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Sample records for excitation fluorescence lifetime

  1. Toward two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime endomicroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Charles-Henri; Leclerc, Pierre; Fabert, Marc; Brevier, Julien; Habert, Rémi; Braud, Flavie; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Louradour, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) represents a powerful tool for biological studies. Endoscopic FLIM applied to the intracellular native biomarker NADH and FAD represents a promising mean for in vivo in situ malignant tissue diagnosis in the medical field. Else, 2-photon-excited fluorescence (2PEF) provides increased 3D resolution and imaging depth. But very few demonstrations about 2PEF lifetime measurement through a fiber have been reported and none about endoscopic 2P-FLIM through a practical fiber length (FLIM. Our goal is now to check that collecting fluorescence through the same endoscopic fiber does not deteriorate the lifetime measurement. Relying on the basis previously published in case of 1PEF by P. French and co-workers (J. Biophotonics, 2015), we have experimentally quantitatively evaluated the influence on the lifetime measurement of the fiber chromatic and intermodal dispersions. The main result is that the fiber contribution to the system impulse response function, even in the case of a 3-meter long double-clad optical fiber, does not hinder the separation between free and bound NADH states using FLIM. Related calibrations and measurements will be detailed. Ongoing experiments about the development of a 2P-FLIM endomicroscope on the basis of an previously reported 2P-endomicroscope (Ducourthial et al., Sc. Reports, 2015), used under various configurations (i.e. point measurement in the center of the 2P-endomicroscope image, averaged lifetime, binned endoscopic 2P-FLIM image), will be also presented.

  2. Applying two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study photosynthesis in plant leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, K.; Borst, J.W.; Amerongen, van H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates to which extent two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be applied to study picosecond fluorescence kinetics of individual chloroplasts in leaves. Using femtosecond 860 nm excitation pulses, fluorescence lifetimes can be measured in leaves of

  3. Applying two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study photosynthesis in plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broess, Koen; Borst, Jan Willem; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2009-05-01

    This study investigates to which extent two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be applied to study picosecond fluorescence kinetics of individual chloroplasts in leaves. Using femtosecond 860 nm excitation pulses, fluorescence lifetimes can be measured in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and Alocasia wentii under excitation-annihilation free conditions, both for the F (0)- and the F (m)-state. The corresponding average lifetimes are approximately 250 ps and approximately 1.5 ns, respectively, similar to those of isolated chloroplasts. These values appear to be the same for chloroplasts in the top, middle, and bottom layer of the leaves. With the spatial resolution of approximately 500 nm in the focal (xy) plane and 2 microm in the z direction, it appears to be impossible to fully resolve the grana stacks and stroma lamellae, but variations in the fluorescence lifetimes, and thus of the composition on a pixel-to-pixel base can be observed.

  4. Lifetime of fluorescence from light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins: excitation intensity dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordlund, T.M. (Univ. of Rochester, NY); Knox, W.H.

    1981-10-01

    The fluorescence from a purified, aggregate form of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein has a lifetime of 1.2 +/- 0.5 ns at low excitation intensity, but the lifetime decreases significantly when the intensity of the 20-ps, 5300nm excitation pulse is increased above about 10/sup 16/ photons/cm/sup 2/. A solubilized, monomeric form of the protein, on the other hand, has a fluorescence lifetime of 3.1 +/- 0.3 ns independent of excitation intensity from 10/sup 14/-10/sup 18/ photons/cm/sup 2//pulse. We interpret the lifetime shortening in the aggregates and the lack of shortening in monomers in terms of exciton annihilation, facilitated in the aggregate by the larger population of interacting chlorophylls.

  5. Two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy for FRET study on protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Junle; Lin, Ziyang; Liu, Lixin; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Danni; Niu, Hanben

    2005-01-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging (2P-FLIM) provides a more direct and precise approach to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), which allows studying the dynamic behavior of protein-protein interactions in living cells. In this paper, we describe the combination of a Leica TCS SP2 laser scanning microscope and a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) lifetime imaging module developed by Becker & Hickl for two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging. This 2P-FLIM system was used for FRET study on the interaction of heat shock protein hsp27 with p38 MAP kinase in the single living cell. Results show that the reduction in donor (CFP) lifetime in the presence of acceptor (YFP) reveals interactions between the two proteins.

  6. Video-rate two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging system with interleaved digitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Ximeng Y; Sullivan, Shane Z; Muir, Ryan D; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-07-15

    A fast (up to video rate) two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging system based on interleaved digitization is demonstrated. The system is compatible with existing beam-scanning microscopes with minor electronics and software modification. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed using laser dyes and biological tissue.

  7. Parallel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime confocal microscopy for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-05-05

    We present a novel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) method that surpasses current FLIM techniques in multiplexing capability. The method employs Fourier multiplexing to simultaneously acquire confocal fluorescence lifetime images of multiple excitation wavelength and emission color combinations at 44,000 pixels/sec. The system is built with low-cost CW laser sources and standard PMTs with versatile spectral configuration, which can be implemented as an add-on to commercial confocal microscopes. The Fourier lifetime confocal method allows fast multiplexed FLIM imaging, which makes it possible to monitor multiple biological processes in live cells. The low cost and compatibility with commercial systems could also make multiplexed FLIM more accessible to biological research community.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; Rietdorf, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique to map the spatial distribution of nanosecond excited state lifetimes within microscopic images. FLIM systems have been implemented both in the frequency domain, using sinusoidally intensity-modulated excitation light and modulated

  9. Two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging and spectroscopy of melanins in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Stringari, Chiara; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Gratton, Enrico; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Changes in the amounts of cellular eumelanin and pheomelanin have been associated with carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to develop methods based on two-photon-excited-fluorescence (TPEF) for measuring relative concentrations of these compounds. We acquire TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000 nm) of melanin in vitro from melanoma cells, hair specimens, and in vivo from healthy volunteers. We find that the pheomelanin emission peaks at approximately 615 to 625 nm and eumelanin exhibits a broad maximum at 640 to 680 nm. Based on these data we define an optical melanin index (OMI) as the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 645 and 615 nm. The measured OMI for the MNT-1 melanoma cell line is 1.6±0.22 while the Mc1R gene knockdown lines MNT-46 and MNT-62 show substantially greater pheomelanin production (OMI=0.5±0.05 and 0.17±0.03, respectively). The measured values are in good agreement with chemistry-based melanin extraction methods. In order to better separate melanin fluorescence from other intrinsic fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of in vitro specimens. The relative concentrations of keratin, eumelanin, and pheomelanin components are resolved using a phasor approach for analyzing lifetime data. Our results suggest that a noninvasive TPEF index based on spectra and lifetime could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma by two photon excited fluorescence combined with lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shunping; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Liu, Shaoxiong; Lu, Yuan; Qu, Junle

    2014-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of human skin cancer. The traditional diagnostic procedure of BCC is histological examination with haematoxylin and eosin staining of the tissue biopsy. In order to reduce complexity of the diagnosis procedure, a number of noninvasive optical methods have been applied in skin examination, for example, multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this study, we explored two-photon optical tomography of human skin specimens using two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging and FLIM. There are a number of naturally endogenous fluorophores in skin sample, such as keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin, flavin and porphyrin. Confocal microscopy was used to obtain structures of the sample. Properties of epidermic and cancer cells were characterized by fluorescence emission spectra, as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging. Our results show that two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging can provide accurate optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and is potentially a quantitative optical diagnostic method in skin cancer diagnosis.

  11. Adaptive optics two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy of exogenous fluorophores in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeks, James A; Hunter, Jennifer J

    2017-05-01

    In vivo cellular scale fluorescence lifetime imaging of the mouse retina has the potential to be a sensitive marker of retinal cell health. In this study, we demonstrate fluorescence lifetime imaging of extrinsic fluorophores using adaptive optics fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (AOFLIO). We recorded AOFLIO images of inner retinal cells labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and capillaries labeled with fluorescein. We demonstrate that AOFLIO can be used to differentiate spectrally overlapping fluorophores in the retina. With further refinements, AOFLIO could be used to assess retinal health in early stages of degeneration by utilizing lifetime-based sensors or even fluorophores native to the retina.

  12. Two-photon excitation with pico-second fluorescence lifetime imaging to detect nuclear association of flavanols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Harvey, Irene, E-mail: i.mueller-harvey@reading.ac.uk [Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory, Food Production and Quality Research Division, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, P O Box 236, Reading RG6 6AT (United Kingdom); Feucht, Walter, E-mail: walter.feucht@gmail.com [Department of Plant Sciences, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Polster, Juergen, E-mail: j.polster@wzw.tum.de [Department of Physical Biochemistry, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Trnkova, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.trnkova@uhk.cz [University of Hradec Kralove, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Rokitanskeho 62, 50003 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Burgos, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.burgos@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Parker, Anthony W., E-mail: tony.parker@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Botchway, Stanley W., E-mail: stan.botchway@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) technique for flavanols overcomes autofluorescence interference in cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plant flavanols differed in their lifetimes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dissolved and bound flavanols revealed contrasting lifetime changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique will allow studying of flavanol trafficking in live cells. - Abstract: Two-photon excitation enabled for the first time the observation and measurement of excited state fluorescence lifetimes from three flavanols in solution, which were {approx}1.0 ns for catechin and epicatechin, but <45 ps for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The shorter lifetime for EGCG is in line with a lower fluorescence quantum yield of 0.003 compared to catechin (0.015) and epicatechin (0.018). In vivo experiments with onion cells demonstrated that tryptophan and quercetin, which tend to be major contributors of background fluorescence in plant cells, have sufficiently low cross sections for two-photon excitation at 630 nm and therefore do not interfere with detection of externally added or endogenous flavanols in Allium cepa or Taxus baccata cells. Applying two-photon excitation to flavanols enabled 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and showed that added EGCG penetrated the whole nucleus of onion cells. Interestingly, EGCG and catechin showed different lifetime behaviour when bound to the nucleus: EGCG lifetime increased from <45 to 200 ps, whilst catechin lifetime decreased from 1.0 ns to 500 ps. Semi-quantitative measurements revealed that the relative ratios of EGCG concentrations in nucleoli associated vesicles: nucleus: cytoplasm were ca. 100:10:1. Solution experiments with catechin, epicatechin and histone proteins provided preliminary evidence, via the appearance of a second lifetime ({tau}{sub 2} = 1.9-3.1 ns), that both flavanols may be interacting with histone proteins. We conclude that there

  13. Mercury effects on Thalassiosira weissflogii: Applications of two-photon excitation chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging and flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yun [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Zeng Yan; Qu, Jianan Y. [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2012-04-15

    The toxic effects of inorganic mercury [Hg(II)] and methylmercury (MeHg) on the photosynthesis and population growth in a marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii were investigated using two methods: two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and flow cytometry (FCM). For photosynthesis, Hg(II) exposure increased the average chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime, whereas such increment was not found under MeHg stress. This may be caused by the inhibitory effect of Hg(II) instead of MeHg on the electron transport chain. For population growth, modeled specific growth rate data showed that the reduction in population growth by Hg(II) mainly resulted from an increased number of injured cells, while the live cells divided at the normal rates. However, MeHg inhibitory effects on population growth were contributed by the reduced division rates of all cells. Furthermore, the cell images and the FCM data reflected the morphological changes of diatom cells under Hg(II)/MeHg exposure vividly and quantitatively. Our results demonstrated that the toxigenicity mechanisms between Hg(II) and MeHg were different in the algal cells.

  14. Two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with sub-nanosecond pulses and a high analog bandwidth signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Hakert, Hubertus; Weng, Daniel; Huber, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) are powerful imaging techniques in bio-molecular science. The need for elaborate light sources for TPEF and speed limitations for FLIM, however, hinder an even wider application. We present a way to overcome this limitations by combining a robust and inexpensive fiber laser for nonlinear excitation with a fast analog digitization method for rapid FLIM imaging. The applied sub nanosecond pulsed laser source is synchronized to a high analog bandwidth signal detection for single shot TPEF- and single shot FLIM imaging. The actively modulated pulses at 1064nm from the fiber laser are adjustable from 50ps to 5ns with kW of peak power. At a typically applied pulse lengths and repetition rates, the duty cycle is comparable to typically used femtosecond pulses and thus the peak power is also comparable at same cw-power. Hence, both types of excitation should yield the same number of fluorescence photons per time on average when used for TPEF imaging. However, in the 100ps configuration, a thousand times more fluorescence photons are generated per pulse. In this paper, we now show that the higher number of fluorescence photons per pulse combined with a high analog bandwidth detection makes it possible to not only use a single pulse per pixel for TPEF imaging but also to resolve the exponential time decay for FLIM. To evaluate the performance of our system, we acquired FLIM images of a Convallaria sample with pixel rates of 1 MHz where the lifetime information is directly measured with a fast real time digitizer. With the presented results, we show that longer pulses in the many-10ps to nanosecond regime can be readily applied for TPEF imaging and enable new imaging modalities like single pulse FLIM.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  16. Mean fluorescence lifetime and its error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiserova, Eva [Department of Mathematical Analysis and Applications of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kubala, Martin, E-mail: mkubala@prfnw.upol.cz [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-15

    Mean excited-state lifetime is one of the fundamental fluorescence characteristics and enters as an important parameter into numerous calculations characterizing molecular interactions, such as e.g. FRET or fluorescence quenching. Our experiments demonstrated that the intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic, in contrast to the amplitude-weighted one, which value is dependent on the data quality and particularly on the used fitting model. For the first time, we also report the procedure for the error estimation for both the intensity- and amplitude-weighted mean fluorescence lifetimes. Furthermore, we present a method for estimation of the mean fluorescence lifetime directly from the fluorescence-decay curve recorded by TCSPC (Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting) method. For its simplicity and low computational demands, it could be a useful tool in the high-throughput applications, such as FACS, FLIM-FRET or HPLC detectors. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amplitude-weighted mean lifetime depends on the selection of fitting model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigorous procedure for estimation of confidence intervals for mean lifetime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean lifetime can be estimated directly from the TCSPC histogram.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime selectivity in excitation-emission matrices for qualitative analysis of a two-component system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millican, D.W.; McGown, L.B. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA))

    1989-03-15

    Steady-state fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and phase-resolved EEMs (PREEMs) collected at modulation frequencies of 6, 18, and 30 MHz, were used for qualitative analysis of mixtures of benzo(k)fluoranthene ({tau} = 8 ns) and benzo(b)fluoranthene ({tau} = 29 ns) in ethanol. The EEMs of the individual components were extracted from mixture EEMs by means of wavelength component vector-gram (WCV) analysis. Phase resolution was found to be superior to steady-state measurements for extraction of the component spectra, for mixtures in which the intensity contributions from the two components are unequal.

  18. Two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-01-01

    We discovered that hemoglobin emits high energy Soret fluorescence when two-photon excited by the visible femtosecond light sources. The unique spectral and temporal characteristics of hemoglobin fluorescence were measured by using a time-resolved spectroscopic detection system. The high energy Soret fluorescence of hemoglobin shows the spectral peak at 438 nm with extremely short lifetime. This discovery enables two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy to become a potentially powerful t...

  19. Multiplexed fluorescence lifetime measurements by frequency-sweeping Fourier spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Peng, Leilei

    2010-09-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes at multiple excitation wavelengths with a Fourier transform frequency domain fluorescence lifetime spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a Michelson interferometer with its differential optical path length scanning at a 22,000 Hz scan rate. The scan speed of the optical delay varies linearly during each scan and creates interference modulations that sweep from -150 to 150 MHz in 45.5 micros. The frequency-sweeping modulation allows nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements within 45.5 micros. Because the interference modulation frequency is wavelength dependent, under the Fourier multiplexing principle, the spectrometer can perform lifetime measurements on multiple excitation wavelengths simultaneously.

  20. System for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geest, Lambertus K.; Boddeke, Frank R.; van Dijk, Pieter W.; Kamp, Arjen F.; van der Oord, Cornelius J. R.; Stoop, Karel W. J.

    1999-05-01

    One of the promising recent developments in fluorescence microscopy is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this technique the fluorescence lifetime (ns range) of molecules is expressed in the image rather than the intensity of the light emitted by these molecules. This physical property is of interest as it gives information about the local environment of the molecule, such as molecular concentration of O2, Ca2+, pH, and conjugation. We develop an affordable, robust and easy-to-use FLIM workstation which is completely automated and does not need any difficult calibration procedure. The system consists of a standard fluorescence microscope, a modulated excitation light source, a camera, a modulation signal generator and acquisition/processing software. The camera contains an Intensified CCD of which the image intensifier gain is modulated. Depending on the application different light sources can be selected. The current light source contains a 12 mW modulated laser-diode emitting at 635 nm. A homodyne detection scheme with modulation frequencies of 1 to 100 MHz is applied, aiming at a resolution of 0.1 ns or better. High level image acquisition strategies are implemented in software, along with the low level image processing routines for lifetime estimation, calibration and correction. An evaluation of the system and its critical components will be presented in this paper.

  1. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Quantum Dot Labeled DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G. Terry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot (QD labeling combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is proposed as a powerful transduction technique for the detection of DNA hybridization events. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA microarray spots of hybridized QD labeled target indicated a characteristic lifetime value of 18.8 ns, compared to 13.3 ns obtained for spots of free QD solution, revealing that QD labels are sensitive to the spot microenvironment. Additionally, time gated detection was shown to improve the microarray image contrast ratio by 1.8, achieving femtomolar target sensitivity. Finally, lifetime multiplexing based on Qdot525 and Alexa430 was demonstrated using a single excitation-detection readout channel.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  3. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I. [Becker & Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, Berlin 12277 (Germany); Institute of Biomedical Technologies, Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy, Minin and Pozharsky Square, 10/1, Nizhny Novgorod 603005 (Russian Federation); Neubauer, A.; Becker, W. [Becker & Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, Berlin 12277 (Germany); Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Str. 10, Berlin 13092 (Germany)

    2016-02-29

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  4. Flow cytometric fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA binding fluorochromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissman, Harry A.; Cui, H. H. (H. Helen); Steinkamp, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Most flow cytometry (FCM) applications monitor fluorescence intensity to quantitate the various cellular parameters; however, the fluorescence emission also contains information relative to the fluorescence lifetime. Recent developments in FCM (Pinsky et al., 1993; Steinkamp & Crissman, 1993; Steinkamp et al., 1993), provide for the measurement of fluorescence lifetime which is also commonly referred to as fluorescence decay, or the time interval in which a fluorochrome remains in the excited state. Many unbound fluorochromes have characteristic lifetime values that are determined by their molecular structure; however, when the probe becomes bound, the lifetime value is influenced by a number of factors that affect the probe interaction with a target molecule. Monitoring the changes in the lifetime of the probe yields information relating to the molecular conformation, the functional state or activity of the molecular target. In addition, the lifetime values can be used as signatures to resolve the emissions of multiple fluorochrome labels with overlapping emission spectra that cannot be resolved by conventional FCM methodology. Such strategies can increase the number of fluorochrome combinations used in a flow cytometer with a single excitation source. Our studies demonstrate various applications of lifetime measurements for the analysis of the binding of different fluorochromes to DNA in single cells. Data presented in this session will show the utility of lifetime measurements for monitoring changes in chromatin structure associated with cell cycle progression, cellular differentiation, or DNA damage, such as induced during apoptosis. Several studies show that dyes with specificity for nucleic acids display different lifetime values when bound to DNA or to dsRNA. The Phase Sensitive Flow Cytometer is a multiparameter instrument, capable of performing lifetime measurements in conjunction with all the conventional FCM measurements. Future modifications of this

  5. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Bobin George Abraham; Karen S Sarkisyan; Mishin, Alexander S.; Ville Santala; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Matti Karp

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicit...

  6. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Gordon T; Munro, Ian; Poher, Vincent; French, Paul M W; Neil, Mark A A [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Elson, Daniel S [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hares, Jonathan D [Kentech Instruments Ltd, Unit 9, Hall Farm Workshops, South Moreton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 9AG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gordon.kennedy@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-05-07

    We demonstrate flexible use of low cost, high-power light emitting diodes as illumination sources for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques have been implemented at wavelengths spanning the range 450-640 nm. Additionally, we demonstrate optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging by combining structured illumination with frequency-domain FLIM.

  7. Clinical results of fluorescence lifetime imaging in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, D.; Quick, S.; Klemm, M.; Hammer, M.; Jentsch, S.; Dawczynski, J.; Becker, W.

    2009-07-01

    A laser scanner ophthalmoscope was developed for in vivo fluorescence lifetime measurements at the human retina. Measurements were performed in 30 degree fundus images. The fundus was excited by pulses of 75 ps (FWHM). The dynamic fluorescence was detected in two spectral channels K1(490-560nm), K2(560-700 nm) by time-correlated single photon counting. The decay of fluorescence was three-exponentially. Local and global alterations in lifetimes were found between healthy subjects and patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and vessel occlusion. The lifetimes T1, T2, and T3 in both channels are changed to longer values in AMD and diabetic retinopathy in comparison with healthy subjects. The lifetime T2 in K1 is most sensitive to metabolic alterations in branch arterial vessel occlusion.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in dental biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; de Grauw, Cees J.

    2000-12-01

    Dental biofilm consists of micro-colonies of bacteria embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and salivary proteins. pH and oxygen concentration are of great importance in dental biofilm. Both can be measured using fluorescence techniques. The imaging of dental biofilm is complicated by the thickness of the biofilms that can be up to several hundred micrometers thick. Here, we employed a combination of two-photon excitation microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify the oxygen concentration in dental biofilm. Collisional quenching of fluorescent probes by molecular oxygen leads to a reduction of the fluorescence lifetime of the probe. We employed this mechanism to measure the oxygen concentration distribution in dental biofilm by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. Here, TRIS Ruthenium chloride hydrate was used as an oxygen probe. A calibration procedure on buffers was use to measure the lifetime response of this Ruthenium probe. The results are in agreement with the Stern-Volmer equation. A linear relation was found between the ratio of the unquenched and the quenched lifetime and the oxygen concentration. The biofilm fluorescence lifetime imaging results show a strong oxygen gradient at the buffer - biofilm interface and the average oxygen concentration in the biofilm amounted to 50 μM.

  9. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver to NASA an innovative, portable, and power efficient Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer...

  10. Solvent dependence of cyanoindole fluorescence lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilaire, Mary Rose; Mukherjee, Debopreeti; Troxler, Thomas; Gai, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Several cyanotryptophans have been shown to be useful biological fluorophores. However, how their fluorescence lifetimes vary with solvent has not been examined. In this regard, herein we measure the fluorescence decay kinetics as well as the absorption and emission spectra of six cyanoindoles in different solvents. In particular, we find, among other results, that only 4-cyanoindole affords a long fluorescence lifetime and hence high quantum yield in H2O. Therefore, our measurements provide not only a guide for choosing which cyanotryptophan to use in practice but also data for computational modeling of the substitution effect on the electronic transitions of indole.

  11. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  12. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean C; Margineanu, Anca; Alibhai, Dominic; Kelly, Douglas J; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Katan, Matilda; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M W

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset). This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis of live cell

  13. Early Amyloidogenic Oligomerization Studied through Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Orte

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidogenic protein aggregation is a persistent biomedical problem. Despite active research in disease-related aggregation, the need for multidisciplinary approaches to the problem is evident. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy are valuable for examining heterogenic biomolecular systems. In this work, we have explored the initial stages of amyloidogenic aggregation by employing fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS, an advanced modification of conventional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS that utilizes time-resolved information. FLCS provides size distributions and kinetics for the oligomer growth of the SH3 domain of α-spectrin, whose N47A mutant forms amyloid fibrils at pH 3.2 and 37 °C in the presence of salt. The combination of FCS with additional fluorescence lifetime information provides an exciting approach to focus on the initial aggregation stages, allowing a better understanding of the fibrillization process, by providing multidimensional information, valuable in combination with other conventional methodologies.

  14. Timing and Operating Mode Design for Time-Gated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state fluorence imaging and time-resolved fluorescence imaging are two important areas in fluorescence imaging research. Fluorescence lifetime imaging is an absolute measurement method which is independent of excitation laser intensity, fluorophore concentration, and photobleaching compared to fluorescence intensity imaging techniques. Time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM can provide high resolution and high imaging frame during mature FLIM methods. An abstract time-gated FLIM model was given, and important temporal parameters are shown as well. Aiming at different applications of steady and transient fluorescence processes, two different operation modes, timing and lifetime computing algorithm are designed. High resolution and high frame can be achieved by one-excitation one-sampling mode and least square algorithm for steady imaging applications. Correspondingly, one-excitation two-sampling mode and rapid lifetime determination algorithm contribute to transient fluorescence situations.

  15. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  16. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin George Abraham

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM.

  17. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM).

  18. New measurements of the lifetimes of excited states of Mn55 below 2.7 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggiano, J. A.; Hasty, R. D.; Korbly, S. E.; Park, W. H.; Warren, G. A.

    2009-09-01

    The lifetimes of the excited states of Mn55 between 1.5 and 2.7 MeV were measured using nuclear resonance fluorescence. The absolute lifetimes of the excited levels were determined from simultaneous measurements of manganese and aluminum. In this approach, the precisely known aluminum state serves as a means to normalize the results. Our findings differ from the evaluated level lifetimes in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), but agree with earlier nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements.

  19. Prostate cancer diagnosis with fluorescence lifetime imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F.; Dall'Era, Marc; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    More than 1 million men in the United States undergo a prostate biopsy procedure annually and approximately 200,000 men receive a diagnosis of prostate cancer. 5-10% of these men have to undergo a repeat biopsy due to insufficient tissue sampling. We are studying the utility of a multi-spectral time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (MS-TRFS) technique for real-time prostate cancer diagnosis. The MS-TRFS imaging setup, which includes a fiberoptic set-up with a 355nm excitation light source coupled with a blue (450nm) aiming beam, was used to image ex-vivo prostatectomy specimen. The prostate tissue from 11 patients was sectioned at 2mm thickness and the fluorescence lifetime information was overlaid spatially for histology and thus, diagnostic co-registration. Initial results show that fluorescence lifetime in the 390±40nm channel, which measures collagen and elastin signatures, is longer for glandular regions than in the stromal regions. Additionally, lifetime in the 452±45nm channel, corresponding to NAD redox state, is longer in the cancerous glandular region in comparison with the normal glandular regions. Current work is focused on developing real-time quantitative algorithms to combine the fluorescence signatures from the two channels for performing prostate cancer diagnosis on biopsies.

  20. A hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime probe for skin cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beule, P. A. A.; Dunsby, C.; Galletly, N. P.; Stamp, G. W.; Chu, A. C.; Anand, U.; Anand, P.; Benham, C. D.; Naylor, A.; French, P. M. W.

    2007-12-01

    The autofluorescence of biological tissue can be exploited for the detection and diagnosis of disease but, to date, its complex nature and relatively weak signal levels have impeded its widespread application in biology and medicine. We present here a portable instrument designed for the in situ simultaneous measurement of autofluorescence emission spectra and temporal decay profiles, permitting the analysis of complex fluorescence signals. This hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime probe utilizes two ultrafast lasers operating at 355 and 440nm that can excite autofluorescence from many different biomolecules present in skin tissue including keratin, collagen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), and flavins. The instrument incorporates an optical fiber probe to provide sample illumination and fluorescence collection over a millimeter-sized area. We present a description of the system, including spectral and temporal characterizations, and report the preliminary application of this instrument to a study of recently resected (skin lesions, illustrating its potential for skin cancer detection and diagnosis.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime standards for time and frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boens, N.; Qin, Wenwu; Basaric, N.; Hofkens, J.; Ameloot, M.; Pouget, J.; Lefevre, J.P.; Valeur, B.; Gratton, E.; Ven, van de M.; Silva jr., D.; Engelborghs, Y.; Willaert, K.; Sillen, A.; Rumbles, G.; Philips, D.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Hoek, van A.; Lakowicz, J.R.; Malak, H.; Gryczynski, I.; Szabo, A.G.; Krajcarski, D.T.; Tamai, N.; Miura, A.

    2007-01-01

    A series of fluorophores with single-exponential fluorescence decays in liquid solution at 20 C were measured independently by nine laboratories using single-photon timing and multifrequency phase and modulation fluorometry instruments with lasers as excitation source. The dyes that can serve as

  2. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D., E-mail: salthouse@ecs.umass.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J. [Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Chemical Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 μM. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  3. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. phiFLIM: a new method to avoid aliasing in frequency domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Gadella, Th.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    In conventional wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), excitation light is intensity-modulated at megahertz frequencies. Emitted fluorescence is recorded by a CCD camera through an image intensifier, which is modulated at the same frequency. From images recorded

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data analysis with TIMP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laptenok, S.; Mullen, K.M.; Borst, J.W.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Apanasovich, V.V.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) allows fluorescence lifetime images of biological objects to be collected at 250 nm spatial resolution and at (sub-)nanosecond temporal resolution. Often ncomp kinetic processes underlie the observed fluorescence at all locations, but the intensity of

  6. Molecular Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarder, Pinaki; Maji, Dolonchampa; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of biological processes and pathologic conditions at the cellular and tissue levels largely rely on the use of fluorescence intensity signals from fluorophores or their bioconjugates. To overcome the concentration dependency of intensity measurements, evaluate subtle molecular interactions, and determine biochemical status of intracellular or extracellular microenvironments, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging has emerged as a reliable imaging method complementary to intensity measurements. Driven by a wide variety of dyes exhibiting stable or environment-responsive FLTs, information multiplexing can be readily accomplished without the need for ratiometric spectral imaging. With knowledge of the fluorescent states of the molecules, it is entirely possible to predict the functional status of biomolecules or microevironment of cells. Whereas the use of FLT spectroscopy and microscopy in biological studies is now well established, in vivo imaging of biological processes based on FLT imaging techniques is still evolving. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of the FLT of molecular probes for imaging cells and small animal models of human diseases. It also highlights some challenges that continue to limit the full realization of the potential of using FLT molecular probes to address diverse biological problems, and outlines areas of potential high impact in the future. PMID:25961514

  7. Stroboscopic optical boxcar technique for the determination of fluorescence lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Douglas R.; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander; Ware, William R.

    1992-02-01

    This work describes a stroboscopic optical boxcar technique for the determination of fluorescence lifetimes which achieves performance comparable to techniques such as time-correlated single photon counting or phase modulation. The stroboscopic technique is based on the use of a traveling wave injected into a delay line connecting the dynodes of a photomultiplier tube. The transient potential difference created between two adjacent dynodes results simultaneously in significant amplification and the generation of a ``gate'' for the amplification process. Accurate control of the timing between the flashing of the gated lamp and the computer controlled delayable triggering of the photomultiplier tube pulser allows the gate to be placed at any time position within the range of the digital delay generator. The intensity of the fluorescence emission can thus be measured as a function of time relative to the excitation flash yielding data which is very similar to that from time-correlated single photon counting. Data analysis is done by iterative reconvolution in a procedure very similar to the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting data. Fluorescence lifetimes from a few hundred picoseconds to hundreds of nanoseconds can be determined to an accuracy and precision of better than ±2%.

  8. Fluorescent multiple chemical sensing using time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Nagl, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging in multiple chemical sensing approaches. Using fluorescence lifetime as an analytical parameter allows extracting more information out of probes than fluorescence intensity measurements and it is therefore attractive in order to quantitate multiple species. It leads to better data quality as fluorescence lifetime measurements are not or less affected by many sources of noise in fluorescence signals such as straylight and othe...

  9. Multiphoton fluorescence spectra and lifetimes of biliverdins and their protein-associated complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chin-Jie; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2012-03-01

    To investigate whether endogenous biliverdins can serve as a fluorescence metabolic marker in cancer diagnosis, we measured their multiphoton fluorescence spectra and lifetimes with femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser. Excited at 1230nm, the two-photon fluorescence of biliverdins peaks around 670nm. The corresponding lifetime (biliverdins with proteins like fetal bovine serum (FBS), biliverdins reductase A (BVRA), or heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the yields of red autofluorescences didn't change a lot, but the corresponding lifetimes with HO-1 and BSA were lengthened to 200~300ps. This indicates that biliverdin can have an association with these proteins and change its lifetime. These spectral and temporal characteristics of fluorescence make biliverdin a potential marker fluorophore for hyperspectral diagnosis on the heme catabolism in human cells or tissues.

  10. Surface plasmon-enhanced and quenched two-photon excited fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C.-Y.; Lien, C.-H.; Chiu, K.-C.; Chang, C.-Y.; Chang, S.-H.; Guo, T.-F.; Chen, S.-J.

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated theoretically and experimentally that two-photon excited fluorescence is enhanced and quenched via surface plasmons (SPs) excited by total internal reflection with a silver film. The fluorescence intensity is fundamentally affected by the local electromagnetic field enhancement and the quantum yield change according to the surrounding structure and materials. By utilizing the Fresnel equation and classical dipole radiation modeling, local electric field enhancement, fluorescence quantum yield, and fluorescence emission coupling yield via SPs were theoretically analyzed at different dielectric spacer thicknesses between the fluorescence dye and the metal film. The fluorescence lifetime was also decreased substantially via the quenching effect. A two-photon excited total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy with a time-correlated single photon counting device has been developed to measure the fluorescence lifetimes, photostabilities, and enhancements. The experimental results demonstrate that the fluorescence lifetimes and the trend of the enhancements are consistent with the theoretical analysis. The maximum fluorescence enhancement factor in the surface plasmon-total internal reflection fluorescence (SP-TIRF) configuration can be increased up to 30 fold with a suitable thickness SiO2 spacer. Also, to compromise for the fluorescence enhancement and the fluorophore photostability, we find that the SP-TIRF configuration with a 10 nm SiO2 spacer can provide an enhanced and less photobleached fluorescent signal via the assistance of enhanced local electromagnetic field and quenched fluorescence lifetime, respectively.

  11. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence lifetime measurements of the macula using the fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Quellec, Gwénolé; Abegg, Mathias; Menke, Marcel N; Wolf-Schnurrbusch, Ute; Kowal, Jens; Blatz, Johannes; La Schiazza, Olivier; Leichtle, Alexander B; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2014-04-03

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) cannot only be characterized by the intensity or the emission spectrum, but also by its lifetime. As the lifetime of a fluorescent molecule is sensitive to its local microenvironment, this technique may provide more information than fundus autofluorescence imaging. We report here the characteristics and repeatability of FAF lifetime measurements of the human macula using a new fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (FLIO). A total of 31 healthy phakic subjects were included in this study with an age range from 22 to 61 years. For image acquisition, a fluorescence lifetime ophthalmoscope based on a Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system was used. Fluorescence lifetime maps of the retina were recorded in a short- (498-560 nm) and a long- (560-720 nm) spectral channel. For quantification of fluorescence lifetimes a standard ETDRS grid was used. Mean fluorescence lifetimes were shortest in the fovea, with 208 picoseconds for the short-spectral channel and 239 picoseconds for the long-spectral channel, respectively. Fluorescence lifetimes increased from the central area to the outer ring of the ETDRS grid. The test-retest reliability of FLIO was very high for all ETDRS areas (Spearman's ρ = 0.80 for the short- and 0.97 for the long-spectral channel, P macula in healthy subjects. By using a custom-built software, we were able to quantify fluorescence lifetimes within the ETDRS grid. Establishing a clinically accessible standard against which to measure FAF lifetimes within the retina is a prerequisite for future studies in retinal disease.

  12. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  13. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  14. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  15. Construction and characterization of a frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, T.W.J.; van Hoek, A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    1997-01-01

    The construction of a homodyne frequency domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope is described. The system consists of (i) an intensity-modulated laser excitation source, (ii) an epifluorescence microscope, (iii) a gain-modulated microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier, and (iv) a

  16. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  17. Lifetimes of excited states in neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilieva, Stoyanka; Kroell, Thorsten [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: EXILL-FATIMA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The EXILL and FATIMA campaign at ILL, Grenoble is the first prompt-fission γ-ray spectroscopy experiment performed with a mixed array of Ge detectors (EXILL) and fast LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators (FATIMA). The lifetimes of excited states, populated by neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu targets, were directly measured. The high-resolution EXILL detector gives us the possibility to identify the nuclides of interest among the large amount of produced fission fragments. Using the generalized centroid difference method to analyse the data from FATIMA we could measure lifetimes down to ∼ 10 ps. The lifetime of an excited state is a direct measure for the strength (collectivity) of a transition. The properties of the excited states in even-even nuclei can be largely described by quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom. This contribution will present the current status of the analysis for the neutron-rich even-even {sup 138,140,142}Xe isotopes which lie in the vicinity of the double shell closure Z=50 and N=82. Through the direct lifetime measurement we aim to study the evolution of quadrupole and octupole collectivity above {sup 132}Sn.

  18. Refractive index sensing using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    The fluorescence lifetime is a function of the refractive index of the fluorophore's environment, for example in the case of the biologically important green fluorescent protein (GFP). In order to address the question whether this effect can be exploited to image the local environment of specific proteins in cell biology, we need to determine the distance over which the fluorophore's lifetime is sensitive to the refractive index. To this end, we employ Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) of fluorescein in NaOH buffer at an interface. This approach allows us to map the fluorescence lifetime as a function of distance from a buffer/air and buffer/oil interface. Preliminary data show that the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein increases near a buffer/air interface and decreases near a buffer/oil interface. The range over which this fluorescence lifetime change occurs is found to be of the order several {mu}m which is consistent with a theoretical model based on the full width at half maximum of the emission spectrum proposed by Toptygin.

  19. Development of a time-gated fluorescence lifetime microscope for in vivo corneal metabolic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana F.; Batista, Ana; Castejón, Olga C.; Quadrado, Maria João.; Domingues, José Paulo; Morgado, Miguel

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic imaging can be a valuable tool in the early diagnosis of corneal diseases. Cell metabolic changes can be assessed through non-invasive optical methods due to the autofluorescence of metabolic co-factors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Both molecules exhibit double exponential fluorescence decays, with well-separated short and long lifetime components, which are related to their protein-bound and free states. Corneal metabolism can be monitored by measuring the relative contribution of these two components. Here we report on the development of a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for in vivo measurement of FAD fluorescence lifetimes in corneal cells. The microscope is based on one-photon fluorescence excitation, through a pulsed blue diode laser. Fluorescence lifetime imaging is achieved using the Time-Gated technique. Structured illumination is used to improve the low axial resolution of wide-field time-gated FLIM. A Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is used to produce the sinusoidal patterns required by structural illumination. The DMD control is integrated with the acquisition software of the imaging system which is based on an ultra-high speed gated image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera. We present preliminary results concerning optical and timing performance of the fluorescence lifetime microscope. Preliminary tests with ex-vivo bovine corneas are also described.

  20. Digital Analysis and Sorting of Fluorescence Lifetime by Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Jessica P.; Naivar, Mark A.; Freyer, James P.

    2010-01-01

    Frequency-domain flow cytometry techniques are combined with modifications to the digital signal processing capabilities of the Open Reconfigurable Cytometric Acquisition System (ORCAS) to analyze fluorescence decay lifetimes and control sorting. Real-time fluorescence lifetime analysis is accomplished by rapidly digitizing correlated, radiofrequency modulated detector signals, implementing Fourier analysis programming with ORCAS’ digital signal processor (DSP) and converting the processed data into standard cytometric list mode data. To systematically test the capabilities of the ORCAS 50 MS/sec analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and our DSP programming, an error analysis was performed using simulated light scatter and fluorescence waveforms (0.5–25 ns simulated lifetime), pulse widths ranging from 2 to 15 µs, and modulation frequencies from 2.5 to 16.667 MHz. The standard deviations of digitally acquired lifetime values ranged from 0.112 to >2 ns, corresponding to errors in actual phase shifts from 0.0142° to 1.6°. The lowest coefficients of variation (flow cytometer demonstrated similar precision and accuracy on measurements of a range of fluorescent microspheres, unstained cells and cells stained with three common fluorophores. Sorting based on fluorescence lifetime was accomplished by adding analog outputs to ORCAS and interfacing with a commercial cell sorter with a radiofrequency modulated solid-state laser. Two populations of fluorescent microspheres with overlapping fluorescence intensities but different lifetimes (2 and 7 ns) were separated to ~98% purity. Overall, the digital signal acquisition and processing methods we introduce present a simple yet robust approach to phase-sensitive measurements in flow cytometry. The ability to simply and inexpensively implement this system on a commercial flow sorter will both allow better dissemination of this technology and better exploit the traditionally underutilized parameter of fluorescence lifetime

  1. Studying membrane properties using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöckl, M.T.; Bizzarri, R.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Mely, Y.; Duportail, G.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a powerful tool to investigate the structure and composition of biological membranes. A wide variety of fluorescent probes suitable for FLIM experiments have been described. These compounds differ strongly in the details of their incorporation into

  2. Fluorescence lifetime-based glucose sensor using NADH

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ketteler, A.; Siegberg, D.; Herten, D. P.; Horn, C.; Petrich, W.

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime-based glucose sensing does not depend on fluctuations of the intensity of the light source, light scattering, or changes in the transmission of optical components. Here we demonstrate the sensing of glucose based on the fluorescence lifetime properties of dihydro nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which is reduced from NAD in the presence of glucose and glucose dehydrogenase. In particular we use the difference in the fluorescence properties of free and protein-bound NADH and calculate an average fluorescence lifetime, which arises from the two short lifetimes τ1=0.28ns and τ2=0.60ns (representing free NADH) and the longer lifetime of τ3=2.9ns (for the protein-bound NADH). While initial results were derived from measurements in aqueous solution, we also demonstrate the suitability of this method for determining the concentration of glucose in blood using test strips. We find that the average fluorescence lifetime changes linearly by a factor of 0.17 per 100mg/dl change in glucose concentration. As an alternative the ratio between free and protein-bound components Rs/l may also be used for quantification. Rs/l increases by a factor of 0.74 per 100mg/dl change in glucose concentration.

  3. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging System for in Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinuddin Hassan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a fluorescence lifetime imaging system for small animals is presented. Data were collected by scanning a region of interest with a measurement head, a linear fiber array with fixed separations between a single source fiber and several detection fibers. The goal was to localize tumors and monitor their progression using specific fluorescent markers. We chose a near-infrared contrast agent, Alexa Fluor 750 (Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA. Preliminary results show that the fluorescence lifetime for this dye was sensitive to the immediate environment of the fluorophore (in particular, pH, making it a promising candidate for reporting physiologic changes around a fluorophore. To quantify the intrinsic lifetime of deeply embedded fluorophores, we performed phantom experiments to investigate the contribution of photon migration effects on observed lifetime by calculating the fluorescence intensity decay time. A previously proposed theoretical model of migration, based on random walk theory, is also substantiated by new experimental data. The developed experimental system has been used for in vivo mouse imaging with Alexa Fluor 750 contrast agent conjugated to tumor-specific antibodies (trastuzumab [Herceptin]. Three-dimensional mapping of the fluorescence lifetime indicates lower lifetime values in superficial breast cancer tumors in mice.

  4. Single pulse two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (SP-FLIM) with MHz pixel rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Weng, Daniel; Hakert, Hubertus; Pfeiffer, Tom; Kolb, Jan Philip; Huber, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a chemically specific 3-D sensing modality providing valuable information about the microstructure, composition and function of a sample. However, a more widespread application of this technique is hindered by the need for a sophisticated ultra-short pulse laser source and by speed limitations of current FLIM detection systems. To overcome these limitations, we combined a robust sub-nanosecond fiber laser as the excitation source with high analog bandwidth detection. Due to the long pulse length in our configuration, more fluorescence photons are generated per pulse, which allows us to derive the lifetime with a single excitation pulse only. In this paper, we show high quality FLIM images acquired at a pixel rate of 1 MHz. This approach is a promising candidate for an easy-to-use and benchtop FLIM system to make this technique available to a wider research community.

  5. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  6. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with LED) and mechanical (handling) strain on the optical system. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  7. Design of a fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscope workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddeke, Frank R.; van Geest, Lambertus K.; Young, Ian T.

    1997-05-01

    One of the promising recent developments in fluorescence microscopy is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. This type of microscopy images the lifetime of fluorescence molecules (in the nano second range) rather than the amount of light emitted by these molecules. This physical property is of interest while it gives information about the local environment of the molecule, such as molecular concentration of O2, Ca2+, pH, and conjugation. Our goal is to design a affordable, robust and easy-to-use FLIM workstation which is completely automated and does not need any difficult calibration. Therefore we are developing a workstation which applies a homodyne detection scheme (frequency range: 1 - 100 MHz) with use of an intensity modulated laser-diode (635 nm) and a gain modulated intensified CCD camera to image fluorescence lifetimes in the range of 1 - 100 ns. Using these components it is possible to make a FLIM workstation based on a normal fluorescence microscope by just replacing the light source and image detector. The FLIM image acquisition procedure in software allows automatic optical measurements of fluorescence lifetimes in different ranges and mixtures of lifetimes by adjusting the modulation frequency.

  8. ATP Changes the Fluorescence Lifetime of Cyan Fluorescent protein via an Interaction with His148

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.W.; Willemse, M.; Slijkhuis, R.; Krogt, G.; Laptenok, S.; Jalink, K.; Wieringa, B.; Fransen, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we described that ATP induces changes in YFP/CFP fluorescence intensities of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors based on CFP-YFP. To get insight into this phenomenon, we employed fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy to analyze the influence of ATP on these fluorescent

  9. ATP changes the fluorescence lifetime of cyan fluorescent protein via an interaction with His148.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.W.; Willemse, M.P.; Slijkhuis, R.; Krogt, G. van der; Laptenok, S.P.; Jalink, K.; Wieringa, B.; Fransen, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we described that ATP induces changes in YFP/CFP fluorescence intensities of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors based on CFP-YFP. To get insight into this phenomenon, we employed fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy to analyze the influence of ATP on these fluorescent

  10. Interactions between natural organic ligands and trace metals studied by fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhi, Ayoub; Hajjoul, Houssam; Redon, Roland; Gagné, Jean-Pierre; Mounier, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Improved insight on the interactions between natural organic ligands and trace metals is of paramount importance for better understanding transport and toxicity pathways of metal ions in the environment. Fluorescence spectroscopy allows introspecting ligands-metals interactions. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) measures fluorophore lifetime probing the local molecular environment. Excitation Emission Fluorescence Matrices (EEFMs) and their statistical treatment : parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) using PROGMEEF Matlab homemade program, can give insight on the number or nature of organic fluorophores involved in the interactions. Quenching of fluorescence by metals can occur following two processes: dynamic and static quenching (Lakowicz, 2013). In the first case, quenching is caused by physical collisions among molecules and in the second case fluorophores can form nonfluorescent complexes with quenchers. It is possible to identify the different mechanisms because each type of quenching corresponds to a different mathematical model (Lakowicz, 2013; Valeur and Berberan-Santos, 2012). In TRLFS, the study of fluorescence decay's laws induced by nanosecond pulsed laser will allow to exactly qualify the type of interaction. The crucial point of the temporal deconvolution will be the evaluation of the best fitting between the different physical models and the decays measured. From the most suitable time decay model, it will be possible to deduce the quenching which modifies the fluorescence. The aim of this study was to characterize interactions between natural organic ligands and trace metals using fluorescence tools to evaluate the fluorescence lifetime of the fluorophore, the occurrence of quenching in presence of metal, discuss its mechanism and estimate conditional stability constants if a complex organic ligand-metal is formed. This study has been done in two steps. First, we have examined the interactions between salicylic acid and copper in

  11. Characterizing non-photochemical quenching in leaves through fluorescence lifetime snapshots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylak-Glassman, Emily J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; IDA Science and Technology Policy Inst. (STPI), Washington, DC (United States); Zaks, Julia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Graduate Program in Applied Science and Technology; Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Amarnath, Kapil [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). FAS Center for Systems Biology; Leuenberger, Michelle [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; Fleming, Graham R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Graduate Program in Applied Science and Technology

    2015-03-12

    A technique is described to measure the fluorescence decay profiles of intact leaves during adaptation to high light and subsequent relaxation to dark conditions. We illustrate how to ensure that photosystem II reaction centers are closed and compare data for wild type Arabidopsis thaliana with conventional pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorescence measurements. Unlike PAM measurements, the lifetime measurements are not sensitive to photobleaching or chloroplast shielding, and the form of the fluorescence decay provides additional information to test quantitative models of excitation dynamics in intact leaves.

  12. New method to estimate the fluorescence lifetime of the Erbium-doped-fiber temperature sensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weimin; Zhang, Jianzhong; Zhao, Yancheng; Sun, Qiuhua; Yuan, Libo

    2002-09-01

    Erbium-doped fiber is a main component of Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs), which is wildly used in optical communication. Erbium doped fiber is a good sensing material of fluorescence temperature sensors as well. The Erbium-doped-fiber temperature sensors can operate under high temperature up to 1100°C. Fluorescence sensors show considerable promise, with the advantage of being intensity independent. Following the termination of a square excitation light pulse, the fluorescence signal is an exponential decay, which decay lifetime depends on the temperature and can be measured by several methods. The decay acquisition and estimation methods are one kind of them. Different arithmetic is developed such as the Marquardt method, the Prony method and the log-fit method. A new estimation is given in this paper, basing on the FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) and the Taylor series. The fluorescence lifetime can be calculated from the items of the FFT with different accuracy. This method is especially designed for the long-fluorescence-lifetime system, for example, Erbium-doped fiber sensing with lifetime up to 10mn. However this method can be used for other fluorescence material also with a little shift. The advantages of this method include high accuracy, quick processing, independence on the base offset etc. The effect of this method is discussed and compared with other estimation methods by numerical simulation and experiment results.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous molecules in live mouse cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindrych, Zdenek; Wang, Tianxiong; Hu, Song; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2017-02-01

    NADH and FAD are important endogenous fluorescent coenzymes participating in key enzymatic reactions of cellular metabolism. While fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD have been used to determine the redox state of cells and tissues, this simple approach breaks down in the case of deep-tissue intravital imaging due to depth- and wavelength-dependent light absorption and scattering. To circumvent this limitation, our research focuses on fluorescence lifetimes of two-photon excited NADH and FAD emission to study the metabolic state of live tissues. In our custom-built scanning microscope we combine tunable femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (operating at 740 nm for NADH excitation and 890 nm for FAD excitation), two GaAsP hybrid detectors for registering individual fluorescence photons and two Becker and Hickl time correlator boards for high precision lifetime measurements. Together with our rigorous FLIM analysis approach (including image segmentation, multi-exponential decay fitting and detailed statistical analysis) we are able to detect metabolic changes in cancer xenografts (human pancreatic cancer MPanc96 cells injected subcutaneously into the ear of an immunodeficient nude mouse), relative to surrounding healthy tissue. Advantageously, with the same instrumentation we can also take high-resolution and high-contrast images of second harmonic signal (SHG) originating from collagen fibers of both the healthy skin and the growing tumor. The combination of metabolic measurements (NADH and FAD lifetime) and morphological information (collagen SHG) allows us to follow the tumor growth in live mouse model and the changes in tumor microenvironment.

  14. Applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanwen Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime is not only associated with the molecular structure of fluorophores, but also strongly depends on the environment around them, which allows fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM to be used as a tool for precise measurement of the cell or tissue microenvironment. This review introduces the basic principle of fluorescence lifetime imaging technology and its application in clinical medicine, including research and diagnosis of diseases in skin, brain, eyes, mouth, bone, blood vessels and cavity organs, and drug evaluation. As a noninvasive, nontoxic and nonionizing radiation technique, FLIM demonstrates excellent performance with high sensitivity and specificity, which allows to determine precise position of the lesion and, thus, has good potential for application in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis.

  15. Silica nanodisks as platforms for fluorescence lifetime-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the sensitivity of their fluorescent properties to subtle changes in microenvironments.5 However, constraints .... the similar fashion as mentioned for RITC/FITC SNDs. (scheme 1). This type of nanodisk is referred to as ... I(t), I(0) are the fluorescence intensities at time t and zero, respectively, after instantaneous excitation, τ1, ...

  16. Simultaneous single molecule atomic force and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Olaf; Koberling, Felix; Walters, Deron; Koenig, Marcelle; Viani, Jacob; Ros, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with single-molecule-sensitive confocal fluorescence microscopy enables a fascinating investigation into the structure, dynamics and interactions of single biomolecules or their assemblies. AFM reveals the structure of macromolecular complexes with nanometer resolution, while fluorescence can facilitate the identification of their constituent parts. In addition, nanophotonic effects, such as fluorescence quenching or enhancement due to the AFM tip, can be used to increase the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit, thus enabling the identification of different fluorescence labels within a macromolecular complex. We present a novel setup consisting of two commercial, state-of-the-art microscopes. A sample scanning atomic force microscope is mounted onto an objective scanning confocal fluorescence lifetime microscope. The ability to move the sample and objective independently allows for precise alignment of AFM probe and laser focus with an accuracy down to a few nanometers. Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) gives us the opportunity to measure single-molecule fluorescence lifetimes. We will be able to study molecular complexes in the vicinity of an AFM probe on a level that has yet to be achieved. With this setup we simultaneously obtained single molecule sensitivity in the AFM topography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of YOYO-1 stained lambda-DNA samples and we showed silicon tip induced single molecule quenching on organic fluorophores.

  17. Digital analysis and sorting of fluorescence lifetime by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Jessica P; Naivar, Mark A; Freyer, James P

    2010-09-01

    Frequency-domain flow cytometry techniques are combined with modifications to the digital signal-processing capabilities of the open reconfigurable cytometric acquisition system (ORCAS) to analyze fluorescence decay lifetimes and control sorting. Real-time fluorescence lifetime analysis is accomplished by rapidly digitizing correlated, radiofrequency (RF)-modulated detector signals, implementing Fourier analysis programming with ORCAS' digital signal processor (DSP) and converting the processed data into standard cytometric list mode data. To systematically test the capabilities of the ORCAS 50 MS/sec analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and our DSP programming, an error analysis was performed using simulated light scatter and fluorescence waveforms (0.5-25 ns simulated lifetime), pulse widths ranging from 2 to 15 micros, and modulation frequencies from 2.5 to 16.667 MHz. The standard deviations of digitally acquired lifetime values ranged from 0.112 to >2 ns, corresponding to errors in actual phase shifts from 0.0142 degrees to 1.6 degrees. The lowest coefficients of variation (<1%) were found for 10-MHz modulated waveforms having pulse widths of 6 micros and simulated lifetimes of 4 ns. Direct comparison of the digital analysis system to a previous analog phase-sensitive flow cytometer demonstrated similar precision and accuracy on measurements of a range of fluorescent microspheres, unstained cells, and cells stained with three common fluorophores. Sorting based on fluorescence lifetime was accomplished by adding analog outputs to ORCAS and interfacing with a commercial cell sorter with a RF-modulated solid-state laser. Two populations of fluorescent microspheres with overlapping fluorescence intensities but different lifetimes (2 and 7 ns) were separated to approximately 98% purity. Overall, the digital signal acquisition and processing methods we introduce present a simple yet robust approach to phase-sensitive measurements in flow cytometry. The ability to

  18. On the Uncertainty in Single Molecule Fluorescent Lifetime and Energy Emission Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; McCollom, Alex D.

    1996-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least squares methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large, however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67 percent of those can be noise, and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous Poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probability density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. The ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background noise and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  19. Measuring and sorting cell populations expressing isospectral fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Sands

    Full Text Available Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼ 1.5 ns vs ∼ 3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a "pseudophasor" that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation.

