compensating for the signal bias. We present a method to quantitatively characterize novel reference materials as a calibration reference for biomaterials analytics. The reference materials under investigation comprise thin layers of fluorophores embedded in polymer matrices. These layers are highly homogeneous in their fluorescence response, where cumulative variations do not exceed 1% over the field of view (1.5 x 1.1 mm). An automated and reproducible measurement methodology, enabling sufficient correction for measurement artefacts, is reported. The measurement setup is equipped with an autofocus system, ensuring that the measured film quality is not artificially increased by out-of-focus reduction of the system modulation transfer function. The quantitative characterization method is suitable for analysis of modified bio-materials, especially through patterned protein decoration. The imaging method presented here can be used to statistically analyze protein patterns, thereby increasing both precision and throughput. Further, the method can be developed to include a reference emitter and detector pair on the image surface of the reference object, in order to provide traceable measurements.

  1. A disordered polaron model for polarized fluorescence excitation spectra of LH1 and LH2 bacteriochlorophyll antenna aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinkunas, Gediminas; Freiberg, Arvi

    2006-01-01

    Excitonic polarons in antenna complexes are subject to static lattice disorder. A model has been developed to analyze polarized fluorescence excitation spectra of circular light-harvesting complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria containing bacteriochlorophyll as the main photoactive pigment that includes both diagonal (energetic) and off-diagonal (structural) disorders. Essential differences of disorder realizations seem to exist between the core LH1 and peripheral LH2 complexes from the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The disorder in LH1 appears to be dominated by the structural disorder, while that in LH2, by energetic one. These differences may be due to relatively bigger size of the LH1 complex and, consequently, with its enhanced structural flexibility

  2. Improvement of detection limits in the annular 241Am radioisotope-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis for minor elements of environmental sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai My Phe; Ngo Quang Huy; Nguyen Van Suc; Tran Van Luyen; Nguyen Van Mai; Dao Van Hoang; Trinh Thi Bich

    2003-01-01

    The improvement of limit detection to elements Pb, Sr, Zr, Nd, and Ba in mud samples is presented. Two ways for reducing background radiation are: 1/ choosing the optimum γ-ray-excited X-ray assembly such as scattering angle (θ), filter for primary beam, excited holder, collimator for fluorescent lines, etc; 2/ using the chemical separation method to remove major composition for matrix reduction. (NHA)

  3. Contribution to the analysis of light elements using x fluorescence excited by radio-elements; Contribution a l'analyse des elements legers par fluorescence x excitee au moyen de radioelements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In order to study the possibilities of using radioactive sources for the X-fluorescence analysis of light elements, the principle is given, after a brief description of X-fluorescence, of the excitation of this phenomenon by X, {beta} and {alpha} emission from radio-elements. The operation and use of the proportional gas counter for X-ray detection is described. A device has been studied for analysing the elements of the 2. and 3. periods of the Mendeleev table. It makes it possible to excite the fluorescence with a radioactive source emitting X-rays or a particles; the X-ray fluorescence penetrates into a window-less proportional counter, this being made possible by the use of an auxiliary electric field in the neighbourhood of the sample. The gas detection pressure leading to the maximum detection yield is given. The spectra are given for the K{sub {alpha}} lines of 3. period elements excited by {sup 55}Fe, {sup 3}H/Zr and {sup 210}Po sources; for the 2. period the K{sub {alpha}} spectra of carbon and of fluorine excited by the {alpha} particles of {sup 210}Po. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier les possibilites d'emploi de sources radioactives a l'analyse par fluorescence X des elements legers, on presente apres rappel de notions generales sur la fluorescence X, le principe de l'excitation de ce phenomene par emission X, {beta}, {alpha} de radioelements. Le fonctionnement et l'utilisation du compteur proportionnel a gaz a la detection du rayonnement X est developpe. Un dispositif permettant l'analyse des elements des 2eme et 3eme periodes de la classification de Mendeleev est etudie. Il permet l'excitation de la fluorescence par source radioactive emettrice de rayons X ou de particules {alpha}; le rayonnement X de fluorescence penetre dans un compteur proportionnel depourvu de fenetre, ceci est rendu possible en creant un champ electrique auxiliaire au voisinage de l'echantillon. On definit une pression du gaz de detection pour un rendement de detection maximal

  4. Contribution to the analysis of light elements using x fluorescence excited by radio-elements; Contribution a l'analyse des elements legers par fluorescence x excitee au moyen de radioelements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In order to study the possibilities of using radioactive sources for the X-fluorescence analysis of light elements, the principle is given, after a brief description of X-fluorescence, of the excitation of this phenomenon by X, {beta} and {alpha} emission from radio-elements. The operation and use of the proportional gas counter for X-ray detection is described. A device has been studied for analysing the elements of the 2. and 3. periods of the Mendeleev table. It makes it possible to excite the fluorescence with a radioactive source emitting X-rays or a particles; the X-ray fluorescence penetrates into a window-less proportional counter, this being made possible by the use of an auxiliary electric field in the neighbourhood of the sample. The gas detection pressure leading to the maximum detection yield is given. The spectra are given for the K{sub {alpha}} lines of 3. period elements excited by {sup 55}Fe, {sup 3}H/Zr and {sup 210}Po sources; for the 2. period the K{sub {alpha}} spectra of carbon and of fluorine excited by the {alpha} particles of {sup 210}Po. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier les possibilites d'emploi de sources radioactives a l'analyse par fluorescence X des elements legers, on presente apres rappel de notions generales sur la fluorescence X, le principe de l'excitation de ce phenomene par emission X, {beta}, {alpha} de radioelements. Le fonctionnement et l'utilisation du compteur proportionnel a gaz a la detection du rayonnement X est developpe. Un dispositif permettant l'analyse des elements des 2eme et 3eme periodes de la classification de Mendeleev est etudie. Il permet l'excitation de la fluorescence par source radioactive emettrice de rayons X ou de particules {alpha}; le rayonnement X de fluorescence penetre dans un compteur proportionnel depourvu de fenetre, ceci est rendu possible en creant un champ electrique auxiliaire au voisinage de l'echantillon. On definit une pression du gaz de detection

  5. Design considerations for highly effective fluorescence excitation and detection optical systems for molecular diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Axel; Van Hille, Herbert; Kuk, Sola

    2018-02-01

    Modern instruments for molecular diagnostics are continuously optimized for diagnostic accuracy, versatility and throughput. The latest progress in LED technology together with tailored optics solutions allows developing highly efficient photonics engines perfectly adapted to the sample under test. Super-bright chip-on-board LED light sources are a key component for such instruments providing maximum luminous intensities in a multitude of narrow spectral bands. In particular the combination of white LEDs with other narrow band LEDs allows achieving optimum efficiency outperforming traditional Xenon light sources in terms of energy consumption, heat dissipation in the system, and switching time between spectral channels. Maximum sensitivity of the diagnostic system can only be achieved with an optimized optics system for the illumination and imaging of the sample. The illumination beam path must be designed for optimum homogeneity across the field while precisely limiting the angular distribution of the excitation light. This is a necessity for avoiding spill-over to the detection beam path and guaranteeing the efficiency of the spectral filtering. The imaging optics must combine high spatial resolution, high light collection efficiency and optimized suppression of excitation light for good signal-to-noise ratio. In order to achieve minimum cross-talk between individual wells in the sample, the optics design must also consider the generation of stray light and the formation of ghost images. We discuss what parameters and limitations have to be considered in an integrated system design approach covering the full path from the light source to the detector.

  6. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved by 39% compared to that of the Xenon flash lamp based unit, due to the LEDs narrower emission spectrum and longer pulse width. Key parameters of the LED system are discussed to further optimize the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-background, and hence the sensitivity of the instrument.

  7. Green analytical determination of emerging pollutants in environmental waters using excitation-emission photoinduced fluorescence data and multivariate calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Sánchez, María Del Carmen; Lozano, Valeria A; Rodríguez-Cáceres, María Isabel; Durán-Merás, Isabel; Escandar, Graciela M

    2015-03-01

    An eco-friendly strategy for the simultaneous quantification of three emerging pharmaceutical contaminants is presented. The proposed analytical method, which involves photochemically induced fluorescence matrix data combined with second-order chemometric analysis, was used for the determination of carbamazepine, ofloxacin and piroxicam in water samples of different complexity without the need of chromatographic separation. Excitation-emission photoinduced fluorescence matrices were obtained after UV irradiation, and processed with second-order algorithms. Only one of the tested algorithms was able to overcome the strong spectral overlapping among the studied pollutants and allowed their successful quantitation in very interferent media. The method sensitivity in superficial and underground water samples was enhanced by a simple solid-phase extraction with C18 membranes, which was successful for the extraction/preconcentration of the pollutants at trace levels. Detection limits in preconcentrated (1:125) real water samples ranged from 0.04 to 0.3 ng mL(-1). Relative prediction errors around 10% were achieved. The proposed strategy is significantly simpler and greener than liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods, without compromising the analytical quality of the results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterizing fluorescent dissolved organic matter in a membrane bioreactor via excitation-emission matrix combined with parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tahir; Quang, Viet Ly; Cho, Jinwoo; Hur, Jin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we successfully tracked the dynamic changes in different constitutes of bound extracellular polymeric substances (bEPS), soluble microbial products (SMP), and permeate during the operation of bench scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Three fluorescent groups were identified, including two protein-like (tryptophan-like C1 and tyrosine-like C2) and one microbial humic-like components (C3). In bEPS, protein-like components were consistently more dominant than C3 during the MBR operation, while their relative abundance in SMP depended on aeration intensities. C1 of bEPS exhibited a linear correlation (R(2)=0.738; pbEPS amounts in sludge, and C2 was closely related to the stability of sludge. The protein-like components were more greatly responsible for membrane fouling. Our study suggests that EEM-PARAFAC can be a promising monitoring tool to provide further insight into process evaluation and membrane fouling during MBR operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Volumetric label-free imaging and 3D reconstruction of mammalian cochlea based on two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen; Geng, Yang; Ye, Qing

    2013-01-01

    The visualization of the delicate structure and spatial relationship of intracochlear sensory cells has relied on the laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy is advantageous for its high resolution and deep penetration depth, yet disadvantageous due to the necessity of exogenous labeling. In this study, we present the volumetric imaging of rat cochlea without exogenous dyes using a near-infrared femtosecond laser as the excitation mechanism and endogenous two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) as the contrast mechanism. We find that TPEF exhibits strong contrast, allowing cellular and even subcellular resolution imaging of the cochlea, differentiating cell types, visualizing delicate structures and the radial nerve fiber. Our results further demonstrate that 3D reconstruction rendered with z-stacks of optical sections enables better revealment of fine structures and spatial relationships, and easily performed morphometric analysis. The TPEF-based optical biopsy technique provides great potential for new and sensitive diagnostic tools for hearing loss or hearing disorders, especially when combined with fiber-based microendoscopy. (paper)

  10. Alpha particle excited x-ray fluorescence analysis for trace elements in cervical spinal cords of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Iwata, Shiro; Sasajima, Kazuhisa; Yase, Yoshio; Yoshida, Shohei.

