WorldWideScience

Sample records for excitation energy flow

  1. Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model for internal energy excitation and dissociation in hypersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munafò, A; Panesi, M; Magin, T E

    2014-02-01

    A Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model is proposed to reduce a detailed kinetic mechanism database developed at NASA Ames Research Center for internal energy transfer and dissociation in N(2)-N interactions. The coarse-grained model is constructed by lumping the rovibrational energy levels of the N(2) molecule into energy bins. The population of the levels within each bin is assumed to follow a Boltzmann distribution at the local translational temperature. Excitation and dissociation rate coefficients for the energy bins are obtained by averaging the elementary rate coefficients. The energy bins are treated as separate species, thus allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. The proposed coarse-grained model is applied to the study of nonequilibrium flows behind normal shock waves and within converging-diverging nozzles. In both cases, the flow is assumed inviscid and steady. Computational results are compared with those obtained by direct solution of the master equation for the rovibrational collisional model and a more conventional multitemperature model. It is found that the proposed coarse-grained model is able to accurately resolve the nonequilibrium dynamics of internal energy excitation and dissociation-recombination processes with only 20 energy bins. Furthermore, the proposed coarse-grained model provides a superior description of the nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in shock heated and nozzle flows when compared with the conventional multitemperature models.

  2. Energy Flow Exciting Field-Aligned Current at Substorm Expansion Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-12-01

    At substorm expansion onset, upward field-aligned currents (FACs) increase abruptly, and a large amount of electromagnetic energy starts to consume in the polar ionosphere. A question arises as to where the energy comes from. Based on the results obtained by the global magnetohydrodynamics simulation, we present energy flow and energy conversion associated with the upward FACs that manifest the onset. Our simulations show that the cusp/mantle region transmits electromagnetic energy to almost the entire region of the magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field is southward. Integral curve of the Poynting flux shows a spiral moving toward the ionosphere, probably suggesting the pathway of electromagnetic energy from the cusp/mantle dynamo to the ionosphere. The near-Earth reconnection initiates three-dimensional redistribution of the magnetosphere. Flow shear in the near-Earth region results in the generation of the near-Earth dynamo and the onset FACs. The onset FACs are responsible to transport the electromagnetic energy toward the Earth. In the near-Earth region, the electromagnetic energy coming from the cusp/mantle dynamo is converted to the kinetic energy (known as bursty bulk flow) and the thermal energy (associated with high-pressure region in the inner magnetosphere). Then, they are converted to the electromagnetic energy associated with the onset FACs. A part of electromagnetic energy is stored in the lobe region during the growth phase. The release of the stored energy, together with the continuously supplied energy from the cusp/mantle dynamo, contributes to the energy supply to the ionosphere during the expansion phase.

  3. Hardness and excitation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that the first excitation energy can be given by the Kohn-Sham hardness (i.e. the energy difference of the ground-state lowest unoccupied and highest occupied levels) plus an extra term coming from the partial derivative of the ensemble exchange-correlation energy with respect to the weighting factor in the ...

  4. Hardness and excitation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the ground-state lowest unoccupied and highest occupied levels) plus an extra term coming from the partial derivative of the ensemble exchange-correlation energy with respect to the weighting factor in the limit → 0. It is proposed that the first excitation energy can be used as a reactivity index instead of the hardness.

  5. Hardness and excitation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In the density functional theory the total energy E[n] is a unique functional of the density n. Parr et al consider the total energy E a function of the number of electrons N. The chemical potential is defined as the negative of the electronegativity. µ = (∂E/∂N)v = –χ. (1). It was long ago showed by Mulliken5 that the elec-.

  6. Hardness and excitation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In the density functional theory the total energy E[n] is a unique ... The hardness η of an electronic system is defined7 as . 2. 1. 2. 1. 2. 2 ... η ε ε. = −. (6). Electronegativity, hardness and softness have proved to be very useful quantities in the chemical reactivity theory. Nevertheless, the definitions above cannot be applied with ...

  7. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Phillip W.K.; Sauer, Stephan P.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Oddershede, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Quantum Theory Project, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sabin, John R., E-mail: sabin@qtp.ufl.edu [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Quantum Theory Project, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state contributing to the mean excitation energy.

  8. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Phillip W. K.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens

    2017-01-01

    with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state...

  9. Nuclear structure at high excitation energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Study of the structure of nuclei in extreme conditions of angular momentum, excitation energy (temperature) and isospin has recently become a very interesting and active area of research in nuclear physics. Experimentally compound nuclei can be formed at high excitation energies and in high angular momentum states ...

  10. Excitation energy migration dynamics in upconversion nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, L.; Liu, X.; Wu, F.; Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts and progress in unraveling the fundamental mechanism of excitation energy migration dynamics in upconversion nanomaterials are covered in this review, including short-and long-term interactions and other interactions in homogeneous and heterogeneous nanostructures. Comprehension of

  11. Excitation methods for energy dispersive analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaklevic, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The rapid development in recent years of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis has been based primarily on improvements in semiconductor detector x-ray spectrometers. However, the whole analysis system performance is critically dependent on the availability of optimum methods of excitation for the characteristic x rays in specimens. A number of analysis facilities based on various methods of excitation have been developed over the past few years. A discussion is given of the features of various excitation methods including charged particles, monochromatic photons, and broad-energy band photons. The effects of the excitation method on background and sensitivity are discussed from both theoretical and experimental viewpoints. Recent developments such as pulsed excitation and polarized photons are also discussed

  12. The mean excitation energy of atomic ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens; Sabin, John R.

    2015-01-01

    A method for calculation of the mean excitation energies of atomic ions is presented, making the calculation of the energy deposition of fast ions to plasmas, warm, dense matter, and complex biological systems possible. Results are reported to all ions of helium, lithium, carbon, neon, aluminum...

  13. Hot nuclei, limiting temperatures and excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, J.

    1986-09-01

    Hot fusion nuclei are produced in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies (20-100 MeV/U). Information on the maximum excitation energy per nucleon -and temperatures- indicated by the experimental data is compared to the predictions of static and dynamical calculations. Temperatures around 5-6 MeV are reached and seem to be the limit of formation of thermally equilibrated fusion nuclei

  14. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, A; Faginas-Lago, N; Pacifici, L; Grossi, G

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  15. Coriolis mass flow meter using contactless excitation and detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Lotters, Joost Conrad; Lötters, Joost Conrad; Zwikker, Jan Marinus

    2006-01-01

    A mass flowmeter of the Coriolis type with a tube through which a medium flows during operation and with excitation means for causing the entire tube or part thereof to perform a rotational vibration about a primary axis of rotation during operation. The excitation means are electromagnetic and

  16. Fluid Flow Nozzle Energy Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkenmeyer, Phillip; Winn, Tyler; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

  17. Flow energy conversion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargsyan, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    A cost-effective hydropower system called here Flow Energy Converter was developed, patented, manufactured and tested for water pumping, electricity generation and other purposes especially useful for the rural communities. The system consists of water-driven turbine with plane-surface blades, power transmission means and pump and/or generator. Working sample of the Flow Energy Converter was designed and manufactured at the Institute of Radio Physics and Electronics

  18. Aerodynamic Flow Control by Thermoacoustic Excitation from the Constituent Nanomaterials on the Platform Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    the ratio of εf to ε0 was varied to examine the effect of the enhanced energy dissipation rate in forced flow . The solution does not converge for... gradual spanwise decrease in mean velocity from the maximum at y/δ = 0 to near zero at y/δ = 0.50 is typical of a turbulent jet in fully turbulent flow ...ARL-TR-7598 ● FEB 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Aerodynamic Flow Control by Thermoacoustic Excitation from the Constituent

  19. ECAL Energy Flow Calibration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    My talk will be covering my work as a whole over the course of the semester. The focus will be on using energy flow calibration in ECAL to check the precision of the corrections made by the light monitoring system used to account for transparency loss within ECAL crystals due to radiation damage over time.

  20. Evolution of vortex structures in an electromagnetically excited separated flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cierpka, Christian; Weier, Tom; Gerbeth, Gunter [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Time periodic wall parallel Lorentz forces have been used to excite the separated flow on the suction side of an inclined flat plate. Experiments for a Reynolds number of 10{sup 4} and an angle of attack of {alpha}=13 are reported. The controlled flow is characterised by a small number of relatively large scale vortices, which are related to the control mechanism. The influence of the main parameters, i.e. the excitation frequency, amplitude and wave form on the suction side flow structures was investigated by analysing time resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) measurements using continuous wavelet analysis for vortex detection and characterisation. Statistical analysis of the coherent structures of the flow was performed on a large amount of data samples. (orig.)

  1. Industrial energy-flow management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampret, Marko; Bukovec, Venceslav; Paternost, Andrej; Krizman, Srecko; Lojk, Vito; Golobic, Iztok

    2007-01-01

    Deregulation of the energy market has created new opportunities for the development of new energy-management methods based on energy assets, risk management, energy efficiency and sustainable development. Industrial energy-flow management in pharmaceutical systems, with a responsible approach to sustainable development, is a complex task. For this reason, an energy-information centre, with over 14,000 online measured data/nodes, was implemented. This paper presents the energy-flow rate, exergy-flow rate and cost-flow rate diagrams, with emphasis on cost-flow rate per energy unit or exergy unit of complex pharmaceutical systems

  2. Ultraviolet 320 nm laser excitation for flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William; Stickland, Lynn; Koschorreck, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Although multiple lasers and high-dimensional analysis capability are now standard on advanced flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (usually 325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. This is primarily due to their cost, and the small number of applications that require this wavelength. The development of the Brilliant Ultraviolet (BUV fluorochromes, however, has increased the importance of this formerly niche excitation wavelength. Historically, UV excitation was usually provided by water-cooled argon- and krypton-ion lasers. Modern flow cytometers primary rely on diode pumped solid state lasers emitting at 355 nm. While useful for all UV-excited applications, DPSS UV lasers are still large by modern solid state laser standards, and remain very expensive. Smaller and cheaper near UV laser diodes (NUVLDs) emitting at 375 nm make adequate substitutes for 355 nm sources in many situations, but do not work as well with very short wavelength probes like the fluorescent calcium chelator indo-1. In this study, we evaluate a newly available UV 320 nm laser for flow cytometry. While shorter in wavelength that conventional UV lasers, 320 is close to the 325 nm helium-cadmium wavelength used in the past on early benchtop cytometers. A UV 320 nm laser was found to excite almost all Brilliant Ultraviolet dyes to nearly the same level as 355 nm sources. Both 320 nm and 355 nm sources worked equally well for Hoechst and DyeCycle Violet side population analysis of stem cells in mouse hematopoetic tissue. The shorter wavelength UV source also showed excellent excitation of indo-1, a probe that is not compatible with NUVLD 375 nm sources. In summary, a 320 nm laser module made a suitable substitute for conventional 355 nm sources. This laser technology is available in a smaller form factor than current 355 nm units, making it useful for small cytometers with space constraints. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International

  3. US energy flow, 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, C. K.; Borg, I. Y.

    1982-10-01

    Flow diagrams to describe the US energy situation are given. In 1981 the energy consumption was 73 quads (or 73 times 10 to the 15th power Btu). Use was down from 75 quads in 1980. Oil continues to dominate the picture as it comprises 45% of the total energy used. Net oil use (exclusive of oil purchased for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and Exports) fell 8%; oil imports declined 14%. In contrast to oil, use of natural gas and coal remained at 1980 levels. Decreased use of residual oils, principally for electric power generating, account for much of the drop in oil use. Increased use of coal and nuclear energy for power generation almost compensated for the decrease in use of oil in that end use. Transmitted power remained at 1980 levels. The remainder of the drop in energy usage is attributed to price driven conservation, increased efficiencies in end use and the recession that prevailed during most of the year. The share of the energy drop attributable to the recession is estimated by various analysts to be on the order of 40 to 50%.

  4. Energy dependence of the ionization of highly excited atoms by collisions with excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, T.; Nakai, Y.; Nakamura, H.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate analytical expressions are derived for the ionization cross sections in the high- and low-collision-energy limits using the improved impulse approximation based on the assumption that the electron-atom inelastic-scattering amplitude is a function only of the momentum transfer. Both cases of simultaneous excitation and de-excitation of one of the atoms are discussed. The formulas are applied to the collisions between two excited hydrogen atoms and are found very useful for estimating the cross sections in the wide range of collisions energies

  5. Multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory for doublet excitation energies and excited state geometries: the excited states of CN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jie J; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G

    2017-11-15

    Multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT) is a post multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) method with similar performance to complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) but with greater computational efficiency. Cyano radical (CN) is a molecule whose spectrum is well established from experiments and whose excitation energies have been used as a testing ground for theoretical methods to treat excited states of open-shell systems, which are harder and much less studied than excitation energies of closed-shell singlets. In the present work, we studied the adiabatic excitation energies of CN with MC-PDFT. Then we compared this multireference (MR) method to some single-reference (SR) methods, including time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and completely renormalized equation-of-motion coupled-cluster theory with singles, doubles and noniterative triples [CR-EOM-CCSD(T)]; we also compared to some other MR methods, including configuration interaction singles and doubles (MR-CISD) and multistate CASPT2 (MS-CASPT2). Through a comparison between SR and MR methods, we achieved a better appreciation of the need to use MR methods to accurately describe higher excited states, and we found that among the MR methods, MC-PDFT stands out for its accuracy for the first four states out of the five doublet states studied this paper; this shows its efficiency for calculating doublet excited states.

  6. On the determination of the mean excitation energy of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Water is a ubiquitous substance in nature, and thus the mean excitation energy of water is an important quantity for understanding and prediction of the details of many fast ion/molecule collision processes such as those involved in external beam radiotherapy of tumors. There are several methods...... for determining numerical values for a mean excitation energy for water, both theoretical and experimental. Here the factors affecting the determination of the value of the mean excitation energy of water, especially from experiment, are discussed....

  7. Study of excitation energy dependence of nuclear level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanto, G.; Nayak, B.K.; Saxena, A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have populated CN by fusion reaction and excitation energy of the intermediate nuclei is determined after first chance α-emission to investigate excitation energy dependence of the NLD parameter. Evaporated neutron spectra were measured following alpha evaporation for obtaining NLD parameter for the reaction 11 B + 197 Au, populating CN 208 Po. This CN after evaporating an α-particle populates intermediate nucleus 204 Pb. The 204 Pb has magic number of Z=82. Our aim is to study the excitation energy dependence of NLD parameter for closed shell nuclei

  8. Roles of the Excitation in Harvesting Energy from Vibrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    Full Text Available The study investigated the role of excitation in energy harvesting applications. While the energy ultimately comes from the excitation, it was shown that the excitation may not always behave as a source. When the device characteristics do not perfectly match the excitation, the excitation alternately behaves as a source and a sink. The extent to which the excitation behaves as a sink determines the energy harvesting efficiency. Such contradictory roles were shown to be dictated by a generalized phase defined as the instantaneous phase angle between the velocity of the device and the excitation. An inductive prototype device with a diamagnetically levitated seismic mass was proposed to take advantage of the well established phase changing mechanism of vibro-impact to achieve a broader device bandwidth. Results suggest that the vibro-impact can generate an instantaneous, significant phase shift in response velocity that switches the role of the excitation. If introduced properly outside the resonance zone it could dramatically increase the energy harvesting efficiency.

  9. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, we have reported theoretical studies on the rate of energy transfer from an electronically excited molecule to graphene. It was found that graphene is a very efficient quencher of the electronically excited states and that the rate -4. The process was found to be effective up to 30 which is well beyond the ...

  10. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  11. Design and development of a parametrically excited nonlinear energy harvester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, Tanju; Ghayesh, Mergen H.; Li, Weihua; Alici, Gursel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A parametrically broadband energy harvester was fabricated. • Strong softening-type nonlinear behaviour was observed. • Experiments were conducted showing the large bandwidth of the device. - Abstract: An energy harvester has been designed, fabricated and tested based on the nonlinear dynamical response of a parametrically excited clamped-clamped beam with a central point-mass; magnets have been used as the central point-mass which pass through a coil when parametrically excited. Experiments have been conducted for the energy harvester when the system is excited (i) harmonically near the primary resonance; (ii) harmonically near the principal parametric resonance; (iii) by means of a non-smooth periodic excitation. An electrodynamic shaker was used to parametrically excite the system and the corresponding displacement of the magnet and output voltages of the coil were measured. It has been shown that the system displays linear behaviour at the primary resonance; however, at the principal parametric resonance, the motion characteristic of the magnet substantially changed displaying a strong softening-type nonlinearity. Theoretical simulations have also been conducted in order to verify the experimental results; the comparison between theory and experiment were within very good agreement of each other. The energy harvester developed in this paper is capable of harvesting energy close to the primary resonance as well as the principal parametric resonance; the frequency-band has been broadened significantly mainly due to the nonlinear effects as well as the parametric excitation.

  12. Random excitation of heat exchanger tubes by cross-flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axisa, F.; Villard, B. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d' Etudes Mecaniques et Thermiques); Antunes, J. (Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, LNETI/ICEN/DEEN, Sacavem (Portugal). Dept. of Nuclear Energy and Engineering); Axisa, F.; Beaufils, B.; Guilbaud, D. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d' Etudes Mecaniques et Thermiques)

    1990-05-01

    This paper investigates the random excitation mechanism of tube arrays in cross-flow, also often called ''turbulent buffeting''. It summarizes the experimental data obtained so far at CEA-Saclay on various tube bundles subjected to single and to two-phase flows. An attempt is made to put them into an appropriate theoretical framework. The formalism used to reduce the force spectra produced by single-phase cross-flow is first reviewed. It allows the determination of a reduced force spectrum which is found to be fairly independent of the tube array geometry. On the other hand, the situation in two-phase flow still remains insufficiently documented. Based on the restricted data set obtained at Saclay in the high void fraction range, random forces produced by air-water and by steam-water mixtures would be of the same order of magnitude. Only a crude estimate of it can be produced by using the single-phase force spectrum together with the homogenous two-phase flow model without slip. Further investigations are still clearly required to confirm such preliminary conclusions and to derive the physically relevant scaling factors to reduce conveniently the two-phase data. (author).

  13. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Franco; Segado, Mireia; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π*, π-π*, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  14. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, Franco, E-mail: franco.egidi@sns.it; Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri, 7 I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Koch, Henrik [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Cappelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, via G. Moruzzi, 3 I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  15. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  16. Rotating permanent magnet excitation for blood flow measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sarath S; Vinodkumar, V; Sreedevi, V; Nagesh, D S

    2015-11-01

    A compact, portable and improved blood flow measurement system for an extracorporeal circuit having a rotating permanent magnetic excitation scheme is described in this paper. The system consists of a set of permanent magnets rotating near blood or any conductive fluid to create high-intensity alternating magnetic field in it and inducing a sinusoidal varying voltage across the column of fluid. The induced voltage signal is acquired, conditioned and processed to determine its flow rate. Performance analysis shows that a sensitivity of more than 250 mV/lpm can be obtained, which is more than five times higher than conventional flow measurement systems. Choice of rotating permanent magnet instead of an electromagnetic core generates alternate magnetic field of smooth sinusoidal nature which in turn reduces switching and interference noises. These results in reduction in complex electronic circuitry required for processing the signal to a great extent and enable the flow measuring device to be much less costlier, portable and light weight. The signal remains steady even with changes in environmental conditions and has an accuracy of greater than 95%. This paper also describes the construction details of the prototype, the factors affecting sensitivity and detailed performance analysis at various operating conditions.

  17. Measurement of excitation energy of neutron-rich precursor fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Michelle Anthea

    Projectile fragmentation forms the basis for beam production at radioactive beam facilities such as the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), yet uncertainties remain about the specifics of the production mechanism. For example, very little is known about the excitation energy of the precursors of the observed final fragments. In the present work, isotopes of sodium, neon, and fluorine produced in the fragmentation of a 32 Mg beam at 86 MeV/nucleon in a beryllium target, ranging in mass loss from DeltaA = 3--12, were observed and the coincident neutrons were detected using the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA). Neutron hit multiplicity in MoNA was compared to output from the statistical evaporation model PACE which was passed through a GEANT4 simulation to account for detector response with a X2v analysis. The neutron hit multiplicity distributions were used to determine the mass loss and excitation energy of the precursor fragments created in the fast step of the reaction. The mass loss and excitation energy were compared to abrasion/ablation models and an internuclear cascade model, ISABEL. For sodium and neon observed fragments, a single precursor mass was found, with a wide range of high excitation energies, up to 60 MeV. Observed fluorine isotopes were also found to have high excitation energies, ranging from 40--80 MeV, but with some variation in precursor mass.

  18. A scalable piezoelectric impulse-excited energy harvester for human body excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillatsch, P; Yeatman, E M; Holmes, A S

    2012-01-01

    Harvesting energy from low-frequency and non-harmonic excitations typical of human motion presents specific challenges. While resonant devices do have an advantage in environments where the excitation frequency is constant, and while they can make use of the entire proof mass travel range in the case of excitation amplitudes that are smaller than the internal displacement limit, they are not suitable for body applications since the frequencies are random and the amplitudes tend to be larger than the device size. In this paper a piezoelectric, impulse-excited approach is presented. A cylindrical proof mass actuates an array of piezoelectric bi-morph beams through magnetic attraction. After the initial excitation these transducers are left to vibrate at their natural frequency. This increases the operational frequency range as well as the electromechanical coupling. The principle of impulse excitation is discussed and a centimetre-scale functional model is introduced as a proof of concept. The obtained data show the influence of varying the frequency, acceleration and proof mass. Finally, a commercially available integrated circuit for voltage regulation is tested. At a frequency of 2 Hz and an acceleration of 2.7 m s −2 a maximal power output of 2.1 mW was achieved. (paper)

  19. Realistic level densities in fragment emission at high excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, M.G.; Blann, M.; Ignatyuk, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy fragment emission from a 44 100 Ru compound nucleus at 400 and 800 MeV of excitation is analyzed to study the influence of level density models on final yields. An approach is used in which only quasibound shell-model levels are included in calculating level densities. We also test the traditional Fermi gas model for which there is no upper energy limit to the single particle levels. We compare the influence of these two level density models in evaporation calculations of primary fragment excitations, kinetic energies and yields, and on final product yields

  20. The role of excitations statistic and nonlinearity in energy harvesting from random impulsive excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khovanova, N. A.; Khovanov, I. A.

    2011-10-01

    Design of an efficient energy harvester is now feasible as technology develops and a viable approach to solve this need is to exploit the concept and application of a nonlinear design. In this letter, we conducted a comparative analysis of linear and nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvesting from random impulsive excitations modelled by white Poisson noise. It is shown that the harvester performance depends on both nonlinearity and properties of ambient energy, and nonlinearity should be optimized for a given type of ambient vibration in order to achieve efficient harvesting.

  1. Energy banking flowing well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, John Edward

    2003-01-01

    Russia and LNG are themes for the coming year. Despite many hot spots globally, these two topics have been huge drivers of our business in the past year and we believe will continue to be so for the coming future. We will also briefly touch on the environment, as this is a topic gaining significant attention and investment by all stakeholders in the industry. During 2003, energy bankers have been busy, although perhaps not as busy as several years ago. While there have been some notable deals in the M and A, capital markets, and lending parts of the business, overall business has been slower than a few years ago. However, Energy bankers are busier than their colleagues in other sectors, and the outlook is favourable. Particularly, energy lending activities should remain robust

  2. Determination of the excitation energy of high spin isomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernholm, S.; Borggreen, J.; Christensen, O.; Del Zoppo, A.; Herskind, B.; Pedersen, J.; Sletten, G.

    1979-01-01

    The sum spectrometer technique to study delayed radiation is discussed. Results on half-lives and isomer excitation energies are presented for 144 Gd, 147 Gd, 148 Tb, 151 Dy, 152 Dy, 149-153 Ho, 151 Er, 152 Er, 153 Er, and 154 Er. 2 figures, 1 table

  3. Excitation-energy influence at the scission configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer- and fusion-induced fission in inverse kinematics was proven to be a powerful tool to investigate nuclear fission, widening the information of the fission fragments and the access to unstable fissioning systems with respect to other experimental approaches. An experimental campaign for fission investigation has being carried out at GANIL with this technique since 2008. In these experiments, a beam of 238U, accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u, impinges on a 12C target. Fissioning systems from U to Cf are populated through transfer and fusion reactions, with excitation energies that range from few MeV up to 46 MeV. The use of inverse kinematics, the SPIDER telescope, and the VAMOS spectrometer permitted the characterization of the fissioning system in terms of mass, nuclear charge, and excitation energy, and the isotopic identification of the full fragment distribution. The neutron excess, the total neutron multiplicity, and the even-odd staggering in the nuclear charge of fission fragments are presented as a function of the excitation energy of the fissioning system. Structure effects are observed at Z∼50 and Z∼55, where their impact evolves with the excitation energy.

  4. Mean excitation energy for molecules of hydrogen and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Kamaratos, E.

    1981-01-01

    The Gordon-Kim electron gas model of molecular bonding is used to calculate correction factors for the Bragg rule for molecules of hydrogen and carbon. General rules for molecular mean excitation energies are obtained that agree to about 4% with experimental values.

  5. Energy traps of excited energy transfer processes in polymer solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masahide Yamamoto; Kenji Hisada; Shinzaburo Ito

    1999-01-01

    In this report, the singlet and triplet exciton behaviors of the polymers containing carbazole (Cz) or phenanthrene (Ph) chromophores as the side group were studied in the solid state. The role of electronic energy traps in energy transfer process will be discussed and controlling factors of energy transfer processes will be given

  6. Indigenous development of a 2 kW RF-excited fast axial flow CO2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RF-excited fast axial flow CO2 lasers in kilowatt regime are presently being used for various new scientific applications in addition to laser material processing because of its versatility and superior beam quality. We have indigenously developed a compact 2 kW RF-excited fast axial flow CO2 laser with moderate beam ...

  7. Time Resolved Energy Transfer and Photodissociation of Vibrationally Excited Molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crim, F. F

    2007-01-01

    ...) in solution and in the gas phase. This second experiment is one of the few direct comparisons of intramolecular vibrational energy flow in a solvated molecule with that in the same molecule isolated in a gas...

  8. Variety in excitation energy transfer processes from phycobilisomes to photosystems I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Niwa, Kyosuke; Abe, Tomoko; Murakami, Akio; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-09-01

    The light-harvesting antennas of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms capture light energy and transfer it to the reaction centers of their photosystems. The light-harvesting antennas of cyanobacteria and red algae, called phycobilisomes (PBSs), supply light energy to both photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). However, the excitation energy transfer processes from PBS to PSI and PSII are not understood in detail. In the present study, the energy transfer processes from PBS to PSs in various cyanobacteria and red algae were examined in vivo by selectively exciting their PSs or PBSs, and measuring the resulting picosecond to nanosecond time-resolved fluorescences. By observing the delayed fluorescence spectrum of PBS-selective excitation in Arthrospira platensis, we demonstrated that energy transfer from PBS to PSI via PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer) occurs even for PSI trimers. The contribution of PBS→PSII→PSI transfer was species dependent, being largest in the wild-type of red alga Pyropia yezoensis (formerly Porphyra yezoensis) and smallest in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Comparing the time-resolved fluorescence after PSs- and PBS-selective excitation, we revealed that light energy flows from CP43 to CP47 by energy transfer between the neighboring PSII monomers in PBS-PSII supercomplexes. We also suggest two pathways of energy transfer: direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI (PBS→PSI transfer) and indirect transfer through PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer). We also infer that PBS→PSI transfer conveys light energy to a lower-energy red chlorophyll than PBS→PSII→PSI transfer.

  9. General theory for environmental effects on (vertical) electronic excitation energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2016-10-21

    Almost 70 years ago, the first theoretical model for environmental effects on electronic excitation energies has been derived. Since then, several different interpretations and refined models have been proposed for the perichromic shift of a chromophore due to its surrounding medium. Some of these models are contradictory. Here, the contributing terms are derived within the framework of long-range perturbation theory with the least approximations so far. The derivation is based on a state-specific interpretation of the interaction energies and all terms can be identified with individual properties of either the chromophore or the surroundings, respectively. Further, the much debated contribution due to transition moments coupled to the environment can be verified in the form of a non-resonant excitonic coupling to the dynamic polarizabilities in the environment. These general insights should clarify discussions and interpretations of environmental effects on electronic excitations and should foster the development of new models for the computation of these effects.

  10. Quantum dynamics study of fulvene double bond photoisomerization: The role of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution and excitation energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blancafort, Lluis [Institut de Quimica Computacional, Department de Quimica, Universitat de Girona, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Gatti, Fabien [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (UMR 5253), CC 1501, Universite Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05 (France); Meyer, Hans-Dieter [Theoretische Chemie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-10-07

    The double bond photoisomerization of fulvene has been studied with quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Fulvene is a test case to develop optical control strategies based on the knowledge of the excited state decay mechanism. The decay takes place on a time scale of several hundred femtoseconds, and the potential energy surface is centered around a conical intersection seam between the ground and excited state. The competition between unreactive decay and photoisomerization depends on the region of the seam accessed during the decay. The dynamics are carried out on a four-dimensional model surface, parametrized from complete active space self-consistent field calculations, that captures the main features of the seam (energy and locus of the seam and associated branching space vectors). Wave packet propagations initiated by single laser pulses of 5-25 fs duration and 1.85-4 eV excitation energy show the principal characteristics of the first 150 fs of the photodynamics. Initially, the excitation energy is transferred to a bond stretching mode that leads the wave packet to the seam, inducing the regeneration of the reactant. The photoisomerization starts after the vibrational energy has flowed from the bond stretching to the torsional mode. In our propagations, intramolecular energy redistribution (IVR) is accelerated for higher excess energies along the bond stretch mode. Thus, the competition between unreactive decay and isomerization depends on the rate of IVR between the bond stretch and torsion coordinates, which in turn depends on the excitation energy. These results set the ground for the development of future optical control strategies.

  11. Quantum dynamics study of fulvene double bond photoisomerization: The role of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution and excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blancafort, Lluis; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The double bond photoisomerization of fulvene has been studied with quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Fulvene is a test case to develop optical control strategies based on the knowledge of the excited state decay mechanism. The decay takes place on a time scale of several hundred femtoseconds, and the potential energy surface is centered around a conical intersection seam between the ground and excited state. The competition between unreactive decay and photoisomerization depends on the region of the seam accessed during the decay. The dynamics are carried out on a four-dimensional model surface, parametrized from complete active space self-consistent field calculations, that captures the main features of the seam (energy and locus of the seam and associated branching space vectors). Wave packet propagations initiated by single laser pulses of 5-25 fs duration and 1.85-4 eV excitation energy show the principal characteristics of the first 150 fs of the photodynamics. Initially, the excitation energy is transferred to a bond stretching mode that leads the wave packet to the seam, inducing the regeneration of the reactant. The photoisomerization starts after the vibrational energy has flowed from the bond stretching to the torsional mode. In our propagations, intramolecular energy redistribution (IVR) is accelerated for higher excess energies along the bond stretch mode. Thus, the competition between unreactive decay and isomerization depends on the rate of IVR between the bond stretch and torsion coordinates, which in turn depends on the excitation energy. These results set the ground for the development of future optical control strategies.

  12. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  13. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-11-16

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  14. Excited state conformational dynamics in carotenoids: dark intermediates and excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Warren F; Bishop, Michael M; Roscioli, Jerome D; Ghosh, Soumen; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    A consideration of the excited state potential energy surfaces of carotenoids develops a new hypothesis for the nature of the conformational motions that follow optical preparation of the S2 (1(1)Bu(+)) state. After an initial displacement from the Franck-Condon geometry along bond length alternation coordinates, it is suggested that carotenoids pass over a transition-state barrier leading to twisted conformations. This hypothesis leads to assignments for several dark intermediate states encountered in femtosecond spectroscopic studies. The Sx state is assigned to the structure reached upon the onset of torsional motions near the transition state barrier that divides planar and twisted structures on the S2 state potential energy surface. The X state, detected recently in two-dimensional electronic spectra, corresponds to a twisted structure well past the barrier and approaching the S2 state torsional minimum. Lastly, the S(∗) state is assigned to a low lying S1 state structure with intramolecular charge transfer character (ICT) and a pyramidal conformation. It follows that the bent and twisted structures of carotenoids that are found in photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins yield excited-state structures that favor the development of an ICT character and optimized energy transfer yields to (bacterio)chlorophyll acceptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Excitation of energy harvesters using stick-slip motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helseth, L. E.

    2014-08-01

    During the past decades a large number of energy harvesting systems with the ability to transform mechanical energy into electrical energy have been proposed, ranging from systems exhibiting pure sinusoidal motion to stochastic systems. However, to date little emphasis has been put on stick-slip motion as a method for excitation of energy harvesting systems. Stick-slip motion can be associated with both microscopic and macroscopic processes and is omnipresent. The motion can be characterized by two stages. In the first stage there is buildup of elastic energy with little associated motion, whereas in the second stage the elastic energy is released into kinetic energy. We study here the spectral signal characteristics of two different electrical generators excited by stick-slip motion: a piezoelectric macro fiber composite and a triboelectric generator. The force and the voltage generated during the motion were monitored, and we found that the signal spectral density of both variables changes with the frequency in a characteristic manner, thus classifying the slip-stick motion as a colored noise excitation scheme. The force spectral density in both systems was found to exhibit a power-law spectrum following an {{f}^{-2}} trend, where f is the frequency. The voltage spectral density was governed by the product of a high-pass filter, the force spectral density, and the intrinsic generator spectral density. Here the piezoelectric generator exhibited a nearly flat voltage spectral density below the cutoff frequency of the high-pass filter and an {{f}^{-2}} spectrum at higher frequencies, thus demonstrating that the piezoelectric coupling coefficient had a nearly flat frequency response. On the other hand, the triboelectric generator had a coupling coefficient with a spectral response that varied in a non-systematic manner, possibly related to the large number of contact sites and relaxation times occurring during operation. The average power delivered by the generators

  16. Regulation of excitation energy transfer in diatom PSII dimer: How does it change the destination of excitation energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokono, Makio; Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Energy transfer dynamics in dimeric photosystem II (PSII) complexes isolated from four diatoms, Chaetoceros gracilis, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, are examined. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements were conducted in the range of 0-80ns. Delayed fluorescence spectra showed a clear difference between PSII monomer and PSII dimer isolated from the four diatoms. The difference can be interpreted as reflecting suppressed energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer for efficient energy trapping at the reaction center. The observation was especially prominent in C. gracilis and T. pseudonana. The pathways seem to be suppressed under a low pH condition in isolated PSII complexes from C. gracilis, and excitation energy may be quenched with fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding protein (FCP) that was closely associated with PSII in C. gracilis. The energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer may play a role in excitation energy regulation in diatoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus in binary decay processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paşca H.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Employing the improved scission-point model, the isotopic and excitation energy trends of the charge distribution of fission fragments are studied in fission of even-even Th isotopes at low and high excitation energies.

  18. Odd-even effect dependence on the excitation energy in low energy fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirea, M.

    2017-09-01

    An inversion of the odd-even effect was observed experimentally in cold fission: the odd-odd fragmentation yields are favored over the even-even ones for excitations energies of the fragments smaller than 4 MeV. This effect is linked to the important problem of quasiparticle excitations during the dynamical evolution of the nuclear system from its ground-state configuration up to scission. An explanation based on the Landau-Zener promotion mechanism generalized for superfluid systems is offered for the inversion of the odd-even effect. In principle, the even-even fission products cannot be produced at very low excitation energies due dynamical quasiparticle excitations produced in the avoided- level-crossing regions. These excitations are produced with a large probability when the nuclear system deforms slowly.

  19. Coherence, energy and charge transfers in de-excitation pathways of electronic excited state of biomolecules in photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-01-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin–chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used F¨orster–Dexter th...

  20. INDRA-GSI: Collective flow from Fermi to relativistic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukasik, J.; Trautmann, W.; Begemann-Blaich, M.L.; Bittiger, R.; Gourio, D.; Le Fevre, A.; Lynen, U.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Orth, H.; Sfienti, C.; Schwarz, C.; Turzo, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Auger, G.; Bouriquet, B.; Chbihi, A.; Frankland, J.D.; Hudan, S.; Lopez, O. [GANIL, CEA et IN2P3-CNRS, 14 - Caen (France); Borderie, B.; Galichet, E.; Lavaud, F.; Plagnol, E. [Paris-11 Univ., Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, 91 - Orsay (France); Bellaize, N.; Bocage, F.; Bougault, R.; Durand, D.; Hurst, B.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E. [Caen Univ., LPC (IN2P3-CNRS/ENSI), 14 - Caen (France); Charvet, J.L.; Dayras, R.; Legrain, R.; Nalpas, L.; Volant, C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee (DAPNIA/SPhN), 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Guinet, D.; Lautesse, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Rosato, E.; Vigilante, M. [INFN, Univ. Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Sezione, Napoli (Italy); Saija, A. [Universita and INFN I, Dipartimento di Fisica dell' , Catania (Italy); Trzcinski, A.; Zwieglinski, B. [A. Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Lukasik, J. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Galichet, E. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-07-01

    Directed flow for the {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au reactions at incident energies between 40 and 150 A*MeV has been measured using the 4{pi} multi-detector INDRA at the GSI facility. In particular, the bombarding energy at which the elliptic flow switches from in-plane to out-of-plane enhancement has been determined to be around 100 A*MeV in good agreement with the result obtained by the FOPI Collaboration. The new data allows also to extend the experimental excitation function of v{sub 2} to lower energies. (authors)

  1. Dependence of the energy transfer to graphene on the excitation energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackowski, Sebastian, E-mail: mackowski@fizyka.umk.pl; Kamińska, Izabela [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2015-07-13

    Fluorescence studies of natural photosynthetic complexes on a graphene layer demonstrate pronounced influence of the excitation wavelength on the energy transfer efficiency to graphene. Ultraviolet light yields much faster decay of fluorescence, with average efficiencies of the energy transfer equal to 87% and 65% for excitation at 405 nm and 640 nm, respectively. This implies that focused light changes locally the properties of graphene affecting the energy transfer dynamics, in an analogous way as in the case of metallic nanostructures. Demonstrating optical control of the energy transfer is important for exploiting unique properties of graphene in photonic and sensing architectures.

  2. Spins, Parity, Excitation Energies, and Octupole Structure of an Excited Superdeformed Band in 194Hg and Implications for Identical Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackman, G.; Khoo, T. L.; Carpenter, M. P.; Lauritsen, T.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Calderin, I. J.; Janssens, R. V.; Ackermann, D.; Ahmad, I.; Agarwala, S.; Blumenthal, D. J.; Fischer, S. M.; Nisius, D.; Reiter, P.; Young, J.; Amro, H.; Moore, E. F.; Hannachi, F.; Korichi, A.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Døssing, T.; Nakatsukasa, T.

    1997-11-01

    An excited superdeformed band in 194Hg, observed to decay directly to both normal-deformed and superdeformed yrast states, is proposed to be a Kπ = 2- octupole vibrational band, based on its excitation energies, spins, and likely parity. The transition energies are identical to those of the yrast superdeformed band in 192Hg, but originate from levels with different spins and parities. The evolution of transition energies with spin suggests that cancellations between pairing and particle alignment are partly responsible for the identical transition energies.

  3. Energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Dridi, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical investigations of energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides made of line defects and branching points are presented. It is shown that vortices of energy flow may occur, and the net energy flow along: the line defect is described via the effective propagation velocity...

  4. Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET) Velocimetry in Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET), a non-seeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and non-reactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25-nm 100-fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 µJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and non-reactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities and further demonstrate the significantly less-intrusive nature of STARFLEET.

  5. Electron emission from materials at low excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urma, N.; Kijek, M.; Millar, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: An experimental system has been designed and developed with the purpose of measuring the total electron emission yield from materials at low energy excitation. In the first instance the reliability of the system was checked by measuring the total electron emission yield for a well defined surface (aluminium 99.45%). The obtained data was in the expected range given by the literature, and consequently the system will be used further for measuring the total electron yield for a range of materials with interest in the instrumentation industry. We intend to measure the total electron emission yield under electron bombardment as a function of incident electron energy up to 1200 eV, angle of incidence, state of the surface and environment to which the surface has been exposed. Dependence of emission on total electron irradiated dose is also of interest. For many practical application of the 'Secondary Electron Emission', the total electron yield is desired to be as large as possible. The above phenomenon has practical applicability in electron multiplier tube and Scanning electron microscopy - when by means of the variation of the yield of the emitted electrons one may produce visible images of small sample areas. The electron multiplier tube, is a device which utilises the above effect to detect and amplify both single particles and low currents streams of charged particles. The majority of electron tubes use electrons with low energy, hundreds of eV. Not a lot has been published in the literature about this regime and also about the emission when the impinging electrons have small energy, up to 1 KeV. The information obtained from the experimental measurements concerning the total electron emission yield is used to asses the investigated materials as a potential electron emitting surfaces or dynodes in an electron multiplier tube

  6. Energy harvesting from human motion: exploiting swing and shock excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ylli, K; Hoffmann, D; Willmann, A; Becker, P; Folkmer, B; Manoli, Y

    2015-01-01

    Modern compact and low power sensors and systems are leading towards increasingly integrated wearable systems. One key bottleneck of this technology is the power supply. The use of energy harvesting techniques offers a way of supplying sensor systems without the need for batteries and maintenance. In this work we present the development and characterization of two inductive energy harvesters which exploit different characteristics of the human gait. A multi-coil topology harvester is presented which uses the swing motion of the foot. The second device is a shock-type harvester which is excited into resonance upon heel strike. Both devices were modeled and designed with the key constraint of device height in mind, in order to facilitate the integration into the shoe sole. The devices were characterized under different motion speeds and with two test subjects on a treadmill. An average power output of up to 0.84 mW is achieved with the swing harvester. With a total device volume including the housing of 21 cm 3 a power density of 40 μW cm −3 results. The shock harvester generates an average power output of up to 4.13 mW. The power density amounts to 86 μW cm −3 for the total device volume of 48 cm 3 . Difficulties and potential improvements are discussed briefly. (paper)

  7. Anomalous argon excitation in pulse supersonic flows of Ar + CH sub 4 , Ar + SiH sub 4 and Ar + CH sub 4 + SiH sub 4 mixtures, activated with an electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Madirbaev, V Z; Korobejshchikov, N G; Sharafutdinov, R G

    2001-01-01

    The processes of energy exchange in the supersonic flows of the argon mixtures with methane and silane, activated by the electron beam, are studied. It is shown, that at the initial stage of condensation in the flux there takes place selective excitation of the argon atoms energy levels. The boundary parameters, whereby the effect of the anomalous radiation excitation is observed, are determined

  8. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  9. Malaysia commercial energy flow: status and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Maragatham Kumar; Nik Arlina Nik Ali; Abi Muttaqin Jalal Bayar; Aisya Raihan Abdul Kadir; Muhammed Zulfakar Zolkaffly; Azlinda Aziz; Jamal Khaer Ibrahim

    2008-08-01

    With further growth of Malaysia economy, future development of the energy sector in Malaysia is vital to ensure targeted growth. Commercial Energy continues to play a major role in ensuring a balanced energy mix for power generation due to a potential increase in energy demand from various sectors, especially the industrial sector. This paper presents the status and structure of Malaysia Commercial Energy Flow, which gives an overview of the flow of all types of energy sources from primary energy supply to final energy use, and also the potential for nuclear power in electricity generation in Malaysia. (Author)

  10. Low-energy charge transfer excitations in NiO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V I; Yermakov, A Ye; Uimin, M A; Gruzdev, N B; Pustovarov, V A; Churmanov, V N; Ivanov, V Yu; Sokolov, P S; Baranov, A N; Moskvin, A S

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analysis of photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of NiO poly- and nanocrystals in the spectral range 2-5.5 eV reveals two PLE bands peaked near 3.7 and 4.6 eV with a dramatic rise in the low-temperature PLE spectral weight of the 3.7 eV PLE band in the nanocrystalline NiO as compared with its polycrystalline counterpart. In frames of a cluster model approach we assign the 3.7 eV PLE band to the low-energy bulk-forbidden p-d (t 1g (π)-e g ) charge transfer (CT) transition which becomes the allowed one in the nanocrystalline state while the 4.6 eV PLE band is related to a bulk allowed d-d (e g -e g ) CT transition scarcely susceptible to the nanocrystallization. The PLE spectroscopy of the nanocrystalline materials appears to be a novel informative technique for inspection of different CT transitions.

  11. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295 0 K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295 0 K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ΔJ transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references

  12. Influence of collision energy and vibrational excitation on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For atom-diatom reactions (i.e., A+BC), reagent vibrational excitation has been of longstanding inter- est in reaction dynamics, thus, a focus of present work has been on whether significant influence of vibrational excitation on this reaction can be observed. Initial vibra- tional state (v=0-3, j =0) selected ICS is depicted.

  13. Unsteady separated boundary layer in a transonic diffuser flow with self-excited oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T.; Coakley, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical investigation of two-dimensional unsteady boundary layer in a transonic diffuser flow with self-excited oscillations and strong flow separation by solving the compressible, Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations with two-equations turbulence model is described. Three different meshes with constant streamwise mesh distribution and varying vertical mesh distribution were used. Results obtained indicate that a refinement of mesh studied here has minimal effect on the mean boundary layer flow but significantly increases the amplitude of oscillation of all flow variables. Comparisons of unsteady wall pressure, velocity profile, terminal shock, and separation pocket among computations and with experiment are presented.

  14. Excitation of an acoustic pulse by an impulsive shear flow in a dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, John; Dusty plasma Team

    2017-10-01

    A dusty plasma is a strongly-coupled plasma that contains micron-sized particles. These particles, also called dust particles, are highly charged by ambient plasma; they interact with each other, sustaining collective wave motion. Both longitudinal and transverse waves can in general be excited. Here we use an electrostatic three-dimensional (3D) simulation to reveal a wave excitation mechanism that is due to viscous heating. In the simulation, an impulsive force was applied to drive a shear flow motion with a sudden onset. After a delay, a longitudinal acoustic pulse wave was observed, propagating outwards from the edge of the flow. We found that the viscous heating due to shear motion can result in a brief localized rarefaction in the dust cloud, leading to the excitation of a longitudinal acoustic wave. The simulation parameters were motivated by the PK-4 instrument on the International Space Station (ISS). Work was supported by NASA.

  15. Z-dependence of Mean Excitation Energies for Second and Third Row Atoms and Their Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens

    2018-01-01

    All mean excitations energies for second and third row atoms and their ions are calculated in the random‐phase approximation using large basis sets. To a very good approximation it turns out that mean excitation energies within an isoelectronic series is a quadratic function of the nuclear charge...

  16. Flow Energy Piezoelectric Bimorph Nozzle Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Walkemeyer, Phillip E. (Inventor); Hall, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Lee, Hyeong Jae (Inventor); Colonius, Tim (Inventor); Tosi, Phillipe (Inventor); Kim, Namhyo (Inventor); Sun, Kai (Inventor); Corbett, Thomas Gary (Inventor); Arrazola, Alvaro Jose (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A flow energy harvesting device having a harvester pipe includes a flow inlet that receives flow from a primary pipe, a flow outlet that returns the flow into the primary pipe, and a flow diverter within the harvester pipe having an inlet section coupled to the flow inlet, a flow constriction section coupled to the inlet section and positioned at a midpoint of the harvester pipe and having a spline shape with a substantially reduced flow opening size at a constriction point along the spline shape, and an outlet section coupled to the constriction section. The harvester pipe may further include a piezoelectric structure extending from the inlet section through the constriction section and point such that the fluid flow past the constriction point results in oscillatory pressure amplitude inducing vibrations in the piezoelectric structure sufficient to cause a direct piezoelectric effect and to generate electrical power for harvesting.

  17. Vibration excitation and energy transfer during ultrasonically assisted drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitsky, V. I.; Astashev, V. K.; Meadows, A.

    2007-12-01

    Successful application of ultrasonically assisted drilling needs dynamic matching of the transducer with the drill bit considered as a continuous system loaded by the nonlinear processing load. When using standard tools this leads to the compatible choice of the transducer and accurate matching of the transducer and tool. The principal dynamical features of this matching are considered. Optimal position of excitation cross section of the drill bit, which depends on the relationship between elasto-dissipative characteristics of the transducer, the drill bit and the work load, is found in general analytical form. The optimal matching preserves the resonant tuning of the transducer and compensates the additional energy losses in the drill bit and processing. This produces also an amplification of vibration amplitude. The effect is achieved through the generation and maintenance of a nonlinear resonant mode of vibration and by active matching of the oscillating system with the dynamic loads imposed by the cutting process with the help of the intelligent electronic feedback circuitry. A prototype of an ultrasonic drilling system has been designed, manufactured. and tested. Improvements of machining characteristics due to superposition of ultrasonic vibration are demonstrated. Substantial improvements in the cutting performance of drill bits lead to benefits in drilling performance, which include faster penetration rates, reduction of tool wear, improvements in the surface finish, roundness and straightness of holes and, in ductile materials, the reduction or even complete elimination of burrs on both the entrance and exit faces of plates. The reduction in the reactive force experienced also causes greatly reduced deformation when drilling through thin, flexible plates and helps to alleviate delamination hazard.