  20. Early Amyloidogenic Oligomerization Studied through Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Angel Orte; Lorena Varela; Fabio Castello; Elena Fernandez; Salvador Casares; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Jose M. Paredes

    2012-01-01

    Amyloidogenic protein aggregation is a persistent biomedical problem. Despite active research in disease-related aggregation, the need for multidisciplinary approaches to the problem is evident. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy are valuable for examining heterogenic biomolecular systems. In this work, we have explored the initial stages of amyloidogenic aggregation by employing fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS), an advanced modification of conve...

  1. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9

  2. Developing and Testing a Bayesian Analysis of Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Kaye

    Full Text Available FRET measurements can provide dynamic spatial information on length scales smaller than the diffraction limit of light. Several methods exist to measure FRET between fluorophores, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM, which relies on the reduction of fluorescence lifetime when a fluorophore is undergoing FRET. FLIM measurements take the form of histograms of photon arrival times, containing contributions from a mixed population of fluorophores both undergoing and not undergoing FRET, with the measured distribution being a mixture of exponentials of different lifetimes. Here, we present an analysis method based on Bayesian inference that rigorously takes into account several experimental complications. We test the precision and accuracy of our analysis on controlled experimental data and verify that we can faithfully extract model parameters, both in the low-photon and low-fraction regimes.

  3. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM Data Analysis with TIMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Laptenok

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM allows fluorescence lifetime images of biological objects to be collected at 250 nm spatial resolution and at (sub-nanosecond temporal resolution. Often ncomp kinetic processes underlie the observed fluorescence at all locations, but the intensity of the fluorescence associated with each process varies per-location, i.e., per-pixel imaged. Then the statistical challenge is global analysis of the image: use of the fluorescence decay in time at all locations to estimate the ncomp lifetimes associated with the kinetic processes, as well as the amplitude of each kinetic process at each location. Given that typical FLIM images represent on the order of 102 timepoints and 103 locations, meeting this challenge is computationally intensive. Here the utility of the TIMP package for R to solve parameter estimation problems arising in FLIM image analysis is demonstrated. Case studies on simulated and real data evidence the applicability of the partitioned variable projection algorithm implemented in TIMP to the problem domain, and showcase options included in the package for the visual validation of models for FLIM data.

  4. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed.

  5. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope : All-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Schelen, B.; Schouten, R.

    2012-01-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device

  6. Non-radiative excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riachy, Lina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-03-01

    Non-radiative Excitation Fluorescence Microscopy (NEFM) constitutes a new way to observe biological samples beyond the diffraction limit. Non-radiative excitation of the samples is achieved by coating the substrate with donor species, such as quantum dots (QDs). Thus the dyes are not excited directly by the laser source, as in common fluorescence microscopy, but through a non-radiative energy transfer. To prevent dewetting of the donor film, we have recently implemented a silanization process to covalently bond the QDs on the substrate. An homogeneous monolayer of QDs was then deposited on only one side of the coverslips. Atomic force microscopy was then used to characterize the QD layer. We highlight the potential of our method through the study of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) labeled with DiD as acceptor, in interaction with surface functionalized with poly-L-lysine. In the presence of GUVs, we observed a quenching of QDs emission, together with an emission of DiD located in the membrane, which clearly indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to DiD occurs.

  7. Fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy using Europium complexes improves atherosclerotic plaques discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicchieri, Letícia Bonfante; de Andrade Natal, Rodrigo; Courrol, Lilia Coronato

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize arterial tissue with and without atherosclerosis by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using Europium Chlortetracycline complex (EuCTc) as fluorescent marker. For this study, twelve rabbits were randomly divided into a control group (CG) and an experimental group (EG), where they were fed a normal and hypercholesterolemic diet, respectively, and were treated for 60 days. Cryosections of the aortic arch specimens were cut in a vertical plane, mounted on glass slides, and stained with Europium (Eu), Chlortetracycline (CTc), Europium Chlortetracycline (EuCTc), and Europium Chlortetracycline Magnesium (EuCTcMg) solutions. FLIM images were obtained with excitation at 405 nm. The average autofluorescence lifetime within plaque depositions was ~1.36 ns. Reduced plaque autofluorescence lifetimes of 0.23 and 0.31 ns were observed on incubation with EuCTc and EuCTcMg respectively. It was observed a quenching of collagen, cholesterol and TG emission spectra increasing EuCTc concentration. The drastic reduction in fluorescence lifetimes is due to a resonant energy transfer between collagen, triglycerides, cholesterol and europium complexes, quenching fluorescence.

  8. Precise Lifetime Measurements in ^98Ru using Inverse Coulomb Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeck, D.; Werner, V.; Ilie, G.; Ahn, T.; Casperson, R.; Heinz, A.; Wiliiams, E.; Smith, M.; Bettermann, L.; Chevrier, R.; McCarthy, D.; Anagnostatou, V.

    2010-11-01

    The mass region A 90-100 is of great interest in the study of the evolution of proton-neutron collectivity from spherical to deformed nuclei. Controversial publications concerning the vibrational character of 98Ru can be found in literature [1.2]. To get a comprehensive understanding of the structure, absolute transition strengths are important. With large uncertainties in essential quantities like the B4/2 value, theoretical interpretations remain difficult. In order to reduce uncertainties, the RDDS method using inverse Coulomb excitation was used to measure lifetimes. This technique, combined with the selective reaction, yields high precision lifetimes but several corrections are required due to relativistic and deorientation effects. Analysis techniques and results will be presented. New results on the absolute transition strengths are compared to known data on other nuclei in the mass region. [1] B. Cakirli et al., PRC 70, 044312 (2004). [2] E. Williams et al., PRC 74, 024302 (2006). This work was supported by the US DOE grant no. DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and D.R. thanks for financial support by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

  9. Investigations on exponential lifetime measurements for fluorescence thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernicola, V. C.; Rosso, L.; Galleano, R.; Sun, T.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2000-07-01

    Lifetime-based methods have been, on the whole, one of the most successful schemes for fiber optic temperature sensing, using fluorescent materials whose response is intensity independent. Several approaches for determining the fluorescence lifetime, and with that the measurand, have been investigated. An experimental comparison of direct and indirect measurement methods, i.e., involving actual signals from representative optical media instead of simply using Monte Carlo simulations, has been carried out. Direct fitting methods, including Marquardt, log-fit and Prony, were used to estimate the fluorescence lifetime of a Cr3+:YAG-based sensor system and the results were compared. An agreement to better than 0.5% between Marquardt and log-fit algorithms and an agreement of about 1.5% between Marquardt and Prony approaches was found. Thus, a temperature reproducibility, of 0.5 and 1.2 °C, respectively, can be obtained with the Cr3+:YAG sensor system. An indirect measurement approach based on a phase-locked (analog-to-digital signal processor) (A-DSP) was also tested. It was found that when the A-DSP output is used to estimate the lifetime, it performs only slightly better than using direct fitting methods. On the contrary, when the whole A-DSP sensor system was directly calibrated against temperature, the measurement accuracy improves by at least a factor of 10.

  10. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy application for ex vivo investigation of ocular fundus samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sven; Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2011-07-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of ocular tissue has recently become a promising tool in ophthalmology for diagnostic and research purposes. The feasibility and the advantages of TPEF imaging, namely deeper tissue penetration and improved high-resolution imaging of microstructures, have been demonstrated lately using human ocular samples. The autofluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ocular fundus tissue are well known from spectrophotometric analysis. But fluorophores, especially when it comes to fluorescence lifetime, typically display a dependence of their fluorescence properties on local environmental parameters. Hence, a more detailed investigation of ocular fundus autofluorescence ideally in vivo is of utmost interest. The aim of this study is to determine space-resolved the stationary and time-resolved fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ex vivo porcine ocular fundus samples by means of two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum and lifetime imaging microscopy (FSIM/FLIM). By our first results, we characterized the autofluorescence of individual anatomical structures of porcine retina samples excited at 760 nm. The fluorescence properties of almost all investigated retinal layers are relatively homogenous. But as previously unknown, ganglion cell bodies show a significantly shorter fluorescence lifetime compared to the adjacent mueller cells. Since all retinal layers exhibit bi-exponential autofluorescence decays, we were able to achieve a more precise characterization of fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores compared to a present in vivo FLIM approach by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO).

  11. Fluorescence Intensity and Lifetime Cell Imaging with Luminescent Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Conroy, Cecil V; Tang, Zhenghua; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y; Wang, Gangli

    2012-12-20

    In this article, luminescent properties of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) were studied at the single nanoparticle level and also used as novel imaging agents in cell media. Two types of water-soluble AuNCs which were stabilized with a monolayer composed of either mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) or tiopronin thiolate ligands were synthesized by a chemical reduction reaction. These AuNCs were determined to have an average core diameter of less than 2 nm. On a time-resolved confocal microscope, the emission signals from the single AuNCs were distinctly recordable. The quantum yields of these AuNCs were measured to be ca. 5%. The lifetime of these AuNCs is also much longer than the lifetime of cellular autofluorescence in lifetime cell imaging as well as the lifetime of organic dye Alexa Fluor 488. After being derivatized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) moieties, the AuNCs were uploaded efficiently in the HeLa cells. Fluorescence intensity and lifetime cell images were recorded on the time-resolved confocal microscope in which the emission from the AuNCs was readily differentiated from the cellular autofluorescence background because of their relatively stronger emission intensities and longer lifetimes. These loaded nanoclusters in the cells were observed to widely distribute throughout the cells and especially densely loaded near the cell nucleuses. The AuNCs in the cells were also tested to have a better photostability relative to the organic fluorophores under the same conditions. We thus conclude that the AuNCs have a great potential as novel nanoparticle imaging agents, especially as lifetime imaging agents, in fluorescence imaging applications. We also prospect much broader applications of these AuNCs after further improvements of their luminescence quantum yields.

  12. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of membrane markers in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Wagner, Michael; Kretzschmar, Martina; Strauss, Wolfgang S.; Sailer, Reinhard

    2003-10-01

    An experimental setup for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has been combined with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) in order to detect various membrane markers within living cells. The method is established using T47D human breast cancer cells transfected by a plasmid encoding for a membrane associated yellow fluorescent protein (EYFPmem). For further measurements the mitochondrial marker rhodamine 123 (R123) as well as the membrane marker laurdan are used. With increasing concentration R123 is accumulated outside the mitochondria, in particular within the plasma membrane, whereas mitochondrial fluorescence is quenched. Fluorescence lifetime of laurdan can be used to probe membrane dynamics, in particular the phase of membrane lipids. These lipids are in a rigid gel phase at temperatures around 24°C, whereas the gel phases and a liquid crystalline phase coexist at T >= 30°C. This phase pattern also depends on the age and the growth phase of the cells and may play a role in the uptake of pharmaceutical agents.

  14. Mapping microbubble viscosity using fluorescence lifetime imaging of molecular rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A.; Mohamedi, Graciela; Rademeyer, Paul; Owen, Joshua; Wu, Yilei; Tang, Meng-Xing; Eckersley, Robert J.; Stride, Eleanor; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles are well established as highly effective contrast agents for ultrasound imaging. There remain, however, some significant challenges to fully realize the potential of microbubbles in advanced applications such as perfusion mapping, targeted drug delivery, and gene therapy. A key requirement is accurate characterization of the viscoelastic surface properties of the microbubbles, but methods for independent, nondestructive quantification and mapping of these properties are currently lacking. We present here a strategy for performing these measurements that uses a small fluorophore termed a “molecular rotor” embedded in the microbubble surface, whose fluorescence lifetime is directly related to the viscosity of its surroundings. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging to show that shell viscosities vary widely across the population of the microbubbles and are influenced by the shell composition and the manufacturing process. We also demonstrate that heterogeneous viscosity distributions exist within individual microbubble shells even with a single surfactant component. PMID:23690599

  15. Normalized fluorescence lifetime imaging for tumor identification and margin delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Adria J.; Papour, Asael; Bhargava, Siddharth; Taylor, Zach; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique that has been proven to produce quantitative and qualitative differentiation and identification of substances with good specificity and sensitivity based on lifetime extracted information. This technique has shown the ability to also differentiate between a wide range of tissue types to identify malignant from benign tissue in vivo and ex vivo. However, the complexity, long duration and effort required to generate this information has limited the adoption of these techniques in a clinical setting. Our group has developed a time-resolved imaging system (patent pending) that does not require the extraction of lifetimes or use of complex curve fitting algorithms to display the needed information. The technique, entitled Lifetime Fluorescence Imaging (LFI, or NoFYI), converts fluorescence lifetime decay information directly into visual contrast. Initial studies using Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. Subsequent studies demonstrated the ability to separate collagen and elastin powders. The technique uses nanosecond pulsed UV LEDs at 375 nm for average illumination intensities of ~4.5 μW on the tissue surface with detection by a gated CCD camera. To date, we have imaged 11 surgical head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and brain cancer biopsy specimens including 5 normal and 6 malignant samples. Images at multiple wavelengths clearly demonstrate differentiation between benign and malignant tissue, which was later confirmed by histology. Contrast was obtained between fluorophores with 35 μm spatial resolution and an SNR of ~30 dB allowing us to clearly define tumor margins in these highly invasive cancers. This method is capable of providing both anatomical and chemical information for the pathologist and the surgeon. These results suggest that this technology has a possible role in identifying tumors in tissue specimens and detecting tumor margins during procedures.

  16. Evanescent excitation and emission in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Daniel

    2013-04-02

    Evanescent light-light that does not propagate but instead decays in intensity over a subwavelength distance-appears in both excitation (as in total internal reflection) and emission (as in near-field imaging) forms in fluorescence microscopy. This review describes the physical connection between these two forms as a consequence of geometrical squeezing of wavefronts, and describes newly established or speculative applications and combinations of the two. In particular, each can be used in analogous ways to produce surface-selective images, to examine the thickness and refractive index of films (such as lipid multilayers or protein layers) on solid supports, and to measure the absolute distance of a fluorophore to a surface. In combination, the two forms can further increase selectivity and reduce background scattering in surface images. The polarization properties of each lead to more sensitive and accurate measures of fluorophore orientation and membrane micromorphology. The phase properties of the evanescent excitation lead to a method of creating a submicroscopic area of total internal reflection illumination or enhanced-resolution structured illumination. Analogously, the phase properties of evanescent emission lead to a method of producing a smaller point spread function, in a technique called virtual supercritical angle fluorescence. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Online multispectral fluorescence lifetime values estimation and overlay onto tissue white-light video frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging has been shown to be a robust technique for biochemical and functional characterization of tissues and to present great potential for intraoperative tissue diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. We report a technique for real-time mapping of fluorescence parameters (i.e. lifetime values) onto the location from where the fluorescence measurements were taken. This is achieved by merging a 450 nm aiming beam generated by a diode laser with the excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and by continuously imaging the region of interest with a color CMOS camera. The interrogated locations are then extracted from the acquired frames via color-based segmentation of the aiming beam. Assuming a Gaussian profile of the imaged aiming beam, the segmentation results are fitted to ellipses that are dynamically scaled at the full width of three automatically estimated thresholds (50%, 75%, 90%) of the Gaussian distribution's maximum value. This enables the dynamic augmentation of the white-light video frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. A fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples were used to evaluate this method with motorized and hand-held scanning measurements. At 640x512 pixels resolution the area of interest augmented with fluorescence decay parameters can be imaged at an average 34 frames per second. The developed method has the potential to become a valuable tool for real-time display of optical spectroscopy data during continuous scanning applications that subsequently can be used for tissue characterization and diagnosis.

  18. Time-domain whole-field fluorescence lifetime imaging with optical sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, M J; Siegel, J; Webb, S E; Jones, R; Dowling, K; Dayel, M J; Parsons-Karavassilis, D; French, P M; Lever, M J; Sucharov, L O; Neil, M A; Juskaitis, R; Wilson, T

    2001-09-01

    A whole-field time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscope with the capability to perform optical sectioning is described. The excitation source is a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser that is regeneratively amplified and frequency doubled to 415 nm. Time-gated fluorescence intensity images at increasing delays after excitation are acquired using a gated microchannel plate image intensifier combined with an intensified CCD camera. By fitting a single or multiple exponential decay to each pixel in the field of view of the time-gated images, 2-D FLIM maps are obtained for each component of the fluorescence lifetime. This FLIM instrument was demonstrated to exhibit a temporal discrimination of better than 10 ps. It has been applied to chemically specific imaging, quantitative imaging of concentration ratios of mixed fluorophores and quantitative imaging of perturbations to fluorophore environment. Initially, standard fluorescent dyes were studied and then this FLIM microscope was applied to the imaging of biological tissue, successfully contrasting different tissues and different states of tissue using autofluorescence. To demonstrate the potential for real-world applications, the FLIM microscope has been configured using potentially compact, portable and low cost all-solid-state diode-pumped laser technology. Whole-field FLIM with optical sectioning (3D FLIM) has been realized using a structured illumination technique.

  19. Green fluorescent protein with anionic tryptophan-based chromophore and long fluorescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Goryashchenko, Alexander S; Lidsky, Peter V; Gorbachev, Dmitry A; Bozhanova, Nina G; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Pereverzeva, Alina R; Ryumina, Alina P; Zherdeva, Victoria V; Savitsky, Alexander P; Solntsev, Kyril M; Bommarius, Andreas S; Sharonov, George V; Lindquist, Jake R; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Mishin, Alexander S

    2015-07-21

    Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins, crucial for multiparameter imaging, is based mainly on chemical diversity of their chromophores. Recently we have reported, to our knowledge, a new green fluorescent protein WasCFP-the first fluorescent protein with a tryptophan-based chromophore in the anionic state. However, only a small portion of WasCFP molecules exists in the anionic state at physiological conditions. In this study we report on an improved variant of WasCFP, named NowGFP, with the anionic form dominating at 37°C and neutral pH. It is 30% brighter than enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and exhibits a fluorescence lifetime of 5.1 ns. We demonstrated that signals of NowGFP and EGFP can be clearly distinguished by fluorescence lifetime in various models, including mammalian cells, mouse tumor xenograft, and Drosophila larvae. NowGFP thus provides an additional channel for multiparameter fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of green fluorescent proteins. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bessel beam fluorescence lifetime tomography of live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography allows isotropic 3D imaging of embryos. Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for fluorescence imaging of live embryos. We previously reported an imaging system that combines SLOT with a novel Fourier-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) technique named FmFLIM-SLOT. FmFLIM-SLOT performs multiplexed FLIM-FRET readout of multiple FRET sensors in live embryos. Here we report a recent effort on improving the spatial resolution of the FmFLIM-SLOT system in order to image complex biochemical processes in live embryos at the cellular level. Optical tomography has to compromise between resolution and the depth of view. In SLOT, the commonly-used focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focal plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging in a large volume specimen. We thus introduce Bessel beam laser-scanning tomography, which illuminates the sample with a spatial-light-modulator-generated Bessel beam that has an extended focal depth. The Bessel beam is scanned across the whole specimen. Fluorescence projection images are acquired at equal angular intervals as the sample rotates. Reconstruction artifacts due to annular-rings of the Bessel beam are removed by a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm. Furthermore, in combination of Fourier-multiplexing fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) method, the Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT system is capable of perform 3D lifetime imaging of live embryos at cellular resolution. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove that Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT is a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous biomarker of oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Rupsa; Alfonso-García, Alba; Cinco, Rachel; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess of normal physiological level results in oxidative stress. This can lead to a range of pathological conditions including inflammation, diabetes mellitus, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease. Biomarkers of oxidative stress play an important role in understanding the pathogenesis and treatment of these diseases. A number of fluorescent biomarkers exist. However, a non-invasive and label-free identification technique would be advantageous for in vivo measurements. In this work we establish a spectroscopic method to identify oxidative stress in cells and tissues by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). We identified an autofluorescent, endogenous species with a characteristic fluorescent lifetime distribution as a probe for oxidative stress. To corroborate our hypothesis that these species are products of lipid oxidation by ROS, we correlate the spectroscopic signals arising from lipid droplets by combining FLIM with THG and CARS microscopy which are established techniques for selective lipid body imaging. Further, we performed spontaneous Raman spectral analysis at single points of the sample which provided molecular vibration information characteristics of lipid droplets. PMID:25993434

  2. Fluorescence lifetime, dipole orientation and bilayer polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Xuan Long; Chen, Po-Jui; Woon, Wei-Yen; White, Jonathon David

    2017-10-01

    Bilayer films consisting of the optically transparent polymers, polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were spin-cast on glass substrates. The upper 13.5 nm layer (PS) was lightly doped with Rhodamine-6 G (RH6G) or MEH-PPV. While the fluorescence of MEH-PPV was independent of PMMA thickness, the lifetime of RH6G increased 3-fold as the underlying PMMA thickness increased from 0 to 500 nm while the collected flux decreased suggesting a reorientation of the smaller molecule's dipole with respect to the air-polymer interface with PMMA thickness. This suggests lifetime may find application for nondestructive thickness measurements of transparent films with sub-micron lateral resolution and large range.

  3. GPU acceleration of time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Nowotny, Thomas; Chen, Yu; Li, David Day-Uei

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) plays a significant role in biological sciences, chemistry, and medical research. We propose a graphic processing unit (GPU) based FLIM analysis tool suitable for high-speed, flexible time-domain FLIM applications. With a large number of parallel processors, GPUs can significantly speed up lifetime calculations compared to CPU-OpenMP (parallel computing with multiple CPU cores) based analysis. We demonstrate how to implement and optimize FLIM algorithms on GPUs for both iterative and noniterative FLIM analysis algorithms. The implemented algorithms have been tested on both synthesized and experimental FLIM data. The results show that at the same precision, the GPU analysis can be up to 24-fold faster than its CPU-OpenMP counterpart. This means that even for high-precision but time-consuming iterative FLIM algorithms, GPUs enable fast or even real-time analysis.

  4. Three-dimensional printed miniaturized spectral system for collagen fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Luwei; Koslakiewicz, Ronald; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-07-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g., type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes such as wound healing and fibrosis. When excited by ultraviolet light, collagens exhibit autofluorescence distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Here, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system as a noninvasive probe for monitoring tissue collagen compositions. A sine-modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain fluorescence lifetime measurements under three wavelength bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387, 409, and 435 nm. We employed a lithography-based three-dimensional (3-D) printer with LED) and mechanical (from handling) strain on the optical system. The geometry was further optimized with ray tracing to form the final 3-D printed structure. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes. This system represents a low cost, handheld probe for clinical tissue monitoring applications.

  5. Simultaneous acquisition of trajectory and fluorescence lifetime of moving single particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianqian; Qi, Jing; Lin, Danying; Yan, Wei; Hu, Rui; Peng, Xiao; Qu, Junle

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has been a powerful tool in life science because it can reveal the interactions of an excited fluorescent molecule and its environment. The combination with two-photon excitation (TPE) and timecorrelated single photon counting (TCSPC) provides it the ability of optical sectioning, high time resolution and detection efficiency. In previous work, we have introduced a two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector (AOD) into TCSPC-based FLIM to achieve fast and flexible FLIM. In this work, we combined the AOD-FLIM system with a single particle tracking (SPT) setup and algorithm and developed an SPT-FLIM system. Using the system, we acquired the trajectory and fluorescence lifetime of a moving particle simultaneously and reconstructed a life-time-marked pseudocolored trajectory, which might reflect dynamic interaction between the moving particle and its local environment along its motion trail. The results indicated the potential of the technique for studying the interaction between specific moving biological macromolecules and the ambient micro-environment in live cells.

  6. Three-dimensional online surface reconstruction of augmented fluorescence lifetime maps using photometric stereo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jakob; Lagarto, Joao; Phipps, Jennifer; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Sorger, Jonathan; Farwell, Gregory; Bold, Richard; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    Multi-Spectral Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy (ms-TRFS) can provide label-free real-time feedback on tissue composition and pathology during surgical procedures by resolving the fluorescence decay dynamics of the tissue. Recently, an ms-TRFS system has been developed in our group, allowing for either point-spectroscopy fluorescence lifetime measurements or dynamic raster tissue scanning by merging a 450 nm aiming beam with the pulsed fluorescence excitation light in a single fiber collection. In order to facilitate an augmented real-time display of fluorescence decay parameters, the lifetime values are back projected to the white light video. The goal of this study is to develop a 3D real-time surface reconstruction aiming for a comprehensive visualization of the decay parameters and providing an enhanced navigation for the surgeon. Using a stereo camera setup, we use a combination of image feature matching and aiming beam stereo segmentation to establish a 3D surface model of the decay parameters. After camera calibration, texture-related features are extracted for both camera images and matched providing a rough estimation of the surface. During the raster scanning, the rough estimation is successively refined in real-time by tracking the aiming beam positions using an advanced segmentation algorithm. The method is evaluated for excised breast tissue specimens showing a high precision and running in real-time with approximately 20 frames per second. The proposed method shows promising potential for intraoperative navigation, i.e. tumor margin assessment. Furthermore, it provides the basis for registering the fluorescence lifetime maps to the tissue surface adapting it to possible tissue deformations.

  7. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  8. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  9. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    In-Suck Baek; Moon S. Kim; Hoosoo Lee; Wang-Hee Lee; Byoung-Kwan Cho

    2014-01-01

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 4...

  10. Lifetime measurement of excited atomic and ionic states of some ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. High-frequency deflection (HFD) technique with a delayed coincidence single photon counting arrangement is an efficient technique for radiative lifetime measurement. An apparatus for measurement of the radiative lifetime of atoms and molecules has been developed in our laboratory and measurements have ...

  11. Lifetime measurement of excited atomic and ionic states of some ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-frequency deflection (HFD) technique with a delayed coincidence single photon counting arrangement is an efficient technique for radiative lifetime measurement. An apparatus for measurement of the radiative lifetime of atoms and molecules has been developed in our laboratory and measurements have been ...

  12. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  13. Application of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) to Measure Intracellular Environments in a Single Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Awasthi, Kamlesh; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has now been used in many bioscience fields, which comes from the quantification of fluorescence lifetime. The procedure for obtaining lifetime images is very similar to that used in fluorescence microscopy. However, obtaining reliable lifetime images requires an understanding of the theory of fluorescence lifetime, principle of FLIM systems, and evaluation procedure of intracellular environments. In this chapter, the materials, methods, and notes on FLIM measurements have been described, in conjunction with a brief explanation of the background of FLIM.

  14. Optimal fluorescence waveband determination for detecting defect cherry tomatoes using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defect cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface, and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-...

  15. A total internal reflection-fluorescence correlation spectroscopy setup with pulsed diode laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Lukas; Hoffmann-Jacobsen, Kerstin

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measures fluctuations in a (sub-)femtoliter volume to analyze the diffusive behavior of fluorescent particles. This highly sensitive method has proven to be useful for the analysis of dynamic biological systems as well as in chemistry, physics, and material sciences. It is routinely performed with commercial fluorescence microscopes, which provide a confined observation volume by the confocal technique. The evanescent wave of total internal reflectance (TIR) is used in home-built systems to permit a surface sensitive FCS analysis. We present a combined confocal and TIR-FCS setup which uses economic low-power pulsed diode lasers for excitation. Excitation and detection are coupled to time-correlated photon counting hardware. This allows simultaneous fluorescence lifetime and FCS measurements in a surface-sensitive mode. Moreover, the setup supports fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy at surfaces. The excitation can be easily switched between TIR and epi-illumination to compare the surface properties with those in liquid bulk. The capabilities of the presented setup are demonstrated by measuring the diffusion coefficients of a free dye molecule, a labeled polyethylene glycol, and a fluorescent nanoparticle in confocal as well as in TIR-FCS.

  16. Saturated excitation of Fluorescence to quantify excitation enhancement in aperture antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Aouani, Heykel

    2012-07-23

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used to probe the electromagnetic intensity amplification on optical antennas, yet measuring the excitation intensity amplification is a challenge, as the detected fluorescence signal is an intricate combination of excitation and emission. Here, we describe a novel approach to quantify the electromagnetic amplification in aperture antennas by taking advantage of the intrinsic non linear properties of the fluorescence process. Experimental measurements of the fundamental f and second harmonic 2f amplitudes of the fluorescence signal upon excitation modulation are used to quantify the electromagnetic intensity amplification with plasmonic aperture antennas. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  17. Improving accuracy and precision in biological applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Wei

    The quantitative understanding of cellular and molecular responses in living cells is important for many reasons, including identifying potential molecular targets for treatments of diseases like cancer. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can quantitatively measure these responses in living cells by producing spatially resolved images of fluorophore lifetime, and has advantages over intensity-based measurements. However, in live-cell microscopy applications using high-intensity light sources such as lasers, maintaining biological viability remains critical. Although high-speed, time-gated FLIM significantly reduces light delivered to live cells, making measurements at low light levels remains a challenge affecting quantitative FLIM results. We can significantly improve both accuracy and precision in gated FLIM applications. We use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with fluorescent proteins to detect molecular interactions in living cells: the use of FLIM, better fluorophores, and temperature/CO2 controls can improve live-cell FRET results with higher consistency, better statistics, and less non-specific FRET (for negative control comparisons, p-value = 0.93 (physiological) vs. 9.43E-05 (non-physiological)). Several lifetime determination methods are investigated to optimize gating schemes. We demonstrate a reduction in relative standard deviation (RSD) from 52.57% to 18.93% with optimized gating in an example under typical experimental conditions. We develop two novel total variation (TV) image denoising algorithms, FWTV ( f-weighted TV) and UWTV (u-weighted TV), that can achieve significant improvements for real imaging systems. With live-cell images, they improve the precision of local lifetime determination without significantly altering the global mean lifetime values (high-light cases (RSD = 12.76% at total photon counts (TC) = 100 vs. RSD = 23.03% at TC = 400). Therefore, high-intensity excitation of living cells can be avoided

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF A BOXCAR INTEGRATOR AVERAGER SYSTEM FOR EXCITED-STATE LIFETIME MEASUREMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    NOVO, JBM; PESSINE, FBT

    1992-01-01

    The instrumental distortions due to adjustable parameters of the SR250 boxcar integrator/averager system and a pulsed-laser luminescence spectrometer on the excited-state lifetime decay waveforms were investigated. A theoretical model which takes into account the exponential moving average for this instrument and also RC distortion on the time-dependent luminescence signal is presented. An analytical expression relating the sample's excited-state lifetime and the adjustable instrumental param...

  19. mhFLIM: resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence decays in widefield lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlachter, S; Elder, A D; Esposito, A; Kaminski, G S; Frank, J H; van Geest, L K; Kaminski, C F

    2009-02-02

    Frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate way of measuring fluorescence lifetimes in widefield microscopy. However, the resolution of multiple exponential fluorescence decays has remained beyond the reach of most practical FD-FLIM systems. In this paper we describe the implementation of FD-FLIM using a 40 MHz pulse train derived from a supercontinuum source for excitation. The technique, which we term multi-harmonic FLIM (mhFLIM), makes it possible to accurately resolve biexponential decays of fluorophores without any a priori information. The system's performance is demonstrated using a mixture of spectrally similar dyes of known composition and also on a multiply-labeled biological sample. The results are compared to those obtained from time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) microscopy and a good level of agreement is achieved. We also demonstrate the first practical application of an algorithm derived by G. Weber [1] for analysing mhFLIM data. Because it does not require nonlinear minimisation, it offers potential for realtime analysis during acquisition.

  20. Effect of xanthophyll composition on the chlorophyll excited state lifetime in plant leaves and isolated LHCII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Zia, Ahmad [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Horton, Peter [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Ruban, Alexander V., E-mail: a.ruban@qmul.ac.uk [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-19

    Xanthophyll excited states have been implicated by transient absorption and two-photon excitation studies in playing a key role in the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting via photoprotective energy dissipation. For any proposed quenching mechanism to be effective it must reduce the chlorophyll excited state lifetime from 2 ns to {approx}0.5-0.4 ns. In the presented study the effect of xanthophyll composition on the chlorophyll excited state lifetime in Arabidopsis leaves in the light harvesting (F{sub m}) and photoprotective (NPQ) states was determined. The data was compared to the chlorophyll excited state lifetime of native isolated LHCII and CP26 in detergent micelles with varying xanthophyll composition. It was found that although the differences in xanthophyll composition between LHC complexes from various Arabidopsis mutants were sufficient to explain the varying F{sub m} lifetime (and varying PSII efficiency), they were not of a sufficient scale to fully explain the observed differences in the NPQ lifetimes. Only when the LHC complexes were exposed to a low detergent/low pH media, a condition known to mimic the conformational state of LHCII associated with NPQ in vivo, were variations in excited state lifetime large enough to explain the differences observed in leaves. Furthermore, the data reveal that the replacement of lutein by either zeaxanthin or violaxanthin in the internal xanthophyll binding sites of LHCII and CP26 reduces the efficiency of energy dissipation in the photoprotective state in leaves and isolated complexes.

  1. Singlet oxygen phosphorescence lifetime imaging based on a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenming; Deng, Liezheng; Jin, Shengye; Yang, Heping; Cui, Rongrong; Zhang, Qing; Shi, Wenbo; Zhang, Chunlei; Yuan, Xiaolin; Sha, Guohe

    2015-04-09

    The feasibility of singlet oxygen phosphorescence (SOP) lifetime imaging microscope was studied on a modified fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM). SOP results from the infrared radiative transition of O2(a(1)Δg → X(3)Σg(-)) and O2(a(1)Δg) was produced in a C60 powder sample via photosensitization process. To capture the very weak SOP signal, a dichroic mirror was placed between the objective and tube lens of the FLIM and used to divide the luminescence returning from the sample into two beams: the reflected SOP beam and the transmitted photoluminescence of C60 (C60-PL) beam. The C60-PL beam entered the scanner of the FLIM and followed the normal optical path of the FLIM, while the SOP steered clear of the scanner and directly entered a finely designed SOP detection channel. Confocal C60-PL images and nonconfocal SOP images were then simultaneously obtained by using laser-scanning mode. Experimental results show that (1) under laser-scanning mode, the obstacle to confocal SOP imaging is the infrared-incompatible scanner, which can be solved by using an infrared-compatible scanner. Confocal SOP imaging is also expected to be realized under stage-scanning mode when the laser beam is parked and meanwhile a pinhole is added into the SOP detection channel. (2) A great challenge to SOP imaging is its extraordinarily long imaging time, and selecting only a few interesting points from fluorescence images to measure their SOP time-dependent traces may be a correct compromise.

  2. Revisit laser scanning fluorescence microscopy performance under fluorescence-lifetime-limited regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Antony C.; Wong, Terence T. W.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-03-01

    Continuing desire for higher-speed laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and progressive advancement in ultrafast and sensitive photodetectors might imply that our conventional understanding of LSFM is not adequate when approaching to the intrinsic speed limit — fluorescence lifetime. In this regard, we here revisit the theoretical framework of LSFM and evaluate its general performance in lifetime-limited and noise-limited regimes. Our model suggests that there still exists an order-of-magnitude gap between the current LSFM speed and the intrinsic limit. An imaging frame rate of > 100 kHz could be viable with the emerging laser-scanning techniques using ultrafast wavelength-swept sources, or optical time-stretch.

  3. Optically sectioned wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy enabled by structured illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsdale, Taylor; Olsovsky, Cory; Rico-Jimenez, Jose J.; Maitland, Kristen C.; Jo, Javier A.; Malik, Bilal H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of structured illumination microscopy to enhance the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging to resolve fluorescence lifetimes in relatively thick samples that possess distinct but spectrally overlapping fluorescent layers. Structured illumination fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (SI-FLIM) is shown to be able to accurately reconstruct lifetime values in homogenous fluorophore samples (POPOP, NADH, and FAD) as well as accurately measure fluorescent lifetime in two layer models that are layered with NADH/FAD over POPOP, where NADH/FAD and POPOP have spectral overlap. Finally, the ability of SI-FLIM was demonstrated in a hamster cheek pouch ex vivo to show that more accurate lifetimes could be measured for each layer of interest in the oral mucosa (epithelium and submucosa). PMID:28663841

  4. Combined fiber probe for fluorescence lifetime and Raman spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dochow, Sebastian; Ma, Dinglong; Latka, Ines; Bocklitz, Thomas; Hartl, Brad; Bec, Julien; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Marple, Eric; Urmey, Kirk; Schmitt, Michael; Marcu, Laura; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been proven to have tremendous potential as biomedical analytical tool for spectroscopic disease diagnostics. The use of fiberoptic coupled Raman spectroscopy systems can enable in-vivo characterization of suspicious lesions. However, Raman spectroscopy has the drawback of rather long acquisition times of several hundreds of milliseconds which makes scanning of larger regions quite challenging. By combining Raman spectroscopy with a fast imaging technique this problem can be alleviate in part. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) offers a great potential for such a combination. FLIm can allow for fast tissue area pre-segmentation and location of the points for Raman spectra acquisition. Here, we introduce an optical fiber probe combining FLIm and Raman spectroscopy with an outer diameter of 2 mm. Fluorescence is generated via excitation with a fiber laser at 355 nm. The fluorescence emission is spectrally resolved using a custom-made wavelength-selection module (WSM). The Raman excitation power at 785 nm was set to 50 mW for the in-vivo measurements to prevent sample drying. The lateral probe resolution was determined to be brain and subsequently to acquire FLIm guided Raman spectra of several tissues in and around the craniotomy.

  5. Low-pressure effective fluorescence lifetimes and photo-physical rate constants of one- and two-ring aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzler, Thorsten; Faust, Stephan; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2015-12-01

    One- and two-ring aromatics such as toluene and naphthalene are frequently used molecular tracer species in laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging diagnostics. Quantifying LIF signal intensities requires knowledge of the photo-physical processes that determine the fluorescence quantum yield. Collision-induced and intramolecular energy transfer processes in the excited electronic state closely interact under practical conditions. They can be separated through experiments at variable low pressures. Effective fluorescence lifetimes of gaseous toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, anisole, naphthalene, and 1-methylnaphthalene diluted in CO2 were measured after picosecond laser excitation at 266 nm and time-resolved detection of fluorescence intensities. Measurements in an optically accessible externally heated cell between 296 and 475 K and 0.010-1 bar showed that effective fluorescence lifetimes generally decrease with temperature, while the influence of the bath-gas pressure depends on the respective target species and temperature. The results provide non-radiative and fluorescence rate constants and experimentally validate the effect of photo-induced cooling.

  6. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of fluorescent proteins as an effective quantitative tool for noninvasive study of intracellular processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana M. Levchenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is an effective noninvasive bioanalytical tool based on measuring fluorescent lifetime of fluorophores. A growing number of FLIM studies utilizes genetically engineered fluorescent proteins targeted to specific subcellular structures to probe local molecular environment, which opens new directions in cell science. This paper highlights the unconventional applications of FLIM for studies of molecular processes in diverse organelles of live cultured cells.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of fluorescent proteins as an effective quantitative tool for noninvasive study of intracellular processes

    OpenAIRE

    Svitlana M. Levchenko; Artem Pliss; Junle Qu

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is an effective noninvasive bioanalytical tool based on measuring fluorescent lifetime of fluorophores. A growing number of FLIM studies utilizes genetically engineered fluorescent proteins targeted to specific subcellular structures to probe local molecular environment, which opens new directions in cell science. This paper highlights the unconventional applications of FLIM for studies of molecular processes in diverse organelles of live cultured cells.

  8. Photostability of a fluorescent marker under pulsed excited-state depletion through stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyba, Marcus; Hell, Stefan W

    2003-09-01

    Saturated stimulated-emission depletion (STED) of a fluorescent marker has been shown to break the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy and to facilitate spatial resolution down to a few tens of nanometers. Here we investigate the photostability of a fluorophore that, in this concept, is repeatedly excited and depleted by synchronized laser pulses. Our study of bacteria labeled with RH-414, a membrane marker, reveals that increasing the duration of the STED pulse from approximately 10 to 160 ps fundamentally improves the photostability of the dye. At the same time the STED efficiency is maintained. The observed photobleaching of RH-414 is due primarily to multiphoton absorption from its ground state. One can counteract photobleaching by employing STED pulses that range from 150 ps to approximately half of the lifetime of the excited state. The results also have implications for multiphoton excitation microscopy.

  9. Fluorescence lifetime images of different green fluorescent proteins in fly brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Sih-Yu; Lin, Y. Y.; Chiang, A. S.; Huang, Y. C.

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms of learning and memory are the most important functions in an animal brain. Investigating neuron circuits and network maps in a brain is the first step toward understanding memory and learning behavior. Since Drosophila brain is the major model for understanding brain functions, we measure the florescence lifetimes of different GFP-based reporters expressed in a fly brain. In this work, two Gal4 drivers, OK 107 and MZ 19 were used. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]) concentration is an importation indicator of neuronal activity. Therefore, several groups have developed GFP-based calcium sensors, among which G-CaMP is the most popular and reliable. The fluorescence intensity of G-CaMP will increase when it binds to calcium ion; however, individual variation from different animals prevents quantitative research. In this work, we found that the florescence lifetime of G-CaMP will shrink from 1.8 ns to 1.0 ns when binding to Ca2+. This finding can potentially help us to understand the neuron circuits by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is a light-activated ion-channel protein on a neuron cell membrane. In this work, we express ChR2 and G-CaMP in a fly brain. Using a pulsed 470-nm laser to activate the neurons, we can also record the fluorescence lifetime changes in the structure. Hence, we can trace and manipulate a specific circuit in this animal. This method provides more flexibility in brain research.

  10. Optimal fluorescence waveband determination for detecting defective cherry tomatoes using a fluorescence excitation-emission matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, In-Suck; Kim, Moon S; Lee, Hoosoo; Lee, Wang-Hee; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2014-11-14

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  11. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  12. Melanin fluorescence spectra by step-wise three photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2012-03-01

    Melanin is the characteristic chromophore of human skin with various potential biological functions. Kerimo discovered enhanced melanin fluorescence by stepwise three-photon excitation in 2011. In this article, step-wise three-photon excited fluorescence (STPEF) spectrum between 450 nm -700 nm of melanin is reported. The melanin STPEF spectrum exhibited an exponential increase with wavelength. However, there was a probability of about 33% that another kind of step-wise multi-photon excited fluorescence (SMPEF) that peaks at 525 nm, shown by previous research, could also be generated using the same process. Using an excitation source at 920 nm as opposed to 830 nm increased the potential for generating SMPEF peaks at 525 nm. The SMPEF spectrum peaks at 525 nm photo-bleached faster than STPEF spectrum.

  13. FLIMX: A Software Package to Determine and Analyze the Fluorescence Lifetime in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Data from the Human Eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Klemm

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO is a new technique for measuring the in vivo autofluorescence intensity decays generated by endogenous fluorophores in the ocular fundus. Here, we present a software package called FLIM eXplorer (FLIMX for analyzing FLIO data. Specifically, we introduce a new adaptive binning approach as an optimal tradeoff between the spatial resolution and the number of photons required per pixel. We also expand existing decay models (multi-exponential, stretched exponential, spectral global analysis, incomplete decay to account for the layered structure of the eye and present a method to correct for the influence of the crystalline lens fluorescence on the retina fluorescence. Subsequently, the Holm-Bonferroni method is applied to FLIO measurements to allow for group comparisons between patients and controls on the basis of fluorescence lifetime parameters. The performance of the new approaches was evaluated in five experiments. Specifically, we evaluated static and adaptive binning in a diabetes mellitus patient, we compared the different decay models in a healthy volunteer and performed a group comparison between diabetes patients and controls. An overview of the visualization capabilities and a comparison of static and adaptive binning is shown for a patient with macular hole. FLIMX's applicability to fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is shown in the ganglion cell layer of a porcine retina sample, obtained by a laser scanning microscope using two-photon excitation.

  14. Time resolved multiphoton excited fluorescence probes in model membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, this thesis reports on a time-resolved fluorescence study of several fluorescent probes successfully employed in membrane research. Concentration and temperature effects on fluorescence anisotropy parameters are demonstrated by DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and PPO in DPPC lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy has shown that trans-stilbene and Rhd 800 have a two-site location in membranes. Multiphoton induced fluorescence of DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl in liposomes was measured using 800nm excitation with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. P-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl are new probes for membranes. Comparison of one and multiphoton excitation results has demonstrated higher initial anisotropy with multiphoton excitation than with one-photon excitation. The rotational times were identical for one and multiphoton excitation, indicating the absence of significant local heating or sample perturbation. Excimer formation of alpha-NPO w...

  15. Two-photon excited fluorescence of the lens for the diagnosis of presbyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, R.; Kessler, M.; Fugger, O.; Dolp, F.; Russ, D.

    2009-09-01

    Presbyopia is a wide spread phenomenon in elder people and is caused by the hardening of the lens in human eyes. Research is performed to make such lenses again more flexible by application of geometrically optimised cuts through the lens with a femtosecond-laser. Different protein agglomerations are responsible for the flexibility reduction of the lens. Two-photon excited fluorescence of the lens can be used as a diagnostic tool to localise such protein accumulations. In in-vitro experiments with human cataract lenses and also lenses of the Philly-mouse it could be demonstrated that with age the fluorescence increases as presbyopia proceeds. The distribution of the fluorescing compounds are not homogeneous but rather cloudy. Discrimination of the compounds by fluorescence lifetime measurements in relation of the depth in the lens is possible.

  16. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes......' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2......-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein) and diffusion coefficients of distinct fluorescence probes (raster imaging correlation spectroscopy) can be obtained from different regions of the tissue. Comparative studies of different tissue strata, but also between equivalent regions of normal and abnormal...

  17. Room-temperature fluorescence lifetime of pseudoisocyanine (PIC) J excitons with various aggregate morphologies in relation to microcavity polariton formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Yuki; Saitoh, Keita; Oda, Masaru; Tani, Toshiro

    2012-01-01

    The results of room-temperature fluorescence lifetime measurements are reported for the excitation of J aggregates (Js) of pseudoisocyanine chloride (PIC-Cl) prepared in potassium polyvinyl sulfate (PVS) polymer thin films, their aqueous solutions, and NaCl aqueous solutions. Variations of the microscopic morphologies of the aggregates were investigated. The results show that fluorescence decay features correlated to the morphology change. The observed fluorescence lifetime and quantum efficiency of PIC J aggregates (PIC-Js) in a NaCl aqueous solution were 310 ps and 28%, respectively. The lifetime of the fibril-shaped macroaggregates prepared in PVS thin films was below the instrumental time resolution of 5 ps, and the efficiency decreased to below 3%. The results indicate that PIC-Js prepared with PVS polymers have an increased nonradiative contribution to the excitation deactivation process. In particular, macro-Js with isolated fibril-shaped structures revealed nonradiative pathway(s) that are closely associated to the specific packaging morphology of the constituent meso-Js. The possibility of a destructive effect on the formation of cavity-polaritons is also discussed.

  18. Room-Temperature Fluorescence Lifetime of Pseudoisocyanine (PIC J Excitons with Various Aggregate Morphologies in Relation to Microcavity Polariton Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Obara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of room-temperature fluorescence lifetime measurements are reported for the excitation of J aggregates (Js of pseudoisocyanine chloride (PIC-Cl prepared in potassium polyvinyl sulfate (PVS polymer thin films, their aqueous solutions, and NaCl aqueous solutions. Variations of the microscopic morphologies of the aggregates were investigated. The results show that fluorescence decay features correlated to the morphology change. The observed fluorescence lifetime and quantum efficiency of PIC J aggregates (PIC-Js in a NaCl aqueous solution were 310 ps and 28%, respectively. The lifetime of the fibril-shaped macroaggregates prepared in PVS thin films was below the instrumental time resolution of 5 ps, and the efficiency decreased to below 3%. The results indicate that PIC-Js prepared with PVS polymers have an increased nonradiative contribution to the excitation deactivation process. In particular, macro-Js with isolated fibril-shaped structures revealed nonradiative pathway(s that are closely associated to the specific packaging morphology of the constituent meso-Js. The possibility of a destructive effect on the formation of cavity-polaritons is also discussed.

  19. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-02-28

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18-0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function.

  20. The FERRUM project: Experimental lifetimes and transition probabilities from highly excited even 4d levels in Fe ii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report lifetime measurements of the 6 levels in the 3d6(5D)4d e6G term in Fe ii at an energy of 10.4 eV, and f-values for 14 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions in a laser-produced plasma. The high excitation energy, and the fact that the levels have the same parity as the the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, necessitated the use of a two-photon excitation scheme. The probability for this process is greatly enhanced by the presence of the 3d6(5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy difference. The f-values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode discharge lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer. The data is important for benchmarking atomic calculations of astrophysically important quantities and useful for spectroscopy of hot stars.

  1. Investigation of in-vivo skin autofluorescence lifetimes under long-term cw optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lihachev, A; Ferulova, I; Vasiljeva, K; Spigulis, J [Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia)

    2014-08-31

    The main results obtained during the last five years in the field of laser-excited in-vivo human skin photobleaching effects are presented. The main achievements and results obtained, as well as methods and experimental devices are briefly described. In addition, the impact of long-term 405-nm cw low-power laser excitation on the skin autofluorescence lifetime is experimentally investigated. (laser biophotonics)

  2. Novel Application of Fluorescence Lifetime and Fluorescence Microscopy Enables Quantitative Access to Subcellular Dynamics in Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgass, Kirstin; Caesar, Katharina; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Meixner, Alfred J.; Harter, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Background Optical and spectroscopic technologies working at subcellular resolution with quantitative output are required for a deeper understanding of molecular processes and mechanisms in living cells. Such technologies are prerequisite for the realisation of predictive biology at cellular and subcellular level. However, although established in the physical sciences, these techniques are rarely applied to cell biology in the plant sciences. Principal Findings Here, we present a combined application of one-chromophore fluorescence lifetime microscopy and wavelength-selective fluorescence microscopy to analyse the function of a GFP fusion of the Brassinosteroid Insensitive 1 Receptor (BRI1-GFP) with high spatial and temporal resolution in living Arabidopsis cells in their tissue environment. We show a rapid, brassinolide-induced cell wall expansion and a fast BR-regulated change in the BRI1-GFP fluorescence lifetime in the plasmamembrane in vivo. Both cell wall expansion and changes in fluorescence lifetime reflect early BR-induced and BRI1-dependent physiological or signalling processes. Our experiments also show the potential of one-chromophore fluorescence lifetime microscopy for the in vivo monitoring of the biochemical and biophysical subcellular environment using GFP fusion proteins as probes. Significance One-chromophore fluorescence lifetime microscopy, combined with wavelength-specific fluorescence microscopy, opens up new frontiers for in vivo dynamic and quantitative analysis of cellular processes at high resolution which are not addressable by pure imaging technologies or transmission electron microscopy. PMID:19492078

  3. Detecting and Quantifying Biomolecular Interactions of a Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Nanoparticle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of nanoparticles with biomaterials determine the biological activity that is key for the physiological response. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS were found recently to act as an inhibitor of inflammation by blocking selectins. Systemic application of dPGS would present this nanoparticle to various biological molecules that rapidly adsorb to the nanoparticle surface or lead to adsorption of the nanoparticle to cellular structures such as lipid membranes. In the past, fluorescence lifetime measurements of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles at a molecular and cellular/tissue level have been proven to reveal valuable information on the local nanoparticle environment via characteristic fluorescent lifetime signatures of the nanoparticle bound dye. Here, we established fluorescence lifetime measurements as a tool to determine the binding affinity to fluorescently tagged dPGS (dPGS-ICC; ICC: indocarbocyanine. The binding to a cell adhesion molecule (L-selectin and a human complement protein (C1q to dPGS-ICC was evaluated by the concentration dependent change in the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC. The apparent binding affinity was found to be in the nanomolar range for both proteins (L-selectin: 87 ± 4 nM and C1q: 42 ± 12 nM. Furthermore, the effect of human serum on the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC was measured and found to be different from the interactions with the two proteins and lipid membranes. A comparison between the unique lifetime signatures of dPGS-ICC in different biological environments shows that fluorescence lifetime measurements of unique dPGS-ICC fluorescence lifetime signatures are a versatile tool to probe the microenvironment of dPGS in cells and tissue.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime biosensing with DNA microarrays and a CMOS-SPAD imager

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giraud, G.; Schulze, H.; Li, D.U.; Bachmann, T.T.; Crain, J.; Tyndall, D.; Richardson, J.; Walker, R.; Stoppa, D.; Charbon, E.; Henderson, R.; Arlt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime of dye molecules is a sensitive reporter on local microenvironment which is generally independent of fluorophores concentration and can be used as a means of discrimination between molecules with spectrally overlapping emission. It is therefore a potentially powerful

  5. Fluorescence-Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Visualization of Quantum Dots’ Endocytic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leona Damalakiene

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of carboxylated polyethylene glycol (PEG CdSe/ZnSquantum dots (QDs has been monitored in living fibroblasts using confocal microscopy for fluorescence intensity and fluorescence-lifetime imaging (FLIM. The wide range of mean photoluminescence (PL lifetime values was observed for the intracellular QDs in different intracellular microenvironment, which revealed structural heterogeneity of endosomes and enabled the distinguishing among endosomes of different maturity.

  6. Lifetime Fluorescence and Raman Imaging for Detection of Wound Failure and Heterotopic Ossification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-2-0075 TITLE: Lifetime Fluorescence and Raman Imaging for Detection of Wound Failure and Heterotopic Ossification ...15Sep2012 - 14Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lifetime Fluorescence and Raman Imaging for Detection of Wound Failure and Heterotopic Ossification 5a...with the presence of inflammatory cytokines [1]. An additional wound failure mechanism is the formation of Heterotopic Ossification (HO) [3, 7]. In

  7. Imaging corneal crosslinking by autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Philipp; Hovakimyan, Marina; Guthoff, Rudolf F; Hüttmann, Gereon; Stachs, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the use of 2-photon microscopy (TPM), which excites tissue autofluorescence, in detecting and calculating the grade of collagen corneal crosslinks, which are not visible through the slitlamp and in vivo confocal microscopy. Departments of Ophthalmology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, and University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany. Experimental study. Corneas of rabbits were treated with different crosslinking (CXL) protocols. Two weeks after treatment, the corneas were evaluated in vivo by confocal microscopy. Eyes were enucleated and TPM was performed at 710 nm and 826 nm excitation wavelengths to detect tissue autofluorescence, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime measurements (FLIM). Eyes were then fixed and analyzed by histology. Crosslinking following the standard protocol generated a strong autofluorescence signal in the stroma that was detected by TPM. This signal was weakly present in the control specimens, and a sharp transition zone between the peripheral zone and the CXL zone was seen. On FLIM, an increase in corneal crosslinks was measured when the standard protocol was used. Two-photon microscopy, a noninvasive method, was able to detect the effects of therapeutic CXL and measure the grade of CXL. In addition to postoperative treatment control, the technique has possibilities for use in online dosimetry during 2-photon triggered CXL. Copyright © 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of signal-to-noise ratio in frequency-domain multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yide; Khan, Aamir A; Vigil, Genevieve D; Howard, Scott S

    2016-07-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has enabled three-dimensional quantitative molecular microscopy in vivo. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and thus the imaging rate of MPM-FLIM, which is fundamentally limited by the shot noise and fluorescence saturation, has not been quantitatively studied yet. In this paper, we investigate the SNR performance of the frequency-domain (FD) MPM-FLIM with two figures of merit: the photon economy in the limit of shot noise, and the normalized SNR in the limit of saturation. The theoretical results and Monte Carlo simulations find that two-photon FD-FLIM requires 50% fewer photons to achieve the same SNR as conventional one-photon FLIM. We also analytically show that the MPM-FD-FLIM can exploit the DC and higher harmonic components generated by nonlinear optical mixing of the excitation light to improve SNR, reducing the required number of photons by an additional 50%. Finally, the effect of fluorophore saturation on the experimental SNR performance is discussed.