    1980-01-01

    The mean contents of trace elements in anterior gray horn section of cervical spinal cords of six amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases were relatively determined against those of six control cases by α-particle excited X-ray fluorescence analysis. The anterior gray horn section of cervical spinal cord samples were excited by 1.6 MeV α-particle beam of 2 mm diameter accelerated with a Van de Graaff accelerator, and characteristic X-ray spectra were measured with a Si(Li) detector. From the peak areas on the X-ray spectra, the relative mean contents of the trace elements in cervical spinal cords of ALS and control cases were determined. As a result, the X-ray peaks of Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn were detected. The contents of Al, Si, P, Ca, Ti, V, Mn and Fe in ALS cases were higher than those in control cases. The contents of S, Cl, K, Cu and Zn in ALS and in control cases were equal to each other within standard deviation. The precipitation mechanisms of Al, Si, P, Ca, Ti, V, Mn and Fe into cervical spinal cord of ALS cases are discussed on the basis of the previous studies. (author)

  11. Investigation of excited states populations density of Hall thruster plasma in three dimensions by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoruchko, D. D.; Skrylev, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article deals with investigation of the excited states populations distribution of a low-temperature xenon plasma in the thruster with closed electron drift at 300 W operating conditions were investigated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) over the 350-1100 nm range. Seven xenon ions (Xe II) transitions were analyzed, while for neutral atoms (Xe I) just three transitions were explored, since the majority of Xe I emission falls into the ultraviolet or infrared part of the spectrum and are difficult to measure. The necessary spontaneous emission probabilities (Einstein coefficients) were calculated. Measurements of the excited state distribution were made for points (volume of about 12 mm3) all over the plane perpendicular to thruster axis in four positions on it (5, 10, 50 and 100 mm). Measured LIF signal intensity have differences for each location of researched point (due to anisotropy of thruster plume), however the structure of states populations distribution persisted at plume and is violated at the thruster exit plane and cathode area. Measured distributions show that for describing plasma of Hall thruster one needs to use a multilevel kinetic model, classic model can be used just for far plume region or for specific electron transitions.

  12. Radioisotopic-excited x-ray fluorescent system for PPM measurement of toxic heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leddicotte, G.W.; Tolea, F.; Hansen, J.S.

    1974-01-01

    In agricultural research there is a continual awareness of the need to determine the role trace elements have as micronutrients in soil-plant systems. Similarly, these agronomic needs have a strong relationship to the concern other life sciences researchers have about the roles and effects of toxic trace elements on the natural environment and the physiological well-being of man and animals. However, in order for these interest areas to carry out more effective study efforts, more practical and precise analytical methodology and devices need to be developed. This report describes a research effort to develop an analytical system for micronutient as well as toxic elements based on x-ray fluorescence

  13. Instrumental aspects of tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.; Nullens, H.; Espen, P. van

    1983-01-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is an attractive and widely used method for sensitive multi-element analysis. The method suffers from the extreme density of spectral components in a rather limited energy range which implies the need for computer based spectrum analysis. The method of iterative least squares analysis is the most powerful tool for this. It requires a systematic and accurate description of the spectral features. Other important necessities for accurate analysis are the calibration of the spectrometer and the correction for matrix absorption effects in the sample; they can be calculated from available physical constants. Ours and similar procedures prove that semi-automatic analyses are possible with an accuracy of the order of 5%. (author)

  14. Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence and Ionization in a Graphite Furnace for the Determination of Metals and Nonmetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, David James

    1990-01-01

    Here is reported novel instrumentation for atomic spectrometry that combined the use of a pulsed laser system as the light source and an electrothermal atomizer as the atom cell. The main goal of the research was to develop instrumentation that was more sensitive for elemental analysis than commercially available instruments and could be used to determine elements in real sample matrices. Laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS) in an electrothermal atomizer (ETA) was compared to ETA atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for the determination of thallium, manganese, and lead in food and agricultural standard reference materials (SRMs). Compared to ETA AAS, ETA LEAFS has a longer linear dynamic range (LDR) (5-7 orders of magnitude compared to 2-3 orders of magnitude) and higher sensitivity (10 ^{-16} to 10^{ -14} g as compared to 10^{ -13} to 10^{-11} g). Consequently, ETA LEAFS allows elemental analysis to be done over a wider range of concentrations with less dilution steps. Thallium was accurately determined in biological samples by ETA LEAFS at amounts five to one hundred times below the ETA AAS detection limit. ETA AAS and ETA LEAFS were compared for the determination of lead and manganese, and in general, the accuracies and precisions of ETA AAS were the same, with typical precisions between 3% and 6%. Fluorine was determined using laser excited molecular fluorescence spectrometry (LEMOFS) in an ETA. Molecular fluorescence from magnesium fluoride was collected, and the detection limit of 0.3 pg fluorine was two to six orders of magnitude more sensitive than other methods commonly used for the determination of fluorine. Significant interferences from ions were observed, but the sensitivity was high enough that fluorine could be determined in freeze dried urine SRMs by diluting the samples by a factor of one hundred to remove the interferences. Laser enhanced ionization (LEI) in an ETA was used for the determination of metals. For thallium, indium

  15. Improving the efficiency of a fluorescent Xe dielectric barrier light source using short pulse excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beleznai, Sz; Mihajlik, G; Richter, P; Maros, I; Balazs, L

    2008-01-01

    Operation of a Xe dielectric barrier discharge lamp producing 147-172 nm VUV radiation is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Xe gas pressure varies between 100 and 300 mbar, and the glass body of the lamp is coated with LAP (green) phosphor to convert radiation into the visible part of the spectrum. Simulation results predict improved discharge efficiencies reaching 67% when excited by a fast rise-time, short pulse (∼200 ns) driving waveform. In this case most power deposited into the plasma efficiently produces Xe 2 * excimers, while other energy dissipation processes (ion heating, e-Xe elastic collision) are kept at a low rate. Simulation and experimental results are compared in terms of discharge efficacy and show good agreement. A lamp efficacy value as high as 80 lm W -1 is demonstrated experimentally

  16. Energy dispersive soft X-ray fluorescence analysis by radioisotopic α-particle excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.

    1977-01-01

    A Si(Li) X-ray detector system and 210 Po α-particle excitation source are combined to form a spectrometer for low energy X-rays. Its response in terms of Ksub(α) X-ray rate is shown for thick targets of elements from fluorine to copper. Potential applications of the equipment to useful quantitative elemental analysis of geological, biological and organic materials are explored. The results of analyses for oxygen and silicon in rocks and potassium in vegetation samples are included. A semi-empirical method of correcting for absorption and enhancement effects is employed. This is based upon X-ray production and photon absorption cross-sections taken from the literature and upon a minimal number of experimentally derived coefficients. (Auth.)

  17. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  18. Nuclear lifetime measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, Georges

    Three direct techniques of lifetime measurement are emphasized: electronic methods and two methods based on the Doppler effect (the recoil distance methods or RDM, the Doppler shift attenuation methods or DSAM). Said direct methods are concerned with the direct measurement of the radioactive decay constants of nuclear excited states. They allow lifetimes of nucleus bound states whose deexcitations occur by electromagnetic transitions, to be determined. Other methods for measuring lifetimes are also examined: microwave techniques and those involving the blocking effect in crystals (direct methods) and also various indirect methods of obtaining lifetimes (γ resonance scattering, capture reactions, inelastic electron and nucleus scattering, and Coulomb deexcitation) [fr

  19. Fluorescence from gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a near-UV dye laser. [Decay time,quenching rate,room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetti, P [Pavia Univ. (Italy); Cubeddu, R; Sacchi, C A; Svelto, O; Zaraga, F [Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    1976-06-01

    Preliminary data are reported on the visible fluorescence of gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a dye laser at 374 nm. A decay time of 500 ns at p = 0 and a quenching rate of 5.7 x 10/sup -12/cm/sup 3/molec/sup -1/s/sup -1/ have been measured at room temperature.

  20. Highly efficient exciplex formation via radical ion pair recombination in X-irradiated alkane solutions for luminophores with short fluorescence lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Anatoly R; Kalneus, Evgeny V; Korolev, Valeri V; Dranov, Igor G; Kruppa, Alexander I; Stass, Dmitri V

    2014-08-01

    X-irradiation of alkane solutions of N,N-dimethylaniline with various organic luminophores produces characteristic emission bands ascribed to the corresponding exciplexes. In contrast to optical generation, which requires diffusion-controlled quenching of excited states, an additional channel of exciplex formation via irreversible recombination of radical ion pairs is operative here, which produces exciplexes in solution with high efficiency even for p-terphenyl and diphenylacetylene having fluorescence decay times of 0.95 ns and 8 ps, respectively. The exciplex emission band is sensitive to an external magnetic field and exerts a very large observed magnetic field effect of up to 20%, the maximum possible value under the conditions of the described experiment.

  1. Anthracene Fluorescence Quenching by a Tetrakis (Ketocarboxamide Cavitand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Zoltan Janosi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quenching of both fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence intensity of anthracene was investigated in the presence of a newly derived tetrakis (ketocarboxamide cavitand at various concentrations. Time-correlated single photon counting method was applied for the lifetime measurements. A clear correlation between the fluorescence lifetime of anthracene as a function of cavitand concentration in dimethylformamide solution was observed. The bimolecular collisional quenching constant was derived from the decrease of lifetime. Fluorescence intensity was measured in the emission wavelength region around 400 nm as a result of excitation at 280 nm. Effective quenching was observed in the presence of the cavitand. The obtained Stern-Volmer plot displayed upward curvature. The results did not follow even extended Stern-Volmer behavior, often used to describe deviations from static bimolecular quenching. To explain our results we adopted the Smoluchowski model and obtained a reasonable estimate for the molecular radius of the cavitand in solution.

  2. Impulsive IR-multiphoton dissociation of acrolein: observation of non-statistical product vibrational excitation in CO ( v=1-12) by time resolved IR fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, P. K.

    2000-10-01

    On IR-multiphoton excitation, vibrationally highly excited acrolein molecules undergo concerted dissociation generating CO and ethylene. The vibrationally excited products, CO and ethylene, are detected immediately following the CO 2 laser pulse by observing IR fluorescence at 4.7 and 3.2 μm, respectively. The nascent CO is formed with significant vibrational excitation, with a Boltzmann population distribution for v=1-12 levels corresponding to T v=12 950±50 K. The average vibrational energy in the product CO is found to be 26 kcal mol -1, in contrast to its statistical share of 5 kcal mol -1, available from the product energy distribution. The nascent vibrationally excited ethylene either dissociates by absorbing further infrared laser photons from the tail of the CO 2 laser pulse or relaxes by collisional deactivation. Ethylene IR-fluorescence excitation spectrum showed a structure in the quasi-continuum, with a facile resonance at 10.53 μm corresponding to the 10P(14) CO 2 laser line, which explains the higher acetylene yield observed at a higher pressure. A hydrogen atom transfer mechanism followed by C-C impulsive break in the acrolein transition state may be responsible for such non-statistical product energy distribution.

  3. [Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of CDOM from Yundang Lagoon and its indication for organic pollution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jian-Fu; Guo, Wei-Dong; Deng, Xun; Zhang, Zhi-Ying; Xu, Jing; Huang, Ling-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) combined with absorption spectroscopy were applied to study the optical properties of CDOM samples from highly-polluted Yundang Lagoon in Xiamen in order to demonstrate the feasibility of using these spectral properties as a tracer of the degree of organic pollution in similar polluted coastal waters. Surface water samples were collected from 13 stations 4 times during April and May, 2008. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model was used to resolve the EEMs of CDOM. Five separate fluorescent components were identified, including two humic-like components (C1: 240, 325/422 nm; C5: 260, 380/474 nm), two protein-like components (C2: 225, 275/350 nm; C4: 240, 300/354 nm) and one xenobiotic-like component (C3: 225/342 nm), which could be used as a good tracer for the input of the anthropogenic organic, pollutants. The concentrations of component C3 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are much higher near the inlet of sewage discharge, demonstrating that the discharge of surrounding sewage is a major source of organic pollutants in Yundang Lagoon. CDOM absorption coefficient alpha (280) and the score of humic-like component C1 showed significant linear relationships with COD(Mn), and a strong positive correlation was also found between the score of protein-like component C2 and BOD5. This suggested that the optical properties of CDOM may provide a fast in-situ way to monitor the variation of the water quality in Yundang Lagoon and that of similar polluted coastal waters.