  18. Observation of low- and high-energy Gamow-Teller phonon excitations in nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Y; Fujita, H; Adachi, T; Bai, C L; Algora, A; Berg, G P A; von Brentano, P; Colò, G; Csatlós, M; Deaven, J M; Estevez-Aguado, E; Fransen, C; De Frenne, D; Fujita, K; Ganioğlu, E; Guess, C J; Gulyás, J; Hatanaka, K; Hirota, K; Honma, M; Ishikawa, D; Jacobs, E; Krasznahorkay, A; Matsubara, H; Matsuyanagi, K; Meharchand, R; Molina, F; Muto, K; Nakanishi, K; Negret, A; Okamura, H; Ong, H J; Otsuka, T; Pietralla, N; Perdikakis, G; Popescu, L; Rubio, B; Sagawa, H; Sarriguren, P; Scholl, C; Shimbara, Y; Shimizu, Y; Susoy, G; Suzuki, T; Tameshige, Y; Tamii, A; Thies, J H; Uchida, M; Wakasa, T; Yosoi, M; Zegers, R G T; Zell, K O; Zenihiro, J

    2014-03-21

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in atomic nuclei are sensitive to both nuclear shell structure and effective residual interactions. The nuclear GT excitations were studied for the mass number A = 42, 46, 50, and 54 "f-shell" nuclei in ((3)He, t) charge-exchange reactions. In the (42)Ca → (42)Sc reaction, most of the GT strength is concentrated in the lowest excited state at 0.6 MeV, suggesting the existence of a low-energy GT phonon excitation. As A increases, a high-energy GT phonon excitation develops in the 6-11 MeV region. In the (54)Fe → (54)Co reaction, the high-energy GT phonon excitation mainly carries the GT strength. The existence of these two GT phonon excitations are attributed to the 2 fermionic degrees of freedom in nuclei.

  19. Excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, B.

    1996-01-01

    A short introduction to instrumental resolution is followed by a discussion of visibilities of phonon modes due to their eigenvectors. High precision phonon dispersion curves in GaAs are presented together with 'ab initio' calculations. Al 2 O 3 is taken as an example of selected visibility due to group theory. By careful determination of phonon intensities eigenvectors can be determined, such as in Silicon and Diamond. The investigation of magnon modes is shown for the garnet Fe 2 Ca 3 (GeO 4 ) 3 , where also a quantum gap due to zero point spin fluctuations was observed. The study of the splitting of excitons in CsFeCl 3 in an applied magnetic field demonstrates the possibilities of neutron polarisation analysis, which made it possible to observe a mode crossing. An outlook to inelastic X-ray scattering with very high energy resolution of synchrotron radiation is given with the examples of phonons in Beryllium and in water. (author) 19 figs., 36 refs

  20. Excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1996-12-31

    A short introduction to instrumental resolution is followed by a discussion of visibilities of phonon modes due to their eigenvectors. High precision phonon dispersion curves in GaAs are presented together with `ab initio` calculations. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is taken as an example of selected visibility due to group theory. By careful determination of phonon intensities eigenvectors can be determined, such as in Silicon and Diamond. The investigation of magnon modes is shown for the garnet Fe{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3}, where also a quantum gap due to zero point spin fluctuations was observed. The study of the splitting of excitons in CsFeCl{sub 3} in an applied magnetic field demonstrates the possibilities of neutron polarisation analysis, which made it possible to observe a mode crossing. An outlook to inelastic X-ray scattering with very high energy resolution of synchrotron radiation is given with the examples of phonons in Beryllium and in water. (author) 19 figs., 36 refs.

  1. Field-dependent molecular ionization and excitation energies: Implications for electrically insulating liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Davari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular ionization potential has a relatively strong electric-field dependence as compared to the excitation energies which has implications for electrical insulation since the excited states work as an energy sink emitting light in the UV/VIS region. At some threshold field, all the excited states of the molecule have vanished and the molecule is a two-state system with the ground state and the ionized state, which has been hypothesized as a possible origin of different streamer propagation modes. Constrained density-functional theory is used to calculate the field-dependent ionization potential of different types of molecules relevant for electrically insulating liquids. The low singlet-singlet excitation energies of each molecule have also been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. It is shown that low-energy singlet-singlet excitation of the type n → π* (lone pair to unoccupied π* orbital has the ability to survive at higher fields. This type of excitation can for example be found in esters, diketones and many color dyes. For alkanes (as for example n-tridecane and cyclohexane on the other hand, all the excited states, in particular the σ → σ* excitations vanish in electric fields higher than 10 MV/cm. Further implications for the design of electrically insulating dielectric liquids based on the molecular ionization potential and excitation energies are discussed.

  2. Metastable states and energy flow pathway in square graphene resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yisen; Zhu, Zhigang; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Liang

    2018-01-01

    Nonlinear interaction between flexural modes is critical to heat conductivity and mechanical vibration of two-dimensional materials such as graphene. Much effort has been devoted to understand the underlying mechanism. In this paper, we examine solely the out-of-plane flexural modes and identify their energy flow pathway during thermalization process. The key is the development of a universal scheme that numerically characterizes the strength of nonlinear interactions between normal modes. In particular, for our square graphene system, the modes are grouped into four classes by their distinct symmetries. The couplings are significantly larger within a class than between classes. As a result, the equations for the normal modes in the same class as the initially excited one can be approximated by driven harmonic oscillators, therefore, they get energy almost instantaneously. Because of the hierarchical organization of the mode coupling, the energy distribution among the modes will arrive at a stable profile, where most of the energy is localized on a few modes, leading to the formation of "natural package" and metastable states. The dynamics for modes in other symmetry classes follows a Mathieu type of equation, thus, interclass energy flow, when the initial excitation energy is small, starts typically when there is a mode that lies in the unstable region in the parameter space of Mathieu equation. Due to strong coupling of the modes inside the class, the whole class will get energy and be lifted up by the unstable mode. This characterizes the energy flow pathway of the system. These results bring fundamental understandings to the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem in two-dimensional systems with complex potentials, and reveal clearly the physical picture of dynamical interactions between the flexural modes, which will be crucial to the understanding of their abnormal contribution to heat conduction and nonlinear mechanical vibrations.

  3. Production of O2(1Δ) in flowing plasmas using spiker-sustainer excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Y.; Arakoni, Ramesh A.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    In chemical oxygen iodine lasers (COILs), oscillation at 1.315 μm in atomic iodine ( 2 P 1/2 → 2 P 3/2 ) is produced by collisional excitation transfer of O 2 ( 1 Δ) to I 2 and I. Plasma production of O 2 ( 1 Δ) in electrical COILs (eCOILs) eliminates liquid phase generators. For the flowing plasmas used for eCOILs (He/O 2 , a few to tens of torr), self-sustaining electron temperatures, T e , are 2-3 eV whereas excitation of O 2 ( 1 Δ) optimizes with T e =1-1.5 eV. One method to increase O 2 ( 1 Δ) production is by lowering the average value of T e using spiker-sustainer (SS) excitation where a high power pulse (spiker) is followed by a lower power period (sustainer). Excess ionization produced by the spiker enables the sustainer to operate with a lower T e . Previous investigations suggested that SS techniques can significantly raise yields of O 2 ( 1 Δ). In this paper, we report on the results from a two-dimensional computational investigation of radio frequency (rf) excited flowing He/O 2 plasmas with emphasis on SS excitation. We found that the efficiency of SS methods generally increase with increasing frequency by producing a higher electron density, lower T e , and, as a consequence, a more efficient production of O 2 ( 1 Δ)

  4. A Miniature Radial-Flow Wind Turbine Using Piezoelectric Transducers and Magnetic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, H.; Yeatman, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a miniature radial-flow piezoelectric wind turbine for harvesting airflow energy. The turbine's transduction is achieved by magnetic “plucking”of a piezoelectric beam by the passing rotor. The magnetic coupling is formed by two magnets on the beam's free end and on the rotor plate. Frequency up-conversion is realized by the magnetic excitation, allowing the rotor to rotate at any low frequency while the beam can vibrate at its resonant frequency after each plucking. The operating range of the device is, therefore, expanded by this mechanism. Two arrangements of magnetic orientation have been investigated, showing that the repulsive arrangement has higher output power. The influence of the vertical gap between magnets was also examined, providing guidance for the final design. A prototype was built and tested in a wind tunnel. A peak power output of 159 μW was obtained with a 270 kΩ load at 2.7 m/s airflow speed. The device started working at 3.5 m/s and kept operating when the airflow speed fell to 1.84 m/s.

  5. Guidelines for random excitation forces due to cross flow in steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.E.; Pettigrew, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Random excitation forces can cause low-amplitude tube motion that will result in long-term fretting-wear or fatigue. To prevent these tube failures in steam generators and other heat exchangers, designers and trouble-shooters must have guidelines that incorporate random or turbulent fluid forces. Experiments designed to measure fluid forces have been carried out at Chalk River Laboratories and at other labs around the world. The data from these experiments have been studied and collated to determine suitable guidelines for random excitation forces. In this paper, a guideline for random excitation forces in single-phase cross flow is presented in the form of normalised spectra that are applicable to a wide range of flow conditions and tube frequencies. In particular, the experimental results used in this study were carried out over the full range of flow conditions found in a nuclear steam generator. The proposed guidelines are applicable to steam generators, condensers, reheaters and other shell-and-tube heat exchangers. They may be used for flow-induced vibration analysis of new or existing components, as input to vibration analysis computer codes and as specifications in procurement documents. (author)

  6. Energy harvesting from coherent resonance of horizontal vibration of beam excited by vertical base motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, C. B.; Qin, W. Y. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-15

    This letter investigates the energy harvesting from the horizontal coherent resonance of a vertical cantilever beam subjected to the vertical base excitation. The potential energy of the system has two symmetric potential wells. So, under vertical excitation, the system can jump between two potential wells, which will lead to the large vibration in horizontal direction. Two piezoelectric patches are pasted to harvest the energy. From experiment, it is found that the vertical excitation can make the beam turn to be bistable. The system can transform vertical vibration into horizontal vibration of low frequency when excited by harmonic motion. The horizontal coherence resonance can be observed when excited by a vertical white noise. The corresponding output voltages of piezoelectric films reach high values.

  7. Potential energy surface of excited semiconductors: Graphene quantum dot and BODIPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colherinhas, Guilherme [Departamento de Física-CEPAE, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74690-900 Goiânia (Brazil); Fileti, Eudes Eterno [Instituto de Ciência e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, 12231-280 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Chaban, Vitaly V., E-mail: vvchaban@gmail.com [Instituto de Ciência e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, 12231-280 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-08-02

    Graphical abstract: Excitation of graphene quantum dot significantly alters its interaction with water. - Abstract: Binding energy (BE) is an important descriptor in chemistry, which determines thermodynamics and phase behavior of a given substance. BE between two molecules is not directly accessible from the experiment. It has to be reconstructed from cohesive energies, vaporization heats, etc. We report BE for the excited states of two semiconductor molecules – boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) and graphene quantum dot (GQD) – with water. We show, for the first time, that excitation increases BE twofold at an optimal separation (energy minimum position), whereas higher separations lead to higher differences. Interestingly, the effects of excitation are similar irrespective of the dominant binding interactions (van der Waals or electrostatic) in the complex. This new knowledge is important for simulations of the excited semiconductors by simplified interaction functions.

  8. Fundamentally excited flow past a surface-mounted rib. Part II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, the selection of proper excitation parameters requires the complete understanding of turbulent transport quantities and their evolution in the reattaching shear layer. Hence, the detailed turbulent statistics and energy budget of the reattaching shear layer behind a surface-mounted rib is the focus of this paper.

  9. Performance of SOPPA-based methods in the calculation of vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Pitzner-Frydendahl, Henrik Frank; Buse, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    methods, the original SOPPA method as well as SOPPA(CCSD) and RPA(D) in the calculation of vertical electronic excitation energies and oscillator strengths is investigated for a large benchmark set of 28 medium-size molecules with 139 singlet and 71 triplet excited states. The results are compared...

  10. Hadron fragment emission in cluster excitation processes at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Zs.

    1985-12-01

    An extended version of the cluster excitation model is proposed to describe the emission of various particle types in nuclear reactions in a consistent way. At first pion, proton deuteron and triton spectra from neutron-carbon interactions at 545 MeV in the angular region from deg 73 to deg 165 were tried to interpret by the model. The results are compared with model calculations. (author)

  11. Equations for the kinetic modeling of supersonically flowing electrically excited lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, R.C.

    1973-01-01

    The equations for the kinetic modeling of a supersonically flowing electrically excited laser system are presented. The work focuses on the use of diatomic gases, in particular carbon monoxide mixtures. The equations presented include the vibrational rate equation which describes the vibrational population distribution, the electron, ion and electronic level rate equations, the gasdynamic equations for an ionized gas in the presence of an applied electric field, and the free electron Boltzmann equation including flow and gradient coupling terms. The model developed accounts for vibration--vibration collisions, vibration-translation collisions, electron-molecule inelastic excitation and superelastic de-excitation collisions, charge particle collisions, ionization and three body recombination collisions, elastic collisions, and radiative decay, all of which take place in such a system. A simplified form of the free electron Boltzmann equation is developed and discussed with emphasis placed on its coupling with the supersonic flow. A brief description of a possible solution procedure for the set of coupled equations is discussed

  12. Low energy nuclear spin excitations in Ho metal investigated by high resolution neutron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Tapan; Jalarvo, Niina

    2013-04-17

    We have investigated the low energy excitations in metallic Ho by high resolution neutron spectroscopy. We found at T = 3 K clear inelastic peaks in the energy loss and energy gain sides, along with the central elastic peak. The energy of this low energy excitation, which is 26.59 ± 0.02 μeV at T = 3 K, decreased continuously and became zero at TN ≈ 130 K. By fitting the data in the temperature range 100-127.5 K with a power law we obtained the power-law exponent β = 0.37 ± 0.02, which agrees with the expected value β = 0.367 for a three-dimensional Heisenberg model. Thus the energy of the low energy excitations can be associated with the order parameter.

  13. Mean excitation energies for use in Bethe's stopping-power formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.J.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    A review has been made of the mean excitation energies that can be derived from the analysis of stopping-power and range measurements, and from semi-empirical dipole oscillator-strength distributions for gases and dielectric-response functions for solids. On the basis of this review, mean excitation energies have been selected for 43 elemental substances and 54 compounds. Additivity rules have also been considered which allow one to estimate the mean excitation energies for compounds for which no direct data are available. These additivity rules are based on the use of mean excitation energies for atomic constituents which, to a certain extent, take into account the effects of chemical binding and physical aggregation

  14. Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, R.N. (comp.)

    1984-12-01

    This volume covers electronic excitations, momentum distributions, high energy photons, and a wrap-up session. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  15. Optogalvanic monitoring of collisional transfer of laser excitation energy in a neon RF plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    The optogalvanic signals produced by pulsed laser excitation of 1s5--2p8 and 1s5-2p9 (Paschen notation) transition by a ∼29 MHz radiofrequency (rf) discharge at ∼5 torr have been investigated. The optogalvanic signal produced by 1s5-2p9 excitations indicates that there is transfer of energy from the 2p9 state to some other state. The state to which this energy is transferred is believed to be mainly the 2p8 state because of the very small energy gap between the 2p9 and 2p8 states. To verify this transfer, the 1s5-2p8 transition was investigated. The similarity of the temporal profiles of the optogalvanic signals in both excitations confirms the collisional transfer of laser excitation energy from 2p9 to 2p8

  16. Energy, entropy, and the flow of nature

    CERN Document Server

    Sherman, Thomas F

    2018-01-01

    A fresh and unified exploration of the laws that govern natural change, examining the historical roots and meaning of the concepts of energy and entropy. All natural processes--mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, and biological--are viewed as a flow across free energy gradients that interact with one another.

  17. Influence of excited states on the energy loss of fast ions in a hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-8046 Garching, Germany (DE)); Peter, T. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, D-6500 Mainz, Germany (DE))

    1991-04-01

    Stopping power calculations of fast ions penetrating a hydrogen plasma target in local thermodynamic equilibrium at arbitrary temperatures are performed. Excited state contributions to the energy loss are included in the framework of the Bethe formalism. Average ionization potentials for the excited ions are given in a quasiclassical approximation. It is shown that the net effect is an enhancement of the stopping power compared to the energy loss when assuming all atoms to be in their ground state.

  18. California energy flow in 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1995-04-01

    Energy consumption in the state of California decreased about 3% in 1993 reflecting continuation of the recession that was manifest in a moribund construction industry and a high state unemployment that ran counter to national recovery trends. Residential/commercial use decreased slightly reflecting a mild winter in the populous southern portion of the state, a decrease that was offset to some extent by an increase in the state population. Industrial consumption of purchased energy declined substantially as did production of self-generated electricity for in-house use. Consumption in the transportation sector decreased slightly. The amount of power transmitted by the utilities was at 1992 levels; however a smaller proportion was produced by the utilities themselves. Generation of electricity by nonutilities, primarily cogenerators and small power producers, was the largest of any state in the US. The growth in the number of private power producers combined with increased amounts of electricity sold to the public utilities set the stage for the sweeping proposals before the California Public Utility Commission to permit direct sales from the nonutilities to retail customers. California production of both oil and natural gas declined; however, to meet demand only the imports of natural gas increased. A break in the decade-long drought during the 1992--1993 season resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of hydroelectricity generated during the year. Geothermal energy`s contribution increased substantially because of the development of new resources by small power producers. Decline in steam production continued at The Geysers, the state`s largest field, principally owned and managed by a public utility. Increases in windpower constituted 1--1/2% of the total electric supply--up slightly from 1992. Several solar photo voltaic demonstration plants were in operation, but their contribution remained small.

  19. Coulomb excitation of $^{68}_{28}Ni_{40}$ at safe energies

    CERN Document Server

    Bree, N; Butler, P A; Cederkäll, J; Davinson, T; Delahaye, P; Eberth, J; Fedorov, D; Fedosseev, V; Fraile, L M; Franchoo, S; Georgiev, G; Gladnishki, K; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Iwanicki, J; Jolie, J; Köster, U; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Marsh, B A; Niedermaier, O; Reiter, P; Scheit, H; Schwalm, D; Sieber, T; Vande Walle, J; Van Duppen, P; Warr, N; Weisshaar, D; Wenander, F; Zemlyanoy, S; Instituutvoor Kern-en Stralingsfysica; Leuven, K U

    2008-01-01

    The $B(E2;0^+\\to2^+)$ value in $^{68}$Ni has been measured using Coulomb excitation at safe energies. The $^{68}$Ni radioactive beam was post-accelerated at the ISOLDE facility (CERN) to 2.9 MeV/u. The emitted $\\gamma$ rays were detected by the MINIBALL detector array. A kinematic particle reconstruction was performed in order to increase the measured c.m. angular range of the excitation cross section. The obtained value of 2.8$\\pm$1.0 10$^2$ e$^2$fm$^4$ is in good agreement with the value measured at intermediate energy Coulomb excitation, confirming the low transition probability.

  20. Effect of magnetic field on the impurity binding energy of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of external magnetic field on the excited state energies in a spher- ical quantum dot was studied. The impurity energy and binding energy were calculated using the variational method within the effective mass approximation and finite barrier potential. The results showed that by increasing the magnetic ...

  1. Effect of magnetic field on the impurity binding energy of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of external magnetic field on the excited state energies in a spherical quantum dot was studied. The impurity energy and binding energy were calculated using the variational method within the effective mass approximation and finite barrier potential. The results showed that by increasing the magnetic field, the ...

  2. The structure of nuclear states at low, intermediate and high excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, V.G.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that within the model based on the quasiparticle-phonon interaction one can obtain the description of few-quasiparticle components of nuclear states at low, intermediate and high excitation energies. For the low-lying states the energy of each level is calculated. The few-quasiparticle components at intermediate and high excitation energies are represented to be averaged in certain energy intervals and their characteri stics are given as the corresponding strength functions. The fragmentation of single-particle states in deformed nuclei is studied. It is shown that in the distribution of the single-particle strength alongside with a large maximum there appear local maxima and the distribution itself has a long tail. The dependence of neutron strength functions on the excitation energy is investigated for the transfer reaction of the type (d,p) and (d,t). The s,- p,- and d-wave neutron strength functions are calculated at the neutron binding energy Bn. A satisfactory agreement with experiment is obtained. The energies and Elambda-strength functions for giant multipole resonances in deformed nuclei are calculated. The energies of giant quadrupole and octupole resonances are calculated. Their widths and fine structure are being studied. It is stated that to study the structure of highly excited states it is necessary to find the values of many-quasiparticle components of the wave functions. The ways of experimental determination of these components based on the study of γ-transitions between highly excited states are discussed

  3. Energy risk management through self-exciting marked point process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Crude oil is a dynamically traded commodity that affects many economies. We propose a collection of marked self-exciting point processes with dependent arrival rates for extreme events in oil markets and related risk measures. The models treat the time among extreme events in oil markets as a stochastic process. The main advantage of this approach is its capability to capture the short, medium and long-term behavior of extremes without involving an arbitrary stochastic volatility model or a prefiltration of the data, as is common in extreme value theory applications. We make use of the proposed model in order to obtain an improved estimate for the Value at Risk in oil markets. Empirical findings suggest that the reliability and stability of Value at Risk estimates improve as a result of finer modeling approach. This is supported by an empirical application in the representative West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and Brent crude oil markets. - Highlights: • We propose marked self-exciting point processes for extreme events in oil markets. • This approach captures the short and long-term behavior of extremes. • We improve the estimates for the VaR in the WTI and Brent crude oil markets

  4. Blade design loads on the flow exciting force in centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y; Yang, A L; Langand, D P; Dai, R

    2012-01-01

    The three-dimensional viscous flow field of two centrifugal pumps, which have the same volute, design head, design flow rate and rotational speed but the blade design load, are analyzed based on large eddy simulation. The comparisons are implemented including the hydraulic efficiencies, flow field characteristics, pressure pulsations and unsteady forces applied on the impellers to investigate the effect of the design blade load on hydraulic performance and flow exciting force. The numerical results show that the efficiency of the pump, the impeller blade of which has larger design load, is improved by 1.1%∼2.9% compared to the centrifugal pump with lower blade design load. The pressure fluctuation of the pump with high design load is more remarkable. Its maximum amplitude of coefficient of static pressure is higher by 43% than the latter. At the same time the amplitude of unsteady radial force is increased by 11.6% in the time domain. The results also imply that the blade design load is an important factor on the excitation force in centrifugal pumps.

  5. California energy flow in 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, C. K.; Borg, I. Y.

    1981-03-01

    Energy use in California during 1979 differed significantly from 1978. Overall use of natural gas in the state increased substantially (14.3%) due principally to greater use for electrical power production; 4% more gas was used for electrical power generation in 1979 than in 1978 and 21% more than in 1977. Use of fuel oil for electrical generation remained at the 1978 level but below the high 1977 level, which reflected substitution of oil for hydroelectric power during the 1976 to 1977 drought. Together, oil and gas accounted for 80% of the fuels used to generate electricity. Crude-oil imports principally from Indonesia fell substantially; however, use of Alaskan North Slope oil increased so that the net increase in crude oil use was up about 4%. The transportation end-use sector consumed about as much as in 1978 despite shortages in early 1979 associated with the Iranian revolution. While sales fell slightly, sales of high-sulfur residual oils (Bunker C) increased markedly. Transportation represents 38% of total energy consumption in California.

  6. Photosensitized, energy transfer-mediated organometallic catalysis through electronically excited nickel(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welin, Eric R; Le, Chip; Arias-Rotondo, Daniela M; McCusker, James K; MacMillan, David W C

    2017-01-27

    Transition metal catalysis has traditionally relied on organometallic complexes that can cycle through a series of ground-state oxidation levels to achieve a series of discrete yet fundamental fragment-coupling steps. The viability of excited-state organometallic catalysis via direct photoexcitation has been demonstrated. Although the utility of triplet sensitization by energy transfer has long been known as a powerful activation mode in organic photochemistry, it is surprising to recognize that photosensitization mechanisms to access excited-state organometallic catalysts have lagged far behind. Here, we demonstrate excited-state organometallic catalysis via such an activation pathway: Energy transfer from an iridium sensitizer produces an excited-state nickel complex that couples aryl halides with carboxylic acids. Detailed mechanistic studies confirm the role of photosensitization via energy transfer. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Dual excitation multi-fluorescence flow cytometry for detailed analyses of viability and apoptotic cell transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mazzini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The discrimination of live/dead cells as well as the detection of apoptosis is a frequent need in many areas of experimental biology. Cell proliferation is linked to apoptosis and controlled by several genes. During the cell life, specific events can stimulate proliferation while others may trigger the apoptotic pathway. Very few methods (i.e. TUNEL are now available for studies aimed at correlation between apoptosis and proliferation. Therefore, there is interest in developing new methodological approaches that are able to correlate apoptosis to the cell cycle phases. Recently new approaches have been proposed to detect and enumerate apoptotic cells by flow cytometry. Among these, the most established and applied are those based on the cell membrane modifications induced in the early phases of the apoptotic process. The dye pair Hoechst 33342 (HO and Propidium Iodide (PI, thanks to their peculiar characteristics to be respectively permeable and impermeable to the intact cell membrane, seems to be very useful. Unfortunately the spectral interaction of these dyes generates a consistent “energy transfer” from HO to PI. The co-presence of the dyes in a nucleus results in a modification in the intensity of both the emitted fluorescences. In order to designate the damaged cells (red fluorescence to the specific cell cycle phases (blue fluorescence, we have tested different staining protocols aimed to minimize the interference of these dyes as much as possible. In cell culture models, we are able to detect serum-starved apoptotic cells as well as to designate their exact location in the cell cycle phases using a very low PI concentration. Using a Partec PAS flow cytometer equipped with HBO lamp and argon ion laser, a double UV/blue excitation has been performed. This analytical approach is able to discriminate live blue cells from the damaged (blue-red ones even at 0.05 ?g/mL PI. The same instrumental setting allows performing other multi

  8. Isobar excitations and low energy spectra of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerski, P.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study the possible influence of inner excitations of nucleons into the Δ(3,3)-resonance on the low lying spectra of light nuclei like 12 C and 16 O. Before we can study the effect of such exotic configurations one has to perform a reliable investigation within the normal nuclear model, which is based on a microscopic theory. This is achieved by performing RPA (Random Phase Approximation) calculations using a realistic residual interaction derived from the Brueckner G-matrix. An efficient parametrisation of the residual interaction is introduced and the reliability of the more phenomenological parametrisations which are generally used is discussed. Within such realistic calculations, the isobar effects are small. (orig.) [de

  9. Downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in transonic diffuser flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T.; Coakley, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in two-dimensional, separated transonic diffuser flows has been conducted numerically by solving the compressible, Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation turbulence model. It was found that the unsteady diffuser flowfields are very sensitive to the location of the downstream boundary. Extension of the diffuser downstream boundary significantly reduces the frequency and amplitude of oscillations for pressure, velocity and shock. Computational results suggest that the mechanism causing the self-excited oscillation changes from viscous convective wave dominated oscillations to inviscid acoustic wave dominated oscillations when the location of downstream boundary varies from 8.66 to 134.7 throat height. The existence of a suction slot in the experimental setup obscures the physical downstream boundary and, therefore, presents a difficulty for quantitative comparisons between computation and experiment.

  10. Multi-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy based on modified multi-energy constrained iterative deconvolution algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wenlong; Cai, Zhijian; Zhou, Hongwu; Wu, Jianhong

    2013-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy is fast and nondestructive, and it is widely used in chemistry, biomedicine, food safety and other areas. However, Raman spectroscopy is often hampered by strong fluorescence background, especially in food additives detection and biomedicine researching. In this paper, one efficient technique was the multi-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (MERDS) which incorporated a series of small wavelength-shift wavelengths as excitation sources. A modified multi-energy constrained iterative deconvolution (MMECID) algorithm was proposed to reconstruct the Raman Spectroscopy. Computer simulation and experiments both demonstrated that the Raman spectrum can be well reconstructed from large fluorescence background. The more excitation sources used, the better signal to noise ratio got. However, many excitation sources were equipped on the Raman spectrometer, which increased the complexity of the experimental system. Thus, a trade-off should be made between the number of excitation frequencies and experimental complexity.

  11. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from flow-induced vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D-A; Ko, H-H

    2010-01-01

    A new piezoelectric energy harvester for harnessing energy from flow-induced vibration is developed. It converts flow energy into electrical energy by piezoelectric conversion with oscillation of a piezoelectric film. A finite element model is developed in order to estimate the generated voltage of the piezoelectric laminate subjected to a distributed load. Prototypes of the energy harvester are fabricated and tested. Experimental results show that an open circuit output voltage of 2.2 V pp and an instantaneous output power of 0.2 µW are generated when the excitation pressure oscillates with an amplitude of 1.196 kPa and a frequency of about 26 Hz. The solution of the generated voltage based on the finite element model agrees well with the experiments. Based on the finite element model, the effects of the piezoelectric film dimensions, the fluid pressure applied to the harvester and types of piezoelectric layer on the output voltage of the harvester can be investigated.

  12. Comparison of excitation energy transfer in cyanobacterial photosystem I in solution and immobilized on conducting glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Sebastian; Giera, Wojciech; D'Haene, Sandrine; van Grondelle, Rienk; Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof

    2017-05-01

    Excitation energy transfer in monomeric and trimeric forms of photosystem I (PSI) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in solution or immobilized on FTO conducting glass was compared using time-resolved fluorescence. Deposition of PSI on glass preserves bi-exponential excitation decay of ~4-7 and ~21-25 ps lifetimes characteristic of PSI in solution. The faster phase was assigned in part to photochemical quenching (charge separation) of excited bulk chlorophylls and in part to energy transfer from bulk to low-energy (red) chlorophylls. The slower phase was assigned to photochemical quenching of the excitation equilibrated over bulk and red chlorophylls. The main differences between dissolved and immobilized PSI (iPSI) are: (1) the average excitation decay in iPSI is about 11 ps, which is faster by a few ps than for PSI in solution due to significantly faster excitation quenching of bulk chlorophylls by charge separation (~10 ps instead of ~15 ps) accompanied by slightly weaker coupling of bulk and red chlorophylls; (2) the number of red chlorophylls in monomeric PSI increases twice-from 3 in solution to 6 after immobilization-as a result of interaction with neighboring monomers and conducting glass; despite the increased number of red chlorophylls, the excitation decay accelerates in iPSI; (3) the number of red chlorophylls in trimeric PSI is 4 (per monomer) and remains unchanged after immobilization; (4) in all the samples under study, the free energy gap between mean red (emission at ~710 nm) and mean bulk (emission at ~686 nm) emitting states of chlorophylls was estimated at a similar level of 17-27 meV. All these observations indicate that despite slight modifications, dried PSI complexes adsorbed on the FTO surface remain fully functional in terms of excitation energy transfer and primary charge separation that is particularly important in the view of photovoltaic applications of this photosystem.

  13. Quenching of the Giant Dipole Resonance Strength at High Excitation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonocito, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Delaunay, F.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frascaria, N.; Hongmei, F.; Lima, V.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    2007-05-01

    The evolution with excitation energy of the Giant Dipole Resonance features in nuclei of mass A≈108-136 is reviewed. We first discuss the results of the experiments performed with MEDEA studying the GDR gamma decay from hot nuclei populated at excitation energies above 300 MeV. The focus of the paper is on the excitation energy region between 160 and 290 MeV. This region has been investigated through the study of the reactions 116Sn + 12C at 17 and 23 A MeV, and 116Sn + 24Mg at 17 A MeV. Gamma-rays were detected using MEDEA in coincidence with evaporation residues detected in MACISTE. The analysis of the gamma-ray spectra and their comparison with statistical calculations are presented. The comparison with γ-ray spectra from the reaction 36Ar + 98Mo at higher excitation energies shows a coherent scenario where a progressive reduction of γ multiplicity relative to predictions for 100% of the Energy Weighted Sum Rule is observed above 200 MeV excitation energy. Finally, the existence of a link between disappearance of collective motion and the liquid-gas phase transitions is discussed.

  14. Quenching of the Giant Dipole Resonance Strength at High Excitation Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santonocito, D. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Blumenfeld, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, F-91406 Orsay (France); Agodi, C. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Alba, R. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Bellia, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Coniglione, R. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Delaunay, F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, F-91406 Orsay (France); Del Zoppo, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Finocchiaro, P. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Frascaria, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, F-91406 Orsay (France); Hongmei, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Lima, V. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, F-91406 Orsay (France); Maiolino, C. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Migneco, E. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Piattelli, P. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sapienza, P. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Scarpaci, J.A. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, F-91406 Orsay (France)

    2007-05-15

    The evolution with excitation energy of the Giant Dipole Resonance features in nuclei of mass A{approx}108-136 is reviewed. We first discuss the results of the experiments performed with MEDEA studying the GDR gamma decay from hot nuclei populated at excitation energies above 300 MeV. The focus of the paper is on the excitation energy region between 160 and 290 MeV. This region has been investigated through the study of the reactions {sup 116}Sn + {sup 12}C at 17 and 23A MeV, and {sup 116}Sn + {sup 24}Mg at 17A MeV. Gamma-rays were detected using MEDEA in coincidence with evaporation residues detected in MACISTE. The analysis of the gamma-ray spectra and their comparison with statistical calculations are presented. The comparison with {gamma}-ray spectra from the reaction {sup 36}Ar + {sup 98}Mo at higher excitation energies shows a coherent scenario where a progressive reduction of {gamma} multiplicity relative to predictions for 100% of the Energy Weighted Sum Rule is observed above 200 MeV excitation energy. Finally, the existence of a link between disappearance of collective motion and the liquid-gas phase transitions is discussed.

  15. Quenching of the Giant Dipole Resonance Strength at High Excitation Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santonocito, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Delaunay, F.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frascaria, N.; Hongmei, F.; Lima, V.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution with excitation energy of the Giant Dipole Resonance features in nuclei of mass A∼108-136 is reviewed. We first discuss the results of the experiments performed with MEDEA studying the GDR gamma decay from hot nuclei populated at excitation energies above 300 MeV. The focus of the paper is on the excitation energy region between 160 and 290 MeV. This region has been investigated through the study of the reactions 116 Sn + 12 C at 17 and 23A MeV, and 116 Sn + 24 Mg at 17A MeV. Gamma-rays were detected using MEDEA in coincidence with evaporation residues detected in MACISTE. The analysis of the gamma-ray spectra and their comparison with statistical calculations are presented. The comparison with γ-ray spectra from the reaction 36 Ar + 98 Mo at higher excitation energies shows a coherent scenario where a progressive reduction of γ multiplicity relative to predictions for 100% of the Energy Weighted Sum Rule is observed above 200 MeV excitation energy. Finally, the existence of a link between disappearance of collective motion and the liquid-gas phase transitions is discussed

  16. Linker proteins enable ultrafast excitation energy transfer in the phycobilisome antenna system of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganou, C; David, L; Adir, N; Mkandawire, M

    2016-01-01

    We applied a femtosecond flash method, using induced transient absorption changes, to obtain a time-resolved view of excitation energy transfer in intact phycobilisomes of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus at room temperature. Our measurement of an excitation energy transfer rate of 888 fs in phycobilisomes shows the existence of ultrafast kinetics along the phycocyanin rod subcomplex to the allophycocyanin core that is faster than expected for previous excitation energy transfer based on Förster theory in phycobilisomes. Allophycocyanin in the core further transfers energy to the terminal emitter(s) in 17 ps. In the phycobilisome, rod doublets composed of hexameric phycocyanin discs and internal linker proteins are arranged in a parallel fashion, facilitating direct rod-rod interactions. Excitonic splitting likely drives rod absorption at 635 nm as a result of strong coupling between β84 chromophores (20 ± 1 Å) in adjacent hexamers. In comparison to the absorbance of the phycobilisome antenna system of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, which possesses a single rod structure, the linkers in T. vulcanus rods induce a 17 nm red shift in the absorbance spectrum. Furthermore, the kinetics of 888 fs indicates that the presence of the linker protein induces ultrafast excitation energy transfer between phycocyanin and allophycocyanin inside the phycobilisome, which is faster than all previous excitation energy transfer in phycobilisome subunits or sub-complexes reported to date.

  17. Benzoxazinone derivatives: new fluorescent probes for two-color flow cytometry analysis using one excitation wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsigny, M; Midoux, P; Le Bris, M T; Roche, A C; Valeur, B

    1989-01-01

    A new class of fluorescent dye which upon excitation at 488 nm turns red is shown to be probe-suitable for using in flow cytometry alone or in conjunction with fluorescein derivatives. 7-dimethylamino 3-(p-formylstyryl) 1,4 benzoxazin 2-one is suitable for rendering microorganisms, such as Plasmodium merozoites and cells detectable by flow cytometry, allowing a dual fluorescence analysis when the cells are labelled with suitable fluoresceinylated ligands such as fluorescein labeled neoglycoproteins or antibodies. The synthesis of the new benzoxazinone derivatives is described: p-[beta-(7-dimethylamino 1,4 benzoxazin 2-one 3-yl)-vinyl]-phenylpropenoic acid can be easily activated as a hydroxysuccinimide derivative and linked to amino groups of polypeptides. Hydrophilic polypeptides such as poly-L-lysine or glycosylated polymers combined with this new fluorescent dye are shown to be helpful in analyzing cell surface receptors, in dual fluorescence flow cytometry analysis, using a single excitation wavelength and two sets of compounds labeled with the new benzoxazinone derivative and with fluorescein isothiocyanate, respectively. The new benzoxazinone derivative has a high molar absorbance, a good quantum yield fluorescence when it is bound to hydrophilic polypeptides and its fluorescence intensity is not dependent on pH in the physiological pH range.

  18. Glass-like, low-energy excitations in neutron-irradiated quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The specific heat and thermal conductivity of neutron-irradiated crystalline quartz have been measured for temperatures approx. = 0.1 to 5 K. Four types of low-energy excitations are observed in the irradiated samples, two of which can be removed selectively by heat treatment. One set of remaining excitations gives rise to low-temperature thermal behavior characteristic of glassy (amorphous) solids. The density of these glass-like excitations can be 50% the density observed in vitreous silica, yet the sample still retains long-range atomic order. In a less-irradiated sample, glass-like excitations may be present with a density only approx. = 2.5% that observed in vitreous silica and possess a similar broad energy spectrum over 0.1 to 1 K

  19. Singlet-triplet splittings from the virial theorem and single-particle excitation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becke, Axel D.

    2018-01-01

    The zeroth-order (uncorrelated) singlet-triplet energy difference in single-particle excited configurations is 2Kif, where Kif is the Coulomb self-energy of the product of the transition orbitals. Here we present a non-empirical, virial-theorem argument that the correlated singlet-triplet energy difference should be half of this, namely, Kif. This incredibly simple result gives vertical HOMO-LUMO excitation energies in small-molecule benchmarks as good as the popular TD-B3LYP time-dependent approach to excited states. For linear acenes and nonlinear polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the performance is significantly better than TD-B3LYP. In addition to the virial theorem, the derivation borrows intuitive pair-density concepts from density-functional theory.

  20. State-selective high-energy excitation of nuclei by resonant positron annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Belov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the annihilation of a positron with a bound atomic electron, the virtual γ photon created may excite the atomic nucleus. We put forward this effect as a spectroscopic tool for an energy-selective excitation of nuclear transitions. This scheme can efficiently populate nuclear levels of arbitrary multipolarities in the MeV regime, including giant resonances and monopole transitions. In certain cases, it may have higher cross sections than the conventionally used Coulomb excitation and it can even occur with high probability when the latter is energetically forbidden.

  1. Numerical simulation of self-excited oscillations in a ramjet inlet-diffuser flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T.; Coakley, T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes numerical simulations of self-excited oscillations in a two-dimensional transonic inlet-diffuser flow by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with a two-equation turbulence model. The calculated amplitudes of oscillations for the terminal shock and the velocity fields compare well with experimental measurements; however, the predicted frequency of oscillations is about 50 percent higher. The formation of a pair of downstream-traveling, counter-rotating vortices at each cycle of velocity fluctuations, as reported experimentally, is vividly revealed by the numerical results.

  2. Probing shape coexistence in neutron-deficient $^{72}$Se via low-energy Coulomb excitation

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-­deficient $^{72}$Se by performing a low-­energy Coulomb excitation measurement. Matrix elements will be determined for low-­lying excited states allowing for a full comparison with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the intrinsic shape of the ground state, and the second 0$^{+}$ state, will be investigated using the quadrupole sum rules method.

  3. Be, Li, He and H decay half-lives at low excitation energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bonilla, C

    2003-01-01

    The Be, Li, He and H decay half-lives of slightly excited nuclei have been determined within a tunneling process through a potential barrier calculated from a generalized liquid drop model and quasimolecular shapes. Analytic formulae allowing to obtain rapidly these different partial half-lives are proposed. For a given decay they depend only on the mass and charge numbers of the emitter, the Q value and the excitation energy. (author)

  4. Excitation and dissociation of molecules by low-energy (0-15 eV) electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    The author deals with excitation and dissociation processes which result from the interaction between low-energy (0.15 eV) electrons and molecules. Low-energy electron-impact spectroscopy is used to gain a better knowledge of the electronic structure of halomethanes, ethylene and some of its halogen substituted derivatives, and some more complex organic molecules. (Auth.)

  5. Generating Excitement: Build Your Own Generator to Study the Transfer of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kurt; Rommel-Esham, Katie; Farthing, Dori; Sheldon, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of energy from one form to another can be difficult to understand. The electrical energy that turns on a lamp may come from the burning of coal, water falling at a hydroelectric plant, nuclear reactions, or gusts of wind caused by the uneven heating of the Earth. The authors have developed and tested an exciting hands-on activity to…

  6. Separating annihilation and excitation energy transfer dynamics in light harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengris, Mikas; Larsen, Delmar S; Valkunas, Leonas; Kodis, Gerdenis; Herrero, Christian; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas; Moore, Ana; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2013-09-26

    The dependence of excitation energy transfer kinetics on the electronic state of the acceptor (ground vs excited) has been resolved with a novel multipulse prePump-Pump-Probe spectroscopy. The primary energy transfer and annihilation dynamics in two model light-harvesting systems were explored: an artificially synthesized carotenoid-zinc-phthalocyanine dyad and a naturally occurring light-harvesting peridinin-chlorophyll protein complex from Amphidinium carterae. Both systems use carotenoid as the primary excitation energy donor with porphyrin chromophores as the acceptor molecules. The prePump-Pump-Probe transient signals were analyzed with Monte Carlo modeling to explicitly address the underlying step-by-step kinetics involved in both excitation migration and annihilation processes. Both energy transfer and annihilation dynamics were demonstrated to occur with approximately the same rate in both systems, regardless of the excitation status of the acceptor pigments. The possible reasons for these observations are discussed in the framework of the Förster energy transfer model.

  7. Range-separated density-functional theory for molecular excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebolini, E.

    2014-01-01

    Linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is nowadays a method of choice to compute molecular excitation energies. However, within the usual adiabatic semi-local approximations, it is not able to describe properly Rydberg, charge-transfer or multiple excitations. Range separation of the electronic interaction allows one to mix rigorously density-functional methods at short range and wave function or Green's function methods at long range. When applied to the exchange functional, it already corrects most of these deficiencies but multiple excitations remain absent as they need a frequency-dependent kernel. In this thesis, the effects of range separation are first assessed on the excitation energies of a partially-interacting system in an analytic and numerical study in order to provide guidelines for future developments of range-separated methods for excitation energy calculations. It is then applied on the exchange and correlation TDDFT kernels in a single-determinant approximation in which the long-range part of the correlation kernel vanishes. A long-range frequency-dependent second-order correlation kernel is then derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation and added perturbatively to the range-separated TDDFT kernel in order to take into account the effects of double excitations. (author)

  8. Influence of collision energy and vibrational excitation on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations of H+HBr→H2+Br reaction have been performed on a recently proposed ab initio potential energy surface. The reaction probability and integral cross section are found to be in fairly good agreement with the available quantum mechanical (QM) results on this surface.

  9. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to graphene. Recent experiments that have been per- formed after our theoretical studies have infact found efficient energy transfer to graphene and the process was found to be useful in identifying graphene flakes both on substrates and in solution.4 Quenching by graphene was also found to be useful in obtaining good.

  10. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of energy transfer to graphene.15,16 We imagine that the. Fermi level is shifted into the conduction band to a level with magnitude of wave vector, kF . To keep the calcu- lations simple, we use the Dirac cone approximation, which allows us to get analytical expressions for the rate at large distances. We note that as we are ...

  11. A Galloping Energy Harvester with Attached Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenko, Petr; Khovanov, Igor; Tucker-Harvey, Sam

    2017-11-01

    Aeroelastic energy harvesters are a promising technology for the operation of wireless sensors and microelectromechanical systems, as well as providing the possibility of harvesting wind energy in applications were conventional wind turbines are ineffective, such as in highly turbulent flows, or unreliable, such as in harsh environmental conditions. The development of aeroelastic energy harvesters to date has focused on the flutter of airfoils, the galloping of prismatic structures, and the vortex induced vibrations. We present a novel type of galloping energy harvester with the flow becoming attached when the oscillation amplitude is high enough. With the flow attached, the harvester blade acts closer to an aerofoil than a bluff body, which results in a higher efficiency. The dynamics of a prototype device has been characterised experimentally with the use of a motion tracking system. The flow structure in the vicinity of the device has been studied using smoke visualisation and PIV measurements. A lumped parameter mathematical model has been developed and related to the experimental results.

  12. Stand-alone excitation synchronous wind power generators with power flow management strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzuen-Lih Chern

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a stand-alone excitation synchronous wind power generator (SESWPG with power flow management strategy (PFMS. The rotor speed of the excitation synchronous generator tracks the utility grid frequency by using servo motor tracking technologies. The automatic voltage regulator governs the exciting current of generator to achieve the control goals of stable voltage. When wind power is less than the needs of the consumptive loading, the proposed PFMS increases motor torque to provide a positive power output for the loads, while keeping the generator speed constant. Conversely, during the periods of wind power greater than output loads, the redundant power of generator production is charged to the battery pack and the motor speed remains constant with very low power consumption. The advantage of the proposed SESWPG is that the generator can directly output stable alternating current (AC electricity without using additional DC–AC converters. The operation principles with software simulation for the system are described in detail. Experimental results of a laboratory prototype are shown to verify the feasibility of the system.

  13. Excitation functions for some evaporation residues identified in the interaction of 20Ne and 93Nb at moderate excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Avinash; Rizvi, I.A.; Gupta, Meenal; Ahamad, Tauseef; Ghugre, S.S.; Sinha, A.K.; Chaubey, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    With the motivation of studying the complete and incomplete fusion reactions, excitation functions for the reactions 93 Nb(Ne, p2n) 110 Sn, 93 Nb(Ne, 2pn) 110 In, 93 Nb(Ne, 2p2n) 109 In, 93 Nb(Ne, αn) 108 In, 93 Nb(Neα2n) 107 In and 93 Nb(Ne, α p n) 107 Cd have been measured at the incident energy ranging from 91.4 MeV - 145 MeV. The well established activation technique followed by off line high purity gamma- ray spectroscopy was employed. The measured excitation functions were compared with the statistical model calculations by using the codes ALICE-91 and Pace-4. The effect of variation of different parameters including level density parameter involved in these codes has also been studied. Excellent agreement was found between theoretical and experimental values in some of the fusion evaporation reaction channels. However, significant enhancement of cross-section observed in α-emission channels may be due to incomplete fusion process. (author)

  14. Onset of quenching of the giant dipole resonance at high excitation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonocito, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Delaunay, F.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Hongmei, F.; Lima, V.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Wieland, O.

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) properties in nuclei of mass A =120 to 132 has been investigated in an excitation energy range between 150 and 270 MeV through the study of complete and nearly complete fusion reactions using 116Sn beams at 17 A and 23 A MeV from the cyclotron of the Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud impinging on 12C and 24Mg targets. γ rays and light charged particles were detected using the multi-element detector array MEDEA in coincidence with evaporation residues detected by using mass and charge identification spectrometry with telescope (MACISTE). Light-charged-particle energy spectra were analyzed within the framework of a multiple-source-emission scenario by using a fitting procedure to determine the amount of pre-equilibrium emission and deduce the excitation energies reached in the compound nuclei. A detailed analysis of the γ -ray spectra and their comparison with statistical model calculations is presented. Evidence of a quenching of the GDR gamma yield was found at 270 MeV excitation energy. The quenching effect becomes progressively more important with increasing excitation energy, as observed when the comparison is extended to data from the reaction 36Ar+96Mo at 37 A MeV where hot nuclei were populated up to 430 MeV excitation energy. A coherent scenario emerges indicating the existence of a limiting excitation energy for the collective motion of about E*/A =2.1 MeV for systems of mass A =105 to 111 while a slightly lower value was observed for nuclei of mass A ˜132 . The existence of a possible link between GDR disappearance and the liquid-gas phase transition is discussed.