  9. Assessing the photoaging process at sun exposed and non-exposed skin using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Photoaging is the skin premature aging due to exposure to ultraviolet light, which damage the collagen, elastin and can induce alterations on the skin cells DNA, and, then, it may evolve to precancerous lesions, which are widely investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime. The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime analysis has been presented as a technique of great potential for biological tissue characterization at optical diagnostics. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and may contribute to a non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries such as skin lesions. These lesions and the possible areas where they may develop can be interrogated using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy taking into account the variability of skin phototypes and the changes related to melanin, collagen and elastin, endogenous fluorophores which have emissions that spectrally overlap to the NADH and FAD emission. The objective of this study is to assess the variation on fluorescence lifetimes of normal skin at sun exposed and non-exposed areas and associate this variation to the photoaging process.

  10. Investigating protein-protein interactions in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Day, Richard N; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is now routinely used for dynamic measurements of signaling events inside living cells, including detection of protein-protein interactions. An understanding of the basic physics of fluorescence lifetime measurements is required to use this technique. In this protocol, we describe both the time-correlated single photon counting and the frequency-domain methods for FLIM data acquisition and analysis. We describe calibration of both FLIM systems, and demonstrate how they are used to measure the quenched donor fluorescence lifetime that results from Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET ). We then show how the FLIM-FRET methods are used to detect the dimerization of the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α in live mouse pituitary cell nuclei. Notably, the factors required for accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described. With either method, the entire protocol including specimen preparation, imaging and data analysis takes ~2 d. PMID:21886099

  11. Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, R. M.; Drachev, V. P.; Liu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Enhanced fluorescence is observed from dye molecules interacting with optical nanoantenna arrays. Elliptical gold dimers form individual nanoantennae with tunable plasmon resonances depending upon the geometry of the two particles and the size of the gap between them. A fluorescent dye, Rhodamine...... 800, is uniformly embedded in a dielectric host that coats the nanoantennae. The nanoantennae act to enhance the dye absorption. In turn, emission from the dye drives the plasmon resonance of the antennae; the nanoantennae act to enhance the fluorescence signal and change the angular distribution...

  12. [Development of X-ray excited fluorescence spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chen; Gu, Mu; Di, Wang; Cao, Dun-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Huang, Shi-Ming

    2009-08-01

    An X-ray excited fluorescence spectrometer was developed with an X-ray tube and a spectrometer. The X-ray tube, spectrometer, autocontrol method and data processing selected were roundly evaluated. The wavelength and detecting efficiency of the apparatus were calibrated with the mercury and tungsten bromine standard lamps, and the X-ray excited emission spectra of BaF2, Cs I (Tl) crystals were measured. The results indicate that the apparatus has advantages of good wavelength resolution, high stability, easy to operation and good radioprotection. It is a wery effective tool for exploration of new scintillation materials.

  13. The Taser Induced Fluorescence Spectra And Decay Lifetime Of NI2+ Doped Chrysoberyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanting, Ji; Genwang, Wen; Jun, Oian; Zhende, Chen; Wenbin, Gao; Songhao, Lui

    1985-12-01

    This paper reports the experimental results on the fluorescence spectra and decay lifetime of 3T2---3A2 vibronic transition of NI2+ : BeAl204 with LIFM. The center wavelength of fluorescence spectra is 1.33u , the bandwidth (FWHM) is 0.14u (1.26 - 1.40u), and the center red-shift of fluorescence spectra in relative to absorption spectra is 0.225u at room temperature (300k). The radiation lifetime is 3T2 band is 198 us.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime-based sensing of sodium by an optode

    OpenAIRE

    SCHWARZE, Thomas; Müller, Holger; Ast, Sandra; Steinbrück, Dörte (Dr.); Eidner, Sascha; Geißler, Felix; Kumke, Michael U.; Holdt, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    We report a 1,2,3-triazol fluoroionophore for detecting Na+ that shows in vitro enhancement in the Na+-induced fluorescence intensity and decay time. The Na+-selective molecule 1 was incorporated into a hydrogel as a part of a fiber optical sensor. This sensor allows the direct determination of Na+ in the range of 1–10 mM by measuring reversible fluorescence decay time changes.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime-based sensing of sodium by an optode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Thomas; Müller, Holger; Ast, Sandra; Steinbrück, Dörte; Eidner, Sascha; Geissler, Felix; Kumke, Michael U; Holdt, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-11-25

    We report a 1,2,3-triazol fluoroionophore for detecting Na(+) that shows in vitro enhancement in the Na(+)-induced fluorescence intensity and decay time. The Na(+)-selective molecule 1 was incorporated into a hydrogel as a part of a fiber optical sensor. This sensor allows the direct determination of Na(+) in the range of 1-10 mM by measuring reversible fluorescence decay time changes.

  16. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging with multi wavelength LED excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthman, A. Siri; Dumitru, Sebastian; Quirós-Gonzalez, Isabel; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) can combine morphological and molecular information, yielding potential for real-time and high throughput multiplexed fluorescent contrast agent imaging. Multiplexed readout from targets, such as cell surface receptors overexpressed in cancer cells, could improve both sensitivity and specificity of tumor identification. There remains, however, a need for compact and cost effective implementations of the technology. We have implemented a low-cost wide-field multiplexed fluorescence imaging system, which combines LED excitation at 590, 655 and 740 nm with a compact commercial solid state HSI system operating in the range 600 - 1000 nm. A key challenge for using reflectance-based HSI is the separation of contrast agent fluorescence from the reflectance of the excitation light. Here, we illustrate how it is possible to address this challenge in software, using two offline reflectance removal methods, prior to least-squares spectral unmixing. We made a quantitative comparison of the methods using data acquired from dilutions of contrast agents prepared in well-plates. We then established the capability of our HSI system for non-invasive in vivo fluorescence imaging in small animals using the optimal reflectance removal method. The HSI presented here enables quantitative unmixing of at least four fluorescent contrast agents (Alexa Fluor 610, 647, 700 and 750) simultaneously in living mice. A successful unmixing of the four fluorescent contrast agents was possible both using the pure contrast agents and with mixtures. The system could in principle also be applied to imaging of ex vivo tissue or intraoperative imaging in a clinical setting. These data suggest a promising approach for developing clinical applications of HSI based on multiplexed fluorescence contrast agent imaging.

  17. Scanless multitarget-matching multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junpeng Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the combination of a reflective blazed grating and a reflective phase-only diffractive spatial light modulator (SLM, scanless multitarget-matching multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy (SMTM-MPM was achieved. The SLM shaped an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:sapphire laser beam into an excitation pattern with addressable shapes and sizes that matched the samples of interest in the field of view. Temporal and spatial focusing were simultaneously realized by combining an objective lens and a blazed grating. The fluorescence signal from illuminated areas was recorded by a two-dimensional sCMOS camera. Compared with a conventional temporal focusing multiphoton microscope, our microscope achieved effective use of the laser power and decreased photodamage with higher axial resolution.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using a single photon avalanche diode array sensor (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargocki, Piotr M.; Spence, David J.; Goldys, Ewa M.; Charbon, Edoardo; Bruschini, Claudio E.; Antalović, Ivan Michel; Burri, Samuel

    2017-02-01

    Single photon detectors allows us work with the weakest fluorescence signals. Single photon arrays, combined with ps-controlled gating allow us to create image maps of fluorescence lifetimes, which can be used for in-vivo discrimination of tissue activity. Here we present fluorescence lifetime imaging using the `SwissSPAD' sensor, a 512-by-128-pixel array of gated single photon detectors, fabricated in a standard high-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS process. We present a protocol for spatially resolved lifetime measurements where the lifetime can be retrieved for each pixel. We demonstrate the system by imaging patterns of Fluorescein and Rhodamine B on test slides, as well as measuring mixed samples to retrieve both components of the decay lifetime. The single photon sensitivity of the sensor creates a valuable instrument to perform live cell or live animal (in vivo) measurements of the weak autofluorescent signals, for example distinguishing unlabelled free and bound NADH. Our ultimate goal is to create a real time fluorescence lifetime imaging system, possibly integrated into augmented reality goggles, which could allow immediate discrimination of in vivo tissues.

  19. Multiphoton excited fluorescent materials for frequency upconversion emission and fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Wong, Man Shing

    2014-08-20

    Recent progress in developing various strategies for exploiting efficient MPA fluorophores for two emerging technological MPA applications including frequency upconversion photoluminescence and lasing as well as 2PA fluorescence bioimaging and biosensing are presented. An intriguing application of MPA frequency-upconverted lasing offers opportunity for the fabrication of high-energy coherent light sources in the blue region which could create new advantages and breakthroughs in various laser-based applications. In addition, multiphoton excitation has led to considerable progress in the development of advanced diagnostic and therapeutic treatments; further advancement is anticipated with the emergence of various versatile 2PA fluorescence probes. It is widely appreciated that the two-photon excitation offers significant advantages for the biological fluorescence imaging and sensing which includes higher spatial resolution, less photobleaching and photodamage as well as deeper tissue penetration as compared to the one-photon excited microscopy. To be practically useful, the 2PA fluorescent probes for biological applications are required to have a site-specificity, a high fluorescence quantum yield, proper two-photon excitation and subsequent emission wavelengths, good photodecomposition stability, water solubility, and biocompatibility besides large 2PA action cross-sections. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Silica nanodisks as platforms for fluorescence lifetime-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Core-shell conjugates of silica nanodisks and fluorescent dyes have been prepared. Rhodamine B, the reference, has been attached to the core, by surface functionalization of the pristine SNDs. Then, a layer of silica has been deposited on the composite nanodisks. Finally, the surface has been functionalized with ...

  1. Automated analysis of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data based on the Laguerre deconvolution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Paritosh; Jo, Javier A

    2011-01-01

    In fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), fluorescence time decay at each pixel of the imaged sample are measured. Every recorded fluorescence decay corresponds to the time convolution of the instrument response with the intrinsic fluorescence impulse response function (IRF), from which the sample fluorescence lifetime is determined. To estimate the IRF, the instrument response thus needs to be deconvolved from the recorded fluorescence decay. We have recently introduced a novel FLIM time-deconvolution method based on the linear expansion of the fluorescence decays on an orthonormal Laguerre basis. Since this method allows simultaneous estimation of the IRFs at all pixels, it performs at least two orders of magnitude faster than standard algorithms. In its original implementation, however, the Laguerre basis, determined by the Laguerre parameter α, is selected using a heuristic approach. Here, we present an automated implementation, whereby the Laguerre parameter α is treated as a free parameter within a nonlinear least squares optimization scheme. The new implementation combines the unmatched inherent computational speed of the Laguerre deconvolution method with a systematic model selection approach. This method will thus facilitate applications of FLIM requiring automatic estimation of the spatial distribution of fluorescence lifetimes, such as in in vivo tissue FLIM imaging.

  2. Asante Calcium Green and Asante Calcium Red--novel calcium indicators for two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Jahn

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and potential dysfunctions therein, an analysis of the ubiquitous intracellular second messenger calcium is of particular interest. This study examined the suitability of the novel Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes Asante Calcium Red (ACR and Asante Calcium Green (ACG for two-photon (2P-excited time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Both dyes displayed sufficient 2P fluorescence excitation in a range of 720-900 nm. In vitro, ACR and ACG exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay behavior and the two decay time components in the ns-range could be attributed to the Ca(2+-free and Ca(2+-bound dye species. The amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay time changed in a Ca(2+-dependent way, unraveling in vitro dissociation constants K(D of 114 nM and 15 nM for ACR and ACG, respectively. In the presence of bovine serum albumin, the absorption and steady-state fluorescence behavior of ACR was altered and its biexponential fluorescence decay showed about 5-times longer decay time components indicating dye-protein interactions. Since no ester derivative of ACG was commercially available, only ACR was evaluated for 2P-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM in living cells of American cockroach salivary glands. In living cells, ACR also exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay with clearly resolvable short (0.56 ns and long (2.44 ns decay time components attributable to the Ca(2+-free and Ca(2+-bound ACR species. From the amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay times, an in situ K(D of 180 nM was determined. Thus, quantitative [Ca(2+]i recordings were realized, unraveling a reversible dopamine-induced [Ca(2+]i elevation from 21 nM to 590 nM in salivary duct cells. It was concluded that ACR is a promising new Ca(2+ indicator dye for 2P-FLIM recordings applicable in diverse biological systems.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy analysis of defects in multi-tube physical vapor transport grown Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Andreas; Veale, Matthew C.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Seller, Paul; Botchway, Stanley W. [Science and Technology Facility Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Detector Development Group and Central Laser Facility, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, Steven J. [Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Duarte, Diana D. [Science and Technology Facility Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Detector Development Group and Central Laser Facility, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Choubey, Ashutosh; Halliday, Douglas [Department of Physics, Durham University, Rochester Building, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is the material of choice for high-energy room-temperature X-ray and γ-ray detectors. However, the performance of pixelated detectors is greatly influenced by the quality of CZT. Crystal defects and impurities are one source of shallow and deep level traps for charge carriers. Fluorescence lifetime of the recombination of optically excited charges may indicate the presence and type of defects and impurities in CZT. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is used to examine the excited-state lifetime in CZT fabricated by different growth methods and conditions. The FLIM set-up analyzes luminescence emitted from the sample following photo excitation. Samples were optically excited above band gap with a pulsed laser (590 nm) for raster scanning a 220 x 165 μm{sup 2} sample area. In-situ room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) and FLIM were recorded simultaneously. In order to analyze the FLIM data, two dominant charge carrier decay processes (τ{sub 1}, τ{sub 2}) were identified. The luminescence signal decays with a rapid lifetime of τ{sub 1} ∼ 50-200 ps, and a large variety of long-lifetime components τ{sub 2} were found in the range of 225-900 ps. CZT grown by multi-tube physical vapor transport (MTPVT) showed extremely long-lived recombination decay times up to 3.5 ns in the vicinity of the interface at growth start. Further away from this interface, the recombination lifetime was in the typical range of fast transitions similar to those found in detector-grade CZT fabricated by travelling heater method. Crystalline material quality strongly influences FLIM lifetime. Time-resolved transients of MTPVT-grown CZT compared with industry-leading detector grade CZT (dots: measured data; lines: fitted exponential decay curves). (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Rapid fluorescence lifetime estimation with modified phasor approach and Laguerre deconvolution: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marcu, Laura

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging has been shown to serve as a valuable tool for interrogating and diagnosis of biological tissue at a mesoscopic level. The ability to analyze fluorescence decay curves to extract lifetime values in real-time is crucial for clinical translation and applications such as tumor margin delineation or intracoronary imaging of atherosclerotic plaques. In this work, we compare the performance of two popular non-parametric (fit-free) methods for determining lifetime values from fluorescence decays in real-time—the Phasor approach and Laguerre deconvolution. We demonstrate results from simulated and experimental data to compare the accuracy and speed of both methods and their dependence on noise and model parameters.

  5. Temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime of a fluorescent polymeric thermometer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), labeled by polarity and hydrogen bonding sensitive 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, Chie; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2008-03-13

    Fluorescent molecular thermometers showing temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes enable thermal mapping of small spaces such as a microchannel and a living cell. We report the temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA), which is a random copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and an environment-sensitive fluorescent monomer (DBD-AA) containing a 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan structure. The average fluorescence lifetime of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) in aqueous solution increased from 4.22 to 14.1 ns with increasing temperature from 30 to 35 degrees C. This drastic change in fluorescence lifetime (27% increase per 1 degrees C) is the sharpest ever reported. Concentration independency, one of the advantages of fluorescence lifetime measurements, was seen in average fluorescence lifetime (13.7 +/- 0.18 ns) of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) at 33 degrees C over a wide concentration range (0.005-1 w/v%). With increasing temperature, polyNIPAM units in poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) change their structure from an extended form to a globular form, providing apolar and aprotic environments to the fluorescent DBD-AA units. Consequently, the environment-sensitive DBD-AA units translate the local environmental changes into the extension of the fluorescence lifetime. This role of the DBD-AA units was revealed by a study of solvent effects on fluorescence lifetime of a model environment-sensitive fluorophore.

  6. Time-Domain Microfluidic Fluorescence Lifetime Flow Cytometry for High-Throughput Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedbal, Jakub; Visitkul, Viput; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Weitsman, Gregory; Chana, Prabhjoat; Matthews, Daniel R; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Sensing ion or ligand concentrations, physico-chemical conditions, and molecular dimerization or conformation change is possible by assays involving fluorescent lifetime imaging. The inherent low throughput of imaging impedes rigorous statistical data analysis on large cell numbers. We address this limitation by developing a fluorescence lifetime-measuring flow cytometer for fast fluorescence lifetime quantification in living or fixed cell populations. The instrument combines a time-correlated single photon counting epifluorescent microscope with microfluidics cell-handling system. The associated computer software performs burst integrated fluorescence lifetime analysis to assign fluorescence lifetime, intensity, and burst duration to each passing cell. The maximum safe throughput of the instrument reaches 3,000 particles per minute. Living cells expressing spectroscopic rulers of varying peptide lengths were distinguishable by Förster resonant energy transfer measured by donor fluorescence lifetime. An epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulation assay demonstrated the technique's capacity to selectively quantify EGF receptor phosphorylation in cells, which was impossible by measuring sensitized emission on a standard flow cytometer. Dual-color fluorescence lifetime detection and cell-specific chemical environment sensing were exemplified using di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a lipophilic environmentally sensitive dye that exhibits changes in its fluorescence lifetime as a function of membrane lipid order. To our knowledge, this instrument opens new applications in flow cytometry which were unavailable due to technological limitations of previously reported fluorescent lifetime flow cytometers. The presented technique is sensitive to lifetimes of most popular fluorophores in the 0.5–5 ns range including fluorescent proteins and is capable of detecting multi-exponential fluorescence lifetime decays. This instrument vastly enhances the throughput of experiments involving

  7. Lifetime measurements using two-step laser excitation for high-lying even-parity levels and improved theoretical oscillator strengths in Y ii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Lundberg, H.; Engström, L.; Nilsson, H.; Hartman, H.

    2017-10-01

    We report new time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence lifetime measurements for 22 highly excited even-parity levels in singly ionized yttrium (Y ii). To populate these levels belonging to the configurations 4d6s, 5s6s 4d5d, 5p2, 4d7s and 4d6d, a two-step laser excitation technique was used. Our previous pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock model (Biémont et al. 2011) was improved by extending the configuration interaction up to n = 10 to reproduce the new experimental lifetimes. A set of semi-empirical oscillator strengths extended to transitions falling in the spectral range λλ194-3995 nm, depopulating these 22 even-parity levels in Y ii, is presented and compared to the values found in the Kurucz's data base (Kurucz 2011).

  8. Wide-field TCSPC-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhling, Klaus; Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Becker, Wolfgang; Smietana, Stefan; Netz, Holger; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Le Marois, Alix; Jagutzki, Ottmar

    2016-05-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is a widely used, sensitive, precise, robust and mature technique to measure photon arrival times in applications such as fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy, light detection and ranging (lidar) and optical tomography. Wide-field TCSPC detection techniques, where the position and the arrival time of the photons are recorded simultaneously, have seen several advances in the last few years, from the microsecond to the picosecond time scale. Here, we summarise some of our recent work in this field with emphasis on microsecond resolution phosphorescence lifetime imaging (PLIM) and nanosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscopy.

  9. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  10. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreham, Alexander; Brodwolf, Robert; Walker, Karolina; Haag, Rainer; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2016-12-24

    The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  11. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  12. Multiphoton Laser Microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging for the Evaluation of the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Seidenari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiphoton laser microscopy is a new, non-invasive technique providing access to the skin at a cellular and subcellular level, which is based both on autofluorescence and fluorescence lifetime imaging. Whereas the former considers fluorescence intensity emitted by epidermal and dermal fluorophores and by the extra-cellular matrix, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM, is generated by the fluorescence decay rate. This innovative technique can be applied to the study of living skin, cell cultures and ex vivo samples. Although still limited to the clinical research field, the development of multiphoton laser microscopy is thought to become suitable for a practical application in the next few years: in this paper, we performed an accurate review of the studies published so far, considering the possible fields of application of this imaging method and providing high quality images acquired in the Department of Dermatology of the University of Modena.

  13. Membrane lipid domains and rafts: current applications of fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F M; Loura, Luís M S; Prieto, Manuel

    2009-02-01

    Membrane microdomains and their involvement in cellular processes are part of the current paradigm of biomembranes. However, a better characterization of domains, namely lipid rafts, is needed. In this review, it is shown how the use of time-resolved fluorescence, with the adequate parameters and probes, helps elucidating the type, number, fraction, composition and size of lipid phases and domains in multicomponent model systems. The determination of phase diagrams for lipid mixtures containing sphingolipids and/or cholesterol is exemplified. The use of fluorescence quenching and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are also illustrated. Strategies for studying protein-induced domains are presented. The advantages of using single point microscopic decays and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in systems with three-phase coexistence are explained. Finally, the introduction of FLIM allows studies in live cell membranes, and the nature of the microdomains observed is readily elucidated due to the information retrieved from fluorescence lifetimes.

  14. Bright blue-shifted fluorescent proteins with Cys in the GAF domain engineered from bacterial phytochromes: fluorescence mechanisms and excited-state dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontani, Yusaku; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Baloban, Mikhail; Zhu, Jingyi; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2016-11-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes (BphPs) are of great interest for in vivo imaging. They utilize biliverdin (BV) as a chromophore, which is a heme degradation product, and therefore they are straightforward to use in mammalian tissues. Here, we report on fluorescence properties of NIR FPs with key alterations in their BV binding sites. BphP1-FP, iRFP670 and iRFP682 have Cys residues in both PAS and GAF domains, rather than in the PAS domain alone as in wild-type BphPs. We found that NIR FP variants with Cys in the GAF or with Cys in both PAS and GAF show blue-shifted emission with long fluorescence lifetimes. In contrast, mutants with Cys in the PAS only or no Cys residues at all exhibit red-shifted emission with shorter lifetimes. Combining these results with previous biochemical and BphP1-FP structural data, we conclude that BV adducts bound to Cys in the GAF are the origin of bright blue-shifted fluorescence. We propose that the long fluorescence lifetime follows from (i) a sterically more constrained thioether linkage, leaving less mobility for ring A than in canonical BphPs, and (ii) that π-electron conjugation does not extend on ring A, making excited-state deactivation less sensitive to ring A mobility.

  15. Lifetime Reliability Estimate and Extreme Permanent Deformations of Randomly Excited Elasto-Plastic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for life-time reliability' estimates of randomly excited yielding systems, assuming the structure to be safe, when the plastic deformations are confined below certain limits. The accumulated plastic deformations during any single significant loading history are considered...... to be the outcome of identically distributed, independent stochastic variables,for which a model is suggested. Further assuming the interarrival times of the elementary loading histories to be specified by a Poisson process, and the duration of these to be small compared to the designed life-time, the accumulated...... plastic deformation during several loadings can be modelled as a filtered Poisson process. Using the Markov property of this quantity the considered first-passage problem as well as the related extreme distribution problems are then solved numerically, and the results are compared to simulation studies....

  16. Practical use of corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of fluorescent proteins in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Visser, N.V.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2003-01-01

    Corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra have been obtained from several enhanced variants of the green fluorescent protein (EGFP) isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, blue fluorescence protein (EBFP), cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), EGFP and yellow fluorescent protein

  17. Polarized Fluorescence from Nitrogen Molecules Excited by Polarized Electron Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseberg, J. W.; Furst, J. E.; Gay, T. J.

    2005-05-01

    We have measured the optical excitation function and relative Stokes parameters for 388±5 nm fluorescence from spin-polarized electron impact excitation of molecular N2. Specifically, the circular polarization fraction normalized to the incident electron spin, P3/Pe, was found to be +1(5)% at an electron energy of 30eV. This result, even though it contains contributions from 6 different triplet spectral lines, is consistent with the data of the Münster group [1] who measured the N2 337 nm C3πu - B3πg (ν'=0, ν=0) transition and found P3 Mette et al., Verhandl. DPG (VI) 29, 462 (1994). [2] A.S. Green et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 093201 (2004).

  18. Polymer filters for ultraviolet-excited integrated fluorescence sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandin, Marc; Abshire, Pamela; Smela, Elisabeth

    2012-09-01

    Optical filters for blocking ultraviolet (UV) light were fabricated by doping various polymer hosts with a UV absorbing chromophore. The polymers were polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a silicone elastomer frequently used in microfluidics, SU-8, a photopatternable epoxy, and Humiseal 1B66, an acrylic coating used for moisture protection of integrated circuits. The chromophore was 2-(2‧-hydroxy-5‧-methylphenyl) benzotriazole (BTA), which has a high extinction coefficient between 300 nm and 400 nm. We demonstrate filters 5 µm thick that exhibit high ultraviolet rejection (nearly -40 dB at 342 nm) yet pass visible light (near 0 dB above 400 nm), making them ideal for ultraviolet-excited fluorescence sensing within microsystems. The absorbance of the BTA depended on the host polymer. These filters are promising for integrated fluorescence spectroscopy in bioanalytical platforms because they can be patterned by dry etching, molding or exposure to ultraviolet light.

  19. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (flimscopy). Methodology development and application to studies of endosome fusion in single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Oida, T; Sako, Y.; Kusumi, A.

    1993-01-01

    A new method of fluorescence microscopy for cell imaging has been developed that takes advantage of the spatial variations of fluorescence lifetimes in single cells as a source of image contrast, and thus it is named "fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (flimscopy)". Since time-resolved fluorescence measurements are sensitive to molecular dynamics and interactions, flimscopy allows the molecular information to be visualized in single cells. In flimscopy measurements, several (nanosecond)...

  20. Rapid diagnosis and intraoperative margin assessment of human lung cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyan Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A method of rapidly differentiating lung tumor from healthy tissue is extraordinarily needed for both the diagnosis and the intraoperative margin assessment. We assessed the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues with the autofluorescence, and also elucidated the mechanism in tissue studies and cell studies. A 15-patient testing group was used to compare FLIM results with traditional histopathology diagnosis. Based on the endogenous fluorescence lifetimes of the testing group, a criterion line was proposed to distinguish normal and cancerous tissues. Then by blinded examined 41 sections from the validation group of other 16 patients, the sensitivity and specificity of FLIM were determined. The cellular metabolism was studied with specific perturbations of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in cell studies. The fluorescence lifetime of cancerous lung tissues is consistently lower than normal tissues, and this is due to the both decrease of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD lifetimes. A criterion line of lifetime at 1920 ps can be given for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues.The sensitivity and specificity of FLIM for lung cancer diagnosis were determined as 92.9% and 92.3%. These findings suggest that NADH and FAD can be used to rapidly diagnose lung cancer. FLIM is a rapid, accurate and highly sensitive technique in the judgment during lung cancer surgery and it can be potential in earlier cancer detection.

  1. Rapid diagnosis and intraoperative margin assessment of human lung cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyan; Tang, Feng; Pan, Xiaobo; Yao, Longfang; Wang, Xinyi; Jing, Yueyue; Ma, Jiong; Wang, Guifang; Mi, Lan

    2017-12-01

    A method of rapidly differentiating lung tumor from healthy tissue is extraordinarily needed for both the diagnosis and the intraoperative margin assessment. We assessed the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues with the autofluorescence, and also elucidated the mechanism in tissue studies and cell studies. A 15-patient testing group was used to compare FLIM results with traditional histopathology diagnosis. Based on the endogenous fluorescence lifetimes of the testing group, a criterion line was proposed to distinguish normal and cancerous tissues. Then by blinded examined 41 sections from the validation group of other 16 patients, the sensitivity and specificity of FLIM were determined. The cellular metabolism was studied with specific perturbations of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in cell studies. The fluorescence lifetime of cancerous lung tissues is consistently lower than normal tissues, and this is due to the both decrease of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) lifetimes. A criterion line of lifetime at 1920 ps can be given for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues.The sensitivity and specificity of FLIM for lung cancer diagnosis were determined as 92.9% and 92.3%. These findings suggest that NADH and FAD can be used to rapidly diagnose lung cancer. FLIM is a rapid, accurate and highly sensitive technique in the judgment during lung cancer surgery and it can be potential in earlier cancer detection.

  2. Spectral and fluorescence lifetime endoscopic system using a double-clad photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A; Poulon, F; Melouki, F; Zanello, M; Varlet, P; Habert, R; Devaux, B; Kudlinski, A; Abi Haidar, D

    2016-11-15

    We present a customized small-core double-clad photonic crystal fiber for spectral and fluorescence lifetime measurements of human samples. In this Letter, the new fiber has been characterized on different fluorophores and samples of human brain tumor; a comparison to a bi-fiber homemade system and a commercial fiber probe was made.

  3. Time-Domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Techniques Suitable for Solid-State Imaging Sensor Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Henderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully demonstrated video-rate CMOS single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD-based cameras for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM by applying innovative FLIM algorithms. We also review and compare several time-domain techniques and solid-state FLIM systems, and adapt the proposed algorithms for massive CMOS SPAD-based arrays and hardware implementations. The theoretical error equations are derived and their performances are demonstrated on the data obtained from 0.13 μm CMOS SPAD arrays and the multiple-decay data obtained from scanning PMT systems. In vivo two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging data of FITC-albumin labeled vasculature of a P22 rat carcinosarcoma (BD9 rat window chamber are used to test how different algorithms perform on bi-decay data. The proposed techniques are capable of producing lifetime images with enough contrast.

  4. A Cellular Screening Assay Using Analysis of Metal-Modified Fluorescence Lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Nicholas I.; Fruhwirth, Gilbert; Archibald, Stephen J.; Ng, Tony; Richards, David

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Current methods for screening cell receptor internalization often require complex image analysis with limited sensitivity. Here we describe a novel bioassay based on detection of changes in global fluorescence lifetime above a gold substrate, with superresolution axial sensitivity and no need for image analysis. We show that the lifetime of enhanced green fluorescent protein expressed in a cellular membrane is greatly reduced in close proximity to the gold, resulting in a distance-dependent lifetime distribution throughout the cell. We demonstrate the application of this phenomenon in a screening assay by comparing the efficacies of two small molecule inhibitors interfering with the internalization process of a G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:20513420

  5. Fluorescence lifetime of emitters with broad homogeneous linewidths modified in opal photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad homogene......We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad...... states (LDOS) in the three-dimensional photonic crystals. The experiments and theory taken together reveal that the emission lifetime is modified over frequency ranges that are broader than the homogeneous emission line width of R6G dye....

  6. Towards sensitive, high-throughput, biomolecular assays based on fluorescence lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanna Skilitsi, Anastasia; Turko, Timothé; Cianfarani, Damien; Barre, Sophie; Uhring, Wilfried; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Léonard, Jérémie

    2017-09-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence detection for robust sensing of biomolecular interactions is developed by implementing time-correlated single photon counting in high-throughput conditions. Droplet microfluidics is used as a promising platform for the very fast handling of low-volume samples. We illustrate the potential of this very sensitive and cost-effective technology in the context of an enzymatic activity assay based on fluorescently-labeled biomolecules. Fluorescence lifetime detection by time-correlated single photon counting is shown to enable reliable discrimination between positive and negative control samples at a throughput as high as several hundred samples per second.

  7. Determination of optimal excitation and emission wavebands for detection of defect cherry tomato by using fluorescence emission and excitation matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, In-Suck; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Kim, Moon S.; Kim, Young-Sik

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescence imaging technique has been widely used for quality and safety measurements of agro-food materials. Fluorescence emission intensities of target materials are influenced by wavelengths of excitation sources. Hence, selection of a proper excitation wavelength is an important factor in differentiating target materials effectively. In this study, optimal fluorescence excitation wavelength was determined on the basis of fluorescence emission intensity of defect and sound areas of cherry tomatoes. The result showed that fluorescence responses of defect and sound surfaces of cherry tomatoes were most significantly separated with the excitation light wavelength range between 400 and 410 nm. Fluorescence images of defect cherry tomatoes were acquired with the LEDs with the central wavelength of 410 nm as the excitation source to verify the detection efficiency of cherry tomato defects. The resultant fluorescence images showed that the defects were discriminated from sound areas on cherry tomatoes with above 98% accuracy. This study shows that high power LEDs as the excitation source for fluorescence imaging are suitable for defect detection of cherry tomatoes.

  8. Universal correlation between solvent polarity, fluorescence lifetime and macroscopic viscosity of alcohol solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradip; Bohidar, H B

    2012-05-01

    In this report, we show interesting correlation between solvent polarity of alcohol solutions and fluorescence lifetime (τ(av)), estimated from time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS), and macroscopic viscosity (η). Non-functionalized carbon nanoparticles (NCNP) were successfully used as flurophores in these measurements. The solvent polarity, described through polarizability (Δf) of dielectric continuum theory, could universally describe both τ(av)/τ(max) and η/η(max) through the relation, [Formula: see text] with X = τ(av)/τ(max) or η/η(max), (subscript OH represents corresponding values for alcohols) for alcohol solutions of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol at room temperature. We show that fluorescence lifetime and solvent viscosity are universal functions of solvent polarity for alcohol solutions.

  9. Azadioxatriangulenium: a long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just Sørensen, Thomas; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Laursen, Bo W.

    2013-06-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy has great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation, as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is on the order of 20-200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatic dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecule assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red-emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immunoglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time of more than 75%, and an increase in the steady-state anisotropy of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay to detect binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with most other red-emitting organic dyes.

  10. Spatially resolved fluorescence lifetime mapping of enzyme kinetics in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V K; Jo, J A; Cantu, G; Herman, B A

    2008-06-01

    Traditional cuvette-based enzyme studies lack spatial information and do not allow real-time monitoring of the effects of modulating enzyme functions in vivo. In order to probe the realistic timescales of steric modifications in enzyme-substrate complexes and functional binding-unbinding kinetics in living cells without losing spatial information, it is imperative to develop sensitive imaging strategies that can report enzyme kinetics in real time over a wide dynamic range of timescales. Here we present a multi-photon excitation-based, ultra-fast photon detection using a streak camera and Laguerre expansion-based fast deconvolution approach for achieving high spatio-temporal resolution in monitoring real-time enzyme kinetics in single cells. In particular, we report spatially resolved, nanosecond-scale fluorescence dynamics associated with binding-unbinding kinetics of endogenous metabolic co-factor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with enzymes in intact living cells. By monitoring real-time kinetics of NAD(P)H-enzyme kinetics in primary hepatocytes isolated from young and aged mouse models, we observed that the mechanism of inhibition of mitochondrial respiration at complex I site is mediated by redistribution of free and protein-bound nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide pools and that this equilibrium redistribution is affected by age-related modifications in mitochondrial function. We describe unique advantages of Laguerre deconvolution algorithm in comparison with conventional lifetime analysis approaches. Non-invasive monitoring of metabolic dysfunctions in intact animal models is an attractive strategy for gaining insight into the dynamics of tissue metabolism in health and in various metabolic syndromes such as cancer, diabetes and aging-induced metabolic dysfunctions. Besides the example demonstrated above, we envisage that the proposed method can find applications in a variety of other situations where intensity-based approaches fall short owing to

  11. From morphology to clinical pathophysiology: multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging at patients' bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mess, Christian; Zens, Katharina; Gorzelanny, Christian; Metze, Dieter; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of skin diseases. By means of multiphoton excitation, endogenous biomolecules like NADH, collagen or elastin show autofluorescence or second harmonic generation. Thus, these molecules provide information about the subcellular morphology, epidermal architecture and physiological condition of the skin. To gain a deeper understanding of the linkage between cellular structure and physiological processes, non-invasive multiphotonbased intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) were combined within the scopes of inflammatory skin, chronic wounds and drug delivery in clinical application. The optical biopsies generated via MPT were morphologically analyzed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed a perinuclear accumulation in lesional skin in contrast to an even distribution in healthy skin. Confirmatively, MPT-FLIM showed an obvious metabolic shift in lesions. Moreover, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. The feasibility of primary in vivo tracking of applied therapeutic agents further broadened our scope: We examined the permeation and subsequent distribution of agents directly visualized in patientś skin in short-term repetitive measurements. Furthermore, we performed MPT-FLIM follow-up investigations in the long-term course of therapy. Therefore, clinical MPT-FLIM application offers new insights into the pathophysiology and the individual therapeutic course of skin diseases, facilitating a better understanding of the processes of inflammation and wound healing.

  12. Lifetime evaluation of DC-supplied electronic ballasts with fluorescent lamps for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosillo, F.G. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-05-01

    The evaluation of the lifetime of fluorescent lamps and electronic ballast is a current issue in illuminating engineering. The difficulty of carrying out this extensive evaluation by means of time-consuming tests of durability led to the search for a single-factor or shortened durability test that would give a reliable evaluation. This paper presents the results of submitting three samples of 14 different models of DC ballast with fluorescent lamps for photovoltaic (PV) applications, to a durability test of 2 h 45 min on/15 min off, for 10,500 h. An additional sample of each model was used for the measurement of various parameters such as the current crest factor (CCF) and a description is given of the main factors affecting lifetime. As a result of these tests, the CCF is assessed as a lifetime evaluator, together with a regression model that relates this CCF to the relative frequency at which premature breakdown occurs. A possible relationship is suggested between lamp voltage and lifetime, together with some considerations of the effect on lifetime of the state of charge of the battery. (author)

  13. Rotational multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound: bimodal system for intravascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marcu, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report the development and validation of a hybrid intravascular diagnostic system combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for cardiovascular imaging applications. A prototype FLIm system based on fluorescence pulse sampling technique providing information on artery biochemical composition was integrated with a commercial IVUS system providing information on artery morphology. A customized 3-Fr bimodal catheter combining a rotational side-view fiberoptic and a 40-MHz IVUS transducer was constructed for sequential helical scanning (rotation and pullback) of tubular structures. Validation of this bimodal approach was conducted in pig heart coronary arteries. Spatial resolution, fluorescence detection efficiency, pulse broadening effect, and lifetime measurement variability of the FLIm system were systematically evaluated. Current results show that this system is capable of temporarily resolving the fluorescence emission simultaneously in multiple spectral channels in a single pullback sequence. Accurate measurements of fluorescence decay characteristics from arterial segments can be obtained rapidly (e.g., 20 mm in 5 s), and accurate co-registration of fluorescence and ultrasound features can be achieved. The current finding demonstrates the compatibility of FLIm instrumentation with in vivo clinical investigations and its potential to complement conventional IVUS during catheterization procedures. PMID:24898604

  14. Rotational multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound: bimodal system for intravascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marcu, Laura

    2014-06-01

    We report the development and validation of a hybrid intravascular diagnostic system combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for cardiovascular imaging applications. A prototype FLIm system based on fluorescence pulse sampling technique providing information on artery biochemical composition was integrated with a commercial IVUS system providing information on artery morphology. A customized 3-Fr bimodal catheter combining a rotational side-view fiberoptic and a 40-MHz IVUS transducer was constructed for sequential helical scanning (rotation and pullback) of tubular structures. Validation of this bimodal approach was conducted in pig heart coronary arteries. Spatial resolution, fluorescence detection efficiency, pulse broadening effect, and lifetime measurement variability of the FLIm system were systematically evaluated. Current results show that this system is capable of temporarily resolving the fluorescence emission simultaneously in multiple spectral channels in a single pullback sequence. Accurate measurements of fluorescence decay characteristics from arterial segments can be obtained rapidly (e.g., 20 mm in 5 s), and accurate co-registration of fluorescence and ultrasound features can be achieved. The current finding demonstrates the compatibility of FLIm instrumentation with in vivo clinical investigations and its potential to complement conventional IVUS during catheterization procedures.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  16. Fluorescence of Bacteria, Pollens, and Naturally Occurring Airborne Particles: Excitation/Emission Spectra

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven C; Mayo, Michael W; Chang, Richard K

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence intensity as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths (EEM spectra) was measured for different species of bacteria, biochemical constituents of cells, pollens, and vegetation...

  17. Tissue fluorescence origins evaluation using excitation-emission matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkova, A.; Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Pavlova, E.; Keremedchiev, M.; Avramov, L.

    2015-01-01

    Autofluorescence has been proven to be a very sensitive, accurate, noninvasive method for detection of early pathological changes in tissues. This optical method has the potential to provide a real-time diagnosis of different benign, dysplastic and malignant tissue pathologies. We obtain tissue samples after surgical excision of preliminary clinically diagnosed tumours. Ethical approval for our investigations is received from Ethical Committee of University Hospital "Queen Jiovanna-ISUL" - Sofia, where the samples will be obtained as well. The investigations presented in this report are based on ex vivo measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) for normal and neoplastic human tissue samples with various cutaneous malignant and dysplastic lesions, as well for gastrointestinal tract (GIT) normal mucosa, polyps and carcinoma. The origins of the endogenous fluorescence are found and the differences observed are discussed from the point of view of their diagnostic value and correlation with the morphological and biochemical changes occurred during the tumour development.

  18. Carrier Lifetimes in Fluorescent 6H-SiC for LEDs Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivickas, Vytautas; Gulbinas, Karolis; Jokubavičius, Valdas

    Recently it was shown a new approach based on all-semiconductor material technology which is composed with a near ultra-violet GaN LED excitation source and fluorescent silicon carbide (f-6H-SiC) substrate which generates a visible broad spectral light by N and B dopants and an efficient donor...

  19. Using fluorescence lifetime microscopy to study the subcellular localization of anthocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanoca, Alexandra; Burkel, Brian; Kovinich, Nik; Grotewold, Erich; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Otegui, Marisa S

    2016-12-01

    Anthocyanins are flavonoid pigments that accumulate in most seed plants. They are synthesized in the cytoplasm but accumulate inside the vacuoles. Anthocyanins are pigmented at the lower vacuolar pH, but in the cytoplasm they can be visualized based on their fluorescence properties. Thus, anthocyanins provide an ideal system for the development of new methods to investigate cytoplasmic pools and association with other molecular components. We have analyzed the fluorescence decay of anthocyanins by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), in both in vitro and in vivo conditions, using wild-type and mutant Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Within plant cells, the amplitude-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime (τm ) correlated with distinct subcellular localizations of anthocyanins. The vacuolar pool of anthocyanins exhibited shorter τm than the cytoplasmic pool. Consistently, lowering the pH of anthocyanins in solution shortened their fluorescence decay. We propose that FLIM is a useful tool for understanding the trafficking of anthocyanins and, potentially, for estimating vacuolar pH inside intact plant cells. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Use of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) as a Timer of Cell Cycle S Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkelman, Irina A; Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Foley, Tara; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of thymidine analogues in replicating DNA, coupled with antibody and fluorophore staining, allows analysis of cell proliferation, but is currently limited to monolayer cultures, fixed cells and end-point assays. We describe a simple microscopy imaging method for live real-time analysis of cell proliferation, S phase progression over several division cycles, effects of anti-proliferative drugs and other applications. It is based on the prominent (~ 1.7-fold) quenching of fluorescence lifetime of a common cell-permeable nuclear stain, Hoechst 33342 upon the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in genomic DNA and detection by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We show that quantitative and accurate FLIM technique allows high-content, multi-parametric dynamic analyses, far superior to the intensity-based imaging. We demonstrate its uses with monolayer cell cultures, complex 3D tissue models of tumor cell spheroids and intestinal organoids, and in physiological study with metformin treatment.

  1. Exciton-polaron quenching in organic thin-film transistors studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Leißner, Till; Osadnik, Andreas

    Organic semiconductors show great potential in electronic and optical applications. However, a major challenge is the degradation of the semiconductor materials that cause a reduction in device performance. Here, we present our investigations of Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) based on the m......Organic semiconductors show great potential in electronic and optical applications. However, a major challenge is the degradation of the semiconductor materials that cause a reduction in device performance. Here, we present our investigations of Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) based...... on the material 5,5-bis(naphthyl)-2,20-bithiophene (NaT2). These types of OTFT have previously been shown to have light emitting properties. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been used to investigate the exciton-polaron quenching in biased OTFTs. A clear reduction in fluorescence lifetime...

  2. Picosecond fluorescence of cryptomonad biliproteins. Effects of excitation intensity and the fluorescence decay times of phycocyanin 612, phycocyanin 645, and phycoerythrin 545.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guard-Friar, D; MacColl, R; Berns, D S; Wittmershaus, B; Knox, R S

    1985-01-01

    The fluorescence of purified biliproteins (phycocyanin 645, phycocyanin 612, and phycoerythrin 545) from three cryptomonads, Chroomonas species, Hemiselmis virescens, and Rhodomonas lens, and C-phycocyanin from Anacystis nidulans has been time resolved in the picosecond region with a streak camera system having less than or equal to 2-ps jitter. The fluorescence lifetimes of phycocyanins from Chroomonas species and Hemiselmis virescens are 1.5 +/- 0.2 ns and 2.3 +/- 0.2 ns, respectively, regardless of the fluence of the 30 ps, 532-nm excitation pulse. (Fluence [or photons/cm2] = f intensity [photons/cm2s]dt.). In contrast, that of C-phycocyanin is 2.3 +/- 0.2 ns when the excitation fluence is 8.2 X 10(11) photons/cm2 and decreases to a decay approximated by an exponential decay time of 0.65 +/- 0.1 ns at 7.2 X 10(16) photons/cm2. The cryptomonad phycoerythrin fluorescence decay lifetime is also dependent on intensity, having a decay time of 1.5 +/- 0.1 ns at low fluences and becoming clearly biphasic at higher fluences (greater than 10(15) photons/cm2). We interpret the shortening of decay times for C-phycocyanin and phycoerythrin 545 in terms of exciton annihilation, and have discussed the applicability of exciton annihilation theories to the high fluence effects. PMID:3926017

  3. High-speed multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging implementation for in vivo applications

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Sebina; Applegate, Brian E.; Park, Jesung; Xiao, Xudong; Pande, Paritosh; Javier A. Jo

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) offers a noninvasive approach for characterizing the biochemical composition of biological tissue. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the application of multispectral FLIM for medical diagnosis. Central to the clinical translation of FLIM technology is the development of robust, fast, and cost-effective FLIM instrumentation suitable for in vivo tissue imaging. Unfortunately, the predominant multispectral FLIM approaches su...

  4. Characterization of thylakoid membrane in a heterocystous cyanobacterium and green alga with dual-detector fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy with a systematic change of incident laser power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozue, Shuho; Mukuno, Akira; Tsuda, Yumi; Shiina, Takashi; Terazima, Masahide; Kumazaki, Shigeichi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been applied to plants, algae and cyanobacteria, in which excitation laser conditions affect the chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime due to several mechanisms. However, the dependence of FLIM data on input laser power has not been quantitatively explained by absolute excitation probabilities under actual imaging conditions. In an effort to distinguish between photosystem I and photosystem II (PSI and PSII) in microscopic images, we have obtained dependence of FLIM data on input laser power from a filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis and single cellular green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Nitrogen-fixing cells in A. variabilis, heterocysts, are mostly visualized as cells in which short-lived fluorescence (≤0.1 ns) characteristic of PSI is predominant. The other cells in A. variabilis (vegetative cells) and P. kessleri cells show a transition in the status of PSII from an open state with the maximal charge separation rate at a weak excitation limit to a closed state in which charge separation is temporarily prohibited by previous excitation(s) at a relatively high laser power. This transition is successfully reproduced by a computer simulation with a high fidelity to the actual imaging conditions. More details in the fluorescence from heterocysts were examined to assess possible functions of PSII in the anaerobic environment inside the heterocysts for the nitrogen-fixing enzyme, nitrogenase. Photochemically active PSII:PSI ratio in heterocysts is tentatively estimated to be typically below our detection limit or at most about 5% in limited heterocysts in comparison with that in vegetative cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. mTOR direct interactions with Rheb-GTPase and raptor: sub-cellular localization using fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Rahul B

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signalling pathway has a key role in cellular regulation and several diseases. While it is thought that Rheb GTPase regulates mTOR, acting immediately upstream, while raptor is immediately downstream of mTOR, direct interactions have yet to be verified in living cells, furthermore the localisation of Rheb has been reported to have only a cytoplasmic cellular localization. Results In this study a cytoplasmic as well as a significant sub-cellular nuclear mTOR localization was shown , utilizing green and red fluorescent protein (GFP and DsRed fusion and highly sensitive single photon counting fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM of live cells. The interaction of the mTORC1 components Rheb, mTOR and raptor, tagged with EGFP/DsRed was determined using fluorescence energy transfer-FLIM. The excited-state lifetime of EGFP-mTOR of ~2400 ps was reduced by energy transfer to ~2200 ps in the cytoplasm and to 2000 ps in the nucleus when co-expressed with DsRed-Rheb, similar results being obtained for co-expressed EGFP-mTOR and DsRed-raptor. The localization and distribution of mTOR was modified by amino acid withdrawal and re-addition but not by rapamycin. Conclusions The results illustrate the power of GFP-technology combined with FRET-FLIM imaging in the study of the interaction of signalling components in living cells, here providing evidence for a direct physical interaction between mTOR and Rheb and between mTOR and raptor in living cells for the first time.

  6. Fluorescence anisotropy of indole molecules under two-photon excitation in the spectral range of 485-510 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasin, M. E.; Tushkanov, V. I.; Smolin, A. G.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.

    2017-10-01

    Decay of polarized fluorescence in indole dissolved in propylene glycol under two-photon excitation by femtosecond laser pulses in the wavelength range of 485-510 nm has been studied. It is shown that under the experimental conditions used the fluorescence decay signal can be well described by a single excited state lifetime τf and a single rotation diffusion time τrot. By processing the data obtained, the times τf and τrot as well as anisotropy parameter r 0 characterizing the symmetry of two-photon excitation of indole molecules have been determined. Decreasing of the anisotropy parameter r0 down to zero under two-photon excitation energy higher than 5.1 eV has been observed. Interpretation of the obtained results have been done on the basis of ab initio quantum-mechanical computations. A model of energy relaxation under the condition of twophoton excitation of indole in a polar solvent has been discussed.

  7. A New Method To Evaluate Excited States Lifetimes Based on Green's Function: Application to Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzer, David; Iuchi, Satoru; Yasuda, Koji

    2016-07-12

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSCs) are the promising device for electricity generation. However, the initial stage in which an electron is injected from a dye to the semiconductor has not been precisely understood. Standard quantum chemistry methods cannot handle infinite number of orbitals coming from the band structure of the semiconductor, whereas solid state calculations cannot handle many excited states at a reasonable computational cost. In this regard, we propose a new method to evaluate lifetimes of many excited states of a molecule on a semi-infinite surface. On the basis of the theory of resonance state, the effect of the semi-infinite semiconductor is encoded into the complex self-energy from surface Green's function. The lifetimes of excited states are evaluated through the imaginary part of the self-energy, and the self-energy correction is included into excitation energies obtained from time-dependent density functional theory calculations. This new method is applied to a DSSC system composed of black dye attached to the TiO2 semiconductor, and the computed lifetimes are linked to the natures of excited states and to the surface properties. The present method provides the firm ground for analysis of interplay between many excited states of the dye and band structure of the semiconductor.

  8. Sensitivity of CFP/YFP and GFP/mCherry pairs to donor photobleaching on FRET determination by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramier, Marc; Zahid, Morad; Mevel, Jean-Claude; Masse, Marie-Jo; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté

    2006-11-01

    Fluorescent protein-based FRET is a powerful method for visualizing protein-protein interactions and biochemical reactions in living cells. It can be difficult, however, to avoid photobleaching when observing fluorescent cells under the microscope, especially those expressing CFP. We compared the sensitivity of two protein-based FRET pairs to light-induced fluorescence changes in the donor, on FRET determination by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Thanks to the very low excitation light levels of the time- and space-correlated single photon counting (TSCSPC) method, FLIM acquisitions were achieved without donor photobleaching. Here, we show that photobleaching of CFP by a mercury lamp under the microscope induced a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime, which interfered with FRET determination between CFP and YFP. Importantly, the range of light-induced variation of the mean fluorescence lifetime of CFP was not proportional to the decrease in the steady state fluorescence intensity and varied from cell to cell. The choice of the CFP/YFP pair therefore requires that the cells be observed and analyzed at very low light levels during the whole FRET experiment. In contrast, the GFP/mCherry pair provided an accurate FRET measurement by FLIM, even if some GFP photobleaching took place. We thus demonstrate that CFP can be an unreliable donor for FRET determination in living cells, due to its photosensitivity properties. We demonstrate that the GFP/mCherry pair is better suited for FRET measurement by FLIM in living cells than the CFP/YFP pair. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Compressive hyperspectral time-resolved wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Qi; Yao, Ruoyang; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging and spatial multiplexing have offered information content and collection-efficiency boosts in microscopy, but efficient implementations for macroscopic applications are still lacking. An imaging platform based on time-resolved structured light and hyperspectral single-pixel detection has been developed to perform quantitative macroscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging (MFLI) over a large field of view (FOV) and multiple spectral bands simultaneously. The system makes use of three digital micromirror device (DMD)-based spatial light modulators (SLMs) to generate spatial optical bases and reconstruct N by N images over 16 spectral channels with a time-resolved capability (∼40 ps temporal resolution) using fewer than N2 optical measurements. We demonstrate the potential of this new imaging platform by quantitatively imaging near-infrared (NIR) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) both in vitro and in vivo. The technique is well suited for quantitative hyperspectral lifetime imaging with a high sensitivity and paves the way for many important biomedical applications.

  10. Correlation of NADH fluorescence lifetime and oxidative phosphorylation metabolism in the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Han-Wen; Yu, Jia-Sin; Hsu, Shu-Han; Wei, Yau-Huei; Lee, Oscar K.; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence lifetime has been broadly used as a metabolic indicator for stem cell imaging. However, the direct relationship between NADH fluorescence lifetime and metabolic pathway and activity remains to be clarified. In this study, we measured the NADH fluorescence lifetime of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as well as the metabolic indictors, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level, oxygen consumption, and lactate release, up to 4 weeks under normal osteogenic differentiation and oxidative phosphorylation-attenuated/inhibited differentiation by oligomycin A (OA) treatment. NADH fluorescence lifetime was positively correlated with oxygen consumption and ATP level during energy transformation from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation. Under OA treatment, oxidative phosphorylation was attenuated/inhibited (i.e., oxygen consumption remained the same as controls or lower), cells showed attenuated differentiation under glycolysis, and NADH fluorescence lifetime change was not detected. Increased expression of the overall complex proteins was observed in addition to Complex I. We suggested special caution needs to be exercised while interpreting NADH fluorescence lifetime signal in terms of stem cell differentiation.

  11. Fluorescence lifetime technique for surgical imaging, guidance and augmented reality (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The surgeon's limited ability to accurately delineate the tumor margin during surgical interventions is one key challenge in clinical management of cancer. New methods for guiding tumor resection decisions are needed. Numerous studies have shown that tissue autofluorescence properties have the potential to asses biochemical features associates with distinct pathologies in tissue and to distinguish various cancers from normal tissues. However, despite these promising reports, autofluorescence techniques were sparsely adopted in clinical settings. Moreover, when adopted they were primarily used for pre-operative diagnosis rather than guiding interventions. To address this need, we have researched and engineered instrumentation that utilizes label-free fluorescence lifetime contrast to characterize tissue biochemical features in vivo in patients and methodologies conducive to real-time (few seconds) diagnosis of tissue pathologies during surgical procedures. This presentation overviews clinically-compatible multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging techniques developed in our laboratory and their ability to operate as stand-alone tools, integrated in a biopsy needle and in conjunction with the da Vinci surgical robot. We present pre-clinical and clinical studies in patients that demonstrate the potential of these techniques for intraoperative assessment of brain tumors and head and neck cancer. Current results demonstrate that intrinsic fluorescence signals can provide useful contrast for delineation distinct types of tissues including tumors intraoperatively. Challenges and solutions in the clinical implementation of these techniques are discussed.