  4. Fluorescence Decay Dynamics of Ethidium Bromide in Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Ah Young; Min Yung

    2010-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetimes of EB in five polymers covering LDPE, HDPE, PC, PS, and PAA were measured by picosecond time-correlated single photon counting. The lifetime change of EB has been previously described by hydrogen bonding ability. In this work, we have observed that the lifetime of EB depends strongly on the Young's modulus of medium. Thus, it is possible that the fluorescence decay dynamics of EB could be influenced by medium rigidity rather than hydrogen bonding ability in polymer. The medium influence on the fluorescence decay dynamics of ethidium bromide (EB) has been investigated in various environments. For example, Ohmstead and Kearns related the fluorescence lifetime of EB to the excited-state proton transfer process. In addition, they reported that the solvent viscosity plays a minor role in the excited state decay process of EB. Chirico et al. measured the fluorescence decay of EB as 1.7 ns in water and 6.5 ns in ethanol and concluded that hydrogen bonding ability is a key factor for the nonradiative relaxation. Pal et al. measured the fluorescence decay time of EB in acetone, acetonitrile, and their mixtures. They observed that the fluorescence decay processes were independent on the solvent polarity. These results show that the EB lifetime does not depend much on polarity or viscosity, but is mainly influenced by hydrogen bonding. Overall, EB is one of most widely used dyes for probing DNA. When EB is intercalated into the helical structure of DNA, a large increase in the fluorescence lifetime has been observed in comparison with water environment, and the fluorescence enhancement was attributed to the blocking of the excited-state proton transfer

  5. Lifetime measurement of the 8s level in francium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, E.; Sprouse, G.D.; Orozco, L.A.; Galvan, A. Perez

    2005-01-01

    We measure the lifetime of the 8s level of 210 Fr atoms on a magneto-optically trapped sample with time-correlated single-photon counting. The 7P 1/2 state serves as the resonant intermediate level for two-step excitation of the 8s level completed with a 1.3-μm laser. Analysis of the fluorescence decay through the 7P 3/2 level gives 53.30±0.44 ns for the 8s level lifetime

  6. Effect of anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols on chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra in apple fruit: signature analysis, assessment, modelling, and relevance to photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlyak, Mark N; Melø, Thor Bernt; Naqvi, K Razi

    2008-01-01

    Whole apple fruit (Malus domestica Borkh.) widely differing in pigment content and composition has been examined by recording its chlorophyll fluorescence excitation and diffuse reflection spectra in the visible and near UV regions. Spectral bands sensitive to the pigment concentration have been identified, and linear models for non-destructive assessment of anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols via chlorophyll fluorescence measurements are put forward. The adaptation of apple fruit to high light stress involves accumulation of these protective pigments, which absorb solar radiation in broad spectral ranges extending from UV to the green and, in anthocyanin-containing cultivars, to the red regions of the spectrum. In ripening apples the protective effect in the blue region could be attributed to extrathylakoid carotenoids. A simple model, which allows the simulation of chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra in the visible range and a quantitative evaluation of competitive absorption by anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols, is described. Evidence is presented to support the view that anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols play, in fruit with low-to-moderate pigment content, the role of internal traps (insofar as they compete with chlorophylls for the absorption of incident light in specific spectral bands), affecting thereby the shape of the chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum.

  7. Fluorescence excitation involving multiple electron transition states of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.Y.R.; Chen, F.Z.; Hung, T.; Judge, D.L. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The electronic states and electronic structures of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the 8-50 eV energy region have been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically. In the energy region higher than 25 eV there exists many electronic states including multiple electron transition (MET) states which are responsible for producing most of the dissociative photoionization products. The electronic states at energies higher than 50 eV have been mainly determined by Auger spectroscopy, double charge transfer, photofragment spectroscopy and ion-ion coincidence spectroscopy. The absorption and ionization spectra of these molecules at energies higher than 50 eV mainly show a monotonic decrease in cross section values and exhibit structureless features. The decay channels of MET and Rydberg (or superexcited) states include autoionization, ionization, dissociative ionization, predissociation, and dissociation while those of single ion and multiple ion states may involve predissociation. and dissociation processes. The study of fluorescence specifically probes electronically excited species resulting from the above-mentioned decay channels and provides information for understanding the competition among these channels.

  8. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy for rapid identification and quality evaluation of cell culture media components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boyan; Ryan, Paul W; Shanahan, Michael; Leister, Kirk J; Ryder, Alan G

    2011-11-01

    The application of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy to the quantitative analysis of complex, aqueous solutions of cell culture media components was investigated. These components, yeastolate, phytone, recombinant human insulin, eRDF basal medium, and four different chemically defined (CD) media, are used for the formulation of basal and feed media employed in the production of recombinant proteins using a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell based process. The comprehensive analysis (either identification or quality assessment) of these materials using chromatographic methods is time consuming and expensive and is not suitable for high-throughput quality control. The use of EEM in conjunction with multiway chemometric methods provided a rapid, nondestructive analytical method suitable for the screening of large numbers of samples. Here we used multiway robust principal component analysis (MROBPCA) in conjunction with n-way partial least squares discriminant analysis (NPLS-DA) to develop a robust routine for both the identification and quality evaluation of these important cell culture materials. These methods are applicable to a wide range of complex mixtures because they do not rely on any predetermined compositional or property information, thus making them potentially very useful for sample handling, tracking, and quality assessment in biopharmaceutical industries.

  9. The multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments and its applications to the analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao Qiong; Wang, Xue; Li Xu, Min; Zhai, Hong Lin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Jin Jin

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy with an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) is a fast and inexpensive technique and has been applied to the detection of a very wide range of analytes. However, serious scattering and overlapping signals hinder the applications of EEM spectra. In this contribution, the multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments was investigated in depth and applied to the analysis of two EEM data sets (data set 1 consisted of valine-tyrosine-valine, tryptophan-glycine and phenylalanine, and data set 2 included vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and vitamin B6) for the first time. By means of the Tchebichef moments with different orders, the different information in the EEM spectra can be represented. It is owing to this multi-resolution capability that the overlapping problem was solved, and the information of chemicals and scatterings were separated. The obtained results demonstrated that the Tchebichef moment method is very effective, which provides a promising tool for the analysis of EEM spectra. It is expected that the applications of Tchebichef moment method could be developed and extended in complex systems such as biological fluids, food, environment and others to deal with the practical problems (overlapped peaks, unknown interferences, baseline drifts, and so on) with other spectra.

  10. Endogenous Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Provides Label-Free Visualization of the Inflammatory Response in the Rodent Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortrud Uckermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of CNS resident microglia and invasion of external macrophages plays a central role in spinal cord injuries and diseases. Multiphoton microscopy based on intrinsic tissue properties offers the possibility of label-free imaging and has the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed cellular structures displaying endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF in the pathologic spinal cord. It was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to Iba1 and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in two models: rat spinal cord injury and mouse encephalomyelitis. The extent of tissue damage was retrieved by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS and second harmonic generation imaging. The pattern of CD68-positive cells representing postinjury activated microglia/macrophages was colocalized to the TPEF signal. Iba1-positive microglia were found in areas lacking any TPEF signal. In peripheral areas of inflammation, we found similar numbers of CD68-positive microglia/macrophages and TPEF-positive structures while the number of Iba1-positive cells was significantly higher. Therefore, we conclude that multiphoton imaging of unstained spinal cord tissue enables retrieving the extent of microglia activation by acquisition of endogenous TPEF. Future application of this technique in vivo will enable monitoring inflammatory responses of the nervous system allowing new insights into degenerative and regenerative processes.

  11. Endogenous Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Provides Label-Free Visualization of the Inflammatory Response in the Rodent Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckermann, Ortrud; Galli, Roberta; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim-Hakan; Later, Robert; Leipnitz, Elke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CNS resident microglia and invasion of external macrophages plays a central role in spinal cord injuries and diseases. Multiphoton microscopy based on intrinsic tissue properties offers the possibility of label-free imaging and has the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed cellular structures displaying endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in the pathologic spinal cord. It was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to Iba1 and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in two models: rat spinal cord injury and mouse encephalomyelitis. The extent of tissue damage was retrieved by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation imaging. The pattern of CD68-positive cells representing postinjury activated microglia/macrophages was colocalized to the TPEF signal. Iba1-positive microglia were found in areas lacking any TPEF signal. In peripheral areas of inflammation, we found similar numbers of CD68-positive microglia/macrophages and TPEF-positive structures while the number of Iba1-positive cells was significantly higher. Therefore, we conclude that multiphoton imaging of unstained spinal cord tissue enables retrieving the extent of microglia activation by acquisition of endogenous TPEF. Future application of this technique in vivo will enable monitoring inflammatory responses of the nervous system allowing new insights into degenerative and regenerative processes. PMID:26355949

  12. Monitoring the Behavior of Emerging Contaminants in Wastewater-Impacted Rivers Based on the Use of Fluorescence Excitation Emission Matrixes (EEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgroi, Massimiliano; Roccaro, Paolo; Korshin, Gregory V; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2017-04-18

    This study investigated the applicability of fluorescence indexes based on the interpretation of excitation emission matrices (EEMs) by PARAFAC analysis and by selecting fluorescence intensities at a priori defined excitation/emission pairs as surrogates for monitoring the behavior of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) in two catchment basins impacted by wastewater discharges. Relevant EOC and EEM data were obtained for a 90 km stretch of the Simeto River, the main river in Sicily, and the smaller San Leonardo River, which was investigated for a 17 km stretch. The use of fluorescence indexes developed by these two different approaches resulted in similar observations. Changes of the fluorescence indexes that correspond to a group of humic-like fluorescing species were determined to be highly correlated with the concentrations of recalcitrant contaminants such as sucralose, sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine, which are typical wastewater markers in river water. Changes of the fluorescence indexes related to tyrosine-like substances were well correlated with the concentrations of ibuprofen and caffeine, anthropogenic indicators of untreated wastewater discharges. Chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were correlated with humic-like fluorescence indexes. The observed correlations were site-specific and characterized by different regression parameters for every collection event. Caffeine and carbamazepine showed correlations with florescence indexes in the San Leonardo River and in the alluvial plain stretch of the Simeto River, whereas sucralose, sulfamethoxazole and ibuprofen have always been well correlated in all the investigated river stretches. However, when data of different collection events from river stretches where correlations were observed were combined, good linear correlations were obtained for data sets generated via the normalization of the measured concentrations by the average value for the corresponding collection event

  13. High speed fluorescence imaging with compressed ultrafast photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. V.; Mason, J. D.; Beier, H. T.; Bixler, J. N.

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent lifetime imaging is an optical technique that facilitates imaging molecular interactions and cellular functions. Because the excited lifetime of a fluorophore is sensitive to its local microenvironment,1, 2 measurement of fluorescent lifetimes can be used to accurately detect regional changes in temperature, pH, and ion concentration. However, typical state of the art fluorescent lifetime methods are severely limited when it comes to acquisition time (on the order of seconds to minutes) and video rate imaging. Here we show that compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) can be used in conjunction with fluorescent lifetime imaging to overcome these acquisition rate limitations. Frame rates up to one hundred billion frames per second have been demonstrated with compressed ultrafast photography using a streak camera.3 These rates are achieved by encoding time in the spatial direction with a pseudo-random binary pattern. The time domain information is then reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm, resulting in a cube of data (x,y,t) for each readout image. Thus, application of compressed ultrafast photography will allow us to acquire an entire fluorescent lifetime image with a single laser pulse. Using a streak camera with a high-speed CMOS camera, acquisition rates of 100 frames per second can be achieved, which will significantly enhance our ability to quantitatively measure complex biological events with high spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, we will demonstrate the ability of this technique to do single-shot fluorescent lifetime imaging of cells and microspheres.

  14. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1 ± 2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6 ± 8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  15. Correlation between the number of quantum-statistical modes of the exciting field and the number of lines in the resonance fluorescence spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryzhanovskii, Boris V; Sokolov, G B

    2000-01-01

    The quasi-energy wave functions of a two-level atom in an electromagnetic field, the state of which represents a superposition of coherent states, were found. The fluorescence spectrum of an atom excited by such a field was investigated. It was shown that a spectral fluorescence mode corresponds to each mode of the quantum-statistical distribution of the field incident on the atom. This means that the number of statistical modes of the incident field may be recorded as the number of data bits of the information carried by the light pulse. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Two-photon excited fluorescence from higher electronic states of chlorophylls in photosynthetic antenna complexes a new approach to detect strong excitonic chlorophyll a/b coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Leupold, D; Ehlert, J; Irrgang, K D; Renger, G; Lokstein, H

    2002-01-01

    Stepwise two-photon excitation of chlorophyll a and b in the higher plant main light-harvesting complex (LHC II) and the minor complex CP29 (as well as in organic solution) with 100-fs pulses in the Q/sub y/ region results in a weak blue fluorescence. The dependence of the spectral shape of the blue fluorescence on excitation wavelength offers a new approach to elucidate the long-standing problem of the origin of spectral "chlorophyll forms" in pigment-protein complexes, in particular the characterization of chlorophyll a/b-heterodimers. As a first result we present evidence for the existence of strong chlorophyll a/b-interactions (excitonically coupled transitions at 650 and 680 nm) in LHC II at ambient temperature. In comparison with LHC II, the experiments with CP29 provide further evidence that the lowest energy chlorophyll a transition (at ~680 nm) is not excitonically coupled to chlorophyll b. (22 refs).