  15. Energy Transformations in a Self-Excited Switched Reluctance Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Martinez-Iturbe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wind generation systems require mechanisms that allow optimal adaptation of the generator to varying wind speed and to extract maximum energy from the wind. Robust and affordable high-performance methods are also needed for isolated sites. This paper takes this approach, in which an AC switched reluctance generator is used as a generator with a variable rotor speed. Although the voltage obtained is of insufficient quality to connect the generator directly to the power grid, this kind of generator can be used in isolated sites to charge a battery bank with a simple bridge rectifier. Due to the nonlinear behavior of the machine with the position and current, along with the alternating nature of the current that circulates through its phases, the machine experiences cyclical energy transformations of a mechanical, electrical and magnetic nature. This paper analyzes these transformations for the purpose of providing guidelines for machine design and optimization as a wind turbine in isolated sites.

  16. Energy dependence of 1+ spin excitations in 28Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.; Morlet, M.; Marty, N.; Djalali, C.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Van de Wiele, J.; Mack, A.; Bonin, B.; Fergerson, R.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Lugol, J.C.; Duchazeaubeneix, J.C.; Sakaguchi, H.

    1991-01-01

    Forward-angle cross sections and analyzing powers for the main 1 + T=1 and 1 + T=0 states in 28 Si have been measured by proton inelastic scattering at 200, 400, and 600 MeV bombarding energy. The results are compared with microscopic distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) calculations. The sensitivity to the optical potentials is pointed out. Two DWIA methods give compatible results for the ΔT=1 transition at 200 and 400 MeV, but differ strongly for the ΔT=0 transition at 200 MeV. For both the ΔT=0 and the ΔT=1 transitions no clear dependence on the incident energy can be ascertained for the ratio of the experimental to the theoretical cross section

  17. Comparison of sensitivities and detection limits between direct excitation and secondary excitation modes in energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artz, B.E.; Short, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison was made between the direct tube excitation mode and the secondary target excitation mode using a Kevex 0810 energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence system. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined with two system configurations. The first configuration used a standard, high power, x-ray fluorescence tube to directly excite the specimen. Several x-ray tubes, including chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten, both filtered and not filtered, were employed. The second configuration consisted of using the x-ray tube to excite a secondary target which in turn excited the specimen. Appropriate targets were compared to the direct excitation results. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined for K-series lines for elements from magnesium to barium contained in a low atomic number matrix and in a high atomic number matrix

  18. Possible dynamical limitations to excitation energy storage in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Laurent, F.; Kyanowski, A.; Ardouin, D.; Delagrange, H.; Doubre, H.; Gregoire, C.; Mittig, W.; Peghaire, A.; Peter, J.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Bizard, G.; Lefebvres, F.; Tamain, B.

    1987-01-01

    The dependence of the relative populations of particle unbound states on the associated charged particle multiplicity and on the total kinetic energy of the two decay products was investigated for 40 Ar induced reactions on 197 Au at E/A=60 MeV. The measurements indicate that the relative populations exhibit little sensitivity to the violence of the collision and to the time of emission. Implications of these results upon the dynamics of the reaction are discussed

  19. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong Jae Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well.

  20. Energy and material flows of megacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher A; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-Gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-05-12

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world's 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001-2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth.

  1. Redistribution of Kinetic Energy in Turbulent Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Pumir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In statistically homogeneous turbulent flows, pressure forces provide the main mechanism to redistribute kinetic energy among fluid elements, without net contribution to the overall energy budget. This holds true in both two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D flows, which show fundamentally different physics. As we demonstrate here, pressure forces act on fluid elements very differently in these two cases. We find in numerical simulations that in 3D pressure forces strongly accelerate the fastest fluid elements, and that in 2D this effect is absent. In 3D turbulence, our findings put forward a mechanism for a possibly singular buildup of energy, and thus may shed new light on the smoothness problem of the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation in 3D.

  2. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  3. Low-energy electronic excitations and band-gap renormalization in CuO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödl, Claudia; Ruotsalainen, Kari O.; Sottile, Francesco; Honkanen, Ari-Pekka; Ablett, James M.; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Sirotti, Fausto; Verbeni, Roberto; Al-Zein, Ali; Reining, Lucia; Huotari, Simo

    2017-05-01

    Combining nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments with state-of-the-art ab initio many-body calculations, we investigate the electronic screening mechanisms in strongly correlated CuO in a large range of energy and momentum transfers. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment, including the low-energy charge excitations, allows us to use the calculated dynamical screening as a safe building block for many-body perturbation theory and to elucidate the crucial role played by d -d excitations in renormalizing the band gap of CuO. In this way we can dissect the contributions of different excitations to the electronic self-energy which is illuminating concerning both the general theory and this prototypical material.

  4. Convergence of environment polarization effects in multiscale modeling of excitation energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beerepoot, Maarten; Steindal, Arnfinn Hykkerud; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    of polarization interactions for chromophores in different chemical environments. We find that the rate of convergence of excitation energies with respect to polarization cut-off is much slower for chromophores in an ordered environment such as a protein than for chromophores in a homogeneous medium......We present a systematic investigation of the influence of polarization effects from a surrounding medium on the excitation energies of a chromophore. We use a combined molecular dynamics and polarizable embedding time-dependent density functional theory (PE-TD-DFT) approach for chromophores....... By varying the subset of sites in the environment for which atomic polarizabilities are included, we investigate to what distance from the quantum region explicit polarization effects need to be taken into account in order to provide converged excitation energies. Our study gives new insight into the range...

  5. Charging power optimization for nonlinear vibration energy harvesting systems subjected to arbitrary, persistent base excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Quanqi; Harne, Ryan L.

    2018-01-01

    The vibrations of mechanical systems and structures are often a combination of periodic and random motions. Emerging interest to exploit nonlinearities in vibration energy harvesting systems for charging microelectronics may be challenged by such reality due to the potential to transition between favorable and unfavorable dynamic regimes for DC power delivery. Therefore, a need exists to devise an optimization method whereby charging power from nonlinear energy harvesters remains maximized when excitation conditions are neither purely harmonic nor purely random, which have been the attention of past research. This study meets the need by building from an analytical approach that characterizes the dynamic response of nonlinear energy harvesting platforms subjected to combined harmonic and stochastic base accelerations. Here, analytical expressions are formulated and validated to optimize charging power while the influences of the relative proportions of excitation types are concurrently assessed. It is found that about a 2 times deviation in optimal resistive loads can reduce the charging power by 20% when the system is more prominently driven by harmonic base accelerations, whereas a greater proportion of stochastic excitation results in a 11% reduction in power for the same resistance deviation. In addition, the results reveal that when the frequency of a predominantly harmonic excitation deviates by 50% from optimal conditions the charging power reduces by 70%, whereas the same frequency deviation for a more stochastically dominated excitation reduce total DC power by only 20%. These results underscore the need for maximizing direct current power delivery for nonlinear energy harvesting systems in practical operating environments.

  6. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters under simultaneous parametric and external excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fei; Xia, Guanghui; Wang, Jianguo

    2018-02-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of cantilevered piezoelectric beams is investigated under simultaneous parametric and external excitations. The beam is composed of a substrate and two piezoelectric layers and assumed as an Euler-Bernoulli model with inextensible deformation. A nonlinear distributed parameter model of cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters is proposed using the generalized Hamilton's principle. The proposed model includes geometric and inertia nonlinearity, but neglects the material nonlinearity. Using the Galerkin decomposition method and harmonic balance method, analytical expressions of the frequency-response curves are presented when the first bending mode of the beam plays a dominant role. Using these expressions, we investigate the effects of the damping, load resistance, electromechanical coupling, and excitation amplitude on the frequency-response curves. We also study the difference between the nonlinear lumped-parameter and distributed-parameter model for predicting the performance of the energy harvesting system. Only in the case of parametric excitation, we demonstrate that the energy harvesting system has an initiation excitation threshold below which no energy can be harvested. We also illustrate that the damping and load resistance affect the initiation excitation threshold.

  7. JANUS - A setup for low-energy Coulomb excitation at ReA3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunderberg, E.; Belarge, J.; Bender, P. C.; Bucher, B.; Cline, D.; Elman, B.; Gade, A.; Liddick, S. N.; Longfellow, B.; Prokop, C.; Weisshaar, D.; Wu, C. Y.

    2018-03-01

    A new experimental setup for low-energy Coulomb excitation experiments was constructed in a collaboration between the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of Rochester and was commissioned at the general purpose beam line of NSCL's ReA3 reaccelerator facility. The so-called JANUS setup combines γ-ray detection with the Segmented Ge Array (SeGA) and scattered particle detection using a pair of segmented double-sided Si detectors (Bambino 2). The low-energy Coulomb excitation program that JANUS enables will complement intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation studies that have long been performed at NSCL by providing access to observables that quantify collectivity beyond the first excited state, including the sign and magnitude of excited-state quadrupole moments. In this work, the setup and its performance will be described based on the commissioning run that used stable 78Kr impinging onto a 1.09 mg/cm2208Pb target at a beam energy of 3.9 MeV/u.

  8. Transport coefficients in high-temperature ionized air flows with electronic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Oblapenko, G. P.

    2018-01-01

    Transport coefficients are studied in high-temperature ionized air mixtures using the modified Chapman-Enskog method. The 11-component mixture N2/N2+/N /N+/O2/O2+/O /O+/N O /N O+/e- , taking into account the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of molecules and electronic degrees of freedom of both atomic and molecular species, is considered. Using the PAINeT software package, developed by the authors of the paper, in wide temperature range calculations of the thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion, diffusion, and shear viscosity coefficients for an equilibrium ionized air mixture and non-equilibrium flow conditions for mixture compositions, characteristic of those in shock tube experiments and re-entry conditions, are performed. For the equilibrium air case, the computed transport coefficients are compared to those obtained using simplified kinetic theory algorithms. It is shown that neglecting electronic excitation leads to a significant underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 25 000 K. For non-equilibrium test cases, it is shown that the thermal diffusion coefficients of neutral species and the self-diffusion coefficients of all species are strongly affected by the mixture composition, while the thermal conductivity coefficient is most strongly influenced by the degree of ionization of the flow. Neglecting electronic excitation causes noticeable underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 20 000 K.

  9. An experimentally validated bimorph cantilever model for piezoelectric energy harvesting from base excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erturk, A; Inman, D J

    2009-01-01

    Piezoelectric transduction has received great attention for vibration-to-electric energy conversion over the last five years. A typical piezoelectric energy harvester is a unimorph or a bimorph cantilever located on a vibrating host structure, to generate electrical energy from base excitations. Several authors have investigated modeling of cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters under base excitation. The existing mathematical modeling approaches range from elementary single-degree-of-freedom models to approximate distributed parameter solutions in the sense of Rayleigh–Ritz discretization as well as analytical solution attempts with certain simplifications. Recently, the authors have presented the closed-form analytical solution for a unimorph cantilever under base excitation based on the Euler–Bernoulli beam assumptions. In this paper, the analytical solution is applied to bimorph cantilever configurations with series and parallel connections of piezoceramic layers. The base excitation is assumed to be translation in the transverse direction with a superimposed small rotation. The closed-form steady state response expressions are obtained for harmonic excitations at arbitrary frequencies, which are then reduced to simple but accurate single-mode expressions for modal excitations. The electromechanical frequency response functions (FRFs) that relate the voltage output and vibration response to translational and rotational base accelerations are identified from the multi-mode and single-mode solutions. Experimental validation of the single-mode coupled voltage output and vibration response expressions is presented for a bimorph cantilever with a tip mass. It is observed that the closed-form single-mode FRFs obtained from the analytical solution can successfully predict the coupled system dynamics for a wide range of electrical load resistance. The performance of the bimorph device is analyzed extensively for the short circuit and open circuit resonance

  10. Effect of sound-absorbing coatings on the disturbance evolution in a flow of a mixture of vibrationally excited gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetova, A. I.; Poplavskaya, T. V.; Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Tsyrulnikov, I. S.

    2017-10-01

    The flow around a solid plate and a plate with a sound-absorbing coating at a non-zero angle of attack in a hypersonic flow (M∞=8.44) of a mixture of vibrationally excited carbon dioxide and nitrogen is considered. Numerical simulations are performed by solving two-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations with a two-temperature model of relaxing flows. The vibrational energy as a function of time is defined by the Landau-Teller equation. A skeleton model, which is a set of square elements arranged in a staggered order, is used for simulating the porous coating made of foamed nickel with a porosity coefficient of 95%. The distance between the elements is equal to the pore diameter of the real sound-absorbing material. Data on the evolution of disturbances on the solid plate and on the plate with the sound-absorbing coating are presented for various angles of attack and CO2 concentrations in the mixture. The experimental and calculated data on pressure fluctuations on the plate surfaces are found to be in good agreement. The effects of various parameters of the sound-absorbing coating (depth, length, and location at the flat plate) are considered. It is shown that the sound-absorbing coating significantly reduces the intensity of pressure fluctuations on the plate surface as compared to the solid surface (up to 50% depending on the length and location of the sound-absorbing coating).

  11. Vortex shedding induced energy harvesting from piezoelectric materials in heating, ventilation and air conditioning flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, L A; Cacan, M R; So, P M; Wright, P K

    2012-01-01

    A cantilevered piezoelectric beam is excited in a heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) flow. This excitation is amplified by the interactions between (a) an aerodynamic fin attached at the end of the piezoelectric cantilever and (b) the vortex shedding downstream from a bluff body placed in the air flow ahead of the fin/cantilever assembly. The positioning of small weights along the fin enables tuning of the energy harvester to operate at resonance for flow velocities from 2 to 5 m s −1 , which are characteristic of HVAC ducts. In a 15 cm diameter air duct, power generation of 200 μW for a flow speed of 2.5 m s −1 and power generation of 3 mW for a flow speed of 5 m s −1 was achieved. These power outputs are sufficient to power a wireless sensor node for HVAC monitoring systems or other sensors for smart building technology. (paper)

  12. Behavior of shell effects with the excitation energy in atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egido; Robledo; Martin

    2000-07-03

    We study the behavior of shell effects, like pairing correlations and shape deformations, with the excitation energy in atomic nuclei. The analysis is carried out with the finite temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method and a finite range density dependent force. For the first time, properties associated with the octupole and hexadecupole deformation and with the superdeformation as a function of the excitation energy are studied. Calculations for the well quadrupole deformed 164Er and 162Dy, superdeformed 152Dy, octupole deformed 224Ra, and spherical 118Sn nuclei are shown. We find, in particular, the level density of superdeformed states to be 4 orders of magnitude smaller than for normal deformed ones.

  13. Prediction of Excitation Energies for Conjugated Oligomers and Polymers from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianmin; Tretiak, Sergei; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2010-01-01

    With technological advances, light-emitting conjugated oligomers and polymers have become competitive candidates in the commercial market of light-emitting diodes for display and other technologies, due to the ultralow cost, light weight, and flexibility. Prediction of excitation energies of these systems plays a crucial role in the understanding of their optical properties and device design. In this review article, we discuss the calculation of excitation energies with time-dependent density functional theory, which is one of the most successful methods in the investigation of the dynamical response of molecular systems to external perturbation, owing to its high computational efficiency.

  14. Dependence of Fission-Fragment Properties On Excitation Energy For Neutron-Rich Actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos D.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic fission yields of 250Cf, 244Cm, 240Pu, 239Np and 238U are presented in this work. With this information, the average number of neutrons as a function of the atomic number of the fragments is calculated, which reflects the impact of nuclear structure around Z=50, N=80 on the production of fission fragments. The characteristics of the Super Long, Standard I, Standard II, and Standard III fission channels were extracted from fits of the fragment yields for different ranges of excitation energy. The position and contribution of the fission channels as function of excitation energy are presented.

  15. Anomalous High-Energy Spin Excitations in La2CuO4

    OpenAIRE

    Headings, N. S.; Hayden, S. M.; Coldea, R.; Perring, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering is used to investigate the collective magnetic excitations of the high-temperature superconductor parent antiferromagnet La2CuO4. We find that while the lower energy excitations are well described by spin-wave theory, including one- and two-magnon scattering processes, the high-energy spin waves are strongly damped near the (1/2,0) position in reciprocal space and merge into a momentum dependent continuum. This anomalous damping indicates the decay of spin waves i...

  16. Collective flow measurements at RHIC energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esumi Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental results on collective flow measurements from relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC are presented and discussed to study high-temperature and high-density quark-nuclear matter, Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP especially focusing on bulk properties, such as freeze-out parameters, temperature, chemical potential, collective expansion, azimuthal event anisotropy measurements. Their relations to the various correlation and fluctuation studies are also discussed, including initial geometrical and E- and B-field conditions as well as possible collective flow evolution that could even be developed in small systems. Current results and understandings from the beam energy scan program (BES and future plans are discussed and reviewed.

  17. Theoretical characterization of excitation energy transfer in chlorosome light-harvesting antennae from green sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Huh, Joonsuk; Saikin, Semion K; Brookes, Jennifer C; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of excitation dynamics in the chlorosome antenna complex of green photosynthetic bacteria based on a recently proposed model for the molecular assembly. Our model for the excitation energy transfer (EET) throughout the antenna combines a stochastic time propagation of the excitonic wave function with molecular dynamics simulations of the supramolecular structure and electronic structure calculations of the excited states. We characterized the optical properties of the chlorosome with absorption, circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy decay spectra. The simulation results for the excitation dynamics reveal a detailed picture of the EET in the chlorosome. Coherent energy transfer is significant only for the first 50 fs after the initial excitation, and the wavelike motion of the exciton is completely damped at 100 fs. Characteristic time constants of incoherent energy transfer, subsequently, vary from 1 ps to several tens of ps. We assign the time scales of the EET to specific physical processes by comparing our results with the data obtained from time-resolved spectroscopy experiments.

  18. The energy flux of MHD wave modes excited by realistic photospheric drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedun, Viktor; Von Fay-Siebenburgen, Erdélyi Robert; Mumford, Stuart

    The mechanism(s) responsible for solar coronal heating are still an unresolved and challenging task. In the framework of 3D numerical modelling of MHD wave excitation and propagation in the strongly stratified solar atmosphere we analyse the mode coupling and estimate the wave energy partition which can be supplied to the upper layers of the solar atmosphere by locally decomposed slow, fast and Alfven modes. These waves are excited by a number of realistic photospheric drivers which are mimicking the random granular buffeting, the coherent global solar oscillations and swirly motion observed in e.g. magnetic bright points. Based on a self-similar approach, a realistic magnetic flux tubes configuration is constructed and implemented in the VALIIIC model of the solar atmosphere. A novel method for decomposing the velocity perturbations into parallel, perpendicular and azimuthal components in 3D geometry is developed using field lines to trace a volume of constant energy flux. This method is used to identify the excited wave modes propagating upwards from the photosphere and to compute the percentage energy contribution of each mode. We have found, that for all cases where torsional motion is present, the main contribution to the flux (60%) is by Alfven wave. In the case of the vertical driver it is found to mainly excite the fast- and slow-sausage modes and a horizontal driver primarily excites the slow kink mode.

  19. Multireference excitation energies for bacteriochlorophylls A within light harvesting system 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anda, Andre; Hansen, Thorsten; De Vico, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria is one of the most popular antenna complexes used to study Nature's way of collecting and channeling solar energy. The dynamics of the absorbed energy is probed by ultrafast spectroscopy. Simulation of these experiments relies on fitting a range...... of parameters to reproduce the spectra. Here, we present a method that can determine key parameters to chemical accuracy. These will eliminate free variables in the modeling, thus reducing the problem. Using MS-RASPT2/RASSCF calculations, we compute excitation energies and transition dipole moments of all...... bacteriochlorophylls in LH2. We find that the excitation energies vary among the bacteriochlorophyll monomers and that they are regulated by the curvature of the macrocycle ring and the dihedral angle of an acetyl moiety. Increasing the curvature lifts the ground state energy, which causes a red shift...

  20. Energy conservation attenuates the loss of skeletal muscle excitability during intense contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, W A; Ørtenblad, N; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2007-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation of skeletal muscle has long been associated with ionic perturbations, resulting in the loss of membrane excitability, which may prevent action potential propagation and result in skeletal muscle fatigue. Associated with intense skeletal muscle contractions are large...... with control muscles, the resting metabolites ATP, phosphocreatine, creatine, and lactate, as well as the resting muscle excitability as measured by M-waves, were unaffected by treatment with BTS plus dantrolene. Following 20 or 30 s of continuous 60-Hz stimulation, BTS-plus-dantrolene-treated muscles showed...... changes in muscle metabolites. However, the role of metabolites in the loss of muscle excitability is not clear. The metabolic state of isolated rat extensor digitorum longus muscles at 30 degrees C was manipulated by decreasing energy expenditure and thereby allowed investigation of the effects of energy...

  1. Energy flow and mineral cycling mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of energy flow patterns and mineral cycling mechanisms provides a first step in identifying major transport pathways away from waste management areas. A preliminary food web pattern is described using results from ongoing and completed food habit studies. Biota possessing the greatest potential for introducing radionuclides into food chains leading to man include deer, rabbits, hares, waterfowl, honeybees and upland game birds and are discussed separately

  2. Excitation energies from range-separated time-dependent density and density matrix functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernal, Katarzyna

    2012-05-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) in the adiabatic formulation exhibits known failures when applied to predicting excitation energies. One of them is the lack of the doubly excited configurations. On the other hand, the time-dependent theory based on a one-electron reduced density matrix functional (time-dependent density matrix functional theory, TD-DMFT) has proven accurate in determining single and double excitations of H(2) molecule if the exact functional is employed in the adiabatic approximation. We propose a new approach for computing excited state energies that relies on functionals of electron density and one-electron reduced density matrix, where the latter is applied in the long-range region of electron-electron interactions. A similar approach has been recently successfully employed in predicting ground state potential energy curves of diatomic molecules even in the dissociation limit, where static correlation effects are dominating. In the paper, a time-dependent functional theory based on the range-separation of electronic interaction operator is rigorously formulated. To turn the approach into a practical scheme the adiabatic approximation is proposed for the short- and long-range components of the coupling matrix present in the linear response equations. In the end, the problem of finding excitation energies is turned into an eigenproblem for a symmetric matrix. Assignment of obtained excitations is discussed and it is shown how to identify double excitations from the analysis of approximate transition density matrix elements. The proposed method used with the short-range local density approximation (srLDA) and the long-range Buijse-Baerends density matrix functional (lrBB) is applied to H(2) molecule (at equilibrium geometry and in the dissociation limit) and to Be atom. The method accounts for double excitations in the investigated systems but, unfortunately, the accuracy of some of them is poor. The quality of the other

  3. Integrated OLED as excitation light source in fluorescent lateral flow immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Vishak; Steckl, Andrew J

    2015-12-15

    The integration of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) as excitation light sources for quantum dot-based fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay systems (LFIA) was investigated. This approach has the potential to deliver a sensitive visible detection scheme for low-cost, disposable lab-on-chip point-of-care (POC) diagnosis system. Thin film phosphorescent green OLEDs fabricated on plastic substrates were integrated on-chip to excite the test line of a quantum dot-based LFIA (QD-LFIA). OLEDs were fabricated by sequential deposition of organic thin films (total of ~100 nm) onto ITO-coated PET substrates. CdSe/ZnS QDs emitting at 655 nm and Au nanoparticles (NP - 10 nm size) conjugated antibodies were used for the fluorescence QD-LFIA and conventional reflection-mode Au NP-LFIA, respectively. Thin plastic color light filters were integrated for filtering the excitation light source and, thereby, increasing the contrast of the emitted light for optimized visual detection. Integration of the OLED and color filters with the analytical membrane was achieved using adhesive techniques facilitated by the planar nature of the layers, which suggests possible large scale manufacturing using roll-to-roll processing. Gray scale analysis from digital images captured with a digital camera was used to quantify the visual sensitivity. The signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limit of detection (LOD) of OLED integrated QD-LFIAs were compared to Au NP LFIAs. OLED QD-LFIA exhibited superior performance in all signal aspects: 7-8× higher signal intensity and SNR, and a 7× lower LOD of 3 nM (measured at S/N=3). These results demonstrate the potential of OLED-integrated in LFIA devices for obtaining sensitive, fast and low-cost POC diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of antenna-depletion in photosystem II on excitation energy transfer in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oort, Bart; Alberts, Marieke; De Bianchi, Silvia; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Trinkunas, Gediminas; Croce, Roberta; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    The role of individual photosynthetic antenna complexes of Photosystem II (PSII) both in membrane organization and excitation energy transfer have been investigated. Thylakoid membranes from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana, and three mutants lacking light-harvesting complexes CP24, CP26, or CP29,

  5. Influence of the excitation parameters of the mechanical subsystem on effectiveness of energy harvesting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchacz, A.; Banaś, W.; Płaczek, M.

    2015-11-01

    Piezoelectric transducers are used more and more often in modern technical devices. The wide range of their possible applications is a result of the possibility to use both direct and reverse piezoelectric effect. Nowadays, application of piezoelectric transducers in energy harvesting systems is getting more and more popular. It is caused by the easy way to convert energy of mechanical vibration to the electric voltage using piezoelectric transducers. This paper presents results of influence analysis of the vibrating mechanical subsystem's excitation parameters on the effectiveness of the system designed for energy harvesting. The considered vibrating system is a composite plate with piezoelectric transducer bonded to its surface. Vibrations of the system are excited by means of an actuator with possibility to change the excitation amplitude and frequency. Recovering of electrical energy from mechanical vibrations is possible by using the direct piezoelectric effect - generation of the electric voltage while the transducer is mechanically deformed. In carried out test Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) piezoelectric transducers were used. It was proved that the time that is necessary for switch on the output voltage in analyzed system depends on the frequency of the excitation.

  6. Interqubit coupling mediated by a high-excitation-energy quantum object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashhab, S.; Niskanen, A.O.; Harrabi, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Picot, T.; De Groot, P.C.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Mooij, J.E.; Nori, F.

    2008-01-01

    We consider a system composed of two qubits and a high excitation energy quantum object used to mediate coupling between the qubits. We treat the entire system quantum mechanically and analyze the properties of the eigenvalues and eigenstates of the total Hamiltonian. After reproducing well known

  7. Low-energy excitations in a low-viscous glass-forming liquid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low-energy excitations in a low-viscous glass-forming liquid. ANGELOS G KALAMPOUNIAS. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, GR 26504, Patras, Greece and Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas – Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes, ...

  8. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various...... transition-metal surfaces and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system with parameters obtained from the excited-state potential energy surface and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics...... in both the DIET and DIMET regimes and reproduce the power-law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong....

  9. An inclined wall jet: Mean flow characteristics and effects of acoustic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J. C. S.; Lu, D.

    2000-12-01

    The mean velocity field of a 30° inclined wall jet has been investigated using both hot-wire and laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). Provided that the nozzle aspect ratio is greater than 30 and the inclined wall angle (β) is less than 50°, LDA measurements for various β show that the reattachment length is independent of the nozzle aspect ratio and the nozzle exit Reynolds number (in the range 6670-13,340). There is general agreement between the reattachment lengths determined by LDA and those determined using wall surface oil film visualisation technique. The role of coherent structures arising from initial instabilities of a 30° wall jet has been explored by hot-wire spectra measurements. Results indicate that the fundamental vortex roll-up frequency in both the inner and outer shear layer corresponds to a Strouhal number (based on nozzle exit momentum thickness and velocity) of 0.012. The spatial development of instabilities in the jet has been studied by introducing acoustic excitation at a frequency corresponding to the shear layer mode. The formation of the fundamental and its first subharmonic has been identified in the outer shear layer. However, the development of the first subharmonic in the inner shear layer has been severely suppressed. Distributions of mean velocities, turbulence intensities and Reynolds shear stress indicate that controlled acoustic excitation enhances the development of instabilities and promotes jet reattachment to the wall, resulting in a substantially reduced recirculation flow region.

  10. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-07

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N(4)). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as ⟨Ŝ(2)⟩ are also developed and tested.

  11. Numerical simulation and comparison with experiment for self-excited oscillations in a diffuser flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T.; Bogar, T. J.; Coakley, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes numerical simulations of self-excited oscillations in a two-dimensional transonic diffuser flow obtained by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with a two-equation turbulence model. Comparisons were made between the computational results and experimental data. For the mean flowfields, the agreement between computation and experiment is good for the wall pressures, shock location, and the separation and reattachment points. However, the thickness of the computed recirculation zone is about 50 percent of the measured thickness. For the fluctuating flowfields, a great deal of qualitative similarity exists between the computation and experiment; however, the predicted oscillation frequency is about 50 percent higher than the measured value. The formation of a succession of downstream-traveling counter-rotating vortices, as seen experimentally, is also vividly displayed in the numerical results.

  12. Evaluation of kinetic energy in flowing rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, T. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Canadian Hydraulics Centre

    2008-07-01

    New methods of evaluating the kinetic energy in rivers were discussed. Developed by the National Research Council's Canadian Hydraulics Centre, the numerical models were designed to generate hydrographs of river flow from dams; accommodate power density anomalies caused by the presence of islands in a river; and assess mean kinetic power rates. This presentation provided details of a simulation of 6 turbines located in close proximity to each other. The model was used to calculate velocity fields downstream of the turbines as well as changes in water surface elevation due to power production by the 6 75 kW turbines. Turbine power extraction and kinetic power in the upstream cross-section was assessed. The model showed that the turbines extracted 9 per cent of the river's 17,000 kW of estimated energy potential. The turbines were modelled by considering the porosity of the numerical elements at the location of the turbine and extracting known quantities of energy from the flow. The model was also used to calculate new hydrodynamics of the whole region with the turbines in place by assuming that energy was extracted over the entire depth of the location. The presentation included detailed charts of rivers modelled during the study. tabs., figs.

  13. Determination of minimum impact parameter by modified touching spheres schemes for intermediate energy Coulomb excitation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Sharma, Shagun; Singh, Pradeep; Kharab, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The energy-independent touching spheres schemes commonly used for the determination of the safe minimum value of the impact parameter for Coulomb excitation experiments are modified through the inclusion of an energy-dependent term. The touching spheres+3fm scheme after modification emerges out to be the best one while touching spheres+4fm scheme is found to be better in its unmodified form. (orig.)

  14. A coupled cluster theory with iterative inclusion of triple excitations and associated equation of motion formulation for excitation energy and ionization potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Rahul; Akinaga, Yoshinobu; Nakajima, Takahito

    2017-08-21

    A single reference coupled cluster theory that is capable of including the effect of connected triple excitations has been developed and implemented. This is achieved by regrouping the terms appearing in perturbation theory and parametrizing through two different sets of exponential operators: while one of the exponentials, involving general substitution operators, annihilates the ground state but has a non-vanishing effect when it acts on the excited determinant, the other is the regular single and double excitation operator in the sense of conventional coupled cluster theory, which acts on the Hartree-Fock ground state. The two sets of operators are solved as coupled non-linear equations in an iterative manner without significant increase in computational cost than the conventional coupled cluster theory with singles and doubles excitations. A number of physically motivated and computationally advantageous sufficiency conditions are invoked to arrive at the working equations and have been applied to determine the ground state energies of a number of small prototypical systems having weak multi-reference character. With the knowledge of the correlated ground state, we have reconstructed the triple excitation operator and have performed equation of motion with coupled cluster singles, doubles, and triples to obtain the ionization potential and excitation energies of these molecules as well. Our results suggest that this is quite a reasonable scheme to capture the effect of connected triple excitations as long as the ground state remains weakly multi-reference.

  15. Optimized excitation energy transfer in a three-dye luminescent solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sheldon T.; Lokey, Gretchen E.; Hanes, Melinda S.; McLafferty, Jason B.; Beaumont, Gregg T.; Wittmershaus, Bruce P. [School of Science, Pennsylvania State University: Erie, The Behrend College, Erie, PA 16563-0203 (United States); Shearer, John D.M.; Baseler, Timothy T.; Layhue, Joshua M.; Broussard, Dustin R. [School of Engineering, Pennsylvania State University: Erie, The Behrend College, Erie, PA 16563-1701 (United States); Zhang, Yu-Zhong [Molecular Probes Inc., 4849 Pitchford Ave., Eugene, OR 97402-9165 (United States)

    2007-01-05

    The spectral range of sunlight absorbed by a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) is increased by using multiple dyes. Absorption, fluorescence, and fluorescence excitation spectra, and relative light output are reported for LSCs made with one, two, or three BODIPY dyes in a thin polymer layer on glass. Losses caused by multiple emission and reabsorption events are minimized by optimizing resonance excitation energy transfer between dyes. Increases in the outputs from the multiple-dye LSCs are directly proportional to increases in the number of photons absorbed. The output of the three-dye LSC is 45-170% higher than those of the single-dye LSCs. (author)

  16. Energy transfer from excited cyclobutane-t chemically activated by nuclear recoil reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogar, N.S.

    1976-01-01

    Relative energy transfer efficiencies were determined for collisions between highly excited cyclobutane-t and a number of thermal bath gases, including nitrogen, tetrafluoromethane, the noble gases, and cyclobutane. The excited cyclobutane-t was produced with a broad spectrum of energies about a mean energy of 5 eV by replacement of hydrogen with nuclear recoil tritium. The distribution of cyclobutane-t included a fraction produced at such low energies that it was not subjected to unimolecular decomposition, a fraction always found as the decomposition product, ethylene-t, and a fraction subject to competitive stabilization-decomposition reactions. The fraction of cyclobutane-t produced at such extreme energies that it was not subject to competitive unimolecular reaction was determined by curve-fitting the pressure dependence of ratio of cyclobutane-t to ethylene-t. Subsequent examination of the composition dependence of the ratio of competitive cyclobutane-t and ethylene-t yields gave energy transfer efficiencies for C 4 H 8 , CF 4 , N 2 , He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe of 1.00:1.05:0.40, 0.12, 0.23, 0.24, 0.31, 0.39. The relative efficiencies found in this system are similar to those found in high energy conventional chemical activation systems, supporting this method for determination of energy transfer efficiencies following nuclear recoil activation. Cascade deactivation is demonstrated for this system and discussed with respect to energy transfer in hot atom activated systems

  17. Irreversible energy flow in forced Vlasov dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Plunk, Gabriel G.

    2014-10-01

    © EDP Sciences, Società Italiana di Fisica, Springer-Verlag. The recent paper of Plunk [G.G. Plunk, Phys. Plasmas 20, 032304 (2013)] considered the forced linear Vlasov equation as a model for the quasi-steady state of a single stable plasma wavenumber interacting with a bath of turbulent fluctuations. This approach gives some insight into possible energy flows without solving for nonlinear dynamics. The central result of the present work is that the forced linear Vlasov equation exhibits asymptotically zero (irreversible) dissipation to all orders under a detuning of the forcing frequency and the characteristic frequency associated with particle streaming. We first prove this by direct calculation, tracking energy flow in terms of certain exact conservation laws of the linear (collisionless) Vlasov equation. Then we analyze the steady-state solutions in detail using a weakly collisional Hermite-moment formulation, and compare with numerical solution. This leads to a detailed description of the Hermite energy spectrum, and a proof of no dissipation at all orders, complementing the collisionless Vlasov result.

  18. Intermediate energy electron impact excitation of composite vibrational modes in phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física ‘Gleb Wataghin,’ Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, C.P. 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-05-21

    We report differential cross section results from an experimental investigation into the electron impact excitation of a number of the low-lying composite (unresolved) vibrational modes in phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The measurements were carried out at incident electron energies in the range 15–40 eV and for scattered-electron angles in the range 10–90°. The energy resolution of those measurements was typically ∼80 meV. Calculations, using the GAMESS code, were also undertaken with a B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level model chemistry, in order to enable us to assign vibrational modes to the features observed in our energy loss spectra. To the best of our knowledge, the present cross sections are the first to be reported for vibrational excitation of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH molecule by electron impact.

  19. [Energy flow in arctic aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, D.M.

    1985-12-31

    This study is aimed at determining the major pathways of energy flow in freshwater ecosystems of the Alaskan arctic coastal plain. Selected sites for study of the processes supplying energy to streams and lakes to verify the generality of past findings will be surveyed for collection of organisms including the Colville River drainage and the lake region around Teshekpuk Lake. Specific objectives are to collect food web apex organisms (fish and birds) from a variety of sites in the coastal plain to verify descriptive models of ecosystem structure and food web pathways and to compare the utilization rates by insect larvae of fresh litter and in situ primary production relative to more refractory peaty materials through seasonal sampling for isotopic analysis.

  20. [Energy flow in arctic aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining the major pathways of energy flow in freshwater ecosystems of the Alaskan arctic coastal plain. Selected sites for study of the processes supplying energy to streams and lakes to verify the generality of past findings will be surveyed for collection of organisms including the Colville River drainage and the lake region around Teshekpuk Lake. Specific objectives are to collect food web apex organisms (fish and birds) from a variety of sites in the coastal plain to verify descriptive models of ecosystem structure and food web pathways and to compare the utilization rates by insect larvae of fresh litter and in situ primary production relative to more refractory peaty materials through seasonal sampling for isotopic analysis.

  1. Phenothiazine Radical Cation Excited States as Super-oxidants for Energy Demanding Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Joseph A; Phelan, Brian T; Chaudhuri, Subhajyoti; Acharya, Atanu; Batista, Victor S; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2018-03-28

    We demonstrate that the 10-phenyl-10H-phenothiazine radical cation (PTZ +• ) has a manifold of excited doublet states accessible using visible and near-infrared light that can serve as super-photooxidants with excited state potentials in excess of +2.1 V vs SCE to power energy demanding oxidation reactions. Photoexcitation of PTZ +• in CH 3 CN with a 517 nm laser pulse populates a D n electronically excited doublet state that decays first to the unrelaxed lowest electronic excited state, D 1 ' (τ < 0.3 ps), followed by relaxation to D 1 (τ = 10.9 ± 0.4 ps), which finally decays to D 0 (τ = 32.3 ± 0.8 ps). D 1 ' can also be populated directly using a lower energy 900 nm laser pulse, which results in a longer D 1 ' → D 1 relaxation time (τ = 19 ± 2 ps). To probe the oxidative power of PTZ +• photoexcited doublet states, PTZ +• was covalently linked to each of three hole acceptors, perylene (Per), 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DPA), and 10-phenyl-9-anthracenecarbonitrile (ACN), which have oxidation potentials of 1.04, 1.27, and 1.6 V vs. SCE, respectively. In all three cases, photoexcitation wavelength dependent ultrafast hole transfer occurs from D n , D 1 ', or D 1 of PTZ +• to Per, DPA, and ACN. The ability to take advantage of the additional oxidative power provided by the upper excited doublet states of PTZ +• will enable applications using this chromophore as a super-oxidant for energy demanding reactions.

  2. Electrohydroelastic dynamics of macro-fiber composites for underwater energy harvesting from base excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-04-01

    Low-power electronic systems are used in various underwater applications ranging from naval sensor networks to ecological monitoring for sustainability. In this work, underwater base excitation of cantilevers made of Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) piezoelectric structures is explored experimentally and theoretically to harvest energy for such wireless electronic components toward enabling self-powered underwater systems. Bimorph cantilevers made of MFCs with different length-to-width ratios and same thickness are tested in air and under water to characterize the change in natural frequency and damping with a focus on the fundamental bending mode. The real and imaginary parts of hydrodynamic frequency response functions are identified and corrected based on this set of experiments. An electrohydroelastic model is developed and experimentally validated for predicting the power delivered to an electrical load as well as the shunted underwater vibration response under base excitation. Variations of the electrical power output with excitation frequency and load resistance are obtained for different length-to-width ratios. Underwater power density results are reported and compared with their in-air counterparts. Specifically a nonlinear dependence of the power density to the cantilever width is reported for energy harvesting from underwater base excitation.

  3. Superconducting qubit in a nonstationary transmission line cavity: Parametric excitation, periodic pumping, and energy dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, A.A. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shapiro, D.S., E-mail: shapiro.dima@gmail.com [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); V.A. Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISIS, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Remizov, S.V. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); V.A. Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pogosov, W.V. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lozovik, Yu.E. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Moscow Region, Troitsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-12

    We consider a superconducting qubit coupled to the nonstationary transmission line cavity with modulated frequency taking into account energy dissipation. Previously, it was demonstrated that in the case of a single nonadiabatical modulation of a cavity frequency there are two channels of a two-level system excitation which are due to the absorption of Casimir photons and due to the counterrotating wave processes responsible for the dynamical Lamb effect. We show that the parametric periodical modulation of the resonator frequency can increase dramatically the excitation probability. Remarkably, counterrotating wave processes under such a modulation start to play an important role even in the resonant regime. Our predictions can be used to control qubit-resonator quantum states as well as to study experimentally different channels of a parametric qubit excitation. - Highlights: • Coupled qubit-resonator system under the modulation of a resonator frequency is considered. • Counterrotating terms of the Hamiltonian are of importance even in the resonance. • Qubit excited state population is highest if driving frequency matches dressed-state energy.

  4. Evolution of collectivity in the 78Ni region: Coulomb excitation of 74Ni at intermediate energies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchi T.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of the collective properties of nuclear excitations far from stability provides information about the shell structure at extreme conditions. Spectroscopic observables such as the energy or the transition probabilities of the lowest states, in nuclei with large neutron excess, allow to probe the density and isospin dependence of the effective interaction. Indeed, it was recently shown that tensor and three-body forces play an important role in breaking and creating magic numbers. Emblematic is the case of the evolution of the Ni isotopic chain where several features showed up moving from the most neutron rich stable isotope (64Ni towards the 78Ni nucleus where the large neutron excess coincides with a double shell closure. In this framework, we have recently performed an experiment with the goal to extract the B(E2; 0+ → 2+ value for the 74Ni nucleus in an intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation experiment: preliminary results are discussed.

  5. Excitation of high energy levels under laser exposure of suspensions of nanoparticles in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafeev, G.A.; Simakin, A.V.; Bozon-Verduraz, F.; Robert, M.

    2007-01-01

    Laser exposure of suspensions of nanoparticles in liquids leads to excitation of high energy levels in both liquid and nanoparticle material. The emission spectrum of the colloidal solution under exposure of a suspension metallic nanoparticles in water to radiation of a Nd:YAG laser of a picosecond range of pulse duration is discussed. Excitation of nuclear energy levels and neutron release is experimentally studied on the model system of transmutation of Hg into Au that occurs under exposure of Hg nanodrops suspended in D 2 O. The proposed mechanism involves: (i) emission of X-ray photons by Hg nanoparticles upon laser exposure, leading to neutron release from D 2 O, (ii) initiation of Hg → Au transmutation by the capture of neutrons. The effect of transmutation is more pronounced using 196 Hg isotope instead of Hg of natural isotope composition. The influence of laser pulse duration on the degree of transmutation (from fs through ns range) is discussed

  6. Excitation of high energy levels under laser exposure of suspensions of nanoparticles in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafeev, G. A.; Simakin, A. V.; Bozon-Verduraz, F.; Robert, M.

    2007-12-01

    Laser exposure of suspensions of nanoparticles in liquids leads to excitation of high energy levels in both liquid and nanoparticle material. The emission spectrum of the colloidal solution under exposure of a suspension metallic nanoparticles in water to radiation of a Nd:YAG laser of a picosecond range of pulse duration is discussed. Excitation of nuclear energy levels and neutron release is experimentally studied on the model system of transmutation of Hg into Au that occurs under exposure of Hg nanodrops suspended in D 2O. The proposed mechanism involves: (i) emission of X-ray photons by Hg nanoparticles upon laser exposure, leading to neutron release from D 2O, (ii) initiation of Hg → Au transmutation by the capture of neutrons. The effect of transmutation is more pronounced using 196Hg isotope instead of Hg of natural isotope composition. The influence of laser pulse duration on the degree of transmutation (from fs through ns range) is discussed.

  7. Current status of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, G.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants for rocket engines. Nascent or atomic forms of diatomic gases are considered free radicals as well as the highly reactive diatomic triatomic molecules that posess unpaired electrons. Manufacturing and storage problems are described, and a review of current experimental work related to the manufacture of atomic hydrogen propellants is presented.

  8. Frontiers in propulsion research: Laser, matter-antimatter, excited helium, energy exchange thermonuclear fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papailiou, D. D. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Concepts are described that presently appear to have the potential for propulsion applications in the post-1990 era of space technology. The studies are still in progress, and only the current status of investigation is presented. The topics for possible propulsion application are lasers, nuclear fusion, matter-antimatter annihilation, electronically excited helium, energy exchange through the interaction of various fields, laser propagation, and thermonuclear fusion technology.

  9. Energy flow modeling and optimal operation analysis of the micro energy grid based on energy hub

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Tengfei; Wu, Junyong; Hao, Liangliang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Design a novel architecture for energy hub integrating power hub, cooling hub and heating hub. • The micro energy grid based on energy hub is introduced and its advantages are discussed. • Propose a generic modeling method for the energy flow of micro energy grid. • Propose an optimal operation model for micro energy grid with considering demand response. • The roles of renewable energy, energy storage devices and demand response are discussed separately. - Abstract: The energy security and environmental problems impel people to explore a more efficient, environment friendly and economical energy utilization pattern. In this paper, the coordinated operation and optimal dispatch strategies for multiple energy system are studied at the whole Micro Energy Grid level. To augment the operation flexibility of energy hub, the innovation sub-energy hub structure including power hub, heating hub and cooling hub is put forward. Basing on it, a generic energy hub architecture integrating renewable energy, combined cooling heating and power, and energy storage devices is developed. Moreover, a generic modeling method for the energy flow of micro energy grid is proposed. To minimize the daily operation cost, a day-ahead dynamic optimal operation model is formulated as a mixed integer linear programming optimization problem with considering the demand response. Case studies are undertaken on a community Micro Energy Grid in four different scenarios on a typical summer day and the roles of renewable energy, energy storage devices and demand response are discussed separately. Numerical simulation results indicate that the proposed energy flow modeling and optimal operation method are universal and effective over the entire energy dispatching horizon.

  10. Low-energy Coulomb excitation of neutron-rich zinc isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Van de Walle, J; Behrens, T; Bildstein, V; Blazhev, A; Cederkäll, J; Clément, E; Cocolios, T E; Davinson, T; Delahaye, P; Eberth, J; Ekström, A; Fedorov, D V; Fedosseev, V; Fraile, L M; Franchoo, S; Gernhäuser, R; Georgiev, G; Habs, D; Heyde, K; Huber, G; Huyse, M; Ibrahim, F; Ivanov, O; Iwanicki, J; Jolie, J; Kester, O; Köster, U; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Lauer, M; Lisetskiy, A F; Lutter, R; Marsh, B A; Mayet, P; Niedermaier, O; Pantea, M; Raabe, R; Reiter, P; Sawicka, M; Scheit, H; Schrieder, G; Schwalm, D; Seliverstov, M D; Sieber, T; Sletten, G; Smirnova, N; Stanoiu, M; Stefanescu, I; Thomas, J C; Valiente-Dobón, J J; Van Duppen, P; Verney, D; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Weisshaar, D; Wenander, F; Wolf, B H; Zielinska, M

    2009-01-01

    At the radioactive ion beam facility REX-ISOLDE, neutron-rich zinc isotopes were investigated using low-energy Coulomb excitation. These experiments have resulted in B(E2,20) values in 74-80Zn, B(E2,42) values in 74,76Zn and the determination of the energy of the first excited 2 states in 78,80Zn. The zinc isotopes were produced by high-energy proton- (A=74,76,80) and neutron- (A=78) induced fission of 238U, combined with selective laser ionization and mass separation. The isobaric beam was postaccelerated by the REX linear accelerator and Coulomb excitation was induced on a thin secondary target, which was surrounded by the MINIBALL germanium detector array. In this work, it is shown how the selective laser ionization can be used to deal with the considerable isobaric beam contamination and how a reliable normalization of the experiment can be achieved. The results for zinc isotopes and the N=50 isotones are compared to collective model predictions and state-of-the-art large-scale shell-model calculations, i...

  11. LASER EMISSIONS FROM CO2 VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS IN A LOW TEMPERATURE SUPERSONIC FLOW EXCITED BY A PULSED ELECTRON BEAM STABILIZED DISCHARGE

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaine, B.; Forestier, B.; Gross, P.; Koudriavtsev, E.

    1980-01-01

    High power long pulse infrared laser emission has been achieved on CO2 molecule with the high density and very low temperature supersonic flow-electron beam-stabilized discharge excitation device developped at I.M.F.M. ([MATH] [MATH] 2 amagats, T [MATH] 70 - 150 K). Laser emission at [MATH] = 10.6 µ has been achieved for a resonant cavity set at the discharge location and also 3 cm downstream of the discharge location. With Ar/CO2, Ar/CO2/H2, He/CO2, and He/CO2/N2 mixtures, lasing energy and ...