  12. An instrument for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay curves at picosecond resolution designed for "double kinetics" experiments: application to fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer study of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishay, Eldad Ben; Hazan, Gershon; Rahamim, Gil; Amir, Dan; Haas, Elisha

    2012-08-01

    The information obtained by studying fluorescence decay of labeled biopolymers is a major resource for understanding the dynamics of their conformations and interactions. The lifetime of the excited states of probes attached to macromolecules is in the nanosecond time regime, and hence, a series of snapshot decay curves of such probes might - in principle - yield details of fast changes of ensembles of labeled molecules down to sub-microsecond time resolution. Hence, a major current challenge is the development of instruments for the low noise detection of fluorescence decay curves within the shortest possible time intervals. Here, we report the development of an instrument, picosecond double kinetics apparatus, that enables recording of multiple fluorescence decay curves with picosecond excitation pulses over wide spectral range during microsecond data collection for each curve. The design is based on recording and averaging multiphoton pulses of fluorescence decay using a fast 13 GHz oscilloscope during microsecond time intervals at selected time points over the course of a chemical reaction or conformational transition. We tested this instrument in a double kinetics experiment using reference probes (N-acetyl-tryptophanamide). Very low stochastic noise level was attained, and reliable multi-parameter analysis such as derivation of distance distributions from time resolved FRET (fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer) measurements was achieved. The advantage of the pulse recording and averaging approach used here relative to double kinetics methods based on the established time correlated single photon counting method, is that in the pulse recording approach, averaging of substantially fewer kinetic experiments is sufficient for obtaining the data. This results in a major reduction in the consumption of labeled samples, which in many cases, enables the performance of important experiments that were not previously feasible.

  13. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging shows spatial segregation of secondary metabolites in Eucalyptus secretory cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskes, A M; Lincoln, C N; Goodger, J Q D; Woodrow, I E; Smith, T A

    2012-07-01

    Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging provides an excellent tool for imaging deep within plant tissues while providing a means to distinguish between fluorophores with high spatial and temporal resolution. Ideal candidates for the application of multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging to plants are the embedded secretory cavities found in numerous species because they house complex mixtures of secondary metabolites within extracellular lumina. Previous investigations of this type of structure have been restricted by the use of sectioned material resulting in the loss of lumen contents and often disorganization of the delicate secretory cells; thus it is not known if there is spatial segregation of secondary metabolites within these structures. In this paper, we apply multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate the spatial arrangement of metabolites within intact secretory cavities isolated from Eucalyptus polybractea R.T. Baker leaves. The secretory cavities of this species are abundant (up to 10 000 per leaf), large (up to 6 nL) and importantly house volatile essential oil rich in the monoterpene 1,8-cineole, together with an immiscible, non-volatile component comprised largely of autofluorescent oleuropeic acid glucose esters. We have been able to optically section into the lumina of secretory cavities to a depth of ∼80 μm, revealing a unique spatial organization of cavity metabolites whereby the non-volatile component forms a layer between the secretory cells lining the lumen and the essential oil. This finding could be indicative of a functional role of the non-volatile component in providing a protective region of low diffusivity between the secretory cells and potentially autotoxic essential oil. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. Evidence for excitation of fluorescence in RPE melanin by multiphoton absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Denton, Michael L.

    2002-06-01

    Previously, we reported that ultrashort, near infrared (NIR) laser pulses caused more DNA breakage in cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells than did CW, NIR laser radiation delivering a similar radiant exposure. We hypothesized that this difference was due to multiphoton absorption in an intracellular chromophore such as the RPE melanin. We investigated two-photon excitation of fluorescence in a suspension of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes exposed to a 1-KHz train of approximately 50- fsec laser pulses at 810 nm from a Ti:Sapphire laser, and compared this to the fluorescence excited by CW exposures at 406 nm from a Krypton ion laser. Fluorescence was measured with a PC-based spectrometer. The CW sources excited fluorescence with a peak at 525 nm. The fluorescence intensity depended on the irradiance of the sample, as well as the melanosome concentration. Peak fluorescence was obtained with a suspension of ~2 x 107 melanin granules/ml. The 810-nm, ultrashort pulses also excited fluorescence, but with a broader, lower-amplitude peak. The weaker fluorescence signal excited by the 810-nm ultrashort pulse laser for a given melanosome concentration, compared to 406-nm CW excitation, is possibly due to the smaller two- photon absorption cross-section. These results indicate the involvement of multiphoton absorption in DNA damage.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime imaging and FRET-induced intracellular redistribution of Tat-conjugated quantum dot nanoparticles through interaction with a phthalocyanine photosensitiser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghini, Elnaz; Giuntini, Francesca; Eggleston, Ian M; Suhling, Klaus; Seifalian, Alexander M; MacRobert, Alexander J

    2014-02-26

    The interaction of Tat-conjugated PEGylated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QD) with the amphiphilic disulfonated aluminium phthalocyanine photosensitiser is investigated in aqueous solution and in a human breast cancer cell line. In aqueous solution, the QDs and phthalocyanine form stable nanocomposites. Using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements combined with singlet oxygen detection, efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is observed with the QDs acting as donors, and the phthalocyanine photosensitiser, which mediates production of singlet oxygen, as acceptors. In cells, the Tat-conjugated QDs localise in lysosomes and the QD fluorescence lifetimes are close to values observed in aqueous solution. Strong FRET-induced quenching of the QD lifetime is observed in cells incubated with the nanocomposites using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Using excitation of the QDs at wavelengths where phthalocyanine absorption is negligible, FRET-induced release of QDs from endo/lysosomes is confirmed using confocal imaging and FLIM, which is attributed to photooxidative damage to the endo/lysosomal membranes mediated by the phthalocyanine acceptor. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Mapping Molecular Function to Biological Nanostructure: Combining Structured Illumination Microscopy with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (SIM + FLIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Görlitz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a new microscope integrating super-resolved imaging using structured illumination microscopy (SIM with wide-field optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM to provide optical mapping of molecular function and its correlation with biological nanostructure below the conventional diffraction limit. We illustrate this SIM + FLIM capability to map FRET readouts applied to the aggregation of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 in Cos 7 cells following ligand stimulation and to the compaction of DNA during the cell cycle.

  17. Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging of an optical antenna with a single diamond NV center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beams, Ryan; Smith, Dallas; Johnson, Timothy W; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Novotny, Lukas; Vamivakas, A Nick

    2013-08-14

    Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter, we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

  18. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  19. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  20. Time Resolved Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Analysis of MoS2/Graphene Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sar, Huseyin; Ozden, Ayberk; Sevik, Cem; Kosku Perkgoz, Nihan; Ay, Feridun

    For high-performance optoelectronic device applications, the lifetime of excitons of MoS2/Graphene (M/G) structures is aimed to be high in order to diminish any exciton recombination processes. The M/G structures were obtained by first transferring CVD grown MoS2 flakes on graphene film, and second by direct growth of the MoS2 flakes onto graphene. The excitonic and interface effects were studied using Raman Scattering, PL and fluorescence lifetime (FL) imaging (FLIM). FLIM of MoS2 flakes on SiO2/Si substrate shows that the FL is varying in the range of 0.3-0.45 ns, throughout a single flake, with higher lifetime at the edges. Contrarily, for M/G structures the PL intensity was observed to be quenched by a factor of 10, with a blue shift of 40 meV for the A-exciton. An important outcome was the throughout-the-flake uniform exciton lifetime on the transferred structures with a value of 0.33 ns. This is caused by charge transfer between MoS2 and graphene (2D peak shift in the graphene Raman spectra) and stress relaxation of MoS2 on graphene after the transfer process (significant downshift of E Raman peak of MoS2). As a result, the lifetime of the transferred MoS2 is uniform through all the flake surface and graphene does not decrease the FL of MoS2.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime components reveal kinetic intermediate states upon equilibrium denaturation of carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtseva, Elena V; Lashchuk, Olesya O; Gerasimova, Marina A; Melnik, Tatiana N; Nagibina, Galina S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2017-12-21

    In most cases, intermediate states of multistage folding proteins are not 'visible' under equilibrium conditions but are revealed in kinetic experiments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used in equilibrium denaturation studies. The technique allows for detecting changes in the conformation and environment of tryptophan residues in different structural elements of carbonic anhydrase II which in its turn has made it possible to study the intermediate states of carbonic anhydrase II under equilibrium conditions. The results of equilibrium and kinetic experiments using wild-type bovine carbonic anhydrase II and its mutant form with the substitution of leucine for alanine at position 139 (L139A) were compared. The obtained lifetime components of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence allowed for revealing that, the same as in kinetic experiments, under equilibrium conditions the unfolding of carbonic anhydrase II ensues through formation of intermediate states.

  2. CVD grown 2D MoS{sub 2} layers: A photoluminescence and fluorescence lifetime imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezden, Ayberk; Madenoglu, Buesra [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Sar, Hueseyin; Ay, Feridun; Perkgoez, Nihan Kosku [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Yeltik, Aydan [Department of Physics, UNAM Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara (Turkey); Sevik, Cem [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2016-11-15

    In this letter, we report on the fluorescence lifetime imaging and accompanying photoluminescence properties of a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown atomically thin material, MoS{sub 2}. μ-Raman, μ-photoluminescence (PL) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) are utilized to probe the fluorescence lifetime and photoluminescence properties of individual flakes of MoS{sub 2} films. Usage of these three techniques allows identification of the grown layers, grain boundaries, structural defects and their relative effects on the PL and fluorescence lifetime spectra. Our investigation on individual monolayer flakes reveals a clear increase of the fluorescence lifetime from 0.3 ns to 0.45 ns at the edges with respect to interior region. On the other hand, investigation of the film layer reveals quenching of PL intensity and lifetime at the grain boundaries. These results could be important for applications where the activity of edges is important such as in photocatalytic water splitting. Finally, it has been demonstrated that PL mapping and FLIM are viable techniques for the investigation of the grain-boundaries. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Functional imaging of live Zebrafish using fluorescence lifetime optical projection tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Natalie; Davis, Samuel; Hay, Carys; Kumar, Sunil; Ramel, Marie-Christine; Bugeon, Laurence; McGinty, James; Dallman, Margaret J.; French, Paul M. W.

    2017-02-01

    Current microscopy techniques are not optimal to image fluorescence in whole live animals. We present fluorescence lifetime optical projection tomography (FLIM OPT) applied to imaging enzyme activity in live transgenic zebrafish expressing Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) biosensors. OPT can be considered the optical equivalent to x-ray CT. Samples are rotated through 360 with images acquired at set intervals, and a back projection technique is applied to reconstruct the 3D image. It can be performed in transmission or fluorescence modes, allowing a wide range of visualisation techniques, including FLIM. Combination of OPT with FRET FLIM can therefore provide functional information in 3D. The optimal size range for OPT is mm-cm, which fills the size gap between confocal and MRI and is also the size range for zebrafish, making them an ideal model for imaging. Transgenic zebrafish expressing a Caspase 3 FRET biosensor were generated on the TraNac background (a transparent mutant) to provide live readouts of apoptosis. We have shown that using FLIM OPT we can detect changes in Caspase 3 activity in both embryo and adult Tg(Ubi:Caspase3biosensor) zebrafish. Apoptosis was induced using 25 Gy from a 137Cs source and post irradiation an increase in fluorescence lifetime was quantified in the head region indicative of biosensor cleavage and Caspase 3 activity. Though development of compressive sensing and multiplexed imaging with two imaging arms we have applied OPT and FLIM OPT to adult zebrafish, enabling us to quickly acquire datasets so the fish can be recovered and imaged longitudinally.

  4. Determination of the Residual Anthracene Concentration in Cultures of Haloalkalitolerant Actinomycetes by Excitation Fluorescence, Emission Fluorescence, and Synchronous Fluorescence: Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna del Carmen Lara-Severino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are compounds that can be quantified by fluorescence due to their high quantum yield. Haloalkalitolerant bacteria tolerate wide concentration ranges of NaCl and pH. They are potentially useful in the PAHs bioremediation of saline environments. However, it is known that salinity of the sample affects fluorescence signal regardless of the method. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative study based on the sensitivity, linearity, and detection limits of the excitation, emission, and synchronous fluorescence methods, during the quantification of the residual anthracene concentration from the following haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes cultures Kocuria rosea, Kocuria palustris, Microbacterium testaceum, and 4 strains of Nocardia farcinica, in order to establish the proper fluorescence method to study the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinobacteria. The study demonstrated statistical differences among the strains and among the fluorescence methods regarding the anthracene residual concentration. The results showed that excitation and emission fluorescence methods performed very similarly but sensitivity in excitation fluorescence is slightly higher. Synchronous fluorescence using Δλ=150 nm is not the most convenient method. Therefore we propose the excitation fluorescence as the fluorescence method to be used in the study of the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes.

  5. Probing the dynamics of doxorubicin-DNA intercalation during the initial activation of apoptosis by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nai-Tzu; Wu, Chia-Yan; Chung, Chao-Yu; Hwu, Yeukuang; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a potent anthracycline antibiotic, commonly used to treat a wide range of cancers. Although postulated to intercalate between DNA bases, many of the details of doxorubicin's mechanism of action remain unclear. In this work, we demonstrate the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to dynamically monitor doxorubicin-DNA intercalation during the earliest stages of apoptosis. The fluorescence lifetime of doxorubicin in nuclei is found to decrease rapidly during the first 2 hours following drug administration, suggesting significant changes in the doxorubicin-DNA binding site's microenvironment upon apoptosis initiation. Decreases in doxorubicin fluorescence lifetimes were found to be concurrent with increases in phosphorylation of H2AX (an immediate signal of DNA double-strand breakage), but preceded activation of caspase-3 (a late signature of apoptosis) by more than 150 minutes. Time-dependent doxorubicin FLIM analyses of the effects of pretreating cells with either Cyclopentylidene-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)-hydrazine (a histone acetyltransferase inhibitor) or Trichostatin A (a histone deacetylase inhibitor) revealed significant correlation of fluorescence lifetime with the stage of chromatin decondensation. Taken together, our findings suggest that monitoring the dynamics of doxorubicin fluorescence lifetimes can provide valuable information during the earliest phases of doxorubicin-induced apoptosis; and implicate that FLIM can serve as a sensitive, high-resolution tool for the elucidation of intercellular mechanisms and kinetics of anti-cancer drugs that bear fluorescent moieties.

  6. Probing the dynamics of doxorubicin-DNA intercalation during the initial activation of apoptosis by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Tzu Chen

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin is a potent anthracycline antibiotic, commonly used to treat a wide range of cancers. Although postulated to intercalate between DNA bases, many of the details of doxorubicin's mechanism of action remain unclear. In this work, we demonstrate the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM to dynamically monitor doxorubicin-DNA intercalation during the earliest stages of apoptosis. The fluorescence lifetime of doxorubicin in nuclei is found to decrease rapidly during the first 2 hours following drug administration, suggesting significant changes in the doxorubicin-DNA binding site's microenvironment upon apoptosis initiation. Decreases in doxorubicin fluorescence lifetimes were found to be concurrent with increases in phosphorylation of H2AX (an immediate signal of DNA double-strand breakage, but preceded activation of caspase-3 (a late signature of apoptosis by more than 150 minutes. Time-dependent doxorubicin FLIM analyses of the effects of pretreating cells with either Cyclopentylidene-[4-(4-chlorophenylthiazol-2-yl-hydrazine (a histone acetyltransferase inhibitor or Trichostatin A (a histone deacetylase inhibitor revealed significant correlation of fluorescence lifetime with the stage of chromatin decondensation. Taken together, our findings suggest that monitoring the dynamics of doxorubicin fluorescence lifetimes can provide valuable information during the earliest phases of doxorubicin-induced apoptosis; and implicate that FLIM can serve as a sensitive, high-resolution tool for the elucidation of intercellular mechanisms and kinetics of anti-cancer drugs that bear fluorescent moieties.

  7. The Measurement of Radiative Lifetimes Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence: Experimental Review and Astrophysical Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartog, E.A. den; Lawler, J.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Sneden, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory

    2005-10-01

    One of the standard methods for determining atomic transition probabilities is to combine branching fractions measured using Fourier-transform spectrometry with radiative lifetimes measurements using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). This combination of techniques provides an efficient method for measuring large sets of accurate, absolute transition probabilities. The radiative lifetimes, which provide the overall scaling for the transition probabilities, can be measured routinely to {+-}5% accuracy using time-resolved LIF. Although the time-resolved LIF technique we use does not achieve the accuracy of fast-beam LIF, the time-resolved technique does enable us to make measurements at a far greater rate (hundreds of level lifetimes per year). Care must be taken, however, to understand and control the systematic effects in time-resolved LIF measurements to maintain {+-}5% accuracy over a wide dynamic range and hundreds of lifetime measurements. Over the last 25 years, we have measured lifetimes for 47 spectra using time resolved LIF. Our atomic beam source can produce a slow beam of neutral and singly ionized atoms of nearly any element. Lifetimes from 2 ns to {approx}2{mu}s can be measured for energy levels ranging from 15,000 to {approx}60,000/cm. In this review we will describe our method of measuring radiative lifetimes with an emphasis on possible errors and techniques used for controlling them. The electronic bandwidth, linearity, and overall fidelity of the fast photomultiplier, cable connections, and transient waveform digitizer are concerns. Possible errors from atomic collisions, radiation trapping, Zeeman quantum beats, hyperfine quantum beats, atoms/ions escaping from the observation region before radiating, and from radiative cascade through lower levels must be understood and controlled. We will then present a recent example of the application of our transition probability data to abundance determinations in the sun and in metal-poor halo stars. Our

  8. Analysis of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) data. Based on a fully automated Laguerre deconvolution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, P; Trivedi, C A; Jo, J A

    2010-01-01

    A novel Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) deconvolution method based on the linear expansion of fluorescence decays on a set of orthonormal Laguerre functions was recently proposed. The Laguerre deconvolution method applies linear least-square estimation to estimate the expansion coefficients of all pixel decays simultaneously, performing at least two orders of magnitude faster than the other algorithms. In the original Laguerre FLIM deconvolution implementation, however, the Laguerre parameter α is selected using a heuristic approach, making it unsuitable for online applications. In this study, we present a fully automated implementation of the Laguerre FLIM deconvolution, whereby the Laguerre parameter α is treated as a free parameter within a nonlinear least-squares optimization scheme. The performance of this method has been successfully validated on simulated data, and experimental FLIM images of standard fluorescent dyes and endogenous tissue fluorescence. The main advantage of the proposed method is that it does not require any user intervention for tuning up the deconvolution process. Thus, we believe this method will facilitate the translation of FLIM to online applications, including real-time clinical diagnosis.

  9. Spatially Resolved Quantification of Chromatin Condensation through Differential Local Rheology in Cell Nuclei Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnol, Stephen T.; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-01-01

    The linear sequence of DNA encodes access to the complete set of proteins that carry out cellular functions. Yet, much of the functionality appropriate for each cell is nested within layers of dynamic regulation and organization, including a hierarchy of chromatin structural states and spatial arrangement within the nucleus. There remain limitations in our understanding of gene expression within the context of nuclear organization from an inability to characterize hierarchical chromatin organization in situ. Here we demonstrate the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to quantify and spatially resolve chromatin condensation state using cell-permeable, DNA-binding dyes (Hoechst 33342 and PicoGreen). Through in vitro and in situ experiments we demonstrate the sensitivity of fluorescence lifetime to condensation state through the mechanical effects that accompany the structural changes and are reflected through altered viscosity. The establishment of FLIM for resolving and quantifying chromatin condensation state opens the door for single-measurement mechanical studies of the nucleus and for characterizing the role of genome structure and organization in nuclear processes that accompany physiological and pathological changes. PMID:26765322

  10. Monitoring Biosensor Activity in Living Cells with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N. Day

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Live-cell microscopy is now routinely used to monitor the activities of the genetically encoded biosensor proteins that are designed to directly measure specific cell signaling events inside cells, tissues, or organisms. Most fluorescent biosensor proteins rely on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET to report conformational changes in the protein that occur in response to signaling events, and this is commonly measured with intensity-based ratiometric imaging methods. An alternative method for monitoring the activities of the FRET-based biosensor proteins is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. FLIM measurements are made in the time domain, and are not affected by factors that commonly limit intensity measurements. In this review, we describe the use of the digital frequency domain (FD FLIM method for the analysis of FRET signals. We illustrate the methods necessary for the calibration of the FD FLIM system, and demonstrate the analysis of data obtained from cells expressing “FRET standard” fusion proteins. We then use the FLIM-FRET approach to monitor the changes in activities of two different biosensor proteins in specific regions of single living cells. Importantly, the factors required for the accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described in detail.

  11. Tracking Functional Tumor Cell Subpopulations of Malignant Glioma by Phasor Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy of NADH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Trinh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intra-tumoral heterogeneity is associated with therapeutic resistance of cancer and there exists a need to non-invasively identify functional tumor subpopulations responsible for tumor recurrence. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH is a metabolic coenzyme essential in cellular respiration. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM of NADH has been demonstrated to be a powerful label-free indicator for inferring metabolic states of living cells. Using FLIM, we identified a significant shift towards longer NADH fluorescence lifetimes, suggesting an increase in the fraction of protein-bound NADH, in the invasive stem-like tumor-initiating cell (STIC subpopulation relative to the tumor mass-forming cell (TMC subpopulation of malignant gliomas. By applying our previously studied model to transition glioma from a majority of STIC to a majority of TMC in serum-adherent culture conditions following serial passages, we compared changes in NADH states, cellular respirations (oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis, EGFR expression, and cell-growth speed over passages. We identified a significant positive correlation between free-NADH fraction and cell growth, which was related to an increase of TMC fraction. In comparison, the increase of EGFR and cellular respirations preceded all these changes. In conclusion, FLIM of NADH provides a non-invasive method to monitor the dynamics of tumor heterogeneity before and after treatment.

  12. Spatially Resolved Quantification of Chromatin Condensation through Differential Local Rheology in Cell Nuclei Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Spagnol

    Full Text Available The linear sequence of DNA encodes access to the complete set of proteins that carry out cellular functions. Yet, much of the functionality appropriate for each cell is nested within layers of dynamic regulation and organization, including a hierarchy of chromatin structural states and spatial arrangement within the nucleus. There remain limitations in our understanding of gene expression within the context of nuclear organization from an inability to characterize hierarchical chromatin organization in situ. Here we demonstrate the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM to quantify and spatially resolve chromatin condensation state using cell-permeable, DNA-binding dyes (Hoechst 33342 and PicoGreen. Through in vitro and in situ experiments we demonstrate the sensitivity of fluorescence lifetime to condensation state through the mechanical effects that accompany the structural changes and are reflected through altered viscosity. The establishment of FLIM for resolving and quantifying chromatin condensation state opens the door for single-measurement mechanical studies of the nucleus and for characterizing the role of genome structure and organization in nuclear processes that accompany physiological and pathological changes.

  13. Monitoring biosensor activity in living cells with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hum, Julia M; Siegel, Amanda P; Pavalko, Fredrick M; Day, Richard N

    2012-11-07

    Live-cell microscopy is now routinely used to monitor the activities of the genetically encoded biosensor proteins that are designed to directly measure specific cell signaling events inside cells, tissues, or organisms. Most fluorescent biosensor proteins rely on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to report conformational changes in the protein that occur in response to signaling events, and this is commonly measured with intensity-based ratiometric imaging methods. An alternative method for monitoring the activities of the FRET-based biosensor proteins is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). FLIM measurements are made in the time domain, and are not affected by factors that commonly limit intensity measurements. In this review, we describe the use of the digital frequency domain (FD) FLIM method for the analysis of FRET signals. We illustrate the methods necessary for the calibration of the FD FLIM system, and demonstrate the analysis of data obtained from cells expressing "FRET standard" fusion proteins. We then use the FLIM-FRET approach to monitor the changes in activities of two different biosensor proteins in specific regions of single living cells. Importantly, the factors required for the accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described in detail.

  14. Single pulse two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (SP-FLIM) with MHz pixel rate and an all fiber based setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Hakert, Hubertus; Weng, Daniel; Pfeiffer, Tom; Kolb, Jan Philip; Huber, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Newly developed microscopy methods have the goal to give researches in bio-molecular science a better understanding of processes ongoing on a cellular level. Especially two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy is a readily applied and widespread modality. Compared to one photon fluorescence imaging, it is possible to image not only the surface but also deeper lying structures. Together with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), which provides information on the chemical composition of a specimen, deeper insights on a molecular level can be gained. However, the need for elaborate light sources for TPEF and speed limitations for FLIM hinder an even wider application. In this contribution, we present a way to overcome this limitations by combining a robust and inexpensive fiber laser for nonlinear excitation with a fast analog digitization method for rapid FLIM imaging. The applied sub nanosecond pulsed laser source is perfectly suited for fiber delivery as typically limiting non-linear effects like self-phase or cross-phase modulation (SPM, XPM) are negligible. Furthermore, compared to the typically applied femtosecond pulses, our longer pulses produce much more fluorescence photons per single shot. In this paper, we show that this higher number of fluorescence photons per pulse combined with a high analog bandwidth detection makes it possible to not only use a single pulse per pixel for TPEF imaging but also to resolve the exponential time decay for FLIM. To evaluate our system, we acquired FLIM images of a dye solution with single exponential behavior to assess the accuracy of our lifetime determination and also FLIM images of a plant stem at a pixel rate of 1 MHz to show the speed performance of our single pulse two-photon FLIM (SP-FLIM) system.

  15. Enhanced imaging resolution in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography by multispectral excitation method (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maomao; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Han; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) is a promising method for the quantitative evaluation of the metabolic process of fluorescent agents in body. However, the resolution is limited due to the ill-posed nature of fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and the high absorption and scattering of the fluorescent light in biological tissues. In this paper, the resolution of DFMT is improved by multispectral excitation method. Firstly, the imaged object with varied fluorescent concentrations at different time points is excited by several excitation lights with different wavelengths, and the fluorescent images are collected. Secondly, the individual FMT images at different time points are respectively reconstructed, and independent component analysis (ICA) is employed to decompose the fluorescent targets. The independent components (ICs) and corresponding spectrum courses (SCs) which obtained from ICA represent the spatial structures and spectral variations of the fluorescent targets, respectively. Thirdly, the ICs and SCs are combined to quantitatively recover the concentrations of individual fluorescent targets. Finally, the metabolic parameters and DFMT images are obtained by fitting the FMT images of each fluorescent targets at different time points into a two compartment model. Numerical simulations are carried out to validate the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the resolution of DFMT is significantly improved. The metabolic curves can be correctly recovered even when the edge-edge-distance of the fluorescent targets is less than 0.1 cm.

  16. Laser-excited fluorescence spectrometric system for tissue diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, Natalia N.; Kozlov, Dmitrij N.; Polivanov, Yu. N.; Pykhov, R. L.; Smirnov, V. V.

    1994-12-01

    A compact experimental spectrometric system designed for experimental and clinical fluorescence diagnostic observations of tumors is described. Methods of tumor diagnostics using fluorescence spectra of photosensitizers employed for photodynamic therapy has been developed. The system has been tested in P.A. Hertzen Moscow Research Oncology Institute for direct and endoscopic fluorescence diagnostics of tumors in the course of clinical trials of new domestically produced drugs.

  17. Picosecond excite-and-probe absorption measurement of the 4T2 state nonradiative lifetime in ruby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, S. K.; Wang, W. B.; Petricevic, V.; Dorsinville, R.; Alfano, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    In a picosecond excite-and-probe absorption measurement, a 527-nm picosecond pulse excites the 4T2 state of the Cr(3+) ion in ruby and a 3.4-micron picosecond probe pulse monitors the growth and decay of population in the 2E state as a function of pump-probe delay. From the growth of population in the metastable 2E state, an upper limit of 7 ps for the nonradiative lifetime of the 4T2 state is determined.

  18. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana eBurdikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g. pH, redox potential due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM. In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  19. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy reveals rerouting of SNARE trafficking driving dendritic cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboogen, Daniëlle Rianne José; González Mancha, Natalia; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2017-01-01

    SNARE proteins play a crucial role in intracellular trafficking by catalyzing membrane fusion, but assigning SNAREs to specific intracellular transport routes is challenging with current techniques. We developed a novel Förster resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FRET-FLIM)-based technique allowing visualization of real-time local interactions of fluorescently tagged SNARE proteins in live cells. We used FRET-FLIM to delineate the trafficking steps underlying the release of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human blood-derived dendritic cells. We found that activation of dendritic cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide leads to increased FRET of fluorescently labeled syntaxin 4 with VAMP3 specifically at the plasma membrane, indicating increased SNARE complex formation, whereas FRET with other tested SNAREs was unaltered. Our results revealed that SNARE complexing is a key regulatory step for cytokine production by immune cells and prove the applicability of FRET-FLIM for visualizing SNARE complexes in live cells with subcellular spatial resolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23525.001 PMID:28524818

  20. Visualizing heterogeneity of photosynthetic properties of plant leaves with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iermak, Ievgeniia; Vink, Jochem; Bader, Arjen N; Wientjes, Emilie; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to analyse the distribution and properties of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) in palisade and spongy chloroplasts of leaves from the C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the C4 plant Miscanthus x giganteus. This was achieved by separating the time-resolved fluorescence of PSI and PSII in the leaf. It is found that the PSII antenna size is larger on the abaxial side of A. thaliana leaves, presumably because chloroplasts in the spongy mesophyll are "shaded" by the palisade cells. The number of chlorophylls in PSI on the adaxial side of the A. thaliana leaf is slightly higher. The C4 plant M. x giganteus contains both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which have a different PSI/PSII ratio. It is shown that the time-resolved fluorescence of bundle sheath and mesophyll cells can be analysed separately. The relative number of chlorophylls, which belong to PSI (as compared to PSII) in the bundle sheath cells is at least 2.5 times higher than in mesophyll cells. FLIM is thus demonstrated to be a useful technique to study the PSI/PSII ratio and PSII antenna size in well-defined regions of plant leaves without having to isolate pigment-protein complexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In Vivo Dendritic Cell Tracking Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging and Near-Infrared-Emissive Polymersomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Natalie A.; Benencia, Fabian; Milone, Michael C.; Li, Guizhi; Frail, Paul R.; Therien, Michael J.; Coukos, George; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Noninvasive in vivo cell-tracking techniques are necessary to advance the field of cellular-based therapeutics as well as to elucidate mechanisms governing in vivo cell biology. Fluorescence is commonly used for in vitro and postmortem biomedical studies but has been limited by autofluorescence at the whole-animal level. Procedures: In this report, we demonstrate the ability of in vivo fluorescent lifetime imaging to remove autofluorescence and thereby enable in vivo dendritic cell tracking in naïve mice. Specifically, we track mature dendritic cells (DCs) labeled internally with near-infrared-emissive polymersomes (NIR-DCs). Results: We establish the ability to detect labeled cells in vivo and image NIR-DC trafficking after both intravenous and subcutaneous delivery. In addition, we demonstrate the longitudinal capacity of this method by characterizing NIR-DC migration kinetics in the popliteal lymph node. Conclusions: This work provides a tool to evaluate dendritic-cell-based immunotherapy and generates novel opportunities for in vivo fluorescence imaging. PMID:19194761

  2. Time-resolved imaging system for fluorescence-guided surgery with lifetime imaging capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powolny, F.; Homicsko, K.; Sinisi, R.; Bruschini, Claudio E.; Grigoriev, E.; Homulle, H.; Prior, John O.; Hanahan, D.; Dubikovskaya, E.; Charbon, E.

    2014-05-01

    We present a single-photon camera for fluorescence imaging, with a time resolution better than 100ps, capable of providing both intensity and lifetime images. the camera was fabricated in standard CMOS technology. With this FluoCam we show the possibility to study sub-nanosecond fluorescence mechanisms. The FluoCam was used to characterize a near-infrared probe, indocyanine green, conjugated with multimeric cyclic pentapeptide (cRGD). The fluorescent probe-conjugated was used to target and mark tumors with better specificity, in particular aiming at targeting the integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5. As a first step towards clinical studies, preliminary results obtained in-vivo are presented. The first envisioned clinical application would be image-guided surgical oncology to help the surgeon to remove tumor tissue by a better discrimination from normal tissues and also to improve the detection of metastatic lymph nodes. A further application could be the in-vivo determination of the αvβ3 and αvβ5 targets to select patients for therapy with RGD chemotherapy conjugates.

  3. A reagentless enzymatic fluorescent biosensor for glucose based on upconverting glasses, as excitation source, and chemically modified glucose oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Barrio, Melisa; Cases, Rafael; Cebolla, Vicente; Hirsch, Thomas; de Marcos, Susana; Wilhelm, Stefan; Galbán, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Upon near-infrared excitation Tm(3+)+Yb(3+) doped fluorohafnate glasses present upconversion properties and emit visible light. This property permits to use these glasses (UCG) as excitation sources for fluorescent optical biosensors. Taking this into account, in this work a fluorescent biosensor for glucose determination is designed and evaluated. The biosensor combines the UCG and the fluorescence of the enzyme glucose oxidase chemically modified with a fluorescein derivative (GOx-FS), whose intensity is modified during the enzymatic reaction with glucose. Optical parameters have been optimized and a mathematical model describing the behavior of the analytical signal is suggested. Working in FIA mode, the biosensor responds to glucose concentrations up to, at least, 15mM with a limit of detection of 1.9mM. The biosensor has a minimum lifetime of 9 days and has been applied to glucose determination in drinks. The applicability of the sensor was tested by glucose determination in two fruit juices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime imaging to differentiate bound from unbound ICG-cRGD both in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegehuis, Paulien L.; Boonstra, Martin C.; de Rooij, Karien E.; Powolny, François E.; Sinisi, Riccardo; Homulle, Harald; Bruschini, Claudio; Charbon, Edoardo; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Dijkstra, Jouke; van de Giessen, Martijn

    2015-03-01

    Excision of the whole tumor is crucial, but remains difficult for many tumor types. Fluorescence lifetime imaging could be helpful intraoperative to differentiate normal from tumor tissue. In this study we investigated the difference in fluorescence lifetime imaging of indocyanine green coupled to cyclic RGD free in solution/serum or bound to integrins e.g. in tumors. The U87-MG glioblastoma cell line, expressing high integrin levels, was cultured to use in vitro and to induce 4 subcutaneous tumors in a-thymic mice (n=4). Lifetimes of bound and unbound probe were measured with an experimental time-domain single-photon avalanche diode array (time resolution bound probe compared to unbound probe. In vivo, lifetimes of the fluorophores in tumors were significantly higher (pbound and unbound probes in vivo.

  5. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) as a Tool to Investigate Hypoxia-Induced Protein-Protein Interaction in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schützhold, Vera; Fandrey, Joachim; Prost-Fingerle, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is widely used as a method to investigate protein-protein interactions in living cells. A FRET pair donor fluorophore in close proximity to an appropriate acceptor fluorophore transfers emission energy to the acceptor, resulting in a shorter lifetime of the donor fluorescence. When the respective FRET donor and acceptor are fused with two proteins of interest, a reduction in donor lifetime, as detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), can be taken as proof of close proximity between the fluorophores and therefore interaction between the proteins of interest. Here, we describe the usage of time-domain FLIM-FRET in hypoxia-related research when we record the interaction of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) subunits HIF-1α and HIF-1β in living cells in a temperature- and CO 2 -controlled environment under the microscope.

  6. FPGA-based multi-channel fluorescence lifetime analysis of Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-09-22

    We report a fast non-iterative lifetime data analysis method for the Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping confocal FLIM (Fm-FLIM) system [Opt. Express 22, 10221 (2014)]. The new method, named R-method, allows fast multi-channel lifetime image analysis in the system's FPGA data processing board. Experimental tests proved that the performance of the R-method is equivalent to that of single-exponential iterative fitting, and its sensitivity is well suited for time-lapse FLIM-FRET imaging of live cells, for example cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level imaging with GFP-Epac-mCherry sensors. With the R-method and its FPGA implementation, multi-channel lifetime images can now be generated in real time on the multi-channel frequency-sweeping FLIM system, and live readout of FRET sensors can be performed during time-lapse imaging.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime imaging and reflectance confocal microscopy for multiscale imaging of oral precancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Joey M.; Cheng, Shuna; Malik, Bilal H.; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Jo, Javier A.; Wright, John; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-04-01

    Optical imaging techniques using a variety of contrast mechanisms are under evaluation for early detection of epithelial precancer; however, tradeoffs in field of view (FOV) and resolution may limit their application. Therefore, we present a multiscale multimodal optical imaging system combining macroscopic biochemical imaging of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with subcellular morphologic imaging of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). The FLIM module images a 16×16 mm2 tissue area with 62.5 μm lateral and 320 ps temporal resolution to guide cellular imaging of suspicious regions. Subsequently, coregistered RCM images are acquired at 7 Hz with 400 μm diameter FOV, mucosa, and a hamster cheek pouch model of oral carcinogenesis. While FLIM is sensitive to biochemical and macroscopic architectural changes in tissue, RCM provides images of cell nuclear morphology, all key indicators of precancer progression.

  8. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of primed SNARE complexes in presynaptic terminals and β cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriko; Sawada, Wakako; Noguchi, Jun; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Yagishita, Sho; Ohno, Mitsuyo; Tokumaru, Hiroshi; Kasai, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear how readiness for Ca2+-dependent exocytosis depends on varying degrees of SNARE complex assembly. Here we directly investigate the SNARE assembly using two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between three pairs of neuronal SNAREs in presynaptic boutons and pancreatic β cells in the islets of Langerhans. These FRET probes functionally rescue their endogenous counterparts, supporting ultrafast exocytosis. We show that trans-SNARE complexes accumulated in the active zone, and estimate the number of complexes associated with each docked vesicle. In contrast, SNAREs were unassembled in resting state, and assembled only shortly prior to insulin exocytosis, which proceeds slowly. We thus demonstrate that distinct states of fusion readiness are associated with SNARE complex formation. Our FRET/FLIM approaches enable optical imaging of fusion readiness in both live and chemically fixed tissues.

  9. Detection of nucleic acid-protein interactions in plant leaves using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camborde, Laurent; Jauneau, Alain; Brière, Christian; Deslandes, Laurent; Dumas, Bernard; Gaulin, Elodie

    2017-09-01

    DNA-binding proteins (DNA-BPs) and RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BPs) have critical roles in living cells in all kingdoms of life. Various experimental approaches exist for the study of nucleic acid-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo, but the detection of such interactions at the subcellular level remains challenging. Here we describe how to detect nucleic acid-protein interactions in plant leaves by using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) approach coupled to fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Proteins of interest (POI) are tagged with a GFP and transiently expressed in plant cells to serve as donor fluorophore. After sample fixation and cell wall permeabilization, leaves are treated with Sytox Orange, a nucleic acid dye that can function as a FRET acceptor. Upon close association of the GFP-tagged POI with Sytox-Orange-stained nucleic acids, a substantial decrease of the GFP lifetime due to FRET between the donor and the acceptor can be monitored. Treatment with RNase before FRET-FLIM measurements allows determination of whether the POI associates with DNA and/or RNA. A step-by-step protocol is provided for sample preparation, data acquisition and analysis. We describe how to calibrate the equipment and include a tutorial explaining the use of the FLIM software. To illustrate our approach, we provide experimental procedures to detect the interaction between plant DNA and two proteins (the AeCRN13 effector from the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches and the AtWRKY22 defensive transcription factor from Arabidopsis). This protocol allows the detection of protein-nucleic acid interactions in plant cells and can be completed in <2 d.

  10. GPU accelerated real-time confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) based on the analog mean-delay (AMD) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungyeon; Park, Byungjun; Lee, Seungrag; Won, Youngjae

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrated GPU accelerated real-time confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) based on the analog mean-delay (AMD) method. Our algorithm was verified for various fluorescence lifetimes and photon numbers. The GPU processing time was faster than the physical scanning time for images up to 800 × 800, and more than 149 times faster than a single core CPU. The frame rate of our system was demonstrated to be 13 fps for a 200 × 200 pixel image when observing maize vascular tissue. This system can be utilized for observing dynamic biological reactions, medical diagnosis, and real-time industrial inspection.

  11. Surface-enhanced fluorescence in metal nanoparticle-doped polymer nanofibers via waveguiding excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Liu, Fang; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2017-04-01

    We report a waveguiding excitation-based approach for surface-enhanced fluorescence. As high as 17-fold enhanced fluorescence intensity of Rhodamine 6G molecules is realized by gold nanoparticles embedded in polymer nanofibers. The enhancement results not only from the spatial confinement of light by the nanofibers but also from the wavelength match among the excitation laser, the localized surface plasmon resonance of nanoparticles, and the absorption band of dyes. On the basis of the enhancement and high-efficient waveguiding regime, the required excitation power for detectable fluorescence is decreased to the 20 nW level, which is about 50 times lower than that by free-space excitation. These fluorophore/nanoparticle-doped nanofibers may find applications in compact and energy-efficient optical devices of chemical analysis and biosensing.

  12. In vivo wound healing diagnosis with second harmonic and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-06-01

    Skin wounds heal when a series of cell lineages are triggered, followed by collagen deposition, to reconstruct damaged tissues. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic rate in vivo during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy respectively. The metabolic rate of cells is reflected through the lifetime of the autofluorescence from the co-enzyme protein, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, due to its change in the relative concentration of bound and free forms. A higher than normal cellular metabolic rate is observed during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually after eight days of wound formation. SHG signal intensity change indicates the net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase, and net regeneration begins on day five. Eventually, the quantity of collagen increases gradually to form a scar tissue as the final product. Importantly, this work demonstrates the feasibility of an in vivo imaging approach for a normal wound on rat skin, which has the potential to supplement the noninvasive clinical diagnosis of wounds.

  13. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as chlorine, bromine, iodine, and sulfur. Preliminary investigations into this area are reported, including documentation

  14. Fluorescence Characteristics and Lifetime Images of Photosensitizers of Talaporfin Sodium and Sodium Pheophorbide a in Normal and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Awasthi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime images of talaporfin sodium and sodium-pheophorbide a, which can be regarded as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, were measured in normal and cancer cells. The reduction of the fluorescence intensity by photoirradiation was observed for both photosensitizers in both cells, but the quenching rate was much faster in cancer cells than in normal cells. These results are explained in terms of the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species via photoexcitation of these photosensitizers in cancer cells. The fluorescence lifetimes of both photosensitizers in cancer cells are different from those in normal cells, which originates from the different intracellular environments around the photosensitizers between normal and cancer cells.

  15. Direct Vpr-Vpr Interaction in Cells monitored by two Photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mély Yves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes several regulatory proteins, notably Vpr which influences the survival of the infected cells by causing a G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Such an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 disease progression has fuelled a large number of studies, from its 3D structure to the characterization of specific cellular partners. However, no direct imaging and quantification of Vpr-Vpr interaction in living cells has yet been reported. To address this issue, eGFP- and mCherry proteins were tagged by Vpr, expressed in HeLa cells and their interaction was studied by two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Results Results show that Vpr forms homo-oligomers at or close to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, Vpr dimers and trimers were found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Point mutations in the three α helices of Vpr drastically impaired Vpr oligomerization and localization at the nuclear envelope while point mutations outside the helical regions had no effect. Theoretical structures of Vpr mutants reveal that mutations within the α-helices could perturb the leucine zipper like motifs. The ΔQ44 mutation has the most drastic effect since it likely disrupts the second helix. Finally, all Vpr point mutants caused cell apoptosis suggesting that Vpr-mediated apoptosis functions independently from Vpr oligomerization. Conclusion We report that Vpr oligomerization in HeLa cells relies on the hydrophobic core formed by the three α helices. This oligomerization is required for Vpr localization at the nuclear envelope but not for Vpr-mediated apoptosis.

  16. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean C.; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J.; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A. A.; Tate, Edward W.; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.

    2017-01-01

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set. PMID:28190060

  17. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlitz, Frederik; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A A; Tate, Edward W; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M W

    2017-01-18

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set.

  18. Global analysis of Förster resonance energy transfer in live cells measured by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy exploiting the rise time of acceptor fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptenok, Sergey P; Borst, Jan Willem; Mullen, Katharine M; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Visser, Antonie J W G; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2010-07-21

    A methodology is described for the quantitative determination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells using the rise time of acceptor fluorescence as determined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). An advantage of this method is that only those molecules that are involved in the energy-transfer process are monitored. This contrasts with current methods that measure either steady-state fluorescence of donor and acceptor molecules or time-resolved fluorescence of donor molecules, and thereby probe a mixture of donor molecules that are involved in FRET and those that are fluorescent but not involved in FRET. The absence of FRET can, for instance, be due to unwanted acceptor bleaching or incomplete maturing of visible proteins that should act as acceptor molecules. In addition, parameters describing the rise of acceptor fluorescence and the decay of donor fluorescence can be determined via simultaneous global analysis of multiple FLIM images, thereby increasing the reliability of the analysis. In the present study, plant protoplasts transfected with fusions of visible fluorescent proteins are used to illustrate the new data analysis method. It is demonstrated that the distances estimated with the present method are substantially smaller than those estimated from the average donor lifetimes, due to a fraction of non-transferring donor molecules. Software to reproduce the presented results is provided in an open-source and freely available package called "TIMP" for "The R project for Statistical Computing".

  19. Mapping live cell viscosity with an aggregation-induced emission fluorogen by means of two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sijie; Hong, Yuning; Zeng, Yan; Sun, Qiqi; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Engui; Bai, Gongxun; Qu, Jianan; Hao, Jianhua; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-03-09

    Intracellular viscosity is a crucial parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we demonstrate the utility of TPE-Cy, a cell-permeable dye with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property, in mapping the viscosity inside live cells. Owing to the AIE characteristics, both the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of this dye are increased along with an increase in viscosity. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of live cells stained with TPE-Cy reveals that the lifetime in lipid droplets is much shorter than that from the general cytoplasmic region. The loose packing of the lipids in a lipid droplet results in low viscosity and thus shorter lifetime of TPE-Cy in this region. It demonstrates that the AIE dye could provide good resolution in intracellular viscosity sensing. This is also the first work in which AIE molecules are applied in fluorescence lifetime imaging and intracellular viscosity sensing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Lifetimes for some excited states of sodium; Vidas medias de niveles excitados del atomo del sodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P.; Campos, J.

    1979-07-01

    The lifetimes of some s,p and d levels of sodium have been measured by the delayed coincidence method, using a single-photon counting technique. The results are compared with the calculated values of the present work, and with other results. The lifetimes of the ns, np, and levels up to n10; of the nf levels up to n-9;and of the ng, nh,n1 and nk levels up to n-8, have been calculated and the transition probabilities of lines with origin in these levels are given. (Author) 38 refs.

  1. Compact solid-state CMOS single-photon detector array for in vivo NIR fluorescence lifetime oncology measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homulle, H.A.R.; Powolny, F; Stegehuis, PL; Dijkstra, J; Li, DU; Homicsko, K; Rimoldi, D.; Muehlethaler, K.; Prior, JO; Sinisi, R; Dubikovskaya, E; Charbon, E.E.E.; Bruschini, C

    2016-01-01

    In near infrared fluorescence-guided surgical oncology, it is challenging to distinguish healthy from cancerous tissue. One promising research avenue consists in the analysis of the exogenous fluorophores’ lifetime, which are however in the (sub-)nanosecond range. We have integrated a single-photon

  2. Cine: Line excitation by infrared fluorescence in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-03-01

    CINE is a Python module for calculating infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. Excitation by solar radiation of vibrational bands followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state is one of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets. This code calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Line transitions are queried from the latest version of the HITRAN spectroscopic repository using the astroquery affiliated package of astropy. Molecular data are obtained from the LAMDA database. These coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy of biological tissue: single- and two-photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Ge, Weikun; Yuen, Powing; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2004-06-01

    Endogenous fluorophores, such as NAD(P)H/FAD and collagen/elastin, have been regarded as in vivo quantitative fluorescence biomarkers for precancerous changes of epithelial tissue. However, the fluorescence signal measured by conventional spectroscopy is a mixture of autofluorescence from the epithelium and deep structures. The dominant fluorescence of collagen/elastin from connective tissue in deep layers creates serious challenge for extracting the epithelial fluorescence of NAD(P)H/FAD that is weak, but important for the characterization of tissue pathology. In this work, we instrumented a confocal fluorescence spectroscopy system and a two-photon excited fluorescence spectroscopy system to measure the depth-resolved single- and two-photon fluorescence spectra from the rabbit esophageal tissues. The excitation wavelengths were 349 nm and 735 nm, respectively. Both systems provided good optical sectioning. The information obtained from depth-resolved fluorescence was generally consistent with the histology of the examined tissue sample. The NAD(P)H signals from epithelial layers were clearly separated from the collagen signal from deep layers. In addition, strong second harmonic generations given by collagen fibers were observed. This work demonstrates that depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy may produce more accurate information on the diagnosis of tissue pathology.

  4. Flash lamp-excited time-resolved fluorescence microscope suppresses autofluorescence in water concentrates to deliver an 11-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connally, Russell; Veal, Duncan; Piper, James

    2004-01-01

    The ubiquity of naturally fluorescing components (autofluorophores) encountered in most biological samples hinders the detection and identification of labeled targets through fluorescence-based techniques. Time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) is a technique by which the effects of autofluorescence are reduced by using specific fluorescent labels with long fluorescence lifetimes (compared with autofluorophores) in conjunction with time-gated detection. A time-resolved fluorescence microscope (TRFM) is described that is based on a standard epifluorescence microscope modified by the addition of a pulsed excitation source and an image-intensified time-gateable CCD camera. The choice of pulsed excitation source for TRFM has a large impact on the price and performance of the instrument. A flash lamp with rapid discharge characteristics was selected for our instrument because of the high spectral energy in the UV region and short pulse length. However, the flash output decayed with an approximate lifetime of 18 micros and the TRFM required a long-lived lanthanide chelate label to ensure that probe fluorescence was visible after decay of the flash plasma. We synthesized a recently reported fluorescent chelate (BHHCT) and conjugated it to a monoclonal antibody directed against the waterborne parasite Giardia lamblia. For a 600-nm bandpass filter set and a gate delay of 60 micros, the TRFM provided an 11.3-fold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of labeled Giardia over background. A smaller gain in an SNR of 9.69-fold was achieved with a 420-nm longpass filter set; however, the final contrast ratio between labeled cyst and background was higher (11.3 versus 8.5). Despite the decay characteristics of the light pulse, flash lamps have many practical advantages compared with optical chopper wheels and modulated lasers for applications in TRFM.

  5. Determination of molecular stoichiometry without reference samples by analyzing fluorescence blinking with and without excitation synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevekerl, Heike; Widengren, Jerker

    2015-06-01

    Stoichiometry of molecular complexes plays a crucial role in biology. Moreover, for quantitative fluorescence studies, it is often useful to know the number of fluorophores labeled onto the molecules studied. In this work, we propose an approach to determine the number of independent fluorescence emitters on fluorescent molecules based on fluorescence blinking caused by photo-induced triplet state formation, photo-isomerization or charge transfer. The fluorescence blinking is measured under two different excitation regimes, on the same setup, and in one and the same sample. By comparing the fluorescence fluctuations under continuous excitation using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), when all the fluorophores are blinking independently of each other, with those occurring under square-pulsed excitation using Transient State (TRAST) spectroscopy, when all fluorophores are blinking in a synchronized manner, the number of fluorophores per molecule can be determined. No calibration sample is needed and the approach is independent of experimental conditions and of the specific environment of the molecules under study. The approach was experimentally validated by labeling double stranded DNA (dsDNA) with different concentrations of the intercalating dye YOYO-1 Iodide. The sample was then measured consecutively by TRAST and FCS and the number of fluorophores per molecule was calculated. The determined numbers were found to agree well with the number of fluorophores per dsDNA, as determined from FCS measurements using additional calibration samples.

  6. Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence from Biological Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    induced fluorescence (LIF) to provide an initial rapid indication of the presence of biological aerosol particles. Examples of recent ultraviolet (UV...pp.4960-4965, 2007. 10. J. W. Lou, M. Currie, V. Sivaprakasam, and J. D. Eversole, “Green and Ultraviolet Pulse Generation with a Compact, Fiber...solutions,” Journal of photochemistry and photobiology 65, 6, 931-936 (1997). 18. S. Dad, R.H. Bisby, I.P. Clark and A.W. Parker, “Identification

  7. Combined evanescent-wave excitation and supercritical-angle fluorescence detection improves optical sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Brunstein, Maia; Tourain, Christophe; Oheim, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Evanescent-wave microscopy achieves sub-diffraction axial sectioning by confining fluorescence excitation to a thin layer close to the cell/substrate interface. How thin this light sheet exactly is, however, is often unknown. Particularly in the popular objective-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) configuration large deviations from the expected exponential intensity decay of the evanescent wave have been reported. Propagating, i.e., non-evanescent, excitation light diminishes the optical sectioning effect, reduces contrast and renders the quantification of TIRFM images uncertain. Here, we use a combination of azimuthal- and polar-angle beam scanning, dark-field scatter imaging, and atomic force microscopy to identify the sources of this unwanted background fluorescence excitation. We identify stray light originating from the microscope optics and the objective lens itself as the major sources of background, with minor contributions due to evanescent-wave scattering at the reflecti...

  8. Diagnostics of MCF plasmas using Lyman-{alpha} fluorescence excited by one or two photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voslamber, D

    1998-11-01

    Laser-induced Lyman-{alpha} fluorescence of the hydrogen isotopes is investigated with regard to diagnostic applications in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. A formal analysis is presented for two excitation schemes: one-photon and Doppler-free two-photon excitation. The analysis includes estimates of the expected experimental errors arising from the photon noise and from the sensitivity of the observed fluorescence signals to variations of the plasma and laser parameters. Both excitation schemes are suitable primarily for application in the plasma edge, but even in the plasma bulk of large machines they can still be applied in combination with a diagnostic neutral beam. The two-photon excitation scheme is particularly attractive because it involves absorption spectra that are resolved within the Doppler width. This implies a large diagnostic potential and in particular offers a way to measure the deuterium-tritium fuel mix in fusion reactors. (author) 37 refs.

  9. In Vivo Interaction Studies by Measuring Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Through Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FRET/FLIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fäßler, Florian; Pimpl, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Combinations of multiple fluorescent fusion proteins are commonly generated and used for colocalization studies in live cell imaging but also biochemical analysis of protein-protein interactions by co-immunoprecipitation in vitro. Advanced microscopy techniques like Förster resonance energy transfer through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FRET/FLIM) nowadays enable the combination of both approaches. This opens up the possibility to perform a location-specific protein-protein interaction analysis in vivo. To this end, the nonradiant energy transfer from a donor to an acceptor fluorophore (FRET) is harnessed to test for close proximity as an indicator for interaction, while the spectromicroscopical measurement of the fluorescence lifetime by FLIM serves as a readout.Here, we describe FRET/FLIM measurements performed with a Leica TCS SP8/PicoHarp 300 combination to demonstrate the interaction between a RFP-tagged GFP-nanobody and its epitope, GFP, in the cytoplasm of tobacco mesophyll protoplasts.