  17. Preparatory studies for the on-line determination of zinc content in zinc ore slurries by radioisotope excited X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donhoffer, D.K.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory tests were carried out to prove the feasibility of determination of Zn-content in zinc ore slurries by isotope excited x-ray fluorescence. Matrix effects were investigated on dry samples. A slurry testloop was built and measurements on slurries were made. The results indicated that the measurement on Zn in ore slurries can be made with a precision of 0,05% Zn. A working equation for interpretation of the measurements is derived. (author)

  18. Fluorescence Excitation Models of Ammonia and Amidogen Radical (NH2) in Comets: Application to Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH2 -- a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH3/H2O is 0.46% +/- 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH2 observations (0.31% -- 0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH3 could be the sole parent of NH2 in this comet.

  19. FLUORESCENCE EXCITATION MODELS OF AMMONIA AND AMIDOGEN RADICAL (NH2) IN COMETS: APPLICATION TO COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 μm wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 μm wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH 2 -a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 μm wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH 3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH 3 /H 2 O is 0.46% ± 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH 2 observations (0.31%-0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH 3 could be the sole parent of NH 2 in this comet.

  20. Measurements of excited-state-to-excited-state transition probabilities and photoionization cross-sections using laser-induced fluorescence and photoionization signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.L.; Sahoo, A.C.; Pulhani, A.K.; Gupta, G.P.; Dikshit, B.; Bhatia, M.S.; Suri, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced photoionization and fluorescence signals were simultaneously observed in atomic samarium using Nd:YAG-pumped dye lasers. Two-color, three-photon photoionization and two-color fluorescence signals were recorded simultaneously as a function of the second-step laser power for two photoionization pathways. The density matrix formalism has been employed to analyze these signals. Two-color laser-induced fluorescence signal depends on the laser powers used for the first and second-step transitions as well as the first and second-step transition probability whereas two-color, three-photon photoionization signal depends on the third-step transition cross-section at the second-step laser wavelength along with the laser powers and transition probability for the first and second-step transitions. Two-color laser-induced fluorescence was used to measure the second-step transition probability. The second-step transition probability obtained was used to infer the photoionization cross-section. Thus, the methodology combining two-color, three-photon photoionization and two-color fluorescence signals in a single experiment has been established for the first time to measure the second-step transition probability as well as the photoionization cross-section. - Highlights: • Laser-induced photoionization and fluorescence signals have been simultaneously observed. • The density matrix formalism has been employed to analyze these signals. • Two-color laser-induced fluorescence was used to measure the second-step transition probability. • The second-step transition probability obtained was used to infer the photoionization cross-section. • Transition probability and photoionization cross-section have been measured in a single experiment

  1. Effect of detergents on the physico-chemical properties of skin stratum corneum: A two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Pashkovski, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Understanding the structural and dynamical features of skin is critical for advancing innovation in personal care and drug discovery. Synthetic detergent mixtures used in commercially available body wash products are thought to be less aggressive towards the skin barrier when compared...... to conventional detergents. The aim of this work is to comparatively characterize the effect of a mild synthetic cleanser mixture (SCM) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) on the hydration state of the intercellular lipid matrix and on proton activity of excised skin stratum corneum (SC). METHOD: Experiments were...... performed using two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescent images of fluorescence reporters sensitive to proton activity and hydration of SC were obtained in excised skin and examined in presence and absence of SCM and SDS detergents. RESULTS: Hydration of the intercellular lipid matrix...

  2. Simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging: A method for aligning an AFM-tip with an excitation beam using a 2D galvanometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, A. N.; Cadby, A. J.

    2018-02-01

    Correlative fluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging is a highly attractive technique for use in biological imaging, enabling force and mechanical measurements of particular structures whose locations are known due to the specificity of fluorescence imaging. The ability to perform these two measurements simultaneously (rather than consecutively with post-processing correlation) is highly valuable because it would allow the mechanical properties of a structure to be tracked over time as changes in the sample occur. We present an instrument which allows simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging by aligning an incident fluorescence excitation beam with an AFM-tip. Alignment was performed by calibrating a 2D galvanometer present in the excitation beam path and using it to reposition the incident beam. Two programs were developed (one manual and one automated) which correlate sample features between the AFM and fluorescence images, calculating the distance required to translate the incident beam towards the AFM-tip. Using this method, we were able to obtain beam-tip alignment (and therefore field-of-view alignment) from an offset of >15 μm to within one micron in two iterations of the program. With the program running alongside data acquisition for real-time feedback between AFM and optical images, this offset was maintained over a time period of several hours. Not only does this eliminate the need to image large areas with both techniques to ensure that fields-of-view overlap, but it also raises the possibility of using this instrument for tip-enhanced fluorescence applications, a technique in which super-resolution images have previously been achieved.

  3. High-resolution imaging of basal cell carcinoma: a comparison between multiphoton microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging and reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Marco; Arginelli, Federica; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul; Talbot, Clifford; König, Karsten; Pellacani, Giovanni; Ponti, Giovanni; Seidenari, Stefania

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare morphological aspects of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) as assessed by two different imaging methods: in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging implementation (MPT-FLIM). The study comprised 16 BCCs for which a complete set of RCM and MPT-FLIM images were available. The presence of seven MPT-FLIM descriptors was evaluated. The presence of seven RCM equivalent parameters was scored in accordance to their extension. Chi-squared test with Fisher's exact test and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were determined between MPT-FLIM scores and adjusted-RCM scores. MPT-FLIM and RCM descriptors of BCC were coupled to match the descriptors that define the same pathological structures. The comparison included: Streaming and Aligned elongated cells, Streaming with multiple directions and Double alignment, Palisading (RCM) and Palisading (MPT-FLIM), Typical tumor islands, and Cell islands surrounded by fibers, Dark silhouettes and Phantom islands, Plump bright cells and Melanophages, Vessels (RCM), and Vessels (MPT-FLIM). The parameters that were significantly correlated were Melanophages/Plump Bright Cells, Aligned elongated cells/Streaming, Double alignment/Streaming with multiple directions, and Palisading (MPT-FLIM)/Palisading (RCM). According to our data, both methods are suitable to image BCC's features. The concordance between MPT-FLIM and RCM is high, with some limitations due to the technical differences between the two devices. The hardest difficulty when comparing the images generated by the two imaging modalities is represented by their different field of view. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy of the mycotoxin citrinin in condensed phase and hydrogel films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Milena H; Gehlen, Marcelo H; de Jesus, Karen; Berlinck, Roberto G S

    2014-05-01

    The emission spectra, quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes of citrinin in organic solvents and hydrogel films have been determined. Citrinin shows complex fluorescence decays due to the presence of two tautomers in solution and interconversion from excited-state double proton transfer (ESDPT) process. The fluorescence decay times associated with the two tautomers have values near 1 and 5 ns depending on the medium. In hydrogel films of agarose and alginate, fluorescence imaging showed that citrinin is not homogeneously dispersed and highly emissive micrometer spots may be formed. Fluorescence spectrum and decay analysis are used to recognize the presence of citrinin in hydrogel films using confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy.

  5. Insight into the heterogeneous adsorption of humic acid fluorescent components on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenghu; Liu, Yangzhi; Cen, Qiulin; Zhu, Yaxian; Zhang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption behavior of commercial humic acid (HA) on pristine and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor (EEM- PARAFAC) analysis. The kinetics, isotherms, thermodynamics and mechanisms of adsorption of HA fluorescent components onto MWCNTs were the focus of the present study. Three humic-like fluorescent components were distinguished, including one carboxylic-like fluorophore C1 (λ ex /λ em = (250, 310) nm/428nm), and two phenolic-like fluorophores, C2 (λ ex /λ em = (300, 460) nm/552nm) and C3 (λ ex /λ em = (270, 375) nm/520nm). The Lagergren pseudo-second-order model can be used to describe the adsorption kinetics of the HA fluorescent components. In addition, both the Freundlich and Langmuir models can be suitably employed to describe the adsorption of the HA fluorescent components onto MWCNTs with significantly high correlation coefficients (R 2 > 0.94, Padsorption affinity (K d ) and nonlinear adsorption degree from the HA fluorescent components to MWCNTs was clearly observed. The adsorption mechanism suggested that the π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interaction played an important role in the interaction between HA fluorescent components and the three MWCNTs. Furthermore, the values of the thermodynamic parameters, including the Gibbs free energy change (ΔG°), enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), showed that the adsorption of the HA fluorescent components on MWCNTs was spontaneous and exothermic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of pharmacologically induced retinal degeneration on retinal autofluorescence lifetimes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Dysli, Muriel; Zinkernagel, Martin S; Enzmann, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) was used to investigate retinal autofluorescence lifetimes in mouse models of pharmacologically induced retinal degeneration over time. Sodium iodate (NaIO 3 , 35 mg/kg intravenously) was used to induce retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration with subsequent loss of photoreceptors (PR) whereas N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU, 45 mg/kg intraperitoneally) was employed for degeneration of the photoreceptor cell layer alone. All mice were measured at day 3, 7, 14, and 28 after the respective injection of NaIO 3 , MNU or NaCl (control). Fluorescence lifetime imaging was performed using a fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). Fluorescence was excited at 473 nm and fluorescence lifetimes were measured in a short and a long spectral channel (498-560 nm and 560-720 nm). Corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT) images were consecutively acquired and histology was performed at the end of the experiments. Segmentation of OCT images and histology verified the cell type-specific degeneration process over time. Retinal autofluorescence lifetimes increased from day 3 to day 28 in mice after NaIO 3 treatment. Finally, at day 28, fluorescence lifetimes were prolonged by 8% in the short and 61% in the long spectral channel compared to control animals (p = 0.21 and p = 0.004, respectively). In mice after MNU treatment, the mean retinal autofluorescence lifetimes were already decreased at day 3 and retinal lifetimes were finally shortened by 27% in the short and 51% in the long spectral channel at day 28 (p = 0.0028). In conclusion, degeneration of the RPE with subsequent photoreceptor degeneration by NaIO 3 lead to longer mean fluorescence lifetimes of the retina compared to control mice, whereas during specific degeneration of the photoreceptor layer induced by MNU shorter lifetimes were measured. Therefore, short retinal fluorescence lifetimes may originate

  7. Nuclear lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraca, J.M.G.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of the results obtained in experiments of measurement of lifetimes for a detailed knowledge of nuclear structure is referred. Direct methods of measurement of nuclear lifetimes are described, namely, electronic methods, recoil-distance method, doppler shift atenuation method and blocking-method. A brief reference is made to indirect methods for measurement of life-times

  8. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le; James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E.; Redding, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  9. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chuji [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 39759 (United States); Pan, Yong-Le, E-mail: yongle.pan.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Redding, Brandon [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  10. Micellar Enhanced Three-Dimensional Excitation-Emission Matrix Fluorescence for Rapid Determination of Antihypertensives in Human Plasma with Aid of Second-Order Calibration Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive three-dimensional excitation-emission fluorescence method was proposed to determine antihypertensives including valsartan and amlodipine besylate in human plasma with the aid of second-order calibration methods based on parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC and alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD algorithms. Antihypertensives with weak fluorescent can be transformed into a strong fluorescent property by changing microenvironment in samples using micellar enhanced surfactant. Both the adopted algorithms with second-order advantage can improve the resolution and directly attain antihypertensives concentration even in the presence of potential strong intrinsic fluorescence from human plasma. The satisfactory results can be achieved for valsartan and amlodipine besylate in complicated human plasma. Furthermore, some statistical parameters and figures of merit were evaluated to investigate the performance of the proposed method, and the accuracy and precision of the proposed method were also validated by the elliptical joint confidence region (EJCR test and repeatability analysis of intraday and interday assay. The proposed method could not only light a new avenue to directly determine valsartan or amlodipine besylate in human plasma, but also hold great potential to be extended as a promising alternative for more practical applications in the determination of weak fluorescent drugs.