  12. Unveiling the excited state energy transfer pathways in peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein by ultrafast multi-pulse transient absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeckas, Kipras; Voiciuk, Vladislava; Zigmantas, Donatas; Hiller, Roger G; Vengris, Mikas

    2017-04-01

    Time-resolved multi-pulse methods were applied to investigate the excited state dynamics, the interstate couplings, and the excited state energy transfer pathways between the light-harvesting pigments in peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein (PCP). The utilized pump-dump-probe techniques are based on perturbation of the regular PCP energy transfer pathway. The PCP complexes were initially excited with an ultrashort pulse, resonant to the S 0 →S 2 transition of the carotenoid peridinin. A portion of the peridinin-based emissive intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state was then depopulated by applying an ultrashort NIR pulse that perturbed the interaction between S 1 and ICT states and the energy flow from the carotenoids to the chlorophylls. The presented data indicate that the peridinin S 1 and ICT states are spectrally distinct and coexist in an excited state equilibrium in the PCP complex. Moreover, numeric analysis of the experimental data asserts ICT→Chl-a as the main energy transfer pathway in the photoexcited PCP systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Numerical prediction analysis of propeller exciting force for hull–propeller–rudder system in oblique flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the characteristics of propeller exciting force, the hybrid grid is adopted and the numerical prediction of KCS ship model is performed for hull–propeller–rudder system by Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS method and volume of fluid (VOF model. Firstly, the numerical simulation of hydrodynamics for bare hull at oblique state is carried out. The results show that with the increasing of the drift angle, the coefficients of resistance, side force and yaw moment are constantly increasing, and the bigger the drift angle, the worse the overall uniformity of propeller disk. Then, propeller bearing force for hull–propeller–rudder system in oblique flow is calculated. It is found that the propeller thrust and torque fluctuation coefficient peak in drift angle are greater than that in straight line navigation, and the negative drift angle is greater than the positive. The fluctuation peak variation law of coefficient of side force and bending moment are different due to various causes.

  14. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barklem, P. S.

    2018-02-01

    Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy O+H collisions is studied; it is a problem of importance for modelling stellar spectra and obtaining accurate oxygen abundances in late-type stars including the Sun. The collisions have been studied theoretically using a previously presented method based on an asymptotic two-electron linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system, together with the multichannel Landau-Zener model. The method has been extended to include configurations involving excited states of hydrogen using an estimate for the two-electron transition coupling, but this extension was found to not lead to any remarkably high rates. Rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K, and charge transfer and (de)excitation processes involving the first excited S-states, 4s.5So and 4s.3So, are found to have the highest rates. Data are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/vizbin/qcat?J/A+A/610/A57. The data are also available at http://https://github.com/barklem/public-data

  15. Flow excited by full jet shower in QGP fluid and its effect on jet shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Yasuki; Chang, Ning-Bo; Qin, Guang-You

    2017-08-01

    We study the nuclear modification of full jet structure in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, with the inclusion of the effect of the medium response. The evolution of full jet shower is described by a set of transport equations, and the space-time evolution of quark-gluon plasma is simulated by solving relativistic hydrodynamic equations coupled with the energy and momentum depositions by jets as the source terms. We study the effect of medium response to full jet shower and present how jet-induced flow contributes to the full jet structure in PbPb collisions at the LHC.

  16. The energy structure and decay channels of the 4p6-shell excited states in Sr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupliauskienė, A.; Kerevičius, G.; Borovik, V.; Shafranyosh, I.; Borovik, A.

    2017-11-01

    The ejected-electron spectra arising from the decay of the 4p{}5{{nln}}{\\prime }{l}{\\prime }{n}{\\prime\\prime }{l}{\\prime\\prime } autoionizing states in Sr atoms have been studied precisely at the incident-electron energies close to excitation and ionization thresholds of the 4{{{p}}}6 subshell. The excitation behaviors for 58 lines observed between 12 and 21 eV ejected-electron kinetic energy have been investigated. Also, the ab initio calculations of excitation energies, autoionization probabilities and electron-impact excitation cross sections of the states 4p{}5{{nln}}{\\prime }{l}{\\prime }{n}{\\prime\\prime }{l}{\\prime\\prime } (nl = 4d, 5s, 5p; {n}{\\prime }{l}{\\prime } = 4d, 5s, 5p; {n}{\\prime\\prime }{l}{\\prime\\prime } = 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 9s, 5p, 6p, 5d, 6d, 7d, 8d, 4f, 5g) have been performed by employing the large-scale configuration-interaction method in the basis of the solutions of Dirac-Fock-Slater equations. The obtained experimental and theoretical data have been used for the accurate identification of the 60 lines in ejected-electron spectra and the 68 lines observed earlier in photoabsorption spectra. The excitation and decay processes for 105 classified states in the 4p55s{}2{nl}, 4p54d{}2{nl} and 4p55s{{nln}}{\\prime }{l}{\\prime } configurations have been considered in detail. In particular, most of the states lying below the ionization threshold of the 4p6 subshell at 26.92 eV possess up to four decay channels with formation of Sr+ in 5s{}1/2, 4d{}3/{2,5/2} and 5p{}1/{2,3/2} states. Two-step autoionization and two-electron Auger transitions with formation of Sr2+ in the 4p6 {}1{{{S}}}0 ground state are the main decay paths for high-lying autoionizing states. The excitation threshold of the 4{{{p}}}6 subshell in Sr has been established at 20.98 ± 0.05 eV.

  17. One-dimensional energy flow model for poroelastic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Soo; Kang, Yeon June

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional energy flow model to investigate the energy behavior for poroelastic media coupled with acoustical media. The proposed energy flow model is expressed by an independent energy governing equation that is classified into each wave component propagating in poroelastic media. The energy governing equation is derived using the General Energetic Method (GEM). To facilitate a comparison with the classical solution based on the conventional displacement-base formulation, approximate solutions of energy density and intensity are obtained. Furthermore, the limitations and usability of the proposed energy flow model for poroelastic media are described.

  18. Performance of popular XC-functionals for the description of excitation energies in GFP-like chromophore models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Nanna Holmegaard; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás

    2012-01-01

    this task. We present an evaluation of the performance of commonly used XC-functionals for the prediction of excitation energies of GFP-like chromophores. In particular, we have considered the TD-DFT vertical excitation energies of chromophores displaying different charge states. We compare the quality...... are found to give the overall best performance. The Coulomb-attenuated CAM-B3LYP functional systematically overestimates the excitation energies of the charged states; however, its error has the attractive feature of being size-independent and almost identical for the considered anionic and cationic systems...

  19. Resonant states in 13C and 16,17O at high excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M R D; Borello-Lewin, T; Miyake, H; Duarte, J L M; Rodrigues, C L; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L B; Ukita, G M; Cappuzzello, F; Foti, A; Cavallaro, M; Agodi, C; Cunsolo, A; Carbone, D; Bondi, M; Napoli, M De; Roeder, B T; Linares, R; Lombardo, I

    2014-01-01

    The 9 Be( 6 Li,d) 13 C and 12,13 C( 6 Li,d) 16,17 O reactions were measured at the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility at 25.5 MeV incident energy. The nuclear emulsion detection technique was applied. Several narrow resonances were populated up to approximately 17 MeV of excitation energy. An excellent energy resolution was obtained: 40 keV for 13 C and 15-30 keV for 16 O. The upper limit for the resonance widths were determined. Recently, d-a angular correlations were measured at θ d = 0° with incident energy of 25 MeV using the LNS Tandem-MAGNEX Spectrometer facility

  20. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, 09210-580 São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  1. Probing core polarization around 78Ni: intermediate energy Coulomb excitation of 74Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchi T.

    2013-12-01

    We have recently measured the B(E2; 0+ → 2+ of the 74Ni nucleus in an intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation experiment performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of the Michigan State University. The 74Ni secondary beam has been produced by fragmentation of 86Kr at 140 AMeV on a thick Be target. Selected radioactive fragments impinged on a secondary 197Au target where the measurement of the emitted γ-rays allows to extract the Coulomb excitation cross section and related structure information. Preliminary B(E2 values do not point towards an enhancement of the transition matrix element and the comparison to what was already measured by Aoi and co-workers in [1] opens new scenarios in the interpretation of the shell evolution of the Z=28 isotopes.

  2. Construction of Vibronic Diabatic Hamiltonian for Excited-State Electron and Energy Transfer Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Jiang, Shengshi; Zheng, Jie; Lan, Zhenggang

    2017-12-21

    Photoinduced excited-state electron and energy transfer processes are crucial in biological photoharvesting systems and organic photovoltaic devices. We discuss the construction of a diabatic vibronic Hamiltonian for the proper treatment of these processes involving the projection approach acting on both electronic wave functions and vibrational modes. In the electronic part, the wave function projection approach is used to construct the diabatic Hamiltonian in which both local excited states and charge-transfer states are included on the same footing. For the vibrational degrees of freedom, the vibronic couplings in the diabatic Hamiltonian are obtained in the basis of the pseudonormal modes localized on each monomer site by applying delocalized-to-localized mode projection. This systematic approach allows us to construct the vibronic diabatic Hamiltonian in molecular aggregates.

  3. Study of the neutron rich sulfure isotope 43S through intermediate energy Coulomb excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calinescu, S.; Cáceres, L.; Grévy, S.; Sohler, D.; Stanoiu, M.; Negoita, F.; Borcea, C.; Borcea, R.; Bowry, M.; Catford, W.; Dombradi, Z.; Franchoo, S.; Gillibert, R.; Thomas, J. C.; Kuti, I.; Lukyanov, S.; Lepailleur, A.; Mrazek, J.; Niikura, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Petrone, C.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Roger, T.; Rotaru, F.; Sorlin, O.; Stefan, I.; Vajta, Z.; Wilson, E.

    2013-02-01

    The reduced transition probability B(E2: 3/2- 7/2-2) has been measured in 43S using Coulomb excitation at intermediate energy. The nucleus of interest was produced by fragmentation of a 48Ca beam at GANIL. The reaction products were separated in the LISE spectrometer. After Coulomb-excitation of 43S in a 208Pb target, the γ rays emitted inflight were detected by 64 BaF2 detectors of the Chǎteau de Cristal array. The preliminary value deduced for the reduced transition probability B(E2: 3/2-7/2-2) is in agreement with the predictions of the shell model calculations and supports a prolate-spherical shape coexistence in the 43S nucleus.

  4. Flow Cells for Scalable Energy Conversion and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-26

    This project is a response to current flow systems that are V-aqueous and not cost effective. It will hopefully enable high energy/ power density flow cells through rational materials and system design.

  5. Bootstrapping the energy flow in the beginning of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, R.; Fedonkin, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper suggests that the energy flow on which all living structures depend only started up slowly, the low-energy, initial phase starting up a second, slightly more energetic phase, and so on. In this way, the build up of the energy flow follows a bootstrapping process similar to that found in

  6. Bootstrapping the energy flow in the beginning of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, R.; Fedonkin, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper suggests that the energy flow on which all living structures depend only started up slowly, the low-energy, initial phase starting up a second, slightly more energetic phase, and so on. In this way, the build up of the energy flow follows a bootstrapping process similar to that found in

  7. Fission-like events in the 12C+169Tm system at low excitation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Arshiya; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sahoo, Rudra N.; Kumar, Pawan; Yadav, Abhishek; Sharma, Vijay R.; Shuaib, Mohd.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Singh, Devendra P.; Gupta, Unnati; Kumar, R.; Aydin, S.; Singh, B. P.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Prasad, R.

    2017-07-01

    Background: Fission has been found to be a dominating mode of deexcitation in heavy-ion induced reactions at high excitation energies. The phenomenon of heavy-ion induced fission has been extensively investigated with highly fissile actinide nuclei, yet there is a dearth of comprehensive understanding of underlying dynamics, particularly in the below actinide region and at low excitation energies. Purpose: Prime objective of this work is to study different aspects of heavy-ion induced fission ensuing from the evolution of composite system formed via complete and/or incomplete fusion in the 12C+169Tm system at low incident energies, i.e., Elab≈6.4 , 6.9, and 7.4 A MeV, as well as to understand charge and mass distributions of fission fragments. Method: The recoil-catcher activation technique followed by offline γ spectroscopy was used to measure production cross sections of fission-like events. The evaporation residues were identified by their characteristic γ rays and vetted by the decay-curve analysis. Charge and mass distributions of fission-like events were studied to obtain dispersion parameters of fission fragments. Results: In the present work, 26 fission-like events (32 ≤Z ≤49 ) were identified at different excitation energies. The mass distribution of fission fragments is found to be broad and symmetric, manifesting their production via compound nuclear processes. The dispersion parameters of fission fragments obtained from the analysis of mass and isotopic yield distributions are found to be in good accord with the reported values obtained for different fissioning systems. A self-consistent approach was employed to determine the isobaric yield distribution. Conclusions: The present work suggests that fission is one of the competing modes of deexcitation of complete and/or incomplete fusion composites at low excitation energies, i.e., E*≈57 , 63, and 69 MeV, where evaporation of light nuclear particle(s) and/or γ rays are assumed to be the sole

  8. Control of base-excited dynamical systems through piezoelectric energy harvesting absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoula, H.; Dai, H. L.; Abdelkefi, A.; Wang, L.

    2017-09-01

    The spring-mass absorber usually offers a good control to dynamical systems under direct base excitations for a specific value of the excitation frequency. As the vibrational energy of a primary dynamical system is transferred to the absorber, it gets dissipated. In this study, this energy is no longer dissipated but converted to available electrical power by designing efficient energy harvesters. A novel design of a piezoelectric beam installed inside an elastically-mounted dynamical system undergoing base excitations is considered. A design is carried out in order to determine the properties and dimensions of the energy harvester with the constraint of simultaneously decreasing the oscillating amplitudes of the primary dynamical system and increasing the harvested power of the energy harvesting absorber. An analytical model for the coupled system is constructed using Euler-Lagrange principle and Galerkin discretization. Different strategies for controlling the primary structure displacement and enhancing the harvested power as functions of the electrical load resistance and thickness of the beam substrate are performed. The linear polynomial approximation of the system’s key parameters as a function of the beam’s substrate thickness is first carried out. Then, the gradient method is applied to determine the adequate values of the electrical load resistance and thickness of the substrate under the constraints of minimizing the amplitudes of the primary structure or maximizing the levels of the harvested power. After that, an iterative strategy is considered in order to simultaneously minimize the amplitudes of the primary structure and maximize the levels of the harvested power as functions of the thickness of the substrate and electrical load resistance. In addition to harmonic excitations, the coupled system subjected to a white noise is explored. Through this analysis, the load resistance and thickness of the substrate of the piezoelectric energy harvester

  9. Luminescence of the SrCl2:Pr crystals under high-energy excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonyak, O.T.; Voloshinovskii, A.S.; Vistovskyy, V.V.; Stryganyuk, G.B.; Kregel, O.P.

    2014-01-01

    The present research was carried out in order to elucidate the mechanisms of energy transfer from the crystal lattice to Pr 3+ ions in SrCl 2 . The luminescence excitation and emission spectra as well as luminescence kinetics of the SrCl 2 :Pr single crystals containing 0.2 mol% Pr were investigated at 300 and 10 K using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The X-ray excited luminescence spectra of the SrCl 2 :Pr (C Pr =0.2 and 0.5 mol%) and SrCl 2 :Pr, K (C Pr =1.5 mol%; C K =1.5 mol%) crystals were studied at 294 and 80 K. Under optical excitation of the samples in the Pr 3+ absorption bands, there were observed five fast ultraviolet emissions assigned to the 4f 1 5d→4f 2 transitions, and two long-wave bands corresponding to the f–f transitions. Furthermore, the intrinsic emission bands of SrCl 2 were observed at 10 K. The X-ray excited luminescence spectrum of the SrCl 2 :Pr crystal containing 0.2 mol% Pr, besides intrinsic emission band near 400 nm, has got a long-wave band at about 490 nm of the Pr 3+ centers. There were not observed any emission bands of the Pr 3+ centers corresponding to the 4f 1 5d–4f 2 transitions in the X-ray excited luminescence spectrum of the SrCl 2 :Pr crystal. The possible mechanisms of energy transfer from the SrCl 2 matrix to the Pr 3+ centers are discussed. -- Highlights: • Spectral-luminescent properties of SrCl 2 :Pr have been investigated. • The identification of emission 4f–4f and 5d–4f bands of Pr 3+ ions was performed. • Adding of potassium prevents clustering of the Pr 3+ centers in the SrCl 2 :Pr, K crystals. • Under X-ray excitation at 80–300 K only Pr 3+ 4f–4f and intrinsic emission is observed

  10. Intermediate energy cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Ellis-Gibbings, L.; García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); School of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY (United Kingdom); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-07

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine, at incident electron energies in the range 15–50 eV. The scattered electron angular range for the DCS measurements was 15°–90°. The measurements at the DCS-level are the first to be reported for vibrational-excitation in pyrimidine via electron impact, while for the ICS we extend the results from the only previous condensed-phase study [P. L. Levesque, M. Michaud, and L. Sanche, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094701 (2005)], for electron energies ⩽12 eV, to higher energies. Interestingly, the trend in the magnitude of the lower energy condensed-phase ICSs is much smaller when compared to the corresponding gas phase results. As there is no evidence for the existence of any shape-resonances, in the available pyrimidine total cross sections [Baek et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 032702 (2013); Fuss et al., ibid. 88, 042702 (2013)], between 10 and 20 eV, this mismatch in absolute magnitude between the condensed-phase and gas-phase ICSs might be indicative for collective-behaviour effects in the condensed-phase results.

  11. Energy considerations in accelerating rapid shear granular flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Pudasaini

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a complete expression for the total energy associated with a rapid frictional granular shear flow down an inclined surface. This expression reduces to the often used energy for a non-accelerating flow of an isotropic, ideal fluid in a horizontal channel, or to the energy for a vertically falling mass. We utilize thickness-averaged mass and momentum conservation laws written in a slope-defined coordinate system. Both the enhanced gravity and friction are taken into account in addition to the bulk motion and deformation. The total energy of the flow at a given spatial position and time is defined as the sum of four energy components: the kinetic energy, gravity, pressure and the friction energy. Total energy is conserved for stationary flow, but for non-stationary flow the non-conservative force induced by the free-surface gradient means that energy is not conserved. Simulations and experimental results are used to sketch the total energy of non-stationary flows. Comparison between the total energy and the sum of the kinetic and pressure energy shows that the contribution due to gravity acceleration and frictional resistance can be of the same order of magnitude, and that the geometric deformation plays an important role in the total energy budget of the cascading mass. Relative importance of the different constituents in the total energy expression is explored. We also introduce an extended Froude number that takes into account the apparent potential energy induced by gravity and pressure.

  12. Singlet oxygen generation in O2 flow excited by RF discharge: I. Homogeneous discharge mode: α-mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braginskiy, O V; Vasilieva, A N; Klopovskiy, K S; Kovalev, A S; Lopaev, D V; Proshina, O V; Rakhimova, T V; Rakhimov, A T

    2005-01-01

    The production and transport dynamics of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ) molecules as well as O( 3 P) atoms has been studied in an O 2 flow excited by a 13.56 MHz RF discharge in a quartz tube at pressures of 1-20 Torr. It has been shown that the densities of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O( 3 P) are saturated with increasing energy input into the discharge. The maximum yield of singlet oxygen (SO) and the O 2 dissociation degree drops with pressure. It is demonstrated that depending on the energy input the RF discharge can exist in three modes: I-in the spatially homogeneous mode or α-mode; III-in the substantially inhomogeneous mode, when plasma jets are present outside the discharge; and II-in the transient mode between modes I and III. In this paper only the homogeneous mode of RF discharge in the O 2 flow is considered in detail. A self-consistent model of the α-mode is developed, that allows us to analyse elementary processes responsible for the production and loss of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ) molecules as well as O( 3 P) atoms in detail. To verify both the kinetic scheme of the model and the conclusions, some experiments have been carried out at lower flow velocities and higher pressures (≥10 Torr), when the stationary densities of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ), O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ) and O( 3 P) in the discharge area were established not by the escape of particles but by the losses due to the volumetric and surface reactions. The O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ) density under these conditions is determined by the balance of O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ) production by both direct electron impact and electronic excitation transfer from metastable O( 1 D) atoms and deactivation by oxygen atoms and tube walls, including quenching by ozone in the afterglow. The O( 3 P) density is determined by the balance between the production through O 2 dissociation by electron impact and heterogeneous loss at the wall recombination. The stationary density of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) is provided by the processes of O

  13. Studies on bacterial chromatophores I. Reversible disturbance of transfer of electronic excitation energy between bacteriochlorophyll-types in chromatium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bril, C.

    1960-01-01

    Desocycholate affects the transfer of excitation energy between bacteriochlorophyll-types in Chromatium chromatophores. It is suggested, that the detergent fragments the chromatophore into subunits and subsequenyly disturbs the spatial arrangement of these bacteriochlorophyll-types.

  14. Microscopic unitary description of tidal excitations in high-energy string-brane collisions

    CERN Document Server

    D'Appollonio, Giuseppe; Russo, Rodolfo; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The eikonal operator was originally introduced to describe the effect of tidal excitations on higher-genus elastic string amplitudes at high energy. In this paper we provide a precise interpretation for this operator through the explicit tree-level calculation of generic inelastic transitions between closed strings as they scatter off a stack of parallel Dp-branes. We perform this analysis both in the light-cone gauge, using the Green-Schwarz vertex, and in the covariant formalism, using the Reggeon vertex operator. We also present a detailed discussion of the high energy behaviour of the covariant string amplitudes, showing how to take into account the energy factors that enhance the contribution of the longitudinally polarized massive states in a simple way.

  15. Measurement of astrophysically important excitation energies of 58Zn with GRETINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langer C.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The level structure of neutron-deficient 58Zn has been extracted experimentally. This nucleus is important for the rapid proton-capture process. 58Zn was produced by using a (d,n-type transfer reaction on 57Cu in inverse kinematics at beam energies of 75 MeV/u. Several γ-ray transitions have been identified. The experiment utilized the state-of-the-art GRETINA γ-ray energy tracking array in conjunction with the largeacceptance spectrometer S800 at NSCL. The excitation energies of the identified low-lying states in 58Zn are important for constraining the 57Cu(p,γ58Zn reaction rate under X-ray burst conditions.

  16. A new analysis technique to measure fusion excitation functions with large beam energy dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuera, P.; Di Pietro, A.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Shotter, A. C.; Ruiz, C.; Zadro, M.

    2018-01-01

    Peculiar nuclear structures of two colliding nuclei such has clustering, neutron halo/skin or very low breakup thresholds can affect the reaction dynamics below the Coulomb barrier and this may also have astrophysical consequences. In order to have a better understanding of this topic, in the last decade, several experiments were performed. A typical experimental challenge of such studies is the need to measure excitation functions below the Coulomb barrier, having a strong energy dependence, with rather large beam energy dispersions inside the target. This may easily lead to ambiguities in associating the measured cross section with a proper beam energy. In this paper a discussion on this topic is reported and a new technique to deal with the above problem will be proposed.

  17. High Excitation Transfer Efficiency from Energy Relay Dyes in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hardin, Brian E.

    2010-08-11

    The energy relay dye, 4-(Dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4- dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM), was used with a near-infrared sensitizing dye, TT1, to increase the overall power conversion efficiency of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) from 3.5% to 4.5%. The unattached DCM dyes exhibit an average excitation transfer efficiency (EÌ?TE) of 96% inside TT1-covered, mesostructured TiO2 films. Further performance increases were limited by the solubility of DCM in an acetonitrile based electrolyte. This demonstration shows that energy relay dyes can be efficiently implemented in optimized dye-sensitized solar cells, but also highlights the need to design highly soluble energy relay dyes with high molar extinction coefficients. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Picosecond excitation energy transfer of allophycocyanin studied in solution and in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar Choubeh, Reza; Sonani, Ravi R; Madamwar, Datta; Struik, Paul C; Bader, Arjen N; Robert, Bruno; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2018-03-01

    Cyanobacteria perform photosynthesis with the use of large light-harvesting antennae called phycobilisomes (PBSs). These hemispherical PBSs contain hundreds of open-chain tetrapyrrole chromophores bound to different peptides, providing an arrangement in which excitation energy is funnelled towards the PBS core from where it can be transferred to photosystem I and/or photosystem II. In the PBS core, many allophycocyanin (APC) trimers are present, red-light-absorbing phycobiliproteins that covalently bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophores. APC trimers were amongst the first light-harvesting complexes to be crystallized. APC trimers have two spectrally different PCBs per monomer, a high- and a low-energy pigment. The crystal structure of the APC trimer reveals the close distance (~21 Å) between those two chromophores (the distance within one monomer is ~51 Å) and this explains the ultrafast (~1 ps) excitation energy transfer (EET) between them. Both chromophores adopt a somewhat different structure, which is held responsible for their spectral difference. Here we used spectrally resolved picosecond fluorescence to study EET in these APC trimers both in crystallized and in solubilized form. We found that not all closely spaced pigment couples consist of a low- and a high-energy pigment. In ~10% of the cases, a couple consists of two high-energy pigments. EET to a low-energy pigment, which can spectrally be resolved, occurs on a time scale of tens of picoseconds. This transfer turns out to be three times faster in the crystal than in the solution. The spectral characteristics and the time scale of this transfer component are similar to what have been observed in the whole cells of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, for which it was ascribed to EET from C-phycocyanin to APC. The present results thus demonstrate that part of this transfer should probably also be ascribed to EET within APC trimers.

  19. Low-energy heavy-atom impact as a tool for production and classification of doubly excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy heavy-atom impact may be an efficient way of preferentially populating doubly excited levels. Using neon as an example, this paper discusses why this is so. The similarity of the structure of the energy level diagrams for doubly excited neon and the level scheme for neutral magnesium is pointed out, suggesting that collective quantum numbers may describe the electron pair. (orig.)

  20. An application of a statistical model for the calculation of the logarithmic mean excitation energy of molecules Molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaratos, E.

    1985-01-01

    A statistical model, the local plasma approximation, is considered for the calculation of the logarithmic mean excitation energy for stopping power of chemically bound particles by taking into consideration chemical bonding. This statistical model is applied to molecular hydrogen and leads to results that suggest a value for the logarithmic mean excitation energy of molecular hydrogen that is larger than the accepted experimental and theoretical values.

  1. Impact-Based Electromagnetic Energy Harvester with High Output Voltage under Low-Level Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Luo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To expand the applications of vibrational energy harvesters (VEHs as power sources of wireless sensor nodes, it is of significance to improve the scavenging efficiency for the broadband, low-frequency, and low-level vibrational energy. The output voltages of electromagnetic vibrational energy harvesters (EMVEHs are usually low, which complicates the power management circuit by an indispensable voltage boosting element. To this end, an impact-based non-resonant EMVEH mainly composed of an outer frame and an inner frame on rollers is proposed. Numerical simulations based on a mathematical model of the harvester are conducted to analyze the effects of structural parameters on the output performance. Under base excitation of 0.1 and 0.3 (where g is the gravitational acceleration, 1 g = 9.8 m · s − 2 , the experimental maximum root mean square voltages of a harvester prototype across a resistor of 11 kΩ are as high as 7.6 and 16.5 V at 6.0 and 8.5 Hz, respectively, with the maximum output powers of 5.3 and 24.8 mW, or the power densities of 54.6 and 256 μW cm−3. By using a management circuit without a voltage boosting element, a wireless sensor node driven by the prototype can measure and transmit the temperature and humidity every 20 s under base excitation of 0.1 g at 5.4 Hz.

  2. Influence of primary fragment excitation energy and spin distributions on fission observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litaize, Olivier; Thulliez, Loïc; Serot, Olivier; Chebboubi, Abdelaziz; Tamagno, Pierre

    2018-03-01

    Fission observables in the case of 252Cf(sf) are investigated by exploring several models involved in the excitation energy sharing and spin-parity assignment between primary fission fragments. In a first step the parameters used in the FIFRELIN Monte Carlo code "reference route" are presented: two parameters for the mass dependent temperature ratio law and two constant spin cut-off parameters for light and heavy fragment groups respectively. These parameters determine the initial fragment entry zone in excitation energy and spin-parity (E*, Jπ). They are chosen to reproduce the light and heavy average prompt neutron multiplicities. When these target observables are achieved all other fission observables can be predicted. We show here the influence of input parameters on the saw-tooth curve and we discuss the influence of a mass and energy-dependent spin cut-off model on gamma-rays related fission observables. The part of the model involving level densities, neutron transmission coefficients or photon strength functions remains unchanged.

  3. Machine learning for quantum dynamics: deep learning of excitation energy transfer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häse, Florian; Kreisbeck, Christoph; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between the structure of light-harvesting systems and their excitation energy transfer properties is of fundamental importance in many applications including the development of next generation photovoltaics. Natural light harvesting in photosynthesis shows remarkable excitation energy transfer properties, which suggests that pigment-protein complexes could serve as blueprints for the design of nature inspired devices. Mechanistic insights into energy transport dynamics can be gained by leveraging numerically involved propagation schemes such as the hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM). Solving these equations, however, is computationally costly due to the adverse scaling with the number of pigments. Therefore virtual high-throughput screening, which has become a powerful tool in material discovery, is less readily applicable for the search of novel excitonic devices. We propose the use of artificial neural networks to bypass the computational limitations of established techniques for exploring the structure-dynamics relation in excitonic systems. Once trained, our neural networks reduce computational costs by several orders of magnitudes. Our predicted transfer times and transfer efficiencies exhibit similar or even higher accuracies than frequently used approximate methods such as secular Redfield theory.

  4. Strategy of ring-shaped aggregates in excitation energy transfer for removing disorder-induced shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Go; Nakatani, Masatoshi; Ishihara, Hajime

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral light harvesting complex (LH2), which is found in photosynthetic antenna systems of purple photosynthetic bacteria, has important functions in the photosynthetic process, such as harvesting sunlight and transferring its energy to the photosynthetic reaction center. The key component in excitation energy transfer (EET) between LH2s is B850, which is a characteristic ring-shaped aggregate of pigments usually formed by 18 or 16 bacteriochlorophylls in LH2. We theoretically study the strategy of the ring-shaped aggregate structure, which maximizes EET efficiency, by using the standard Frenkel exciton model and the self-consistent calculation method for the Markovian quantum master equation and Maxwell equation. As a result, we have revealed a simple but ingenious strategy of the ring-shaped aggregate structure. The combination of three key properties of the ring unit system maximizes the EET efficiency, namely the large dipole moment of aggregates causes the basic improvement of EET efficiency, and the isotropic nature and the large occupying area are critically effective to remove the disorder-induced shielding that inhibits EET in the presence of the randomness of orientation and alignment of carriers of excitation energy.

  5. Strategy of ring-shaped aggregates in excitation energy transfer for removing disorder-induced shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tei, Go; Nakatani, Masatoshi; Ishihara, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral light harvesting complex (LH2), which is found in photosynthetic antenna systems of purple photosynthetic bacteria, has important functions in the photosynthetic process, such as harvesting sunlight and transferring its energy to the photosynthetic reaction center. The key component in excitation energy transfer (EET) between LH2s is B850, which is a characteristic ring-shaped aggregate of pigments usually formed by 18 or 16 bacteriochlorophylls in LH2. We theoretically study the strategy of the ring-shaped aggregate structure, which maximizes EET efficiency, by using the standard Frenkel exciton model and the self-consistent calculation method for the Markovian quantum master equation and Maxwell equation. As a result, we have revealed a simple but ingenious strategy of the ring-shaped aggregate structure. The combination of three key properties of the ring unit system maximizes the EET efficiency, namely the large dipole moment of aggregates causes the basic improvement of EET efficiency, and the isotropic nature and the large occupying area are critically effective to remove the disorder-induced shielding that inhibits EET in the presence of the randomness of orientation and alignment of carriers of excitation energy. (paper)

  6. Investigations of the valence-shell excitations of molecular ethane by high-energy electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Qing; Xu, Long-Quan; Qi, De-Guang; Chen, Tao; Liu, Ya-Wei; Zhu, Lin-Fan

    2018-04-01

    The differential cross sections and generalized oscillator strengths for the low-lying excitations of the valence-shell 1eg orbital electron in ethane have been measured for the first time at a high incident electron energy of 1500 eV and a scattering angular range of 1.5°-10°. A weak feature, termed X here, with a band center of about 7.5 eV has been observed, which was also announced by the previous experimental and theoretical studies. The dynamic behaviors of the generalized oscillator strengths for the 3s (8.7 eV), 3s+3p (9.31 eV, 9.41 eV), and X (˜7.5 eV) transitions on the momentum transfer squared have been obtained. The integral cross sections of these transitions from their thresholds to 5000 eV have been obtained with the aid of the BE-scaling (B is the binding energy and E is the excitation energy) method. The optical oscillator strengths of the above transitions determined by extrapolating their generalized oscillator strengths to the limit of the squared momentum transfer K2 → 0 are in good agreement with the ones from the photoabsorption spectrum [J. W. Au et al., Chem. Phys. 173, 209 (1993)], which indicates that the present differential cross sections, generalized oscillator strengths, and integral cross sections can serve as benchmark data.

  7. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials using local plasma oscillator strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The basic model of Lindhard and Scharff, known as the local plasma model, is used to study the effects on stopping power of the chemical and physical state of the medium. Unlike previous work with the local plasma model, in which individual electron shifts in the plasma frequency were estimated empirically, he Pines correction derived for a degenerate Fermi gas is shown herein to provide a reasonable estimate, even on the atomic scale. Thus, the model is moved to a complete theoretical base requiring no empirical adjustments, as characteristic of past applications. The principal remaining error is in the overestimation of the low-energy absorption properties that are characteristic of the plasma model in the region of the atomic discrete spectrum, although higher-energy phenomena are accurately represented, and even excitation-to-ionization ratios are given to fair accuracy. Mean excitation energies for covalent-bonded gases and solids, for ionic gases and crystals, and for metals are calculated using first-order models of the bonded states.

  8. Theory of energy and power flow of plasmonic waves on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2017-10-01

    The energy theorem of electrodynamics is extended so as to apply to the plasmonic waves on single-walled carbon nanotubes which propagate parallel to the axial direction of the system and are periodic waves in the azimuthal direction. Electronic excitations on the nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of free-electron gas which is described by means of the linearized hydrodynamic theory. General expressions of energy and power flow associated with surface waves are obtained by solving Maxwell and hydrodynamic equations with appropriate boundary conditions. Numerical results for the transverse magnetic mode show that energy, power flow, and energy transport velocity of the plasmonic waves strongly depend on the nanotube radius in the long-wavelength region.

  9. NO-γ emissions from streamer discharges: direct electron impact excitation versus resonant energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ningyu; Pasko, Victor P

    2010-01-01

    It has been established that production of NO-γ emission in pulsed corona discharges is dominated by the energy transfer from N 2 (A 3 Σ u + ) to the NO ground state NO(X 2 Π r ) while direct excitation by electron impact is negligible. However, recent studies suggest that the electron impact excitation plays a more important role. In this work, we report modelling results of NO-γ emission associated with streamer discharges using two cross section data sets available in the literature. The first set was originally reported by Mojarrabi et al (1996 Phys. Rev. A 54 2977-82) and later updated by Brunger et al (2000 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 33 809-19); the second set was published by Hayashi (1990 Nonequilibrium Processes in Partially Ionized Gases (NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series, Series B, Physics vol 220) ed M Capitelli and J N Bardsley (New York: Plenum) pp 333-40). According to the results, the role played by the electron impact excitation in the production of NO-γ is drastically different when different cross sections are used. The results indicate that the first data set leads to better agreement with experimental measurements. (fast track communication)

  10. Application of radionuclide sources for excitation in energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is in broad application in many fields of science where elemental determinations are necessary. Solid and liquid samples are analyzed by this method. Solids are introduced in thin or thick samples as melted glass, pellets, powders or as original specimen. The excitation of X-ray spectra can be performed by specific and polychromic radiation of X-ray tubes, by protons, deuterons, α-particles, heavy ions and synchrotron radiation from accelerators and by α-particles, X- and γ-rays and by bremsstrahlung generated by β - -particles from radionuclide sources. The radionuclides are devided into groups with respect to their decay mode and the energy of the emitted radiation. The broad application of radionuclides in XRF excitation is shown in examples as semi-quantitative analysis of glasses, as quantitative analysis of coarse ceramics and as quantitative determination of heavy elements (mainly actinides) in solutions. The advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide excitation in XRF analysis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  11. Redox flow cell energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    NASA-Redox systems are electrochemical storage devices that use two fully soluble Redox couples, anode and cathode fluids, as active electrode materials separated by a highly selective ion exchange membrane. The reactants are contained in large storage tanks and pumped through a stack of Redox flow cells where the electrochemical reactions (reduction and oxidation) take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. A string or stack of these power producing cells is connected in series in a bipolar manner. Redox energy storage systems promise to be inexpensive and possess many features that provide for flexible design, long life, high reliability and minimal operation and maintenance costs. These features include independent sizing of power and storage capacity requirements and inclusion within the cell stack of a cell that monitors the state of charge of the system as a whole, and a rebalance cell which permits continuous correction to be made for minor side reactions that would tend to result in the anode fluid and cathode fluids becoming electrochemically out of balance. These system features are described and discussed.

  12. An analytical approach for predicting the energy capture and conversion by impulsively-excited bistable vibration energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harne, R. L.; Zhang, Chunlin; Li, Bing; Wang, K. W.

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive energies are abundant throughout the natural and built environments, for instance as stimulated by wind gusts, foot-steps, or vehicle-road interactions. In the interest of maximizing the sustainability of society's technological developments, one idea is to capture these high-amplitude and abrupt energies and convert them into usable electrical power such as for sensors which otherwise rely on less sustainable power supplies. In this spirit, the considerable sensitivity to impulse-type events previously uncovered for bistable oscillators has motivated recent experimental and numerical studies on the power generation performance of bistable vibration energy harvesters. To lead to an effective and efficient predictive tool and design guide, this research develops a new analytical approach to estimate the electroelastic response and power generation of a bistable energy harvester when excited by an impulse. Comparison with values determined by direct simulation of the governing equations shows that the analytically predicted net converted energies are very accurate for a wide range of impulse strengths. Extensive experimental investigations are undertaken to validate the analytical approach and it is seen that the predicted estimates of the impulsive energy conversion are in excellent agreement with the measurements, and the detailed structural dynamics are correctly reproduced. As a result, the analytical approach represents a significant leap forward in the understanding of how to effectively leverage bistable structures as energy harvesting devices and introduces new means to elucidate the transient and far-from-equilibrium dynamics of nonlinear systems more generally.

  13. Explanation of the observed trend in the mean excitation energy of a target as determined using several projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Sabin, J.R.; Oddershede, J.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Porter observed [L.E. Porter, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 90, 684 (2002)] that the mean excitation energy and stopping cross section of a target, obtained from fitting experimental data at given projectile charge to a modified Bethe-Block theory, gives projectile dependent results. The main result of his work is that there is a trend for the inferred target mean excitation energy, to decrease as the projectile atomic number increases. However, this result is inconsistent with the usual definition of the mean excitation energy as a function of target excitation properties only. Here we present an explanation of Porter's results based on the Bethe theory extended to take projectile electronic structure explicitly into account

  14. Energy levels and oscillator strengths of excited states in sodium and sodium like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younis, W.O.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, TH.M.

    2005-01-01

    The Hartree- Fock (IIF) wave functions of The ,round states IS2 2 S2 2 P6 3s ('S) of members of the sodium isoelectronic sequence (up to Kr XXVI) have been constructed using the Clementi Roetti form of the radial wave functions. The radial wave functions of the excited orbitals of the type ns, rip, rid, nf (n 3 6 for Na 1 and M. 11, and n 3 5 for the other members of the sequence) have been optimized using the C1V3 computer code. The configuration interaction (Cl) wave functions thus obtained have been used in calculatin,' level energies, oscillator strengths and lifetimes of the excited levels of the sodium like ions. Our calculated values agree very well with the values calculated using the Multi configurational Hartree Fock method (MCHF), Non orthogonal Spline Cl method (NOSC1),Multi configurational Dirae Fock method (MCDHF) and compiled data by the National Institute Of Standards and Technology (NIST). Meanwhile some new values for energy levels and oscillator strengths, not reported before, are given in the present work

  15. Energy Cascade from Internal Modes in Non-uniformly Stratified Fluid through Excitation of Superharmonic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, B. R.

    2016-02-01

    It is well established that two-dimensional internal plane waves and modes in uniformly stratified fluid efficiently transfer energy to smaller scale waves and ultimately turbulent mixing through parametric subharmonic instability (PSI). The numerical simulations of MacKinnon & Winters (GRL 2005) predicted PSI should act efficiently to disrupt the internal tide. However, while in situ observations showed the presence of PSI, it was not found to be appreciable. One reason for the discrepancy between simulations and observations is that the former examined an internal mode in uniformly stratified fluid whereas, in reality, the internal tide exists in non-uniform stratification and is manifest as sinusoidal oscillations of the thermocline. Through theory supported by numerical simulations, it is shown that internal modes in non-uniform stratification immediately excite superharmonics, not subharmonic disturbances. These have double the horizontal wavenumber and double the frequency of the parent mode and hence move with the same horizontal phase speed of the parent mode. As the disturbances grow in amplitude, however, they interact with the parent mode generating small-scale vertically propagating internal waves within the strongly stratified layer. The occurrence of PSI over very long times can occur, as in the simulations of Hazewinkel and Winters (JPO 2011). However, a comprehensive understanding of the energy cascade from the internal tide to small scales must consider the evolution of excited superharmonic disturbances.

  16. Excitation of high energy levels under laser exposure of suspensions of nanoparticles in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shafeev@kapella.gpi.ru; Simakin, A.V. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bozon-Verduraz, F. [ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, Universite Paris 7-Denis Diderot, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 Paris cedex 05 (France); Robert, M. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 7591, Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2007-12-15

    Laser exposure of suspensions of nanoparticles in liquids leads to excitation of high energy levels in both liquid and nanoparticle material. The emission spectrum of the colloidal solution under exposure of a suspension metallic nanoparticles in water to radiation of a Nd:YAG laser of a picosecond range of pulse duration is discussed. Excitation of nuclear energy levels and neutron release is experimentally studied on the model system of transmutation of Hg into Au that occurs under exposure of Hg nanodrops suspended in D{sub 2}O. The proposed mechanism involves: (i) emission of X-ray photons by Hg nanoparticles upon laser exposure, leading to neutron release from D{sub 2}O, (ii) initiation of Hg {yields} Au transmutation by the capture of neutrons. The effect of transmutation is more pronounced using {sup 196}Hg isotope instead of Hg of natural isotope composition. The influence of laser pulse duration on the degree of transmutation (from fs through ns range) is discussed.

  17. System modeling of waste flow in energy planning | Njoku | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The problem of waste flow in energy system planning was investigated by adopting integrated systems enginee-ring approach. The system model was considered at multiple levels of hierarchy. Waste flow in energy plann-ing process was viewed as a system arranged or organized that plans and policies as controlled ...

  18. Electromagnetic energy flow lines as possible paths of photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidovic, M [Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar Kralja Aleksandra 73, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sanz, A S; Miret-Artes, S [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Arsenovic, D; Bozic, M [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: milena@grf.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: asanz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: arsenovic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: bozic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: s.miret@imaff.cfmac.csic.es

    2009-07-15

    Motivated by recent experiments where interference patterns behind a grating are obtained by accumulating single photon events, we provide here an electromagnetic energy flow-line description to explain the emergence of such patterns. We find and discuss an analogy between the equation describing these energy flow lines and the equation of Bohmian trajectories used to describe the motion of massive particles.

  19. Global flow of glasma in high energy nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guangyao; Fries, Rainer J., E-mail: rjfries@comp.tamu.edu

    2013-06-25

    We discuss the energy flow of the classical gluon fields created in collisions of heavy nuclei at collider energies. We show how the Yang–Mills analog of Faraday's Law and Gauss' Law predicts the initial gluon flux tubes to expand or bend. The resulting transverse and longitudinal structure of the Poynting vector field has a rich phenomenology. Besides the well-known radial and elliptic flow in transverse direction, classical quantum chromodynamics predicts a rapidity-odd transverse flow that tilts the fireball for non-central collisions, and it implies a characteristic flow pattern for collisions of non-symmetric systems A+B. The rapidity-odd transverse flow translates into a directed particle flow v{sub 1} which has been observed at RHIC and LHC. The global flow fields in heavy ion collisions could be a powerful check for the validity of classical Yang–Mills dynamics in high energy collisions.

  20. Excitation function of elastic scattering on 12C + 4He system, at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Torres, R.; Aguilera, E. F.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Murillo, G.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Maldonado-Velazquez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions in the 12 C + 4 He system are of great interest in astrophysics and to help determine the relative abundances of elements in stars, at the end of helium burning [1, 2]. The Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) in Mexico, have made measurements of elastic scattering for this system, using the inverse kinematics method with thick white gas [3, 4], for E CM (0.5 - 4 MeV) θ CM = 180 o . In this work we obtain excitation functions of elastic scattering of 12 C + 4 He system with angular and energy dependence; E CM = 0.5 - 4 MeV and θ CM 100 o -170 o .Using inverse kinematics method with thick white gas and energy loss tables. (Author)

  1. High-energy Cu spin excitations in PrBa2Cu3O6+x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boothroyd, A.T.; Andersen, N.H.; Larsen, B.H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes high-energy neutron inelastic scattering measurements of propagating magnetic excitations in PrBa2Cu3O6+x (x approximate to 0.2 and 0.93). The measurements probe the acoustic and optic modes of the antiferromagnetically ordered copper-oxygen bilayers in the energy range 50......V. The value of J(parallel to) is virtually the same as that found in YBa2Cu3O6.2, but J(perpendicular to) is a factor of 2 smaller. To within experimental error the values of J(parallel to) and J(perpendicular to) for PrBa2Cu3O6+x, do not vary with oxygen doping....

  2. Excitation energy and angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.; Behkami, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the excitation energy (E) dependence of nuclear level density for Bethe formula and constant temperature model. The level density parameter aa nd the back shifted energy from the Bethe formula are obtained by fitting the complete level schemes. Also the level density parameters from the constant temperature model have been determined for several nuclei. we have shown that the microscopic theory provides more precise information on the nuclear level densities. On the other hand, the spin cut-off parameter and effective moment of inertia are determined by studying of the angular momentum (J) dependence of the nuclear level density, and effective moment of inertia is compared with rigid body value.

  3. Hybrid lead halide perovskites for light energy conversion: Excited state properties and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Joseph S.

    travel 220 nm over the course of 2 ns after photoexcitation, with an extrapolated diffusion length greater than one micrometer over the full excited state lifetime. The solution-processability of metal halide perovskites necessarily raises questions as to the properties of the solvated precursors and their connection to the final solid-state perovskite phase. Through structural and steady-state and time-resolved absorption studies, the important link between the excited state properties of the precursor components, composed of solvated and solid-state halometallate complexes, and CH3NH3PbI3 is evinced. This connection provides insight into optical nonlinearities and electronic properties of the perovskite phase. Fundamental studies of CH 3NH3PbI3 ultimately serve as a foundation for application of this and other related materials in high-performance devices. In the final chapter, the operation of CH3NH3PbI 3 solar cells in a tandem architecture is presented. The quest for economic, large scale hydrogen production has motivated the search for new materials and device designs capable of splitting water using only energy from the sun. In light of this, we introduce an all solution-processed tandem water splitting assembly composed of a BiVO4 photoanode and a single-junction CH3NH3PbI3 hybrid perovskite solar cell. This unique configuration allows efficient solar photon management, with the metal oxide photoanode selectively harvesting high energy visible photons and the underlying perovskite solar cell capturing lower energy visible-near IR wavelengths in a single-pass excitation. Operating without external bias under standard terrestrial one sun illumination, the photoanode-photovoltaic architecture, in conjunction with an earthabundant cobalt phosphate catalyst, exhibits a solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 2.5% at neutral pH. The design of low-cost tandem water splitting assemblies employing single-junction hybrid perovskite materials establishes a potentially

  4. Novel simplified hourly energy flow models for photovoltaic power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatib, Tamer; Elmenreich, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed an energy flow model for standalone PV system using MATLAB line code. • We developed an energy flow model for hybrid PV/wind system using MATLAB line code. • We developed an energy flow model for hybrid PV/diesel system using MATLAB line code. - Abstract: This paper presents simplified energy flow models for photovoltaic (PV) power systems using MATLAB. Three types of PV power system are taken into consideration namely standalone PV systems, hybrid PV/wind systems and hybrid PV/diesel systems. The logic of the energy flow for each PV power system is discussed first and then the MATLAB line codes for these models are provided and explained. The results prove the accuracy of the proposed models. Such models help modeling and sizing PV systems

  5. Energy flow theory of nonlinear dynamical systems with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Jing Tang

    2015-01-01

    This monograph develops a generalised energy flow theory to investigate non-linear dynamical systems governed by ordinary differential equations in phase space and often met in various science and engineering fields. Important nonlinear phenomena such as, stabilities, periodical orbits, bifurcations and chaos are tack-led and the corresponding energy flow behaviors are revealed using the proposed energy flow approach. As examples, the common interested nonlinear dynamical systems, such as, Duffing’s oscillator, Van der Pol’s equation, Lorenz attractor, Rössler one and SD oscillator, etc, are discussed. This monograph lights a new energy flow research direction for nonlinear dynamics. A generalised Matlab code with User Manuel is provided for readers to conduct the energy flow analysis of their nonlinear dynamical systems. Throughout the monograph the author continuously returns to some examples in each chapter to illustrate the applications of the discussed theory and approaches. The book can be used as ...

  6. Analysis of the power flow in nonlinear oscillators driven by random excitation using the first Wiener kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, D. H.; Langley, R. S.