  10. Ergodicity, configurational entropy and free energy in pigment solutions and plant photosystems: influence of excited state lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Robert C; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We examine ergodicity and configurational entropy for a dilute pigment solution and for a suspension of plant photosystem particles in which both ground and excited state pigments are present. It is concluded that the pigment solution, due to the extreme brevity of the excited state lifetime, is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. Conversely, due to the rapid energy transfer among pigments, each photosystem is ergodic and the configurational entropy is positive. This decreases the free energy of the single photosystem pigment array by a small amount. On the other hand, the suspension of photosystems is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. The overall configurational entropy which, in principle, includes contributions from both the single excited photosystems and the suspension which contains excited photosystems, also approaches zero. Thus the configurational entropy upon photon absorption by either a pigment solution or a suspension of photosystem particles is approximately zero. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The influence of dead time related distortions on live cell fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeman, Lior; Fixler, Dror

    2014-06-01

    Recent developments in the field of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) techniques allow the use of high repetition rate light sources in live cell experiments. For light sources with a repetition rate of 20-100 MHz, the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) FLIM systems suffer serious dead time related distortions, known as "inter-pulse pile-up". The objective of this paper is to present a new method to quantify the level of signal distortion in TCSPC FLIM experiments, in order to determine the most efficient laser repetition rate for different FLT ranges. Optimization of the F -value, which is the relation between the relative standard deviation (RSD) in the measured FLT to the RSD in the measured fluorescence intensity (FI), allows quantification of the level of FI signal distortion, as well as determination of the correct FLT of the measurement. It is shown that by using a very high repetition rate (80 MHz) for samples characterized by high real FLT's (4-5 ns), virtual short FLT components are added to the FLT histogram while a F -value that is higher than 1 is obtained. For samples characterized with short real FLT's, virtual long FLT components are added to the FLT histogram with the lower repetition rate (20-50 MHz), while by using a higher repetition rate (80 MHz) the "inter-pulse pile-up" is eliminated as the F -value is close to 1. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Study on the effect of deposition rate and concentration of Eu on the fluorescent lifetime of CsI: Tl thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yijun; Guo, Lina [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, Chengdu 610054 (China); Liu, Shuang, E-mail: shuangliu@uestc.edu.cn [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, Chengdu 610054 (China); Wang, Qianfeng; Zhang, Shangjian; Liu, Yong [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhong, Zhiyong [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2017-06-21

    Although there are many new scintillators being developed recently, CsI: Tl is still very efficient among them. The fluorescent lifetime is a very important parameter of CsI: Tl thin film and two series of experiments have been conducted to learn about it. Our experiments, however, have demonstrated that the deposition rate and the codoping of Eu{sup 2+} will significantly influence its fluorescent lifetime. In order to increase the efficiency of the imaging system, we intend to obtain a higher fluorescent lifetime for CsI: Tl thin film by controlling these two conditions. - Highlights: • We used vacuum vapor deposition method to grow the high-quality thin films. • The relationship between the deposition rate and the fluorescent lifetime of CsI: Tl thin film was tested. • Concentration of Eu on fluorescent lifetime of the CsI: Tl thin film was studied.

  13. Lifetime measurements of first excited states in 16,18C

    CERN Document Server

    Ong, H J; Suzuki, D; Iwasaki, H; Sakuraï, H; Onishi, T K; Suzuki, M K; Ota, S; Takeuchi, S; Nakao, T; Togano, Y; Kondo, Y; Aoi, N; Baba, H; Bishop, S; Ichikawa, Y; Ishihara, M; Kubo, T; Kurita, K; Motobayashi, T; Nakamura, T; Okumura, T; Yanagisawa, Y

    2007-01-01

    The electric quadrupole transition from the first 2+ state to the ground 0+ state in 18C was studied through lifetime measurement by an upgraded recoil shadow method applied to inelastically scattered radioactive 18C nuclei. The measured mean lifetime is 18.9 +/- 0.9 (stat) +/- 4.4 (syst) ps, corresponding to a B(E2;2+ -> 0+) value of 4.3 +/- 0.2 +/- 1.0 e2fm4, or about 1.5 Weisskopf units. The mean lifetime of the first 2+ state in 16C was remeasured to be 18.0 +/- 1.6 +/- 4.7 ps, about four times shorter than the value reported previously. The discrepancy between the two results was resolved by incorporating the gamma-ray angular distribution measured in this work into the previous measurement. These transition strengths are hindered compared to the empirical transition strengths, indicating that the anomalous hindrance observed in 16C persists in 18C.

  14. Automated detection of breast cancer in resected specimens with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Unger, Jakob; Darrow, Morgan; Bold, Richard J.; Marcu, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Re-excision rates for breast cancer lumpectomy procedures are currently nearly 25% due to surgeons relying on inaccurate or incomplete methods of evaluating specimen margins. The objective of this study was to determine if cancer could be automatically detected in breast specimens from mastectomy and lumpectomy procedures by a classification algorithm that incorporated parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm). This study generated a database of co-registered histologic sections and FLIm data from breast cancer specimens (N  =  20) and a support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm able to automatically detect cancerous, fibrous, and adipose breast tissue. Classification accuracies were greater than 97% for automated detection of cancerous, fibrous, and adipose tissue from breast cancer specimens. The classification worked equally well for specimens scanned by hand or with a mechanical stage, demonstrating that the system could be used during surgery or on excised specimens. The ability of this technique to simply discriminate between cancerous and normal breast tissue, in particular to distinguish fibrous breast tissue from tumor, which is notoriously challenging for optical techniques, leads to the conclusion that FLIm has great potential to assess breast cancer margins. Identification of positive margins before waiting for complete histologic analysis could significantly reduce breast cancer re-excision rates.

  15. A flow bioreactor system compatible with real-time two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nian; Riedl, Julia A; Carvajal-Berrio, Daniel A; Davis, Zackary; Monaghan, Michael G; Layland, Shannon Lee; Hinderer, Svenja; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2017-11-17

    Bioreactors are essential cell and tissue culture tools that allow the introduction of biophysical signals into in vitro cultures. One major limitation is the need to interrupt experiments and sacrifice samples at certain time points for analyses. To address this issue, we designed a bioreactor that combines high-resolution contact-free imaging and continuous flow in a closed system that is compatible with various types of microscopes. The high-throughput fluid flow bioreactor was combined with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) and validated. The hydrodynamics of the bioreactor chamber were characterized using COMSOL. The simulation of shear stress indicated that the bioreactor system provides homogeneous and reproducible flow conditions. The designed bioreactor was used to investigate the effects of low shear stress on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In a scratch assay, we observed decreased migration of HUVECs under shear stress conditions. Furthermore, metabolic activity shifts from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation-dependent mechanisms in HUVECs cultured under low shear stress conditions were detected using 2P-FLIM. Future applications for this bioreactor range from observing cell fate development in real-time to monitoring the environmental effects on cells or metabolic changes due to drug applications. Creative Commons Attribution license.

  16. From morphology to biochemical state - intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy.

  17. Optically sectioned wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging endoscopy enabled by structured illumination (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsdale, Taylor; Malik, Bilal H.; Rico-Jimenez, Jose J.; Jo, Javier A.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-03-01

    We present a wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system with optical sectioning by structured illumination microscopy (SIM). FLIM measurements were made using a time gated ICCD camera in conjunction with a pulsed nitrogen dye laser operating at 450 nm. Intensity images were acquired at multiple time delays from a trigger initiated by a laser pulse to create a wide-field FLIM image, which was then combined with three phase SIM to provide optical sectioning. Such a mechanism has the potential to increase the reliability and accuracy of the FLIM measurements by rejecting background intensity. SIM also provides the opportunity to create volumetric FLIM images with the incorporation of scanning mechanisms for the sample plane. We present multiple embodiments of such a system: one as a free space endoscope and the other as a fiber microendoscope enabled by the introduction of a fiber bundle. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of such an imaging system by imaging dyes embedded in a tissue phantom.

  18. Referencing techniques for high-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) based on analog mean-delay (AMD) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungyeon; Lee, Minsuk; Park, Byungjun; Lee, Seungrag; Won, Youngjae

    2017-02-01

    Analog mean-delay (AMD) method is a new powerful alternative method in determining the lifetime of a fluorescence molecule for high-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Even though the photon economy and the lifetime precision of the AMD method are proven to be as good as the state-of-the-art time-correlated single photon counting (TC-SPC) method, there have been some speculations and concerns about the accuracy of this method. In the AMD method, the temporal waveform of an emitted fluorescence signal is directly recorded with a slow digitizer whose bandwidth is much lower than the temporal resolution of lifetime to be measured. We found that the drifts and the fluctuations of the absolute zero position in a measured temporal waveform are the major problems in the AMD method. As a referencing technique, we already proposed dual-channel waveform measurement scheme that may suppress these errors. In this study, we have demonstrated real-time confocal AMD-FLIM system with dual-channel waveform measurement technique.

  19. Alterations in cerebral metabolism observed in living rodents using fluorescence lifetime microscopy of intrinsic NADH (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Sakadžić, Sava; Sutin, Jason; Wu, Weicheng; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring cerebral energy metabolism at a cellular level is essential to improve our understanding of healthy brain function and its pathological alterations. In this study, we resolve specific alterations in cerebral metabolism utilizing minimally-invasive 2-Photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (2P-FLIM) measurements of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence, collected in vivo from anesthetized rats and mice. Time-resolved lifetime measurements enables distinction of different components contributing to NADH autofluorescence. These components reportedly represent different enzyme-bound formulations of NADH. Our observations from this study confirm the hypothesis that NADH FLIM can identify specific alterations in cerebral metabolism. Using time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) equipment and a custom-built multimodal imaging system, 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) was performed in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. Multi-exponential fits for NADH fluorescence lifetimes indicate 4 distinct components, or 'species.' We observed distinct variations in the relative proportions of these components before and after pharmacological-induced impairments to several reactions involved in anaerobic glycolysis and aerobic oxidative metabolism. Classification models developed with experimental data correctly predict the metabolic impairments associated with bicuculline-induced focal seizures in separate experiments. Compared to traditional intensity-based NADH measurements, lifetime imaging of NADH is less susceptible to the adverse effects of overlying blood vessels. Evaluating NADH measurements will ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of cerebral energetics and its pathology-related alterations. Such knowledge will likely aid development of therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke.

  20. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  1. Oral cancer detection based on fluorescence polarization of blood plasma at excitation wavelength 405 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Manoharan, Yuvaraj; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    During metabolism the metabolites such as hormones, proteins and enzymes were released in to the blood stream by the cells. These metabolites reflect any change that occurs due to any disturbances in normal metabolic function of the human system. This was well observed with the altered spectral signatures observed with fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Previously many have reported on the significance of native fluorescence spectroscopic method in the diagnosis of cancer. As fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive and simple, it has complementary techniques such as excitation-emission matrix, synchronous and polarization. The fluorescence polarization measurement provides details about any association or binding reactions and denaturing effects that occurs due to change in the micro environment of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt in the diagnosis of oral cancer at 405 nm excitation using fluorescence polarization measurement. The fluorescence anisotropic values calculated from polarized fluorescence spectral data of normal and oral cancer subjects yielded a good accuracy when analyzed with linear discriminant analysis based artificial neural network. The results will be discussed in detail.

  2. Automatic Discrimination of the Geographical Origins of Milks by Excitation-Emission Fluorescence Spectrometry and Chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Deng, De-Hua; Cai, Chen-Bo; Yang, Hong-Wei

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the automatic discrimination of geographical origins of milks from Western Yunnan Plateau areas and eastern China by excitation-emission fluorescence spectrometry and chemometrics. Genuine plateau milks (n = 60) and milks from eastern China (n = 89) are scanned in the regions of 180–300 nm for excitation and 200–800 nm for emission. Different options of data analysis are investigated and compared in terms of their performance in discriminating milks of different geographical origins: (1) two-way partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) based on excitation and emission spectra, respectively; (2) two-way PLSDA based on fusion of excitation and emission spectra; (3) three-way PLSDA based on excitation-emission matrix spectra. The two-way PLSDA methods with excitation spectra, emission spectra, and fusion of excitation and emission spectra correctly classify 91.3%, 88.6%, and 95.3% of the milk samples, respectively; while the total accuracy of three-way PLSDA is 96.0%. The results demonstrate the two-way data combining excitation and emission spectra are sufficient to characterize and identify the plateau milks. Considering both model accuracy and the analytical time required, two-way PLS-DA with fusion of excitation and emission spectra is recommended as a reliable and quick method to discriminate plateau milks from ordinary milks. PMID:21904469

  3. Long lifetime components in the decay of excited super-heavy nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morjean M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For nuclear reactions in which super-heavy nuclei can be formed, the essential difference between the fusion process followed by fission and non-equilibrium processes leading to fission-like fragments is there action time. Quite probable non-equilibrium processes, characterized by very short reaction times, are highlighted thanks to mass-angle correlations. However, long lifetime components associated with fission following fusion have been observed with two independent experimental techniques, providing evidence for the formation of compound nuclei with Z = 120 and 124, followed by mass asymmetric fission.

  4. THE EFFECTIVE OF DIFFERENT EXCITATION WAVELENGTHS ON THE IDENTIFICATION OF PLANT SPECIES BASED ON FLUORESCENCE LIDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF served as an active technology has been widely used in many field, and it is closely related to excitation wavelength (EW. The objective of this investigation is to discuss the performance of different EWs of LIF LiDAR in identifying plant species. In this study, the 355, 460 and 556 nm lasers were utilized to excite the leaf fluorescence and the fluorescence spectra were measured by using the LIF LiDAR system built in the laboratory. Subsequently, the principal component analysis (PCA with the help of support vector machine (SVM was utilized to analyse fluorescence spectra. For the three EWs, the overall identification rates of the six plant species were 80 %, 83.3 % and 90 %. Experimental results demonstrated that 556 nm excitation light source is superior to 355 and 460 nm for the classification of the plant species for the same genus in this study. Thus, an appropriate excitation wavelength should be considered when the LIF LiDAR was utilized in the field of remote sensing based on the LIF technology.

  5. Digitally synchronized LCD projector for multi-color fluorescence excitation in parallel capillary electrophoresis detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Wei; Chang, Chih-Hang; Wu, Dai-Yang; Lin, Che-Hsin

    2010-10-15

    A simple method is proposed for modulating the excitation light used for multi-color fluorescence detection in a single capillary electrophoresis (CE) channel. In the proposed approach, a low-cost commercial liquid crystal device (LCD) projector with digitally-modulated LCD switches is used to provide the illumination light source and the fluorescence emitted from the CE chip is synchronously detected using an ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectrometer. The modulated light source enables the detection of multiple fluorescence signals within a single CE channel without the need of mechanically switching optical components. In order to enhance the sensing performance of the proposed system, two short-pass filters and one band-pass filter are inserted into the LCD projector to modify the wavelength spectra for fluorescence excitation. With this simple approach, the signal-to-noise (SN) ratio of the fluorescence detection signals is greatly improved by a factor of approximately 22 when detecting Atto647N fluorescent dye. The feasibility of the proposed multi-color CE detection approach is demonstrated by detecting two different samples including a mixed sample comprising FITC, Rhodamine B and Atto647N fluorescent dyes and a bio-sample composed of two ssDNAs labeled with FITC and Cy3, respectively. Results confirm that the digitally-modulated excitation system proposed in this study has significant potential for the parallel analysis of fluorescently-labeled bio-samples using a multi-color detection scheme. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Excitation-resolved multispectral method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescent molecular tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maomao; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Han; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-04-01

    Imaging of the pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, owing to the ill-posed nature of the FMT inverse problem, the relatively low quality of the parametric images makes it difficult to investigate the different metabolic processes of the fluorescent targets with small distances. An excitation-resolved multispectral DFMT method is proposed; it is based on the fact that the fluorescent targets with different concentrations show different variations in the excitation spectral domain and can be considered independent signal sources. With an independent component analysis method, the spatial locations of different fluorescent targets can be decomposed, and the fluorescent yields of the targets at different time points can be recovered. Therefore, the metabolic process of each component can be independently investigated. Simulations and phantom experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed excitation-resolved multispectral method can effectively improve the reconstruction accuracy of the parametric images in DFMT.

  7. Effect of calcinations temperature on the luminescence intensity and fluorescent lifetime of Tb3+-doped hydroxyapatite (Tb-HA) nanocrystallines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hairong Yin; Yanxiao Li; Jianguang Bai; Mingxin Ma; Jing Liu

    2017-01-01

    ...+ ions were observed in emission spectra of 6 mol.% Tb-HA under 378 nm excitation. The luminescent intensity of Tb-HA, which showed the fluorescence quenching, firstly enhanced and then decreased at 700 °C...

  8. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  9. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhy, M. A.; Elshenawy, M. M.; Takahashi, M.; Whitman, B. H.; Walter, N. G.; Hamdan, S. M.

    2011-11-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  10. Parallelized TCSPC for Dynamic Intravital Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging: Quantifying Neuronal Dysfunction in Neuroinflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch, Helena; Andresen, Volker; Mossakowski, Agata; Siffrin, Volker; Seelemann, Thomas; Spiecker, Heinrich; Moll, Ingrid; Herz, Josephine; Hauser, Anja E.; Zipp, Frauke; Behne, Martin J.; Niesner, Raluca

    2013-01-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy has revolutionized our view on vital processes by revealing motility and interaction patterns of various cell subsets in hardly accessible organs (e.g. brain) in living animals. However, current technology is still insufficient to elucidate the mechanisms of organ dysfunction as a prerequisite for developing new therapeutic strategies, since it renders only sparse information about the molecular basis of cellular response within tissues in health and disease. In the context of imaging, Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) is one of the most adequate tools to probe molecular mechanisms of cell function. As a calibration-free technique, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is superior for quantifying FRET in vivo. Currently, its main limitation is the acquisition speed in the context of deep-tissue 3D and 4D imaging. Here we present a parallelized time-correlated single-photon counting point detector (p-TCSPC) (i) for dynamic single-beam scanning FLIM of large 3D areas on the range of hundreds of milliseconds relevant in the context of immune-induced pathologies as well as (ii) for ultrafast 2D FLIM in the range of tens of milliseconds, a scale relevant for cell physiology. We demonstrate its power in dynamic deep-tissue intravital imaging, as compared to multi-beam scanning time-gated FLIM suitable for fast data acquisition and compared to highly sensitive single-channel TCSPC adequate to detect low fluorescence signals. Using p-TCSPC, 256×256 pixel FLIM maps (300×300 µm2) are acquired within 468 ms while 131×131 pixel FLIM maps (75×75 µm2) can be acquired every 82 ms in 115 µm depth in the spinal cord of CerTN L15 mice. The CerTN L15 mice express a FRET-based Ca-biosensor in certain neuronal subsets. Our new technology allows us to perform time-lapse 3D intravital FLIM (4D FLIM) in the brain stem of CerTN L15 mice affected by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and, thereby, to truly quantify neuronal

  11. Parallelized TCSPC for dynamic intravital fluorescence lifetime imaging: quantifying neuronal dysfunction in neuroinflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Leo Rinnenthal

    Full Text Available Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy has revolutionized our view on vital processes by revealing motility and interaction patterns of various cell subsets in hardly accessible organs (e.g. brain in living animals. However, current technology is still insufficient to elucidate the mechanisms of organ dysfunction as a prerequisite for developing new therapeutic strategies, since it renders only sparse information about the molecular basis of cellular response within tissues in health and disease. In the context of imaging, Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET is one of the most adequate tools to probe molecular mechanisms of cell function. As a calibration-free technique, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is superior for quantifying FRET in vivo. Currently, its main limitation is the acquisition speed in the context of deep-tissue 3D and 4D imaging. Here we present a parallelized time-correlated single-photon counting point detector (p-TCSPC (i for dynamic single-beam scanning FLIM of large 3D areas on the range of hundreds of milliseconds relevant in the context of immune-induced pathologies as well as (ii for ultrafast 2D FLIM in the range of tens of milliseconds, a scale relevant for cell physiology. We demonstrate its power in dynamic deep-tissue intravital imaging, as compared to multi-beam scanning time-gated FLIM suitable for fast data acquisition and compared to highly sensitive single-channel TCSPC adequate to detect low fluorescence signals. Using p-TCSPC, 256×256 pixel FLIM maps (300×300 µm(2 are acquired within 468 ms while 131×131 pixel FLIM maps (75×75 µm(2 can be acquired every 82 ms in 115 µm depth in the spinal cord of CerTN L15 mice. The CerTN L15 mice express a FRET-based Ca-biosensor in certain neuronal subsets. Our new technology allows us to perform time-lapse 3D intravital FLIM (4D FLIM in the brain stem of CerTN L15 mice affected by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and, thereby, to truly quantify

  12. Screening for protein-protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margineanu, Anca; Chan, Jia Jia; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Flatters, Delphine; Kumar, Sunil; Katan, Matilda; Dunsby, Christopher W; French, Paul M W

    2016-06-24

    We present a high content multiwell plate cell-based assay approach to quantify protein interactions directly in cells using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) read out by automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Automated FLIM is implemented using wide-field time-gated detection, typically requiring only 10 s per field of view (FOV). Averaging over biological, thermal and shot noise with 100's to 1000's of FOV enables unbiased quantitative analysis with high statistical power. Plotting average donor lifetime vs. acceptor/donor intensity ratio clearly identifies protein interactions and fitting to double exponential donor decay models provides estimates of interacting population fractions that, with calibrated donor and acceptor fluorescence intensities, can yield dissociation constants. We demonstrate the application to identify binding partners of MST1 kinase and estimate interaction strength among the members of the RASSF protein family, which have important roles in apoptosis via the Hippo signalling pathway. KD values broadly agree with published biochemical measurements.

  13. Investigation of the Co-Dependence of Morphology and Fluorescence Lifetime in a Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ossato, Giulia; Hirschle, Patrick; Wuttke, Stefan; Lamb, Don C

    2016-07-01

    Porous materials, due to their large surface-to-volume ratio, are important for a broad range of applications and are the subject of intense research. Most studies investigate the bulk properties of these materials, which are not sensitive to the effect of heterogeneities within the sample. Herein, a new strategy based on correlative fluorescence lifetime imaging and scanning electron microscopy is presented that allows the detection and localization of those heterogeneities, and connects them to morphological and structural features of the material. By applying this method to a dye-modified metal-organic framework (MOF), two independent fluorescence quenching mechanisms in the MOF scaffold are identified and quantified. The first mechanism is based on quenching via amino groups, while the second mechanism is influenced by morphology. Furthermore, a similar correlation between the inherent luminescence lifetime and the morphology of the unmodified MOF structure is demonstrated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Dual fluorescence of ellipticine: excited state proton transfer from solvent versus solvent mediated intramolecular proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sanghamitra; Pabbathi, Ashok; Sekhar, M Chandra; Samanta, Anunay

    2011-08-25

    Photophysical properties of a natural plant alkaloid, ellipticine (5,11-dimethyl-6H-pyrido[4,3-b]carbazole), which comprises both proton donating and accepting sites, have been studied in different solvents using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques primarily to understand the origin of dual fluorescence that this molecule exhibits in some specific alcoholic solvents. Ground and excited state calculations based on density functional theory have also been carried out to help interpretation of the experimental data. It is shown that the long-wavelength emission of the molecule is dependent on the hydrogen bond donating ability of the solvent, and in methanol, this emission band arises solely from an excited state reaction. However, in ethylene glycol, both ground and excited state reactions contribute to the long wavelength emission. The time-resolved fluorescence data of the system in methanol and ethylene glycol indicates the presence of two different hydrogen bonded species of ellipticine of which only one participates in the excited state reaction. The rate constant of the excited state reaction in these solvents is estimated to be around 4.2-8.0 × 10(8) s(-1). It appears that the present results are better understood in terms of solvent-mediated excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction from the pyrrole nitrogen to the pyridine nitrogen leading to the formation of the tautomeric form of the molecule rather than excited state proton transfer from the solvents leading to the formation of the protonated form of ellipticine. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Fluorescence lifetime FRET imaging of receptor-ligand complexes in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkouskaya, Alena; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E.; Barroso, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    To guide the development of targeted therapies with improved efficacy and accelerated clinical acceptance, novel imaging methodologies need to be established. Toward this goal, fluorescence lifetime Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) imaging assays capitalize on the ability of antibodies or protein ligands to bind dimerized membrane bound receptors to measure their target engagement levels in cancer cells. Conventional FLIM FRET microscopy has been widely applied at visible wavelengths to detect protein-protein interactions in vitro. However, operation at these wavelengths restricts imaging quality and ability to quantitate lifetime changes in in vivo small animal optical imaging due to high auto-fluorescence and light scattering. Here, we have analyzed the uptake of iron-bound transferrin (Tf) probes into human breast cancer cells using FLIM-FRET microscopy in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) range. The development of NIR FLIM FRET microscopy allows for the use of quantitative lifetime-based molecular assays to measure drug-target engagement levels at multiple scales: from in vitro microscopy to in vivo small animal optical imaging (macroscopy). This novel approach can be extended to other receptors, currently targeted in oncology. Hence, lifetime-based molecular imaging can find numerous applications in drug delivery and targeted therapy assessment and optimization.

  16. Monitoring uptake of ellipticine and its fluorescence lifetime in relation to the cell cycle phase by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, B L; Valdez, J G; Steinkamp, J A; Darzynkiewicz, Z; Crissman, H A

    1997-10-10

    Ellipticine (5,11-dimethyl-6H-pyrido[4,3-b]carbazole) is a green fluorescent plant alkaloid that inhibits DNA topoisomerase II activity and possesses pharmacologic activity toward both murine and human leukemias in vivo. In this flow cytometric study, the uptake of ellipticine was monitored as a function of cell volume and cell cycle phase in viable human promyelocytic (HL-60) cells costained with the DNA fluorochrome Hoechst 33342. Uptake of ellipticine was time and dose dependent; however, drug content was quantitatively similar in all phases of the cell cycle when normalized for DNA content or similar to cell size when correlated with cell volume. The fluorescence lifetime values of ellipticine in HL-60 cells, as analyzed by novel flow cytometric analysis, reached a plateau when the intra-cellular ellipticine intensity was still rising with increasing drug concentration. Since the free drug and the different subcellular ellipticine complexes, including DNA and RNA, had different lifetime values, the changes in the lifetime values appear to reflect differing proportions of unbound drug to that bound to different cellular constituents in the cells. Further development of phase-sensitive flow cytometry will provide for multiple lifetime determinations so that quantitation of drugs bound to the different cellular components can be performed along with the simultaneous determination of total drug uptake and cell cycle position. Such analyses should provide useful information for the design of drugs with greater affinity for cytotoxic targets.

  17. Determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method in combination with magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doncel, M. [Universidad de Salamanca, Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Salamanca (Spain); Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gadea, A. [CSIC-University of Valencia, Istituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Valiente-Dobon, J.J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Quintana, B. [Universidad de Salamanca, Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Salamanca (Spain); Modamio, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Mengoni, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Moeller, O.; Pietralla, N. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Dewald, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    The current work presents the determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method, in combination with spectrometers for ion identification, normalizing the intensity of the peaks by the ions detected in the spectrometer as a valid technique that produces results comparable to the ones obtained by the conventional shifted-to-unshifted peak ratio method. The technique has been validated using data measured with the γ-ray array AGATA, the PRISMA spectrometer and the Cologne plunger setup. In this paper a test performed with the AGATA-PRISMA setup at LNL and the advantages of this new approach with respect to the conventional Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Role of excited state solvent fluctuations on time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tanping, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu; Kumar, Revati, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    We explore the connection between the solvation dynamics of a chromophore upon photon excitation and equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent. Using molecular dynamics simulations, fluorescence Stokes shift for the tryptophan in Staphylococcus nuclease was examined using both nonequilibrium calculations and linear response theory. When the perturbed and unperturbed surfaces exhibit different solvent equilibrium fluctuations, the linear response approach on the former surface shows agreement with the nonequilibrium process. This agreement is excellent when the perturbed surface exhibits Gaussian statistics and qualitative in the case of an isomerization induced non-Gaussian statistics. However, the linear response theory on the unperturbed surface breaks down even in the presence of Gaussian fluctuations. Experiments also provide evidence of the connection between the excited state solvent fluctuations and the total fluorescence shift. These observations indicate that the equilibrium statistics on the excited state surface characterize the relaxation dynamics of the fluorescence Stokes shift. Our studies specifically analyze the Gaussian fluctuations of the solvent in the complex protein environment and further confirm the role of solvent fluctuations on the excited state surface. The results are consistent with previous investigations, found in the literature, of solutes dissolved in liquids.

  19. Toward Fourier interferometry fluorescence excitation/emission imaging of malignant cells combined with photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Elli; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Berry, John P.; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Ornek, Ceren; Monti, Marco; Leblanc, Roger M.; Schachtschabel, Dietrich O.; Haroon, Sumaira

    2003-10-01

    Dual excitation fluorescence imaging has been used as a first step towards multi-wavelength excitation/emission fluorescence spectral imaging. Target cells are transformed keratinocytes, and other osteosarcoma, human breast and color cancer cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes, e.g. TMRM (tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester), Mitotracker Green (Molecular Probes, Inc., Eugene OR,USA; a recently synthesized mitochondrial oxygen probe, [PRE,P1"- pyrene butyl)-2-rhodamine ester] allow dual excitation in the UV plus in teh blue-green spectral regions. Also, using the natural endogenous probe NAD(P)H, preliminary results indicate mitochondrial responses to metabolic challenges (e.g. glucose addition), plus changes in mitochonrial distribution and morphology. In terms of application to biomedicine (for diagnostiscs, prognostsics and drug trials) three parameters have been selected in addition to the natural probe NAD(P)H, i.e. vital fluorescence probing of mitochondria, lysosomes and Golgi apparatus. It is hoped that such a multiparameter approach will allow malignant cell characterization and grading. A new area being introduced is the use of similar methodology for biotechnical applications such as the study of the hydrogen-producing alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, and possible agricultural applications, such as Saccharomyces yeast for oenology. Complementation by Photoacoustic Microscopy is also contemplated, to study the internal conversion component which follows the excitation by photons.

  20. Vibronic energy map and excited state vibrational characteristics of magnesium myoglobin determined by energy-selective fluorescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaposi, A D; Vanderkooi, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies of the singlet excited state of Mg-substituted myoglobin and relative absorption probabilities were determined by fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy. These spectra contain information on the structure of the excited state species, and the availability of vibrationally resolved spectra from excited state biomolecules should aid in elucidating their structure and reactivity.

  1. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Michał; Kijak, Michał; Piwoński, Hubert; Herbich, Jerzy; Waluk, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters. We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donor-acceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  2. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał

    2017-02-03

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  3. Excitation-emission matrices measurements of human cutaneous lesions: tool for fluorescence origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkova, A.; Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Pavlova, E.; Keremedchiev, M.

    2013-11-01

    The light induced fluorescence (LIF) technique has the potential of providing real-time diagnosis of malignant and premalignant skin tissue; however, human skin is a multilayered and inhomogeneous organ with different optical properties that complicate the analysis of cutaneous fluorescence spectra. In spite of the difficulties related to the detection and analysis of fluorescent data from skin lesions, this technique is among the most widely applied techniques in laboratorial and pre-clinical investigations for early skin neoplasia diagnosis. The important point is to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescence and find any significant alterations distinguishing the normal skin from a cancerous state of the tissue; this would make the autofluorescence signal obtained useful for the development of a non-invasive diagnostic tool for the dermatological practice. Our investigations presented here were based on ex vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from excised tumor lesions and the surrounding skin taken during the daily clinical practice of Queen Jiovanna- ISUL University Hospital, Sofia, the local Ethical Committee's approval having already been obtained. The fluorescence emission was measured between 300 nm and 800 nm using excitation in the 280-440 nm spectral range. In the process of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) measurements we could establish the origin of the autofluorescence and the compounds related by assigning the excitation and emission maxima obtained during the experiments. The EEM were compared for normal human skin, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, benign nevi and malignant melanoma lesions to obtain information for the most common skin malignancies and their precursors. The main spectral features and the applicability of the technique of autofluorescent spectroscopy of human skin in general as an initial diagnostic tool are discussed as well.

  4. In vivo assessment of wound re-epithelialization by UV fluorescence excitation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Padilla-Martinez, Juan Pablo; Williams, Maura; Farinelli, William; Anderson, R. R.; Franco, Walfre

    2017-02-01

    Background and Objectives: We have previously demonstrated the efficacy of a non-invasive, non-contact, fast and simple but robust fluorescence imaging (u-FEI) method to monitor the healing of skin wounds in vitro. This system can image highly-proliferating cellular processes (295/340 nm excitation/emission wavelengths) to study epithelialization in a cultured wound model. The objective of the current work is to evaluate the suitability of u-FEI for monitoring wound re-epithelialization in vivo. Study Design: Full-thickness wounds were created in the tail of rats and imaged weekly using u-FEI at 295/340nm excitation/emission wavelengths. Histology was used to investigate the correlation between the spatial distribution and intensity of fluorescence and the extent of wound epithelialization. In addition, the expression of the nuclear protein Ki67 was used to confirm the association between the proliferation of keratinocyte cells and the intensity of fluorescence. Results: Keratinocytes forming neo-epidermis exhibited higher fluorescence intensity than the keratinocytes not involved in re-epithelialization. In full-thickness wounds the fluorescence first appeared at the wound edge where keratinocytes initiated the epithelialization process. Fluorescence intensity increased towards the center as the keratinocytes partially covered the wound. As the wound healed, fluorescence decreased at the edges and was present only at the center as the keratinocytes completely covered the wound at day 21. Histology demonstrated that changes in fluorescence intensity from the 295/340nm band corresponded to newly formed epidermis. Conclusions: u-FEI at 295/340nm allows visualization of proliferating keratinocyte cells during re-epithelialization of wounds in vivo, potentially providing a quantitative, objective and simple method for evaluating wound closure in the clinic.

  5. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomin, Vladimir I., E-mail: tomin@apsl.edu.pl; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-10-15

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  6. Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) investigations of gastrointestinal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Ts.; Borisova, E.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O.; Penkov, N.; Keremedchiev, M.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this report we will present our recent investigations of the fluorescence properties of lower part gastrointestinal tissues using excitation-emission matrix and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy measurement modalities. The spectral peculiarities observed will be discussed and the endogenous sources of the fluorescence signal will be addressed. For these fluorescence spectroscopy measurements the FluoroLog 3 system (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) was used. It consists of a Xe lamp (300 W, 200-650 nm), a double mono-chromators, and a PMT detector with a work region at 220- 850 nm. Autofluorescence signals were detected in the form of excitation-emission matrices for the samples of normal mucosa, dysphasia and colon carcinoma and specific spectral features for each tissue were found. Autofluorescence signals from the same samples are observed through synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, which is a novel promising modality for fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of bio-samples. It is one of the most powerful techniques for multicomponent analysis, because of its sensitivity. In the SFS regime, the fluorescence signal is recorded while both excitation λexc and emission wavelengths λem are simultaneously scanned. A constant wavelength interval is maintained between the λexc and λem wavelengths throughout the spectrum. The resulted fluorescence spectrum shows narrower peak widths, in comparison with EEMs, which are easier for identification and minimizes the chance for false determinations or pretermission of specific spectral feature. This modality is also faster, than EEMs, a much smaller number of data points are required.1 In our measurements we use constant wavelength interval Δλ in the region of 10-200 nm. Measurements are carried out in the terms of finding Δλ, which results in a spectrum with most specific spectral features for comparison with spectral characteristics observed in EEMs. Implementing synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy in optical

  7. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  8. Excitation and temperature dependent exciton-carrier transport in CVD diamond: Diffusion coefficient, recombination lifetime and diffusion length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ščajev, Patrik, E-mail: patrik.scajev@ff.vu.lt

    2017-04-01

    Time-resolved induced absorption (IA) and light induced transient grating (LITG) techniques were applied for the investigation of nonequilibrium exciton-carrier diffusion and recombination processes in a high-purity CVD diamond. Injection range from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} carrier density was achieved by combining one photon and two photon excitations. The measurements were performed in the 10–750 K temperature range. The LITG diffusion coefficient peaked at 44 cm{sup 2}/s value at room temperature under low injection conditions. At lower temperatures it transferred to much lower exciton diffusion coefficient. A strong decrease of diffusion coefficient under higher injection conditions was explained by exciton formation with a low diffusion coefficient and many body effects, as polyexciton and electron-hole droplet formation. High temperature phonon-limited diffusion coefficient was weakly injection dependent. Low excitation carrier lifetime was about 700 ns above 200 K. At lower temperatures, the decay time reduced by two orders of magnitude, which was explained by the formation of biexcitons. At lowest temperatures, an increase of the carrier recombination rate at high injection was attributed to Auger recombinations of polyexcitons and electron-hole droplets. While at high temperatures, the increase of the recombination rate with 490 meV activation energy was observed. The combination of IA and LITG measurements provided effective diffusion lengths in a 0.3–50 µm range, being strongly dependent on the excess carrier density and temperature.

  9. Anisole fluorescence spectroscopy for temperature measurements with a Hg (Xe) arc lamp excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibert, P.; Kanumuri, S. S.; Bonnety, J.; Tran, K.-H.; Serio, B.; Bonnet, D.; Luc, J.; Lavayssiere, M.

    2017-04-01

    The main contribution of this study is to propose time-resolved measurements to determine temperature with a novel source of continuous excitation for an induced fluorescence technique with laser diagnosis based on tracer-induced fluorescence, which has become a major tool for experimental studies of fluid dynamics in reaction flows. We use a Hg (Xe) arc lamp as a continuous light source that has a wide range of emissions in wavelength. With this setup, one can reach high spatial and temporal resolution (temperature, pressure, species concentration, and velocity) to acquire quantitative data for the control of fluid thermal systems, such as engines, combustion chambers, furnaces, and reactors. A fluorescence study was performed on various tracers and their configurations. We focus on an anisole tracer using a broad wavelength of excitations. We propose a calibration to achieve temperature measurements in the range of 493-773 K and from 0.2 to 3.5 MPa of pressure. The temperature-dependent fluorescence is based on a two-line technique. The results give a better understanding of the influence of temperature and pressure in a nitrogen bath gas on the fluorescence photophysics in the UV domain. High temporal resolution was acquired using a high-speed intensified camera setup. The application of the photomultipliers manages the time-scale evolution of the flow in continuous emission and this eliminates the signal-to-noise ratio impact.

  10. Detection of pretreated fingerprint fluorescence using an LED-based excitation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, Masahisa; Shimoda, Osamu; Onishi, Kyoko; Onishi, Akira; Oguri, Naoki

    2008-07-01

    Optimization of a light emitting diode (LED)-based excitation system for the detection of pretreated fingerprint fluorescence is described. Fluorescent ridges can usually be excited by irradiation with forensic light sources such as xenon arc lamps or quartz-halogen lamps with high-power output and suitable filters. However, they are too expensive for many crime laboratories in smaller organizations. We concentrated on LEDs which have advantages over conventional light sources in that they are simpler and of lower cost, but the power output and quality of each individual LED unit is not sufficient for the detection of weak fluorescent ridges. To resolve this subject, blue and green LED arrays composed of ninety LED units were adopted and suitable low pass filters for them were designed. An experimental system, consisting of blue and green LED arrays with the suitable low pass filters for illumination, high pass filters for viewing, a digital camera and a computer, was tested. The fluorescent images of cyanoacrylate ester fumed/rhodamine 6G stained fingerprint on white polyethylene sheet and weak fluorescent ridges of ninhydrin/indium chloride treated fingerprint on white paper were successfully detected and photographed. It was shown that the improvement of LED beam in intensity and quality can compensate the disadvantages, resulting in well-contrasted images.

  11. Dual fluorescent polyaniline model compounds: steric and temperature effects on excited state charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelle, Sabine; Rettig, Wolfgang; Lapouyade, René

    2002-07-01

    Low temperature dual fluorescence of several derivatives of 4-aminodiphenylamine is investigated quantitatively. A strong thermochromic and solvatochromic redshift is indicative of the high dipole moment of the CT state emitting at long wavelength. The combination of steady state and time-resolved data allowed the calculation of the excited-state equilibrium. The absence of CT-risetimes in diethyl ether and their presence in butyronitrile points to the complication by additional ground state conformational equilibria. Both ground and excited state equilibria depend on solvent polarity and temperature. High solvent polarity favours one of the ground state conformers.

  12. Fluorescence excited in a thunderstorm atmosphere by relativistic runaway electron avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.

    2017-05-01

    The spectrum and spatiotemporal evolution of the fluorescence of an atmospheric discharge developing in the regime of relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) generation have been calculated without involving the relativistic feedback. The discharges generating narrow bipolar pulses, along with the discharges responsible for terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, are shown to be relatively dark. Nevertheless, the fluorescence excited by a discharge involving RREAs can be recorded with cameras used to record high-altitude optical phenomena. A possible connection between a certain class of optical phenomena observed at the tops of thunderclouds and RREA emission is pointed out.

  13. Bi-modal imaging of atherosclerotic plaques: Automated method for co-registration between fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Bishop, John W.; Qi, Jinyi; Marcu, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The risk of atherosclerosis plaque rupture cannot be assessed by the current imaging systems and thus new multi-modal technologies are under investigation. This includes combining a new fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) technique, which is sensitive to plaque biochemical features, with conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which provides information on plaque morphology. In this study we present an automated method allowing for the co-registration of imaging data acquired based on these two techniques. Intraluminal studies were conducted in ex-vivo segments of human coronaries with a multimodal catheter integrating a commercial IVUS (40 MHz) and a rotational side-viewing fiber based multispectral FLIm system (355 nm excitation, 390+/-20, 452+/-22 and 542+/-25 nm acquisition wavelengths). The proposed method relies on the lumen/intima boundary extraction from the IVUS polar images. Image restoration is applied for the noise reduction and edge enhancement, while gray-scale peak tracing over the A-lines of the IVUS polar images is applied for the lumen boundary extraction. The detection of the guide-wire artifact is used for the angular registration between FLIm and IVUS data, after which the lifetime values can be mapped onto the segmented lumen/intima interface. The segmentation accuracy has been assessed against manual tracings, providing 0.120+/-0.054 mm mean Hausdorff distance. This method makes the bi-modal FLIm and IVUS approach feasible for comprehensive intravascular diagnostic by providing co-registered biochemical and morphological information about atherosclerotic plaques.

  14. Multi-color femtosecond source for simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescent proteins in two-photon fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Wu, Juwell; Horton, Nicholas G.; Lin, Charles P.; Xu, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Simultaneous imaging of cells expressing multiple fluorescent proteins (FPs) is of particular interest in applications such as mapping neural circuits, tracking multiple immune cell populations, etc. To visualize both in vivo and ex vivo tissue morphology and physiology at a cellular level deep within scattering tissues, two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PM) is a powerful tool that has found wide applications. However, simultaneous imaging of multiple FPs with 2PM is greatly hampered by the lack of proper ultrafast lasers offering multi-color femtosecond pulses, each targeting the two-photon absorption peak of a different FP. Here we demonstrate simultaneous two-photon fluorescence excitation of RFP, YFP, and CFP in human melanoma cells engineered to express a "rainbow" pallet of colors, using a novel fiber-based source with energetic, three-color femtosecond pulses. The three-color pulses, centered at 775 nm, 864 nm and 950 nm, are obtained through second harmonic generation of the 1550 nm pump laser and SHG of the solitons at 1728 nm and 1900 nm generated through soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) of the pump laser in a large-mode-area (LMA) fiber. The resulting wavelengths are well matched to the two-photon absorption peaks of the three FPs for efficient excitation. Our results demonstrate that multi-color femtosecond pulse generation using SSFS and a turn-key, fiber-based femtosecond laser can fulfill the requirements for simultaneous imaging of multiple FPs in 2PM, opening new opportunities for a wide range of biological applications where non-invasive, high-resolution imaging of multiple fluorescent indicators is required.

  15. Plastic lab-on-a-chip for fluorescence excitation with integrated organic semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Klinkhammer, Sönke; Lemmer, Uli; Mappes, Timo

    2011-04-25

    Laser light excitation of fluorescent markers offers highly sensitive and specific analysis for bio-medical or chemical analysis. To profit from these advantages for applications in the field or at the point-of-care, a plastic lab-on-a-chip with integrated organic semiconductor lasers is presented here. First order distributed feedback lasers based on the organic semiconductor tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) doped with the laser dye 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyril)-4H-pyrane (DCM), deep ultraviolet induced waveguides, and a nanostructured microfluidic channel are integrated into a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate. A simple and parallel fabrication process is used comprising thermal imprint, DUV exposure, evaporation of the laser material, and sealing by thermal bonding. The excitation of two fluorescent marker model systems including labeled antibodies with light emitted by integrated lasers is demonstrated.

  16. Increased fluorescence of PbS quantum dots in photonic crystals by excitation enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Carlo; Roder, Sebastian; Brodoceanu, Daniel; Kraus, Tobias; Hammerschmidt, Martin; Burger, Sven; Becker, Christiane

    2017-07-01

    We report on the enhanced fluorescence of lead sulfide quantum dots interacting with leaky modes of slab-type silicon photonic crystals. The photonic crystal slabs were fabricated, supporting leaky modes in the near infrared wavelength range. Lead sulfite quantum dots which are resonant in the same spectral range were prepared in a thin layer above the slab. We selectively excited the leaky modes by tuning the wavelength and angle of incidence of the laser source and measured distinct resonances of enhanced fluorescence. By an appropriate experiment design, we ruled out directional light extraction effects and determined the impact of enhanced excitation. Three-dimensional numerical simulations consistently explain the experimental findings by strong near-field enhancements in the vicinity of the photonic crystal surface. Our study provides a basis for systematic tailoring of photonic crystals used in biological applications such as biosensing and single molecule detection, as well as quantum dot solar cells and spectral conversion applications.

  17. Analysis of Spectral Features of Seawaterbiooptical Components Fluorescence from the Excitation-emission Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyuk, P. A.; Nagorny, I. G.

    The paper presents the method for processing of excitation-emission matrix of sea water and the allocation of the spectral characteristics of different types of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and phytoplankton cells in seawater. The method consists of identification of regularly observed fluorescence peaks of CDOM in marine waters of different type and definition of the spectral ranges, where the predominant influence of these peaks are observed.

  18. Selective Detection of NADPH Oxidase in Polymorphonuclear Cells by Means of NAD(PH-Based Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Niesner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidase (NOX2 is a multisubunit membrane-bound enzyme complex that, upon assembly in activated cells, catalyses the reduction of free oxygen to its superoxide anion, which further leads to reactive oxygen species (ROS that are toxic to invading pathogens, for example, the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs employ both nonoxidative and oxidative mechanisms to clear this fungus from the lung. The oxidative mechanisms mainly depend on the proper assembly and function of NOX2. We identified for the first time the NAD(PH-dependent enzymes involved in such oxidative mechanisms by means of biexponential NAD(PH-fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM. A specific fluorescence lifetime of 3670±140 picoseconds as compared to 1870 picoseconds for NAD(PH bound to mitochondrial enzymes could be associated with NADPH bound to oxidative enzymes in activated PMNs. Due to its predominance in PMNs and due to the use of selective activators and inhibitors, we strongly believe that this specific lifetime mainly originates from NOX2. Our experiments also revealed the high site specificity of the NOX2 assembly and, thus, of the ROS production as well as the dynamic nature of these phenomena. On the example of NADPH oxidase, we demonstrate the potential of NAD(PH-based FLIM in selectively investigating enzymes during their cellular function.

  19. Fluorescence lifetime of Rhodamine B in aqueous solutions of polysaccharides and proteins as a function of viscosity and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadé-Prieto, Ruben; Rodriguez-Rivera, Luis; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2017-11-08

    Rhodamine B (RhB) is a well known dye extensively used in thermometric studies, either considering the decrease in the fluorescence intensity or the lifetime (τ) with temperature. Lifetime measurements are preferred over intensity ones as they are more robust. In order to expand microscopy thermometry to complex food fluids, the effect of solutes on the τ of RhB was studied using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in a two-photon microscope. Polysaccharides of different molecular weights (glucose, lactose, dextran, maltodextrin, and sodium alginate), as well as whey proteins, were considered as typical model food ingredients. A linear increase in τ with the concentration is observed in most polysaccharides, highlighting that it is not due to an increase in the macroscopic viscosity, but in maltodextrins a Langmuir-like concentration dependence is observed. There are extensive interactions between RhB and whey proteins at small concentrations that quickly increase τ up to saturation at >10 wt% proteins, with τ modelled well using an adsorption Langmuir model. Therefore, the effect of solutes on RhB τ is not related to changes in the macroscopic viscosity. The temperature sensitivity of τ, quantified using apparent activation energies, decreases at high solute contents.

  20. Reduced temporal sampling effect on accuracy of time-domain fluorescence lifetime Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Travis; Zhao, Lingling; Intes, Xavier; Hahn, Juergen

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) aims at quantifying the exponential decay rate of fluorophores to yield lifetime maps over the imaged sample. When combined with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), the technique can be used to indirectly sense interactions at the nanoscale such as protein–protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions, and protein conformational changes. In the case of FLIM-FRET, the fluorescence intensity decays are fitted to a biexponential model in order to estimate the lifetime and fractional amplitude coefficients of each component of the population of the donor fluorophore (quenched and nonquenched). Numerous time data points, also called temporal or time gates, are typically employed for accurately estimating the model parameters, leading to lengthy acquisition times and significant computational demands. This work investigates the effect of the number and location of time gates on model parameter estimation accuracy. A detailed model of a FLIM-FRET imaging system is used for the investigation, and the simulation outcomes are validated with in vitro and in vivo experimental data. In all cases investigated, it is found that 10 equally spaced time gates allow robust estimation of model-based parameters with accuracy similar to that of full temporal datasets (90 gates).

  1. Video-rate fluorescence lifetime imaging camera with CMOS single-photon avalanche diode arrays and high-speed imaging algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, D.D.U.; Arlt, J.; Tyndall, D.; Walker, R.; Richardson, J.; Stoppa, D.; Charbon, E.; Henderson, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    A high-speed and hardware-only algorithm using a center of mass method has been proposed for single-detector fluorescence lifetime sensing applications. This algorithm is now implemented on a field programmable gate array to provide fast lifetime estimates from a 32 × 32 low dark count 0.13 ?m

  2. Two-photon excited fluorescence from a pseudoisocyanine-attached gold-coated tip via a thin tapered fiber under a weak continuous wave excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fang; Takashima, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshito; Fujiwara, Hideki; Sasaki, Keiji

    2013-11-18

    A simple tapered fiber based photonic-plasmonic hybrid nanostructure composed of a thin tapered fiber and a pseudoisocyanine (PIC)-attached Au-coated tip was demonstrated. Using this simple hybrid nanostructure, we succeeded in observing two-photon excited fluorescence from the PIC dye molecules under a weak continuous wave excitation condition. From the results of the tip-fiber distance dependence and excitation polarization dependence, we found that using a thin tapered fiber and an Au-coated tip realized efficient coupling of the incident light (~95%) and LSP excitation at the Au-coated tip, suggesting the possibility of efficiently inducing two-photon excited fluorescence from the PIC dye molecules attached on the Au-coated tip. This simple photonic-plasmonic hybrid system is one of the promising tools for single photon sources, highly efficient plasmonic sensors, and integrated nonlinear plasmonic devices.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime intravascular ultrasound (FLIm-IVUS) and the quest to discriminate between early and advanced lipid cores in atherosclerosis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Bec, Julien; Vela, Deborah; Buja, L. Maximilian; Southard, Jeffrey A.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    FL-IVUS combines intravascular ultrasound with fluorescence lifetime imaging to obtain morphologic and biochemical details from the arterial wall. Ultrasound measurements alone provide morphologic information (plaque burden, remodeling index and presence of calcium). Fluorescence lifetime can determine the presence of a thick fibrous cap, macrophage infiltration, and lipid cores beneath thin fibrous caps. These details are important to assess plaque vulnerability. In this study, we focused on the ability of FL-IVUS to differentiate between early and advanced lipid cores-advanced cores are vulnerable to rupture. We imaged N=12 ex vivo human coronary arteries and performed hematoxylin and eosin, Movat's pentachrome and CD68 immunohistochemistry at 500 micron intervals throughout the length of the vessels. We found only N=1 thin-capped fibroatheroma (TCFA) with an advanced necrotic core and N=7 cases of foam cell infiltration, early lipid cores or deep necrotic cores. IVUS was able to observe the increased plaque burden and calcification of the advanced and deep necrotic cores, but could not identify early lipid cores, foam cell infiltration or discriminate between deep necrotic cores and TCFA. The addition of FLIm to IVUS allowed the TCFA to be discriminated from early lipid accumulation, particularly at 542+/-50 nm (355 nm pulsed excitation): 7.6 +/- 0.5 ns compared to 6.6 +/- 0.4 ns, respectively (P<0.001 by ANOVA analysis). These differences need to be validated in a larger cohort, but exist due to specific lipid content in the necrotic core as well as increased extracellular matrix in early lesions.

  4. Fluorescence Lifetime and UV-Vis Spectroscopy to Evaluate the Interactions Between Quercetin and Its Yeast Microcapsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham-Hoang, Bao-Ngoc; Winckler, Pascale; Waché, Yves

    2017-09-09

    Quercetin is a fragile bioactive compound. Several works have tried to preserve it by encapsulation but the form of encapsulation (mono- or supra-molecular structure, tautomeric form), though important for stability and bioavailability, remains unknown. The present work aims at developing a fluorescence lifetime technique to evaluate the structure of quercetin during encapsulation in a vector capsule that has already proven efficiency, yeast cells. Molecular stabilization was observed during a 4-month storage period. The time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique was used to evaluate the interaction between quercetin molecules and the yeast capsule. The various tautomeric forms, as identified by UV-Vis spectroscopy, result in various lifetimes in TCSPC, although they varied also with the buffer environment. Quercetin in buffer exhibited a three-to-four longer long-time after 24 h (changing from 6-7 to 18-23 ns), suggesting an aggregation of molecules. In yeast microcapsules, the long-time population exhibited a longer lifetime (around 27 ns) from the beginning and concerned about 20% of molecules compared to dispersed quercetin. This shows that lifetime analysis can show the monomolecular instability of quercetin in buffer and the presence of interactions between quercetin molecules and their microcapsules. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Compact solid-state CMOS single-photon detector array for in vivo NIR fluorescence lifetime oncology measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homulle, H A R; Powolny, F; Stegehuis, P L; Dijkstra, J; Li, D-U; Homicsko, K; Rimoldi, D; Muehlethaler, K; Prior, J O; Sinisi, R; Dubikovskaya, E; Charbon, E; Bruschini, C

    2016-05-01

    In near infrared fluorescence-guided surgical oncology, it is challenging to distinguish healthy from cancerous tissue. One promising research avenue consists in the analysis of the exogenous fluorophores' lifetime, which are however in the (sub-)nanosecond range. We have integrated a single-photon pixel array, based on standard CMOS SPADs (single-photon avalanche diodes), in a compact, time-gated measurement system, named FluoCam. In vivo measurements were carried out with indocyanine green (ICG)-modified derivatives targeting the αvβ 3 integrin, initially on a genetically engineered mouse model of melanoma injected with ICG conjugated with tetrameric cyclic pentapeptide (ICG-E[c(RGD f K)4]), then on mice carrying tumour xenografts of U87-MG (a human primary glioblastoma cell line) injected with monomeric ICG-c(RGD f K). Measurements on tumor, muscle and tail locations allowed us to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo lifetime measurements with the FluoCam, to determine the characteristic lifetimes (around 500 ps) and subtle lifetime differences between bound and unbound ICG-modified fluorophores (10% level), as well as to estimate the available photon fluxes under realistic conditions.