  11. [Study on optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in rainwater by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and absorbance spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan-yue; Guo, Wei-dong; Long, Ai-min; Chen, Shao-yong

    2010-09-01

    The optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were determined in rain samples collected in Xiamen Island, during a rainy season in 2007, using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy associated with UV-Vis absorbance spectra. Results showed that the absorbance spectra of CDOM in rain samples decreased exponentially with wavelength. The absorbance coefficient at 300 nm [a(300)] ranged from 0.27 to 3.45 m(-1), which would be used as an index of CDOM abundance, and the mean value was 1.08 m(-1). The content of earlier stage of precipitation events was higher than that of later stage of precipitation events, which implied that anthropogenic sources or atmospheric pollution or air mass types were important contributors to CDOM levels in precipitation. EEMs spectra showed 4 types of fluorescence signals (2 humic-like fluorescence peaks and 2 protein-like fluorescence peaks) in rainwater samples, and there were significant positive correlations of peak A with C and peak B with S, showing their same sources or some relationship of the two humic-like substance and the two protein-like substance. The strong positive correlations of the two humic-like fluorescence peaks with a(300), suggested that the chromophores responsible for absorbance might be the same as fluorophores responsible for fluorescence. Results showed that the presence of highly absorbing and fluorescing CDOM in rainwater is of significant importance in atmospheric chemistry and might play a previously unrecognized role in the wavelength dependent spectral attenuation of solar radiation by atmospheric waters.

  12. On the chlorophill a fluorescence yield in chloroplasts upon excitation with twin turnover flashes (TTF) and high frequency flash trains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.; Prasil, O.; Durchan, M.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence is routinely taken as a quantifiable measure of the redox state of the primary quinone acceptor QA of PSII. The variable fluorescence in thylakoids increases in a single turnover flash (STF) from its low dark level F o towards a maximum F mSTF when QA becomes reduced. We

  13. Details of the Collagen and Elastin Architecture in the Human Limbal Conjunctiva, Tenon's Capsule and Sclera Revealed by Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choul Yong; Marando, Catherine M; Liao, Jason A; Lee, Jimmy K; Kwon, Jiwon; Chuck, Roy S

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the architecture and distribution of collagen and elastin in human limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera. The limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera of human donor corneal buttons were imaged with an inverted two-photon excited fluorescence microscope. No fixation process was necessary. The laser (Ti:sapphire) was tuned at 850 nm for two-photon excitation. Backscatter signals of second harmonic generation (SHG) and autofluorescence (AF) were collected through a 425/30-nm and a 525/45-nm emission filter, respectively. Multiple, consecutive, and overlapping (z-stack) images were acquired. Collagen signals were collected with SHG, whereas elastin signals were collected with AF. The size and density of collagen bundles varied widely depending on depth: increasing from conjunctiva to sclera. In superficial image planes, collagen bundles were image planes (episclera and superficial sclera), collagen bundles were thicker (near 100 μm in width) and densely packed. Comparatively, elastin fibers were thinner and sparse. The orientation of elastin fibers was independent of collagen fibers in superficial layers; but in deep sclera, elastin fibers wove through collagen interbundle gaps. At the limbus, both collagen and elastin fibers were relatively compact and were distributed perpendicular to the limbal annulus. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy has enabled us to understand in greater detail the collagen and elastin architecture of the human limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera.

  14. Solid phase excitation-emission fluorescence method for the classification of complex substances: Cortex Phellodendri and other traditional Chinese medicines as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yao; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2012-09-13

    A novel, simple and direct fluorescence method for analysis of complex substances and their potential substitutes has been researched and developed. Measurements involved excitation and emission (EEM) fluorescence spectra of powdered, complex, medicinal herbs, Cortex Phellodendri Chinensis (CPC) and the similar Cortex Phellodendri Amurensis (CPA); these substances were compared and discriminated from each other and the potentially adulterated samples (Caulis mahoniae (CM) and David poplar bark (DPB)). Different chemometrics methods were applied for resolution of the complex spectra, and the excitation spectra were found to be the most informative; only the rank-ordering PROMETHEE method was able to classify the samples with single ingredients (CPA, CPC, CM) or those with binary mixtures (CPA/CPC, CPA/CM, CPC/CM). Interestingly, it was essential to use the geometrical analysis for interactive aid (GAIA) display for a full understanding of the classification results. However, these two methods, like the other chemometrics models, were unable to classify composite spectral matrices consisting of data from samples of single ingredients and binary mixtures; this suggested that the excitation spectra of the different samples were very similar. However, the method is useful for classification of single-ingredient samples and, separately, their binary mixtures; it may also be applied for similar classification work with other complex substances.

  15. Multiphoton autofluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada

    2017-06-01

    The multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging tomograph MPTflex with its flexible 360-deg scan head, articulated arm, and tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) cultures. Autofluorescence (AF) lifetime imaging was performed with 250-ps temporal resolution and submicron spatial resolution using time-correlated single-photon counting. The two-photon excited AF was based on the metabolic coenzymes NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide/flavoproteins. iPS cells generated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cocultured with growth-arrested MEFs as feeder cells have been studied. Significant differences on AF lifetime signatures were identified between iPS and feeder cells as well as between their differentiating counterparts.

  16. Lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossan, D.B.; Warburton, E.K.

    1974-01-01

    Lifetime measurements are discussed, concentrating on the electronic technique, the recoil distance method (RDM), and the Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM). A brief review of several indirect timing techniques is given, and their specific advantages and applicability are considered. The relationship between lifetimes of nuclear states and the nuclear structure information obtained from them is examined. A short discussion of channeling and microwave methods of lifetime measurement is presented. (23 figures, 171 references) (U.S.)

  17. Bright blue-shifted fluorescent proteins with Cys in the GAF domain engineered from bacterial phytochromes: fluorescence mechanisms and excited-state dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hontani, Yusaku; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Baloban, Mikhail; Zhu, Jingyi; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes (BphPs) are of great interest for in vivo imaging. They utilize biliverdin (BV) as a chromophore, which is a heme degradation product, and therefore they are straightforward to use in mammalian tissues. Here, we

  18. Two-photon excitation in chip electrophoresis enabling label-free fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, David; Belder, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    One of the most commonly employed detection methods in microfluidic research is fluorescence detection, due to its ease of integration and excellent sensitivity. Many analytes though do not show luminescence when excited in the visible light spectrum, require suitable dyes. Deep-ultraviolet (UV) excitation (electrophoresis of small aromatic compounds. Various polymers, such as poly(methyl methacrylate), cyclic olefin polymer, and copolymer as well as poly(dimethylsiloxane) were investigated and compared with respect to achievable LOD and ruggedness against photodamage. To demonstrate the applicability of the technique, the method was also applied to the determination of serotonin and tryptamine in fruit samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Characterization of CDOM from urban waters in Northern-Northeastern China using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Li, Sijia; Ma, Jianhang; Wen, Zhidan

    2016-08-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) plays an important role in aquatic systems, but high concentrations of organic materials are considered pollutants. The fluorescent component characteristics of CDOM in urban waters sampled from Northern and Northeastern China were examined by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) to investigate the source and compositional changes of CDOM on both space and pollution levels. One humic-like (C1), one tryptophan-like component (C2), and one tyrosine-like component (C3) were identified by PARAFAC. Mean fluorescence intensities of the three CDOM components varied spatially and by pollution level in cities of Northern and Northeastern China during July-August, 2013 and 2014. Principal components analysis (PCA) was conducted to identify the relative distribution of all water samples. Cluster analysis (CA) was also used to categorize the samples into groups of similar pollution levels within a study area. Strong positive linear relationships were revealed between the CDOM absorption coefficients a(254) (R (2) = 0.89, p CDOM components can be applied to monitor water quality in real time compared to that of traditional approaches. These results demonstrate that EEM-PARAFAC is useful to evaluate the dynamics of CDOM fluorescent components in urban waters from Northern and Northeastern China and this method has potential applications for monitoring urban water quality in different regions with various hydrological conditions and pollution levels.

  20. Characterization of DOM adsorption of CNTs by using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and multiway analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingguo; Li, Huajie; Li, Dongdong; Du, Erdeng; Li, Zhihong

    2017-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were utilized to adsorb DOM in micro-polluted water. The characteristics of DOM adsorption on CNTs were investigated based on UV 254 , TOC, and fluorescence spectrum measurements. Based on PARAFAC (parallel factor) analysis, four fluorescent components were extracted, including one protein-like component (C4) and three humic acid-like components (C1, C2, and C3). The adsorption isotherms, kinetics, and thermodynamics of DOM adsorption on CNTs were further investigated. A Freundlich isotherm model fit the adsorption data well with high values of correlation. As a type of macro-porous and meso-porous adsorbent, CNTs preferably adsorb humic acid-like substances rather than protein-like substances. The increasing temperature will speed up the adsorption process. The self-organizing map (SOM) analysis further explains the fluorescent properties of water samples. The results provide a new insight into the adsorption behaviour of DOM fluorescent components on CNTs.

  1. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  2. Sampling system for pulsed signals. Study of the radioactive lifetimes of excited 3{sup 2}P1/2 and 3{sup 2}P3/2 states of Na, excited by a tunable dye laser; Sistema de muestreo para senales pulsadas. Estudio de vidas medias de niveles 3{sup 2} P1/2 y 3{sup 2}P3/2 excitados por un laser de colorantes pulsado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P; Campos, J

    1979-07-01

    A system for sampling and averaging repetitive signals in the order of nanoseconds is discussed. The system uses as storage memory a multichannel analyzer operating in multi scaling mode. This instrument is employed for the measurement of atomic level lifetimes using a dye laser to excite the atoms and is applied to the study of lifetimes of the 3{sup 2}P1/2 and 3{sup 2}P3/2 states of sodium. (Author) 32 refs.

  3. Fs-transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion after two- photon excitation of carotenoids in solution and in LHC II

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, P J; Fleming, G R

    2000-01-01

    With time resolved two-photon techniques we determined the lifetime and two-photon spectrum of the forbidden S/sub 1/ state of beta - carotene (9+or-0.2 ps), lutein (15+or-0.5 ps) and the energy transferring carotenoids in LHC II (250+or-50 fs). (7 refs).

  4. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M.

    1997-01-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state

  5. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  6. Characteristics of the fluorescent substances in the Yodo River system by three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectroscopy; Sanjigen reiki/keiko kodoho ni yoru yodogawa suikeichu no keiko busshitsu no tokucho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y.; Nakaguchi, Y.; Hiraki, K.; Kudo, M.; Kimura, M.; Nagao, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Organic substances in the river water in Yodo River system were analyzed by three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectroscopy. Fluorescent substances were taken as an index of organic substances. The amount of fluorescent substances varied widely depending on the environment of river basin. It is suggested that the fluorescent substances are composed of organic substances which is not directly originated from biological activity. It is suggested that the fluorescent substances were produced by leaching of river bottom sediment. The fluorescent substances in Yodo River system consists of fulvic acid-like substances and protein. The analysis of fluorescent substances in river water by three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectroscopy can be useful means for estimation of variation and origin of fluorescent substances. For better understanding of features of fluorescent substances in the surface water into which various kinds of substances enter, it is necessary to determine the exact sampling points based on the consideration of different sources and to make a database of peak positions for identification of fluorescent substances from fluorescence intensity peak. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Spot profile analysis and lifetime mapping in ultrafast electron diffraction: Lattice excitation of self-organized Ge nanostructures on Si(001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Frigge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast high energy electron diffraction in reflection geometry is employed to study the structural dynamics of self-organized Germanium hut-, dome-, and relaxed clusters on Si(001 upon femtosecond laser excitation. Utilizing the difference in size and strain state the response of hut- and dome clusters can be distinguished by a transient spot profile analysis. Surface diffraction from {105}-type facets provide exclusive information on hut clusters. A pixel-by-pixel analysis of the dynamics of the entire diffraction pattern gives time constants of 40, 160, and 390 ps, which are assigned to the cooling time constants for hut-, dome-, and relaxed clusters.