    2018-01-01

    Random excitation of mechanical systems occurs in a wide variety of structures and, in some applications, calculation of the power dissipated by such a system will be of interest. In this paper, using the Wiener series, a general methodology is developed for calculating the power dissipated by a general nonlinear multi-degree-of freedom oscillatory system excited by random Gaussian base motion of any spectrum. The Wiener series method is most commonly applied to systems with white noise inputs, but can be extended to encompass a general non-white input. From the extended series a simple expression for the power dissipated can be derived in terms of the first term, or kernel, of the series and the spectrum of the input. Calculation of the first kernel can be performed either via numerical simulations or from experimental data and a useful property of the kernel, namely that the integral over its frequency domain representation is proportional to the oscillating mass, is derived. The resulting equations offer a simple conceptual analysis of the power flow in nonlinear randomly excited systems and hence assist the design of any system where power dissipation is a consideration. The results are validated both numerically and experimentally using a base-excited cantilever beam with a nonlinear restoring force produced by magnets.

  7. Detection of Parametric Roll Resonance on Ships from Indication of Nonlinear Energy Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    The detection of the onset of parametric roll resonance on ships is of a central importance in order to activate specific control strategies able to counteract the large roll motion. One of the main priorities is to have detectors with a small detection time, such that warnings can be issued when...... the roll oscillations are about 5◦. This paper proposes two different detection approaches: the first one based on sinusoidal detection in white gaussian noise; the second one utilizes an energy flow indicator in order to catch the onset of parametric roll based upon the transfer of energy from heave...... and pitch to roll. Both detectors have been validated against experimental data of a scale model of a container vessel excited with both regular and irregular waves. The detector based on the energy flow indicator proved to be very robust to different scenarios (regular/irregular waves) since it does...

  8. Flow with vibrational energy exchange, application to CO2 electric laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahan, Claude.

    1974-01-01

    The performances of a continuous wave (CO 2 , N 2 , He) laser ionized by an electron beam are calculated. Several types of phenomena are considered: energy exchange processes between molecules of laser medium, electron molecular excitation processes, aerodynamic phenomena: the energy exchanges accompanying the laser effect generate important quantities of heat, which have to be evacuated by the flow. After a survey of the fundamental assumptions on molecular phenomena, a computer code was developed for following, along the flow, the evolution of the thermodynamic parameters (pressure, temperature), of the laser gain, and of the electrical properties (electron density and temperature). To provide a finer description of the last ones, a model giving the energy distribution of the electrons in the laser medium was established [fr

  9. Analytic energy gradient of excited electronic state within TDDFT/MMpol framework: Benchmark tests and parallel implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-07

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the most popular method to calculate the electronic excitation energies, describe the excited-state properties, and perform the excited-state geometric optimization of medium and large-size molecules due to the implementation of analytic excited-state energy gradient and Hessian in many electronic structure software packages. To describe the molecules in condensed phase, one usually adopts the computationally efficient hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) models. Here, we extend our previous work on the energy gradient of TDDFT/MM excited state to account for the mutual polarization effects between QM and MM regions, which is believed to hold a crucial position in the potential energy surface of molecular systems when the photoexcitation-induced charge rearrangement in the QM region is drastic. The implementation of a simple polarizable TDDFT/MM (TDDFT/MMpol) model in Q-Chem/CHARMM interface with both the linear response and the state-specific features has been realized. Several benchmark tests and preliminary applications are exhibited to confirm our implementation and assess the effects of different treatment of environmental polarization on the excited-state properties, and the efficiency of parallel implementation is demonstrated as well.

  10. Dynamic Model and Vibration Power Flow of a Rigid-Flexible Coupling and Harmonic-Disturbance Exciting System for Flexible Robotic Manipulator with Elastic Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the dynamic of a flexible robotic manipulator (FRM which consists of rigid driving base, flexible links, and flexible joints. With considering the motion fluctuations caused by the coupling effect, such as the motor parameters and mechanism inertias, as harmonic disturbances, the system investigated in this paper remains a parametrically excited system. An elastic restraint model of the FRM with elastic joints (FRMEJ is proposed, which considers the elastic properties of the connecting joints between the flexible arm and the driving base, as well as the harmonic disturbances aroused by the electromechanical coupling effect. As a consequence, the FRMEJ accordingly remains a flexible multibody system which conveys the effects of rigid-flexible couple and electromechanical couple. The Lagrangian function and Hamilton’s principle are used to establish the dynamic model of the FRMEJ. Based on the dynamic model proposed, the vibration power flow is introduced to show the vibration energy distribution. Numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the effect of the joint elasticities and the disturbance excitations, and the influences of the structure parameters and motion parameters on the vibration power flow are studied. The results obtained in this paper contribute to the structure design, motion optimization, and vibration control of FRMs.

  11. Evidence for a cysteine-mediated mechanism of excitation energy regulation in a photosynthetic antenna complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orf, Gregory S.; Saer, Rafael G.; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Zhang, Hao; McIntosh, Chelsea L.; Schultz, Jason W.; Mirica, Liviu M.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Light-harvesting antenna complexes not only aid in the capture of solar energy for photosynthesis, but regulate the quantity of transferred energy as well. Light-harvesting regulation is important for protecting reaction center complexes from overexcitation, generation of reactive oxygen species, and metabolic overload. Usually, this regulation is controlled by the association of light-harvesting antennas with accessory quenchers such as carotenoids. One antenna complex, the Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) antenna protein from green sulfur bacteria, completely lacks carotenoids and other known accessory quenchers. Nonetheless, the FMO protein is able to quench energy transfer in aerobic conditions effectively, indicating a previously unidentified type of regulatory mechanism. Through de novo sequencing MS, chemical modification, and mutagenesis, we have pinpointed the source of the quenching action to cysteine residues (Cys49 and Cys353) situated near two low-energy bacteriochlorophylls in the FMO protein from Chlorobaculum tepidum. Removal of these cysteines (particularly removal of the completely conserved Cys353) through N-ethylmaleimide modification or mutagenesis to alanine abolishes the aerobic quenching effect. Electrochemical analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra suggest that in aerobic conditions the cysteine thiols are converted to thiyl radicals which then are capable of quenching bacteriochlorophyll excited states through electron transfer photochemistry. This simple mechanism has implications for the design of bio-inspired light-harvesting antennas and the redesign of natural photosynthetic systems. PMID:27335466

  12. Indigenous development of a 2 kW RF-excited fast axial flow CO2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cooled. The resonator is designed to have a low Fresnel number (N ≈ 2.5) to allow the os- cillation of only one or two lower-order transverse modes, thereby ensuring a good beam quality. High-power capacitively-coupled RF discharge excitation: ...

  13. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  14. Measurement of the rates of reaction of the ground and metastable excited states of 02+, N0+ and 0+ with atmospheric gases at thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glosik, J.; Rakshit, A.B.; Twiddy, N.D.; Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal-energy reaction rate coefficients and product ion distributions have been measured for reactions of both the ground state and metastable electronic states of 0 2 + , N0 + and 0 + with several neutral species, using a selected-ion flow tube. In general the excited-ion reaction rates are fast, frequently approaching the Langevin limit. Collisional quenching occurs for the reactions of N0 + sup(star) with N 2 ,0 2 and H 2 and the quenching rates have been determined. The ion source also provided a substantial yield of doubly charged 0 2 permitting some measurements of reaction rates of 0 2 2+ . (author)

  15. Excited baryon form-factors at high momentum transfer at CEBAF at higher energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoler, P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The possibilities of measuring the properties of excited nucleons at high Q{sup 2} by means of exclusive single meson production at CEBAF with an electron energy of 8 GeV is considered. The motivation is to access short range phenomena in baryon structure, and to investigate the transition from the low Q{sup 2} non-perturbative QCD regime, where constituent quark models are valid, to higher Q{sup 2} where it is believed perturbative QCD plays an increasingly important role. It is found that high quality baryon decay angular distributions can be obtained for the most prominent states up to Q{sup 2} {approximately} 12 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} using a set of moderate resolution, large solid angle magnetic spectrometers.

  16. Nuclei far from stability. Individual and collective excitations at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.

    1984-01-01

    The low energy structure of exotic nuclei is discussed in terms of self-consistent microscopic models. The experimental striking features of the spectroscopy of these nuclei are briefly surveyed and the schematic steps performed to obtain from effective N-N interactions their spectroscopic properties are presented. Their saturation and deformation properties are given by the Hartree-Fock approximation (HF). Then it is shown how to describe the dynamics of even-even exotic nuclei excited states by solving the complete Bohr Hamiltonian, built microscopically using the HF approximation and the adiabatic limit (and its derivatives) of the time-dependent HF approximation (ATDHF). The structure of odd and doubly odd nuclei is discussed in the framework of the unified model, ie the microscopic rotor + quasiparticles model. Finally possible future directions of experimental research concerning exotic nuclei are described and improvements or new theoretical approaches discussed [fr

  17. Excited baryon form-factors at high momentum transfer at CEBAF at higher energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoler, P.

    1994-01-01

    The possibilities of measuring the properties of excited nucleons at high Q 2 by means of exclusive single meson production at CEBAF with an electron energy of 8 GeV is considered. The motivation is to access short range phenomena in baryon structure, and to investigate the transition from the low Q 2 non-perturbative QCD regime, where constituent quark models are valid, to higher Q 2 where it is believed perturbative QCD plays an increasingly important role. It is found that high quality baryon decay angular distributions can be obtained for the most prominent states up to Q 2 ∼ 12 GeV 2 /c 2 using a set of moderate resolution, large solid angle magnetic spectrometers

  18. Role of thermal excitation in ultrafast energy transfer in chlorosomes revealed by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sunhong; Yang, Cheolhee; Kim, Tae Wu; Isaji, Megumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Jeongho

    2015-07-21

    Chlorosomes are the largest light harvesting complexes in nature and consist of many bacteriochlorophyll pigments forming self-assembled J-aggregates. In this work, we use two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) to investigate ultrafast dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in chlorosomes and their temperature dependence. From time evolution of the measured 2D electronic spectra of chlorosomes, we directly map out the distribution of the EET rate among the manifold of exciton states in a 2D energy space. In particular, it is found that the EET rate varies gradually depending on the energies of energy-donor and energy-acceptor states. In addition, from comparative 2D-ES measurements at 77 K and room temperature, we show that the EET rate exhibits subtle dependence on both the exciton energy and temperature, demonstrating the effect of thermal excitation on the EET rate. This observation suggests that active thermal excitation at room temperature prevents the excitation trapping at low-energy states and thus promotes efficient exciton diffusion in chlorosomes at ambient temperature.

  19. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Ca+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic study of Ca + atomic properties is carried out using a high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for the levels up to n=7. Recommended values and estimates of their uncertainties are provided for a large number of electric-dipole transitions. Electric-dipole scalar polarizabilities for the 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 4p j , 5p j , 3d j , and 4d j states and tensor polarizabilities for the 4p 3/2 , 5p 3/2 , 3d j , and 4d j states in Ca + are calculated. Methods are developed to accurately treat the contributions from highly excited states, resulting in significant (factor of 3) improvement in the accuracy of the 3d 5/2 static polarizability value, 31.8(3)a 0 3 , in comparison with the previous calculation [Arora et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 064501 (2007).]. The blackbody radiation shift of the 4s-3d 5/2 clock transition in Ca + is calculated to be 0.381(4) Hz at room temperature, T=300 K. Electric-quadrupole 4s-nd and electric-octupole 4s-nf matrix elements are calculated to obtain the ground-state multipole E2 and E3 static polarizabilities. Excitation energies of the ns, np, nd, nf, and ng states with n≤ 7 in are evaluated and compared with experiment. Recommended values are provided for the 7p 1/2 , 7p 3/2 , 8p 1/2 , and 8p 3/2 removal energies for which experimental measurements are not available. The hyperfine constants A are determined for the low-lying levels up to n=7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of 43 Ca + ground state is investigated. These calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of Ca + atomic properties for use in planning and analysis of various experiments as well as theoretical modeling.

  20. Piezoelectric Wind Energy Harvesting from Self-Excited Vibration of Square Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junlei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-excited vibration of a square cylinder has been considered as an effective way in harvesting piezoelectric wind energy. In present work, both of the vortex-induced vibration and unstable galloping phenomenon process are investigated in a reduced velocity (Ur=U/ωn·D range of 4≤Ur≤20 with load resistance ranging in 100 Ω≤R≤1 MΩ. The vortex-induced vibration covers presynchronization, synchronization, and postsynchronization branches. An aeroelectromechanical model is given to describe the coupling of the dynamic equation of the fluid-structure interaction and the equation of Gauss law. The effects of load resistance are investigated in both the open-circuit and close-circuit system by a linear analysis, which covers the parameters of the transverse displacement, aerodynamic force, output voltage, and harvested power utilized to measure the efficiency of the system. The highest level of the transverse displacement and the maximum value of harvested power of synchronization branch during the vortex-induced vibration and galloping are obtained. The results show that the large-amplitude galloping at high wind speeds can generate energy. Additionally, energy can be harvested by utilization of the lock-in phenomenon of vortex-induced vibration under low wind speed.

  1. Dynamics and quantumness of excitation energy transfer through a complex quantum network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Zhao, X. L.; Yi, X. X.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of efficient and robust energy transfer in organic systems provides us with insights for the optimal design of artificial systems. In this paper, we explore the dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) through a complex quantum network by a toy model consisting of three sites coupled to environments. We study how the coherent evolution and the noise-induced decoherence work together to reach efficient EET and illustrate the role of the phase factor attached to the coupling constant in the EET. By comparing the differences between the Markovian and non-Markovian dynamics, we discuss the effect of environment and the spatial structure of system on the dynamics and the efficiency of EET. A intuitive picture is given to show how the exciton is transferred through the system. Employing the simple model, we show the robustness of EET efficiency under the influence of the environment and elucidate the important role of quantum coherence in EET. We go further to study the quantum feature of the EET dynamics by quantumness and show the importance of quantum coherence from a different perspective. We calculate the energy current in the EET and its quantumness, and results for different system parameters are presented and discussed.

  2. Luminescence and excitation energy transfer in new fluoride crystals containing rare earth ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryba-Romanowski, W. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, PL-50422, Wroclaw (Poland)], E-mail: W.Ryba-Romanowski@int.pan.wroc.pl; Solarz, P.; Gusowski, M.; Dominiak-Dzik, G. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, PL-50422, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2007-04-15

    Spectroscopic characteristics of Pr{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} in K{sub 2}Na{sub 2}GdF{sub 7}, K{sub 5}Li{sub 2}GdF{sub 10} and K{sub 3}GdF{sub 6} fluoride matrices are considered. Crystal structures of these compounds have been ascertained based on X-ray measurement on single crystal samples. Energies of lattice vibrations have been derived from IR and Raman spectra. Spectroscopic features of crystals in the VUV region were studied using experimental facilities of the Superlumi station at HASYLAB in Hamburg. High-resolution spectra and decay curves of luminescence in the visible were used to determine the energy levels and excited state relaxation dynamics of luminescent ions. Relevance of energy transfer processes, which feed the {sup 5}D{sub J} levels of Eu{sup 3+} and the {sup 3}P{sub 0} level of Pr{sup 3+}, is discussed.

  3. Energy flow and thermal comfort in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome

    is based on both radiation and convection. Radiant terminals have the advantage of making use of low grade sources (i.e. low temperature heating and high temperature cooling), thus decreasing the primary energy consumption of buildings. But there is a lack of knowledge on the heat transfer from...... the terminal towards the space and on the parameters influencing the effectiveness of terminals. Therefore the comfort conditions and energy consumption of four types of terminals (active chilled beam, radiant floor, wall and ceiling) have been compared for a typical office room, both numerically......), radiant and air-based terminals have similar energy needs. For higher air change rate, the energy consumption of radiant terminals is lower than that of air-based terminals due to the higher air temperature. At 2 ACH, the energy savings of a radiant wall can be estimated to around 10 % compared...

  4. Quantitative Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency measurements using simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Sanam; Hannagan, John; Rigby, Paul; Pfleger, Kevin; Corry, Ben

    2013-02-01

    Accurate quantification of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using intensity-based methods is difficult due to the overlap of fluorophore excitation and emission spectra. Consequently, mechanisms are required to remove bleedthrough of the donor emission into the acceptor channel and direct excitation of the acceptor when aiming to excite only the donor fluorophores. Methods to circumvent donor bleedthrough using the unmixing of emission spectra have been reported, but these require additional corrections to account for direct excitation of the acceptor. Here we present an alternative method for robust quantification of FRET efficiencies based upon the simultaneous spectral unmixing of both excitation and emission spectra. This has the benefit over existing methodologies in circumventing the issue of donor bleedthrough and acceptor cross excitation without the need for additional corrections. Furthermore, we show that it is applicable with as few as two excitation wavelengths and so can be used for quantifying FRET efficiency in microscope images as easily as for data collected on a spectrofluorometer. We demonstrate the accuracy of the approach by reproducing efficiency values in well characterized FRET standards: HEK cells expressing a variety of linked cerulean and venus fluorescent proteins. Finally we describe simple ImageJ plugins that can be used to calculate and create images of FRET efficiencies from microscope images.

  5. Response functions of 58Ni, 116Sn and 208Pb to the excitation of intermediate-energy α-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.; Alamanos, N.; Berthier, B.; Bruge, G.; Faraggi, H.; Legrand, D.; Lugol, J.C.; Mittig, W.; Papineau, L.; Yavin, A.I.; Scott, D.K.; Levine, M.; Arvieux, J.; Farvacque, L.; Buenerd, M.

    1984-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of 340 MeV and 480 MeV α-particles has been measured on 58 Ni, 116 Sn and 208 Pb up to 60 MeV excitation energy. Consistent background subtraction and multipole analysis has provided the repartition of multipole strength for all three nuclei. The so-obtained response functions show the already known low-energy giant resonances in a detailed way, as well as new giant resonances at high energy. (orig.)

  6. Energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and photochemistry in cob(III)alamins and ferric porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rury, Aaron S; Wiley, Theodore E; Sension, Roseanne J

    2015-03-17

    Porphyrins and the related chlorins and corrins contain a cyclic tetrapyrrole with the ability to coordinate an active metal center and to perform a variety of functions exploiting the oxidation state, reactivity, and axial ligation of the metal center. These compounds are used in optically activated applications ranging from light harvesting and energy conversion to medical therapeutics and photodynamic therapy to molecular electronics, spintronics, optoelectronic thin films, and optomagnetics. Cobalt containing corrin rings extend the range of applications through photolytic cleavage of a unique axial carbon-cobalt bond, permitting spatiotemporal control of drug delivery. The photochemistry and photophysics of cyclic tetrapyrroles are controlled by electronic relaxation dynamics including internal conversion and intersystem crossing. Typically the electronic excitation cascades through ring centered ππ* states, ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) states, metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states, and metal centered states. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for the investigation of the electronic state dynamics in metal containing tetrapyrroles. The UV-visible spectrum is sensitive to the oxidation state, electronic configuration, spin state, and axial ligation of the central metal atom. Ultrashort broadband white light probes spanning the range from 270 to 800 nm, combined with tunable excitation pulses, permit the detailed unravelling of the time scales involved in the electronic energy cascade. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations provide additional insight required for precise assignment of the states. In this Account, we focus on recent ultrafast transient absorption studies of ferric porphyrins and corrin containing cob(III)alamins elucidating the electronic states responsible for ultrafast energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and the resulting photoreactivity or photostability of these compounds. Iron

  7. Excitation and photon decay of giant multipole resonances - the role and future of medium-energy heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.; Horen, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon 17 O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the 208 Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented

  8. Radial, sideward and elliptic flow at AGS energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the sideward flow, the elliptic flow and the radial transverse mass distribution of protons data at. AGS energies. In order to ... data on both sideward and elliptic flow, NL3 model is better at 2 A¡GeV, while NL23 model is at 4–8. A¡GeV. ... port approach RBUU which is based on a coupled set of covariant transport equations for.

  9. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  10. Ab initio calculations of dissociative excitation of water and methane molecules upon electron impact at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, T.J.; McCurdy, C.W.; Rescigno, T.N.; Lengsfield, B.H. III

    1994-01-01

    The authors are reporting results of ab-initio calculations of electron-impact excitation of water and methane occurring at scattering energies up to 60 eV. The authors consider dissociative excited states of both systems since the understanding of their chemistry has considerable importance in plasma technology and atmospheric research. In the case of methane the authors are dealing with the promotion of a valence electron into Rydberg orbitals, while in water the excited states have one electron in an antibonding unoccupied valence orbital and support Feshbach resonances. The authors discuss issues related to convergence of the close-coupling expansion in the case of Rydberg excitation, where the authors have coupled up to 16 channels. The practical realization of the calculation within the framework of the complex Kohn variational principle represents merging of quantum chemistry and quantum scattering theory and is also discussed

  11. Low energy consumption vortex wave flow membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Dong, Weilong; Hu, Xiaohong; Sun, Tianyu; Wang, Tao; Sun, Youshan

    2017-11-01

    In order to reduce the energy consumption and membrane fouling of the conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR), a kind of low energy consumption vortex wave flow MBR was exploited based on the combination of biofilm process and membrane filtration process, as well as the vortex wave flow technique. The experimental results showed that the vortex wave flow state in the membrane module could be formed when the Reynolds number (Re) of liquid was adjusted between 450 and 1,050, and the membrane flux declined more slowly in the vortex wave flow state than those in the laminar flow state and turbulent flow state. The MBR system was used to treat domestic wastewater under the condition of vortex wave flow state for 30 days. The results showed that the removal efficiency for CODcr and NH 3 -N was 82% and 98% respectively, and the permeate quality met the requirement of 'Water quality standard for urban miscellaneous water consumption (GB/T 18920-2002)'. Analysis of the energy consumption of the MBR showed that the average energy consumption was 1.90 ± 0.55 kWh/m 3 (permeate), which was only two thirds of conventional MBR energy consumption.

  12. Analysis of changing hidden energy flow in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Anh Tuyet; Ishihara, Keiichi N.

    2006-01-01

    The energy consumption in production process is changing especially in developing countries by substituting technology. Input-output analysis for energy flows has been developing and is one of the best solutions for investigating macroscopic exchanges of both economy and energy. Since each element in the Leontief inverse contains both direct and indirect effects of any change in final demand, to separate those direct and indirect effects, the power series expansion is available. In this work, the changes of embodied energy intensity in Vietnam from 1996 to 2000 were analyzed using the structural decomposition and its power series expansion. By illustrating the change of causal relationship between direct energy consumption and embodied energy consumption, the change of hidden energy flow, which indicates how the changing embodied energy builds up the change of direct energy consumption in every sector, can be seen. In the case study, the rice processing sector, which is one of the important food processing sectors in Vietnam, is focused. By drawing a diagrammatic map for the change of hidden energy flow, it is clarified that in the case of raising embodied energy intensity, cultivation sector and trade and repaired service sector are the main contributors, and, on the contrary, in the case of reducing embodied energy intensity, paper pulp sector is the main contributor

  13. Fusion-fission dynamics at high excitation energies studied by neutron emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, W. P.; Hilscher, D.; Ingold, G.; Jahnke, U.; Lehmann, M.; Rossner, H.

    1986-02-01

    Neutron emission in coincidence with fusion-fission events and evaporation residues was measured in the heavy-ion reactions 141+(316 MeV) 40Ar and 175Lu+(192 MeV) 12C. Both reactions are leading to similar composite systems and excitation energies as the previously investigated reaction 165Ho+ 20Ne. In order to determine the lifetimes of the composite systems prior to scission and to study entrance channel and angular-momentum effects, the results for all three systems are compared. From measured cross sections of fission and evaporation residues, the angular momentum intervals leading to fission are deduced to be 50-109 ħ and 49-62 ħ for Pr+Ar and Lu+C, respectively. The corresponding prescission neutron multiplicities are deduced to be Mnpresc=3.6+/-0.6 and 6.3+/-0.8, whereas the respective postscission multiplicities are Mnpost=4.4+/-0.4 and 3.6+/-0.6. For the system 175Lu+ 12C it is found that 0.5+/-0.2 preequilibrium neutrons are emitted. In contrast to the evaporative neutrons, a strong anisotropy anPE=2.2+/-0.6 relative to the reaction plane defined by one fission fragment and the beam direction is observed. From the prescission neutron multiplicities, the evaporation time of the system prior to scission is deduced using the statistical model to ~=(3-12)×10-20 s. Nucleus deformation effects and neutron emission from not fully accelerated fission fragments are taken into account. The unexpected long prescission lifetimes can be explained as long transition times to the scission point caused by a large two-body viscosity. Under this assumption the viscosity parameter of the highly excited nuclei has been determined in a first approximation to μ~=0.1 TP. The results might be understood also assuming a mixture of a two-body and one-body friction.

  14. Fission rate of nuclei at high excitation energy and emission of light particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mersits, E.

    1991-10-01

    Light charged-particle emission has been measured for the reactions α + 238 U, 209 Bi, 232 Th at 118 MeV bombarding energies. The rate of particles detected in coincidence with fission fragments have been determined at high excitation energy. Modified precompound decay models and statistical models (program ALICE) have been used in an attempt to interpret the experimental data. The ratio of the level density parameter af/an was found to be 1.03 and 1.08, the temperature of neutron spectra was found to be 1.58 MeV and 1.33 MeV, for 238 U and 209 Bi, respectively. Analysing the experimental light-charged-particle spectra, there was no evidence for emission from the fission fragments which was in good agreement with calculations for the nucleus 209 Bi. On the other hand the theoretical emission spectra of 238 U predict great parts of such 'postfission' particles. Simplification in the model concerning the time of possible particle emission, that is, before the saddle-point and from the fragments, leads to the assumption of light particle emission between the saddle and the scission point

  15. A coherent modified Redfield theory for excitation energy transfer in molecular aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang-Fu, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Yuan-Chung, E-mail: yuanchung@ntu.edu.tw

    2015-02-02

    Highlights: • A CMRT method for coherent energy transfer in molecular aggregates was developed. • Applicability of the method was verified in two-site systems with various parameters. • CMRT accurately describes population dynamics in the FMO-complex. • The method is accurate in a large parameter space and computationally efficient. - Abstract: Excitation energy transfer (EET) is crucial in photosynthetic light harvesting, and quantum coherence has been recently proven to be a ubiquitous phenomenon in photosynthetic EET. In this work, we derive a coherent modified Redfield theory (CMRT) that generalizes the modified Redfield theory to treat coherence dynamics. We apply the CMRT method to simulate the EET in a dimer system and compare the results with those obtained from numerically exact path integral calculations. The comparison shows that CMRT provides excellent computational efficiency and accuracy within a large EET parameter space. Furthermore, we simulate the EET dynamics in the FMO complex at 77 K using CMRT. The results show pronounced non-Markovian effects and long-lasting coherences in the ultrafast EET, in excellent agreement with calculations using the hierarchy equation of motion approach. In summary, we have successfully developed a simple yet powerful framework for coherent EET dynamics in photosynthetic systems and organic materials.

  16. General theory of excitation energy transfer in donor-mediator-acceptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akihiro

    2009-04-21

    General theory of the excitation energy transfer (EET) in the case of donor-mediator-acceptor system was constructed by using generalized master equation (GME). In this theory, we consider the direct and indirect transitions in the EET consistently. Hence, our theory includes the quantum mechanical interference between the direct and indirect transitions automatically. Memory functions in the GME were expressed by the overlap integrals among the time-dependent emission spectrum of the donor, the absorption spectrum of the mediator, the time-dependent emission spectrum of the mediator, and the absorption spectrum of the acceptor. In the Markov limit of the memory functions, we obtained the rate of EET which consists of three terms due to the direct transition, the indirect transition, and the interference between them. We found that the interference works effectively in the limit of slow thermalization at the intermediate state. The formula of EET rate in this limit was expressed by the convolution of the EET interaction and optical spectra. The interference effect strongly depends on the width of the absorption spectrum of mediator molecule and the energy gap between the donor and the mediator molecules.

  17. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  18. Excited state geometry optimizations by analytical energy gradient of long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Mahito; Tsuneda, Takao; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2006-04-14

    An analytical excitation energy gradient of long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory (LC-TDDFT) is presented. This is based on a previous analytical TDDFT gradient formalism, which avoids solving the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham equation for each nuclear degree of freedom. In LC-TDDFT, exchange interactions are evaluated by combining the short-range part of a DFT exchange functional with the long-range part of the Hartree-Fock exchange integral. This LC-TDDFT gradient was first examined by calculating the excited state geometries and adiabatic excitation energies of small typical molecules and a small protonated Schiff base. As a result, we found that long-range interactions play a significant role even in valence excited states of small systems. This analytical LC-TDDFT gradient was also applied to the investigations of small twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) systems. By comparing with calculated ab initio multireference perturbation theory and experimental results, we found that LC-TDDFT gave much more accurate absorption and fluorescence energies of these systems than those of conventional TDDFTs using pure and hybrid functionals. For optimized excited state geometries, LC-TDDFT provided fairly different twisting and wagging angles of these small TICT systems in comparison with conventional TDDFT results.

  19. YIELDS OF IONS AND EXCITED STATES IN NONPOLAR LIQUIDS EXPOSED TO X-RAYS OF 1 TO 30 KEV ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLROYD,R.A.

    1999-08-18

    When x-rays from a synchrotron source are absorbed in a liquid, the x-ray energy (E{sub x}) is converted by the photoelectric effect into the kinetic energy of the electrons released. For hydrocarbons, absorption by the K-electrons of carbon dominates. Thus the energy of the photoelectron (E{sub pe}) is E{sub x}-E{sub b}, where E{sub b} is the K-shell binding energy of carbon. Additional electrons with energy equal to E{sub b} is released in the Auger process that fills the hole in the K-shell. These energetic electrons will produce many ionizations, excitations and products. The consequences of the high density of ionizations and excitations along the track of the photoelectron and special effects near the K-edge are examined here.

  20. High power laser exciter accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.

    1975-01-01

    Recent developments in untriggered oil and water switching now permit the construction of compact, high energy density pulsed power sources for laser excitation. These accelerators, developed principally for electron beam fusion studies, appear adaptable to laser excitation and will provide electron beams of 10 13 to 10 14 W in the next several years. The accelerators proposed for e-beam fusion essentially concentrate the available power from the outside edge of a disk into the central region where the electron beam is formed. One of the main problem areas, that of power flow at the vacuum diode insulator, is greatly alleviated by the multiplicity of electron beams that are allowable for laser excitation. A proposal is made whereby the disk-shaped pulsed power sections are stacked vertically to form a series of radially flowing electron beams to excite the laser gas volume. (auth)

  1. Excitation of high numbers harmonics by flows of oscillators in a periodic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buts, V.A.; Marekha, V.I.; Tolstoluzhsky, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the maximum of radiation spectrum of nonrelativistic oscillators, which move into a periodically inhomogeneous potential, can be in the region of high numbers harmonics. Spectrum of such oscillators radiation becomes similar to the radiation spectrum of relativistic oscillators. The equations, describing the non-linear self-consistent theory of excitations, of high numbers harmonics by ensemble of oscillators are formulated and its numerical analysis is conducted. The numerical analysis has confirmed the capability of radiation of high numbers of harmonics. Such peculiarity of radiation allows t expect of creation of nonrelativistic FEL

  2. Stochastic flow modeling : Quasi-Geostrophy, Taylor state and torsional wave excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    We reconstruct the core flow evolution over the period 1840-2010 under the quasi-geostrophic assumption, from the stochastic magnetic field model COV-OBS and its full model error covariance matrix. We make use of a prior information on the flow temporal power spectrum compatible with that of obse...... variations from 1950 onward. We propose a triggering mechanism for these waves involving non-zonal motions in the framework of Taylor's state....

  3. Optimal energy growth in a stably stratified shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Sharath; Roy, Anubhab; Bale, Rahul; Iyer, Krithika; Govindarajan, Rama

    2018-02-01

    Transient growth of perturbations by a linear non-modal evolution is studied here in a stably stratified bounded Couette flow. The density stratification is linear. Classical inviscid stability theory states that a parallel shear flow is stable to exponentially growing disturbances if the Richardson number (Ri) is greater than 1/4 everywhere in the flow. Experiments and numerical simulations at higher Ri show however that algebraically growing disturbances can lead to transient amplification. The complexity of a stably stratified shear flow stems from its ability to combine this transient amplification with propagating internal gravity waves (IGWs). The optimal perturbations associated with maximum energy amplification are numerically obtained at intermediate Reynolds numbers. It is shown that in this wall-bounded flow, the three-dimensional optimal perturbations are oblique, unlike in unstratified flow. A partitioning of energy into kinetic and potential helps in understanding the exchange of energies and how it modifies the transient growth. We show that the apportionment between potential and kinetic energy depends, in an interesting manner, on the Richardson number, and on time, as the transient growth proceeds from an optimal perturbation. The oft-quoted stabilizing role of stratification is also probed in the non-diffusive limit in the context of disturbance energy amplification.

  4. Energy fluxes and spectra for turbulent and laminar flows

    KAUST Repository

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2017-05-14

    Two well-known turbulence models to describe the inertial and dissipative ranges simultaneously are by Pao~[Phys. Fluids {\\\\bf 8}, 1063 (1965)] and Pope~[{\\\\em Turbulent Flows.} Cambridge University Press, 2000]. In this paper, we compute energy spectrum $E(k)$ and energy flux $\\\\Pi(k)$ using spectral simulations on grids up to $4096^3$, and show consistency between the numerical results and predictions by the aforementioned models. We also construct a model for laminar flows that predicts $E(k)$ and $\\\\Pi(k)$ to be of the form $\\\\exp(-k)$, and verify the model predictions using numerical simulations. The shell-to-shell energy transfers for the turbulent flows are {\\\\em forward and local} for both inertial and dissipative range, but those for the laminar flows are {\\\\em forward and nonlocal}.

  5. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Hg+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, M.; Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.

    2011-01-01

    Excitation energies of the [Xe]4f 14 5d 10 ns, [Xe]4f 14 5d 10 np j , [Xe]4f 14 5d 10 nd j , [Xe]4f 14 5d 10 n ' f j , and [Xe]4f 14 5d 10 n ' g j states in Hg + are evaluated (n≤10, n ' ≤9, and [Xe]=1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 3d 10 4s 2 4p 6 4d 10 5s 2 5p 6 ). First-, second-, third-, and all-order Coulomb energies and first- and second-order Coulomb-Breit energies are calculated. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, and transition rates are determined for electric-dipole transitions, including the ns (n=6-11), np (n=6-10), nd (n=6-10), nf (n=5-9), and ng (n=5-9) states. Lifetime values are determined for all above-mentioned states. The ground state E1, E2, and E3 polarizabilities are evaluated. The hyperfine structure in 199 Hg + and 201 Hg + ions is investigated. The hyperfine A and B values are determined for the first low-lying levels up to n = 7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of 199 Hg + and 201 Hg + ground states is investigated. The calculated shift for the 199 Hg + (F = 1, M = 0) ↔ (F = 0, M = 0) transition is -0.0597(2) Hz/(kV/cm) 2 , in agreement with previous theoretical result -0.060(3) Hz/(kV/cm) 2 . These calculations provide a theoretical benchmark for comparison with experiment and theory and provide values of blackbody radiation shifts for microwave frequency standards with 199 Hg + and 201 Hg + ions.

  6. Inner-shell excitation in heavy ion collisions up to intermediate incident energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reus, T. de.

    1987-04-01

    Electronic excitations in collisions of very heavy ions with a total nuclear charge Z greater than 1/α ≅ 137 at bombarding energies reaching from 3.6 MeV/n up to 100 MeV/n are the subject of this thesis. The dynamical behaviour of the electron-positron-field is described within a semiclassical model, which is reviewed and extended to include electronic interactions via a mean field. A detailed comparison with experimental data of K-vacancy formation, δ-electron and positron emission shows an improved agreement compared with former calculations. Structures in spectra of positrons emitted in sub- and supercritical collision are discussed in two respects: Firstly as a signal of the vacuum decay in supercritical electromagnetic fields which evolve in the vicinity of long living giant nuclear molecules. Secondly as an atomic effect, which might be related to an instaneous formation of molecular 1sσ- and 2p 1/2 σ- levels. However, beyond this speculation the emission spectra of electrons and positrons in deep inelastic reactions have proven to be a powerful tool for measuring nuclear reaction or delay times in the order of 10 -21 s. This property was transfered to the domain of intermediate energy collisions. In first order perturbation theory we derived a scaling law, exhibiting how nuclear stopping times could be extracted from the emission spectra of high energetic δ-electrons. Quantitative calculations within a coupled channel code have been carried out for the system Pb+Pb, yielding cross sections of up to 20 nb for the emission of electrons with a kinetic energy of 50 MeV in 60 MeV/n-collisions. (orig./HSI)

  7. Phototrophic hydrogen production in photobioreactors coupled with solar-energy-excited optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Saratale, Ganesh D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Lee, Chi-Mei [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (China); Chen, Pei-Chung [Department of Food and Nutrition, Hung Kuang University, Taichung (China)

    2008-12-15

    A novel solar-energy-excited optical fiber (SEEOF) photobioreactor (PBR) was developed to enhance the phototrophic H{sub 2} production by Rhodopseudomonas palustris WP3-5 using acetate (HAc) as the sole carbon source. The PBR was illuminated by combinative light sources, including an internal illumination with optical fiber excited by solar energy (OF(sunlight)) as well as external irradiation of tungsten filament lamp (TL). The photo-H{sub 2} producing performance of the SEEOF photobioreactor was further improved by using an innovative light dependent resistor (LDR) system, which could maintain sufficient and continual light supply. The results show that combination of OF(sunlight)/TL was more effective than the TL/TL illumination system, leading to a 138% and 136% increase in cumulative H{sub 2} production (V{sub H{sub 2}}) and H{sub 2} yield (Y{sub H{sub 2}}), respectively. The LDR-coupled SEEOF photobioreactor was able to solve the problems of diurnal variation in solar light intensity, enabling the control of a constant total light irradiation intensity on the PBR surface. Combining OF(sunlight)/TL with LDR, the V{sub H{sub 2}} and Y{sub H{sub 2}} were nearly 27% higher than without LDR. For bioreactor scale up from 50 to 1800 ml working volume, the LDR-coupled SEEOF photobioreactor worked well during daytime, leading to a marked improvement in phototrophic H{sub 2} production with a V{sub H{sub 2}} and Y{sub H{sub 2}} of 3606 ml and 2.45 mol H{sub 2}/mol HAc, respectively. Moreover, continuous cultures operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 48 h show a high hydrogen production rate of 32.4 ml/l/h with stable operation for over 15 days. This optimal performance of LDR-coupled SEEOF photobioreactor is superior to most reported results and is a favorable choice of electricity-saving PBR strategy to improve photo-H{sub 2} production efficiency. (author)

  8. Empirical regularities in the excitation cross-section behavior of the lead atom (transitions from energy levels of 6pnd configurations)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Yu M.

    2018-03-01

    Electron-impact excitation of lead atom levels belonging to 6pnd configurations has been studied in experiment. One hundred two excitation cross-sections have been measured at an incident electron energy of 50 eV. Eleven optical excitation functions (OEFs) have been recorded in the exciting electron energy range of E = 0-200 eV. The resulting findings were used to study the excitation cross-sections dependence on the principal quantum number of upper levels for thirteen PbI spectral series.

  9. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  10. The map of energy flow in HVAC systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Lombard, Luis; Ortiz, Jose; Maestre, Ismael R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Discussion of the four stages in the 'HVAC systems energy chain'. → Examination of HVAC systems as energy conversion devices. → Analysis of HVAC Sankey diagrams. → Discussion of HVAC loads and HVAC energy losses. -- Abstract: Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are the most energy consuming building services representing approximately half of the final energy use in the building sector and between one tenth and one fifth of the energy consumption in developed countries. Despite their significant energy use, there is a lack of a consistent and homogeneous framework to efficiently guide research and energy policies, mainly due to the complexity and variety of HVAC systems but also to insufficient rigour in their energy analysis. This paper reviews energy related aspects of HVAC systems with the aim of establishing a common ground for the analysis of their energy efficiency. The paper focuses on the map of energy flow to deliver thermal comfort: the HVAC energy chain. Our approach deals first with thermal comfort as the final service delivered to building occupants. Secondly, conditioned spaces are examined as the systems where useful heat (or coolth) is degraded to provide comfort. This is followed by the analysis of HVAC systems as complex energy conversion devices where energy carriers are transformed into useful heat and coolth, and finally, the impact of HVAC energy consumption on energy resources is discussed.

  11. Reduced-cost second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction method for excitation energies and transition moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, Dávid; Nagy, Péter R.; Kállay, Mihály

    2018-03-01

    A reduced-cost implementation of the second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction [ADC(2)] method is presented. We introduce approximations by restricting virtual natural orbitals and natural auxiliary functions, which results, on average, in more than an order of magnitude speedup compared to conventional, density-fitting ADC(2) algorithms. The present scheme is the successor of our previous approach [D. Mester, P. R. Nagy, and M. Kállay, J. Chem. Phys. 146, 194102 (2017)], which has been successfully applied to obtain singlet excitation energies with the linear-response second-order coupled-cluster singles and doubles model. Here we report further methodological improvements and the extension of the method to compute singlet and triplet ADC(2) excitation energies and transition moments. The various approximations are carefully benchmarked, and conservative truncation thresholds are selected which guarantee errors much smaller than the intrinsic error of the ADC(2) method. Using the canonical values as reference, we find that the mean absolute error for both singlet and triplet ADC(2) excitation energies is 0.02 eV, while that for oscillator strengths is 0.001 a.u. The rigorous cutoff parameters together with the significantly reduced operation count and storage requirements allow us to obtain accurate ADC(2) excitation energies and transition properties using triple-ζ basis sets for systems of up to one hundred atoms.

  12. High energy density redox flow device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, William Craig; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  13. High energy density redox flow device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yet -Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2015-10-06

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  14. Fundamentally excited flow past a surface-mounted rib. Part I ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    flow. The most common data analysis approach has been to use phase-locked conditional sampling technique with the driving signal as a timing reference. Yang & Karlsson (1991),. Rajaee & Karlsson (1992) and Hussain (1980) have used this approach to determine the large-scale structure amplitude. One limitation of the ...

  15. Ab Initio Model for Vibrational Excitation of Polar Molecules by Low-Energy Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanroose, W. I.; Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.

    2003-05-01

    Vibrational excitation of the hydrogen halides by electron impact has been a subject of continued interest ever since the first observations of pronounced threshold peaks in the cross sections by Rohr and Linder twenty five years ago. Two semi-empirical models have been developed to explain these features, one a virtual state model by Gauyacq and Herzenberg based on effective-range theory, the other by Domcke and co-workers based on a non-local Feshbach resonance model. We will show that a non-empirical model can be formulated which captures the essential features of the observed cross sections. The only parameters needed to implement the calculations are the potential energy curve of the negative ion in the region where it is bound, the potential curve of the neutral target and its R-dependent dipole moment. We use an effective range theory for the nuclear dynamics, which can be implemented without an expansion in target vibrational states, instead of non-local equations derived from Feshbach partitioning. Another new element is the use of a dipole coupled partial-wave model to predict the analytic continuation of the negative ion potential curve into the continuum. We will illustrate the new model with results for electron-HCl scattering.

  16. Unequal allocation of excitation energy between photosystem II and I reduces cyanolichen photosynthesis in blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Xie, Li; Gauslaa, Yngvar

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthesis was compared in two cyanobacterial lichens (Lobaria hallii and Peltigera praetextata) and two green algal lichens (Lobaria pulmonaria and Peltigera leucophlebia) exposed to red, green or blue light. Cyanolichens had substantially lower photosynthetic CO(2) uptake and O(2) evolution than the green algal lichens in blue light, but slightly higher photosynthesis in red and green light. The effective quantum yield of photosystem (PS) II (Φ(PSII)) decreased with increasing red and green light for all species, but in blue light this response occurred in green algal lichens only. Cyanolichen Φ(PSII) increased with increasing blue light at low irradiances, but decreased at stronger exposures. However, after adding red light the efficiency of blue light for photosynthetic O(2) evolution increased by 2.4 times. Because phycobilisomes associated with PSII have a low blue light absorption, our results are consistent with blue light absorption mainly by Chl in PSI. Thereby, unequal allocation of excitation energy between PSII and PSI results in low cyanolichen photosynthesis under blue light. This is new knowledge in the science of lichenology with important implications for e.g. the reliability of using Chl fluorometers with blue light for cyanolichens. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Effect of neutron irradiation on the density of low-energy excitations in vitreous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    Systematic low-temperature measurements of the thermal conductivity, specific heat, dielectric constant, and temperature-dependent ultrasound velocity were made on a single piece of vitreous silica. These measurements were repeated after fast neutron irradiation of the material. It was found that the irradiation produced changes of the same relative magnitude in the low-temperature excess specific heat C/sub ex/, the thermal conductivity kappa, and the anomalous temperature dependence of the ultrasound velocity Δv/v. A corresponding change in the temperature dependent dielectric constant was not observed. It is therefore likely that kappa and Δv/v are determined by the same localized excitations responsible for C/sub ex/, but the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant may have a different, though possibly related, origin. A consistent account for the measured C/sub ex/, kappa, and Δv/v of unirradiated silica is given by the tunneling-state model with a single, energy-dependent density of states. Changes in these three properties due to irradiation can be explained by altering only the density of tunneling states incorporated in the model

  18. Energy-dependence of skin-mode fraction in E1 excitations of neutron-rich nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakada H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have extensively investigated characters of the low-energy E1 strengths in N > Z nuclei, by analyzing the transition densities obtained by the HF+RPA calculations with several effective interactions. Crossover behavior has been confirmed, from the skin mode at low energy to the pn mode at higher energy. Decomposing the E1 strengths into the skin-mode, pn-mode and interference fractions, we show that the ratio of the skin-mode strength to the full strength may be regarded as a generic function of the excitation energy, insensitive to nuclides and effective interactions, particularly beyond Ni.

  19. Nanoscale fluid-structure interaction: flow resistance and energy transfer between water and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Ma, Ming; Jin, Kai; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Shen, Luming; Zheng, Quanshui; Xu, Zhiping

    2011-10-01

    We investigate here water flow passing a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT), through analysis based on combined atomistic and continuum mechanics simulations. The relation between drag coefficient C(D) and Reynolds number Re is obtained for a wide range of flow speed u from 5 to 600 m/s. The results suggest that Stokes law for creep flow works well for small Reynolds numbers up to 0.1 (u ≈ 100 m/s), and indicates a linear dependence between drag force and flow velocity. Significant deviation is observed at elevated Re values, which is discussed by considering the interfacial slippage, reduction of viscosity due to friction-induced local heating, and flow-induced structural vibration. We find that interfacial slippage has a limited contribution to the reduction of the resistance, and excitations of low-frequency vibration modes in the carbon nanotube play an important role in energy transfer between water and carbon nanotubes, especially at high flow speeds where drastic enhancement of the carbon nanotube vibration is observed. The results reported here reveal nanoscale fluid-structure interacting mechanisms, and lay the ground for rational design of nanofluidics and nanoelectromechanical devices operating in a fluidic environment.

  20. Study of energy flows in Pantanal - Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanna, F. B.; Arruda, P. H. Z. D.; Pinto-Jr, O. B.

    2014-12-01

    The main goal of this work was to estimate fluxes using the eddy covariance method in a wetland area, basically with herb-shrub physiognomy, sparse woody vegetation and approximately 4m height. The geographical position of the Pantanal, altitude, latitude, longitude, climate and weather conditions are determined by the dynamics of the atmosphere that affects the whole South America and consequently influence the ecological framework of ecosystems. The results shown by the components considered in the energy balance were more significant during the day, which the atmospheric boundary layer extends from the ground to about 50 or 100 meters height, showing greater instability and turbulence (u* > 0.2 m / s), and this turbulence is what justifies the use of the eddy covariance method to estimate the sensible and latent heat flux. The Pantanal presents seasonal difference between the densities estimates of sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat flux. During the rainy season the sensible heat flux (H) was 30% and the latent heat flux (LE) 58%. During the dry season the sensible heat flux (H) was 46% and the latent heat flux (LE) 40% of the energy budget.

  1. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules. [Relaxation rates, self-relaxation, upper limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295/sup 0/K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295/sup 0/K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ..delta..J transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references.

  2. Tensor numerical methods in quantum chemistry: from Hartree-Fock to excitation energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoromskaia, Venera; Khoromskij, Boris N

    2015-12-21

    We resume the recent successes of the grid-based tensor numerical methods and discuss their prospects in real-space electronic structure calculations. These methods, based on the low-rank representation of the multidimensional functions and integral operators, first appeared as an accurate tensor calculus for the 3D Hartree potential using 1D complexity operations, and have evolved to entirely grid-based tensor-structured 3D Hartree-Fock eigenvalue solver. It benefits from tensor calculation of the core Hamiltonian and two-electron integrals (TEI) in O(n log n) complexity using the rank-structured approximation of basis functions, electron densities and convolution integral operators all represented on 3D n × n × n Cartesian grids. The algorithm for calculating TEI tensor in a form of the Cholesky decomposition is based on multiple factorizations using algebraic 1D "density fitting" scheme, which yield an almost irreducible number of product basis functions involved in the 3D convolution integrals, depending on a threshold ε > 0. The basis functions are not restricted to separable Gaussians, since the analytical integration is substituted by high-precision tensor-structured numerical quadratures. The tensor approaches to post-Hartree-Fock calculations for the MP2 energy correction and for the Bethe-Salpeter excitation energies, based on using low-rank factorizations and the reduced basis method, were recently introduced. Another direction is towards the tensor-based Hartree-Fock numerical scheme for finite lattices, where one of the numerical challenges is the summation of electrostatic potentials of a large number of nuclei. The 3D grid-based tensor method for calculation of a potential sum on a L × L × L lattice manifests the linear in L computational work, O(L), instead of the usual O(L(3) log L) scaling by the Ewald-type approaches.