  6. Spoilage of foods monitored by native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    The modern food processing and storage environments require the real-time monitoring and rapid microbiological testing. Optical spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelengths can be the basis of a novel, rapid, reagent less, noncontact and non-destructive technique for monitoring the food spoilage. The native fluorescence spectra of muscle foods stored at 2-4°C (in refrigerator) and 20-24°C (in room temperature) were measured as a function of time with a selective excitation wavelength of 340nm. The contributions of the principal molecular components to the native fluorescence spectra of meat were measured spectra of each fluorophore: collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and flavin. The responsible components were extracted using a method namely Multivariate Curve Resolution with Alternating Least-Squares (MCR-ALS). The native fluorescence combined with MCR-ALS can be used directly on the surface of meat to produce biochemically interpretable "fingerprints", which reflects the microbial spoilage of foods involved with the metabolic processes. The results show that with time elapse, the emission from NADH in meat stored at 24°C increases much faster than that at 4°C. This is because multiplying of microorganisms and catabolism are accompanied by the generation of NADH. This study presents changes of relative content of NADH may be used as criterion for detection of spoilage degree of meat using native fluorescence spectroscopy.

  7. Nuclear uptake of ultrasmall gold-doxorubicin conjugates imaged by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Shastry, Sathvik; Bradforth, Stephen E; Nadeau, Jay L

    2015-01-07

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in Dox-resistant cancers.

  8. Сomparative Analysis of 0.266 and 0.355 µm Fluorescence Excitation Wavelengths for Laser Fluores-Cence Monitoring of Oil Pollution Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Belov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The on-line detection of pipeline spillage is really essential for the fast oil spill response to the ecological and economical consequences. However existing on-line pipelines spillage detection systems have a sensibility of 0.2 – 1 % of pipe flow and do not detect the smaller-sized spillages.For unpeopled or sparsely populated regions an advanced technique for detection of pipeline spillages (including low-intensity ones is to monitor oil pollution (petroleum spills on the earth surface along the pipeline using, for example, an air drone.The laser remote sensing method is an effective method to detect the pipelines spillage.The paper is dedicated to development of laser fluorescence detection method of oil pollution. The remote sensing laser method to monitor oil pollution is based on the fluorescence excitation of oil in UV spectral band and on the data record of the earth surface laser-induced fluorescence radiation.For laser fluorescence method of monitoring oil pollution the paper presents a comparative analysis  of 0.266 and 0.355 µm wavelengths of the fluorescence excitation in terms of earth atmosphere propagation, eye-safety, laser characteristics, and petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency.It is shown that in terms of eye-safety, laser characteristics, and propagation in the earth atmosphere a 0.355 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has a sure advantage.In the context of petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency a 0.266 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has the advantage, but this advantage depends heavily on the petroleum base. For low-sulfur (sweet oil for instance,  it is not that big.At large, in solving the task of oil pollution detection because of the oil pipeline spillages the 0.355 µm wavelength of fluorescence excitation ought to be preferable. However, when creating a monitoring system for the pipeline with a specific petroleum base the irreversible decision depends on the

  9. Some new properties of DNA-YOYO-3 homodimer complexes revealed by electrophoresis and fluorescence lifetime measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, L M; Winter, S; Löber, G

    1994-12-01

    The DNA bis-intercalator oxazole homodimer (YOYO-3: 1,1'-(4,4,7,7-tetramethyl-4,7-diazaundecamethylene)-bis-4-[3-methy l- 2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-oxazole)-2-methylidene]-quinolinium tetraiodide) specifically alters the electrophoretic pattern of covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA molecules. Thus, YOYO-3 seems to remove the CCC DNA supercoils and induces the appearance of additional bands by changing the linking number. It also promotes an unusual "star" activity for the restriction enzyme Hind III. Fluorescence lifetime measurements indicate that YOYO-3 is capable of binding to DNA by bis- and mono-intercalation.

  10. Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons by fluorescent light from organic nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Józefowski, Leszek; Kawalec, Tomasz; Leißner, Till; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Adam, Jost; Fiutowski, Jacek

    2017-11-01

    Micro- and nano-scale systems with defined active elements acting as local surface plasmons polariton (SPP) sources are crucial for the development of future plasmonic circuits. We demonstrate SPP excitation by fluorescent light from crystalline organic para-hexaphenylene nanofibers deposited on a dielectric/metal surface. We characterize the SPPs using angle-resolved leakage radiation spectroscopy, in the excitation wavelength range 420 - 675 nm, corresponding to the nanofiber photoluminescence band. The nanofiber arrangement's capability to act as an SPP coupler for coherent as well as non-coherent excitation indicates its prospect for future integrated systems. To support our experimental results, we investigate the proposed geometries by analytical calculations and finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) modelling. The experimentally obtained angular leakage radiation peak positions can readily be predicted by our analytical calculations. Nevertheless, the experimental results exhibit a distinct asymmetry in the peak intensities. In agreement with our FDTD calculations, we address this asymmetrical SPP excitation to the nanofiber molecular orientation. The proposed structure's high flexibility, the ease of selective positioning of organic nanofibers, together with the gained insight into its photon-SPP coupling mechanism show great promise towards future local SPP excitation-based integrated devices.

  11. Excitation energy migration in yellow fluorescent protein (citrine) layers adsorbed on modified gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusoff, Hanis Mohd, E-mail: hanismy@umt.edu.my [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Miyagi (Japan); Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu (Malaysia); Rzeźnicka, Izabela I. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Miyagi (Japan); Institute for International Education, Tohoku University, Katahira, 2-chome, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); Hoshi, Hirotaka [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kajimoto, Shinji; Horimoto, Noriko Nishizawa [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Miyagi (Japan); Sogawa, Kazuhiro [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Fukumura, Hiroshi, E-mail: fukumura@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Miyagi (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    The nature of functional proteins adsorbed on solid surfaces is interesting from the perspective of developing of bioelectronics and biomaterials. Here we present evidence that citrine (one of yellow fluorescent protein variants) adsorbed on modified gold surfaces would not undergo denaturation and energy transfer among the adsorbed citrine molecules would occur. Gold substrates were chemically modified with 3-mercaptopropionic acid and tert-butyl mercaptan for the preparation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, respectively. A pure solution of citrine was dropped and dried on the modified gold substrates and their surface morphology was studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The obtained STM images showed multilayers of citrine adsorbed on the modified surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, citrine was adsorbed more randomly, formed various non-uniform aggregates, while on hydrophilic surfaces, citrine appeared more aligned and isolated uniform protein clusters were observed. Fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay of these dried citrine layers were also measured using the time correlated single photon counting method. Fluorescence anisotropy of citrine on the hydrophobic surface decayed faster than citrine on the hydrophilic surface. From these results we concluded that fluorescence energy migration occurred faster among citrine molecules which were randomly adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface to compare with the hydrophilic surface.

  12. Reactions of electronically excited boron atoms. Quenching rate constants and the radiative lifetime of the 4p 2P state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuefeng; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    1992-12-01

    Collisional quenching and radiative decay of the 4p 2P level of the boron atom has been studied in a cell experiment, in which B atoms are prepared by 266 nm multiphoton dissociation of BBr 3 and the 4p 2P level is prepared by sequential 2-photon absorption through the 3s 2S level. A radiative lifetime of 360 ± 50 ns is derived for B (4p 2P) by extrapolation of the measured decay rates versus BBr 3 partial pressure in several Torr helium buffer gas. Bimolecular quenching rate constants were also determined for a number of atomic and molecular species from the dependence of the B (4p 2P) decay rate on the quencher gas partial pressure. The quenching rate constants for the molecular species were quite large (≈(1-2)×10 -9 molecule -1 cm 3 s -1), presumably reflecting the small B (4p 2P) ionization potential and the rapid removal of the excited state by chemical reaction.

  13. Fluorescence Intrinsic Characterization of Excitation-Emission Matrix Using Multi-Dimensional Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chien Hsiao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-emission matrix (EEM fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive method for tissue diagnosis and has become important in clinical use. However, the intrinsic characterization of EEM fluorescence remains unclear. Photobleaching and the complexity of the chemical compounds make it difficult to distinguish individual compounds due to overlapping features. Conventional studies use principal component analysis (PCA for EEM fluorescence analysis, and the relationship between the EEM features extracted by PCA and diseases has been examined. The spectral features of different tissue constituents are not fully separable or clearly defined. Recently, a non-stationary method called multi-dimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition (MEEMD was introduced; this method can extract the intrinsic oscillations on multiple spatial scales without loss of information. The aim of this study was to propose a fluorescence spectroscopy system for EEM measurements and to describe a method for extracting the intrinsic characteristics of EEM by MEEMD. The results indicate that, although PCA provides the principal factor for the spectral features associated with chemical compounds, MEEMD can provide additional intrinsic features with more reliable mapping of the chemical compounds. MEEMD has the potential to extract intrinsic fluorescence features and improve the detection of biochemical changes.

  14. Ultrafast fluorescence detection in tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex in solution: relaxation dynamics involving higher excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasikuttan, Achikanath C; Suzuki, Masaya; Nakashima, Satoru; Okada, Tadashi

    2002-07-17

    The excited-state dynamics of a transition metal complex, tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+), has been investigated using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy. The relaxation dynamics in these molecules is of great importance in understanding the various ultrafast processes related to interfacial electron transfer, especially in semiconductor nanoparticles. Despite several experimental and theoretical efforts, direct observation of a Franck-Condon singlet excited state in this molecule was missing. In this study, emission from the Franck-Condon excited singlet state of [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) has been observed for the first time, and its lifetime has been estimated to be 40 +/- 15 fs. Biexponential decays with a fast rise component observed at longer wavelengths indicated the existence of more than one emitting state in the system. From a detailed data analysis, it has been proposed that, on excitation at 410 nm, crossover from higher excited (1)(MLCT) states to the vibrationally hot triplet manifold occurs with an intersystem crossing time constant of 40 +/- 15 fs. Mixing of the higher levels in the triplet state with the singlet state due to strong spin-orbit coupling is proposed. This enhances the radiative rate constant, k(r), of the vibrationally hot states within the triplet manifold, facilitating the upconversion of the emitted photons. The vibrationally excited triplet, which is emissive, undergoes vibrational cooling with a decay time in the range of 0.56-1.3 ps and relaxes to the long-lived triplet state. The results on the relaxation dynamics of the higher excited states in [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) are valuable in explaining the role of nonequilibrated higher excited sensitizer states of transition metal complexes in the electron injection and other ultrafast processes.

  15. Low power super resolution fluorescence microscopy by lifetime modification and image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Richard J; Culley, Siân; Bain, Angus J

    2014-05-19

    We demonstrate a new method for obtaining sub-diffraction resolution in fluorescence microscopy. The technique involves the analysis of the time evolution of fluorescence images in the presence of weak and unstructured (fundamental Gaussian) continuous wave stimulated emission depletion. A reduced point spread functions (PSF) is obtained by the recombination of time segments of the evolving image. A significant reduction in the PSF for 20 nm fluorescent beads (ca. 240 nm to 125 nm) is obtained with an on-sample power of 7.5 mW (17 MW/cm2) - substantially lower than that required for spatially structured stimulated emission depletion microscopy.

  16. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy as a tool for determining quality of sparkling wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcoroaristizabal, Saioa; Callejón, Raquel M; Amigo, Jose M; Ocaña-González, Juan A; Morales, M Lourdes; Ubeda, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Browning in sparkling wines was assessed by the use of excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy combined with PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC). Four different cava sparkling wines were monitored during an accelerated browning process and subsequently storage. Fluorescence changes observed during the accelerated browning process were monitored and compared with other conventional parameters: absorbance at 420nm (A420) and the content of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF). A high similarity of the spectral profiles for all sparkling wines analyzed was observed, being explained by a four component PARAFAC model. A high correlation between the third PARAFAC factor (465/530nm) and the commonly used non-enzymatic browning indicators was observed. The fourth PARAFAC factor (280/380nm) gives us also information about the browning process following a first order kinetic reaction. Hence, excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy, together with PARAFAC, provides a faster alternative for browning monitoring to conventional methods, as well as useful key indicators for quality control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluorescence spectroscopy using excitation and emission matrix for quantification of tissue native fluorophores and cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Gayen, S. K.; Xu, M.

    2014-03-01

    Native fluorescence spectrum of normal and cancerous human prostate tissues is studied to distinguish between normal and cancerous tissues, and cancerous tissues at different cancer grade. The tissue samples were obtained from Cooperative Human Tissue Network (CHTN) and National Disease Research Interchange(NDRI). An excitation and emission matrix (EEM) was generated for each tissue sample by acquiring native fluorescence spectrum of the sample using multiple excitation wavelengths. The non-negative matrix factorization algorithm was used to generate fluorescence EEMs that correspond to the fluorophores in biological tissues, including tryptophan, collagen, elastin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the background paraffin. We hypothesize that, as a consequence of metabolic changes associated with the development of cancer, the concentrations of NADH and FAD are different in normal and cancerous tissues, and also different for different cancer grades. We used the ratio of the abundances of FAD and NADH to distinguish between normal and cancerous tissues, and the tissue cancer grade. The FAD-to-NADH ratio was found to be the highest for normal tissue and decreased as the cancer grade increased.

  18. Mechanisms of drought-induced dissipation of excitation energy in sun- and shade-adapted drought-tolerant mosses studied by fluorescence yield change and global and target analysis of fluorescence decay kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hisanori; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Heber, Ulrich; Itoh, Shigeru

    2017-11-18

    Some mosses stay green and survive long even under desiccation. Dissipation mechanisms of excess excitation energy were studied in two drought-tolerant moss species adapted to contrasting niches: shade-adapted Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus and sun-adapted Rhytidium rugosum in the same family. (1) Under wet conditions, a light-induced nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) mechanism decreased the yield of photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence in both species. The NPQ extent saturated at a lower illumination intensity in R. squarrosus, suggesting a larger PSII antenna size. (2) Desiccation reduced the fluorescence intensities giving significantly lower F 0 levels and shortened the overall fluorescence lifetimes in both R. squarrosus and R. rugosum, at room temperature. (3) At 77 K, desiccation strongly reduced the PSII fluorescence intensity. This reduction was smaller in R. squarrosus than in R. rugosum. (4) Global and target analysis indicated two different mechanisms of energy dissipation in PSII under desiccation: the energy dissipation to a desiccation-formed strong fluorescence quencher in the PSII core in sun-adapted R. rugosum (type-A quenching) and (5) the moderate energy dissipation in the light-harvesting complex/PSII in shade-adapted R. squarrosus (type-B quenching). The two mechanisms are consistent with the different ecological niches of the two mosses.

  19. Prolonged fluorescence lifetime of carbon quantum dots by combining with hydroxyapatite nanorods for bio-applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baojin; Zhang, Shan; Liu, Ruoyu; Qiu, Jichuan; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Shicai; Li, Jianhua; Sang, Yuanhua; Jiang, Huaidong; Liu, Hong

    2017-02-09

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are a new type of fluorescent nanoparticle for cell imaging and tracking. However, they would easily diffuse and quench, followed by the loss of their fluorescence ability. By connecting their functional groups with other nanoparticles, the CQDs will be protected from destruction and exhibit long-time fluorescence. Here, carbon quantum dot-hydroxyapatite (CQD-HAp) hybrid nanorods were prepared by the self-assembly of CQDs on the surface of HAp nanorods through a facile one-pot process. The morphology and size of the CQD-HAp hybrid nanorods can be well controlled by using oleic acid, which meanwhile is the source of CQDs. The hydrophilic CQD-HAp hybrid nanorods have prolonged fluorescence life due to the connection between CQDs and HAp nanorods, and exhibit a higher fluorescence quantum yield than pure CQDs. In addition, when hybrid nanorods load doxorubicin (Dox) to form Dox-CQD-HAp hybrid nanorods, they can more efficiently kill human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells, rather than human prostatic cancer (PC-3) cells. Long time fluorescence for cell imaging and high efficiency in killing cancer cells as a drug-delivery medium make CQD-HAp hybrid nanorods have great potential applications in the bio-field.

  20. Low-frequency wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging using a high-power near-infrared light-emitting diode light source

    OpenAIRE

    Gioux, Sylvain; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLi) could potentially improve exogenous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging, because it offers the capability of discriminating a signal of interest from background, provides real-time monitoring of a chemical environment, and permits the use of several different fluorescent dyes having the same emission wavelength. We present a high-power, LED-based, NIR light source for the clinical translation of wide-field (larger than 5 cm in diameter) FLi at frequenc...

  1. Two-step excitation and blue fluorescence under continuous-wave pumping in Nd:YLF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, T. Y.; Byer, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    Near-UV and blue fluorescence from the 4D3/2 and 4D5/2 manifolds in Nd:YLF has been observed at room temperature under CW pumping by a rhodamine 590 dye laser. Excitation to these manifolds is attributed to two-step excitation involving excited-state absorption from the 4F3/2 metastable level. A similar phenomenon has also been observed in Nd:YAG and Nd:glass. The effective excited-state absorption cross section is measured to be (2 + or - 1) x 10 to the -20th sq cm at 587.4 nm in the pi polarization, and the peak effective stimulated emission cross section is measured to be 5 x 10 to the -20th sq cm at 411.7 nm, also in the pi polarization. Estimated laser threshold at 411.7 nm for two-step pumping at 587.4 nm is 70 mW.

  2. Fluorescence excitation spectrum and solvent-assisted conformational isomerization (SACI) of jet-cooled acetaminophen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Woon Yong; Kang, Jeong Seok; Lee, So Young; Kang, Hyuk

    2013-08-01

    Fluorescence excitation spectrum of jet-cooled acetaminophen was obtained. When AAP was expanded with a buffer gas containing 0.3-1.1% of water, absorption peaks of the less stable trans conformer was significantly reduced by solvent-assisted conformational isomerization (SACI), which is confirmed by a separately measured UV-UV hole burning spectroscopy. It is also confirmed by quantum mechanical calculation and RRKM calculation that it is energetically and kinetically possible to induce SACI in AAP with water. The SACI mechanism suggests a possible pathway that acetaminophen can adopt an active conformation in vivo, which is need for molecular recognition and drug activity.

  3. Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Nelson, T.; Kalinin, K.; Kuzmenko, V.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-07-01

    An efficient method of treating solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics (ESMD) is implemented and tested by exploring the solvatochromic effects in substituted p-phenylene vinylene oligomers. A continuum solvent model is used which has very little computational overhead. This allows simulations of ESMD with solvent effects on the scale of hundreds of picoseconds for systems of up to hundreds of atoms. At these time scales, solvatochromic shifts in fluoresence spectra can be described. Solvatochromic shifts in absorption and fluorescence spectra from ESMD are compared with time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experiments.

  4. Dual-wavelength excitation to reduce background fluorescence for fluorescence spectroscopic quantitation of erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin-IX and protoporphyrin-IX from whole blood and oral mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Georg; Vogeser, Michael; Holdt, Lesca M.; Homann, Christian; Großmann, Michael; Stepp, Herbert; Gruber, Christian; Erdogan, Ilknur; Hasmüller, Stephan; Hasbargen, Uwe; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2014-02-01

    Erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP) and protoporphyrin-IX (PPIX) accumulate in a variety of disorders that restrict or disrupt the biosynthesis of heme, including iron deficiency and various porphyrias. We describe a reagent-free spectroscopic method based on dual-wavelength excitation that can measure simultaneously both ZnPP and PPIX fluorescence from unwashed whole blood while virtually eliminating background fluorescence. We further aim to quantify ZnPP and PPIX non-invasively from the intact oral mucosa using dual-wavelength excitation to reduce the strong tissue background fluorescence while retaining the faint porphyrin fluorescence signal originating from erythrocytes. Fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were made on 35 diluted EDTA blood samples using a custom front-face fluorometer. The difference spectrum between fluorescence at 425 nm and 407 nm excitation effectively eliminated background autofluorescence while retaining the characteristic porphyrin peaks. These peaks were evaluated quantitatively and the results compared to a reference HPLC-kit method. A modified instrument using a single 1000 μm fiber for light delivery and detection was used to record fluorescence spectra from oral mucosa. For blood measurements, the ZnPP and PPIX fluorescence intensities from the difference spectra correlated well with the reference method (ZnPP: Spearman's rho rs = 0.943, p oral mucosa, background fluorescence was reduced significantly, while porphyrin signals remained observable. The dual-wavelength excitation method evaluates quantitatively the ZnPP/heme and PPIX/heme ratios from unwashed whole blood, simplifying clinical laboratory measurements. The difference technique reduces the background fluorescence from measurements on oral mucosa, allowing for future non-invasive quantitation of erythrocyte ZnPP and PPIX.

  5. In vivo Diagnosis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Using 337-nm- Excited Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, N.; Mitchell, M. F.; Mahadevan, A.; Warren, S.; Thomsen, S.; Silva, E.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1994-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence at 337-nm excitation was used in vivo to differentiate neoplastic [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)], nonneoplastic abnormal (inflammation and human papilloma viral infection), and normal cervical tissues. A colposcope (low-magnification microscope used to view the cervix with reflected light) was used to identify 66 normal and 49 abnormal (5 inflammation, 21 human papilloma virus infection, and 23 CIN) sites on the cervix in 28 patients. These sites were then interrogated spectroscopically. A two-stage algorithm was developed to diagnose CIN. The first stage differentiated histologically abnormal tissues from colposcopically normal tissues with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 92%, 90%, and 88%, respectively. The second stage differentiated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues from nonneoplastic abnormal tissues with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 87%, 73%, and 74%, respectively. Spectroscopic differences were consistent with a decrease in the absolute contribution of collagen fluorescence, an increase in the absolute contribution of oxyhemoglobin attenuation, and an increase in the relative contribution of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] fluorescence as tissue progresses from normal to abnormal in the same patient. These results suggest that in vivo fluorescence spectroscopy of the cervix can be used to diagnose CIN at colposcopy.

  6. Label-free in vivo imaging of human leukocytes using two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence enables label-free morphological and functional imaging of various human blood cells. Specifically, we achieved distinctive morphological contrast to visualize morphology of important leukocytes, such as polymorphonuclear structure of granulocyte and mononuclear feature of agranulocyte, through the employment of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence signals. In addition, NADH fluorescence images clearly reveal the morphological transformation process of neutrophils during disease-causing bacterial infection. Our findings also show that time-resolved NADH fluorescence can be potentially used for functional imaging of the phagocytosis of pathogens by leukocytes (neutrophils) in vivo. In particular, we found that free-to-bound NADH ratios measured in infected neutrophils increased significantly, which is consistent with a previous study that the energy consumed in the phagocytosis of neutrophils is mainly generated through the glycolysis pathway that leads to the accumulation of free NADH. Future work will focus on further developing and applying label-free imaging technology to investigate leukocyte-related diseases and disorders.

  7. Gas-phase fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy of mass-selected trapped molecular ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qunzhou; Forbes, Matthew W; Talbot, Francis O; Jockusch, Rebecca A

    2010-03-20

    A flexible interface to perform optical spectroscopic measurements on gaseous ions stored in a modified commercial quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer is described. The modifications made to the mass spectrometer did not adversely affect its operating characteristics. Gas-phase ions are produced using electrospray ionization, mass isolated and stored in the trapping mass spectrometer. The ions are subsequently irradiated with visible light from a tunable laser and dispersed fluorescence spectra are recorded simultaneously. Mass spectra are recorded after the irradiation period. This set-up allows us to track a range of possible outcomes upon photoexcitation of selected ions including fluorescence, photofragmentation and photodetachment of electrons. The experimental set-up is characterized using rhodamine 590, which is a methyl ester variant of rhodamine 6G. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of gaseous rhodamine 590 are measured and compared with solution-phase spectra. Excitation and emission maxima for the gaseous ions are found to lie at higher energy than for the solvated rhodamine 590. In addition, the gas-phase Stokes shift is significantly smaller than the solution-phase Stokes shift. The effects of several experimental parameters on the observed fluorescence signal are investigated, including laser power, relative number of ions, q(z) trapping parameter and buffer gas pressure. In addition to its use for the photophysical characterization of the intrinsic properties of ionic chromophores, this set-up may be used to investigate the properties of mass-selected, dye-labeled biomolecules, both alone and in well-defined complexes and clusters.

  8. Application of 'direct' beta particle excitation for the determination of noble metals in catalysts by radioisotope excited X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Rosales, P.A.; Quiero, A. (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas)

    1982-01-01

    A new technique was applied for exciting X-rays for X-ray fluorescence analysis by 'direct' beta excitation for the determination of noble metals in catalytic materials. A series of five synthetic standards were prepared each for platinum and palladium in the range of 0.5-10% for both carbon and alumina supports. The X-ray spectrometer system employed was a modified TN-11 and /sup 147/Pm inserted directly in the sample itself acts as the excitation source. The detector was a high resolution Si(Li) semiconductor with better than 160 eV resolution.

  9. Imaging bio-distribution of a topically applied dermatological cream on minipig skin using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Chaney, Eric J.; Criley, Jennifer M.; Spillman, Darold R.; Hutchison, Phaedra B.; Li, Joanne; Marjanovic, Marina; Frey, Steve; Cook, Steven; Boppart, Stephen A.; Arp, Zane A.

    2017-02-01

    Currently there is a lack of in vivo techniques to evaluate the spatial bio-distribution of dermal drugs over time without the need to take multiple serial biopsies. To address this gap, we investigated the use of multi-photon optical imaging methods to non-invasively track drug distribution on miniature pig (Species: Sus scrofa, Strain: Göttingen) skin in vivo. Minipig skin is the standard comparative research model to human skin, and is anatomically and functionally similar. We employed fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to visualize the spatial distribution and residency time of a topically applied experimental dermatological cream. This was made possible by the endogenous fluorescent optical properties of the experimental drug (fluorescence lifetime > 3000 ps). Two different drug formulations were applied on 2 minipigs for 7 consecutive days, with the control creams applied on the contralateral side, followed by 7 days of post-application monitoring using a multi-modal optical imaging system (MPTflex-CARS, JenLab, Germany). FLIM images were obtained from the treated regions 24 hr post-application from day 1 to day 14 that allowed visualization of cellular and sub-cellular features associated with different dermal layers non-invasively to a depth of 200 µm. Five punch biopsies per animal were obtained from the corresponding treated regions between days 8 and 14 for bioanalytical analysis and comparison with results obtained using FLIM. In conclusion, utilization of non-invasive optical biopsy methods for dermal drug evaluation can provide true longitudinal monitoring of drug spatial distribution, remove sampling limitations, and be more time-efficient compared to traditional methods.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of alterations to cellular metabolism by domain 2 of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Mazumder

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV co-opts hepatic lipid pathways to facilitate its pathogenesis. The virus alters cellular lipid biosynthesis and trafficking, and causes an accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs that gives rise to hepatic steatosis. Little is known about how these changes are controlled at the molecular level, and how they are related to the underlying metabolic states of the infected cell. The HCV core protein has previously been shown to independently induce alterations in hepatic lipid homeostasis. Herein, we demonstrate, using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy, that expression of domain 2 of the HCV core protein (D2 fused to GFP is sufficient to induce an accumulation of larger lipid droplets (LDs in the perinuclear region. Additionally, we performed fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides [NAD(PH], a key coenzyme in cellular metabolic processes, to monitor changes in the cofactor's abundance and conformational state in D2-GFP transfected cells. When expressed in Huh-7 human hepatoma cells, we observed that the D2-GFP induced accumulation of LDs correlated with an increase in total NAD(PH fluorescence and an increase in the ratio of free to bound NAD(PH. This is consistent with an approximate 10 fold increase in cellular NAD(PH levels. Furthermore, the lifetimes of bound and free NAD(PH were both significantly reduced--indicating viral protein-induced alterations in the cofactors' binding and microenvironment. Interestingly, the D2-expressing cells showed a more diffuse localization of NAD(PH fluorescence signal, consistent with an accumulation of the co-factor outside the mitochondria. These observations suggest that HCV causes a shift of metabolic control away from the use of the coenzyme in mitochondrial electron transport and towards glycolysis, lipid biosynthesis, and building of new biomass. Overall, our findings demonstrate that HCV induced alterations in hepatic

  11. Multiphoton versus single-photon excitation of photosensitizers for laser-induced fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Theo A.; Graschew, Georgi; Schneider, Marc; Rakowsky, Stefan; Sinn, Hanns-joerg; Schlag, Peter M.

    2001-04-01

    In laser-induced fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy of cancer the applied photosensitizers (PS) are often covalently derivatized with macromolecules to improve their selective accumulation in the cancerous tissue, while maintaining its single-photon excited photophysical properties. In this contribution methoxy-polyethylene glycol (MPEG, MW ~5 kDa) and human serum albumin (HSA, MW ~60 kDa) are used as PS carriers. Multiphoton (MP) excitation of the PS is favorable as compared to single-photon excitation because the penetration depth of the laser light is improved (>5 mm) due to the longer wavelength of the ~200 fs laser pulses used in this case (700-1050 nm). In this study cotton fibers and silica gel beads (quinone) do not exhibit multiphoton-induced fluorescence. Some derivatized PS (sulforhodamine B, erythrosin B, purpurin) exhibit MP-induced fluorescence, although no single-photon absorption band exists in the spectral region around half the excitation wavelength

  12. A fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe using photonic crystal fiber for nanoscale thermometry based on fluorescence-lifetime measurement of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takuro; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Saiki, Toshiharu; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called fluorescence near-field optics thermal nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN). Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se quantum dots (QDs). For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF). The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  13. A Fusion-Spliced Near-Field Optical Fiber Probe Using Photonic Crystal Fiber for Nanoscale Thermometry Based on Fluorescence-Lifetime Measurement of Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiharu Saiki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called Fluorescence Near-field Optics Thermal Nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN. Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se Quantum Dots (QDs. For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF. The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  14. Impact of laser excitation intensity on deep UV fluorescence detection in microchip electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Philipp; Ludwig, Martin; Belder, Detlev

    2008-12-01

    A high intensity 266 nm continuous wave (cw-) laser developed for material processing was utilised as an excitation source for sensitive native fluorescence detection of unlabelled compounds in MCE. This 120 mW laser was attached via an optical fibre into a commercial epifluorescence microscope. With this MCE set-up we evaluated the impact of laser power on the S/N of aromatic compounds as well as of proteins. Compared with a previous work which used a 4 mW pulsed laser for excitation, improved S/N for small aromatics and to a lesser extent for proteins could be attained. The LOD of the system was determined down to 24 ng/mL for serotonin (113 nM), 24 ng/mL for propranolol (81 nM), 80 ng/mL for tryptophan (392 nM) and 80 ng/mL for an aromatic diol (475 nM). Sensitive protein detection was obtained at concentrations of 5 microg/mL for lysocyme, trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen (340, 208 and 195 nM, respectively). Finally, a comparison of the cw- with a pulsed 266 nm laser, operating at the same average power, showed a higher attainable sensitivity of the cw-laser. This can be attributed to fluorescence saturation and photobleaching effects of the pulsed laser at high pulse energies.

  15. Integrated OLED as excitation light source in fluorescent lateral flow immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Vishak; Steckl, Andrew J

    2015-12-15

    The integration of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) as excitation light sources for quantum dot-based fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay systems (LFIA) was investigated. This approach has the potential to deliver a sensitive visible detection scheme for low-cost, disposable lab-on-chip point-of-care (POC) diagnosis system. Thin film phosphorescent green OLEDs fabricated on plastic substrates were integrated on-chip to excite the test line of a quantum dot-based LFIA (QD-LFIA). OLEDs were fabricated by sequential deposition of organic thin films (total of ~100 nm) onto ITO-coated PET substrates. CdSe/ZnS QDs emitting at 655 nm and Au nanoparticles (NP - 10 nm size) conjugated antibodies were used for the fluorescence QD-LFIA and conventional reflection-mode Au NP-LFIA, respectively. Thin plastic color light filters were integrated for filtering the excitation light source and, thereby, increasing the contrast of the emitted light for optimized visual detection. Integration of the OLED and color filters with the analytical membrane was achieved using adhesive techniques facilitated by the planar nature of the layers, which suggests possible large scale manufacturing using roll-to-roll processing. Gray scale analysis from digital images captured with a digital camera was used to quantify the visual sensitivity. The signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limit of detection (LOD) of OLED integrated QD-LFIAs were compared to Au NP LFIAs. OLED QD-LFIA exhibited superior performance in all signal aspects: 7-8× higher signal intensity and SNR, and a 7× lower LOD of 3 nM (measured at S/N=3). These results demonstrate the potential of OLED-integrated in LFIA devices for obtaining sensitive, fast and low-cost POC diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Revisiting the Cornea and Trabecular Meshwork Junction With 2-Photon Excitation Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marando, Catherine M; Park, Choul Yong; Liao, Jason A; Lee, Jimmy K; Chuck, Roy S

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the collagen and elastin architecture at the junction of the human cornea and trabecular meshwork (TM). The cornea, TM, and ciliary body (CB) tendons of unfixed human corneal buttons were imaged with an inverted 2-photon excited fluorescence microscope (FluoView FV-1000; Olympus, Central Valley, PA). The laser (Ti:sapphire) was tuned to 850 nm for 2-photon excitation. Backscatter signals of second harmonic generation and autofluorescence were collected through a 425/30-nm emission filter and a 525/45-nm emission filter, respectively. The second harmonic generation signal corresponds to collagen fibers, and the autofluorescence signal corresponds to elastin-containing tissue. Tissue structure representations were obtained through software-generated reconstructions of consecutive and overlapping (z-stack) images through a relevant sample depth. Collagen-rich CB tendons insert into the cornea between Descemet membrane (DM) and posterior stroma along with elastin fibers originating from the TM. The CB tendons directly abut DM, and their insertion narrows as they course centrally in the cornea, giving a wedge appearance to these parallel collagen fibers. Approximately 260 μm centrally from the edge of DM, the CB tendons fan out and merge with pre-DM collagen. As the CB tendons enter the cornea, they form a dense collagenous comb-like structure orthogonal to the edge of DM and supported by a delicate elastin network of interwoven fibers originating from the TM. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy has improved our understanding of the peripheral corneal architecture. CB tendon insertions in this region may contribute to the radial tears encountered when preparing DM endothelial keratoplasty grafts.

  17. In vivo and in vitro investigations of retinal fluorophores in age-related macular degeneration by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M.; Quick, S.; Klemm, M.; Schenke, S.; Mata, N.; Eitner, A.; Schweitzer, D.

    2009-02-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, a deeper understanding of the generation of single compounds contributing to the lipofuscin as well as of the role of other fluorophores such as FAD, glycated proteins, and collagen needs their discrimination by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). FLIM at the ocular fundus is performed using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope equipped with a picosecond laser source (448nm or 468nm respectively, 100ps, 80 MHz repetition rate) and dual wavelength (490-560nm and 560-7600nm) time-correlated single photon counting. A three-exponential fit of the fluorescence decay revealed associations of decay times to anatomical structures. Disease-related features are identified from alterations in decay times and-amplitudes. The in-vivo investigations in patients were paralleled by experiments in an organ culture of the porcine ocular fundus. Photo-oxidative stress was induced by exposure to blue light (467nm, 0.41 mW/mm2). Subsequent analysis (fluorescence microscopy, HPLC, LC-MS) indicated the accumulation of the pyridinium bis-retinoid A2E and its oxidation products as well as oxidized phospholipids. These compounds contribute to the tissue auto-fluorescence and may play a key role in the pathogenesis of AMD. Thus, FLIM observation at the ocular fundus in vivo enhances our knowledge on the etiology of AMD and may become a diagnostic tool.

  18. An excited-state intramolecular photon transfer fluorescence probe for localizable live cell imaging of cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Wen; Liu, Si-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2017-03-01

    Small molecule probes suitable for selective and specific fluorescence imaging of some important but low-concentration intracellular reactive sulfur species such as cysteine (Cys) pose a challenge in chemical biology. We present a readily available, fast-response fluorescence probe CHCQ-Ac, with 2-(5‧-chloro-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)-6-chloro-4(3 H)-quinazolinone (CHCQ) as the fluorophore and acrylate group as the functional moiety, that enables high-selectivity and high-sensitivity for detecting Cys in both solution and biological system. After specifically reacted with Cys, the probe undergoes a seven-membered intramolecular cyclization and released the fluorophore CHCQ with excited-state intramolecular photon transfer effect. A highly fluorescent, insoluble aggregate was then formed to facilitate high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging. The results showed that probe CHCQ-Ac affords a remarkably large Stokes shift and can detect Cys under physiological pH condition with no interference from other analytes. Moreover, this probe was proved to have excellent chemical stability, low cytotoxicity and good cell permeability. Our design of this probe provides a novel potential tool to visualize and localize cysteine in bioimaging of live cells that would greatly help to explore various Cys-related physiological and pathological cellular processes in cell biology and diagnostics.

  19. [Intensity loss of two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy images of mouse oocyte chromosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng-Ying; Wu, Hong-Xin; Chen, Die-Yan; Ma, Wan-Yun

    2014-07-01

    As an optical microscope with high resolution, two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscope is widely used in noninvasive 3D optical imaging of biological samples. Compared with confocal laser scanning microscope, TPE fluorescence microscope provides a deeper detecting depth. In spite of that, the image quality of sample always declines as the detecting depth increases when a noninvasive 3D optical imaging of thicker samples is performed. Mouse oocytes with a large diameter, which play an important role in clinical and biological fields, have obvious absorption and scattering effects. In the present paper, we performed compensation for two-photon fluorescence images of mouse oocyte chromosomes. Using volume as a parameter, the attenuation degree of these chromosomes was also studied. The result of our data suggested that there exists a severe axial intensity loss in two-photon microscopic images of mouse oocytes due to the absorption and scattering effects. It is necessary to make compensation for these images of mouse oocyte chromosomes obtained from two-photon microscopic system. It will be specially needed in studying the quantitative three-dimensional information of mouse oocytes.

  20. Compact 3D printed module for fluorescence and label-free imaging using evanescent excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vikas; Gupta, Shalini; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is widely used for selective excitation and high-resolution imaging of fluorophores, and more recently label-free nanosized objects, with high vertical confinement near a liquid–solid interface. Traditionally, high numerical aperture objectives (>1.4) are used to simultaneously generate evanescent waves and collect fluorescence emission signals which limits their use to small area imaging (3D module called cTIRF that can generate evanescent waves in microscope glass slides via a planar waveguide illumination. The module can be attached as a fixture to any existing optical microscope, converting it into a TIRF and enabling high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) fluorescence imaging using any magnification objective. As the incidence optics is perpendicular to the detector, label-free evanescent scattering-based imaging of submicron objects can also be performed without using emission filters. SNR is significantly enhanced in this case as compared to cTIRF alone, as seen through our model experiments performed on latex beads and mammalian cells. Extreme flexibility and the low cost of our approach makes it scalable for limited resource settings.

  1. Simultaneous, label-free, multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical coherence tomography using a double-clad fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, Benjamin E; Phipps, Jennifer E; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel fiber-based imaging platform that allows simultaneous fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) using a double-clad fiber. This platform acquires co-registered images showing structural and compositional contrast in unlabeled biological samples by scanning the fiber tip across the sample surface. In this Letter, we report a characterization of each modality and show examples of co-registered FLIm and OCT images acquired from a lemon segment and a section of human coronary artery. The close comparison between the combined FLIm and OCT images and a co-registered histology section provides a qualitative validation of the technique and highlights its potential for minimally invasive, multimodal imaging of tissue structure and composition.

  2. Robust Bayesian Fluorescence Lifetime Estimation, Decay Model Selection and Instrument Response Determination for Low-Intensity FLIM Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I Rowley

    Full Text Available We present novel Bayesian methods for the analysis of exponential decay data that exploit the evidence carried by every detected decay event and enables robust extension to advanced processing. Our algorithms are presented in the context of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM and particular attention has been paid to model the time-domain system (based on time-correlated single photon counting with unprecedented accuracy. We present estimates of decay parameters for mono- and bi-exponential systems, offering up to a factor of two improvement in accuracy compared to previous popular techniques. Results of the analysis of synthetic and experimental data are presented, and areas where the superior precision of our techniques can be exploited in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET experiments are described. Furthermore, we demonstrate two advanced processing methods: decay model selection to choose between differing models such as mono- and bi-exponential, and the simultaneous estimation of instrument and decay parameters.

  3. Robust Bayesian Fluorescence Lifetime Estimation, Decay Model Selection and Instrument Response Determination for Low-Intensity FLIM Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Mark I; Coolen, Anthonius C C; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Barber, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    We present novel Bayesian methods for the analysis of exponential decay data that exploit the evidence carried by every detected decay event and enables robust extension to advanced processing. Our algorithms are presented in the context of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and particular attention has been paid to model the time-domain system (based on time-correlated single photon counting) with unprecedented accuracy. We present estimates of decay parameters for mono- and bi-exponential systems, offering up to a factor of two improvement in accuracy compared to previous popular techniques. Results of the analysis of synthetic and experimental data are presented, and areas where the superior precision of our techniques can be exploited in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) experiments are described. Furthermore, we demonstrate two advanced processing methods: decay model selection to choose between differing models such as mono- and bi-exponential, and the simultaneous estimation of instrument and decay parameters.

  4. Label-free separation of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiating progenies by phasor fluorescence lifetime microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringari, Chiara; Sierra, Robert; Donovan, Peter J.; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-04-01

    We develop a label-free optical technique to image and discriminate undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) from their differentiating progenies in vitro. Using intrinsic cellular fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) and phasor analysis to obtain hESC metabolic signatures. We identify two optical biomarkers to define the differentiation status of hESCs: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and lipid droplet-associated granules (LDAGs). These granules have a unique lifetime signature and could be formed by the interaction of reactive oxygen species and unsaturated metabolic precursor that are known to be abundant in hESC. Changes in the relative concentrations of these two intrinsic biomarkers allow for the discrimination of undifferentiated hESCs from differentiating hESCs. During early hESC differentiation we show that NADH concentrations increase, while the concentration of LDAGs decrease. These results are in agreement with a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation rate. Single-cell phasor FLIM signatures reveal an increased heterogeneity in the metabolic states of differentiating H9 and H1 hESC colonies. This technique is a promising noninvasive tool to monitor hESC metabolism during differentiation, which can have applications in high throughput analysis, drug screening, functional metabolomics and induced pluripotent stem cell generation.

  5. Label-free separation of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiating progenies by phasor fluorescence lifetime microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringari, Chiara; Sierra, Robert; Donovan, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We develop a label-free optical technique to image and discriminate undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) from their differentiating progenies in vitro. Using intrinsic cellular fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) and phasor analysis to obtain hESC metabolic signatures. We identify two optical biomarkers to define the differentiation status of hESCs: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and lipid droplet-associated granules (LDAGs). These granules have a unique lifetime signature and could be formed by the interaction of reactive oxygen species and unsaturated metabolic precursor that are known to be abundant in hESC. Changes in the relative concentrations of these two intrinsic biomarkers allow for the discrimination of undifferentiated hESCs from differentiating hESCs. During early hESC differentiation we show that NADH concentrations increase, while the concentration of LDAGs decrease. These results are in agreement with a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation rate. Single-cell phasor FLIM signatures reveal an increased heterogeneity in the metabolic states of differentiating H9 and H1 hESC colonies. This technique is a promising noninvasive tool to monitor hESC metabolism during differentiation, which can have applications in high throughput analysis, drug screening, functional metabolomics and induced pluripotent stem cell generation. PMID:22559690

  6. Study on discrimination of oral cancer from normal using blood plasma based on fluorescence steady and excited state at excitation wavelength 280 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, Pachaiappan; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Many research works based on fluorescence spectroscopy have proven its potential in the diagnosis of various diseases using the spectral signatures of the native key fluorophores such as tryptophan, tyrosine, collagen, NADH, FAD and porphyrin. These fluorophores distribution, concentration and their conformation may be changed depending upon the pathological and metabolic conditions of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt to characterize the blood plasma of normal subject and oral cancer patients by native fluorescence spectroscopy at 280 nm excitation. Further, the fluorescence data were analyzed by employing the multivariate statistical method - linear discriminant analyses (LDA) using leaves one out cross validation method. The results illustrate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy technique in the diagnosis of oral cancer using blood plasma.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy in type 2 diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Deutsch, Lydia; Klemm, Matthias; Jentsch, Susanne; Hammer, Martin; Peters, Sven; Haueisen, Jens; Müller, Ulrich A.; Dawczynski, Jens

    2015-06-01

    The time-resolved autofluorescence of the eye is used for the detection of metabolic alteration in diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy. One eye from 37 phakic and 11 pseudophakic patients with type 2 diabetes, and one eye from 25 phakic and 23 pseudophakic healthy subjects were included in the study. After a three-exponential fit of the decay of autofluorescence, histograms of lifetimes τi, amplitudes αi, and relative contributions Qi were statistically compared between corresponding groups in two spectral channels (490diabetic patients and age-matched controls (p450 ps, and the shift of τ3 from ˜3000 to 3700 ps in ch1 of diabetic patients when compared with healthy subjects indicate an increased production of free flavin adenine dinucleotide, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), and, probably, a change from free to protein-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide at the fundus. AGE also accumulated in the crystalline lens.

  8. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    CERN Document Server

    Amor, Rumelo; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report that the relative intensities in each plane of excitation depend on the Stokes shift of the fluorochrome. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  9. Imaging of surgical margin in pancreatic metastasis using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Hong; Chen, Youting; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy, has become a powerful tool for imaging unstained tissue samples at subcellular level in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without H-E staining can be used to identify the boundary between normal pancreas and pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The typical features such as the significant increase of cancerous nests, the absence of pancreatic ductal, the appearance of cancer cells were observed to present the boundary between normal pancreas and pancreatic metastasis from RCC. These results correlated well with the corresponding histological outcomes. With the advent of clinically miniaturized TPEF microscopy and integrative endoscopy, TPEF microscopy has the potential application on surgical location of pancreatic metastasis from RCC in the near future.

  10. Quantitative optical biomarkers of lung cancer based intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwen; Zhan, Zhenlin; Lin, Hongxin; Zuo, Ning; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xie, Shusen; Chen, Jianxin; Zhuo, Shuangmu

    2016-10-01

    Alterations in the elastic fibers have been implicated in lung cancer. However, the label-free, microscopic imaging of elastic fibers in situ remains a major challenge. Here, we present the use of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal as a novel means for quantification of the elastic fibers in intact fresh human lung tissues. We obtained the TPEF images of elastic fibers from ex vivo the human lung tissues. We found that three features, including the elastic fibers area, the elastic fibers orientation, the elastic fibers structure, provide the quantitative identification of lung cancer and the direct visual cues for cancer versus non-cancer areas. These results suggest that the TPEF signal can be used as the label-free optical biomarkers for rapid clinical lung diagnosis and instant image-guided surgery.

  11. Determination of rare-earth elements in rocks by isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated......-ray spectrometric scan of a longitudinally sliced drill core showed a close correlation between rare-earth abundances and appropriate minerals....

  12. Noninvasive fluorescence excitation spectroscopy for the diagnosis of oral neoplasia in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezar, Jeyasingh; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Aruna, Prakasarao; Muralinaidu, Radhakrishnan; Renganathan, Kannan; Saraswathy, Thillai Rajasekaran

    2012-09-01

    Fluorescence excitation spectroscopy (FES) is an emerging approach to cancer detection. The goal of this pilot study is to evaluate the diagnostic potential of FES technique for the detection and characterization of normal and cancerous oral lesions in vivo. Fluorescence excitation (FE) spectra from oral mucosa were recorded in the spectral range of 340 to 600 nm at 635 nm emission using a fiberoptic probe spectrofluorometer to obtain spectra from the buccal mucosa of 30 sites of 15 healthy volunteers and 15 sites of 10 cancerous patients. Significant FE spectral differences were observed between normal and well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (WDSCC) oral lesions. The FE spectra of healthy volunteers consists of a broad emission band around 440 to 470 nm, whereas in WDSCC lesions, a new primary peak was seen at 410 nm with secondary peaks observed at 505, 540, and 580 nm due to the accumulation of porphyrins in oral lesions. The FE spectral bands of the WDSCC lesions resemble the typical absorption spectra of a porphyrin. Three potential ratios (I410/I505, I410/I540, and I410/I580) were calculated from the FE spectra and used as input variables for a stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA) for normal and WDSCC groups. Leave-one-out (LOO) method of cross-validation was performed to check the reliability on spectral data for tissue characterization. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were determined for normal and WDSCC lesions from the scatter plot of the discriminant function scores. It was observed that diagnostic algorithm based on discriminant function scores obtained by SLDA-LOO method was able to distinguish WDSCC from normal lesions with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100%. Results of the pilot study demonstrate that the FE spectral changes due to porphyrin have a good diagnostic potential; therefore, porphyrin can be used as a native tumor marker.

  13. Excitation-Dependent Carrier lifetime and Diffusion Length in Bulk CdTe Determined by Time-Resolved Optical Pump-Probe Techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuciauskas, Darius [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Scajev, Patrik [Vilnius University; Miasojedovas, Saulius [Vilnius University; Mekys, Algirdas [Vilnius University; Lynn, Kelvin G. [Washington State University; Swain, Santosh K. [Washington State University; Jarasiunas, Kestutis [Vilnius University

    2018-01-11

    We applied time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy based on free carrier absorption and light diffraction on a transient grating for direct measurements of the carrier lifetime and diffusion coefficient D in high-resistivity single crystal CdTe (codoped with In and Er). The bulk carrier lifetime t decreased from 670 +/-50 ns to 60 +/- 10 ns with increase of excess carrier density N from 10^16 to 5 x 10^18 cm-3 due to the excitation-dependent radiative recombination rate. In this N range, the carrier diffusion length dropped from 14 um to 6 um due to lifetime decrease. Modeling of in-depth (axial) and in-plane (lateral) carrier diffusion provided the value of surface recombination velocity S = 6 x 10^5 cm/s for the untreated surface. At even higher excitations, in the 10^19-3 x 10^20 cm-3 density range, D increase from 5 to 20 cm^2/s due to carrier degeneracy was observed.

  14. Mapping of hemoglobin in erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukara, Katarina; Jovanić, Svetlana; Drvenica, Ivana T.; Stančić, Ana; Ilić, Vesna; Rabasović, Mihailo D.; Pantelić, Dejan; Jelenković, Branislav; Bugarski, Branko; Krmpot, Aleksandar J.

    2017-02-01

    The present study describes utilization of two photon excitation fluorescence (2PE) microscopy for visualization of the hemoglobin in human and porcine erythrocytes and their empty membranes (i.e., ghosts). High-quality, label- and fixation-free visualization of hemoglobin was achieved at excitation wavelength 730 nm by detecting visible autofluorescence. Localization in the suspension and spatial distribution (i.e., mapping) of residual hemoglobin in erythrocyte ghosts has been resolved by 2PE. Prior to the 2PE mapping, the presence of residual hemoglobin in the bulk suspension of erythrocyte ghosts was confirmed by cyanmethemoglobin assay. 2PE analysis revealed that the distribution of hemoglobin in intact erythrocytes follows the cells' shape. Two types of erythrocytes, human and porcine, characterized with discocyte and echinocyte morphology, respectively, showed significant differences in hemoglobin distribution. The 2PE images have revealed that despite an extensive washing out procedure after gradual hypotonic hemolysis, a certain amount of hemoglobin localized on the intracellular side always remains bound to the membrane and cannot be eliminated. The obtained results open the possibility to use 2PE microscopy to examine hemoglobin distribution in erythrocytes and estimate the purity level of erythrocyte ghosts in biotechnological processes.

  15. Nanosecond two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging with a multi color fiber MOPA laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpf, Sebastian; Eibl, Matthias; Huber, Robert

    2015-07-01

    A system is presented that uses a fiber based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with nanosecond-range pulses for two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging. The robust laser in the extended near infrared is based on an actively modulated electro-optical modulator (EOM), enabling free synchronization of the pulses to any other light source or detection unit. Pulses with a freely programmable duration between 0.4 and 10 ns are generated and then amplified to up to kilowatts of peak power with ytterbium doped fiber amplifiers (YDFA). Since we achieve peak power and duty cycles comparable to standard femto- and picosecond setups, the TPEF signal levels are similar, but realized with a robust and inexpensive fiber-based setup. The delivery fiber is further used as an optional, electronically controllable Raman shifter to effectively shift the 1064 nm light to 1122 nm and to 1186 nm. This allows imaging of a manifold of fluorophores, like e.g. TexasRed, mCherry, mRaspberry and many more. We show TPEF imaging of the autofluorescence of plant leaves of moss and algae, acquired in epi-direction. This modular laser unit can be integrated into existing systems as either a fiber-based, alignment free excitation laser or an extension for multi-modal imaging.

  16. Performance of fluorescence spectroscopy for beef meat authentication: Effect of excitation mode and discriminant algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aït-Kaddour, A; Loudiyi, M; Ferlay, A; Gruffat, D

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluated the performance of classical front face (FFFS) and synchronous (SFS) fluorescence spectroscopy combined with Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLSDA), Support Vector Machine associated with PLS (PLS-SVM) and Principal Components Analysis (PCA-SVM) to discriminate three beef muscles (Longissimus thoracis, Rectus abdominis and Semitendinosus). For the FFFS, 5 excitation wavelengths were investigated, while 6 offsets were studied for SFS. Globally, the results showed a good discrimination between muscles with Recall and Precision between 47.82 and 94.34% and Error ranging from 6.03 to 32.39%. For the FFFS, the PLS-SVM with the 382nm excitation wavelength gave the best discrimination results (Recall, Precision and Error of 94.34%, 89.53% and 6.03% respectively). For SFS, when performing discrimination of the three muscles, the 120nm offset gave the highest Recall and Precision (from 57.66% to 94.99%) and the lowest Error values (from 6.78 to 8.66%) whatever the algorithm (PLSDA, PLS-SVM and PCA-SVM). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluorescence excitation and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations for benzocyclobutane: vibrations and structure of its excited S(1)(π,π(*)) electronic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Won; Ocola, Esther J; Kim, Sunghwan; Laane, Jaan

    2014-01-21

    The fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzocyclobutane have been recorded and together with its ultraviolet absorption spectra have been used to assign the vibrational frequencies for this molecule in its S1(π,π(*)) electronic excited state. Theoretical calculations at the CASSCF(6,6)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory were carried out to compute the structure of the molecule in its excited state. The calculated structure was compared to that of the molecule in its electronic ground state as well as to the structures of related molecules in their S0 and S1(π,π(*)) electronic states. In each case the decreased π bonding in the electronic excited states results in longer carbon-carbon bonds in the benzene ring. The skeletal vibrational frequencies in the electronic excited state were readily assigned and these were compared to the ground state and to the frequencies of five similar molecules. The vibrational levels in both S0 and S1(π,π(*)) states were remarkably harmonic in contrast to the other bicyclic molecules. The decreases in the frequencies of the out-of-plane skeletal modes reflect the increased floppiness of these bicyclic molecules in their S1(π,π(*)) excited state.