  8. A study on the determination of Ca/P molar ratio in calcium-hydroxyapatite by alpha excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Iwata, Shiro.

    1979-01-01

    Nondestructive powdery calcium-hydroxyapatite (HAp) target was prepared by electrodeposition method. The powdery HAp was deposited on the copper electrode plate of cathode in the electrodeposition solution such as ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, etc. The experiments were carried out as functions of different electrodeposition solution, ethyl alcohol concentration, distance between anode and cathode, electrodeposition time and HAp amount added in bath, and distribution of HAp on the copper electrode plate obtained from each experiment was investigated by alpha excited X-ray fluorescence analysis. Ca/P molar ratio of thin HAp target prepared with this method was determined by alpha excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The nondestructive HAp targets of thickness in the range of 5 mu g/cm 2 to 10 mg/cm 2 were easily prepared with comparatively simple apparatus. The HAp on the copper electrode plate was uniform thickness over 15 x 20 mm copper plate within 5%. The Ca/P molar ratio of HAp was 1.64 +- 0.05, which agreed well with stoichiometric value of 1.67 in HAp within standard deviation. (author)

  9. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  10. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging using violet LEDs as excitation sources for fecal matter contaminate identification on spinach leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food safety in the production of fresh produce for human consumption is a worldwide issue and needs to be addressed to decrease foodborne illnesses and resulting costs. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for detection of fecal contaminates on spina...

  11. Seasonal characterization of CDOM for lakes in semiarid regions of Northeast China using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Wen, Zhidan; Li, Lin; Zang, Shuying; Shao, Tiantian; Li, Sijia; Du, Jia

    2016-03-01

    The seasonal characteristics of fluorescent components in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) for lakes in the semiarid region of Northeast China were examined by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Two humic-like (C1 and C2) and protein-like (C3 and C4) components were identified using PARAFAC. The average fluorescence intensity of the four components differed under seasonal variation from June and August 2013 to February and April 2014. Components 1 and 2 exhibited a strong linear correlation (R2 = 0.628). Significantly positive linear relationships between CDOM absorption coefficients a(254) (R2 = 0.72, 0.46, p DOC). However, almost no obvious correlation was found between salinity and EEM-PARAFAC-extracted components except for C3 (R2 = 0.469). Results from this investigation demonstrate that the EEM-PARAFAC technique can be used to evaluate the seasonal dynamics of CDOM fluorescent components for inland waters in the semiarid regions of Northeast China, and to quantify CDOM components for other waters with similar environmental conditions.

  12. Three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy with regional integration analysis for assessing waste sludge hydrolysis treated with multi-enzyme and thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Lu, Mingmin; Li, Qianqian; Zhang, Jiawen; Zong, Yan; She, Zonglian

    2014-11-01

    The hydrolysis effect of waste sludge after multi-enzyme and thermophilic bacteria pretreatments is investigated using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) in this study. The compositional characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and dissolved organic matters (DOM) were analyzed to evaluate the sludge disintegration. The EPS and cell wall in sludge were disrupted after hydrolysis which led to carbohydrate, protein and soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of DOM increasing in sludge supernatant. The bio-degradability level in the extracted fractions of EPS and DOM depending on the fluorescence zones was found after hydrolysis. The highest proportion of percent fluorescence response (Pi,n) in EPS and DOM was soluble microbial by-product and humic acid-like organics. A significant increase of humic acid-like organics in DOM after thermophilic bacteria hydrolysis was obtained. The assessment of hydrolysis using EEM coupled with FRI provided a new insight toward the bio-utilization process of waste sludge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Obstruction of photoinduced electron transfer from excited porphyrin to graphene oxide: a fluorescence turn-on sensing platform for iron (III ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong De Liu

    Full Text Available A comparative research of the assembly of different porphyrin molecules on graphene oxide (GO and reduced graphene oxide (RGO was carried out, respectively. Despite the cationic porphyrin molecules can be assembled onto the surfaces of graphene sheets, including GO and RGO, to form complexes through electrostatic and π-π stacking interactions, the more obvious fluorescence quenching and the larger red-shift of the Soret band of porphyrin molecule in RGO-bound states were observed than those in GO-bound states, due to the difference of molecular flattening in degree. Further, more interesting finding was that the complexes formed between cationic porphyrin and GO, rather than RGO sheets, can facilitate the incorporation of iron (III ions into the porphyrin moieties, due to the presence of the oxygen-contained groups at the basal plane of GO sheets served as auxiliary coordination units, which can high-efficiently obstruct the electron transfer from excited porphyrin to GO sheets and result in the occurrence of fluorescence restoration. Thus, a fluorescence sensing platform has been developed for iron (III ions detection in this contribution by using the porphyrin/GO nanohybrids as an optical probe, and our present one exhibited rapid and sensitive responses and high selectivity toward iron (III ions.

  14. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraja, Jana; Suresh Kumar, H M; Inamdar, S R; Wari, M N

    2016-02-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of π→π⁎ transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (μ(e)). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (μ(e)) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Characterization of phosphates and phosphogypsum by x-ray fluorescence with radioisotopic excitation sources of 55 Fe, 238 Pu and 109 Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parreira, Paulo S.; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F.

    1999-01-01

    Using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique (ED-XRF), with radioisotopic sources of 55 Fe, 238 Pu e 109 Cd samples excitation, a qualitative study was carried out in a phosphogypsum and phosphate samples from different origin. The objective was to verify the excitation responses from different sources and to establish the analytical conditions of the technique for these kind of matrices. Besides the P and Ca, characteristic macro elements of this of matrix, it was also observed the elements Si, S, K, matrix, it was also observed the elements Si, S, K, Ti, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Sr, Y, Zr and Nb. With different sources could be observed different groups of elements, since the emission response of the characteristic X-rays are associated to the excitation energy, in other words to the radioactive source. From the nutrients of major interest in this kind of matrix (P, S and Ca), the P and S elements showed small analytical sensibilities to the 109 Cd source. Greater intensities of characteristics X-ray emissions for the mainly elements of interest, was observed with the 55 Fe source and with the 238 Pu and 109 Cd sources analysis could be done showing trace elements which are present in those sort of samples. (author)

  16. Lifetimes of partial charge transfer exciplexes of 9-cyanophenanthrene and 9-cyanoanthracene

    OpenAIRE

    Dolotova, Elena; Dogadkin, Denis; Soboleva, Irina; Kuzmin, Michael; Nicolet, Olivier; Vauthey, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The fluorescence decays of several exciplexes with partial charge transfer have been investigated in solvents of various polarity. The measured lifetimes are found to be in reasonable agreement with the activation enthalpy and entropy of exciplex decay obtained earlier from the temperature dependence of the exciplex emission quantum yields. For exciplexes with 9-cyanophenanthrene substantial contribution of the higher local excited state into the exciplex electronic structure is found and bor...

  17. Characterization of porcine eyes based on autofluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Morgado, António Miguel; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a non-invasive imaging technique with ideal characteristics for biological applications. In this study, we propose to characterize three major structures of the porcine eye, the cornea, crystalline lens, and retina using two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2PE-FLIM). Samples were imaged using a laser-scanning microscope, consisting of a broadband sub-15 femtosecond (fs) near-infrared laser. Signal detection was performed using a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector (PML-16PMT). Therefore, spectral analysis of the fluorescence lifetime data was possible. To ensure a correct spectral analysis of the autofluorescence lifetime data, the spectra of the individual endogenous fluorophores were acquired with the 16-channel PMT and with a spectrometer. All experiments were performed within 12h of the porcine eye enucleation. We were able to image the cornea, crystalline lens, and retina at multiple depths. Discrimination of each structure based on their autofluorescence intensity and lifetimes was possible. Furthermore, discrimination between different layers of the same structure was also possible. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first time that 2PE-FLIM was used for porcine lens imaging and layer discrimination. With this study we further demonstrated the feasibility of 2PE-FLIM to image and differentiate three of the main components of the eye and its potential as an ophthalmologic technique.

  18. Comparative study of the fatty acid binding process of a new FABP from Cherax quadricarinatus by fluorescence intensity, lifetime and anisotropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayao Li

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are small cytosolic proteins, largely distributed in invertebrates and vertebrates, which accomplish uptake and intracellular transport of hydrophobic ligands such as fatty acids. Although long chain fatty acids play multiple crucial roles in cellular functions (structural, energy metabolism, regulation of gene expression, the precise functions of FABPs, especially those of invertebrate species, remain elusive. Here, we have identified and characterized a novel FABP family member, Cq-FABP, from the hepatopancreas of red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. We report the characterization of fatty acid-binding affinity of Cq-FABP by four different competitive fluorescence-based assays. In the two first approaches, the fluorescent probe 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS, a binder of internal cavities of protein, was used either by directly monitoring its fluorescence emission or by monitoring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring between the single tryptophan residue of Cq-FABP and ANS. The third and the fourth approaches were based on the measurement of the fluorescence emission intensity of the naturally fluorescent cis-parinaric acid probe or the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements of a fluorescently labeled fatty acid (BODIPY-C16, respectively. The four methodologies displayed consistent equilibrium constants for a given fatty acid but were not equivalent in terms of analysis. Indeed, the two first methods were complicated by the existence of non specific binding modes of ANS while BODIPY-C16 and cis-parinaric acid specifically targeted the fatty acid binding site. We found a relationship between the affinity and the length of the carbon chain, with the highest affinity obtained for the shortest fatty acid, suggesting that steric effects primarily influence the interaction of fatty acids in the binding cavity of Cq-FABP. Moreover, our results show that the binding affinities

  19. A Rotational BODIPY Nucleotide: An Environment-Sensitive Fluorescence-Lifetime Probe for DNA Interactions and Applications in Live-Cell Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dziuba, Dmytro; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Cebecauer, Marek; Hof, Martin; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2016), s. 174-178 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA ČR(CZ) GC14-03141J Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : DNA * fluorescence spectroscopy * fluorescent probes * nucleosides * time-resolved spectroscopy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry ; BO - Biophysics (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  20. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) variability in Barataria Basin using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shatrughan; D'Sa, Eurico J; Swenson, Erick M

    2010-07-15

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) variability in Barataria Basin, Louisiana, USA,was examined by excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). CDOM optical properties of absorption and fluorescence at 355nm along an axial transect (36 stations) during March, April, and May 2008 showed an increasing trend from the marine end member to the upper basin with mean CDOM absorption of 11.06 + or - 5.01, 10.05 + or - 4.23, 11.67 + or - 6.03 (m(-)(1)) and fluorescence 0.80 + or - 0.37, 0.78 + or - 0.39, 0.75 + or - 0.51 (RU), respectively. PARAFAC analysis identified two terrestrial humic-like (component 1 and 2), one non-humic like (component 3), and one soil derived humic acid like (component 4) components. The spatial variation of the components showed an increasing trend from station 1 (near the mouth of basin) to station 36 (end member of bay; upper basin). Deviations from this increasing trend were observed at a bayou channel with very high chlorophyll-a concentrations especially for component 3 in May 2008 that suggested autochthonous production of CDOM. The variability of components with salinity indicated conservative mixing along the middle part of the transect. Component 1 and 4 were found to be relatively constant, while components 2 and 3 revealed an inverse relationship for the sampling period. Total organic carbon showed increasing trend for each of the components. An increase in humification and a decrease in fluorescence indices along the transect indicated an increase in terrestrial derived organic matter and reduced microbial activity from lower to upper basin. The use of these indices along with PARAFAC results improved dissolved organic matter characterization in the Barataria Basin. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of Cr2O3 in chrome-tanned leather by radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melich, M.; Palagyi, S.; Kern, M.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary results on the determination of Cr 2 O 3 in chrome-tanned leather by measuring the content of Cr by means of radionuclide-excited XRF analysis are reported. For excitation a 3.7 GBq 238 Pu source was used and the characteristic K X-rays of Cr were detected with a planar Si(Li) detector. Both smooth and rough sides of the leather were analyzed directly or with a pair of V/Ti balanced filters. A fairly good correlation was found between Cr Kx counts of the rough side and the Cr 2 O 3 concentrations determined chemically in the range of 3.5 to 6.0% Cr 2 O 3 . The method renders possible a rapid and non-destructive determination of Cr 2 O 3 in various leather samples. (author)

  2. Rapid qualitative determination of main components in archeological samples by radioisotope-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenberg, C.; Boazi, M.