  3. Excitation photon energy dependence of photo-induced phase transition in (EDO-TTF)2PF6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, S.; Onda, K.; Shimizu, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Okimoto, Y.; Shao, X. F.; Nakano, Y.; Yamochi, H.; Saito, G.; Koshihara, S.

    2009-02-01

    The conducting charge transfer complex (EDO-TTF)2PF6 has two types of charge transfer bands in the low temperature insulator phase: CT1 at 0.56 eV and CT2 at 1.38 eV. We excited these bands independently with a tunable ultrashort pulse laser and studied the difference of the photo-induced phases by measuring change in reflectivity spectrum over a wide photon energy range. As a result, we found that both the photo-induced phases by CT1 and CT2 excitation are the same except for their photo-conversion efficiencies

  4. Excitation energies and oscillator strengths for the 1s2 2s2 3d 2D e ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    involving electronic transitions induced by energetic radiation [15]. Tiwary [16] calculated the excitation energies and oscillator strengths, of both the length ( fL) and velocity ( fV) forms, for the inner-shell excitation 1s2 2s2 2p6 3s2 3p6. 3d 2De → 1s2 2s2 2p6 3s2 3p5 3d2 2Po, 2Do, 2Fo transitions using the configuration in-.

  5. Initial angular momentum and flow in high energy nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Rainer J.; Chen, Guangyao; Somanathan, Sidharth

    2018-03-01

    We study the transfer of angular momentum in high energy nuclear collisions from the colliding nuclei to the region around midrapidity, using the classical approximation of the color glass condensate (CGC) picture. We find that the angular momentum shortly after the collision (up to times ˜1 /Qs , where Qs is the saturation scale) is carried by the "β -type" flow of the initial classical gluon field, introduced by some of us earlier. βi˜μ1∇iμ2-μ2∇iμ1 (i =1 ,2 ) describes the rapidity-odd transverse energy flow and emerges from Gauss's law for gluon fields. Here μ1 and μ2 are the averaged color charge fluctuation densities in the two nuclei, respectively. Interestingly, strong coupling calculations using anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) techniques also find an energy flow term featuring this particular combination of nuclear densities. In classical CGC the order of magnitude of the initial angular momentum per rapidity in the reaction plane, at a time 1 /Qs , is |d L2/d η |≈ RAQs-3ɛ¯0/2 at midrapidity, where RA is the nuclear radius, and ɛ¯0 is the average initial energy density. This result emerges as a cancellation between a vortex of energy flow in the reaction plane aligned with the total angular momentum, and energy shear flow opposed to it. We discuss in detail the process of matching classical Yang-Mills results to fluid dynamics. We will argue that dissipative corrections should not be discarded to ensure that macroscopic conservation laws, e.g., for angular momentum, hold. Viscous fluid dynamics tends to dissipate the shear flow contribution that carries angular momentum in boost-invariant fluid systems. This leads to small residual angular momentum around midrapidity at late times for collisions at high energies.

  6. Fast color flow mode imaging using plane wave excitation and temporal encoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    In conventional ultrasound color flow mode imaging, a large number (~500) of pulses have to be emitted in order to form a complete velocity map. This lowers the frame-rate and temporal resolution. A method for color flow imaging in which a few (~10) pulses have to be emitted to form a complete....... At the axial center line of the CFM image, the velocity is estimated over the vessel with a mean relative standard deviation of 2.64% and a mean relative bias of 6.91%. At an axial line 5 mm to the right of the center of the CFM image, the velocity is estimated over the vessel with a relative standard...

  7. Natural Regulation of Energy Flow in a Green Quantum Photocell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arp, Trevor B; Barlas, Yafis; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel M

    2016-12-14

    Manipulating the flow of energy in nanoscale and molecular photonic devices is of both fundamental interest and central importance for applications in light energy harvesting optoelectronics. Under erratic solar irradiance conditions, unregulated power fluctuations in a light-harvesting photocell lead to inefficient energy storage in conventional solar cells and potentially fatal oxidative damage in photosynthesis. Here, we compare the theoretical minimum energy fluctuations in nanoscale quantum heat engine photocells that incorporate one or two photon-absorbing channels and show that fluctuations are naturally suppressed in the two-channel photocell. This intrinsic suppression acts as a passive regulation mechanism that enables the efficient conversion of varying incident solar power into a steady output for absorption over a broad range of the solar spectrum on Earth. Remarkably, absorption in the green portion of the spectrum provides no inherent regulatory benefit, indicating that green light should be rejected in a photocell whose primary role is the regulation of energy flow.

  8. Radiation energy devaluation in diffusion combusting flows of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhanlall, Deodat; Munda, Josiah L.; Jiang, Peixue

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: CFD (Computational fluid dynamics) is used to evaluate the thermodynamic second-law effects of thermal radiation in turbulent diffusion natural gas flames. Radiative heat transfer processes in gas and at solid walls are identified as important causes of energy devaluation in the combusting flows. The thermodynamic role of thermal radiation cannot be neglected when compared to that of heat conduction and convection, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and viscous dissipation. An energy devaluation number is also defined, with which the optimum fuel–air equivalence for combusting flows can be determined. The optimum fuel–air equivalence ratio for a natural gas flame is determined to be 0.7. The CFD model is validated against experimental measurements. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic effects of thermal radiation in combusting flows analyzed. • General equation for second-law analyses of combusting flows extended. • Optimum fuel–air equivalence ratio determined for natural gas flame

  9. Smart grids, information flows and emerging domestic energy practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Joeri; Spaargaren, Gert; Vliet, Bas J.M. van; Horst, Hilje M. van der

    2014-01-01

    Smart energy grids and smart meters are commonly expected to promote more sustainable ways of living. This paper presents a conceptual framework for analysing the different ways in which smart grid developments shape – and are shaped by – the everyday lives of residents. Drawing upon theories of social practices and the concept of informational governance, the framework discerns three categories of ‘information flows’: flows between household-members, flows between households and energy service providers, and flows between local and distant households. Based on interviews with Dutch stakeholders and observations at workshops we examine, for all three information flows, the changes in domestic energy practices and the social relations they help to create. The analysis reveals that new information flows may not produce more sustainable practices in linear and predictable ways. Instead, changes are contextual and emergent. Second, new possibilities for information sharing between households open up a terrain for new practices. Third, information flows affect social relationships in ways as illustrated by the debates on consumer privacy in the Netherlands. An exclusive focus on privacy, however, deviates attention from opportunities for information disclosure by energy providers, and from the significance of transparency issues in redefining relationships both within and between households. - Highlights: • Smart grids generate three key new information flows that affect social relations. • Practice theory can reveal the ways in which households handle/govern information. • Householders show ambivalence about the workings of the different information flows. • Policies should account for the ‘bright’ as well as the ‘dark’ sides of information

  10. Beam Flutter and Energy Harvesting in Internal Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim; Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae

    2017-11-01

    Aeroelastic flutter, largely studied for causing engineering failures, has more recently been used as a means of extracting energy from the flow. Particularly, flutter of a cantilever or an elastically mounted plate in a converging-diverging flow passage has shown promise as an energy harvesting concept for internal flow applications. The instability onset is observed as a function of throat velocity, internal wall geometry, fluid and structure material properties. To enable these devices, our work explores features of the fluid-structure coupled dynamics as a function of relevant nondimensional parameters. The flutter boundary is examined through stability analysis of a reduced order model, and corroborated with numerical simulations at low Reynolds number. Experiments for an energy harvester design are qualitatively compared to results from analytical and numerical work, suggesting a robust limit cycle ensues due to a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. Bosch Corporation.

  11. The effects of introducing static and dynamic disorder on the low-energy excitations of superfluid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    We present neutron inelastic scattering measurements of the low energy excitations of superfluid 4 He. Measurements on three types of superfluid system have been taken: Bulk superfluid, superfluid in the presence of static disorder ( 4 He confined in porous glasses) and superfluid in the presence of dynamic disorder (dilute 3 He- 4 He mixtures). For the bulk liquid, we find that the temperature dependence of the roton may be described well by the generally accepted BPZ theory [Bedell 1984], over the temperature region 0.4-1.8 K. However we also find our results to be in agreement with the high-resolution measurements of Andersen et al who reported a deviation from the BPZ theory at temperatures below 1 K [Andersen 1996]. We find that the energy of the maxon does surpass that of two times the roton energy at elevated pressure. This result cannot be explained simply from a theoretical point of view and we offer an explanation in terms of a hybridisation between the single particle excitation and the two-roton continuum. A high-resolution study of the roton when the superfluid is confined in porous aerogel glass shows the excitation to remain sharp down to temperatures of 0.07 K. This result contradicts the results of previous studies [Gibbs 1997, Plantevin 1998] who found that the roton exhibited an anomalous linewidth at low temperatures. We present the first successful neutron scattering measurements of the superfluid confined in porous Vycor and xerogel glasses. We observe a sharp excitation with a dispersion almost identical to that of the phonon-roton excitation of the bulk liquid. We also observe extra scattering at energies below that of the bulk-like excitation. This scattering has been attributed to two-dimensional layer excitations previously only observed in neutron scattering studies of thin films of the superfluid adsorbed onto various forms of graphite substrate. High resolution studies of S(Q,ω) of a 1% mixture of 3 He in superfluid 4 He reveals no

  12. On mechanism of Ar(3p54p) states excitation in low-energy Ar-Ar collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurskov, S Y; Kashuba, A S

    2009-01-01

    The present work is devoted to study of Ar(3p 5 4p) states excitation in binary low-energy Ar-Ar collisions. The results of the experimental investigation of excitation cross sections of Ar I 4p'[l/2] 1 , 4p'[3/2] 1 , 4p'[3/2] 2 and 4p[3/2] 2 levels in the collision energy range from threshold up to 500 eV (cm) and degree of polarization for 4s[3/2] 2 0 -4p'[l/2] 1 and 4s[3/2] 2 0 -4p[3/2] 2 transitions in this energy range are represented.

  13. Molecular approaches to solar energy conversion: the energetic cost of charge separation from molecular-excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, James R

    2013-08-13

    This review starts with a brief overview of the technological potential of molecular-based solar cell technologies. It then goes on to focus on the core scientific challenge associated with using molecular light-absorbing materials for solar energy conversion, namely the separation of short-lived, molecular-excited states into sufficiently long-lived, energetic, separated charges capable of generating an external photocurrent. Comparisons are made between different molecular-based solar cell technologies, with particular focus on the function of dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical solar cells as well as parallels with the function of photosynthetic reaction centres. The core theme of this review is that generating charge carriers with sufficient lifetime and a high quantum yield from molecular-excited states comes at a significant energetic cost-such that the energy stored in these charge-separated states is typically substantially less than the energy of the initially generated excited state. The role of this energetic loss in limiting the efficiency of solar energy conversion by such devices is emphasized, and strategies to minimize this energy loss are compared and contrasted.

  14. Exciton description of chlorosome to baseplate excitation energy transfer in filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs and green sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnanto, Juha M; Korppi-Tommola, Jouko E I

    2013-09-26

    A description of intra-chlorosome and from chlorosome to baseplate excitation energy transfer in green sulfur bacteria and in filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs is presented. Various shapes and sizes, single and multiwalled tubes, cylindrical spirals and lamellae of the antenna elements mimicking pigment organization in chlorosomes were generated by using molecular mechanics calculations, and the absorption, LD, and CD spectra of these were predicted by using exciton theory. Calculated absorption and LD spectra were similar for all modeled antenna structures; on the contrary, CD spectra turned out to be sensitive to the size and pigment orientations in the antenna. It was observed that, bringing two tubular antennae at close enough interaction distance, the exciton density of the lowest energy state became localized on pigments facing each other in the antenna dimer. Calculations predicted for stacked tubular antenna elements extremely fast, faster than 500 fs, intra-chlorosome energy transfer toward the baseplates in the direction perpendicular to the chlorosome long axis. Downhill excitation energy transfer according to our model is driven by interactions of the antennae with their immediate surroundings. Energy transfer from the chlorosome to the baseplate, consisting of 2D lattices of monomeric and dimeric bacteriochlorophyll a molecules, was predicted to occur in 5-15 ps, in agreement with experimental findings. Advancement of excitation through a double tube antenna stack, a model for antenna element organization in chlorosomes of green sulfur bacteria, to a monomeric baseplate was visualized in space and in time.

  15. Dynamic interactions of an integrated vehicle-electromagnetic energy harvester-tire system subject to uneven road excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jing Tang; Sun, Zhe; Zhou, Sulian; Tan, Mingyi

    2017-04-01

    An investigation is undertaken of an integrated mechanical-electromagnetic coupling system consisting of a rigid vehicle with heave, roll, and pitch motions, four electromagnetic energy harvesters and four tires subject to uneven road excitations in order to improve the passengers' riding comfort and harvest the lost engine energy due to uneven roads. Following the derived mathematical formulations and the proposed solution approaches, the numerical simulations of this interaction system subject to a continuous sinusoidal road excitation and a single ramp impact are completed. The simulation results are presented as the dynamic response curves in the forms of the frequency spectrum and the time history, which reveals the complex interaction characteristics of the system for vibration reductions and energy harvesting performance. It has addressed the coupling effects on the dynamic characteristics of the integrated system caused by: (1) the natural modes and frequencies of the vehicle; (2) the vehicle rolling and pitching motions; (3) different road excitations on four wheels; (4) the time delay of a road ramp to impact both the front and rear wheels, etc., which cannot be tackled by an often used quarter vehicle model. The guidelines for engineering applications are given. The developed coupling model and the revealed concept provide a means with analysis idea to investigate the details of four energy harvester motions for electromagnetic suspension designs in order to replace the current passive vehicle isolators and to harvest the lost engine energy. Potential further research directions are suggested for readers to consider in the future.

  16. Linking material and energy flow analyses and social theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, Frank [The Open University, Faculty of Maths, Computing and Technology, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    The paper explores the potential of Habermas' theory of communicative action to alter the social reflexivity of material and energy flow analysis. With his social macro theory Habermas has provided an alternative, critical justification for social theory that can be distinguished from economic libertarianism and from political liberalism. Implicitly, most flow approaches draw from these theoretical traditions rather than from discourse theory. There are several types of material and energy flow analyses. While these concepts basically share a system theoretical view, they lack a specific interdisciplinary perspective that ties the fundamental insight of flows to disciplinary scientific development. Instead of simply expanding micro-models to the social macro-dimension social theory suggests infusing the very notion of flows to the progress of disciplines. With regard to the functional integration of society, material and energy flow analyses can rely on the paradigm of ecological economics and at the same time progress the debate between strong and weak sustainability within the paradigm. However, placing economics at the centre of their functional analyses may still ignore the broader social integration of society, depending on their pre-analytic outline of research and the methods used. (author)

  17. Linking material and energy flow analyses and social theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The paper explores the potential of Habermas' theory of communicative action to alter the social reflexivity of material and energy flow analysis. With his social macro theory Habermas has provided an alternative, critical justification for social theory that can be distinguished from economic libertarianism and from political liberalism. Implicitly, most flow approaches draw from these theoretical traditions rather than from discourse theory. There are several types of material and energy flow analyses. While these concepts basically share a system theoretical view, they lack a specific interdisciplinary perspective that ties the fundamental insight of flows to disciplinary scientific development. Instead of simply expanding micro-models to the social macro-dimension social theory suggests infusing the very notion of flows to the progress of disciplines. With regard to the functional integration of society, material and energy flow analyses can rely on the paradigm of ecological economics and at the same time progress the debate between strong and weak sustainability within the paradigm. However, placing economics at the centre of their functional analyses may still ignore the broader social integration of society, depending on their pre-analytic outline of research and the methods used. (author)

  18. How Parallel Are Excited State Potential Energy Surfaces from Time-Independent and Time-Dependent DFT? A BODIPY Dye Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Keenan T; Kowalczyk, Tim

    2016-10-06

    To support the development and characterization of chromophores with targeted photophysical properties, excited-state electronic structure calculations should rapidly and accurately predict how derivatization of a chromophore will affect its excitation and emission energies. This paper examines whether a time-independent excited-state density functional theory (DFT) approach meets this need through a case study of BODIPY chromophore photophysics. A restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS) treatment of the S 1 excited state of BODIPY dyes is contrasted with linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Vertical excitation energies predicted by the two approaches are remarkably different due to overestimation by TDDFT and underestimation by ROKS relative to experiment. Overall, ROKS with a standard hybrid functional provides the more accurate description of the S 1 excited state of BODIPY dyes, but excitation energies computed by the two methods are strongly correlated. The two approaches also make similar predictions of shifts in the excitation energy upon functionalization of the chromophore. TDDFT and ROKS models of the S 1 potential energy surface are then examined in detail for a representative BODIPY dye through molecular dynamics sampling on both model surfaces. We identify the most significant differences in the sampled surfaces and analyze these differences along selected normal modes. Differences between ROKS and TDDFT descriptions of the S 1 potential energy surface for this BODIPY derivative highlight the continuing need for validation of widely used approximations in excited state DFT through experimental benchmarking and comparison to ab initio reference data.

  19. Scaling of anisotropy flows in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Y.G.; Yan, T.Z.; Cai, X.Z.; Chen, J.G.; Fang, D.Q.; Guo, W.; Liu, G.H.; Ma, C.W.; Ma, E.J.; Shen, W.Q.; Shi, Y.; Su, Q.M.; Tian, W.D.; Wang, H.W.; Wang, K.

    2007-01-01

    Anisotropic flows (v 1 , v 2 and v 4 ) of light nuclear clusters are studied by a nucleonic transport model in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. The number-of-nucleon scalings of the directed flow (v 1 ) and elliptic flow (v 2 ) are demonstrated for light nuclear clusters. Moreover, the ratios of v 4 /v 2 2 of nuclear clusters show a constant value of 1/2 regardless of the transverse momentum. The above phenomena can be understood by the coalescence mechanism in nucleonic level and are worthy to be explored in experiments

  20. The Redox Flow System for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odonnell, P.; Gahn, R. F.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The interfacing of a Solar Photovoltaic System and a Redox Flow System for storage was workable. The Redox Flow System, which utilizes the oxidation-reduction capability of two redox couples, in this case iron and titanium, for its storage capacity, gave a relatively constant output regardless of solar activity so that a load could be run continually day and night utilizing the sun's energy. One portion of the system was connected to a bank of solar cells to electrochemically charge the solutions, while a separate part of the system was used to electrochemically discharge the stored energy.

  1. Identification of energy dissipation in structural joints by means of the energy flow analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez, S.S.; Metrikine, A.; Carboni, B.; Lacarbonara, W.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, identification of energy dissipation in the joints of a lab-scale structure is accomplished. The identification is carried out by means of an energy flow analysis and experimental data. The devised procedure enables to formulate an energy balance in the vicinity of the joints to

  2. Flow dynamics and energy efficiency of flow in the left ventricle during myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Vivek; Low, Adriel Jia Jun; Annamalai, Sarayu Parimal; Sampath, Smita; Poh, Kian Keong; Totman, Teresa; Mazlan, Muhammad; Croft, Grace; Richards, A Mark; de Kleijn, Dominique P V; Chin, Chih-Liang; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2017-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, where myocardial infarction (MI) is a major category. After infarction, the heart has difficulty providing sufficient energy for circulation, and thus, understanding the heart's energy efficiency is important. We induced MI in a porcine animal model via circumflex ligation and acquired multiple-slice cine magnetic resonance (MR) images in a longitudinal manner-before infarction, and 1 week (acute) and 4 weeks (chronic) after infarction. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed based on MR images to obtain detailed fluid dynamics and energy dynamics of the left ventricles. Results showed that energy efficiency flow through the heart decreased at the acute time point. Since the heart was observed to experience changes in heart rate, stroke volume and chamber size over the two post-infarction time points, simulations were performed to test the effect of each of the three parameters. Increasing heart rate and stroke volume were found to significantly decrease flow energy efficiency, but the effect of chamber size was inconsistent. Strong complex interplay was observed between the three parameters, necessitating the use of non-dimensional parameterization to characterize flow energy efficiency. The ratio of Reynolds to Strouhal number, which is a form of Womersley number, was found to be the most effective non-dimensional parameter to represent energy efficiency of flow in the heart. We believe that this non-dimensional number can be computed for clinical cases via ultrasound and hypothesize that it can serve as a biomarker for clinical evaluations.

  3. Energy Cascade Analysis: from Subscale Eddies to Mean Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh, Mohamad Ibrahim; Wonnell, Louis; Chen, James

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the energy transfer between eddies and mean flow can provide insights into the energy cascade process. Much work has been done to investigate the energy cascade at the level of the smallest eddies using different numerical techniques derived from the Navier-Stokes equations. These methodologies, however, prove to be computationally inefficient when producing energy spectra for a wide range of length scales. In this regard, Morphing Continuum Theory (MCT) resolves the length-scales issues by assuming the fluid continuum to be composed of inner structures that play the role of subscale eddies. The current study show- cases the capabilities of MCT in capturing the dynamics of energy cascade at the level of subscale eddies, through a supersonic turbulent flow of Mach 2.93 over an 8× compression ramp. Analysis of the results using statistical averaging procedure shows the existence of a statistical coupling of the internal and translational kinetic energy fluctuations with the corresponding rotational kinetic energy of the subscale eddies, indicating a multiscale transfer of energy. The results show that MCT gives a new characterization of the energy cascade within compressible turbulence without the use of excessive computational resources. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-17-1-0154.

  4. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  5. Validations of CNDOL approximate Hamiltonian as a fast and reliable method to obtain vertical excitation energies in polyatomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero-Alejo, Ana L.; Gonzalez-Santana, Susana; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Erix Wiliam; Fuentes-Montero, Maria Elena; Bunge-Molina, Carlos F.; Gonzalez, Augusto

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical prediction of vertical excitation energies and an estimation of charge distributions of polyatomic systems can be calculated, through the configuration interaction of single (CIS) excited determinants procedure, with the CNDOL (Complete Neglect of Differential Overlap considering the l azimuthal quantum number) Hamiltonians. This method does not use adjusted parameters to fit experimental data and only employ a priori data on atomic orbitals and simple formulas to substitute large computations of electronic integrals. In this sense, different functions for bi-electron integrals have been evaluated in order to improve the approximate Hamiltonian. The reliability of predictions and theoretical consistence has been tested with a benchmark set of organic molecules that covers important classes of chromophores including polyenes and other unsaturated aliphatic compounds, aromatic, hydrocarbons, heterocycles, carbonyl compounds, and nucleobases. The calculations are done at identical geometries (MP2) with the same basis set (6-31G) for these medium-sized molecules and the obtained results were statistically compared with other analogous methods and experimental data. The accuracy of prediction of each CNDOL vertical transitions energy increases while the active space is more complete allowing the best variational optimization of CIS matrices i.e. molecular excited states. Moreover and due to the feasible computation procedure for large polyatomic systems, the studies have been extended, as a preliminary work, in the field of optoelectronic materials for photovoltaic applications. Hence, the excitation energies of different conjugated Phenyl-cored Thiophene Dendrimers optimized by DFT (Density Functional Theory) were calculated and show good agreement with the experiment data. The predicted charge distribution during the excitation contributes to understand the photophysics process on these kind materials. (Full text)

  6. Ergodicity, configurational entropy and free energy in pigment solutions and plant photosystems: influence of excited state lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Robert C; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We examine ergodicity and configurational entropy for a dilute pigment solution and for a suspension of plant photosystem particles in which both ground and excited state pigments are present. It is concluded that the pigment solution, due to the extreme brevity of the excited state lifetime, is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. Conversely, due to the rapid energy transfer among pigments, each photosystem is ergodic and the configurational entropy is positive. This decreases the free energy of the single photosystem pigment array by a small amount. On the other hand, the suspension of photosystems is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. The overall configurational entropy which, in principle, includes contributions from both the single excited photosystems and the suspension which contains excited photosystems, also approaches zero. Thus the configurational entropy upon photon absorption by either a pigment solution or a suspension of photosystem particles is approximately zero. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Natural Regulation of Energy Flow in a Green Quantum Photocell

    OpenAIRE

    Arp, Trevor B.; Barlas, Yafis; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulating the flow of energy in nanoscale and molecular photonic devices is of both fundamental interest and central importance for applications in light harvesting optoelectronics. Under erratic solar irradiance conditions, unregulated power fluctuations in a light harvesting photocell lead to inefficient energy storage in conventional solar cells and potentially fatal oxidative damage in photosynthesis. Here, we show that regulation against these fluctuations arises naturally within a tw...

  8. Excitation of Contained Modes by High Energy Nuclei and Correlated Cyclotron Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, B.; Penn, G.; Riconda, C.

    1997-12-01

    In experiments with fusing plasmas, enhanced radiation emission at the harmonics of the cyclotron frequency of fusion reaction products has been observed. A theory is presented that explains key features of these observations and indicates the possibility of extracting significant information about the fusion product population distribution, both in velocity space and over the plasma cross section. The considered model is consistent in particular with the fact that, in DT plasmas, the radiation peaks occur at frequencies corresponding to harmonics of the αparticles' cyclotron frequency Δαevaluated at the outer edge of the plasma column, and that a transition to a "continuum" spectrum at high frequencies ( ω≳7 Δ α) can be identified. In this model, the radiation is the result of the excitation of radially "contained" modes which are driven unstable by the fusion products. The modes considered to be responsible for the discrete part of the spectrum are spatially localized near the plasma edge. The radial containment, which is associated mainly with the inhomogeneity of the plasma density, is in fact a fundamental characteristic since only contained modes can grow out of a relatively weak mode-particle interaction and justify the detected emission power levels. The contained mode is a solution to a set of macroscopic equations, in which the electron motion is tied to that of the magnetic field (Hall effect). The growth rate has been evaluated considering the particle orbits in a toroidal confinement configuration and modelling the distribution function of the interacting particles with the energy at birth before slowing down occurs. The growth rate depends linearly on the α-particle density and can be larger than, or of the order of, the bounce frequency of the magnetically trapped α-particles, which can have a resonant interaction with the mode. According to the theoretical model presented, the discrete part of the observed spectrum of emission yields

  9. Characterization of a rotary piezoelectric energy harvester based on plucking excitation for knee-joint wearable applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzi, Michele; Zhu, Meiling

    2012-01-01

    Wearable medical and electronic devices demand a similarly wearable electrical power supply. Human-based piezoelectric energy harvesters may be the solution, but the mismatch between the typical frequencies of human activities and the optimal operating frequencies of piezoelectric generators calls for the implementation of a frequency up-conversion technique. A rotary piezoelectric energy harvester designed to be attached to the knee-joint is here implemented and characterized. The wearable harvester is based on the plucking method of frequency up-conversion, where a piezoelectric bimorph is deflected by a plectrum and permitted to vibrate unhindered upon release. Experiments were conducted to characterize the energy produced by the rotary piezoelectric energy harvester with different electric loads and different excitation speeds, covering the range between 0.1 and 1 rev s −1 to simulate human gait speeds. The electrical loads were connected to the generator either directly or through a rectifying bridge, as would be found in most power management circuits. The focus of the paper is to study the capability of energy generation of the harvester for knee-joint wearable applications, and study the effects of the different loads and different excitation speeds. It is found that the energy harvested is around 160–490 µJ and strongly depends on the angular speed, the connected electric loads and also the manufacturing quality of the harvester. Statistical analysis is used to predict the potential energy production of a harvester manufactured to tighter tolerances than the one presented here. (paper)

  10. Optimal Power Flow in Microgrids with Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levron, Yoash; Guerrero, Josep M.; Beck, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Energy storage may improve power management in microgrids that include renewable energy sources. The storage devices match energy generation to consumption, facilitating a smooth and robust energy balance within the microgrid. This paper addresses the optimal control of the microgrid’s energy...... storage devices. Stored energy is controlled to balance power generation of renewable sources to optimize overall power consumption at the microgrid point of common coupling. Recent works emphasize constraints imposed by the storage device itself, such as limited capacity and internal losses. However......, these works assume flat, highly simplified network models, which overlook the physical connectivity. This work proposes an optimal power flow solution that considers the entire system: the storage device limits, voltages limits, currents limits, and power limits. The power network may be arbitrarily complex...

  11. Laminar Flow Processes of Fluid Energy Carries in Pipe Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Еsman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes methodology for analysis and calculation of laminar fluid flows in pipes and channels.  Various regimes of fluid motion in pipelines of heat-power units and equipment are considered in the paper.The presented dependencies can be used for practical calculations while transporting energy carriers for various application.

  12. Radial, sideward and elliptic flow at AGS energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We study the baryon transverse in-plane (sideward) and elliptic flow from SIS to AGS energies for Au+Au collisions in a relativistic dynamical simulation model that includes all baryon resonances up to a mass of 2 GeV as well as string degrees of freedom for the higher mass continuum. There are two factors which ...

  13. Neutron radigoraphy of fluid flow for geothermal energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Jacobson, David [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems seek to expand the potential for geothermal energy by engineering heat exchange systems within the earth. A neutron radiography imaging method has been developed for the study of fluid flow through rock under environmental conditions found in enhanced geothermal energy systems. For this method, a pressure vessel suitable for neutron radiography was designed and fabricated, modifications to imaging instrument setups were tested, multiple contrast agents were tested, and algorithms developed for tracking of flow. The method has shown success for tracking of single phase flow through a manufactured crack in a 3.81 cm (1.5 inch) diameter core within a pressure vessel capable of confinement up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi) using a particle tracking approach with bubbles of fluorocarbon-based fluid as the “particles” and imaging with 10 ms exposures.

  14. Lowest excited-state impurity binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW: magnetic field effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddou El Ghazi; Anouar Jorio; Izeddine Zorkani

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the magnetic field effect on the lowest excited-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wire (PQWW) using the finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model. The calculations are performed within the framework of the effective mass approximation. A cylindrical QWW effective radius is taken into account to describe the lateral confinement strength. The numerical results show that: (i) the probability density is the largest on a circularity whose radius is the effective radius and (ii) the lowest excited-state binding energy is the largest when an impurity is located on this circularity while it starts to decrease as the impurity is away from the circularity. (author)

  15. The Use of Energy in Malaysia: Tracing Energy Flows from Primary Source to End Use

    OpenAIRE

    Chinhao Chong; Weidou Ni; Linwei Ma; Pei Liu; Zheng Li

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia is a rapidly developing country in Southeast Asia that aims to achieve high-income country status by 2020; its economic growth is highly dependent on its abundant energy resources, especially natural gas and crude oil. In this paper, a complete picture of Malaysia’s energy use from primary source to end use is presented by mapping a Sankey diagram of Malaysia’s energy flows, together with ongoing trends analysis of the main factors influencing the energy flows. The results indicate t...

  16. Control of Energy Flow Dynamics between Tetracene Ligands and PbS Quantum Dots by Size Tuning and Ligand Coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroupa, Daniel M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Arias, Dylan H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Blackburn, Jeffrey L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Carroll, Gerard M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Granger, Devin B. [Department; Anthony, John E. [Department; Beard, Matthew C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Johnson, Justin C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States

    2018-01-08

    We have prepared a series of samples with the ligand 6,13-bistri(iso-propyl)silylethynyl tetracene 2-carboxylic acid (TIPS-Tc-COOH) attached to PbS quantum dot (QD) samples of three different sizes in order to monitor and control the extent and time scales of energy flow after photoexcitation. Fast energy transfer (~1 ps) to the PbS QD occurs upon direct excitation of the ligand for all samples. The largest size QD maintains the microsecond exciton lifetime characteristic of the as-prepared oleate terminated PbS QDs. However, two smaller QD sizes with lowest exciton energies similar to or larger than the TIPS-Tc-COO- triplet energy undergo energy transfer between QD core and ligand triplet on nanosecond to microsecond timescales. For the intermediate size QDs in particular, energy can be recycled many times between ligand and core, but the triplet remains the dominant excited species at long times, living for ~3 us for fully exchanged QDs and up to 30 us for partial ligand exchange, which is revealed as a method for controlling the triplet lifetime. A unique upconverted luminescence spectrum is observed that results from annihilation of triplets after exclusive excitation of the QD core.

  17. Excitation of the 4.3-μm bands of CO2 by low-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, R.R.; Phelps, A.V.

    1976-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the excitation of the 4.3-μm bands of CO 2 by low-energy electrons in CO 2 have been measured using a drift-tube technique. The CO 2 density [(1.5 to 7) x 10 17 molecules/cm 3 ] was chosen to maximize the radiation reaching the detector. Line-by-line transmission calculations were used to take into account the absorption of 4.3-μm radiation. A small fraction of the approximately 10 -8 W of the 4.3-μm radiation produced by the approximately 10 -7 -A electron current was incident on an InSb photovoltaic detector. The detector calibration and absorption calculations were checked by measuring the readily calculated excitation coefficients for vibrational excitation of N 2 containing a small concentration of CO 2 . For pure CO 2 the number of molecules capable of emitting 4.3-μm radiation produced per cm of electron drift and per CO 2 molecule varied from 10 -17 cm -2 at E/N = 6 x 10 -17 V cm 2 to 5.4 x 10 -16 cm -2 at E/N = 4 x 10 -16 V cm 2 . Here E is the electric field and N is total gas density. The excitation coefficients at lower E/N are much larger than estimated previously. A set of vibrational excitation cross sections is obtained for CO 2 which is consistent with the excitation coefficient data and with most of the published electron-beam data

  18. Pulsatile blood flow, shear force, energy dissipation and Murray's Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtsson Hans-Uno

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murray's Law states that, when a parent blood vessel branches into daughter vessels, the cube of the radius of the parent vessel is equal to the sum of the cubes of the radii of daughter blood vessels. Murray derived this law by defining a cost function that is the sum of the energy cost of the blood in a vessel and the energy cost of pumping blood through the vessel. The cost is minimized when vessel radii are consistent with Murray's Law. This law has also been derived from the hypothesis that the shear force of moving blood on the inner walls of vessels is constant throughout the vascular system. However, this derivation, like Murray's earlier derivation, is based on the assumption of constant blood flow. Methods To determine the implications of the constant shear force hypothesis and to extend Murray's energy cost minimization to the pulsatile arterial system, a model of pulsatile flow in an elastic tube is analyzed. A new and exact solution for flow velocity, blood flow rate and shear force is derived. Results For medium and small arteries with pulsatile flow, Murray's energy minimization leads to Murray's Law. Furthermore, the hypothesis that the maximum shear force during the cycle of pulsatile flow is constant throughout the arterial system implies that Murray's Law is approximately true. The approximation is good for all but the largest vessels (aorta and its major branches of the arterial system. Conclusion A cellular mechanism that senses shear force at the inner wall of a blood vessel and triggers remodeling that increases the circumference of the wall when a shear force threshold is exceeded would result in the observed scaling of vessel radii described by Murray's Law.

  19. Control of energy flow in residential buildings; Energieflussregelung in Wohngebaeuden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Energy systems in residential buildings are changing from monovalent, combustion based systems to multivalent systems containing technologies such as solar collectors, pellet boilers, heat pumps, CHP and multiple storages. Multivalent heat and electricity generation and additional storages raise the number of possible control signals in the system. This creates additional degrees of freedom regarding the choice of the energy converter and the instant of time for energy conversion. New functionality of controllers such as prioritisation of energy producers, optimization of electric self consumption and control of storages and energy feed-in are required. Within the scope of this thesis, new approaches for demand-driven optimal control of energy flows in multivalent building energy systems are developed and evaluated. The approaches are evaluated by means of system energy costs and operating emissions. For parametrisation of the controllers an easily understandable operating concept is developed. The energy flow controllers are implemented as a multi agent system (MAS) and a nonlinear model predictive controller (MPC). Proper functionality and stability are demonstrated in simulations of two example energy systems. In both example systems the MPC controller achieves less energy costs and operating emissions due to system wide global optimization and the more detailed system model within the controller. The multi agent approach turns out to perform better for systems with a huge number of components, e.g. in home automation and energy management systems. Due to the good performance of the reference control strategies, a significant reduction of energy costs and operating emissions is only possible with limitations. Systems for heat generation show only an especially low potential for optimization because of marginal variation ins heat production costs. The adaptation of the operation mode to user priorities, changing utilization characteristics and dynamic energy

  20. Systematics of nuclear densities, deformations and excitation energies within the context of the generalized rotation-vibration model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamon, L.C., E-mail: luiz.chamon@dfn.if.usp.b [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carlson, B.V. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2010-11-30

    We present a large-scale systematics of charge densities, excitation energies and deformation parameters for hundreds of heavy nuclei. The systematics is based on a generalized rotation-vibration model for the quadrupole and octupole modes and takes into account second-order contributions of the deformations as well as the effects of finite diffuseness values for the nuclear densities. We compare our results with the predictions of classical surface vibrations in the hydrodynamical approximation.

  1. Crystal field and low energy excitations measured by high resolution RIXS at the L edge of Cu, Ni and Mn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiringhelli, G.; Piazzalunga, A.; Wang, X.

    2009-01-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in the soft x-ray regime has been profiting much from technical advances that have lowered considerably the instru- mental linewidth. At the ADRESS beam line of the Swiss Light Source the SAXES spectrometer can be used to measure RIXS spectra at the L edges of ...... energy scale becomes accessible opening the way to the study of collective excitations in strongly correlated electron systems, like magnons and orbitons....

  2. Nematomorph parasites drive energy flow through a riparian ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takuya; Wtanabe, Katsutoshi; Kanaiwa, Minoru; Niizuma, Yasuaki; Harada, Yasushi; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Parasites are ubiquitous in natural systems and ecosystem-level effects should be proportional to the amount of biomass or energy flow altered by the parasites. Here we quantified the extent to which a manipulative parasite altered the flow of energy through a forest-stream ecosystem. In a Japanese headwater stream, camel crickets and grasshoppers (Orthoptera) were 20 times more likely to enter a stream if infected by a nematomorph parasite (Gordionus spp.), corroborating evidence that nematomorphs manipulate their hosts to seek water where the parasites emerge as free-living adults. Endangered Japanese trout (Salvelinus leucomaenis japonicus) readily ate these infected orthopterans, which due to their abundance, accounted for 60% of the annual energy intake of the trout population. Trout grew fastest in the fall, when nematomorphs were driving energy-rich orthopterans into the stream. When infected orthopterans were available, trout did not eat benthic invertebrates in proportion to their abundance, leading to the potential for cascading, indirect effects through the forest-stream ecosystem. These results provide the first quantitative evidence that a manipulative parasite can dramatically alter the flow of energy through and across ecosystems.

  3. Photophysical Parameters, Excitation Energy Transfer, and Photoreactivity of 1,4-Bis(5-phenyl-2-oxazolylbenzene (POPOP Laser Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy A. El-Daly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of solvents on the absorption and emission spectra of 1,4-bis(5-phenyl-2-oxazolylbenzene (POPOP laser dye has been studied in various solvents at 298 K. A bathochromic shift was observed in absorption and fluorescence spectra upon increase of solvent polarity, which indicates that this transition is π-∗. The ground and excited state dipole moments were calculated as 2.23 and 6.34 Debye, respectively. The dye solution in MeOH, n-heptane, and methyl isobutyl ketone gives laser emission in the blue region upon excitation by a 337.1 nm nitrogen pulse; the gain coefficient and emission cross section as well as normalized photostability have been determined. Excitation energy transfer from POPOP to rhodamine B and fluorescine was studied to improve the laser emission from these dyes. Such an energy transfer dye laser system (ETDL obeys a long range columbic energy transfer mechanism with a critical transfer distance, R0, of 25 and 33 Å and kq equal to 10.4×1012 and 26.2×1012M−1s−1 for the POPOP/RB and POPOP/fluorescine pair, respectively. The POPOP dye is highly photostable in polar protic and polar aprotic solvents, while it displays photodecomposition in chloromethane solvent via formation of a contact ion pair. The photochemical quantum yield and rate of photodecomposition depend on the electron affinity of solvent.

  4. Collisional and radiative relaxation of the first excited states of rare gases. Energy transfer from argon excited atoms to different molecules and fluorescence of molecular xenon excited by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutuit-Fleischmann, Odile

    1978-01-01

    In the first section, the measurement of total deexcitation cross sections of the 3P 2,1,0 and 1 P 1 argon states by N 2 , H 2 , CO and SF 6 using a pulsed gas radiolysis technique and 600 keV electrons is discussed. The energy transfer from the resonant states 3 P 1 and 1 P 1 of argon (as excited selectively by synchrotron radiation) to the C 3 π u state of nitrogen has been studied in more detail. On the basis of these results, the different theoretical models for these reactions have been discussed. In the second section, the fluorescence of the second continuum of molecular xenon at around 1700 A, as excited by synchrotron radiation in the region of the 3P 1 1 S 0 resonance line at 1470 A, is considered. A short lived component of the fluorescence decay has been observed; this is attributed to emission at short interatomic distances from the high vibrational levels of Xe 2 + (O u + ). The emissions at the left turning point of the potential curve of the O u + state has been observed at λ > 2000 A. From these results, the potential curves for the states Xe 2 (O g + ) and Xe 2 * (O u + ) have been estimated and the Franck-Condon factors have also been calculated as a function of the wavelength of the fluorescence. (author) [fr

  5. Proton-proton elastic scattering excitation functions at intermediate energies: Cross sections and analyzing powers

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterberger, F; Altmeier, M; Bauer, F; Bisplinghoff, J; Büsser, K; Busch, M; Colberg, T; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuk, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    2000-01-01

    The EDDA experiment at the cooler synchrotron COSY measures proton-proton elastic scattering excitation functions in the momentum range 0.8 - 3.4 GeV/c. In phase 1 of the experiment, spin-averaged differential cross sections were measured continuously during acceleration with an internal polypropylene (CH sub 2) fiber target, taking particular care to monitor luminosity as a function of beam momentum. In phase 2, excitation functions of the analyzing power A sub N and the polarization correlation parameters A sub N sub N , A sub S sub S and A sub S sub L are measured using a polarized proton beam and a polarized atomic hydrogen beam target. The paper presents recent d sigma/d OMEGA and A sub N data. The results provide excitation functions and angular distributions of high precision and internal consistency. No evidence for narrow structures was found. The data are compared to recent phase shift solutions.

  6. Excited state interactions in graphene oxide-semiconductor/metal nanoparticle architectures for sensing and energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightcap, Ian V.

    The recent emergence of graphene, along with its unique and impressive set of properties, has resulted in a concerted effort to incorporate the material into electronic devices and composite materials. Graphene oxide, a chemically modified form of graphene which can be produced economically and in large scale, is one of the most common starting materials for making graphene composite materials with improved conductivity, photovoltaic performance, and photocatalytic activity, to name a few examples. This dissertation describes progress made in understanding and quantifying the electronic properties of graphene oxide as they relate to electron storage and shuttling in composite materials. A more complete understanding of the nature of electronic interactions in graphene composites was achieved through two processes: 1) A dual electron-titration showing storage and shuttling of electrons in reduced graphene oxide. 2) A method developed to isolate the energy and electron transfer pathways involved in the deactivation of excited CdSe quantum dots by RGO. The results obtained from these two processes provide insight into the electronic interactions between graphene, semiconductors, and metals. Additionally, composite films were constructed to demonstrate the electron transfer properties of reduced graphene oxide. TiO2-reduced graphene oxide films were made via a simple drop-cast technique. The films show enhanced photovoltaic and photocatalytic characteristics when compared to TiO2-only films. A stacked architecture incorporating single-layer reduced graphene oxide on thin TiO2 nanoparticle films was developed as a method for illumination-controlled deposition of metal nanoparticles. Films of metal nanoparticles made using this technique were employed as Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman (SERRS) sensors and show nano-molar sensitivity. Finally, quantum dot-reduced graphene oxide composites were made via an electrophoretic deposition process. The resulting films were used

  7. Low-energy scattering of excited helium atoms by rare gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peach, G.

    1978-01-01

    The construction of semi-empirical model potentials for systems composed of helium in an excited state (Hestar) and a rare-gas atom (He or Ne) is described. The model of the atom-atom pair which has been adopted is one in which the excited electron is included explicitly, but the residual He + ion and the rare-gas atom are treated simply as cores which may be polarised. The results obtained are in satisfactory agreement with other calculations where they are available. (author)

  8. Eight energy and material flow characteristics of urban ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xuemei

    2016-11-01

    Recent decades have seen an expanding literature exploring urban energy and material flows, loosely branded as urban metabolism analysis. However, this has occurred largely in parallel to the mainstream studies of cities as ecosystems. This paper aims to conceptually bridge these two distinctive fields of research, by (a) identifying the common aspects between them; (b) identifying key characteristics of urban ecosystems that can be derived from energy and material flow analysis, namely energy and material budget and pathways; flow intensity; energy and material efficiency; rate of resource depletion, accumulation and transformation; self-sufficiency or external dependency; intra-system heterogeneity; intersystem and temporal variation; and regulating mechanism and governing capacity. I argue that significant ecological insight can be, or has the potential to be, drawn from the rich and rapidly growing empirical findings of urban metabolism studies to understand the behaviour of cities as human-dominated, complex systems. A closer intellectual linkage and cross pollination between urban metabolism and urban ecosystem studies will advance our scientific understanding and better inform urban policy and management practices.

  9. Oxygen auroral transition laser system excited by collisional and photolytic energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.R.; Powell, H.T.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1975-06-01

    The properties of laser media involving the auroral transition of atomic oxygen and analogous systems are examined. A discussion of the atomic properties, collisional mechanisms, excitation processes, and collisionally induced radiative phenomena is given. Crossing phenomena play a particularly important role in governing the dynamics of the medium

  10. Ultrafast Deactivation Processes in Aminopyridine Clusters: Excitation energy dependence and isotope effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samoylova, E.; Smith, V. R.; Ritze, H. H.; Radloff, W.; Kabeláč, Martin; Schultz, T.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 49 (2006), s. 15652-15656 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : femtosecond spectroscopy * aminopyridine * excited states Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.696, year: 2006

  11. Architected squirt-flow materials for energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Tal; Kurzeja, Patrick; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-12-01

    In the present study we explore material architectures that lead to enhanced dissipation properties by taking advantage of squirt-flow - a local flow mechanism triggered by heterogeneities at the pore level. While squirt-flow is a known dominant source of dissipation and seismic attenuation in fluid saturated geological materials, we study its untapped potential to be incorporated in highly deformable elastic materials with embedded fluid-filled cavities for future engineering applications. An analytical investigation, that isolates the squirt-flow mechanism from other potential dissipation mechanisms and considers an idealized setting, predicts high theoretical levels of dissipation achievable by squirt-flow and establishes a set of guidelines for optimal dissipation design. Particular architectures are then investigated via numerical simulations showing that a careful design of the internal voids can lead to an increase of dissipation levels by an order of magnitude, compared with equivalent homogeneous void distributions. Therefore, we suggest squirt-flow as a promising mechanism to be incorporated in future architected materials to effectively and reversibly dissipate energy.

  12. Size-dependent piezoelectric energy-harvesting analysis of micro/nano bridges subjected to random ambient excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radgolchin, Moeen; Moeenfard, Hamid

    2018-02-01

    The construction of self-powered micro-electro-mechanical units by converting the mechanical energy of the systems into electrical power has attracted much attention in recent years. While power harvesting from deterministic external excitations is state of the art, it has been much more difficult to derive mathematical models for scavenging electrical energy from ambient random vibrations, due to the stochastic nature of the excitations. The current research concerns analytical modeling of micro-bridge energy harvesters based on random vibration theory. Since classical elasticity fails to accurately predict the mechanical behavior of micro-structures, strain gradient theory is employed as a powerful tool to increase the accuracy of the random vibration modeling of the micro-harvester. Equations of motion of the system in the time domain are derived using the Lagrange approach. These are then utilized to determine the frequency and impulse responses of the structure. Assuming the energy harvester to be subjected to a combination of broadband and limited-band random support motion and transverse loading, closed-form expressions for mean, mean square, correlation and spectral density of the output power are derived. The suggested formulation is further exploited to investigate the effect of the different design parameters, including the geometric properties of the structure as well as the properties of the electrical circuit on the resulting power. Furthermore, the effect of length scale parameters on the harvested energy is investigated in detail. It is observed that the predictions of classical and even simple size-dependent theories (such as couple stress) appreciably differ from the findings of strain gradient theory on the basis of random vibration. This study presents a first-time modeling of micro-scale harvesters under stochastic excitations using a size-dependent approach and can be considered as a reliable foundation for future research in the field of

  13. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumlak, U., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Golingo, R. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Nelson, B. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Bowers, C. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Doty, S. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Forbes, E. G., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Hughes, M. C., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Kim, B., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Knecht, S. D., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lambert, K. K., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lowrie, W., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Ross, M. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Weed, J. R., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu [Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 98195-2250 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  14. Excitation energy spectra of the Λc and Λb baryons in a finite-size diquark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumakawa, Kento; Jido, Daisuke

    2017-12-01

    The excitation energies of the Λc and Λb baryons are investigated in a finite-size diquark potential model, in which the heavy baryons are treated as bound states of a charm quark and a scalar-isoscalar diquark. The diquark is considered as a sizable object. The quark-diquark interaction is calculated as a sum of the quark-quark interaction that is assumed to be half of the quark-antiquark interaction for the color singlet. The potential parameters in the quark-antiquark interaction are fixed so as to reproduce the charmonium spectrum. We find the diquark size to be 1.1 fm for the diquark mass 0.5 GeV/c2 to reproduce the 1p excitation energy of Λc. In this model, the Λc and Λb excitation spectra are reproduced well, while this model does not explain Λc(2765), whose isospin and spin-parity are still unknown. Thus, the detailed properties of Λc(2765) are very important to the presence of the diquark in heavy baryons as an effective constituent. We also discuss the Ξc spectrum with the scalar strange diquark.