  18. Fluorescence excitation and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations for benzocyclobutane: Vibrations and structure of its excited S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) electronic state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Won; Ocola, Esther J.; Laane, Jaan, E-mail: laane@mail.chem.tamu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States); Kim, Sunghwan [National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20894 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    The fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzocyclobutane have been recorded and together with its ultraviolet absorption spectra have been used to assign the vibrational frequencies for this molecule in its S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) electronic excited state. Theoretical calculations at the CASSCF(6,6)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory were carried out to compute the structure of the molecule in its excited state. The calculated structure was compared to that of the molecule in its electronic ground state as well as to the structures of related molecules in their S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) electronic states. In each case the decreased π bonding in the electronic excited states results in longer carbon-carbon bonds in the benzene ring. The skeletal vibrational frequencies in the electronic excited state were readily assigned and these were compared to the ground state and to the frequencies of five similar molecules. The vibrational levels in both S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) states were remarkably harmonic in contrast to the other bicyclic molecules. The decreases in the frequencies of the out-of-plane skeletal modes reflect the increased floppiness of these bicyclic molecules in their S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) excited state.

  19. Fluorescence excitation and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations for benzocyclobutane: Vibrations and structure of its excited S1(π,π*) electronic state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Won; Ocola, Esther J.; Kim, Sunghwan; Laane, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzocyclobutane have been recorded and together with its ultraviolet absorption spectra have been used to assign the vibrational frequencies for this molecule in its S1(π,π*) electronic excited state. Theoretical calculations at the CASSCF(6,6)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory were carried out to compute the structure of the molecule in its excited state. The calculated structure was compared to that of the molecule in its electronic ground state as well as to the structures of related molecules in their S0 and S1(π,π*) electronic states. In each case the decreased π bonding in the electronic excited states results in longer carbon-carbon bonds in the benzene ring. The skeletal vibrational frequencies in the electronic excited state were readily assigned and these were compared to the ground state and to the frequencies of five similar molecules. The vibrational levels in both S0 and S1(π,π*) states were remarkably harmonic in contrast to the other bicyclic molecules. The decreases in the frequencies of the out-of-plane skeletal modes reflect the increased floppiness of these bicyclic molecules in their S1(π,π*) excited state. PMID:25669377

  20. Fluorescence excitation and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations for benzocyclobutane: Vibrations and structure of its excited S1(π,π*) electronic state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Won; Ocola, Esther J.; Kim, Sunghwan; Laane, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzocyclobutane have been recorded and together with its ultraviolet absorption spectra have been used to assign the vibrational frequencies for this molecule in its S1(π,π*) electronic excited state. Theoretical calculations at the CASSCF(6,6)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory were carried out to compute the structure of the molecule in its excited state. The calculated structure was compared to that of the molecule in its electronic ground state as well as to the structures of related molecules in their S0 and S1(π,π*) electronic states. In each case the decreased π bonding in the electronic excited states results in longer carbon-carbon bonds in the benzene ring. The skeletal vibrational frequencies in the electronic excited state were readily assigned and these were compared to the ground state and to the frequencies of five similar molecules. The vibrational levels in both S0 and S1(π,π*) states were remarkably harmonic in contrast to the other bicyclic molecules. The decreases in the frequencies of the out-of-plane skeletal modes reflect the increased floppiness of these bicyclic molecules in their S1(π,π*) excited state.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime readouts of Troponin-C-based calcium FRET sensors: a quantitative comparison of CFP and mTFP1 as donor fluorophores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Laine

    Full Text Available We have compared the performance of two Troponin-C-based calcium FRET sensors using fluorescence lifetime read-outs. The first sensor, TN-L15, consists of a Troponin-C fragment inserted between CFP and Citrine while the second sensor, called mTFP-TnC-Cit, was realized by replacing CFP in TN-L15 with monomeric Teal Fluorescent Protein (mTFP1. Using cytosol preparations of transiently transfected mammalian cells, we have measured the fluorescence decay profiles of these sensors at controlled concentrations of calcium using time-correlated single photon counting. These data were fitted to discrete exponential decay models using global analysis to determine the FRET efficiency, fraction of donor molecules undergoing FRET and calcium affinity of these sensors. We have also studied the decay profiles of the donor fluorescent proteins alone and determined the sensitivity of the donor lifetime to temperature and emission wavelength. Live-cell fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM of HEK293T cells expressing each of these sensors was also undertaken. We confirmed that donor fluorescence of mTFP-TnC-Cit fits well to a two-component decay model, while the TN-L15 lifetime data was best fitted to a constrained four-component model, which was supported by phasor analysis of the measured lifetime data. If the constrained global fitting is employed, the TN-L15 sensor can provide a larger dynamic range of lifetime readout than the mTFP-TnC-Cit sensor but the CFP donor is significantly more sensitive to changes in temperature and emission wavelength compared to mTFP and, while the mTFP-TnC-Cit solution phase data broadly agreed with measurements in live cells, this was not the case for the TN-L15 sensor. Our titration experiment also indicates that a similar precision in determination of calcium concentration can be achieved with both FRET biosensors when fitting a single exponential donor fluorescence decay model to the fluorescence decay profiles. We therefore

  2. Fluorescence lifetime readouts of Troponin-C-based calcium FRET sensors: a quantitative comparison of CFP and mTFP1 as donor fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Romain; Stuckey, Daniel W; Manning, Hugh; Warren, Sean C; Kennedy, Gordon; Carling, David; Dunsby, Chris; Sardini, Alessandro; French, Paul M W

    2012-01-01

    We have compared the performance of two Troponin-C-based calcium FRET sensors using fluorescence lifetime read-outs. The first sensor, TN-L15, consists of a Troponin-C fragment inserted between CFP and Citrine while the second sensor, called mTFP-TnC-Cit, was realized by replacing CFP in TN-L15 with monomeric Teal Fluorescent Protein (mTFP1). Using cytosol preparations of transiently transfected mammalian cells, we have measured the fluorescence decay profiles of these sensors at controlled concentrations of calcium using time-correlated single photon counting. These data were fitted to discrete exponential decay models using global analysis to determine the FRET efficiency, fraction of donor molecules undergoing FRET and calcium affinity of these sensors. We have also studied the decay profiles of the donor fluorescent proteins alone and determined the sensitivity of the donor lifetime to temperature and emission wavelength. Live-cell fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of HEK293T cells expressing each of these sensors was also undertaken. We confirmed that donor fluorescence of mTFP-TnC-Cit fits well to a two-component decay model, while the TN-L15 lifetime data was best fitted to a constrained four-component model, which was supported by phasor analysis of the measured lifetime data. If the constrained global fitting is employed, the TN-L15 sensor can provide a larger dynamic range of lifetime readout than the mTFP-TnC-Cit sensor but the CFP donor is significantly more sensitive to changes in temperature and emission wavelength compared to mTFP and, while the mTFP-TnC-Cit solution phase data broadly agreed with measurements in live cells, this was not the case for the TN-L15 sensor. Our titration experiment also indicates that a similar precision in determination of calcium concentration can be achieved with both FRET biosensors when fitting a single exponential donor fluorescence decay model to the fluorescence decay profiles. We therefore suggest that m

  3. A Rotational BODIPY Nucleotide: An Environment-Sensitive Fluorescence-Lifetime Probe for DNA Interactions and Applications in Live-Cell Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Dmytro; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Cebecauer, Marek; Hof, Martin; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-04

    Fluorescent probes for detecting the physical properties of cellular structures have become valuable tools in life sciences. The fluorescence lifetime of molecular rotors can be used to report on variations in local molecular packing or viscosity. We used a nucleoside linked to a meso-substituted BODIPY fluorescent molecular rotor (dC(bdp)) to sense changes in DNA microenvironment both in vitro and in living cells. DNA incorporating dC(bdp) can respond to interactions with DNA-binding proteins and lipids by changes in the fluorescence lifetimes in the range 0.5-2.2 ns. We can directly visualize changes in the local environment of exogenous DNA during transfection of living cells. Relatively long fluorescence lifetimes and extensive contrast for detecting changes in the microenvironment together with good photostability and versatility for DNA synthesis make this probe suitable for analysis of DNA-associated processes, cellular structures, and also DNA-based nanomaterials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Short-wavelength two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy of tryptophan with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Palero (Jonathan); V.O. Boer (Vincent); J.C. Vijverberg (Jacob); H.C. Gerritsen (Hans); H.J.C.M. Sterenborg (Dick)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe report on a novel and simple light source for short-wavelength two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy based on the visible nonsolitonic radiation from a photonic crystal fiber. We demonstrate tunability of the light source by varying the wavelength and intensity of the

  5. Low-frequency wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging using a high-power near-infrared light-emitting diode light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Lomnes, Stephen J; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLi) could potentially improve exogenous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging, because it offers the capability of discriminating a signal of interest from background, provides real-time monitoring of a chemical environment, and permits the use of several different fluorescent dyes having the same emission wavelength. We present a high-power, LED-based, NIR light source for the clinical translation of wide-field (larger than 5 cm in diameter) FLi at frequencies up to 35 MHz. Lifetime imaging of indocyanine green (ICG), IRDye 800-CW, and 3,3(')-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) was performed over a large field of view (10 cm by 7.5 cm) using the LED light source. For comparison, a laser diode light source was employed as a gold standard. Experiments were performed both on the bench by diluting the fluorescent dyes in various chemical environments in Eppendorf tubes, and in vivo by injecting the fluorescent dyes mixed in Matrigel subcutaneously into CD-1 mice. Last, measured fluorescence lifetimes obtained using the LED and the laser diode sources were compared with those obtained using a state-of-the-art time-domain imaging system and with those previously described in the literature. On average, lifetime values obtained using the LED and the laser diode light sources were consistent, exhibiting a mean difference of 3% from the expected values and a coefficient of variation of 12%. Taken together, our study offers an alternative to laser diodes for clinical translation of FLi and explores the use of relatively low frequency modulation for in vivo imaging.

  6. Twisting in the excited state of an N-methylpyridinium fluorescent dye modulated by nano-heterogeneous micellar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, A; Carlotti, B; Gentili, P L; Germani, R; Spalletti, A; Elisei, F

    2016-04-01

    A push-pull N-methylpyridinium fluorescent dye with a pyrenyl group as the electron-donor portion was investigated within the nano-heterogeneous media provided by some micellar systems. The molecule was studied by stationary and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques in spherical micellar solutions and viscoelastic hydrogels, in order to throw light on the role played by twisting in its excited state deactivation. As proven by femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion and transient absorption experiments, the excited state dynamics of the molecule is ruled by charge transfer and twisting processes, which, from the locally excited (LE) state initially populated upon excitation, progressively lead to twisted (TICT) and planar (PICT) intramolecular charge transfer states. The inclusion within micellar aggregates was found to slow down and/or limit the rotation of the molecule with respect to what had previously been observed in water, while its confinement within the hydrophobic domains of the gel matrixes prevents any molecular torsion. The increasing viscosity of the medium, when passing from water to micellar systems, implies that the detected steady-state fluorescence comes from an excited state which is not fully relaxed, as is the case with the TICT state in micelles or the LE state in hydrogels, where the detected emission changes its usual orange colour to yellow.

  7. Excited-state structural dynamics of a dual-emission calmodulin-green fluorescent protein sensor for calcium ion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, Breland G; Liu, Weimin; Zhao, Yongxin; Tang, Longteng; Wang, Yanli; Campbell, Robert E; Fang, Chong

    2014-07-15

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have played a pivotal role in bioimaging and advancing biomedicine. The versatile fluorescence from engineered, genetically encodable FP variants greatly enhances cellular imaging capabilities, which are dictated by excited-state structural dynamics of the embedded chromophore inside the protein pocket. Visualization of the molecular choreography of the photoexcited chromophore requires a spectroscopic technique capable of resolving atomic motions on the intrinsic timescale of femtosecond to picosecond. We use femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy to study the excited-state conformational dynamics of a recently developed FP-calmodulin biosensor, GEM-GECO1, for calcium ion (Ca(2+)) sensing. This study reveals that, in the absence of Ca(2+), the dominant skeletal motion is a ∼ 170 cm(-1) phenol-ring in-plane rocking that facilitates excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) with a time constant of ∼ 30 ps (6 times slower than wild-type GFP) to reach the green fluorescent state. The functional relevance of the motion is corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. Upon Ca(2+) binding, this in-plane rocking motion diminishes, and blue emission from a trapped photoexcited neutral chromophore dominates because ESPT is inhibited. Fluorescence properties of site-specific protein mutants lend further support to functional roles of key residues including proline 377 in modulating the H-bonding network and fluorescence outcome. These crucial structural dynamics insights will aid rational design in bioengineering to generate versatile, robust, and more sensitive optical sensors to detect Ca(2+) in physiologically relevant environments.

  8. The origin of radiationless conversion of the excited state in the kindling fluorescent protein (KFP): femtosecond studies and quantum modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelaev, I.; Mironov, V.; Rusanov, A.; Gostev, F.; Bochenkova, A.; Sarkisov, O.; Nemukhin, A.; Savitsky, A.

    2011-06-01

    The Ala143Gly variant of the chromoprotein asCP from the sea anemony Anemonia sulcata, called the kindling fluorescent protein (KFP), is a promising candidate for the development of novel subdiffraction method of fluorescent microscopy. The pump-probe method with the delay times between the pump and probe pulses up to 5 ps was applied to study dynamics of the primary processes upon excitation of KFP. The differential absorption spectra at 80 fs delay showed the absorption peak in the range 450-510 nm with the maximum wavelength at 490 nm, which diminished almost twice by intensity by 400 fs and practically disappeared by 1.5 ps. The quantum calculations showed that upon photo-excitation of KFP to the first excited state S1, the fast radiationless relaxation occurred to the ground state S0 due to rotation of the phenolic fragment of the chromophore.

  9. Separation and determination of amino acids by micellar electrokinetic chromatography coupling with novel multiphoton excited fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Xu, Youzhi; Xu, Fei; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Luo, Qingming; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2007-08-31

    In this article, it was demonstrated that separation and determination of 20 amino acids were accomplished by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) coupling with novel multiphoton excited fluorescence (MPEF) detection method. Different from MPEF achieved by expensive fs laser, continuous wave (CW) diode laser of ultra-low cost was uniquely employed in our MPEF system. Amino acids were fluorescently labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-based MEKC separation and CW-based MPEF detection. The result was compared with that by single photon excited fluorescence (SPEF), which indicated that MPEF had the advantages of better mass detectability and higher separation selectivity over SPEF. Quantitative analysis was performed and revealed linear dynamic range of over 2 orders of magnitude, with mass detection limit down to ymole level. To evaluate the reliability, this method was successfully applied for analyzing a commercial nutrition supplement liquid.

  10. Phasor fluorescence lifetime microscopy of free and protein-bound NADH reveals neural stem cell differentiation potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Stringari

    Full Text Available In the stem cell field there is a lack of non invasive and fast methods to identify stem cell's metabolic state, differentiation state and cell-lineage commitment. Here we describe a label-free method that uses NADH as an intrinsic biomarker and the Phasor approach to Fluorescence Lifetime microscopy to measure the metabolic fingerprint of cells. We show that different metabolic states are related to different cell differentiation stages and to stem cell bias to neuronal and glial fate, prior the expression of lineage markers. Our data demonstrate that the NADH FLIM signature distinguishes non-invasively neurons from undifferentiated neural progenitor and stem cells (NPSCs at two different developmental stages (E12 and E16. NPSCs follow a metabolic trajectory from a glycolytic phenotype to an oxidative phosphorylation phenotype through different stages of differentiation. NSPCs are characterized by high free/bound NADH ratio, while differentiated neurons are characterized by low free/bound NADH ratio. We demonstrate that the metabolic signature of NPSCs correlates with their differentiation potential, showing that neuronal progenitors and glial progenitors have a different free/bound NADH ratio. Reducing conditions in NPSCs correlates with their neurogenic potential, while oxidative conditions correlate with glial potential. For the first time we show that FLIM NADH metabolic fingerprint provides a novel, and quantitative measure of stem cell potential and a label-free and non-invasive means to identify neuron- or glial- biased progenitors.

  11. In vivo detection of oral epithelial cancer using endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging: a pilot human study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Javier A.; Hwang, Dae Yon; Palma, Jorge; Cheng, Shuna; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Malik, Bilal; Jabbour, Joey; Cheng, Lisa; Wright, John; Maitland, Kristen

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) provides direct access to the concomitant functional and biochemical changes accompanying tissue transition from benign to precancerous and cancerous. Since FLIM can noninvasively measure different and complementary biomarkers of precancer and cancer, we hypothesize that it will aid in clinically detecting early oral epithelial cancer. Our group has recently demonstrated the detection of benign from premalignant and malignant lesions based on endogenous multispectral FLIM in the hamster cheek-pouch model. Encouraged by these positive preliminary results, we have developed a handheld endoscope capable of acquiring multispectral FLIM images in real time from the oral mucosa. This novel FLIM endoscope is being used for imaging clinically suspicious pre-malignant and malignant lesions from patients before undergoing tissue biopsy for histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial cancer. Our preliminary results thus far are already suggesting the potential of endogenous FLIM for distinguishing a variety of benign lesions from advanced dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To the best of out knowledge, this is the first in vivo human study aiming to demonstrate the ability to predict the true malignancy of clinically suspicious lesions using endogenous FLIM. If successful, the resulting clinical tool will allow noninvasive real-time detection of epithelial precancerous and cancerous lesions in the oral mucosa and could potentially be used to assist at every step involved on the clinical management of oral cancer patients, from early screening and diagnosis, to treatment and monitoring of recurrence.

  12. Optimal Spectral Regions For Laser Excited Fluorescence Diagnostics For Point Of Care Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gėgžna, V.; Varanius, D.; Vaitkus, J.

    2011-09-01

    The tissue fluorescence gives the response of light emitting molecule signature, and characterizes the cell composition and peculiarities of metabolism. Both are useful for the biomedical diagnostics, as reported in previous our and others works. The present work demonstrates the results of application of laser excited autofluorescence for diagnostics of pathology in genital tissues, and the feasibility for the bedside at "point of care—off lab" application. A portable device using the USB spectrophotometer, micro laser (355 nm Nd:YAG, 0,5 ns pulse, repetition rate 10 kHz, output power 15 mW), three channel optical fiber and computer with diagnostic program was designed and ready for clinical trial to be used for cytology and biopsy specimen on site diagnostics, and for the endoscopy/puncture procedures. The biopsy and cytology samples, as well as intervertebral disc specimen were evaluated by pathology experts and the fluorescence spectra were investigated in the fresh and preserved specimens. The spectra were recorded in the spectral range 350-900 nm. At the initial stage the Gaussian components of spectra were found and the Mann-Whitney test was used for the groups' differentiation and the spectral regions for optimal diagnostics purpose were found. Then a formal dividing of spectra in the components or the definite width bands, where the main difference of the different group spectra was observed, was used to compare these groups. The ROC analysis based diagnostic algorithms were created for medical prognosis. The positive prognostic values and negative prediction values were determined for cervical Liquid PAP smear supernatant sediment diagnosis of being Cervicitis and Norma versus CIN2+. In a case of intervertebral disc the analysis allows to get the additional information about the disc degeneration status. All these results demonstrated an efficiency of the proposed procedure and the designed device could be tested at the point-of-care site or for

  13. Two-photon excited fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging of melanin in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to detect early melanoma non-invasively would improve clinical outcome and reduce mortality. Recent advances in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in vivo microscopy offer a powerful tool in early malignant melanoma diagnostics. The goal of this work was to develop a TPEF optical index for measuring relative concentrations of eumelanin and pheomelanin since ex vivo studies show that changes in this ratio have been associated with malignant transformation. We acquired TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000 nm) of melanin from several specimens, including human hair, malignant melanoma cell lines, and normal melanocytes and keratinocytes in different skin layers (epidermis, papillary dermis) in five healthy volunteers in vivo. We found that the pheomelanin emission peaks at around 620 nm and is blue-shifted from the eumelanin with broad maximum at 640-680nm. We defined "optical melanin index" (OMI) as a ratio of fluorescence signal intensities measured at 645 nm and 615nm. The measured OMI for a melanoma cell line MNT-1 was 1.6+/-0.2. The MNT-46 and MNT-62 lines (Mc1R gene knockdown) showed an anticipated change in melanins production ratio and had OMI of 0.55+/-0.05 and 0.17+/-0.02, respectively, which strongly correlated with HPLC data obtained for these lines. Average OMI measured for basal cells layers (melanocytes and keratinocytes) in normal human skin type I, II-III (not tanned and tanned) in vivo was 0.5, 1.05 and 1.16 respectively. We could not dependably detect the presence of pheomelanin in highly pigmented skin type V-VI. These data suggest that a non-invasive TPEF index could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo, including pigmented lesions.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence with an OPO system. Part II: direct determination of lead content in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, A; Lijour, Y; Giamarchi, P; Burel-Deschamps, L; Stephan, L

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence was induced by coupling a laser with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to develop an analytical method for the direct determination of lead content, at ultra-trace level, in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF). The optimization of atomization conditions, laser pulse energy, and mainly temporal parameters allowed us to reach a 3 fg detection limit (0.3 ng L(-1)) despite the low repetition rate of the device. The expected error on predicted concentrations of lead, at trace levels, in seawater was below 15%.

  15. Dual excitation multi-fluorescence flow cytometry for detailed analyses of viability and apoptotic cell transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mazzini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The discrimination of live/dead cells as well as the detection of apoptosis is a frequent need in many areas of experimental biology. Cell proliferation is linked to apoptosis and controlled by several genes. During the cell life, specific events can stimulate proliferation while others may trigger the apoptotic pathway. Very few methods (i.e. TUNEL are now available for studies aimed at correlation between apoptosis and proliferation. Therefore, there is interest in developing new methodological approaches that are able to correlate apoptosis to the cell cycle phases. Recently new approaches have been proposed to detect and enumerate apoptotic cells by flow cytometry. Among these, the most established and applied are those based on the cell membrane modifications induced in the early phases of the apoptotic process. The dye pair Hoechst 33342 (HO and Propidium Iodide (PI, thanks to their peculiar characteristics to be respectively permeable and impermeable to the intact cell membrane, seems to be very useful. Unfortunately the spectral interaction of these dyes generates a consistent “energy transfer” from HO to PI. The co-presence of the dyes in a nucleus results in a modification in the intensity of both the emitted fluorescences. In order to designate the damaged cells (red fluorescence to the specific cell cycle phases (blue fluorescence, we have tested different staining protocols aimed to minimize the interference of these dyes as much as possible. In cell culture models, we are able to detect serum-starved apoptotic cells as well as to designate their exact location in the cell cycle phases using a very low PI concentration. Using a Partec PAS flow cytometer equipped with HBO lamp and argon ion laser, a double UV/blue excitation has been performed. This analytical approach is able to discriminate live blue cells from the damaged (blue-red ones even at 0.05 ?g/mL PI. The same instrumental setting allows performing other multi

  16. Toward intravascular morphological and biochemical imaging of atherosclerosis with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Kim, Wihan; Serafino, Michael; Walton, Brian; Jo, Javier A.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2017-02-01

    We have shown in an ex vivo human coronary artery study that the biochemical information derived from FLIM interpreted in the context of the morphological information from OCT enables a detailed classification of human coronary plaques associated with atherosclerosis. The identification of lipid-rich plaques prone to erosion or rupture and associated with sudden coronary events can impact current clinical practice as well as future development of targeted therapies for "vulnerable" plaques. In order to realize clinical translation of intravascular OCT/FLIM we have had to develop several key technologies. A multimodal catheter endoscope capable of delivering near UV excitation for FLIM and shortwave IR for OCT has been fabricated using a ball lens design with a double clad fiber. The OCT illumination and the FLIM excitation propogate down the inner core while the large outer multimode core captures the fluorescence emission. To enable intravascular pullback imaging with this endoscope we have developed an ultra-wideband fiber optic rotary joint using the same double clad fiber. The rotary joint is based on a lensless design where two cleaved fibers, one fixed and one rotating, are brought into close proximity but not touching. Using water as the lubricant enabled operation over the near UV-shortwave IR range. Transmission over this bandwidth has been measured to be near 100% at rotational frequencies up to 147 Hz. The entire system has been assembled and placed on a mobile cart suitable for cath lab based imaging. System development, performance, and early ex vivo imaging results will be discussed.

  17. Some Secrets of Fluorescent Proteins: Distinct Bleaching in Various Mounting Fluids and Photoactivation of Cyan Fluorescent Proteins at YFP-Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkani, Naila; Schmid, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of spectrally distinct variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) such as cyan or yellow mutants (CFP and YFP, respectively) is very common in all different fields of life sciences, e.g. for marking specific proteins or cells or to determine protein interactions. In the latter case, the quantum physical phenomenon of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is exploited by specific microscopy techniques to visualize proximity of proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings When we applied a commonly used FRET microscopy technique - the increase in donor (CFP)-fluorescence after bleaching of acceptor fluorophores (YFP), we obtained good signals in live cells, but very weak signals for the same samples after fixation and mounting in commercial microscopy mounting fluids. This observation could be traced back to much faster bleaching of CFP in these mounting media. Strikingly, the opposite effect of the mounting fluid was observed for YFP and also for other proteins such as Cerulean, TFP or Venus. The changes in photostability of CFP and YFP were not caused by the fixation but directly dependent on the mounting fluid. Furthermore we made the interesting observation that the CFP-fluorescence intensity increases by about 10 - 15% after illumination at the YFP-excitation wavelength – a phenomenon, which was also observed for Cerulean. This photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at the YFP-excitation can cause false-positive signals in the FRET-microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of a yellow FRET acceptor. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that photostability of fluorescent proteins differs significantly for various media and that CFP bleaches significantly faster in commercial mounting fluids, while the opposite is observed for YFP and some other proteins. Moreover, we show that the FRET microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of the YFP is prone to artifacts due to photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins

  18. Some secrets of fluorescent proteins: distinct bleaching in various mounting fluids and photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at YFP-excitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Malkani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of spectrally distinct variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP such as cyan or yellow mutants (CFP and YFP, respectively is very common in all different fields of life sciences, e.g. for marking specific proteins or cells or to determine protein interactions. In the latter case, the quantum physical phenomenon of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET is exploited by specific microscopy techniques to visualize proximity of proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: When we applied a commonly used FRET microscopy technique--the increase in donor (CFP-fluorescence after bleaching of acceptor fluorophores (YFP, we obtained good signals in live cells, but very weak signals for the same samples after fixation and mounting in commercial microscopy mounting fluids. This observation could be traced back to much faster bleaching of CFP in these mounting media. Strikingly, the opposite effect of the mounting fluid was observed for YFP and also for other proteins such as Cerulean, TFP or Venus. The changes in photostability of CFP and YFP were not caused by the fixation but directly dependent on the mounting fluid. Furthermore we made the interesting observation that the CFP-fluorescence intensity increases by about 10-15% after illumination at the YFP-excitation wavelength--a phenomenon, which was also observed for Cerulean. This photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at the YFP-excitation can cause false-positive signals in the FRET-microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of a yellow FRET acceptor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that photostability of fluorescent proteins differs significantly for various media and that CFP bleaches significantly faster in commercial mounting fluids, while the opposite is observed for YFP and some other proteins. Moreover, we show that the FRET microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of the YFP is prone to artifacts due to photoactivation of cyan fluorescent

  19. Study on vinasse dynamics in soil using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence with radioisotopic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simabuco, S.M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia; Nascimento Filho, V.F. [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz]|[Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    1994-05-01

    The distribution of S, Cl, K and Ca along the profiles of two soils of different texture (Red Yellow Podzolic and Dark Red Latosol) treated with amounts of vinasse equivalent to 4000 m{sup 3}/ha were studied using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, observing a significant increase in the contents of these elements. The same effect was observed for Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr contents in soils treated with vinasse as compared to the control. The concentrations of Al, Si, Ti, Mn, Fe and Zr could also be evaluated but no significant variation was observed due to the high soil initial concentrations of these elements as compared to the low concentrations in the vinasse. Annular radioactive sources of Fe-55 and Cd-109 were employed for the excitation of these elements in the soil samples, treated or not with vinasse. For the detection of the characteristic X-rays, a Si(Li) semiconductor detector was used, coupled to a multichannel emulation card inserted in a microcomputer. (author). 8 refs, 6 figs, 4 tabs.

  20. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and two photon excited fluorescence for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeike, Bernd F M; Meyer, Tobias; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Petersen, Iver; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    There is no established method for in vivo imaging during biopsy and surgery of the brain, which is capable to generate competitive images in terms of resolution and contrast comparable with histopathological staining. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy are non-invasive all optical imaging techniques that are capable of high resolution, label-free, real-time, nondestructive examination of living cells and tissues. They provide image contrast based on the molecular composition of the specimen which allows the study of large tissue areas of frozen tissue sections ex vivo. Here, preliminary data on 55 lesions of the central nervous system are presented. The generated images very nicely demonstrate cytological and architectural features required for pathological tumor typing and grading. Furthermore, information on the molecular content of a probe is provided. The tool will be implemented into a biopsy needle or endoscope in the near future for in vivo studies. With this promising multimodal imaging approach the neurosurgeon might directly see blood vessels to minimize the risk for biopsy associated hemorrhages. The attending neuropathologist might directly identify the tumor and guide the selection of representative specimens for further studies. Thus, collection of non-representative material could be avoided and the risk to injure eloquent brain tissue minimized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. UV fluorescence excitation spectroscopy as a non-invasive predictor of epidermal proliferation and clinical performance of cosmetic formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidhof, Robert; Liebel, Frank; Hwang, Cheng; Ruvolo, Eduardo; Lyga, John

    2017-02-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of skin and is composed of cells primarily containing keratin. It consists of about ten layers of living cells (keratinocytes) and ten layers of dead cells (corneocytes). These cells are continually shed from the outside and replaced from the inside in a process called desquamation which is controlled by two biological events - proliferation and differentiation. One method to non-invasively study biological changes in the skin is using fluorescence excitation spectroscopy. Several characteristic excitation-emission peaks occur in skin that have been related to the epidermal and dermal composition. The magnitude of the peak that occurs at 295nm excitation (F295) has been linked to changes in skin proliferation, cell turnover, epidermal thickening, and skin aging. We hypothesize that changes in this fluorescent signal could be used to assess the potential activity of cosmetic anti-aging compounds to deliver a benefit to skin. Previous work with retinol and glycolic acid, two commonly used actives that effect epidermal proliferation and exfoliation, has demonstrated an increase in F295 (attributed to tryptophan excitation fluorescence). In this study we present the results of a placebo controlled study that aims to correlate changes in F295 with biological performance (epidermal thickening and Ki67 expression).

  2. The generalized centroid difference method for picosecond sensitive determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using large fast-timing arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Régis, J.-M., E-mail: regis@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Mach, H. [Departamento de Física Atómica y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Simpson, G.S. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie Grenoble, 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Jolie, J.; Pascovici, G.; Saed-Samii, N.; Warr, N. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Bruce, A. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Degenkolb, J. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Fraile, L.M. [Departamento de Física Atómica y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fransen, C. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Ghita, D.G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 77125 Bucharest (Romania); and others

    2013-10-21

    A novel method for direct electronic “fast-timing” lifetime measurements of nuclear excited states via γ–γ coincidences using an array equipped with N∈N equally shaped very fast high-resolution LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator detectors is presented. Analogous to the mirror symmetric centroid difference method, the generalized centroid difference method provides two independent “start” and “stop” time spectra obtained by a superposition of the N(N−1)γ–γ time difference spectra of the N detector fast-timing system. The two fast-timing array time spectra correspond to a forward and reverse gating of a specific γ–γ cascade. Provided that the energy response and the electronic time pick-off of the detectors are almost equal, a mean prompt response difference between start and stop events is calibrated and used as a single correction for lifetime determination. These combined fast-timing arrays mean γ–γ time-walk characteristics can be determined for 40keVlifetime determination limit of the method over the total dynamic range is mainly determined by the statistics. The setup of an N=4 detector fast-timing array delivered an absolute time resolving power of 3 ps for 10 000 γ–γ events per total fast timing array start and stop time spectrum. The new method is tested over the total dynamic range by the measurements of known picosecond lifetimes in standard γ-ray sources.

  3. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Imaging of DNA Labeled with DAPI and Hoechst 33342 Using Three-Photon Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Malak, Henryk; Schrader, Martin; Engelhardt, Peter; Kano, Hiroski; Hell, Stefan W.

    1997-01-01

    We examined the fluorescence spectral properties of the DNA stains DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, hydrochloride) and Hoechst 33342 (bis-benzimide, or 2,5′-bi-1H-benzimidazole2′-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-5-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)) with two-photon (2hν) and three-photon (3hν) excitation using femtosecond pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser from 830 to 885 nm. The mode of excitation of DAPI bound to DNA changed from two-photon at 830 nm to three-photon at 885 nm. In contrast, Hoechst 33342 displayed o...

  4. Spectral characterization of biological aerosol particles using two-wavelength excited laser-induced fluorescence and elastic scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Lin, Horn-Bond; Huston, Alan L; Eversole, Jay D

    2011-03-28

    A two-wavelength laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument has been developed and used to characterize individual biological aerosol particles, including biological warfare (BW) agent surrogates. Fluorescence in discrete spectral bands from widely different species, and also from similar species under different growth conditions were measured and compared. The two-wavelength excitation approach was found to increase discrimination among several biological materials, and especially with respect to diesel exhaust particles, a common interferent for LIF BW detection systems. The spectral characteristics of a variety of biological materials and ambient air components have been studied as a function of aerosol particle size and incident fluence.

  5. Manipulating the Electronic Excited State Energies of Pyrimidine-Based Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitters To Realize Efficient Deep-Blue Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Ryutaro; Ohsawa, Tatsuya; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Nakao, Kohei; Hayasaka, Yuya; Kido, Junji

    2017-02-08

    The development of efficient and robust deep-blue emitters is one of the key issues in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) for environmentally friendly, large-area displays or general lighting. As a promising technology that realizes 100% conversion from electrons to photons, thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters have attracted considerable attention. However, only a handful of examples of deep-blue TADF emitters have been reported to date, and the emitters generally show large efficiency roll-off at practical luminance over several hundreds to thousands of cd m-2, most likely because of the long delayed fluorescent lifetime (τd). To overcome this problem, we molecularly manipulated the electronic excited state energies of pyrimidine-based TADF emitters to realize deep-blue emission and reduced τd. We then systematically investigated the relationships among the chemical structure, properties, and device performances. The resultant novel pyrimidine emitters, called Ac-XMHPMs (X = 1, 2, and 3), contain different numbers of bulky methyl substituents at acceptor moieties, increasing the excited singlet (ES) and triplet state (ET) energies. Among them, Ac-3MHPM, with a high ET of 2.95 eV, exhibited a high external quantum efficiency (ηext,max) of 18% and an ηext of 10% at 100 cd m-2 with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.16, 0.15). These efficiencies are among the highest values to date for deep-blue TADF OLEDs. Our molecular design strategy provides fundamental guidance to design novel deep-blue TADF emitters.

  6. Spatially pathogenic forms of tau detected in Alzheimer's disease brain tissue by fluorescence lifetime-based Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, Sergey; Wielgat, Przemyslaw; Wang, Yiner; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Neumann, Harald

    2010-09-30

    In tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease (AD) tau molecules have lost their normal spatial distance to each other and appear in oligomeric or aggregated forms. Conventional immunostaining methods allow detection of abnormally phosphorylated or conformationally altered aggregated tau proteins, but fail to visualize oligomeric forms of tau. Here we show that tau molecules that lost their normal spatial localization can be detected on a subcellular level in postmortem central nervous system (CNS) tissue sections of AD patients by fluorescence lifetime-based Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Paraffin sections were co-immunostained with two tau-specific monoclonal antibodies recognizing the same epitope, but labeled with distinct fluorescence dyes suitable for spatial resolution at a nanometer scale by lifetime-based FRET. A FRET signal was detected in neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of CNS tissue sections of AD patients, showing associated tau proteins typically reflecting either fibrillary, oligomeric or aggregated tau. The 'pretangle-like' structures within the neuronal perikarya did not contain spatially pathogenic forms of tau accordingly to this method. Data demonstrate that fluorescence lifetime-based FRET can be applied to human brain tissue sections to detect pathogenic forms of tau molecules that lost their normal spatial distance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Laser excited analytical atomic and ionic fluorescence in flames, furnaces and inductively coupled plasmas—I. General considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenetto, N.; Human, H. G. C.

    Several important parameters for the analytical use of laser excited fluorescence spectrometry in flames, graphite furnaces and inductively coupled plasmas are discussed in some detail. These parameters include the laser characteristics such as peak power, pulse duration, spectral bandwidth and repetition rate, the choice of the excitation line, the optical arrangement and the detection system, this last one centred on the widespread use of the boxcar averager. It is shown that, if the ultimate sensitivity is the goal to be achieved, then the choice must be the electrothermal atomization. However, even for flames and inductively coupled plasmas, excellent results are possible provided that: (i) the laser system allows complete spectral coverage in the ultraviolet: (ii) saturation of the fluorescence signal can be approached over a large sample volume; and (iii) the gated detection parameters and the laser repetition frequency are optimized with respect to each other so as to reach the maximum signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Third-harmonic generation and multi-photon excitation fluorescence imaging microscopy techniques for online art conservation diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualda, Emilio J; Filippidis, George; Melessanaki, Kristalia; Fotakis, Costas

    2009-03-01

    We present an appropriate methodology and results for using third-harmonic generation (THG) modality for nondestructive high resolution imaging measurements of varnished structures in model painted artifacts. Detection takes place in the reflection mode, demonstrating the ability of the technique to be applied to the evaluation of original artworks. Furthermore, multi-photon excitation fluorescence images were obtained, providing complementary information related to the identification of the chemical composition of the artifacts.

  9. A study of the fluorescence of the rare gases excited by nuclear particles. Use of the principle for the detection of nuclear radiation by scintillation; Etude de la fluorescence des gaz rares excites par des particules nucleaires. Utilisation pour la detection des rayonnements nucleaires par scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-12-15

    In the first part is studied the properties of atoms excited by the passage of {alpha} particles through the various rare gases at atmospheric pressure. A spectral analysis of the emitted light showed that certain impurities play an important part in producing the fluorescence, and it has led to the conclusion that the light emission contains at least two components - one very short - lived due to the direct deexcitation of the rare gas, the other relatively slower due to the energy transfers to the impurity. The measurement of the life-time of the excited states has confirmed this foregoing hypothesis, the rapid part of the impulse is extremely short: less than 2,25.10{sup -9} s in the case of xenon; the slower part has a life-time depending directly on the nitrogen concentration, nitrogen being the impurity giving the largest effect in all cases. The study of rare gases under the influence of an electric field has made it possible to show that the amount of light produced by an {alpha} particle can be multiplied (by 60, for example, in a field of 600 V:cm) so that the luminescent efficiency is greater than in the case of INaTI. In the second part the characteristics of the rare gases acting as scintillators is examined, the most important property being the absence of fluorescence saturation when the intensity of the excitation incident on the gas is very large. This, together with the very short time of scintillation has made it possible to study a certain number of nuclear physical applications (heavy particle energy-measurements, kinetic studies on nuclear reactors, neutron spectroscopy). (author) [French] On etudie dans la premiere partie les proprietes des atomes excites par le passage de particules {alpha} dans les differents gaz rares a la pression atmospherique. L'etude spectrale de la lumiere emise a montre que certaines impuretes jouent un role considerable dans la fluorescence et on a ete amene a penser que l'emission de lumiere comporte au

  10. Fluorescence and picosecond induced absorption from the lowest singlet excited states of quercetin in solutions and polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, S. L.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Buganov, O. V.; Knyukshto, V. N.; Raichenok, T. F.

    2017-03-01

    The spectroscopic and photophysical properties of the biologically important plant antioxidant quercetin in organic solvents, polymer films of polyvinyl alcohol, and a buffer solution at pH 7.0 are studied by stationary luminescence and femtosecond laser spectroscopy at room temperature and 77 K. The large magnitude of the dipole moment of the quercetin molecule in the excited Franck-Condon state μ e FC = 52.8 C m indicates the dipolar nature of quercetin in this excited state. The transient induced absorption spectra S 1→ S n in all solvents are characterized by a short-wave band at λ abs max = 460 nm with exponential decay times in the range of 10.0-20.0 ps. In the entire spectral range at times of >100 ps, no residual induced absorption was observed that could be attributed to the triplet-triplet transitions T 1 → T k in quercetin. In polar solvents, two-band fluorescence was also recorded at room temperature, which is due to the luminescence of the initial enol form of quercetin ( 415 nm) and its keto form with a transferred proton (550 nm). The short-wave band is absent in nonpolar 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF). The spectra of fluorescence and fluorescence excitation exhibit a low dependence on the wavelength of excitation and detection, which may be related to the solvation and conformational changes in the quercetin molecule. Decreasing the temperature of a glassy-like freezing quercetin solution in ethanol and 2-MTHF to 77 K leads to a strong increase in the intensity (by a factor of 100) of both bands. The energy circuits for the proton transfer process are proposed depending on the polarity of the medium. The main channel for the exchange of electronic excitation energy in the quercetin molecule at room temperature is the internal conversion S 1 ⇝ S 0, induced by the state with a proton transfer.

  11. Dependence of laser-induced fluorescence on exciting-laser power: partial saturation and laser - plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voráč, Jan; Dvořák, Pavel; Procházka, Vojtěch; Morávek, Tomas; Ráhel, Jozef

    2015-08-01

    In recent publications on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), the measurements are usually constricted to the region of weak exciting-laser power - the so called linear LIF. In this work, a practical formula describing the dependence of partially saturated fluorescence on the exciting-laser power is derived, together with practical implementation suggestions and comments on its limitations. In the conclusion, the practical formula F({E}_L)= {α{E}_L}/{1+β {E}_L} is proposed with the limitation for validity β EL ≤ 0.4, where α EL is the hypothetical linear fluorescence without saturation effects, and a more general formula is derived, which is valid for higher values of α EL as well. Extending the range of exciting laser power to the region of partial saturation enhances the signal-to-noise ratio. Such measurements in a surface dielectric barrier discharge further reveal discharge disruption by photoelectrons emitted from the dielectric surface. Methods of control and solution of this problem are discussed. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  12. Tracking of mercury ions in living cells with a fluorescent chemodosimeter under single- or two-photon excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Zhoujun [State Key Lab for Advanced Photonic Materials and Devices, Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang Peinan [State Key Lab for Advanced Photonic Materials and Devices, Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)], E-mail: pnwang@fudan.edu.cn; Zhang Yu [State Key Lab for Advanced Photonic Materials and Devices, Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen Jiyao; Zhen Shen [Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Leng Bing; Tian He [Labs for Advanced Materials and Institute of Fine Chemicals, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2007-08-10

    Tracking of Hg{sup 2+} in solutions as well as in living cells was conducted with a fluorescent chemodosimeter by measuring the spectral shift of its fluorescence under single- or two-photon excitation. The spectral hypsochromic shifts of this chemodosimeter when reacting with Hg{sup 2+} were found to be about 50 nm in acetonitrile/water solutions and 32 nm in Euglena gracilis 277 living cells. This chemodosimeter shows high sensitivity and selectivity, and is not influenced by the pH values. It can signal Hg{sup 2+} in solutions down to the ppb range under either single-photon excitation (SPE) at 405 nm or two-photon excitation (TPE) at 800 nm. However, with low cellular chemodosimeter concentrations, the SPE spectra were disturbed by the auto-fluorescence from the native fluorophore in the cell, while the TPE spectra were still of high quality since the two-photon absorption cross section of this chemodosimeter is much larger than that of the native fluorophores in the cell.

  13. Chromophore twisting in the excited state of a photoswitchable fluorescent protein captured by time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Sliwa, Michel; Woodhouse, Joyce; Schirò, Giorgio; Adam, Virgile; Aquila, Andrew; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Byrdin, Martin; Carbajo, Sergio; de La Mora, Eugenio; Doak, R. Bruce; Feliks, Mikolaj; Fieschi, Franck; Foucar, Lutz; Guillon, Virginia; Hilpert, Mario; Hunter, Mark S.; Jakobs, Stefan; Koglin, Jason E.; Kovacsova, Gabriela; Lane, Thomas J.; Lévy, Bernard; Liang, Mengning; Nass, Karol; Ridard, Jacqueline; Robinson, Joseph S.; Roome, Christopher M.; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Seaberg, Matthew; Thepaut, Michel; Cammarata, Marco; Demachy, Isabelle; Field, Martin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Bourgeois, Dominique; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Schlichting, Ilme; Weik, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Chromophores absorb light in photosensitive proteins and thereby initiate fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, vision and biofluorescence. An important goal in their understanding is the provision of detailed structural descriptions of the ultrafast photochemical events that they undergo, in particular of the excited states that connect chemistry to biological function. Here we report on the structures of two excited states in the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2. We populated the states through femtosecond illumination of rsEGFP2 in its non-fluorescent off state and observed their build-up (within less than one picosecond) and decay (on the several picosecond timescale). Using an X-ray free-electron laser, we performed picosecond time-resolved crystallography and show that the hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone chromophore in one of the excited states assumes a near-canonical twisted configuration halfway between the trans and cis isomers. This is in line with excited-state quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics and classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our new understanding of the structure around the twisted chromophore enabled the design of a mutant that displays a twofold increase in its off-to-on photoswitching quantum yield.

  14. PARAFAC modeling of fluorescence excitation-emission spectra of fish bile for rapid en route screening of PAC exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jan H; Tomasi, Giorgio; Strand, Jakob; Andersen, Ole

    2009-06-15

    Polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) metabolites in fish bile can be used as biomarkers for recent environmental exposure to PACs. Here, a novel method for rapid screening of nonhydrolyzed fish bile is presented. The method is based on excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and may constitute an alternative to fixed wavelength fluorescence and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS). PARAFAC was applied to excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) of bile samples of shorthorn sculpins and European eels collected in Greenland and Denmark. The EEMs were decomposed into a four-factor PARAFAC model. The comparison of the PARAFAC factors with the EEMs of PAC metabolites and amino acids suggests that two factors are related to PAC metabolites and two correspond to fluorescent residues of tryptophan and tyrosine in bile proteins. A new standardization procedure based on the mean of the scores for the biological factors was used to correct for feeding status and sample dilution and, upon such normalization, the score plots of PARAFAC factors showed a clear distinction between exposed and nonexposed fish. A good correlation was found between the factor scores and 1-hydroxypyrene equivalents determined by SFS for high contamination levels, whereas the sensitivity was better for the EEM method.

  15. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence as a cycling process between excited singlet and triplet states: application to the fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleizão, Carlos; Berberan-Santos, Mário N

    2007-05-28

    In efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) the excited chromophore alternates randomly between the singlet and triplet manifolds a large number of times before emission occurs. In this work, the average number of cycles n is obtained and is shown to have a simple experimental meaning: n+1 is the intensification factor of the prompt fluorescence intensity, owing to the occurrence of TADF. A new method of data analysis for the determination of the quantum yield of triplet formation, combining steady-state and time-resolved data in a single plot, is also presented. Application of the theoretical results to the TADF of [70]fullerenes shows a general good agreement between different methods of fluorescence analysis and allows the determination of several photophysical parameters.

  16. Multiphoton laser tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of melanoma: morphologic features and quantitative data for sensitive and specific non-invasive diagnostics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Seidenari

    Full Text Available Multiphoton laser tomography (MPT combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is a non-invasive imaging technique, based on the study of fluorescence decay times of naturally occurring fluorescent molecules, enabling a non-invasive investigation of the skin with subcellular resolution. The aim of this retrospective observational ex vivo study, was to characterize melanoma both from a morphologic and a quantitative point of view, attaining an improvement in the diagnostic accuracy with respect to dermoscopy. In the training phase, thirty parameters, comprising both cytological descriptors and architectural aspects, were identified. The training set included 6 melanomas with a mean Breslow thickness±S.D. of 0.89±0.48 mm. In the test phase, these parameters were blindly evaluated on a test data set consisting of 25 melanomas, 50 nevi and 50 basal cell carcinomas. Melanomas in the test phase comprised 8 in situ lesions and had a mean thickness±S.D. of 0.77±1.2 mm. Moreover, quantitative FLIM data were calculated for special areas of interest. Melanoma was characterized by the presence of atypical short lifetime cells and architectural disorder, in contrast to nevi presenting typical cells and a regular histoarchitecture. Sensitivity and specificity values for melanoma diagnosis were 100% and 98%, respectively, whereas dermoscopy achieved the same sensitivity, but a lower specificity (82%. Mean fluorescence lifetime values of melanocytic cells did not vary between melanomas and nevi, but significantly differed from those referring to basal cell carcinoma enabling a differential diagnosis based on quantitative data. Data from prospective preoperative trials are needed to confirm if MPT/FLIM could increase diagnostic specificity and thus reduce unnecessary surgical excisions.

  17. Dataset of the absorption, emission and excitation spectra and fluorescence intensity graphs of fluorescent cyanine dyes for the quantification of low amounts of dsDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Bruijns

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes data related to a research article entitled “Fluorescent cyanine dyes for the quantification of low amounts of dsDNA” (B. Bruijns, R. Tiggelaar, J. Gardeniers, 2016 [1]. Six cyanine dsDNA dyes - EvaGreen, SYBR Green, PicoGreen, AccuClear, AccuBlue NextGen and YOYO-1 – are investigated and in this article the absorption spectra, as well as excitation and emission spectra, for all six researched cyanine dyes are given, all recorded under exactly identical experimental conditions. The intensity graphs, with the relative fluorescence in the presence of low amounts of dsDNA, are also provided.

  18. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting.

  19. Evidence of a state dependent depletion process in the two-photon fluorescence excitation spectra of saturated amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Arthur M.; Gerrity, D. P.; Rothberg, L. J.; Vaida, V.

    1982-01-01

    The two-photon fluorescence excitation (TPFE) spectra of regions of the ? states of two saturated amines 1-azabicyclo [2.2.2]octane (ABCO) and trimethylamine (TMA) are reported. These spectra are compared with the respective one-photon absorption (OPA), one-photon fluorescence excitation (OPFE), and multiphoton ionization (MPI) spectra for both molecules. For ABCO, this comparison clearly indicates major differences in both the vibronic band intensities and the amount of sequence structure present in the TPFE spectrum relative to the MPI, OPA, and OPFE spectra, which are all comparable. The ''distortions'' of the TPFE spectrum are interpreted in terms of a laser-induced ? state-dependent depletion process from ? which results in ionization. Pressure effects on the TPFE spectrum imply that the rate of this up-pumping process depends strongly upon the particular vibrational modes excited in the two-photon-induced ?←? transition. A further implication of this interpretation is that the intramolecular vibrational relaxation time T1 of some initially prepared levels is ?100 ps. A kinetic model is presented which illustrates how (small) variations in the ionization cross sections of the ? state can have large effects on the TPFE spectrum but not on the MPI spectrum.

  20. In situ detection of atomic and molecular iodine using Resonance and Off-Resonance Fluorescence by Lamp Excitation: ROFLEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Martín, J. C.; Blahins, J.; Gross, U.; Ingham, T.; Goddard, A.; Mahajan, A. S.; Ubelis, A.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a new instrument for in situ detection of atmospheric iodine atoms and molecules based on atomic and molecular resonance and off-resonance ultraviolet fluorescence excited by lamp emission. The instrument combines the robustness, light weight, low power consumption and efficient excitation of radio-frequency discharge light sources with the high sensitivity of the photon counting technique. Calibration of I2 fluorescence is achieved via quantitative detection of the molecule by Incoherent Broad Band Cavity-enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy. Atomic iodine fluorescence signal is calibrated by controlled broad band photolysis of known I2 concentrations in the visible spectral range at atmospheric pressure. The instrument has been optimised in laboratory experiments to reach detection limits of 1.2 pptv for I atoms and 13 pptv for I2, for S/N = 1 and 10 min of integration time. The ROFLEX system has been deployed in a field campaign in northern Spain, representing the first concurrent observation of ambient mixing ratios of iodine atoms and molecules in the 1-350 pptv range.

  1. Measuring NLR Oligomerization IV: Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to Determine the Close Proximity of Inflammasome Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssif, Catrin; Flix, Bárbara; Belbin, Olivia; Comalada, Mònica

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular signaling and cellular activation have been demonstrated to reside on multi-protein complexes rather than in isolated proteins. Consequently, techniques to resolve these complexes have gained much attention over the last few years. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) coupled with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) is a powerful tool to discriminate direct interactions between two proteins within a multi-protein complex. Here, we present the use of FRET-FLIM as an experimental tool for the interpretation of the inflammasome composition. We also introduce some considerations required for the correct use of this technique and the control experiments that should be implemented.

  2. PARAFAC modeling of fluorescence excitation - Emission spectra of fish bile for rapid en route screening of PAC exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan H.; Tomasi, Giorgio; Strand, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    . The EEMs were decomposed into a four-factor PARAFAC model. The comparison of the PARAFAC factors with the EEMs of PAC metabolites and amino acids suggests that two factors are related to PAC metabolites and two correspond to fluorescent residues of tryptophan and tyrosine in bile proteins. A new......Polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) metabolites in fish bile can be used as biomarkers for recent environmental exposure to PACs. Here, a novel method for rapid screening of nonhydrolyzed fish bile is presented. The method is based on excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy combined...... standardization procedure based on the mean of the scores for the biological factors was used to correct for feeding status and sample dilution and, upon such normalization, the score plots of PARAFAC factors showed a clear distinction between exposed and nonexposed fish. A good correlation was found between...

  3. Excitation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons by Fluorescent Light from Organic Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Jozefowski, Leszek; Kawalec, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    -coherent excitation indicates its prospect for future integrated systems. To support our experimental results, we investigate the proposed geometries by analytical calculations and finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) modelling. The experimentally obtained angular leakage radiation peak positions can readily...... be predicted by our analytical calculations. Nevertheless, the experimental results exhibit a distinct asymmetry in the peak intensities. In agreement with our FDTD calculations, we address this asymmetrical SPP excitation to the nanofiber molecular orientation. The proposed structure’s high flexibility...