    1975-01-01

    Archeological specimen were examined by the radioisotope-excited X-ray method to determine their chemical composition. Individual K and L X-rays of Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Mo, Ag, In, Sn and Ba were induced by using 241 Am - I and 241 Am- Tm source- target assemblies. A lithium drifted silicone diode coupled to a 400-channel analyzer was used for detection. No sample preparation was required and all the elements were measured simultaneously in 40 min counting time. The use of different targets coupled with only one primary source makes this technique simple, versatile and economical. The target materials are suitable for exciting K and L X-rayd from potassium to uranium. In addition, the targets, as monoenergetic secondary sources, minimize the background effect. (T.G.)

  3. Seasonal characterization of CDOM for lakes in semi-arid regions of Northeast China using excitation-emission matrices fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Song, K.; Wen, Z.; Li, L.; Zang, S.; Shao, T.; Li, S.; Du, J.

    2015-04-01

    The seasonal characteristics of fluorescence components in CDOM for lakes in the semi-arid region of Northeast China were examined by excitation-emission matrices fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC). Two humic-like peaks C1 (Ex/Em = 230, 300/425 nm) and C2 (Ex/Em = 255, 350/460 nm) and two protein-like B (Ex/Em = 220, 275/320 nm) and T (Ex/Em = 225, 290/360 nm) peaks were identified using PARAFAC. The average fluorescence intensity of the four components differed with seasonal variation from June and August 2013 to February and April 2014. The total fluorescence intensity significantly varied from 2.54 ± 0.68 nm-1 in June to the mean value 1.93 ± 0.70 nm-1 in August 2013, and then increased to 2.34 ± 0.92 nm-1 in February and reduced to the lowest 1.57 ± 0.55 nm-1 in April 2014. In general, the fluorescence intensity was dominated by peak C1, indicating that most part of CDOM for inland waters being investigated in this study was originated from phytoplankton degradation. The lowest C2 represents only a small portion of CDOM from terrestrial imported organic matter to water bodies through rainwash and soil leaching. The two protein-like intensities (B and T) formed in situ through microbial activity have almost the same intensity. Especially, in August 2013 and February 2014, the two protein-like peaks showed obviously difference from other seasons and the highest C1 (1.02 nm-1) was present in February 2014. Components 1 and 2 exhibited strong linear correlation (R2 = 0.633). There were significantly positive linear relationships between CDOM absorption coefficients a(254) (R2 = 0.72, 0.46, p DOC. However, almost no obvious correlation was found between salinity and EEM-PARAFAC extracted components except for C3 (R2 = 0.469). Results from this investigation demonstrate that the EEM-PARAFAC technique can be used to evaluate the seasonal dynamics of CDOM fluorescence components for inland waters in semi-arid regions of Northeast China.

  4. The Reduced Recombination and the Enhanced Lifetime of Excited Electron in QDSSCs Based on Different ZnS and SiO2 Passivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Thanh Tung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on the enhanced absorption and reduced recombination of quantum dot solar cells based on photoanodes which were coated by different ZnS or SiO2 passivations using the successive ionic layer absorption and reaction methods. The quantum dot solar cells based on photoanode multilayers, which were coated with a ZnS or SiO2 passivation, increased dramatic absorption in the visible light region as compared with other photoanodes and reduced rapid recombination proccesses in photovoltaic. As a result, the performance efficiency of TiO2/CdS/CdSe photoanode with SiO2 passivation increased by 150% and 375% compared with TiO2/CdS/CdSe with ZnS passivation and TiO2/CdSe photoanode, respectively. For this reason, we note that the tandem multilayers can absorb more wavelengths in the visible light region to increase a large amount of excited electrons, which are transferred into the TiO2 conduction band, and decrease number of electrons returned to the polysulfide electrolyte from QDs when a ZnS or SiO2 passivation is consumed. Moreover, it is obvious that there was a far shift towards long waves in UV-Vis spectra and a sharp drop of intensity in photoluminescence spectra. In addition, the dynamic process in solar cells was carried out by electrochemical impedance spectra.

  5. Fluorescence F 0 of photosystems II and I in developing C3 and C 4 leaves, and implications on regulation of excitation balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Richard B; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Bichele, Irina; Dall'Osto, Luca; Laisk, Agu

    2014-10-01

    This work addresses the question of occurrence and function of photosystem II (PSII) in bundle sheath (BS) cells of leaves possessing NADP-malic enzyme-type C4 photosynthesis (Zea mays). Although no requirement for PSII activity in the BS has been established, several component proteins of PSII have been detected in BS cells of developing maize leaves exhibiting O2-insensitive photosynthesis. We used the basal fluorescence emissions of PSI (F 0I) and PSII (F 0II) as quantitative indicators of the respective relative photosystem densities. Chl fluorescence induction was measured simultaneously at 680 and 750 nm. In mature leaves, the F m(680)/F 0(680) ratio was 10.5 but less in immature leaves. We propose that the lower ratio was caused by the presence of a distinct non-variable component, F c, emitting at 680 and 750 nm. After F c was subtracted, the fluorescence of PSI (F 0I) was detected as a non-variable component at 750 nm and was undetectably low at 680 nm. Contents of Chls a and b were measured in addition to Chl fluorescence. The Chl b/(a + b) was relatively stable in developing sunflower leaves (0.25-0.26), but in maize it increased from 0.09 to 0.21 with leaf tissue age. In sunflower, the F 0I/(F 0I + F 0II) was 0.39 ± 0.01 independent of leaf age, but in maize, this parameter was 0.65 in young tissue of very low Chl content (20-50 mg m(-2)) falling to a stable level of 0.53 ± 0.01 at Chl contents >100 mg m(-2). The values of F 0I/(F 0I + F 0II) showed that in sunflower, excitation was partitioned between PSII and PSI in a ratio of 2:1, but the same ratio was 1:1 in the C4 plant. The latter is consistent with a PSII:PSI ratio of 2:1 in maize mesophyll cells and PSI only in BS cells (2:1:1 distribution). We suggest, moreover, that redox mediation of Chl synthesis, rather than protein accumulation, regulates photosystem assembly to ensure optimum excitation balance between functional PSII and PSI. Indeed, the apparent necessity for two

  6. PS II model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield measured on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana after excitation with light flashes of different energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2011-02-01

    Our recently presented PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008) was improved in order to permit a consistent simulation of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) traces that were earlier measured by Steffen et al. (2005) on whole leaves of Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana at four different energies of the actinic flash. As the essential modification, the shape of the actinic flash was explicitly taken into account assuming that an exponentially decaying rate simulates the time dependent excitation of PS II by the 10 ns actinic flash. The maximum amplitude of this excitation exceeds that of the measuring light by 9 orders of magnitude. A very good fit of the SFITFY data was achieved in the time domain from 100 ns to 10s for all actinic flash energies (the maximum energy of 7.5 × 10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash) is set to 100%, the relative energies of weaker actinic flashes were of ∼8%, 4%, ∼1%). Our model allows the calculation and visualization of the transient PS II redox state populations ranging from the dark adapted state, via excitation energy and electron transfer steps induced by pulse excitation, followed by final relaxation into the stationary state eventually attained under the measuring light. It turned out that the rate constants of electron transfer steps are invariant to intensity of the actinic laser flash. In marked contrast, an increase of the actinic flash energy by more than two orders of magnitude from 5.4×10¹⁴ photons/(cm²flash) to 7.5×10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash), leads to an increase of the extent of fluorescence quenching due to carotenoid triplet (³Car) formation by a factor of 14 and of the recombination reaction between reduced primary pheophytin (Phe(-)) and P680(+) by a factor of 3 while the heat dissipation in the antenna complex remains virtually constant. The modified PS II model offers new opportunities to compare electron transfer and dissipative parameters for different species (e.g. for the green algae and the

  7. Nonlinear spectral imaging of human normal skin, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S. Y.; Yang, J. G.; Zhuang, J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we use nonlinear spectral imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for analyzing the morphology of collagen and elastin and their biochemical variations in basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and normal skin tissue. It was found in this work that there existed apparent differences among BCC, SCC and normal skin in terms of their thickness of the keratin and epithelial layers, their size of elastic fibers, as well as their distribution and spectral characteristics of collagen. These differences can potentially be used to distinguish BCC and SCC from normal skin, and to discriminate between BCC and SCC, as well as to evaluate treatment responses.

  8. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation for detection of hydrogen atoms in a periphery region of high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee-Je; Kajiwara, Toshinori; Motoyama, Sumio; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo

    1989-01-01

    For measurements of atomic hydrogen density in the periphery region of high temperature plasmas, laser fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS) by two-photon excitation (1s-3s, 3d) was developed. Based upon the theoretical estimates for laser source requirements, which indicated the laser energy and spectral width to be more than 10 mJ (assuming the pulse duration of 10 ns) and several tens of picometers around the wavelength of 205.1 nm, respectively, the first Stokes generation in deuterium gas of ArF laser output was adopted and shown to have the necessary performance. Through the LFS experiment employing the laser source, the minimum detectable limit of atomic hydrogen, normalized by a laser power and an observing solid angle, was demonstrated to be 1 x 10 14 [m -3 · MW · sr], which is usually sufficient for the above purpose, and the accuracy of the density determination was shown to be within a factor 2. (author)

  9. New developments in the analysis and measurement of thicknesses by excitation of the fluorescent lines by means of β particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, P.

    1960-01-01

    The process for analysing and measuring the thickness of deposits by β-X fluorescence which we have already described has undergone further development. The use of promethium-147 and krypton-85 sources makes it possible to reduce the background noise which is observed with strontium-90. We present the results obtained for various measurements of the thickness of metallic coatings and the continuous measurement of calcium and of iron in ore samples. We describe the tests carried out with a view to analysing the X-rays by means of a crystal. (author) [fr

  10. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of quinine sulfate dication bound to sodium dodecylsulfate micelles: Fluorescent complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D., E-mail: ddpant@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-15

    Interaction of quinine sulfate dication (QSD) with anionic, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been studied at different premicellar, micellar and postmicellar concentrations in aqueous phase using steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy techniques. At premicellar concentrations of SDS, the decrease in absorbance, appearance of an extra fluorescence band at lower wavelengths and tri-exponential decay behavior of fluorescence, are attributed to complex formation between QSD molecules and surfactant monomers. At postmicellar concentrations the red shift in fluorescence spectrum, increase in quantum yield and increase in fluorescence lifetimes are attributed to incorporation of solute molecules to micelles. At lower concentrations of SDS, a large shift in fluorescence is observed on excitation at the red edge of absorption spectrum and this is explained in terms of distribution of ion pairs of different energies in the ground state and the observed fluorescence lifetime behavior corroborates with this model. The temporal fluorescence anisotropy decay of QSD in SDS micelles allowed determination of restriction on the motion of the fluorophore. All the different techniques used in this study reveal that the photophysics of QSD is very sensitive to the microenvironments of SDS micelles and QSD molecules reside at the water-micelle interface. -- Highlights: • Probe molecule is very sensitive to microenvironment of micelles. • Highly fluorescent ion-pair formation has been observed. • Modulated photophysics of probe molecule in micellar solutions has been observed. • Probe molecules strongly bind with micelles and reside at probe–micelle interface.