  15. Investigation of the molecular mechanism of the blue-light-specific excitation energy quenching in the plant antenna complex LHCII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszecki, Wieslaw I; Zubik, Monika; Luchowski, Rafal; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Gospodarek, Malgorzata; Szurkowski, Janusz; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2011-03-15

    Excitation of the major photosynthetic antenna complex of plants, LHCII, with blue light (470nm) provides an advantage to plants, as it gives rise to chlorophyll a fluorescence lifetimes shorter than with excitation with red light (635nm). This difference is particularly pronounced in fluorescence emission wavelengths longer than 715nm. Illumination of LHCII preparation with blue light additionally induces fluorescence quenching, which develops on a minute timescale. This effect is much less efficient when induced by red light, despite the equalized energy absorbed in both the spectral regions. Simultaneous analysis of the fluorescence and photoacoustic signals in LHCII demonstrated that the light-driven fluorescence quenching is not associated with an increase in heat emission. Instead, a reversible light-induced conformational transformation of the protein takes place, as demonstrated by the FTIR technique. These findings are discussed in terms of the blue-light-specific excitation energy quenching in LHCII, which may have photoprotective applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. A Strategy for Magnifying Vibration in High-Energy Orbits of a Bistable Oscillator at Low Excitation Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guang-Qing; Liao Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on how to maintain a high-energy orbit motion of a bistable oscillator when subjected to a low level excitation. An elastic magnifier (EM) positioned between the base and the bistable oscillator is used to magnify the base vibration displacement to significantly enhance the output characteristics of the bistable oscillator. The dimensionless electromechanical equations of the bistable oscillator with an EM are derived, and the effects of the mass and stiffness ratios between the EM and the bistable oscillator on the output displacement are studied. It is shown that the jump phenomenon occurs at a lower excitation level with increasing the mass and stiffness ratios. With the comparison of the displacement trajectories and the phase portraits obtained from experiments, it is validated that the bistable oscillator with an EM can effectively oscillate in a high-energy orbit and can generate a superior output vibration at a low excitation level as compared with the bistable oscillator without an EM. (paper)

  17. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  18. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flows in Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak

    Reynolds numbers, and thereafter, the fully-developed infinite wind farm boundary later simulations are performed. Sources of inaccuracy in the simulations are investigated and it is found that high Reynolds number flows are more sensitive to the choice of the SGS model than their low Reynolds number......This research is devoted to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), and to lesser extent, wind tunnel measurements of turbulent flows in wind energy. It starts with an introduction to the LES technique associated with the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, discretized using a finite...... volume method. The study is followed by a detailed investigation of the Sub-Grid Scale (SGS) modeling. New SGS models are implemented into the computing code, and the effect of SGS models are examined for different applications. Fully developed boundary layer flows are investigated at low and high...

  20. Dependence the Integrated Energy of the Electromagnetic Response from Excitation Pulse Duration for Epoxy Samples With Sand Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surzhikov, V. P.; Demikhova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Results of research of influence of the excitation pulse duration on the parameters of the electromagnetic response of epoxy samples with filler the quartz sand presented in the paper. The electric component of a response was registered by the capacitive sensors using a differential amplifier. Measurements were carried out at two frequencies of the master generator of 65 kHz and 74 kHz. The pulse duration was changing from 10 to 100 microseconds. The stepped sort of dependence of the integrated oscillations energy in the response from duration of the excitation pulse was discovered. The conclusion was made about the determining role of the normal oscillations in formation of such dependence.

  1. Elastic scattering, vibrational excitation, and attachment in low-energy electron-SF6 scattering: Experiment and effective range theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, Ilya I.; Hotop, Hartmut; Allan, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Cross sections at low energies for vibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering, as well as electron attachment to SF 6 , have been calculated using a multichannel effective range theory (ERT) with complex boundary conditions. The most active vibrational modes, the totally symmetric mode ν 1 and the infrared active mode ν 3 , have been included in the calculation. The ERT parameters were fitted to reproduce the experimental total and attachment cross sections. Differential elastic and vibrational excitation cross sections have been measured at 30 deg. and 135 deg. using a spectrometer with hemispherical analyzers. The calculation reproduces correctly the magnitudes and shapes of the differential elastic and ν 1 , ν 3 , and 2ν 1 excitation cross sections, in particular the sharp structures at vibrational thresholds. The s- and p-wave phase shifts obtained in the present analysis differ from those recently derived by Field et al. [Phys. Rev. A, 69, 052716 (2004)

  2. Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Rodell, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Brain energy metabolism is held to reflect energy demanding processes in neuropil related to the density and activity of synapses. There is recent evidence that men have higher density of synapses in temporal cortex than women. One consequence of these differences would be different rates...... cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen as functions of age in healthy volunteers of both sexes. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen did not change with age for either sex and there were no differences of mean values of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen between men and women in cerebral...

  3. Energy Flows in Low-Entropy Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Chaisson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nature’s many complex systems—physical, biological, and cultural—are islands of low-entropy order within increasingly disordered seas of surrounding, high-entropy chaos. Energy is a principal facilitator of the rising complexity of all such systems in the expanding Universe, including galaxies, stars, planets, life, society, and machines. A large amount of empirical evidence—relating neither entropy nor information, rather energy—suggests that an underlying simplicity guides the emergence and growth of complexity among many known, highly varied systems in the 14-billion-year-old Universe, from big bang to humankind. Energy flows are as centrally important to life and society as they are to stars and galaxies. In particular, the quantity energy rate density—the rate of energy flow per unit mass—can be used to explicate in a consistent, uniform, and unifying way a huge collection of diverse complex systems observed throughout Nature. Operationally, those systems able to utilize optimal amounts of energy tend to survive and those that cannot are non-randomly eliminated.

  4. Effect of NaCl Salts on the Activation Energy of Excited-State Proton Transfer Reaction of Coumarin 183.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Joonyoung F; Kim, Sangin; Park, Sungnam

    2015-12-17

    Coumarin 183 (C183) was used as a photoacid to study excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Here, we studied the effect of ions on the ESPT of C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions using a steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) method. The acid dissociation equilibrium of excited-state C183 and the activation energy for the ESPT of C183 were determined as a function of NaCl concentration. The change in the equilibrium constant was found to be correlated with the solvation energy of deprotonated C183. Frequency-resolved TCSPC signals measured at several temperatures were analyzed by using a global fitting analysis method which enabled us to extract all the rate constants involving the ESPT reaction and the spectra of individual species. The activation energy for the ESPT reaction of C183 was highly dependent on NaCl concentration. Quantum chemical calculations were used to calculate the local hydrogen-bond (H-bond) configurations around C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions. It was found that the activation energy for the ESPT was determined by the local H-bond configurations around C183 which were significantly influenced by the dissolved ions.

  5. Investigation of the influence of incomplete fusion on complete fusion of 16O induced reactions at moderate excitation energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamad Tauseef

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to investigate for the reaction dynamics leading to incomplete fusion (ICF of heavy ions at moderate excitation energies, especially the influence of incomplete fusion on complete fusion (CF of 16O induced reactions at specific energies. Excitation functions (EFs of various reaction products populated via CF and/or ICF of 16O projectile with 45Sc target were measured at energies ≈3-7 MeV/nucleon, using recoil catcher technique followed by offline γ-ray spectroscopy. The measured EFs were compared with theoretical values obtained using the statistical model code PACE4. The experimentally measured EFs were in general found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions for non α-emitting channels in the present target projectile system. However, for α-emitting channels the measured EFs were higher than the predictions of the theoretical model codes, which may be credited to incomplete fusion reactions at these energies.

  6. Direct observation of low energy nuclear spin excitations in HoCrO3 by high resolution neutron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, T; Jalarvo, N; Kumar, C M N; Xiao, Y; Brückel, Th

    2013-07-17

    We have investigated low energy nuclear spin excitations in the strongly correlated electron compound HoCrO3. We observe clear inelastic peaks at E = 22.18 ± 0.04 μeV in both energy loss and gain sides. The energy of the inelastic peaks remains constant in the temperature range 1.5-40 K at which they are observed. The intensity of the inelastic peak increases at first with increasing temperature and then decreases at higher temperatures. The temperature dependence of the energy and intensity of the inelastic peaks is very unusual compared to that observed in other Nd, Co, V and also simple Ho compounds. Huge quasielastic scattering appears at higher temperatures presumably due to the fluctuating electronic moments of the Ho ions that get increasingly disordered at higher temperatures. The strong quasielastic scattering may also originate in the first Ho crystal-field excitations at about 1.5 meV.

  7. Changes in energy of three types of hydrogen bonds upon excitation of aminocoumarins determined from absorption solvatochromic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystkowiak, Ewa; Maciejewski, Andrzej

    2011-06-21

    Absorption spectra of 6-aminocoumarin (6AC) and 7-aminocoumarins (C120 and C151) were studied in polyfluorinated alcohols: (1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP), 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)), in water and in methanol, and compared to those taken in 1-chloro-n-alkanes. According to our results, the observed unusual blue-shift of a long-wavelength band in absorption spectra in strong protic solvents is direct evidence of significant weakening of a NH-O hydrogen bond. The results obtained for the aminocoumarins in HFIP, which in contrast to aliphatic alcohols does not form hydrogen bonds of the acceptor type, prove that the decrease in the energy of the NH-O hydrogen bond upon excitation to the lowest S(1)-LE state is significantly greater than the increase in the energy of hydrogen bonds made by the oxygen atom of carbonyl group OH-O. It is in contrast to theoretical calculations for C151 [Y. Liu, J. Ding, R. Liu, D. Shi and J. Sun, J. Photochem. Photobiol. A, 2009, 201, 203-207]. A comparison of the absorption spectra measured in DMSO and in 1-chloro-n-alkanes shows that the energy of two N-HO hydrogen bonds considerably increases as a result of excitation. These results are consistent with those of the theoretical calculations [Y. Liu, J. Ding, R. Liu, D. Shi and J. Sun, J. Photochem. Photobiol. A, 2009, 201, 203-207; P. Zhou, P. Song, J. Liu, K. Han and G. He, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2009, 11, 9440-9449]. In this study we applied the procedure proposed by us in J. Photochem. Photobiol. A, 2006, 184, 250-264 for the determination of changes in hydrogen bond energy as a result of electronic excitation based on analysis of the absorption spectra of the probe studied in the solvents interacting with it exclusively nonspecifically and in those forming hydrogen bonds with it.

  8. First measurement with a new setup for low-energy Coulomb excitation studies at INFN LNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchini, M.; Hadyńska-Klȩk, K.; Nannini, A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Goasduff, A.; Testov, D.; John, P. R.; Mengoni, D.; Zielińska, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Benzoni, G.; Boso, A.; Cocconi, P.; Chiari, M.; Doherty, D. T.; Galtarossa, F.; Jaworski, G.; Komorowska, M.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Melon, B.; Menegazzo, R.; Napiorkowski, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Ottanelli, M.; Perego, A.; Ramina, L.; Rampazzo, M.; Recchia, F.; Riccetto, S.; Rosso, D.; Siciliano, M.; Sona, P.

    2017-07-01

    A new segmented particle detector, SPIDER, has been designed to be used as an ancillary device with the GALILEO γ-ray spectrometer, as well as with other multi-detector γ-ray arrays that will be available at LNL in the future (e.g. AGATA). To commission the SPIDER-GALILEO experimental setup, a multi-step Coulomb excitation experiment was carried out with a 240 MeV beam of 66Zn produced by the Tandem-XTU accelerator at INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. The measured particle and γ-ray spectra are compared with the results of detailed GEANT4 simulations which used the Coulomb excitation cross sections, estimated with the computer code GOSIA, as an input. The preliminary results indicate that precise transition probabilities will be obtained which are essential for solving discrepancies reported in the literature for this nucleus.

  9. Energy amplification in turbulent flows over complex walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhar, Mitul

    2016-11-01

    Many boundary layer flows in natural and manmade systems are characterized by the presence of complex walls (e.g. porous, rough, or patterned) that can substantially alter the near-wall turbulence. For example, the streaks and streamwise vortices prevalent in smooth-walled flows are often replaced by structures resembling Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices in flows over porous media and vegetation canopies. While stability analyses can reproduce some of these observations, they are limited in their ability to generate predictions for spectra and coherent structure in fully turbulent flows. The present effort seeks to address this limitation by extending the resolvent formulation to account for complex walls. Under the resolvent formulation, the turbulent velocity field is expressed as a linear superposition of propagating modes, identified via a gain-based decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations. The presence of the complex substrate is modeled as a distributed body force, which alters the gain (i.e. energy amplification) and structure of the modes. Preliminary results show that this approach reproduces key observations from previous simulations and experiments of flow over porous media, vegetation canopies, as well as riblets with minimal computation.

  10. Energy density and energy flow of plasmonic waves in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2017-07-01

    The propagation of plasmonic waves in bilayer graphene is studied based on the classical electrodynamics. The interactions between conduction electrons confined to move on the surface of each layer are taken into account via the two-dimensional linearized hydrodynamic model. The energy theorem of electrodynamics is cast in a form which yields expressions for energy density and energy flow of p-polarized surface plasmon polariton waves in bilayer graphene. Numerical results show that the presence of two layers causes the appearance of two branches in the dispersion relation that introduce alterations in the physical behavior of the energy, power flow and the energy transport velocity, in comparison with the results of monolayer graphene.

  11. Tracing China's energy flow and carbon dioxide flow based on Sankey diagrams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feiyin; Wang, Pengtao; Xu, Xiaomeng; Dong, Lihui; Xue, Honglai; Fu, Shuai [China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory for Precise Mining of Intergrown Energy and Resources, Beijing (China); China University of Mining and Technology, Faculty of Resources and Safety Engineering, Beijing (China); Ji, Yingxu [State Grid Jibei Electric Power Company Limited, Langfang Power Supply Company, Langfang (China)

    2017-10-15

    China has promised to optimize its energy structure and reduce its CO{sub 2} emission in the 13th Five-Year Plan. To track the energy structure, the conversions, efficiencies, end consumptions of total energy and coal and the whole CO{sub 2} emission status, the energy flow, coal flow and CO{sub 2} flow in 2015 were, respectively, drawn at the national level based on Sankey diagrams. Besides, each provincial fossil fuel structure, CO{sub 2} structure and CO{sub 2} intensity were calculated and plotted. It is mainly found that China's energy structure consisted of 69.2% of coal, 19.9% of oil, 6.3% of natural gas and 4.7% of non-fossil energy, where 45.5% of energy was consumed by industry and 23.9% by losses and statistical difference; coal was distributed to industry (55.6%), etc., with a utilization rate of 70.1%; and CO{sub 2} were derived from coal (84.7%), oil (11.1%) and natural gas (4.2%), of which 39.0% was released through the process of thermal power generation and 19.4% by industry. The structures of fossil fuels and their CO{sub 2} emissions together with the evolution of CO{sub 2} intensity at the provincial level and the regional level were also given. Besides, two pieces of policy implications were proposed to provide the government with reference. (orig.)

  12. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H-Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Svenja M; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Kandratsenka, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H-Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  13. Model estimation of energy flow in Oregon coastal seabird populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, J.A.; Scott, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A computer simulation model was used to explore the patterns and magnitudes of population density changes and population energy demands in Oregon populations of Sooty Shear-waters, Leach?s Storm-Petrels, Brandt?s Cormorants, and Common Murres. The species differ in seasonal distribution and abundance, with shearwaters attaining high densities during their migratory movements through Oregon waters, and murres exhibiting the greatest seasonal stability in population numbers. On a unit area basis, annual energy flow is greatest through murre and cormorant populations. However, because shearwaters occupy a larger area during their transit, they dominate the total energy flow through the four-species seabird ?community.?.....Consumption of various prey types is estimated by coupling model output of energy demands with information on dietary habits. This analysis suggests that murres annually consume nearly twice as many herring as any other prey and consume approximately equal quantities of anchovy, smelt, cod, and rockfish. Cormorants consume a relatively small quantity of bottom-dwelling fish, while stormpetrels take roughly equal quantities of euphausiids and hydrozoans. Anchovies account for 43% of the 62,506 metric tons of prey the four species are estimated to consume annually; 86% of this anchovy consumption is by shearwaters. The consumption of pelagic fishes by these four populations within the neritic zone may represent as much as 22% of the annual production of these fish.

  14. Acceleration of coupled granular flow and fluid flow simulations in pebble bed energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanheng, E-mail: liy19@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY (United States); Ji, Wei, E-mail: jiw2@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Fast simulation of coupled pebble flow and coolant flow in PBR systems is studied. ► Dimension reduction based on axisymmetric geometry shows significant speedup. ► Relaxation of coupling frequency is investigated and an optimal range is determined. ► A total of 80% efficiency increase is achieved by the two fast strategies. ► Fast strategies can be applied to simulating other general fluidized bed systems. -- Abstract: Fast and accurate approaches to simulating the coupled particle flow and fluid flow are of importance to the analysis of large particle-fluid systems. This is especially needed when one tries to simulate pebble flow and coolant flow in Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) energy systems on a routine basis. As one of the Generation IV designs, the PBR design is a promising nuclear energy system with high fuel performance and inherent safety. A typical PBR core can be modeled as a particle-fluid system with strong interactions among pebbles, coolants and reactor walls. In previous works, the coupled Discrete Element Method (DEM)-Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach has been investigated and applied to modeling PBR systems. However, the DEM-CFD approach is computationally expensive due to large amounts of pebbles in PBR systems. This greatly restricts the PBR analysis for the real time prediction and inclusion of more physics. In this work, based on the symmetry of the PBR geometry and the slow motion characteristics of the pebble flow, two acceleration strategies are proposed. First, a simplified 3D-DEM/2D-CFD approach is proposed to speed up the DEM-CFD simulation without loss of accuracy. Pebble flow is simulated by a full 3D DEM, while the coolant flow field is calculated with a 2D CFD simulation by averaging variables along the annular direction in the cylindrical and annular geometries. Second, based on the slow motion of pebble flow, the impact of the coupling frequency on the computation accuracy and efficiency is

  15. Acceleration of coupled granular flow and fluid flow simulations in pebble bed energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanheng; Ji, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fast simulation of coupled pebble flow and coolant flow in PBR systems is studied. ► Dimension reduction based on axisymmetric geometry shows significant speedup. ► Relaxation of coupling frequency is investigated and an optimal range is determined. ► A total of 80% efficiency increase is achieved by the two fast strategies. ► Fast strategies can be applied to simulating other general fluidized bed systems. -- Abstract: Fast and accurate approaches to simulating the coupled particle flow and fluid flow are of importance to the analysis of large particle-fluid systems. This is especially needed when one tries to simulate pebble flow and coolant flow in Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) energy systems on a routine basis. As one of the Generation IV designs, the PBR design is a promising nuclear energy system with high fuel performance and inherent safety. A typical PBR core can be modeled as a particle-fluid system with strong interactions among pebbles, coolants and reactor walls. In previous works, the coupled Discrete Element Method (DEM)-Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach has been investigated and applied to modeling PBR systems. However, the DEM-CFD approach is computationally expensive due to large amounts of pebbles in PBR systems. This greatly restricts the PBR analysis for the real time prediction and inclusion of more physics. In this work, based on the symmetry of the PBR geometry and the slow motion characteristics of the pebble flow, two acceleration strategies are proposed. First, a simplified 3D-DEM/2D-CFD approach is proposed to speed up the DEM-CFD simulation without loss of accuracy. Pebble flow is simulated by a full 3D DEM, while the coolant flow field is calculated with a 2D CFD simulation by averaging variables along the annular direction in the cylindrical and annular geometries. Second, based on the slow motion of pebble flow, the impact of the coupling frequency on the computation accuracy and efficiency is

  16. Excitation energy transfer in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii deficient in the PSI core or the PSII core under conditions mimicking state transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Lucyna M; Dinc, Emine; Croce, Roberta; Dekker, Jan P

    2016-06-01

    The efficient use of excitation energy in photosynthetic membranes is achieved by a dense network of pigment-protein complexes. These complexes fulfill specific functions and interact dynamically with each other in response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. Here, we studied how in the intact cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C.r.) the lack of the photosystem I (PSI) core or the photosystem II (PSII) core affects these interactions. To that end the mutants F15 and M18 (both PSI-deficient) and FUD7 (PSII-deficient) were incubated under conditions known to promote state transitions in wild-type. The intact cells were then instantly frozen to 77K and the full-spectrum time-resolved fluorescence emission of the cells was measured by means of streak camera. In the PSI-deficient mutants excitation energy transfer (EET) towards light-harvesting complexes of PSI (Lhca) occurs in less than 0.5 ns, and fluorescence from Lhca decays in 3.1 ns. Decreased trapping by PSII and increased fluorescence of Lhca upon state 1 (S1)→state 2 (S2) transition appears in the F15 and less in the M18 mutant. In the PSII-deficient mutant FUD7, quenched (0.5 ns) and unquenched (2 ns) light-harvesting complexes of PSII (LHCII) are present in both states, with the quenched form more abundant in S2 than in S1. Moreover, EET of 0.4 ns from the remaining LHCII to PSI increases upon S1→S2 transition. We relate the excitation energy kinetics observed in F15, M18 and FUD7 to the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus in these mutants under S1 and S2 conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Excitation relaxation dynamics and energy transfer in pigment-protein complexes of a dinoflagellate, revealed by ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazunori; Iida, Satoko; Takaichi, Shinichi; Mimuro, Mamoru; Murakami, Akio; Akimoto, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, found in aquatic photosynthetic organisms, contain a variety of carotenoids and chlorophylls. Most of the photosynthetic dinoflagellates possess two types of light-harvesting antenna complexes: peridinin (Peri)-chlorophyll (Chl) a/c-protein, as an intrinsic thylakoid membrane complex protein (iPCP), and water-soluble Peri-Chl a-protein, as an extrinsic membrane protein (sPCP) on the inner surface of the thylakoid. Peri is a unique carotenoid that has eight C=C bonds and one C=O bond, which results in a characteristic absorption band in the green wavelength region. In the present study, excitation relaxation dynamics of Peri in solution and excitation energy transfer processes of sPCP and the thylakoid membranes, prepared from the photosynthetic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium sp., are investigated by ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that Peri-to-Chl a energy transfer occurs via the Peri S 1 state with a time constant of 1.5 ps or 400 fs in sPCP or iPCP, respectively, and that Chl c-to-Chl a energy transfer occurs in the time regions of 350-400 fs and 1.8-2.6 ps.

  18. Charge transfer in low-energy collisions of H with He+ and H+ with He in excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreau, J.; Ryabchenko, S.; Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Vaeck, N.

    2018-04-01

    The charge transfer process in collisions of excited (n = 2, 3) hydrogen atoms with He+ and in collisions of excited helium atoms with H+ is studied theoretically. A combination of a fully quantum-mechanical method and a semi-classical approach is employed to calculate the charge-exchange cross sections at collision energies from 0.1 eV u‑1 up to 1 keV u‑1. These methods are based on accurate ab initio potential energy curves and non-adiabatic couplings for the molecular ion HeH+. Charge transfer can occur either in singlet or in triplet states, and the differences between the singlet and triplet spin manifolds are discussed. The dependence of the cross section on the quantum numbers n and l of the initial state is demonstrated. The isotope effect on the charge transfer cross sections, arising at low collision energy when H is substituted by D or T, is investigated. Rate coefficients are calculated for all isotopes up to 106 K. Finally, the impact of the present calculations on models of laboratory plasmas is discussed.

  19. Energy flow characteristics of vector X-Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The vector form of X-Waves is obtained as a superposition of transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarized field components. It is shown that the signs of all components of the Poynting vector can be locally changed using carefully chosen complex amplitudes of the transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarization components. Negative energy flux density in the longitudinal direction can be observed in a bounded region around the centroid; in this region the local behavior of the wave field is similar to that of wave field with negative energy flow. This peculiar energy flux phenomenon is of essential importance for electromagnetic and optical traps and tweezers, where the location and momenta of microand nanoparticles are manipulated by changing the Poynting vector, and in detection of invisibility cloaks. © 2011 Optical Society of America.

  20. Variational energy principle for compressible, baroclinic flow. 2: Free-energy form of Hamilton's principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The first and second variations are calculated for the irreducible form of Hamilton's Principle that involves the minimum number of dependent variables necessary to describe the kinetmatics and thermodynamics of inviscid, compressible, baroclinic flow in a specified gravitational field. The form of the second variation shows that, in the neighborhood of a stationary point that corresponds to physically stable flow, the action integral is a complex saddle surface in parameter space. There exists a form of Hamilton's Principle for which a direct solution of a flow problem is possible. This second form is related to the first by a Friedrichs transformation of the thermodynamic variables. This introduces an extra dependent variable, but the first and second variations are shown to have direct physical significance, namely they are equal to the free energy of fluctuations about the equilibrium flow that satisfies the equations of motion. If this equilibrium flow is physically stable, and if a very weak second order integral constraint on the correlation between the fluctuations of otherwise independent variables is satisfied, then the second variation of the action integral for this free energy form of Hamilton's Principle is positive-definite, so the action integral is a minimum, and can serve as the basis for a direct trail and error solution. The second order integral constraint states that the unavailable energy must be maximum at equilibrium, i.e. the fluctuations must be so correlated as to produce a second order decrease in the total unavailable energy.

  1. The energy gap at Z=64 and its implications for the structure of excited states in the A approximately 150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, R.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental results are presented indicating the existence of the energy gap in the single particle level sequence at proton number Z=64. Studied experimentally yrast states of the 64 146 Gd 82 closed core nucleus and of the neighbouring nuclei are interpreted within the framework of the spherical shell model. The consideration of the simple shell model multiparticle configurations is suggested to explain the observed frequent appearance of the high-spin isomers in nuclei of the A approximately 150 region. Emphasized is the role of the octupole excitations in the level structures of considered nuclei and some aspects of the coupling of octupole vibrations with valence nucleons are discussed. (author)

  2. EOMCC over excited state Hartree-Fock solutions (ESHF-EOMCC: An efficient approach for the entire ground state potential energy curves of higher-order bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sajeev

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC method based on the excited state Hartree-Fock (ESHF solutions is shown to be appropriate for computing the entire ground state potential energy curves of strongly correlated higher-order bonds. The new approach is best illustrated for the homolytic dissociation of higher-order bonds in molecules. The required multireference character of the true ground state wavefunction is introduced through the linear excitation operator of the EOMCC method. Even at the singles and doubles level of cluster excitation truncation, the nonparallelity error of the ground state potential energy curve from the ESHF based EOMCC method is small.

  3. Low Energy Excitations of a Bose-Einstein Condensate: A Time-Dependent Variational Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Garcia, V.M.; Michinel, H.; Cirac, J.; Lewenstein, M.; Zoller, P. [Departamento de Matematicas, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]|[Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, E. U. Optica e Optometria, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]|[Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de CC. Quimicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]|[Comissariat a l`Energie Atomique, DSM/DRECAM/SPAM, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    1996-12-01

    We solve the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation by a variational ansatz to calculate the excitation spectrum of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a trap. The trial wave function is a Gaussian which allows an essentially analytical treatment of the problem. Our results reproduce numerical calculations over the whole range from small to large particle numbers, and agree exactly with the Stringari results in the strong interaction limit. Excellent agreement is obtained with the recent JILA experiment and predictions for the negative scattering length case are also made. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Control of Vibratory Energy Harvesters in the Presence of Nonlinearities and Power-Flow Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Ian L.

    Over the past decade, a significant amount of research activity has been devoted to developing electromechanical systems that can convert ambient mechanical vibrations into usable electric power. Such systems, referred to as vibratory energy harvesters, have a number of useful of applications, ranging in scale from self-powered wireless sensors for structural health monitoring in bridges and buildings to energy harvesting from ocean waves. One of the most challenging aspects of this technology concerns the efficient extraction and transmission of power from transducer to storage. Maximizing the rate of power extraction from vibratory energy harvesters is further complicated by the stochastic nature of the disturbance. The primary purpose of this dissertation is to develop feedback control algorithms which optimize the average power generated from stochastically-excited vibratory energy harvesters. This dissertation will illustrate the performance of various controllers using two vibratory energy harvesting systems: an electromagnetic transducer embedded within a flexible structure, and a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam. Compared with piezoelectric systems, large-scale electromagnetic systems have received much less attention in the literature despite their ability to generate power at the watt--kilowatt scale. Motivated by this observation, the first part of this dissertation focuses on developing an experimentally validated predictive model of an actively controlled electromagnetic transducer. Following this experimental analysis, linear-quadratic-Gaussian control theory is used to compute unconstrained state feedback controllers for two ideal vibratory energy harvesting systems. This theory is then augmented to account for competing objectives, nonlinearities in the harvester dynamics, and non-quadratic transmission loss models in the electronics. In many vibratory energy harvesting applications, employing a bi-directional power electronic drive to actively

  5. Kinetic energy budget for electroconvective flows near ion selective membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Karen; Mani, Ali

    2017-11-01

    Electroconvection occurs when ions are driven from a bulk fluid through an ion-selective surface. When the driving voltage is beyond a threshold, this process undergoes a hydrodynamic instability called electroconvection, which can become chaotic due to nonlinear coupling between ion-transport, fluid flow, and electrostatic forces. Electroconvection significantly enhances ion transport and plays an important role in a wide range of electrochemical applications. We investigate this phenomenon by considering a canonical geometry consisting of a symmetric binary electrolyte between an ion-selective membrane and a reservoir using 2D direct numerical simulation (DNS). Our simulations reveal that for most practical regimes, DNS of electroconvection is expensive. Thus, a plan towards development of reduced-order models is necessary to facilitate the adoption of analysis of this phenomenon in industry. Here we use DNS to analyze the kinetic energy budget to shed light into the mechanisms sustaining flow and mixing in electroconvective flows. Our analysis reveals the relative dominance of kinetic energy sources, dissipation, and transport mechanisms sustaining electroconvection at different distances from the interface and over a wide range of input parameters. Karen Wang was supported by the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG). Ali Mani was supported by the National Science Foundation Award.

  6. Excited baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  7. Excited baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested

  8. The Use of Energy in Malaysia: Tracing Energy Flows from Primary Source to End Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinhao Chong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is a rapidly developing country in Southeast Asia that aims to achieve high-income country status by 2020; its economic growth is highly dependent on its abundant energy resources, especially natural gas and crude oil. In this paper, a complete picture of Malaysia’s energy use from primary source to end use is presented by mapping a Sankey diagram of Malaysia’s energy flows, together with ongoing trends analysis of the main factors influencing the energy flows. The results indicate that Malaysia’s energy use depends heavily on fossil fuels, including oil, gas and coal. In the past 30 years, Malaysia has successfully diversified its energy structure by introducing more natural gas and coal into its power generation. To sustainably feed the rapidly growing energy demand in end-use sectors with the challenge of global climate change, Malaysia must pay more attention to the development of renewable energy, green technology and energy conservation in the future.

  9. Novel calibration method for flow cytometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements between visible fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Peter; Bene, László; Hyun, William C; Vereb, György; Braun, Manuela; Antz, Christof; Paysan, Jacques; Damjanovich, Sándor; Park, John W; Szöllősi, János

    2005-10-01

    The combination of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and flow cytometry offers a statistically firm approach to study protein associations. Fusing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to a studied protein usually does not disturb the normal function of a protein, but quantitation of FRET efficiency calculated between GFP derivatives poses a problem in flow cytometry. We generated chimeras in which cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was separated by amino acid linkers of different sizes from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and used them to calibrate the cell-by-cell flow cytometric FRET measurements carried out on two different dual-laser flow cytometers. Then, CFP-Kip1 was coexpressed in yeast cells with YFP and cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (Cdk2) and served as a positive control for FRET measurements, and CFP-Kip1 coexpressed with a random peptide fused to YFP was the negative control. We measured donor, direct, and sensitized acceptor fluorescence intensities and developed a novel way to calculate a factor (alpha) that characterized the fluorescence intensity of acceptor molecules relative to the same number of excited donor molecules, which is essential for quantifying FRET efficiency. This was achieved by calculating FRET efficiency in two different ways and minimizing the squared difference between the two results by changing alpha. Our method reliably detected the association of Cdk2 with its inhibitor, Kip1, whereas the nonspecific FRET efficiency between Cdk2 and a random peptide was negligible. We identified and sorted subpopulations of yeast cells showing interaction between the studied proteins. We have described a straightforward novel calibration method to accurately quantitate FRET efficiency between GFP derivatives in flow cytometry.

  10. Analysis of the Dynamic Performance of Self-Excited Induction Generators Employed in Renewable Energy Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. A. Farrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Incentives, such as the Feed-in-tariff are expected to lead to continuous increase in the deployment of Small Scale Embedded Generation (SSEG in the distribution network. Self-Excited Induction Generators (SEIG represent a significant segment of potential SSEG. The quality of SEIG output voltage magnitude and frequency is investigated in this paper to support the SEIG operation for different network operating conditions. The dynamic behaviour of the SEIG resulting from disconnection, reconnection from/to the grid and potential operation in islanding mode is studied in detail. The local load and reactive power supply are the key factors that determine the SEIG performance, as they have significant influence on the voltage and frequency change after disconnection from the grid. Hence, the aim of this work is to identify the optimum combination of the reactive power supply (essential for self excitation of the SEIG and the active load (essential for balancing power generation and demand. This is required in order to support the SEIG operation after disconnection from the grid, during islanding and reconnection to the grid. The results show that the generator voltage and speed (frequency can be controlled and maintained within the statuary limits. This will enable safe disconnection and reconnection of the SEIG from/to the grid and makes it easier to operate in islanding mode.

  11. Parametrically excited MEMS vibration energy harvesters with design approaches to overcome the initiation threshold amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Yu; Yan, Jize; Soga, Kenichi; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2013-01-01

    Resonant-based vibration harvesters have conventionally relied upon accessing the fundamental mode of directly excited resonance to maximize the conversion efficiency of mechanical-to-electrical power transduction. This paper explores the use of parametric resonance, which unlike the former, the resonant-induced amplitude growth, is not limited by linear damping and wherein can potentially offer higher and broader nonlinear peaks. A numerical model has been constructed to demonstrate the potential improvements over the convention. Despite the promising potential, a damping-dependent initiation threshold amplitude has to be attained prior to accessing this alternative resonant phenomenon. Design approaches have been explored to passively reduce this initiation threshold. Furthermore, three representative MEMS designs were fabricated with both 25 and 10 μm thick device silicon. The devices include electrostatic cantilever-based harvesters, with and without the additional design modification to overcome initiation threshold amplitude. The optimum performance was recorded for the 25 μm thick threshold-aided MEMS prototype with device volume ∼0.147 mm 3 . When driven at 4.2 ms −2 , this prototype demonstrated a peak power output of 10.7 nW at the fundamental mode of resonance and 156 nW at the principal parametric resonance, as well as a 23-fold decrease in initiation threshold over the purely parametric prototype. An approximate doubling of the half-power bandwidth was also observed for the parametrically excited scenario. (paper)

  12. Flow based vs. demand based energy-water modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozos, Evangelos; Nikolopoulos, Dionysis; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koukouvinos, Antonios; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The water flow in hydro-power generation systems is often used downstream to cover other type of demands like irrigation and water supply. However, the typical case is that the energy demand (operation of hydro-power plant) and the water demand do not coincide. Furthermore, the water inflow into a reservoir is a stochastic process. Things become more complicated if renewable resources (wind-turbines or photovoltaic panels) are included into the system. For this reason, the assessment and optimization of the operation of hydro-power systems are challenging tasks that require computer modelling. This modelling should not only simulate the water budget of the reservoirs and the energy production/consumption (pumped-storage), but should also take into account the constraints imposed by the natural or artificial water network using a flow routing algorithm. HYDRONOMEAS, for example, uses an elegant mathematical approach (digraph) to calculate the flow in a water network based on: the demands (input timeseries), the water availability (simulated) and the capacity of the transmission components (properties of channels, rivers, pipes, etc.). The input timeseries of demand should be estimated by another model and linked to the corresponding network nodes. A model that could be used to estimate these timeseries is UWOT. UWOT is a bottom up urban water cycle model that simulates the generation, aggregation and routing of water demand signals. In this study, we explore the potentials of UWOT in simulating the operation of complex hydrosystems that include energy generation. The evident advantage of this approach is the use of a single model instead of one for estimation of demands and another for the system simulation. An application of UWOT in a large scale system is attempted in mainland Greece in an area extending over 130×170 km². The challenges, the peculiarities and the advantages of this approach are examined and critically discussed.

  13. A new ab initio potential energy surface for the collisional excitation of N2H+ by H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielfiedel, Annie; Balança, Christian; Feautrier, Nicole; Senent, Maria Luisa; Kalugina, Yulia; Scribano, Yohann; Lique, François

    2015-01-01

    We compute a new potential energy surface (PES) for the study of the inelastic collisions between N 2 H + and H 2 molecules. A preliminary study of the reactivity of N 2 H + with H 2 shows that neglecting reactive channels in collisional excitation studies is certainly valid at low temperatures. The four dimensional (4D) N 2 H + –H 2 PES is obtained from electronic structure calculations using the coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitation level of theory. The atoms are described by the augmented correlation consistent triple zeta basis set. Both molecules were treated as rigid rotors. The potential energy surface exhibits a well depth of ≃2530 cm −1 . Considering this very deep well, it appears that converged scattering calculations that take into account the rotational structure of both N 2 H + and H 2 should be very difficult to carry out. To overcome this difficulty, the “adiabatic-hindered-rotor” treatment, which allows para-H 2 (j = 0) to be treated as if it were spherical, was used in order to reduce the scattering calculations to a 2D problem. The validity of this approach is checked and we find that cross sections and rate coefficients computed from the adiabatic reduced surface are in very good agreement with the full 4D calculations

  14. A new ab initio potential energy surface for the collisional excitation of N2H(+) by H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielfiedel, Annie; Senent, Maria Luisa; Kalugina, Yulia; Scribano, Yohann; Balança, Christian; Lique, François; Feautrier, Nicole

    2015-07-14

    We compute a new potential energy surface (PES) for the study of the inelastic collisions between N2H(+) and H2 molecules. A preliminary study of the reactivity of N2H(+) with H2 shows that neglecting reactive channels in collisional excitation studies is certainly valid at low temperatures. The four dimensional (4D) N2H(+)-H2 PES is obtained from electronic structure calculations using the coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitation level of theory. The atoms are described by the augmented correlation consistent triple zeta basis set. Both molecules were treated as rigid rotors. The potential energy surface exhibits a well depth of ≃2530 cm(-1). Considering this very deep well, it appears that converged scattering calculations that take into account the rotational structure of both N2H(+) and H2 should be very difficult to carry out. To overcome this difficulty, the "adiabatic-hindered-rotor" treatment, which allows para-H2(j = 0) to be treated as if it were spherical, was used in order to reduce the scattering calculations to a 2D problem. The validity of this approach is checked and we find that cross sections and rate coefficients computed from the adiabatic reduced surface are in very good agreement with the full 4D calculations.

  15. Energy flow in a dispersive qubit read-out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuorila, Jani; Thuneberg, Erkki [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, FI-90014 (Finland)], E-mail: jani.tuorila@oulu.fi

    2009-02-01

    We analyze a superconducting charge qubit that is dispersively coupled to an electric resonator. The system is connected to a transmission line that allows a reflection measurement. In this paper we derive the equations of motion of the system by using the quantum network theory. We assume that the measurement signal is so strong that the resonator behaves classically. The time evolution of the qubit is calculated with the Bloch equations. We have simulated the system in the adiabatic eigenbasis of the qubit to bring out the effects of the changing band curvatures under strong driving. We use circuit theory to calculate the energy flow in different parts of the circuit.

  16. Global Analysis of Response in the Piezomagnetoelastic Energy Harvester System under Harmonic and Poisson White Noise Excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Xiao-Le; Xu Wei; Zhang Ying; Wang Liang

    2015-01-01

    The piezomagnetoelastic energy harvester system subjected to harmonic and Poisson white noise excitations is studied by using the generalized cell mapping method. The transient and stationary probability density functions (PDFs) of response based on the global viewpoint are obtained by the matrix analysis method. Monte Carlo simulation results verify the accuracy of this method. It can be observed that evolutionary direction of transient and stationary PDFs is in accordance with the unstable manifold for this system, and a stochastic P-bifurcation occurs as the intensity of Poisson white noise increases. This study presents an efficient numerical tool to solve the stochastic response of a three-dimensional dynamical system and provides a new idea to analyze the energy harvester system. (paper)

  17. Global Analysis of Response in the Piezomagnetoelastic Energy Harvester System under Harmonic and Poisson White Noise Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiao-Le; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Liang

    2015-10-01

    The piezomagnetoelastic energy harvester system subjected to harmonic and Poisson white noise excitations is studied by using the generalized cell mapping method. The transient and stationary probability density functions (PDFs) of response based on the global viewpoint are obtained by the matrix analysis method. Monte Carlo simulation results verify the accuracy of this method. It can be observed that evolutionary direction of transient and stationary PDFs is in accordance with the unstable manifold for this system, and a stochastic P-bifurcation occurs as the intensity of Poisson white noise increases. This study presents an efficient numerical tool to solve the stochastic response of a three-dimensional dynamical system and provides a new idea to analyze the energy harvester system. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11302170, 11202160, 11302171, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant No. 3102014JCQ01079

  18. Deviation from Boltzmann distribution in excited energy levels of singly-ionized iron in an argon glow discharge plasma for atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lei; Kashiwakura, Shunsuke; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki, E-mail: wagatuma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2012-01-15

    A Boltzmann plot for many iron ionic lines having excitation energies of 4.7-9.1 eV was investigated in an argon glow discharge plasma when the discharge parameters, such as the voltage/current and the gas pressure, were varied. A Grimm-style radiation source was employed in a DC voltage range of 400-800 V at argon pressures of 400-930 Pa. The plot did not follow a linear relationship over a wide range of the excitation energy, but it yielded a normal Boltzmann distribution in the range of 4.7-5.8 eV and a large overpopulation in higher-lying excitation levels of iron ion. A probable reason for this phenomenon is that excitations for higher excited energy levels of iron ion would be predominantly caused by non-thermal collisions with argon species, the internal energy of which is received by iron atoms for the ionization. Particular intense ionic lines, which gave a maximum peak of the Boltzmann plot, were observed at an excitation energy of ca. 7.7 eV. They were the Fe II 257.297-nm and the Fe II 258.111-nm lines, derived from the 3d{sup 5}4s4p {sup 6}P excited levels. The 3d{sup 5}4s4p {sup 6}P excited levels can be highly populated through a resonance charge transfer from the ground state of argon ion, because of good matching in the excitation energy as well as the conservation of the total spin before and after the collision. An enhancement factor of the emission intensity for various Fe II lines could be obtained from a deviation from the normal Boltzmann plot, which comprised the emission lines of 4.7-5.8 eV. It would roughly correspond to a contribution of the charge transfer excitation to the excited levels of iron ion, suggesting that the charge-transfer collision could elevate the number density of the corresponding excited levels by a factor of ca.10{sup 4}. The Boltzmann plots give important information on the reason why a variety of iron ionic lines can be emitted from glow discharge plasmas.

  19. Interplay of defective excitation-contraction coupling, energy starvation, and oxidative stress in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Maack, Christoph

    2011-04-01

    In chronic heart failure, maladaptive remodeling of the left ventricle (LV) with systolic and diastolic dysfunction underlies the inability of the heart to pump sufficient blood to supply the body with blood and oxygen. Three integral aspects of this maladaptive LV remodeling are (1) defects in excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, particularly of cellular Ca(2+) and Na(+) homeostasis; (2) an energetic deficit; and (3) oxidative stress. Although these three aspects are often investigated separately from each other, their close and dynamic interplay are increasingly recognized. Central to this novel approach are mitochondria, which are the main source for cellular ATP, but also for reactive oxygen species, and their function is critically regulated by Ca(2+) and Na(+). Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of how maladaptive changes of EC coupling can contribute to the energetic deficit and oxidative stress, which may initiate a vicious cycle leading to progressive cardiac dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of magnetic field on the impurity binding energy of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Impurity energy; turning point; binding energy. PACS Nos 73.20.Dx; 73.20.Hb; 71.55.-i; 71.55.Eq. 1. Introduction. Because of the recent advances in nanofabrication technology, it is possible to pro- duce quantum dots whose characteristic dimensions are comparable with the elec- tronic de Broglie wavelengths.

  1. Model dependences of the deactivation of phytoplankton pigment excitation energy on environmental conditions in the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Ostrowska

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical, physical models have been derived of the quantum yield ofthe deactivation processes (fluorescence, photosynthesis and heat productionof excited states in phytoplankton pigment molecules. Besides some alreadyknown models (photosynthesis and fluorescence, this novel approachincorporates the dependence of the dissipation yield of the excitation energyin phytoplankton pigment molecules on heat. The quantitative dependences ofthe quantum yields of these three processes on three fundamental parameters ofthe marine environment are defined: the chlorophyll concentration in the surface water layer Ca(0 (the basin trophicity,the irradiance PAR(z and the temperature temp(z at the study site.The model is complemented with two other relevant models describing thequantum yield of photosynthesis and of natural Sun-Induced Chlorophyll a Fluorescence (SICF in the sea, derived earlier by the author or with herparticipation on the basis of statistical analyses of a vast amount ofempirical material. The model described in the present paper enables theestimation of the quantum yields of phytoplankton pigment heat production forany region and season, in waters of any trophicity at different depths fromthe surface to depths of ca 60 m. The model can therefore be used to estimatethe yields of these deactivation processes in more than half the thickness ofthe euphotic zone in oligotrophic waters and in the whole thickness (anddeeper of this zone in mesotrophic and eutrophic waters. In particular theserelationships may be useful for a component analysis of the budget of lightenergy absorbed by phytoplankton pigments, namely, its utilization influorescence, photochemical quenching and nonphotochemical radiationlessdissipation - i.e. direct heat production.

  2. The total flow concept for geothermal energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    A geothermal development project has been initiated at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) to emphasize development of methods for recovery and conversion of the energy in geothermal deposits of hot brines. Temperatures of these waters vary from 150 C to more than 300 C with dissolved solids content ranging from less than 0.1% to over 25% by weight. Of particular interest are the deposits of high-temperature/high-salinity brines, as well as less saline brines, known to occur in the Salton Trough of California. Development of this resource will depend on resolution of the technical problems of brine handling, scale and precipitation control, and corrosion/erosion resistant systems for efficient conversion of thermal to electrical energy. Research experience to date has shown these problems to be severe. Hence, the LLL program emphasizes development of an entirely different approach called the Total Flow concept.

  3. Energy density and energy flow of surface waves in a strongly magnetized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2018-01-01

    General expressions for the energy density and energy flow of plasmonic waves in a two-dimensional massless electron gas (as a simple model of graphene) are obtained by means of the linearized magneto-hydrodynamic model and classical electromagnetic theory when a strong external magnetic field perpendicular to the system is present. Also, analytical expressions for the energy velocity, wave polarization, wave impedance, transverse and longitudinal field strength functions, and attenuation length of surface magneto-plasmon-polariton waves are derived, and numerical results are prepared.

  4. Energy harvesting from vibration of Timoshenko nanobeam under base excitation considering flexoelectric and elastic strain gradient effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managheb, S. A. M.; Ziaei-Rad, S.; Tikani, R.

    2018-05-01

    The coupling between polarization and strain gradients is called flexoelectricity. This phenomenon exists in all dielectrics with any symmetry. In this paper, energy harvesting from a Timoshenko beam is studied by considering the flexoelectric and strain gradient effects. General governing equations and related boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. The flexoelectric effects are defined by gradients of normal and shear strains which lead to a more general model. The developed model also covers the classical Timoshenko beam theory by ignoring the flexoelectric effect. Based on the developed model, flexoelectricity effect on dielectric beams and energy harvesting from cantilever beam under harmonic base excitation is investigated. A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the effects of flexoelectric coefficients, strain gradient constants, base acceleration and the attaching tip mass on the energy harvested from a cantilever Timoshenko beam. Results show that the flexoelectricity has a significant effect on the energy harvester performance, especially in submicron and nano scales. In addition, this effect makes the beam to behave softer than before and also it changes the harvester first resonance frequency. The present study provides guidance for flexoelectric nano-beam analysis and a method to evaluate the performance of energy harvester in nano-dielectric devices.

  5. Advanced Redox Flow Batteries for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-03-19

    This report describes the status of the advanced redox flow battery research being performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 1 of FY2012 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails completion of evaluation and optimization of single cell components for the two advanced redox flow battery electrolyte chemistries recently developed at the lab, the all vanadium (V) mixed acid and V-Fe mixed acid solutions. All the single cell components to be used in future kW-scale stacks have been identified and optimized in this quarter, which include solution electrolyte, membrane or separator; carbon felt electrode and bi-polar plate. Varied electrochemical, chemical and physical evaluations were carried out to assist the component screening and optimization. The mechanisms of the battery capacity fading behavior for the all vanadium redox flow and the Fe/V battery were discovered, which allowed us to optimize the related cell operation parameters and continuously operate the system for more than three months without any capacity decay.