  4. Tracking natural organic matter (NOM) in a drinking water treatment plant using fluorescence excitation-emission matrices and PARAFAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghoth, S A; Sharma, S K; Amy, G L

    2011-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) in water samples from a drinking water treatment train was characterized using fluorescence excitation emission matrices (F-EEMs) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). A seven component PARAFAC model was developed and validated using 147 F-EEMs of water samples from two full-scale water treatment plants. It was found that the fluorescent components have spectral features similar to those previously extracted from F-EEMs of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from diverse aquatic environments. Five of these components are humic-like with a terrestrial, anthropogenic or marine origin, while two are protein-like with fluorescence spectra similar to those of tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like fluorophores. A correlation analysis was carried out for samples of one treatment plant between the maximum fluorescence intensities (F(max)) of the seven PARAFAC components and NOM fractions (humics, building blocks, neutrals, biopolymers and low molecular weight acids) of the same sample obtained using liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). There were significant correlations (p NOM fractions and that they could provide an alternative tool for evaluating the removal of NOM fractions of interest during water treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrafast fluorescence study of the effect of carboxylic and carboxylate substituents on the excited state properties of anthracene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Córdoba, William [Escuela de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Medellín, A.A. 3840, Medellín (Colombia); Noria-Moreno, Raquel; Navarro, Pedro [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Química, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Peon, Jorge, E-mail: jpeon@unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Química, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México, DF (Mexico)

    2014-01-15

    With the objective of understanding the interaction between carboxylic substituents and aromatic systems in electronically excited states, we have studied the photophysics of anthracene-9-carboxylic acid and its conjugate base through spectroscopic and computational approaches. We measured the emission spectrum evolution with femtosecond resolution observing that the formation of the relaxed fluorescent state of the acid corresponds to a red shifting of the emission which takes place within the first picosecond after excitation, a time-scale defined by the solvent response (acetone). For the case of the anthracene-9-carboxylate system, the spectral evolution is practically absent, indicating a lack of relaxation of the substituent orientation in the S{sub 1} state. Computational work at the time-dependent density functional theory level, considering the novel state-specific formalism, indicates that for anthracene-9-carboxylic acid, the first electronically excited state evolves from a structure with a nearly 60° dihedral angle between the carboxylic and aromatic systems, to a relaxed structure with a nearly 30° angle. On the other hand, the calculations show that for the salt, the carboxylate group remains decoupled from the aromatic system both in the ground and fluorescent state, remaining in both states at nearly 90°. Our results elucidate that the emission spectra of the acid and conjugate base are defined by the degree of interaction between the carboxylic (or carboxylate) group and the aromatic system. Such interactions are drastically different from the formal charge present in the carboxylate ion. -- Highlights: • Understanding of the interaction between carboxylic substituents and aromatic systems in electronically excited states. • Elucidation of the excited state dynamics of 9-ACA and its conjugated base in acetone solutions. • The spectral evolution time-scale of the aromatic acid and its salt depends on the solvation dynamics. • The

  6. An accurate and efficient method to predict the electronic excitation energies of BODIPY fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Nan; Jin, Jun-Ling; Geng, Yun; Sun, Shi-Ling; Xu, Hong-Liang; Lu, Ying-Hua; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-03-15

    Recently, the extreme learning machine neural network (ELMNN) as a valid computing method has been proposed to predict the nonlinear optical property successfully (Wang et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2012, 33, 231). In this work, first, we follow this line of work to predict the electronic excitation energies using the ELMNN method. Significantly, the root mean square deviation of the predicted electronic excitation energies of 90 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) derivatives between the predicted and experimental values has been reduced to 0.13 eV. Second, four groups of molecule descriptors are considered when building the computing models. The results show that the quantum chemical descriptions have the closest intrinsic relation with the electronic excitation energy values. Finally, a user-friendly web server (EEEBPre: Prediction of electronic excitation energies for BODIPY dyes), which is freely accessible to public at the web site: http://202.198.129.218, has been built for prediction. This web server can return the predicted electronic excitation energy values of BODIPY dyes that are high consistent with the experimental values. We hope that this web server would be helpful to theoretical and experimental chemists in related research. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Flow injection small-volume fiber-optic pH sensor based on evanescent wave excitation and fluorescence determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Huang, Ying; Ye, Zhongbin; Guan, Yafeng

    2011-05-01

    A small-volume fiber-optic pH sensor (FOEWS) based on evanescent wave excitation is developed and evaluated. The sensor is simply fabricated by inserting a decladded optical fiber into a transparent capillary tube. A microchannel between the optical fiber and the capillary inner wall was formed and acted as flow cell for solution flowing through. The pH-sensitive fluorophore of fluorescein can be excited by the evanescent wave field produced on the fiber core surface to produce emission fluorescence. pH value was then sensed by its enhancing effect on the emission fluorescence intensity. The response range of the sensor is from pH 2.09 to pH 8.85 and the linear range is from pH 3.25 to 8.85. The proposed sensor has a small detection volume of 2.5 μL and a short response time of 8 s. It has been applied to measure pH values of real water samples and was in good agreement with the results obtained by commercial pH meter. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

  8. Characterization of CDOM of river waters in China using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and regional integration techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Shang, Yingxin; Shao, Tiantian; Wen, Zhidan; Lv, Lili

    2017-08-01

    The spatial characteristics of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) components in river waters in China were first examined by excitation-emission matrix spectra and fluorescence regional integration (FRI) with the data collected during September to November between 2013 and 2015. One tyrosine-like (R1), one tryptophan-like (R2), one fulvic-like (R3), one microbial protein-like (R4), and one humic-like (R5) components have been identified by FRI method. Principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted to assess variations in the five FDOM components (FRί (ί = 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5)) and the humification index for all 194 river water samples. The average fluorescence intensities of the five fluorescent components and the total fluorescence intensities FSUM differed under spatial variation among the seven major river basins (Songhua, Liao, Hai, Yellow and Huai, Yangtze, Pearl, and Inflow Rivers) in China. When all the river water samples were pooled together, the fulvic-like FR3 and the humic-like FR5 showed a strong positive linear relationship (R2 = 0.90, n = 194), indicating that the two allochthonous FDOM components R3 and R5 may originate from similar sources. There is a moderate strong positive correlation between the tryptophan-like FR2 and the microbial protein-like FR4 (R2 = 0.71, n = 194), suggesting that parts of two autochthonous FDOM components R2 and R4 are likely from some common sources. However, the total allochthonous substance FR(3+5) and the total autochthonous substances FR(1+2+4) exhibited a weak correlation (R2 = 0.40, n = 194). Significant positive linear relationships between FR3 (R2 = 0.69, n = 194), FR5 (R2 = 0.79, n = 194), and chromophoric DOM (CDOM) absorption coefficient a(254) were observed, which demonstrated that the CDOM absorption was dominated by the allochthonous FDOM components R3 and R5.

  9. The application of a compact multispectral imaging system with integrated excitation source to in vivo monitoring of fluorescence during topical photodynamic therapy of superficial skin cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, J; Nadeau, V; Ferguson, J; Moseley, H; Ibbotson, S; Allen, J W; Sibbett, W; Padgett, M

    2001-03-01

    A novel, compact and low-cost multispectral fluorescence imaging system with an integrated excitation light source is described. Data are presented demonstrating the application of this method to in vivo monitoring of fluorescence before, during and after topical 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy of superficial skin cancers. The excitation source comprised a fluorescent tube with the phosphor selected to emit broadband violet light centered at 394 nm. The camera system simultaneously captured spectrally specific images of the fluorescence of the photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX, the illumination profile and the skin autofluorescence. Real-time processing enabled images to be manipulated to create a composite image of high contrast. The application and validation of this method will allow further detailed studies of the characteristics and time-course of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence, during topical photodynamic therapy in human skin in vivo.

  10. Rapid near-infrared fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy for multifluorophore characterization using an acousto-optic tunable filter technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    We report on a novel acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)-based near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy technique for rapid multifluorophore characterization. We implement a unique light filtering module design by using cascaded AOTFs coupled with three orthogonally oriented polarizers to effectively remove the side-ripple artifacts of AOTFs as well as by using a pair of AOTFs coupled with two orthogonally oriented polarizers to improve detection efficiency for high-quality fluorescence EEM acquisitions. NIR fluorescence EEM spectroscopy (41 excitation wavelengths ranging from 550 to 950 nm in 10-nm increments; fluorescence emission from 570 to 1000 nm at 10-nm intervals) can be acquired from fluorescence dyes [e.g., diethylthiatricarbocyanine (DTTC) iodide, oxazine 750, and IR 140] within 10 s or even less, illustrating the potential of the AOTF-based NIR EEM technique developed for rapid multifluorophore analysis and characterization in biochemical and biomedical systems.

  11. Development of a fluorescence detection system using optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser excitation for in vivo diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J M; Jagannathan, R; Stokes, D L; Kasili, P M; Panjehpour, M; Phan, M N; Overholt, B F; DeNovo, R C; Pan, X; Lee, R J; Vo-Dinh, T

    2003-12-01

    In this work, the development and applications of a fluorescence detection system using optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser excitation for in vivo disease diagnosis including oral carcinoma are described. The optical diagnosis system was based on an OPO laser for multi-wavelength excitation and time-resolved detection. The pulsed Nd-YAG-pumped OPO laser system (6 ns, 20 Hz) is compact and has a rapid, broad, and uniform tuning range. Time-gated detection of intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) making use of external triggering was used to effectively eliminate the laser scattering and contribute to the highly sensitive in vivo measurements. Artificial tissue-simulating phantoms consisting of polystyrene microspheres and tissue fluorophores were tested to optimize the gating parameters. 51-ns gate width and 39-ns gate delays were determined to be the optimal parameters for sensitive detection. In vivo measurements with the optical diagnosis system were applied to esophagus, stomach, and small intestine using an endoscope in canine animal studies. The rapid tuning capability of the optical diagnosis system contributed greatly to the optimization of wavelength for the observation of porphyrin in the small intestine. When the small intestine was thoroughly washed with water, the emission band which corresponds to porphyrin disappeared. Based on this observation, it was concluded that the detected signal was yielded by porphyrin-containing bile secretion. Also, multispectral analyses using multiple excitations from 415 to 480 nm at 5 nm intervals confirmed the porphyrin detection in the small intestine. The optical diagnosis system was also applied to the detection of human xenograft of oral carcinoma in mice using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) which is a photodynamic therapy (PDT) drug. Significant differences in protoporphyrin IX fluorescence intensity between normal and tumor tissue could be obtained 2 hours after the injection of 5-ALA into mice due to the

  12. Reference-independent wide field fluorescence lifetime measurements using Frequency-Domain (FD) technique based on phase and amplitude crossing point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, Gilad; Barnoy, Eran; Roth, Nir; Turgeman, Lior; Fixler, Dror

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is an essential tool in many scientific fields such as biology and medicine thanks to the known advantages of the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) over the classical fluorescence intensity (FI). However, the frequency domain (FD) FLIM technique suffers from its strong dependence on the reference and its compliance to the sample. In this paper, we suggest a new way to calculate the FLT by using the crossing point (CRPO) between the modulation and phase FLTs measured over several light emitting diode (LED) DC currents values instead of either method alone. This new technique was validated by measuring homogeneous substances with known FLT, where the CRPO appears to be the optimal measuring point. Furthermore, the CRPO method was applied in heterogeneous samples. It was found that the CRPO in known mixed solutions is the weighted average of the used solutions. While measuring B16 and lymphocyte cells, the CRPO of the DAPI compound in single FLT regions was measured at 3.5 ± 0.06 ns and at 2.83 ± 0.07 ns, respectively, both of which match previous reports and multi-frequency analyses. This paper suggests the CRPO as a new method to extract the FLT in problematic cases such as high MCP gains and heterogeneous environments. In traditional FD FLIM measurements, the variation in phase angle and modulation are measured. By measuring over varying DC currents, another variation is detected in the FLT determined through the phase and modulation methods, with the CRPO indicating the true FLT. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The Use of Excitation and Emission Matrix Fluorescence for Monitoring Ecological Health in Urban Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A.; Thornhill, I.; Carstea, E.; Robinson, G.; Reynolds, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The fluorescence properties and ecological status of urban waters around the globe are poorly understood. In light of the European Water Framework Directive there is now a need to assess the chemical and ecological status of all surface water bodies, irrespective of how heavily modified these water bodies are, throughout the Community. In particular, ecological monitoring is very slow, labour intensive, technically difficult and requires long-term monitoring strategies if the nature of their change is to be better understood. This work reports the potential of EEM fluorescence for assessing ecological health in urban waters. Water samples were collected from 29 sites in a transect across the West Midlands (United Kingdom). These samples covered a gradient of land use from light suburban through to dense urban. The sampled sites represent still waters up to 2ha in size derived from a variety of sources, including inputs from surface run off, groundwater, wastewater and stormwater. All sampled sites were assessed for the following; 1) Basic water chemistry 2) Fluorescence characterisation 3) Ecological quality More specifically all samples were subjected to a) Assessment of the basic physical and chemical parameters in the field (dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity and temperature) b) EEM fluorescence analysis c) Trace metals analysis d) Dissolved inorganic ions e) Macroinvertebrate sorting f) Microbial enumeration For the microbial enumeration the total aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were enumerated using the spread plate technique. Plates were incubated at 22°C for 5 days and 30°C for 3 days. Following incubation, aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were counted on plates showing between 30 and 300 colonies and expressed as the mean number of colony forming units per millilitre of sampled water (cfu/mL) ±SD. A summary of this data for all 29 sites is shown in Figure 1. This work discusses the relationship between the basic water chemistry features and ecological

  14. Effect of the fluorine substitution in ethyl groups of 1,4-distyrylbenzene on the fine structure fluorescence and fluorescence excitation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, I. A.; Voitova, N. A.; Nurmukhametov, R. N.

    2012-03-01

    The fine-structure fluorescence and fluorescence excitation spectra of conjugated chain compounds, 1,4-distyrylbenzene (DSB) and its fluorine-substituted derivative α,ω-1,4-distyrylbenzene, have been obtained by the Shpolskii method in an n-octane matrix at a temperature of 4.2 K. These spectra have been simulated by representing the band of each of the vibronic transitions as the sum of a zero-phonon line and a phonon wing with the corresponding parameters, such as the half-widths of the spectral lines and the Debye-Waller factors. Based on this simulation, the relative intensities of vibronic transitions have been determined and the frequencies of normal vibrations in the S 0 and S {1/*} states have been refined. It has been found that the energy of the purely electronic transition in the molecule of the fluorine-substituted derivative is higher by 950 cm-1 compared to the unsubstituted DSB. The parameters of the Franck-Condon and Herzberg-Teller interactions have been determined. The observed violation of the mirror symmetry between the conjugated spectra is explained by the interference of intramolecular interactions.

  15. Unique photophysical behavior of 2,2'-bipyridine-3,3'-diol in DMSO-water binary mixtures: potential application for fluorescence sensing of Zn2+ based on the inhibition of excited-state intramolecular double proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sarthak; Ghosh, Surajit; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2013-10-10

    In this work we have investigated the anomalous behavior of DMSO-water binary mixtures using 2,2'-bipyridine-3,3'-diol (BP(OH)2) as a microenvironment-sensitive excited-state-intramolecular-double-proton-transfer (ESIDPT) probe. Here we present results on the UV-vis absorption and fluorescence properties of BP(OH)2 in the binary solutions. DMSO-water binary mixtures at various compositions are an intriguing hydrogen bonded system, where DMSO acts to diminish the hydrogen bonding ability of water with the dissolved solutes. As a result, we observe unusual changes in the photophysical properties of BP(OH)2 with increasing DMSO content in complete correlation with the prior simulation and experimental results on the solvent structures and dynamics. The fluorescence quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime of BP(OH)2 depend strongly on the DMSO content and become maximum at very low mole fraction (∼0.12) of DMSO. The anomalous behavior at this particular region likely arises from the enhanced pair hydrophobicity of the medium as demonstrated by Bagchi and co-workers (Banerjee, S.; Roy, S.; Bagchi, B. J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 12875-12882). In addition we have also shown the utilization of BP(OH)2 as a potential Zn(2+)-selective fluorescent sensor in a 1:1 DMSO-water binary mixture useful for biological applications. We observed highly enhanced fluorescence emission of BP(OH)2 selectively for binding with the Zn(2+) metal ion. Moreover, the fluorescence emission maximum of BP(OH)2-Zn(2+) is significantly blue-shifted with a reduced Stokes shift due to the inhibition of the ESIDPT process of BP(OH)2 through strong coordination.

  16. A Practical Solution for 77 K Fluorescence Measurements Based on LED Excitation and CCD Array Detector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Lamb

    Full Text Available The fluorescence emission spectrum of photosynthetic microorganisms at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K provides important insights into the organization of the photosynthetic machinery of bacteria and eukaryotes, which cannot be observed at room temperature. Conventionally, to obtain such spectra, a large and costly table-top fluorometer is required. Recently portable, reliable, and largely maintenance-free instruments have become available that can be utilized to accomplish a wide variety of spectroscopy-based measurements in photosynthesis research. In this report, we show how to build such an instrument in order to record 77K fluorescence spectra. This instrument consists of a low power monochromatic light-emitting diode (LED, and a portable CCD array based spectrometer. The optical components are coupled together using a fiber optic cable, and a custom made housing that also supports a dewar flask. We demonstrate that this instrument facilitates the reliable determination of chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra for the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  17. Acetone photophysics at 282 nm excitation at elevated pressure and temperature. II: Fluorescence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason; Raju, Mandhapati; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2017-07-01

    This is the second in a series of two papers that presents an updated fluorescence model and compares with the new experimental data reported in the first paper, as well as the available literature data, to extend the range of acetone photophysics to elevated pressure and temperature conditions. This work elucidates the complete acetone photophysical model in terms of each and every competing radiative and non-radiative rate. The acetone fluorescence model is then thoroughly examined and optimized based on disparity with recently conducted elevated pressure and temperature photophysical calibration experiments. The current work offers insight into the competition between non-radiative and vibrational energy decay rates at elevated temperature and pressure and proposes a global optimization of model parameters from the photophysical model developed by Thurber (Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence for Temperature and Multiparameter Imaging in Gaseous Flows. PhD thesis, Stanford University Mechanical Engineering Department, 1999). The collisional constants of proportionality, which govern vibrational relaxation, are shown to be temperature dependent at elevated pressures. A new oxygen quenching rate is proposed which takes into account collisions with oxygen as well as the oxygen-assisted intersystem crossing component. Additionally, global trends in ketone photophysics are presented and discussed.

  18. Effective Fluorescence Lifetime and Stimulated Emission Cross-Section of Nd/Cr:YAG Ceramics under CW Lamplight Pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Taku; Motokoshi, Shinji; Imasaki, Kazuo; Fujioka, Kana; Fujita, Hisanori; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Izawa, Yasukazu; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    2008-10-01

    Remarkable improvements in the lifetime of the Nd upper level and in the effective stimulated emission cross-section of Nd/Cr:YAG ceramics have been theoretically and experimentally studied. Until recently, it had been thought that the long energy transition time from Cr ions to Nd ions of Nd/Cr:YAG adversely affects laser action, degrading optical-optical conversion efficiency under CW and flash lamp pumping. However, current research showed that high-efficiency energy transition has a positive effect on laser action. The effective lifetime is increased from 0.23 to 1.1 ms and the emission cross-section is effectively increased to three times for that of the conventional Nd:YAG. A small signal gain is significantly improved, and the saturation power density is reduced to 1/10 that of the Nd:YAG for the same pumping power density. A CW laser light generated in a laser diode (LD)-pumped 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser oscillator was amplified, and the measured output power was saturated. The output laser power calculated using theoretical saturation power density was consistent with the experimental results.

  19. Influence of matrix rigidity on the internal twisting of electronically excited thioflavin T in polymer nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youmin; Kim, Yu Lim; Kim, Myung Hwa; Lee, Minyung

    2013-11-01

    Thioflavin T (ThT) exhibits an enormous increase in fluorescence intensity (or lifetime) upon binding to β-sheet rich protein aggregates. In this letter, we measured the fluorescence lifetimes of ThT in poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer films and nanofibers and observed that the excited-state motion of ThT is slowed down as the mechanical rigidity of medium increases. Using ThT as a rigidity sensor, we first demonstrate that the fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can easily distinguish the PEO and PAA nanofiber structures, which were not discernable by electron microscopy.

  20. Two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence for label-free in vivo imaging ingestion of disease-causing bacteria by human leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-02-01

    Real time and in vivo monitoring leukocyte behavior provides unique information to understand the physiological and pathological process of infection. In this study, we demonstrate that two-photon excited reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence provides imaging contrast to distinguish granulocyte and agranulocyte. By using spectral and time-resolved NADH fluorescence, we study the immune response of human neutrophils against bacterial infection (Escherichia coli). The two-photon excited NADH fluorescence images clearly review the morphological changes from resting neutrophils (round shape) to activated neutrophils (ruffle shape) during phagocytosis. The free-tobound NADH ratio of neutrophils decreases after ingesting disease-causing pathogen: Escherichia coli. This finding may provide a new optical tool to investigate inflammatory processes by using NADH fluorescence in vivo.

  1. In-focal-plane characterization of excitation distribution for quantitative fluorescence microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Klaus; Brülisauer, Martina; ćaǧin, Emine; Bertsch, Dietmar; Lüthi, Stefan; Heeb, Peter; Stärker, Ulrich; Bernard, André

    2017-06-01

    The applications of fluorescence microscopy span medical diagnostics, bioengineering and biomaterial analytics. Full exploitation of fluorescent microscopy is hampered by imperfections in illumination, detection and filtering. Mainly, errors stem from deviations induced by real-world components inducing spatial or angular variations of propagation properties along the optical path, and they can be addressed through consistent and accurate calibration. For many applications, uniform signal to noise ratio (SNR) over the imaging area is required. Homogeneous SNR can be achieved by quantifying and compensating for the signal bias. We present a method to quantitatively characterize novel reference materials as a calibration reference for biomaterials analytics. The reference materials under investigation comprise thin layers of fluorophores embedded in polymer matrices. These layers are highly homogeneous in their fluorescence response, where cumulative variations do not exceed 1% over the field of view (1.5 x 1.1 mm). An automated and reproducible measurement methodology, enabling sufficient correction for measurement artefacts, is reported. The measurement setup is equipped with an autofocus system, ensuring that the measured film quality is not artificially increased by out-of-focus reduction of the system modulation transfer function. The quantitative characterization method is suitable for analysis of modified bio-materials, especially through patterned protein decoration. The imaging method presented here can be used to statistically analyze protein patterns, thereby increasing both precision and throughput. Further, the method can be developed to include a reference emitter and detector pair on the image surface of the reference object, in order to provide traceable measurements.

  2. Excitation of fluorescent nanoparticles by channel plasmon polaritons propagating in V-grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Irene Fernandez; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been proven that light can be squeezed into metallic channels with subwavelength lateral dimensions. Here, we present the study of the propagation of channel plasmon polaritons confined in gold V-grooves, filled with fluorescent particles. In this way, channel plasmon polaritons...... propagating in nonempty V-grooves can be characterized, as the propagation track can be directly visualized in the microscope. We have found that beads with subwavelength diameters act as frequency converters for the propagating channel modes, resulting in larger propagation lengths. For micrometric...

  3. Automated analysis of multimodal fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical coherence tomography data for the diagnosis of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Paritosh; Shrestha, Sebina; Park, Jesung; Gimenez-Conti, Irma; Brandon, Jimi; Applegate, Brian E.; Jo, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the progression of oral cancer is accompanied by changes in both tissue biochemistry and morphology. A multimodal imaging approach combining functional and structural imaging modalities could therefore provide a more comprehensive prognosis of oral cancer. This idea forms the central theme of the current study, wherein this premise is examined in the context of a multimodal imaging system that combines fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Towards this end, in the first part of the present study, the diagnostic advantage obtained by using both fluorescence intensity and lifetime information is assessed. In the second part of the study, the diagnostic potential of FLIM-derived biochemical features is compared with that of OCT-derived morphological features. For an objective assessment, several quantitative biochemical and morphological features from FLIM and OCT data, respectively, were obtained using signal and image processing techniques. These features were subsequently used in a statistical classification framework to quantify the diagnostic potential of different features. The classification accuracy for combined FLIM and OCT features was estimated to be 87.4%, which was statistically higher than accuracy based on only FLIM (83.2%) or OCT (81.0%) features. Moreover, the complimentary information provided by FLIM and OCT features, resulted in highest sensitivity and specificity for the combined FLIM and OCT features for discriminating benign (88.2% sens., 92.0% spec.), pre-cancerous (81.5% sens., 96.0% spec.), and cancerous (90.1% sens., 92.0% spec.) classes. PMID:27231638

  4. Vibrational Spectrum of an Excited State and Huang-Rhys Factors by Coherent Wave Packets in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyeongjin; Kim, Junwoo; Kim, So Young; Kim, Dong Eon; Joo, Taiha

    2017-03-17

    Coherent nuclear wave packet motions in an electronic excited state of a molecule are measured directly by time-resolved spontaneous fluorescence spectroscopy with an unprecedented time resolution by using two-photon absorption excitation and fluorescence upconversion by noncollinear sum frequency generation. With an estimated time resolution of approximately 25 fs, wave packet motions of vibrational modes up to 1600 cm(-1) are recorded for coumarin 153 in ethanol. Two-color transient absorption at 13 fs time resolution are measured to confirm the result. Vibrational displacements between the ground and excited states and Huang-Rhys factors (HRFs) are calculated by quantum mechanical methods and are compared with the experimental results. HRFs calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT reproduce the experiment adequately. This fluorescence-based method provides a unique and direct way to obtain the vibrational spectrum of a molecule in an electronic excited state and the HRFs, as well as the dynamics of excited states, and it might provide information on the structure of an excited state through the HRFs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Capture of Fluorescence Decay Times by Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naivar, Mark A.; Jenkins, Patrick; Freyer, James P.

    2012-01-01

    In flow cytometry, the fluorescence decay time of an excitable species has been largely underutilized and is not likely found as a standard parameter on any imaging cytometer, sorting, or analyzing system. Most cytometers lack fluorescence lifetime hardware mainly owing to two central issues. Foremost, research and development with lifetime techniques has lacked proper exploitation of modern laser systems, data acquisition boards, and signal processing techniques. Secondly, a lack of enthusiasm for fluorescence lifetime applications in cells and with bead-based assays has persisted among the greater cytometry community. In this unit, we describe new approaches that address these issues and demonstrate the simplicity of digitally acquiring fluorescence relaxation rates in flow. The unit is divided into protocol and commentary sections in order to provide a most comprehensive discourse on acquiring the fluorescence lifetime with frequency-domain methods. The unit covers (i) standard fluorescence lifetime acquisition (protocol-based) with frequency-modulated laser excitation, (ii) digital frequency-domain cytometry analyses, and (iii) interfacing fluorescence lifetime measurements onto sorting systems. Within the unit is also a discussion on how digital methods are used for aliasing in order to harness higher frequency ranges. Also, a final discussion is provided on heterodyning and processing of waveforms for multi-exponential decay extraction. PMID:25419263

  6. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved by 39% compared to that of the Xenon flash lamp based unit, due to the LEDs narrower emission spectrum and longer pulse width. Key parameters of the LED system are discussed to further optimize the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-background, and hence the sensitivity of the instrument.

  7. Characterizing fluorescent dissolved organic matter in a membrane bioreactor via excitation-emission matrix combined with parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tahir; Quang, Viet Ly; Cho, Jinwoo; Hur, Jin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we successfully tracked the dynamic changes in different constitutes of bound extracellular polymeric substances (bEPS), soluble microbial products (SMP), and permeate during the operation of bench scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Three fluorescent groups were identified, including two protein-like (tryptophan-like C1 and tyrosine-like C2) and one microbial humic-like components (C3). In bEPS, protein-like components were consistently more dominant than C3 during the MBR operation, while their relative abundance in SMP depended on aeration intensities. C1 of bEPS exhibited a linear correlation (R(2)=0.738; pbEPS amounts in sludge, and C2 was closely related to the stability of sludge. The protein-like components were more greatly responsible for membrane fouling. Our study suggests that EEM-PARAFAC can be a promising monitoring tool to provide further insight into process evaluation and membrane fouling during MBR operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of geomagnetic field for continuous wave (CW) laser excited sodium guide stars backward fluorescence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-peng; Wang, Hong-yan; Hua, Wei-hong; Ning, Yu; Xu, Xiao-jun

    2013-09-01

    Recent years, benefited from their greater coverage and smaller focus anisoplanatism, sodium laser guide stars are becoming more attractive in providing artificial beacons for adaptive optical (AO) system in large ground telescopes compared to Rayleigh guide stars. And it had been found that the Sodium laser guide stars backward fluorescence intensity is closely related with the local magnetic field intensity and direction. In this paper, we make use of the World Magnetic Model (WMM) 2010 and by considering the geographical differences in Beijing, Nanjing and Kunming we investigate the effects of the light intensity, line-width, polarization of the CW laser and re-pumping conditions on the photon return flux by numerically solving the Rochester et al. Bloch model. So in theory we can get better Sodium guide star in Beijing. In conclusion, according to the simulation results, we can acquire much bright of Sodium guide stars by optimize the parameter of the launched 589 nm laser.

  9. Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence and Ionization in a Graphite Furnace for the Determination of Metals and Nonmetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, David James

    1990-01-01

    Here is reported novel instrumentation for atomic spectrometry that combined the use of a pulsed laser system as the light source and an electrothermal atomizer as the atom cell. The main goal of the research was to develop instrumentation that was more sensitive for elemental analysis than commercially available instruments and could be used to determine elements in real sample matrices. Laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS) in an electrothermal atomizer (ETA) was compared to ETA atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for the determination of thallium, manganese, and lead in food and agricultural standard reference materials (SRMs). Compared to ETA AAS, ETA LEAFS has a longer linear dynamic range (LDR) (5-7 orders of magnitude compared to 2-3 orders of magnitude) and higher sensitivity (10 ^{-16} to 10^{ -14} g as compared to 10^{ -13} to 10^{-11} g). Consequently, ETA LEAFS allows elemental analysis to be done over a wider range of concentrations with less dilution steps. Thallium was accurately determined in biological samples by ETA LEAFS at amounts five to one hundred times below the ETA AAS detection limit. ETA AAS and ETA LEAFS were compared for the determination of lead and manganese, and in general, the accuracies and precisions of ETA AAS were the same, with typical precisions between 3% and 6%. Fluorine was determined using laser excited molecular fluorescence spectrometry (LEMOFS) in an ETA. Molecular fluorescence from magnesium fluoride was collected, and the detection limit of 0.3 pg fluorine was two to six orders of magnitude more sensitive than other methods commonly used for the determination of fluorine. Significant interferences from ions were observed, but the sensitivity was high enough that fluorine could be determined in freeze dried urine SRMs by diluting the samples by a factor of one hundred to remove the interferences. Laser enhanced ionization (LEI) in an ETA was used for the determination of metals. For thallium, indium

  10. In vivo quantification of mTHPC fluorescence in skinfold observation chamber using excitation and detection towards the near infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascáková, Slávka; de Visscher, Sebastiaan; Kruijt, Bastiaan; de Bruijn, Henriëtte S.; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angélique; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, a ratiometric quantification method is developed and applied to monitor mesotetra(hydroxyphenyl) chlorin (mTHPC) pharmacokinetics in the rat skin-fold observation chamber. The method employs a combination of dual-wavelength excitation and dual-wavelength detection. The excitation and detection wavelengths were selected in close to NIR. The first excitation wavelength was used to excite the mTHPC and autofluorescence and the second to excite only autofluorescence, so that this could be substracted. Subsequently the difference was divided by the autofluorescence. Since the method applies division of signal with no mTHPC fluorescence, theory suggests on linear dependency of the method on photosensitizer concentration.

  11. Synergy effects of electric and magnetic fields on locally excited-state fluorescence of photoinduced electron transfer systems in a polymer film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kamlesh; Iimori, Toshifumi; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2009-10-08

    Photoluminescence of electron donor-acceptor pairs that show photoinduced electron transfer (PIET) has been measured in a polymer film under simultaneous application of electric field and magnetic field. Fluorescence emitted from the locally excited state (LE fluorescence) of 9-methylanthracene (MAnt) and pyrene (Py) is quenched by an electric field in a mixture of 1,3-dicyanobenzene (DCB) with MAnt or Py, indicating that PIET from the excited state of MAnt or Py to DCB is enhanced by an electric field. Simultaneous application of electric and magnetic fields enhances the reverse process from the radical-ion pair produced by PIET to the LE fluorescent state of MAnt or Py. As a result, the electric-field-induced quenching of the LE fluorescence is reduced by application of the magnetic fields. Thus, the synergy effect of electric and magnetic fields is observed on the LE fluorescence of MAnt or Py. Exciplex fluorescence spectra resulting from PIET can be obtained by analyzing the field effects on photoluminescence spectra, even when the exciplex fluorescence is too weak to be determined from the steady-state or time-resolved photoluminescence spectra at zero field.

  12. Application of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices and UV/Vis absorption to monitoring the photocatalytic degradation of commercial humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, Sergio, E-mail: hvalens@gmail.com [Procesos Fisicoquimicos Aplicados, Universidad de Antioquia, Carrera 53 61-30, Medellin (Colombia); Marin, Juan M.; Restrepo, Gloria [Procesos Fisicoquimicos Aplicados, Universidad de Antioquia, Carrera 53 61-30, Medellin (Colombia); Frimmel, Fritz H., E-mail: fritz.frimmel@kit.edu [BereichWasserchemie, Engler-Bunte-Institut, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technology (KIT), 7631, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the use of excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and UV/Vis spectroscopy to monitor the changes in the composition and reactivity of Aldrich humic acids (Aldrich HA) as a model compound for natural organic matter (NOM) during photocatalytic degradation. Degussa P-25 titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and a solar UV-light simulator (a batch reactor) were used. The photocatalysis shifted the fluorescence maxima of EEMs of Aldrich HA toward shorter wavelengths, which implied that the photocatalytic degradation of commercial Aldrich HA caused the breakdown of high molecular weight components and the formation of lower molecular weight fractions. In addition, the fluorescence intensity of fulvic- and humic-like Aldrich HA presented a strong correlation with dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA) parameters, trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP), and organically bound halogens absorbable on activated carbon formation potential (AOXFP). Fluorescence spectroscopy was shown to be a powerful tool for monitoring of the photocatalytic degradation of HA. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a strong correlation between the fluorescence intensity of humic acids and DOC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HA-like and FA-like fluorescence intensity and SUVA show strong linear correlation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humic acids with high fluorescence intensity imply high formation of DBPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humic acid photocatalysis lead to a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of EEMs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool to monitor HA photocatalytic removal.

  13. Migration test of Bisphenol A from polycarbonate cups using excitation-emission fluorescence data with parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, M L; Marini, F; Sarabia, L A; Ortiz, M C

    2017-05-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most largely produced chemical in the world; it is used to make plastics and epoxy resins. The endocrine disruptor potential of BPA is well known, but recent researches suggest a relationship between chronic exposure to BPA, genotoxic activity and epigenetic modifications. The main source of exposure to BPA includes food contact materials (FCM). Thus simple and robust test methods are needed to improve the migration test of BPA. In this work, a non-separative, easy, fast and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric method based on the second order calibration of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices (EEMs) was proposed for the determination of BPA. For the first time, molecular fluorescence was used to identify unequivocally and quantify BPA. Trilinearity of the data tensor guarantees the uniqueness of the solution obtained through parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), so one factor of the decomposition matches up with BPA even if other fluorophores are in the test sample. The effect of four experimental factors of the procedure on the figures of merit and the unequivocally identification was investigated by means of a D-optimal design and PARAFAC calibration. The method is linear and accurate in the range 0-720µgL-1. The decision limit CCα and detection capability CCβ are 6.63µgL-1 and 18.85µgL-1 respectively (with probabilities of false positive and false negative fixed at 0.05). Finally the proposed method was applied to carry out a migration test from two polycarbonate cups, using 3% (w/v) acetic acid in aqueous solution as food simulant. The migrated amount of BPA was found to be 688.7µgL-1 (n=5) for the first cup and 710.5µgL-1 (n=4) for the second one, above the specific migration limit set by EFSA (European Food Safety Authority). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime FRET non-invasive imaging of breast cancer xenografts provides a measure of target engagement in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkouskaya, Alena; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier; Barroso, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FLIM-FRET) is a unique non-invasive imaging platform to monitor and quantify in vivo target engagement in pre-clinical studies. FLIM FRET is a valuable tool in targeted drug delivery due to its nanoscale-range molecular resolution that detects near-infrared labeled ligand binding to dimerized receptors followed by their uptake into cancer cells in vivo. Various imaging platforms, including PET, lack the ability to directly discriminate between unbound and internalized ligands. Since transferrin receptor (TfR) level is significantly elevated in cancer cells compared to non-cancerous cells, transferrin (Tf) has been successfully used in molecular imaging and targeted anti-cancer drug delivery. The dimeric nature of TfR allows for the quantification of Tf internalization into cancer cells by measuring FLIM FRET between receptor-bound Tf donor and acceptor NIR fluorophore pairs, based on the reduction of donor fluorophore lifetime in live mice. We analyzed tumor morphology, the level of expression of TfR, estrogen receptor (ER) and Tf accumulation in human breast cancer tumor xenografts. We found a remarkable heterogeneity of breast cancer tumors regarding their size, cell density, TfR and ER expression and Tf uptake. The results of this study confirm a strong correlation between in vivo NIR FLIM FRET and ex vivo evaluation of Tf uptake into tumor tissues, thus validating FD% as a robust measure of the target engagement of TfR-Tf in tumor cells in vivo.

  15. Time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy for the assessment of skin photoaging process

    Science.gov (United States)

    D´Almeida, Camila de Paula; Campos, Carolina; Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    pathology. The optical properties of these intrinsic fluorophores respond to the microenvironment and the metabolic status, thus making fluorescence spectroscopy a valuable tool to study the conditions of biological tissues. The purpose of this study is to investigate the hairless mice skin metabolic changes during the photoaging process through lifetime and fluorescence measurements targeting NADH and FAD. Two lasers centered at 378 nm and 445 nm, respectively, perform excitation of NADH and FAD. The fluorescence acquisition is carried out at mice dorsal and ventral regions throughout the photoaging protocol and aging process. Differences in fluorescence and lifetime data between young and photoaged mice measurements were observed. The endogenous fluorescence spectrum of photoaged dorsal skin showed an increase compared to young and aged skin. Lifetime of bound NADH and free FAD presented an increase in the first week that continued until the end of the protocol. Aging process is being investigated to complement the information obtained from fluorescence data and lifetime of photoaging process.

  16. Effects of solvent on the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of quinazolines, and determination of their ground and excited singlet-state dipole moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, J. J.; Tine, A.; Gaye, M. D.; Parkanyi, C.; Boniface, C.; Bieze, T. W. N.

    The electronic absorption, and fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of 11 quinazolines have been measured at room temperature (298 K) in several solvents of different polarities (cyclohexane, dioxane, ethylether, chloroform, ethylacetate, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, ethanol, methanol, acetonitrile, dimethylformamide and dimethyl sulfoxide). The effects of the solvent upon the spectral properties are discussed. Experimental ground-state dipole moments were measured for quinazolines and were used in combination with the spectral results to evaluate their first excited singlet-state dipole moments by means of the solvatochromic shift method. The theoretical ground and excited singlet-state dipole moments for selected quinazolines were calculated as a vector sum of the π-component (obtained by the PPP method) and the σ-component (obtained from σ-bond moments). A reasonable agreement was observed between the experimental and the theoretical values. Excited singlet-state dipole moments are higher than the ground-state values for most quinazolines.

  17. Cooling and Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Electronically-Excited He2 in a Supersonic Microcavity Plasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rui; Mironov, Andrey; Houlahan, Thomas, Jr.; Eden, J. Gary; LaboratoryOptical Physics; Engineering Team

    2016-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) resulting from transitions between different electronic states of helium dimers generated within a microcavity plasma jet was studied with rotational resolution. In particular, the d3Σu+ , e3Πg and f3Σu+ states, all having electronic energies above 24 eV, are populated by a microplasma in 4 bar of helium gas and rotationally cooled through supersonic expansion. Analysis of two dimensional maps (spectrograms) of dimer emission spectra as a function of distance from the nozzle orifice indicates collisional coupling during the expansion between the lowest rotational levels of the e3Πg , f3Σu+ states and high rotational levels (around N=11) of the d3Σu+ state (all of which are in the v = 0 vibrational state). In an attempt to verify the coupling, a scanning dye laser (centered near 596 nm) pumps the b3Πg -> f3Σu+ transition of the molecule several hundred micrometers downstream of the nozzle. As a result, the emission intensities of relevant rotational lines are observed to be enhanced. This research shows the potential of utilizing microcavity plasma jets as a tool to study and manipulate the collisional dynamics of highly-excited diatomic molecules.

  18. The multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments and its applications to the analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao Qiong; Wang, Xue; Li Xu, Min; Zhai, Hong Lin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Jin Jin

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy with an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) is a fast and inexpensive technique and has been applied to the detection of a very wide range of analytes. However, serious scattering and overlapping signals hinder the applications of EEM spectra. In this contribution, the multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments was investigated in depth and applied to the analysis of two EEM data sets (data set 1 consisted of valine-tyrosine-valine, tryptophan-glycine and phenylalanine, and data set 2 included vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and vitamin B6) for the first time. By means of the Tchebichef moments with different orders, the different information in the EEM spectra can be represented. It is owing to this multi-resolution capability that the overlapping problem was solved, and the information of chemicals and scatterings were separated. The obtained results demonstrated that the Tchebichef moment method is very effective, which provides a promising tool for the analysis of EEM spectra. It is expected that the applications of Tchebichef moment method could be developed and extended in complex systems such as biological fluids, food, environment and others to deal with the practical problems (overlapped peaks, unknown interferences, baseline drifts, and so on) with other spectra.

  19. Fluorescence excitation involving multiple electron transition states of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.Y.R.; Chen, F.Z.; Hung, T.; Judge, D.L. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The electronic states and electronic structures of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the 8-50 eV energy region have been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically. In the energy region higher than 25 eV there exists many electronic states including multiple electron transition (MET) states which are responsible for producing most of the dissociative photoionization products. The electronic states at energies higher than 50 eV have been mainly determined by Auger spectroscopy, double charge transfer, photofragment spectroscopy and ion-ion coincidence spectroscopy. The absorption and ionization spectra of these molecules at energies higher than 50 eV mainly show a monotonic decrease in cross section values and exhibit structureless features. The decay channels of MET and Rydberg (or superexcited) states include autoionization, ionization, dissociative ionization, predissociation, and dissociation while those of single ion and multiple ion states may involve predissociation. and dissociation processes. The study of fluorescence specifically probes electronically excited species resulting from the above-mentioned decay channels and provides information for understanding the competition among these channels.

  20. Dissipation of excess excitation energy by drought-induced nonphotochemical quenching in two species of drought-tolerant moss: desiccation-induced acceleration of photosystem II fluorescence decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hisanori; Itoh, Shigeru

    2013-07-02

    Drought-tolerant mosses survive with their green color intact even after long periods of dehydration that would kill ordinary plants. The mechanism of dissipation of excitation energy under drought stress was studied in two species of drought-tolerant moss, Rhytidium rugosum and Ceratodon purpureus. They showed severe quenching of photosystem II chlorophyll fluorescence (PSII) after being dehydrated in the dark. Quenching was induced by the acceleration of the fluorescence decay rate. This drought-induced nonphotochemical quenching (designated d-NPQ) was fully reversed by rehydration. Global analysis of fluorescence decay at 77 K indicated rapid 46 ps transfer of excitation energy from the 680-690 nm PSII bands to a 710 nm band, and to 740-760 nm bands. The latter bands decayed to the ground state with the same time constant showing the rapid dissipation of excitation energy into heat. The quenching by d-NPQ in dry moss was stronger than that by PSII charge separation or nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ), which operates under hydrating conditions. Drought-tolerant mosses, thus, dissipate excess excitation energy into heat. The d-NPQ mechanism in moss resembles that reported in lichens, suggesting their common origin.

  1. A light-induced photochromic nanoswitch capable of non-destructive readout via fluorescence emission: cluster vs. single-molecule excitation of dihydroindolizines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Thomas; Shrestha, Tej B; Bossmann, Stefan H; Hübner, Christian; Renn, Alois; Dürr, Heinz

    2009-08-01

    We have synthesized a prototype of a photochromic styrylquinolyl-dihydroindolizine (DHI), which forms a highly coloured and fluorescent betaine upon irradiation with lambda<400 nm. Embedding this photochromic DHI in a thin polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) film permits the non-destructive readout via fluorescence at low temperature (77 K). Thus, either a non-destructive photoswitch or an information recording system becomes available. Both possibilities have been explored: image recording and read-out, as well as information storage (at 77 K) have been demonstrated. Cluster- and single molecule-fluorescence upon laser excitation (lambda=355 nm) of the styrylquinolyl-dihydroindolizine in a PMMA matrix, and the effect of fluorescence blinking has been observed.

  2. Monitoring the Behavior of Emerging Contaminants in Wastewater-Impacted Rivers Based on the Use of Fluorescence Excitation Emission Matrixes (EEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgroi, Massimiliano; Roccaro, Paolo; Korshin, Gregory V; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2017-04-18

    This study investigated the applicability of fluorescence indexes based on the interpretation of excitation emission matrices (EEMs) by PARAFAC analysis and by selecting fluorescence intensities at a priori defined excitation/emission pairs as surrogates for monitoring the behavior of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) in two catchment basins impacted by wastewater discharges. Relevant EOC and EEM data were obtained for a 90 km stretch of the Simeto River, the main river in Sicily, and the smaller San Leonardo River, which was investigated for a 17 km stretch. The use of fluorescence indexes developed by these two different approaches resulted in similar observations. Changes of the fluorescence indexes that correspond to a group of humic-like fluorescing species were determined to be highly correlated with the concentrations of recalcitrant contaminants such as sucralose, sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine, which are typical wastewater markers in river water. Changes of the fluorescence indexes related to tyrosine-like substances were well correlated with the concentrations of ibuprofen and caffeine, anthropogenic indicators of untreated wastewater discharges. Chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were correlated with humic-like fluorescence indexes. The observed correlations were site-specific and characterized by different regression parameters for every collection event. Caffeine and carbamazepine showed correlations with florescence indexes in the San Leonardo River and in the alluvial plain stretch of the Simeto River, whereas sucralose, sulfamethoxazole and ibuprofen have always been well correlated in all the investigated river stretches. However, when data of different collection events from river stretches where correlations were observed were combined, good linear correlations were obtained for data sets generated via the normalization of the measured concentrations by the average value for the corresponding collection event

  3. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1 ± 2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6 ± 8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  4. On the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging and dihydroethidium to detect superoxide in intact animals and ex vivo tissues: a reassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Radoslaw; Michalowski, Bartosz; Sikora, Adam; Zielonka, Jacek; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2014-02-01

    Recently, D.J. Hall et al. reported that ethidium (E(+)) is formed as a major product of hydroethidine (HE) or dihydroethidium reaction with superoxide (O2(-)) in intact animals with low tissue oxygen levels (J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab. 32:23-32, 2012). The authors concluded that measurement of E(+) is an indicator of O2(-) formation in intact brains of animals. This finding is in stark contrast to previous reports using in vitro systems showing that 2-hydroxyethidium, not ethidium, is formed from the reaction between O2(-) and HE. Published in vivo results support the in vitro findings. In this study, we performed additional experiments in which HE oxidation products were monitored under different fluxes of O2(-). Results from these experiments further reaffirm our earlier findings (H. Zhao et al., Free Radic. Biol. Med. 34:1359, 2003). We conclude that whether in vitro or in vivo, E(+) measured by HPLC or by fluorescence lifetime imaging is not a diagnostic marker product for O2(-) reaction with HE. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Visualising apoptosis in live zebrafish using fluorescence lifetime imaging with optical projection tomography to map FRET biosensor activity in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Natalie; Ramel, Marie-Christine; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Kerry, Louise; Lockwood, Nicola; Frolov, Antonina; Frankel, Paul; Bugeon, Laurence; McGinty, James; Dallman, Margaret J; French, Paul M W

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) combined with optical projection tomography (OPT) has the potential to map Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) readouts in space and time in intact transparent or near transparent live organisms such as zebrafish larvae, thereby providing a means to visualise cell signalling processes in their physiological context. Here the first application of FLIM OPT to read out biological function in live transgenic zebrafish larvae using a genetically expressed FRET biosensor is reported. Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is mapped in 3-D by imaging the activity of a FRET biosensor that is cleaved by Caspase 3, which is a key effector of apoptosis. Although apoptosis is a naturally occurring process during development, it can also be triggered in a variety of ways, including through gamma irradiation. FLIM OPT is shown here to enable apoptosis to be monitored over time, in live zebrafish larvae via changes in Caspase 3 activation following gamma irradiation at 24 hours post fertilisation. Significant apoptosis was observed at 3.5 hours post irradiation, predominantly in the head region. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Biophotonics published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C.; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1±2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6±8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  7. Comparative Studies in the Fluorescence and Excitation Spectra of 3-Hydroxyflavone and 2(2 '-Heteroaryl)-3-Hydroxy-4H-Chromen-4-Ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, R.; Kaur, K.; Bansal, M.

    2017-05-01

    The absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of FHC and THC have been studied and compared with 3HF in cyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol. Anion formation in acetonitrile and methanol has been observed in all three flavonols in the order THC-FHC-3HF in their ground states. As excitation and absorption spectra are similar in all the cases (including the anion one), it is possible to observe the absorption spectra of the pure anion of the flavonols in neutral solvents, which is difficult to measure directly.

  8. Synthesis, spectral behaviour and photophysics of donor-acceptor kind of chalcones: Excited state intramolecular charge transfer and fluorescence quenching studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannipara, Mehboobali; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Alamry, Khalid A.; Arshad, Muhammad N.; El-Daly, Samy A.

    2015-02-01

    The spectral and photophysical properties of two chalcones containing electron donating and accepting groups with intramolecular charge transfer characteristics were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and X-ray crystallography. Both compounds show very strong solvent polarity dependent changes in their photophysical characteristics, namely, remarkable red shift in the emission spectra with increasing solvent polarity, large change in Stokes shift, significant reduction in the fluorescence quantum yield; indicating that the fluorescence states of these compounds are of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character. The solvent effect on the photophysical parameters such as singlet absorption, molar absorptivity, oscillator strength, dipole moment, fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence quantum yield of both compounds have been investigated comprehensively. For both dyes, Lippert-Mataga and Reichardt's correlations were used to estimate the difference between the excited and ground state dipole moments (Δμ). The interactions of dyes with colloidal silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were also studied in ethanol using steady state fluorescence quenching measurements. The fluorescence quenching data reveal that dynamic quenching and energy transfer play a major role in the fluorescence quenching of dyes by Ag NPs.

  9. Insight into the heterogeneous adsorption of humic acid fluorescent components on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenghu; Liu, Yangzhi; Cen, Qiulin; Zhu, Yaxian; Zhang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption behavior of commercial humic acid (HA) on pristine and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor (EEM- PARAFAC) analysis. The kinetics, isotherms, thermodynamics and mechanisms of adsorption of HA fluorescent components onto MWCNTs were the focus of the present study. Three humic-like fluorescent components were distinguished, including one carboxylic-like fluorophore C1 (λex/λem= (250, 310) nm/428nm), and two phenolic-like fluorophores, C2 (λex/λem= (300, 460) nm/552nm) and C3 (λex/λem= (270, 375) nm/520nm). The Lagergren pseudo-second-order model can be used to describe the adsorption kinetics of the HA fluorescent components. In addition, both the Freundlich and Langmuir models can be suitably employed to describe the adsorption of the HA fluorescent components onto MWCNTs with significantly high correlation coefficients (R2> 0.94, Pfluorescent components to MWCNTs was clearly observed. The adsorption mechanism suggested that the π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interaction played an important role in the interaction between HA fluorescent components and the three MWCNTs. Furthermore, the values of the thermodynamic parameters, including the Gibbs free energy change (ΔG°), enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), showed that the adsorption of the HA fluorescent components on MWCNTs was spontaneous and exothermic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. eGFP-pHsens as a highly sensitive fluorophore for cellular pH determination by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Thaa, Bastian; Junghans, Cornelia; Vitali, Marco; Veit, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The determination of pH in the cell cytoplasm or in intracellular organelles is of high relevance in cell biology. Also in plant cells, organelle-specific pH monitoring with high spatial precision is an important issue, since e.g. ΔpH across thylakoid membranes is the driving force for ATP synthesis critically regulating photoprotective mechanisms like non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence or the xanthophyll cycle. In animal cells, pH determination can serve to monitor proton permeation across membranes and, therefore, to assay the efficiency of drugs against proton-selective transporters or ion channels. In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of the pH-sensitive GFP derivative (eGFP-pHsens, originally termed deGFP4 by Hanson et al. [1]) for pH measurements using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with excellent precision. eGFP-pHsens was either expressed in the cytoplasm or targeted to the mitochondria of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells and applied here for monitoring activity of the M2 proton channel from influenza A virus. It is shown that the M2 protein confers high proton permeability of the plasma membrane upon expression in CHO-K1 cells resulting in rapid and strong changes of the intracellular pH upon pH changes of the extracellular medium. These pH changes are abolished in the presence of amantadine, a specific blocker of the M2 proton channel. These results were obtained using a novel multi-parameter FLIM setup that permits the simultaneous imaging of the fluorescence amplitude ratios and lifetimes of eGFP-pHsens enabling the quick and accurate pH determination with spatial resolution of 500 nm in two color channels with time resolution of below 100 ps. With FLIM, we also demonstrate the simultaneous determination of pH in the cytoplasm and mitochondria showing that the pH in the mitochondrial matrix is slightly higher (around 7.8) than that in the cytoplasm (about 7.0). The results obtained for CHO

  11. Two-photon excited fluorescence from higher electronic states of chlorophylls in photosynthetic antenna complexes a new approach to detect strong excitonic chlorophyll a/b coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Leupold, D; Ehlert, J; Irrgang, K D; Renger, G; Lokstein, H

    2002-01-01

    Stepwise two-photon excitation of chlorophyll a and b in the higher plant main light-harvesting complex (LHC II) and the minor complex CP29 (as well as in organic solution) with 100-fs pulses in the Q/sub y/ region results in a weak blue fluorescence. The dependence of the spectral shape of the blue fluorescence on excitation wavelength offers a new approach to elucidate the long-standing problem of the origin of spectral "chlorophyll forms" in pigment-protein complexes, in particular the characterization of chlorophyll a/b-heterodimers. As a first result we present evidence for the existence of strong chlorophyll a/b-interactions (excitonically coupled transitions at 650 and 680 nm) in LHC II at ambient temperature. In comparison with LHC II, the experiments with CP29 provide further evidence that the lowest energy chlorophyll a transition (at ~680 nm) is not excitonically coupled to chlorophyll b. (22 refs).

  12. Estimation of multiexponential fluorescence decay parameters using compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sejung; Lee, Joohyun; Lee, Youmin; Lee, Minyung; Lee, Byung-Uk

    2015-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a microscopic imaging technique to present an image of fluorophore lifetimes. It circumvents the problems of typical imaging methods such as intensity attenuation from depth since a lifetime is independent of the excitation intensity or fluorophore concentration. The lifetime is estimated from the time sequence of photon counts observed with signal-dependent noise, which has a Poisson distribution. Conventional methods usually estimate single or biexponential decay parameters. However, a lifetime component has a distribution or width, because the lifetime depends on macromolecular conformation or inhomogeneity. We present a novel algorithm based on a sparse representation which can estimate the distribution of lifetime. We verify the enhanced performance through simulations and experiments.

  13. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of anti-tetrol and syn-tetrol dissolved in liquid chloroform II: infrared emission spectra, vibrational excited-state lifetimes, and nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2013-11-21

    The effect of vibrational excitation and relaxation of the hydroxyl stretch on the hydrogen-bond structure and dynamics of stereoselectively synthesized syn-tetrol and anti-tetrol dissolved in deuterated chloroform are investigated via a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation. Emphasis is placed on the changes in hydrogen-bond structure upon photoexcitation and the nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics that follows the subsequent relaxation from the excited to the ground vibrational state. The propensity to form hydrogen bonds is shown to increase upon photoexcitation of the hydroxyl stretch, thereby leading to a sizable red-shift of the infrared emission spectra relative to the corresponding absorption spectra. The vibrational excited state lifetimes are calculated within the framework of Fermi's golden rule and the harmonic-Schofield quantum correction factor, and found to be sensitive reporters of the underlying hydrogen-bond structure. The energy released during the relaxation from the excited to the ground state is shown to break hydrogen bonds involving the relaxing hydroxyl. The spectral signature of this nonequilibrium relaxation process is analyzed in detail.

  14. Fluorescent detection and imaging of Hg{sup 2+} using a novel phenanthroline derivative based single- and two-photon excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xian, E-mail: zhangx@qlu.edu.cn; Li, Long-long; Liu, Ying-kai

    2016-02-01

    A novel phenanthroline derivative, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (MSIPBI), was synthesized, and the linear absor