  11. Dual fluorescence of excited state intra-molecular proton transfer of HBFO: mechanistic understanding, substituent and solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjing; Chen, Xuebo

    2014-03-07

    A combined approach of the multiconfigurational perturbation theory with the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus methodology has been employed to calculate the minimum potential energy profiles and the rates of excited state intra-molecular proton transfer (ESIPT) for the WOLED material molecule of HBFO and its four meta- or para-substituted compounds in gas phase, acetonitrile and cyclohexane solvents. The kinetic control for these reactions is quantitatively determined and extensively studied on the basis of the accurate potential energy surfaces when the thermodynamic factor associated with the free energy change becomes negligible in the case of the existence of a significant barrier in the ESIPT process. These computational efforts contribute to a deep understanding of the ESIPT mechanism, dual emission characteristics, kinetic controlling factor, substituent and solvent effects for these material molecules. The white light emission is generated by the establishment of dynamic equilibrium between enol and keto forms in the charge transfer excited SCT((1)ππ*) state. The performance of white light emission is quantitatively demonstrated to be mainly sensitive to the molecular tailoring approach of the electronic properties of meta- or para- substituents by the modulation of the forward/backward ESIPT rate ratio. The quality of white light emission is slightly tunable through its surrounding solvent environment. These computational results will provide a useful strategy for the molecular design of OLED and WOLED materials.

  12. Fully time-resolved near-field scanning optical microscopy fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Eun-Soo; Vanden Bout, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has been coupled with near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to record complete fluorescence lifetime decays at each pixel in an NSOM image. The resulting three-dimensional data sets can be binned in the time dimension to create images of photons at particular time delays or images of the fluorescence lifetime. Alternatively, regions of interest identified in the topography and fluorescence images can be used to bin the data in the spatial dimensions resulting in high signal to noise fluorescence decays of particular regions of the sample. The technique has been demonstrated on films of poly(vinylalcohol), doped with the fluorescent dye, cascade blue (CB). The CB segregates into small circular regions of high concentration within the films during the drying process. The lifetime imaging shows that the spots have slightly faster excited state decays due to quenching of the luminescence as a result of the higher concentration. The technique is also used to image the fluorescence lifetime of an annealed film of poly(dihexylfluorene). The samples show high contrast in the total intensity fluorescence image, but the lifetime image reveals the sample to be extremely uniform

  13. Detection of Copper (II) and Cadmium (II) binding to dissolved organic matter from macrophyte decomposition by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra combined with parallel factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Dong-hai; Guo, Xu-jing; Wen, Li; He, Lian-sheng; Wang, Jing-gang; Li, Jun-qi

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from macrophyte decomposition, and to study its complexation with Cu (II) and Cd (II). Both the protein-like and the humic-like components showed a marked quenching effect by Cu (II). Negligible quenching effects were found for Cd (II) by components 1, 5 and 6. The stability constants and the fraction of the binding fluorophores for humic-like components and Cu (II) can be influenced by macrophyte decomposition of various weight gradients in aquatic plants. Macrophyte decomposition within the scope of the appropriate aquatic phytomass can maximize the stability constant of DOM-metal complexes. A large amount of organic matter was introduced into the aquatic environment by macrophyte decomposition, suggesting that the potential risk of DOM as a carrier of heavy metal contamination in macrophytic lakes should not be ignored. - Highlights: • Macrophyte decomposition increases fluorescent DOM components in the upper sediment. • Protein-like components are quenched or enhanced by adding Cu (II) and Cd (II). • Macrophyte decomposition DOM can impact the affinity of Cu (II) and Cd (II). • The log K M and f values showed a marked change due to macrophyte decomposition. • Macrophyte decomposition can maximize the stability constant of DOM-Cu (II) complexes. - Macrophyte decomposition DOM can influence on the binding affinity of metal ions in macrophytic lakes

  14. Heterogeneous adsorption behavior of landfill leachate on granular activated carbon revealed by fluorescence excitation emission matrix (EEM)-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sonmin; Hur, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous adsorption behavior of landfill leachate on granular activated carbon (GAC) was investigated by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The equilibrium adsorption of two leachates on GAC was well described by simple Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. More nonlinear isotherm and a slower adsorption rate were found for the leachate with the higher values of specific UV absorbance and humification index, suggesting that the leachate containing more aromatic content and condensed structures might have less accessible sites of GAC surface and a lower degree of diffusive adsorption. Such differences in the adsorption behavior were found even within the bulk leachate as revealed by the dissimilarity in the isotherm and kinetic model parameters between two identified PARAFAC components. For both leachates, terrestrial humic-like fluorescence (C1) component, which is likely associated with relatively large sized and condensed aromatic structures, exhibited a higher isotherm nonlinearity and a slower kinetic rate for GAC adsorption than microbial humic-like (C2) component. Our results were consistent with size exclusion effects, a well-known GAC adsorption mechanism. This study demonstrated the promising benefit of using EEM-PARAFAC for GAC adsorption processes of landfill leachate through fast monitoring of the influent and treated leachate, which can provide valuable information on optimizing treatment processes and predicting further environmental impacts of the treated effluent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rapid determination of trace phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, bromine and iodine by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis with monochromatic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakisaka, Tatsushi; Morita, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Tadashi; Nakahara, Taketoshi

    1998-01-01

    A useful and rapid procedure is described for the determination of trace phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, bromine, and iodine by means of an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDXRF) with monochromatic excitations. Using monochromatic excitations, the detection limits for phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine (Cr-Kα, 5.41 keV), bromine (Mo-Kα, 17.44 keV), and iodine (W-continuum, 40 keV) were found to be 4.6, 1.7, 0.7, 0.09 and 0.5 μg g -1 , respectively. The relative standard deviations in five replicate measurements were 0.9-1.3%. The proposed method was applied to the direct determination of sulfur in the NIST Residual Fuel Oil, and others. The results obtained by the proposed method were in good agreement with the certified values. Bromine in a seawater sample, as well as iodine and bromine in a brine sample were determined by the proposed method. The obtained results were in good agreement with those obtained by ion chromatography. (author)

  16. Analysis of trace in Rhododendron ferrigineum leaves for monitoring of urban atmospheric pollution by x-ray fluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation Excitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Jefferson F.; Simabuco, Silvana M.; Jesus, E.F.O. de

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work was perform the biomonitoring of the atmospheric pollution in Campinas City (SP), applying the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation Excitation technique. For this were performed the elemental analysis of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se and Pb in Rhododendron ferrigineum leaves, employed here as bioindicator from environmental pollution in order to evaluate the effects of spatial and climatic contribution on the elemental concentration on the vegetable. Urban and rural sites were sampling in different seasons. The collected leaves were divided in two parts, one of them was washed by detergent and deionized water, in order to quantify the losses due the washing, and the second one was not washed, following the both parts of material were dried in stove, crushed and so the samples were submitted to an nitric-perchloric digestion. The samples were preconcentrated with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC), and the suspension was separated by filtration in cellulose membrane, then the samples were analyzed with X-ray tube and synchrotron radiation excitations. The results obtained shown that the vehicle flow can be associated to the distribution of the elements in the Rhododendrom ferrigineum leaves therefore the climatic contribution was not conclusive. (author)

  17. Characterizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter in Lake Tianmuhu and its catchment basin using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Yin, Yan; Feng, Longqing; Zhu, Guangwei; Shi, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yuanzhi

    2011-10-15

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is an important optically active substance that transports nutrients, heavy metals, and other pollutants from terrestrial to aquatic systems and is used as a measure of water quality. To investigate how the source and composition of CDOM changes in both space and time, we used chemical, spectroscopic, and fluorescence analyses to characterize CDOM in Lake Tianmuhu (a drinking water source) and its catchment in China. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) identified three individual fluorophore moieties that were attributed to humic-like and protein-like materials in 224 water samples collected between December 2008 and September 2009. The upstream rivers contained significantly higher concentrations of CDOM than did the lake water (a(350) of 4.27±2.51 and 2.32±0.59 m(-1), respectively), indicating that the rivers carried a substantial load of organic matter to the lake. Of the three main rivers that flow into Lake Tianmuhu, the Pingqiao River brought in the most CDOM from the catchment to the lake. CDOM absorption and the microbial and terrestrial humic-like components, but not the protein-like component, were significantly higher in the wet season than in other seasons, indicating that the frequency of rainfall and runoff could significantly impact the quantity and quality of CDOM collected from the catchment. The different relationships between the maximum fluorescence intensities of the three PARAFAC components, CDOM absorption, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration in riverine and lake water indicated the difference in the composition of CDOM between Lake Tianmuhu and the rivers that feed it. This study demonstrates the utility of combining excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and PARAFAC to study CDOM dynamics in inland waters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-organising maps and correlation analysis as a tool to explore patterns in excitation-emission matrix data sets and to discriminate dissolved organic matter fluorescence components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejarque-Gonzalez, Elisabet; Butturini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex mixture of organic compounds, ubiquitous in marine and freshwater systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy, by means of Excitation-Emission Matrices (EEM), has become an indispensable tool to study DOM sources, transport and fate in aquatic ecosystems. However the statistical treatment of large and heterogeneous EEM data sets still represents an important challenge for biogeochemists. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOM) has been proposed as a tool to explore patterns in large EEM data sets. SOM is a pattern recognition method which clusterizes and reduces the dimensionality of input EEMs without relying on any assumption about the data structure. In this paper, we show how SOM, coupled with a correlation analysis of the component planes, can be used both to explore patterns among samples, as well as to identify individual fluorescence components. We analysed a large and heterogeneous EEM data set, including samples from a river catchment collected under a range of hydrological conditions, along a 60-km downstream gradient, and under the influence of different degrees of anthropogenic impact. According to our results, chemical industry effluents appeared to have unique and distinctive spectral characteristics. On the other hand, river samples collected under flash flood conditions showed homogeneous EEM shapes. The correlation analysis of the component planes suggested the presence of four fluorescence components, consistent with DOM components previously described in the literature. A remarkable strength of this methodology was that outlier samples appeared naturally integrated in the analysis. We conclude that SOM coupled with a correlation analysis procedure is a promising tool for studying large and heterogeneous EEM data sets.

  19. Homogeneous immunoassay for the cancer marker alpha-fetoprotein using single wavelength excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and fluorescent dyes as labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinjie; Liu, Heng; Huang, Xiangyi; Ren, Jicun

    2016-01-01

    The article describes sensitive and selective homogeneous immunoassays for the liver cancer biomarker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in human serum by using single wavelength excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (SW-FCCS). Both competitive and sandwich immunoassay modes were applied, and AFP served as a model analyte. Fluorescent CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (with a 655 nm emission peak) and the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 488 (520 nm emission) were chosen to label the antibodies in the sandwich mode, and the antibody and the antigen in the competitive mode. Under optimized conditions, the sandwich assay has a linear dynamic range that covers the 20 pM to 5.0 nM concentration range. The competitive assay, in turn, extends from 180 pM to 15.0 nM. The respective detection limits are 20 pM and 180 pM. The method was successfully applied to directly determine AFP in (spiked) clinical samples, and results were in good agreement with data obtained via ELISAs. (author)

  20. Fluorescent Nanodiamonds in Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitura, Katarzyna Anna; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta

    2018-04-18

    Nanoparticles have an extended surface and a large surface area, which is the ratio of the size of the surfacearea to the volume. A functionalized surface can give rise to more modifications and therefore allows this nanomaterial to have new properties. Fluorescent molecules contain fluorophore, which is capable of being excited via the absorption of light energy at a specific wavelength and subsequently emitting radiation energy of a longer wavelength. A chemically modified surface of nanodiamond (ND; by carboxylation) demonstrated biocompatibility with DNA, cytochrome C, and antigens. In turn, fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) belong to a group of new nanomaterials. Their surface can be modified by joining functional groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl, or amino, after which they can be employed as a fluorescence agent. Their fluorescent properties result from defects in the crystal lattice. FNDs reach dimensions of 4-100 nm, have attributes such as photostability, long fluorescence lifetimes (10 ns), and fluorescence emission between 600 and 700 nm. They are also nontoxic, chemically inert, biocompatible, and environmentally harmless. The main purpose of this article was to present the medical applications of various types of modified NDs.