  6. Inductive-energy power flow for X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, K.D.; Filios, P.G.; Gullickson, R.L.; Hebert, M.P.; Rowley, J.E.; Schneider, R.F.; Summa, W.J.; Vitkovski, I.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) has been developing inductive energy storage (IES) technology for generating intense x-rays from electron beam-target interactions and from plasma radiating sources (PRS). Because of the complex interaction between the commutation of the current from the plasma and the stable dissipation of the energy in the load, DNA has supported several variations of power flow technology. Major variations include: (1) current interruption using a plasma opening switch (POS); (2) continuous current commutation through current-plasma motion against neutral, ionized, or magnetized medium [i.e., dense plasma focus-like (DPF) and plasma flow switch (PFS) technologies]; and, in addition, possible benefits of (3) directly driven complex PRS loads are being investigated. DNA programs include experimental and theoretical modeling and analysis with investigations (1) on Hawk and a Decade module in conjunction with the development of the bremsstrahlung sources (BRS), and (2) on Hawk, ACE-4 and Shiva-Star, as well as cooperative research on GIT-4 and GIT-8, in conjunction with PRS. (author). 1 tab., 12 figs., 17 refs

  7. Photoprotective Energy Dissipation in Higher Plants Involves Alteration of the Excited State Energy of the Emitting Chlorophyll(s) in the Light Harvesting Antenna II (LHCII)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Ruban, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), a mechanism of energy dissipation in higher plants protects photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers from damage by excess light. NPQ involves a reduction in the chlorophyll excited state lifetime in the PSII harvesting antenna (LHCII) by a quencher. Yet, little is known about the effect of the quencher on chlorophyll excited state energy and dynamics. Application of picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that NPQ involves a red-shift (60 ± 5 cm−1) and slight enhancement of the vibronic satellite of the main PSII lifetime component present in intact chloroplasts. Whereas this fluorescence red-shift was enhanced by the presence of zeaxanthin, it was not dependent upon it. The red-shifted fluorescence of intact chloroplasts in the NPQ state was accompanied by red-shifted chlorophyll a absorption. Nearly identical absorption and fluorescence changes were observed in isolated LHCII complexes quenched in a low detergent media, suggesting that the mechanism of quenching is the same in both systems. In both cases, the extent of the fluorescence red-shift was shown to correlate with the lifetime of a component. The alteration in the energy of the emitting chlorophyll(s) in intact chloroplasts and isolated LHCII was also accompanied by changes in lutein 1 observed in their 77K fluorescence excitation spectra. We suggest that the characteristic red-shifted fluorescence emission reflects an altered environment of the emitting chlorophyll(s) in LHCII brought about by their closer interaction with lutein 1 in the quenching locus. PMID:19567871

  8. Approximate inclusion of triple excitations in combined coupled cluster/molecular mechanics: Calculations of electronic excitation energies in solution for acrolein, water, formamide, and n-methylacetamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneskov, Kristian; Gras, Eduard Matito; Kongsted, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    as being applicable for averaging over many solvent configurations derived from, for example, molecular simulations. We test the proposed model using as a benchmark the two lowest-lying valence singlet excitations (n → π* and π → π*) of acrolein, formamide, and N-methylacetamide in aqueous solution as well...

  9. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  10. Three-fold increase of M1 strength in 40Ar at 10 MeV excitation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, Werner; Finch, Sean; Krishichayan, Fnu; Tonchev, Anton

    2017-09-01

    We reexamined the excitation energy region of 40Ar around 9.8 MeV with the goal of determining the known M1 strength located at 9.76 MeV more accurately. The physics motivation was based on the fact that i) the neutrino-nucleus interaction cross section is proportional to the M1 strength of a nucleus, ii) DUNE, the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at SURF will be using liquid argon as detector medium, iii) the energy spectrum of supernova neutrinos is peaked at approximately 10 MeV. Mono-energetic and linearly polarized photons of 9.88 MeV were produced via Compton backscattering of 548 nm FEL photons from 543 MeV electrons at the High-Intensity γ-ray Source (HI γS) facility at TUNL. The 1.25 cm diameter photon beam with energy spread of 300 keV (FWHM) interacted with argon gas contained in a high-pressure cell. The cell was viewed with HPGe detectors placed at 90o relative to the incident photon beam in the horizontal and vertical planes to distinguish between E1 and M1 de-excitation γ-rays. Our re-measurement provided an increase in M1 strength by a factor of approximately 3, mostly due to the discovery that the known level in 40Ar at 9.84 MeV is of M1 character and not of E1 character, as previously thought. In addition to the already known M1 state at 9.76 MeV, we observed weaker M1 states at 9.70, 9.81, 9.87, and 9.89 MeV.

  11. Low-energy vibrational excitations in carbon nanotubes studied by heat capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasjaunias, J. C.; Biljakovic, K.; Monceau, P.; Sauvajol, J. L.

    2003-09-01

    We present low-temperature heat capacity measurements performed on two different kinds of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles which essentially differ in their mean number of tubes (NT) per bundle. For temperatures below a few kelvin, the vibrational heat capacity can be analysed as the sum of two contributions. The first one is a regular T3 phononic one, characteristic of the three-dimensional (3D) elastic character of the bundle for long-wavelength phonons. A crossover to a lower effective dimensionality appears at a few kelvin. From the 3D contribution, we estimate a mean sound velocity, and hence a mean shear modulus of the bundle. The difference in amplitude of the acoustic term and in the crossover temperature between the two samples is ascribed to the different bundle topology (i.e. NT). The second contribution, of similar amplitude in both kinds of samples, shows a peculiar power law Talpha variation (alpha < 1) indicative of localized excitations, very probably due to intrinsic structural defects of the nanotubes.

  12. Multi-step excitation energy transfer engineered in genetic fusions of natural and synthetic light-harvesting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Joshua A; Kodali, Goutham; Jiang, Jianbing; Reddy, Kanumuri Ramesh; Lindsey, Jonathan S; Bryant, Donald A; Dutton, P Leslie; Moser, Christopher C

    2017-02-01

    Synthetic proteins designed and constructed from first principles with minimal reference to the sequence of any natural protein have proven robust and extraordinarily adaptable for engineering a range of functions. Here for the first time we describe the expression and genetic fusion of a natural photosynthetic light-harvesting subunit with a synthetic protein designed for light energy capture and multi-step transfer. We demonstrate excitation energy transfer from the bilin of the CpcA subunit (phycocyanin α subunit) of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic light-harvesting phycobilisome to synthetic four-helix-bundle proteins accommodating sites that specifically bind a variety of selected photoactive tetrapyrroles positioned to enhance energy transfer by relay. The examination of combinations of different bilin, chlorin and bacteriochlorin cofactors has led to identification of the preconditions for directing energy from the bilin light-harvesting antenna into synthetic protein-cofactor constructs that can be customized for light-activated chemistry in the cell. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Communication: State-to-state dynamics of the Cl + H2O → HCl + OH reaction: Energy flow into reaction coordinate and transition-state control of product energy disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Bin; Guo, Hua; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Quantum state-to-state dynamics of a prototypical four-atom reaction, namely, Cl + H 2 O → HCl + OH, is investigated for the first time in full dimensionality using a transition-state wave packet method. The state-to-state reactivity and its dependence on the reactant internal excitations are analyzed and found to share many similarities both energetically and dynamically with the H + H 2 O → H 2 + OH reaction. The strong enhancement of reactivity by the H 2 O stretching vibrational excitations in both reactions is attributed to the favorable energy flow into the reaction coordinate near the transition state. On the other hand, the insensitivity of the product state distributions with regard to reactant internal excitation stems apparently from the transition-state control of product energy disposal

  14. A piezoelectric energy harvester for broadband rotational excitation using buckled beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqiu Xie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a rotational energy harvester using a piezoelectric bistable buckled beam to harvest low-speed rotational energy. The proposed harvester consists of a piezoelectric buckled beam with a center magnet, and a rotary magnet pair with opposite magnetic poles mounted on a revolving host. The magnetic plucking is used to harvest the angular kinetic energy of the host. The nonlinear snap-through mechanism is utilized to improve the vibration displacement and output voltage of the piezoelectric layer over a wide rotation frequency range. Theoretical simulation and experimental results show that the proposed energy harvester can yield a stable average output power ranging between 6.91-48.01 μW over a rotation frequency range of 1-14 Hz across a resistance load of 110 kΩ. Furthermore, dual attraction magnets were employed to overcome the suppression phenomenon at higher frequencies, which yields a broadband and flat frequency response over 6-14 Hz with the output power reaching 42.19-65.44 μW, demonstrating the great potential of the bistable buckled beam for wideband rotation motion energy harvesting.

  15. A piezoelectric energy harvester for broadband rotational excitation using buckled beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhengqiu; Kitio Kwuimy, C. A.; Wang, Zhiguo; Huang, Wenbin

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a rotational energy harvester using a piezoelectric bistable buckled beam to harvest low-speed rotational energy. The proposed harvester consists of a piezoelectric buckled beam with a center magnet, and a rotary magnet pair with opposite magnetic poles mounted on a revolving host. The magnetic plucking is used to harvest the angular kinetic energy of the host. The nonlinear snap-through mechanism is utilized to improve the vibration displacement and output voltage of the piezoelectric layer over a wide rotation frequency range. Theoretical simulation and experimental results show that the proposed energy harvester can yield a stable average output power ranging between 6.91-48.01 μW over a rotation frequency range of 1-14 Hz across a resistance load of 110 kΩ. Furthermore, dual attraction magnets were employed to overcome the suppression phenomenon at higher frequencies, which yields a broadband and flat frequency response over 6-14 Hz with the output power reaching 42.19-65.44 μW, demonstrating the great potential of the bistable buckled beam for wideband rotation motion energy harvesting.

  16. Modeling energy transfer in molecular collisions: Statistical theory versus experiment for highly excited toluene and azulene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Daniel; Nordholm, Sture

    2003-12-01

    The recent development and application of the method of kinetically controlled selective ionization has produced detailed and reliable data on the collisional energy transfer kernel P(E',E) entering master equation theories of unimolecular reaction rates. Here we test the ability of our partially ergodic collision theory (PECT) to predict the functional form of the observed kernel leaving only one parameter, the first moment of the distribution , to be input from other sources. The data explored here include two reactant molecules, toluene and azulene, in collisions with 18 and 8 medium molecules, respectively, ranging from inert gas atoms to n-heptane. The initial energy of the reactant molecule is varied from 10 000 cm-1 to 49 000 cm-1 and 30 000 cm-1, respectively. The energy transfer efficiency βE is about one-tenth of its ergodic collision limit of unity. The PECT is found to fit the monoexponential form of the kernel determined from the experimental data over a broad range of initial energies E including tail regions of very low probability. A minor but systematic deviation is observed for nearly elastic collisions of large medium molecules. The functional fit is good enough to effectively allow the three parameters of the monoexponential experimental kernel to be replaced by a single parameter representing energy transfer efficiency.

  17. Influence of Rotor-Stator Interaction on Flow Stability in Centrifugal Pump Based on Energy Gradient Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lu-Lu; Dou, Hua-Shu; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Zuchao; Cui, Baoling

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulation is performed for the three-dimensional turbulent flow field in a centrifugal pump by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the RNG k-epsilon turbulent model. The finite volume method and the SIMPLE algorithm are employed for the solution of the system. All the parameters in the centrifugal pump at different blade angular positions are obtained by simulation. The flow structure is analyzed and the distributions of the energy gradient function K are calculated at different blade angular positions based on the energy gradient method. According to the energy gradient method, the location which has larger value of K is easier to cause instability and to be of high turbulence intensity. The result shows that the flow instability is easier to be excited nearing the tongue where the value of K is large. The unstable flow area nearing the tongue is also in agreement with the zone where the velocity decreases rapidly. The sudden variation of velocity contributes to the large value of K. The research result also indicates that the tongue has large impact only on the impeller passages passing the tongue.

  18. Differential cross sections for intermediate-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol: Excitation of electronic-states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Thorn, P. A.; Pettifer, Z. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Limão-Vieira, P. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Duflot, D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR CNRS 8523, Université Lille, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); and others

    2014-07-14

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of Rydberg electronic-states in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these experiments was 20–50 eV, while the scattered electron was detected in the 10°–90° angular range. There are currently no other experimental data or theoretical computations against which we can directly compare the present measured results. Nonetheless, we are able to compare our THFA DCSs with earlier cross section measurements for Rydberg-state electronic excitation for tetrahydrofuran, a similar cyclic ether, from Do et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144302 (2011)]. In addition, “rotationally averaged” elastic DCSs, calculated using our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction approach are also reported. Those latter results give integral cross sections consistent with the optical theorem, and supercede those from the only previous study of Milosavljević et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 40, 107 (2006)].

  19. Vibrational energy flow through the green fluorescent protein-water interface: communication maps and thermal boundary conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Leitner, David M

    2014-07-17

    We calculate communication maps for green fluorescent protein (GFP) to elucidate energy transfer pathways between the chromophore and other parts of the protein in the ground and excited state. The approach locates energy transport channels from the chromophore to remote regions of the protein via residues and water molecules that hydrogen bond to the chromophore. We calculate the thermal boundary conductance between GFP and water over a wide range of temperature and find that the interface between the protein and the cluster of water molecules in the β-barrel poses negligible resistance to thermal flow, consistent with facile vibrational energy transfer from the chromophore to the β-barrel waters observed in the communication maps.

  20. Nonlinear δf particle simulations of collective excitations and energy-anisotropy instabilities in high-intensity bunched beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Collective effects with strong coupling between the longitudinal and transverse dynamics are of fundamental importance for applications of high-intensity bunched beams. The self-consistent Vlasov-Maxwell equations are applied to high-intensity finite-length charge bunches, and a generalized δf particle simulation algorithm is developed for bunched beams with or without energy anisotropy. The nonlinear δf method exhibits minimal noise and accuracy problems in comparison with standard particle-in-cell simulations. Systematic studies are carried out under conditions corresponding to strong 3D nonlinear space-charge forces in the beam frame. For charge bunches with isotropic energy, finite bunch-length effects are clearly evident by the fact that the spectra for an infinitely long coasting beam and a nearly spherical charge bunch have strong similarities, whereas the spectra have distinctly different features when the bunch length is varied between these two limiting cases. For bunched beams with anisotropic energy, there exists no exact kinetic equilibrium because the particle dynamics do not conserve transverse energy and longitudinal energy separately. A reference state in approximate dynamic equilibrium has been constructed theoretically, and a quasi-steady state has been established in the simulations for the anisotropic case. Collective excitations relative to the reference state have been simulated using the generalized δf algorithm. In particular, the electrostatic Harris instability driven by strong energy anisotropy is investigated for a finite-length charge bunch. The observed growth rates are larger than those obtained for infinitely long coasting beams. However, the growth rate decreases for increasing bunch length to a value similar to the case of a long coasting beam. For long bunches, the instability is axially localized symmetrically relative to the beam center, and the characteristic wavelength in the longitudinal direction is

  1. Fission excitation function for 19F + 194,196,198Pt at near and above barrier energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Varinderjit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fission excitation functions for 19F + 194,196,198Pt reactions populating 213,215,217Fr compound nuclei are reported. Out of these three compound nuclei, 213Fr is a shell closed (N=126 compound nucleus and the other two are away from the shell closure. From a comparison of the experimental fission cross-sections with the statistical model predictions, it is observed that the fission cross-sections are underestimated by the statistical model predictions using shell corrected finite range rotating liquid drop model (FRLDM fission barriers. Further the FRLDM fission barriers are reduced to fit the fission cross-sections over the entire measured energy range.

  2. A biomass energy flow chart for Sierra Leone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoo-Gottfried, K.; Hall, D.O.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial above-ground biomass production and utilisation in Sierra Leone was analysed for the years 1984/5 to 1990/1. The total production of biomass energy was estimated at an annual average of 131 PJ (39% from agriculture, 51% from forestry and 10% from livestock). Of the 117 PJ produced from agricultural and forestry operations, 37 PJ was harvested as firewood and burnt (10.9 GJ or 0.72 t wood per capita per year, supplying 80% of the country's energy), 12 PJ was harvested for food, 66 PJ was unutilised crop and forestry residues, 3 PJ was harvested crop residues for use directly as fuel, and 2 PJ was harvested and used for industrial purposes and not for fuel. Livestock produced wastes with an energy content of 13 PJ of which only 0.1 PJ was collected and used for fuel. Thus 54 PJ (41%) of the 131 PJ of biomass energy produced annually was actually utilised while 49 PJ remained as unused agricultural residues and dung, and a further 27 PJ was unused forestry residues. The total amount of biomass (fuelwood, residues and dung) used directly to provide energy, mostly in households, was estimated at 40 PJ (11.8 GJ per capita per year of 0.79 t fuelwood equivalent). Direct biomass energy utilisation in agroindustry (0.4 PJ) was negligible in comparison. Two assessments of Sierra Leone's biomass standing stock and MAI (mean annual increment) were examined in order to assess the sustainability of various biomass use scenarios. Large differences were found between the MAI of the two assessments, making it difficult to predict sustainability of biomass production and use. The estimation of total standing stock varied between 227 and 366 Mt and the estimation of MAI varied between 15 and 70 Mt. Analysis of the availability and use of the biomass resource is crucial if biomass energy is to be used on a sustainable basis. A software package has been developed and is available to draft biomass flow charts but further work is needed to incorporate social and economic

  3. Energy Flow Objects and Usage of Tracks for Energy Measurement in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Dan; Kunori, Shuichi; Nikitenko, Alexander; Vardanian, I N; Virdee, Tejinder

    2002-01-01

    We present an algorithm to determine the energy of jets using the CMS calorimeter and tracker. The results on dijet mass reconstruction for a hypothetical Z'(M=120 GeV)->jj are presented. Improvement in Z'mass resolution when the energy flow objects are used is found to be about of 22 % in comparison with the usage of the calorimeter information only. We present also a method to improve jet energy resolution with regional use of tracks when a jet is found first with a ''standard'' jet finder running on calorimeter towers as an input. We factorize the improvement in the jet energy resolution due to addition of tracks swept out of the reconstruction cone in 4T magnetic field, and due to replacement inside cone of the cluster energy by the matched track momentum or (for bad matching) subtraction from the jet energy the expected response of the track in the calorimeter and adding to the jet energy the track momentum. It is shown that for the soft jets of ~ 30-40 GeV the energy resolution may be improved by...

  4. Numerical Investigation on the Effects of Self-Excited Tip Flow Unsteadiness and Blade Row Interactions on the Performance Predictions of Low Speed and Transonic Compressor Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel H.

    The impact blade row interactions can have on the performance of compressor rotors has been well documented. It is also well known that rotor tip clearance flows can have a large effect on compressor performance and stall margin and recent research has shown that tip leakage flows can exhibit self-excited unsteadiness at near stall conditions. However, the impact of tip leakage flow on the performance and operating range of a compressor rotor, relative to other important flow features such as upstream stator wakes or downstream potential effects, has not been explored. To this end, a numerical investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of self-excited tip flow unsteadiness, upstream stator wakes, and downstream blade row interactions on the performance prediction of low speed and transonic compressor rotors. Calculations included a single blade-row rotor configuration as well as two multi-blade row configurations: one where the rotor was modeled with an upstream stator and a second where the rotor was modeled with a downstream stator. Steady-state and time accurate calculations were performed using a RANS solver and the results were compared with detailed experimental data obtained in the GE Low Speed Research Compressor and the Notre Dame Transonic Rig at several operating conditions including near stall. Differences in the performance predictions between the three configurations were then used to determine the effect of the upstream stator wakes and the downstream blade row interactions. Results obtained show that for both the low speed and transonic research compressors used in this investigation time-accurate RANS analysis is necessary to accurately predict the stalling character of the rotor. Additionally, for the first time it is demonstrated that capturing the unsteady tip flow can have a larger impact on rotor performance predictions than adjacent blade row interactions.

  5. Instrumental aspects of tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.; Nullens, H.; Espen, P. van

    1983-01-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is an attractive and widely used method for sensitive multi-element analysis. The method suffers from the extreme density of spectral components in a rather limited energy range which implies the need for computer based spectrum analysis. The method of iterative least squares analysis is the most powerful tool for this. It requires a systematic and accurate description of the spectral features. Other important necessities for accurate analysis are the calibration of the spectrometer and the correction for matrix absorption effects in the sample; they can be calculated from available physical constants. Ours and similar procedures prove that semi-automatic analyses are possible with an accuracy of the order of 5%. (author)

  6. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Puria, Sunil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  7. Hartree-Fock energies of the doubly excited states of the boron isoelectronic sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sherbini, T.M.; Mansour, H.M.; Farrag, A.A.; Rahman, A.A.

    1985-08-01

    Hartree-Fock energies of the 1s 2 2s 2p ns( 4 P), 1s 2 2s 2p np ( 4 P, 4 D) and 1s 2 2s 2p nd ( 4 P, 4 D); n=3-6 states in the boron isoelectronic sequence are reported. The results show a fairly good agreement with the experimental data of Bromander for O IV. (author)

  8. Some dispersive X-ray fluorescence applications in energies with radioisotopic excitation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelfang, P.; Vazquez, C.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this work is based on the use of interelemental correction coefficients which are calculated through fundamental parameters. To this purpose, it is necessary to know about the physical constants for each element including the absorption coefficient values and fluorescence yield, the incidence radiation energy, geometric and instrumental parameters. Besides, a special application of the program for the determination of a Nd-La mixed crystal formula is included. (Author) [es

  9. Tunable luminescence mediated by energy transfer in Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses under UV excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Chen, Guohua; Liu, Xiangyu; Yuan, Changlai; Zhou, Changrong

    2017-11-01

    Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses for white light-emitting diodes were synthesized by a conventional melting-quenching method. A spectroscopic research based on optical, photoluminescence spectrum and decay time curves in Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses was carried out. The color of luminescence could be tuned by altering the concentrations of Tm3+ ions. Under UV light excitation, the CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.3471, 0.3374) and color correlate temperature (CCT = 4866.21 K) close to the standard white-light illumination (0.333, 0.333 and CCT = 5454.12 K) could be achieved in 0.4 Tm3+/0.6 Dy3+ (mol %) co-doped glass sample. The decrease of the Dy3+ emission decay time in existence of Tm3+ ascertained that non-radiative energy transfer from Dy3+ to Tm3+ occurred. Moreover, the research of energy transfers between Dy3+ and Tm3+ based on the Inokuti-Hirayama model revealed that an electric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction might be the predominant mechanism participated in the energy transfer. This finding suggests that the as-prepared Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses may be promising candidate for white LEDs and other display devices.

  10. Electron and excitation energy transfers in covalently linked donor-acceptor dyads: mechanisms and dynamics revealed using quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Giannini, Samuele; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2017-12-20

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET), hole transfer (HT), charge recombination (CR) and energy transfer (EET) are fundamental mechanisms, which occur in both natural and artificial light harvesting systems. Here, we present a computational strategy which determines ET, HT, CR and EET rates in a consistent way and merges them in a kinetic model to reproduce the net excited state dynamics. The effects of the solvent are included in all steps of the calculations making the present strategy a useful tool for a rational design of charge and energy transfer processes in complex systems. An application to covalently linked zinc and free-base porphyrin-naphthalenediimide dyads is presented. For each of the two systems, ultrafast optical spectroscopy experiments have shown a specific photophysics with different processes taking place simultaneously. The model reveals that such a diversity is mainly due to the different relative stability of the charge-separated state, while the electronic couplings for charge and energy transfer processes are quite similar in the two dyads.

  11. Energy/material flows associated with cyclic petrochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    A detailed product flow analysis, starting with the refinery reformate stream, was prepared to identify the major products of interest. The selection of the products and their derivatives for detailed analysis was based on 1978 consumption data which is reported. The products selected for detailed analysis were: Benzene (from Toluene), Polystyrene, Polyester fibers, Cyclohexane, Nylon 6,6, Nylon 6, ABS + SAN, Phenolic resins, Urethane foams, Unsaturated polyesters and SBR. Data on the selling price of these products and the companies which market these products are tabulated. The production routes were analyzed to determine the key manufacturing processes available. A detailed analysis of the important steps in the production of these materials is presented. For each step in the manaufacturing process a process description, a block flow diagram, the energy consumption, and the feedstock conversions are provided. If more than one process was available and was determined to be commercially important, this route was also presented in detail. If the alternate process was not as significant, then this process was noted and briefly described.

  12. Optimal power flow management for distributed energy resources with batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazvinga, Henerica; Zhu, Bing; Xia, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A PV-diesel-battery hybrid system is proposed. • Model minimizes fuel and battery wear costs. • Power flows are analysed in a 24-h period. • Results provide a practical platform for decision making. - Abstract: This paper presents an optimal energy management model of a solar photovoltaic-diesel-battery hybrid power supply system for off-grid applications. The aim is to meet the load demand completely while satisfying the system constraints. The proposed model minimizes fuel and battery wear costs and finds the optimal power flow, taking into account photovoltaic power availability, battery bank state of charge and load power demand. The optimal solutions are compared for cases when the objectives are weighted equally and when a larger weight is assigned to battery wear. A considerable increase in system operational cost is observed in the latter case owing to the increased usage of the diesel generator. The results are important for decision makers, as they depict the optimal decisions considered in the presence of trade-offs between conflicting objectives

  13. The Cascaded Arc: High Flows of Rovibrationally Excited H2 and its Impact on H- Ion Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, O.; Harskamp, W. E. N. van; Schram, D. C.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Engeln, R.

    2009-01-01

    The cascaded arc is a plasma source providing high fluxes of excited and reactive species such as ions, radicals and rovibrationally excited molecules. The plasma is produced under pressures of some kPa in a direct current arc with electrical powers up to 10 kW. The plasma leaves the arc channel through a nozzle and expands with supersonic velocity into a vacuum-chamber kept by pumps at low pressures. We investigated the case of a pure hydrogen plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field that confines ions and electrons in the jet. Highly excited molecules and atoms were detected by means of laser-induced fluorescence and optical emission spectroscopy. In case of an applied magnetic field the atomic state distribution of hydrogen atoms shows an overpopulation between the electronic states p = 5, 4 and 3. The influence of the highly excited hydrogen molecules on H - ion formation and a possible mechanism involving this negative ion and producing atomic hydrogen in state p = 3 will be discussed.

  14. Inclusive excitation-energy distributions of hot nuclei from 44 MeV/nucleon Ar- and 32 MeV/nucleon Kr-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, G.; Frehaut, J.; Patin, Y.; Pranal, Y.; Uzureau, J.L.; Charvet, J.L.; Magnago, C.; Crema, E.; Ingold, G.; Jiang, D.X.; Piasecki, E.

    1993-01-01

    Inclusive neutron multiplicity distributions were measured by means of 4 π liquid-scintillator detectors for Ar and Kr-induced reactions at 44 MeV/nucleon and 32 MeV/nucleon, respectively. For all the systems studied, the observed distributions exhibit a bump structure at large multiplicity corresponding to highly dissipative collisions. For Ar-induced reactions, the excitation energies necessary to explain the most probable neutron multiplicity associated with these dissipative collisions are estimated, the correspondence between excitation energy and neutron multiplicity being calculated in the framework of the statistical model. The so-obtained values of excitation energies, which are systematically lower than those predicted using the massive-transfer picture, are discussed

  15. Application of the Broad Energy Germanium detector: A technique for elucidating β-decay schemes which involve daughter nuclei with very low energy excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhart, M., E-mail: martin.venhart@savba.sk [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Wood, J.L. [Department of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332 (United States); Boston, A.J. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Cocolios, T.E. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern, en Stralingsfysica, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Harkness-Brennan, L.J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Joss, D.T.; Judson, D.S. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Kliman, J.; Matoušek, V. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Motyčák, Š. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, SK-812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Page, R.D.; Patel, A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Petrík, K.; Sedlák, M.; Veselský, M. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-03-21

    A technique for elucidating β-decay schemes of isotopes with a large density of states at low excitation energy has been developed, in which a Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector is used in conjunction with coaxial hyper-pure germanium detectors. The power of this technique is demonstrated using the example of {sup 183}Hg decay. Mass-separated samples of {sup 183}Hg were produced by a deposition of the low-energy radioactive-ion beam delivered by the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The excellent energy resolution of the BEGe detector allowed γ-ray energies to be determined with a precision of a few tens of eV, which was sufficient for the analysis of the Rydberg-Ritz combinations (in conjunction with γ-γ coincidences) in the level scheme. The timestamped structure of the data was used for unambiguous separation of γ rays arising from the decay of {sup 183}Hg from those due to the daughter decays.

  16. Energy flow models for the estimation of technical losses in distribution network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au, Mau Teng; Tan, Chin Hooi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents energy flow models developed to estimate technical losses in distribution network. Energy flow models applied in this paper is based on input energy and peak demand of distribution network, feeder length and peak demand, transformer loading capacity, and load factor. Two case studies, an urban distribution network and a rural distribution network are used to illustrate application of the energy flow models. Results on technical losses obtained for the two distribution networks are consistent and comparable to network of similar types and characteristics. Hence, the energy flow models are suitable for practical application.

  17. Delta self-consistent field method to obtain potential energy surfaces of excited molecules on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Olsen, Thomas; Engelund, Mads

    2008-01-01

    is a density-functional method closely resembling standard density-functional theory (DFT), the only difference being that in Delta SCF one or more electrons are placed in higher lying Kohn-Sham orbitals instead of placing all electrons in the lowest possible orbitals as one does when calculating the ground......-photoemission spectroscopy measurements. This comparison shows that the modified Delta SCF method gives results in close agreement with experiment, significantly closer than the comparable methods. For N2 adsorbed on ruthenium (0001) we map out a two-dimensional part of the potential energy surfaces in the ground state...

  18. Microscopic energy flows in disordered Ising spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agliari, E; Casartelli, M; Vezzani, A

    2010-01-01

    An efficient microcanonical dynamics has been recently introduced for Ising spin models embedded in a generic connected graph even in the presence of disorder, i.e. with the spin couplings chosen from a random distribution. Such a dynamics allows a coherent definition of local temperatures also when open boundaries are coupled to thermostats, imposing an energy flow. Within this framework, here we introduce a consistent definition for local energy currents and we study their dependence on the disorder. In the linear response regime, when the global gradient between thermostats is small, we also define local conductivities following a Fourier discretized picture. Then, we work out a linearized 'mean-field approximation', where local conductivities are supposed to depend on local couplings and temperatures only. We compare the approximated currents with the exact results of the nonlinear system, showing the reliability range of the mean-field approach, which proves very good at high temperatures and not so efficient in the critical region. In the numerical studies we focus on the disordered cylinder but our results could be extended to an arbitrary, disordered spin model on generic discrete structures

  19. Fluxes and energy dissapation in thermal convection and shear flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckhardt, B.; Grossmann, S.; Lohse, Detlef

    2007-01-01

    We expose analogies between turbulence in a fluid heated from below (Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) flow) and shear flows: The unifying theory for RB flow (see Grossmann S. and Lohse D., J. Fluid Mech., 407 (2000) 27 and subsequent refinements) can be extended to the flow between rotating cylinders

  20. Hyperfine structure in 229gTh3+ as a probe of the 229gTh→ 229mTh nuclear excitation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloy, K

    2014-02-14

    We identify a potential means to extract the 229gTh→ 229mTh nuclear excitation energy from precision microwave spectroscopy of the 5F(5/2,7/2) hyperfine manifolds in the ion 229gTh3+. The hyperfine interaction mixes this ground fine structure doublet with states of the nuclear isomer, introducing small but observable shifts to the hyperfine sublevels. We demonstrate how accurate atomic structure calculations may be combined with the measurement of the hyperfine intervals to quantify the effects of this mixing. Further knowledge of the magnetic dipole decay rate of the isomer, as recently reported, allows an indirect determination of the nuclear excitation energy.

  1. Distance dependence of intrahelix Ru(II)* to Os(II) polypyridyl excited-state energy transfer in oligoproline assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennaman, M Kyle; Fleming, Cavan N; Slate, Cheryl A; Serron, Scafford A; Bettis, Stephanie E; Erickson, Bruce W; Papanikolas, John M; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-05-30

    Energy transfer between the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states of [Pra [M(II)(bpy)2(4-Me-4'(-N(H)CO)bpy)](PF6)2 units ([Pra(M(II)bpy2(mbpy)](2+): M(II) = Ru(II) or Os(II), bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, mbpy = 4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridine-4-carboxamido, Pra = 4-M(II)-L-proline) linked covalently to oligoproline assemblies in room temperature acetonitrile occurs on the picosecond-nanosecond time scale and has been time-resolved by transient emission measurements. Three derivatized oligoprolines, [CH3-CO-Pro6-Pra[Os(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro2-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro2-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro6-Glu-NH2](6+) (ORR-2, Pro = L-proline and Glu = glutamic acid); [CH3-CO-Pro6-Pra[Os(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro3-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro3-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro6-Glu-NH2](6+) (ORR-3); and CH3-CO-Pro6-Pra[Os(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro5-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro5-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)Pro6-Glu2-NH2](6+) (ORR-5), were prepared by using solid-phase peptide synthesis. Given the helical nature of the resulting assemblies and the nature of the synthesis, composition, length, and loading pattern are precisely controlled in the assemblies. In acetonitrile, they adopt a proline I helical secondary structure, confirmed by circular dichroism, in which the appended chromophores are ordered in well-defined orientations and internuclear separation distances although helix formation for ORR-2 is incomplete. Quantitative comparison of oligoproline ground-state absorption and steady-state emission spectra to those for the constituents, [Boc-Pra[M(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-OH](PF6)2 (Boc = N(α)-(1,1-dimethylethoxycarbonyl), shows that following Ru(II) light absorption, Ru(II)* undergoes facile energy transfer resulting in sensitization of Os(II). Sensitization efficiencies are 93% for ORR-2, 77% for ORR-3, and 73% for ORR-5. Picosecond-resolved emission measurements reveal complex, coupled dynamics that arise from excited-state decay and kinetically

  2. Material and energy flows in rotary kiln-electric furnace smelting of ferronickel alloy with energy saving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Baokuan; Cheung, Sherman C.P.; Wu, Wenyuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Establish the synergy relationship of material and energy in key RKEF processes. • Develop an analysis model to study energy saving with internal cycling of energy. • Analyze material and energy flow parameters and assess its associated synergy effect. • A methodology to evaluate the synergy and design indices of RKEF processes. - Abstract: An energy saving strategy with two energy saving measures has been proposed for reducing energy loss in the rotary kiln-electric furnace (RKEF) for the smelting of ferronickel alloy. One of the measures is to recover the waste heat of exhaust gas from the rotary kiln for preheating and dehydrating the wet laterite ores in the rotary dryer. Another measure is to recycle the furnace gas from the electric furnace into the rotary kiln as fuel. Based on the mass conservation and energy conservation laws, an analysis model of material and energy flows has been developed to understand the potential energy saving with the internal cycling of material and energy in the RKEF process. The analysis model not only considers the energy efficiency but also assess the synergy degree of system. Furthermore, the model also predicts the ratio of raw materials and the energy flow distribution to investigate residual heat and energy and analyze the effects of nickel content on energy flow. Finally, the evaluation methodology of synergy and the technic indices are also presented. Through the investigation of the synergy effect, the performance of the RKEF process can be evaluated and quantified for performance optimization in future.

  3. Energy resources' utilization in organic and conventional vineyards: Energy flow, greenhouse gas emissions and biofuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavargiris, Stefanos E.; Mamolos, Andreas P.; Nikolaidou, Anna E.; Kalburtji, Kiriaki L.; Tsatsarelis, Constantinos A.

    2009-01-01

    An energy analysis, in conventional and organic vineyards, combined with ethanol production and greenhouse gas emissions, is useful in evaluating present situation and deciding best management strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the differences in the energy flow between organic and conventional vineyards in three locations, to calculate CO 2 , CH 4 and N 2 O-emissions based on the used fossil energy and to explore if wine industry wastes can be used to extract bioethanol. The data were collected through personal interviews with farmers during 2004-2005. Eighteen farmers, who owned vineyards about 1 ha each, were randomly selected to participate in this study [(3 conventional and 3 organic) x 3 locations]. The means averaged over all locations for fertilizer application, plant protection products application, transportation, harvesting, labor, machinery, fuels, plant protections products and tools energy inputs, total energy inputs, outputs (grapes), outputs (grapes + shoots), grape yield, man hour, pomace and ethanol from pomace were significantly higher in conventional than in organic vineyards, while the opposite occurred for the pruning. Means averaged over two farming systems for harvesting, tools energy inputs, energy outputs (grapes), grape yield, pomace and ethanol from pomace were significantly higher at location A, followed by location C and location B. Finally, for irrigation, the means averaged over the two farming systems were significantly lower at location C. Greenhouse gas emissions were significant lower in organic than in conventional vineyards. The results show a clear response of energy inputs to energy outputs that resulted from the farming system and location. (author)

  4. Modeling of fluorescence line-narrowed spectra in weakly coupled dimers in the presence of excitation energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen; Reppert, Mike; Feng, Ximao; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2014-07-01

    This work describes simple analytical formulas to describe the fluorescence line-narrowed (FLN) spectra of weakly coupled chromophores in the presence of excitation energy transfer (EET). Modeling studies for dimer systems (assuming low fluence and weak coupling) show that the FLN spectra (including absorption and emission spectra) calculated for various dimers using our model are in good agreement with spectra calculated by: (i) the simple convolution method and (ii) the more rigorous treatment using the Redfield approach [T. Renger and R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9997 (2002)]. The calculated FLN spectra in the presence of EET of all three approaches are very similar. We argue that our approach provides a simplified and computationally more efficient description of FLN spectra in the presence of EET. This method also has been applied to FLN spectra obtained for the CP47 antenna complex of Photosystem II reported by Neupane et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 4214 (2010)], which indicated the presence of uncorrelated EET between pigments contributing to the two lowest energy (overlapping) exciton states, each mostly localized on a single chromophore. Calculated and experimental FLN spectra for CP47 complex show very good qualitative agreement.

  5. Excitation of a nonlinear plasma ion wake by intense energy sources with applications to the crunch-in regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2017-08-01

    We show the excitation of a nonlinear ion-wake mode by plasma electron modes in the bubble regime driven by intense energy sources, using analytical theory and simulations. The ion wake is shown to be a driven nonlinear ion-acoustic wave in the form of a long-lived cylindrical ion soliton which limits the repetition rate of a plasma-based particle accelerator in the bubble regime. We present the application of this evacuated and radially outwards propagating ion-wake channel with an electron skin-depth scale radius for the "crunch-in" regime of hollow-channel plasma. It is shown that the time-asymmetric focusing force phases in the bubble couple to ion motion significantly differently than in the linear electron mode. The electron compression in the back of the bubble sucks in the ions whereas the space charge within the bubble cavity expels them, driving a cylindrical ion-soliton structure at the bubble radius. Once formed, the soliton is sustained and driven radially outwards by the thermal pressure of the wake energy in electrons. Particle-in-cell simulations are used to study the ion-wake soliton structure, its driven propagation and its use for positron acceleration in the crunch-in regime.

  6. Thermionic and Photo-excited Electron Emission for Energy Conversion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. McCarthy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes advances in thermionic and photoemission materials and applications dating back to the work on thermionic emission by Guthrie in 1873 and the photoelectric effect by Hertz in 1887. Thermionic emission has been employed for electron beam generation from Edison’s work with the light bulb to modern day technologies such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The photoelectric effect has been utilized in common devices such as cameras and photocopiers while photovoltaic cells continue to be widely successful and further researched. Limitations in device efficiency and materials have thus far restricted large-scale energy generation sources based on thermionic and photoemission. However, recent advances in the fabrication of nanoscale emitters suggest promising routes for improving both thermionic and photo-enhanced electron emission along with newly developed research concepts, e.g., photonically enhanced thermionic emission. However, the abundance of new emitter materials and reduced dimensions of some nanoscale emitters increases the complexity of electron emission theory and engender new questions related to the dimensionality of the emitter. This work presents derivations of basic two and three-dimensional thermionic and photoemission theory along with comparisons to experimentally acquired data. The resulting theory can be applied to many different material types regardless of composition, bulk and surface structure.

  7. Photoinduced Ultrafast Intramolecular Excited-State Energy Transfer in the Silylene-Bridged Biphenyl and Stilbene (SBS) System: A Nonadiabatic Dynamics Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Huang, Jing; Du, Likai; Lan, Zhenggang

    2015-07-09

    The photoinduced intramolecular excited-state energy-transfer (EET) process in conjugated polymers has received a great deal of research interest because of its important role in the light harvesting and energy transport of organic photovoltaic materials in photoelectric devices. In this work, the silylene-bridged biphenyl and stilbene (SBS) system was chosen as a simplified model system to obtain physical insight into the photoinduced intramolecular energy transfer between the different building units of the SBS copolymer. In the SBS system, the vinylbiphenyl and vinylstilbene moieties serve as the donor (D) unit and the acceptor (A) unit, respectively. The ultrafast excited-state dynamics of the SBS system was investigated from the point of view of nonadiabatic dynamics with the surface-hopping method at the TDDFT level. The first two excited states (S1 and S2) are characterized by local excitations at the acceptor (vinylstilbene) and donor (vinylbiphenyl) units, respectively. Ultrafast S2-S1 decay is responsible for the intramolecular D-A excitonic energy transfer. The geometric distortion of the D moiety play an essential role in this EET process, whereas the A moiety remains unchanged during the nonadiabatic dynamics simulation. The present work provides a direct dynamical approach to understand the ultrafast intramolecular energy-transfer dynamics in SBS copolymers and other similar organic photovoltaic copolymers.

  8. Excitation energy dependence of fragment-mass distributions from fission of 180,190Hg formed in fusion reactions of 36Ar + 144,154Sm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nishio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass distributions of fission fragments from the compound nuclei 180Hg and 190Hg formed in fusion reactions 36Ar + 144Sm and 36Ar + 154Sm, respectively, were measured at initial excitation energies of E⁎(Hg180=33–66 MeV and E⁎(Hg190=48–71 MeV. In the fission of 180Hg, the mass spectra were well reproduced by assuming only an asymmetric-mass division, with most probable light and heavy fragment masses A¯L/A¯H=79/101. The mass asymmetry for 180Hg agrees well with that obtained in the low-energy β+/EC-delayed fission of 180Tl, from our earlier ISOLDE(CERN experiment. Fission of 190Hg is found to proceed in a similar way, delivering the mass asymmetry of A¯L/A¯H=83/107, throughout the measured excitation energy range. The persistence as a function of excitation energy of the mass-asymmetric fission for both proton-rich Hg isotopes gives strong evidence for the survival of microscopic effects up to effective excitation energies of compound nuclei as high as 40 MeV. This behavior is different from fission of actinide nuclei and heavier mercury isotope 198Hg.

  9. Azimuthal correlation functions and the energy of vanishing flow in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Brou, R.; Cussol, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Patry, J.P.; Peter, J.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Cassagnou, Y.; Legrain, R.; Eudes, P.; Lebrun, C.; He, Z.Y.; Crema, E.; Sao Paulo Univ., SP

    1994-06-01

    A novel method is proposed for studying the evolution of flow phenomena with the incident energy, and for quantitatively estimating the energy of vanishing flow (also called balance energy, E bal ) without reconstructing the reaction plane. We used a method based on the shapes of experimental particle-particle azimuthal correlation functions to determine E bal for three systems: Ar + Al, Zn + Ti, Zn + Ni. We compare the results with estimations using flow parameter analysis and also with theoretical expectations. (authors)

  10. Merged-beams energy-loss technique for electron-ion excitation: Absolute total cross sections for O5+(2s→2p)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, E.W.; Guo, X.Q.; Forand, J.L.; Rinn, K.; Swenson, D.R.; Thompson, J.S.; Dunn, G.H.; Bannister, M.E.; Gregory, D.C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Smith, A.C.H.; Mueller, A.; Timmer, C.A.; Wahlin, E.K.; DePaola, B.D.; Belic, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    A merged-beams electron-energy-loss technique is described, by which absolute cross sections can be measured for near-threshold electron-impact excitation of multipy charged ions. Results are reported here for absolute total electron-impact excitation cross sections for the O 5+ (2s→2p) transition from below threshold to 1.6 eV above threshold. The experimental data are in good agremeent with a seven-state close-coupling calculation throughout the energy range of the experiment. Results agree with calculations showing that more than 90% of the electrons causing excitation are ejected in the backward direction in the center-of-mass frame. This backscattering is shown in both quantum-mechanical and semiclassical calculations. Evidence is observed for high-lying metastable autoionizing states with a lifetime of approximately 0.9 μs which are made to ionize by electron impact

  11. Studying the energy dependence of intrinsic conversion efficiency of single crystal scintillators under X-ray excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyvas, N.; Valais, I.; David, S.; Michail, Ch.; Fountos, G.; Liaparinos, P.; Kandarakis, I.

    2014-05-01

    Single crystal scintilators are used in various radiation detectors applications. The efficiency of the crystal can be determined by the Detector Optical Gain (DOG) defined as the ratio of the emitted optical photon flux over the incident radiation photons flux. A parameter affecting DOG is the intrinsic conversion efficiency ( n C ) giving the percentage of the X-ray photon power converted to optical photon power. n C is considered a constant value for X-ray energies in the order of keV although a non-proportional behavior has been reported. In this work an analytical model, has been utilized to single crystals scintillators GSO:Ce, LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce to examine whether the intrinsic conversion efficiency shows non proportional behavior under X-ray excitation. DOG was theoretically calculated as a function of the incident X-ray spectrum, the X-ray absorption efficiency, the energy of the produced optical photons and the light transmission efficiency. The theoretical DOG values were compared with experimental data obtained by irradiating the crystals with X-rays at tube voltages from 50 to 140 kV and by measuring the light energy flux emitted from the irradiated screen. An initial value for n C (calculated from literature data) was assumed for the X-ray tube voltage of 50 kV. For higher X-ray tube voltages the optical photon propagation phenomena was assumed constant and any deviations between experimental and theoretical data were associated with changes in the intrinsic conversion efficiency. The experimental errors were below 7% for each experimental setup. The behavior of n C values for LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce were found very similar, i.e., ranging with values from 0.089 at 50 kV to 0.015 at 140 kV, while for GSO:Ce, n C demonstrated a peak at 80 kV.

  12. Evolution of disturbances in the shock layer on a flat plate in the flow of a mixture of vibrationally excited gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Poplavskaya, T. V.; Tsyryulnikov, I. S.; Maslov, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    The results of the numerical and experimental investigations of the evolution of the disturbances in a hypersonic shock layer on a flat plate streamlined by a flow of the mixture of vibrationally excited gases are presented. The experimental study was conducted in the hot-shot high-enthalpy wind tunnel IT-302 of the ITAM SB RAS. The numerical simulation was carried out with the aid of the ANSYS Fluent package using the solution of the unsteady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with the incorporation of the user-created modules and enabling the consideration of the vibrational non-equilibrium of the carbon dioxide molecules within the framework of the model of the two-temperature aerodynamics. It was obtained that an increase in the carbon dioxide concentration in the mixture with air leads to a reduction of the intensity of pressure disturbances on the surface. The efficiency (up to 20 %) of the method of sound absorbing coatings in the vibrationally excited flows of the mixture of the carbon dioxide and air has been shown.

  13. Response calculations based on an independent particle system with the exact one-particle density matrix: excitation energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbertz, K J H; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2012-03-07

    Adiabatic response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) suffers from the restriction to basically an occupied → virtual single excitation formulation. Adiabatic time-dependent density matrix functional theory allows to break away from this restriction. Problematic excitations for TDDFT, viz. bonding-antibonding, double, charge transfer, and higher excitations, are calculated along the bond-dissociation coordinate of the prototype molecules H(2) and HeH(+) using the recently developed adiabatic linear response phase-including (PI) natural orbital theory (PINO). The possibility to systematically increase the scope of the calculation from excitations out of (strongly) occupied into weakly occupied ("virtual") natural orbitals to larger ranges of excitations is explored. The quality of the PINO response calculations is already much improved over TDDFT even when the severest restriction is made, to virtually the size of the TDDFT diagonalization problem (only single excitation out of occupied orbitals plus all diagonal doubles). Further marked improvement is obtained with moderate extension to allow for excitation out of the lumo and lumo+1, which become fractionally occupied in particular at longer distances due to left-right correlation effects. In the second place the interpretation of density matrix response calculations is elucidated. The one-particle reduced density matrix response for an excitation is related to the transition density matrix to the corresponding excited state. The interpretation of the transition density matrix in terms of the familiar excitation character (single excitations, double excitations of various types, etc.) is detailed. The adiabatic PINO theory is shown to successfully resolve the problematic cases of adiabatic TDDFT when it uses a proper PI orbital functional such as the PILS functional. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  14. Reverse flow catalytic membrane reactors for energy efficient syngas production

    OpenAIRE

    Smit, Joris

    2006-01-01

    To improve the recuperative heat exchange, a Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactor (RFCMR) with porous membranes is proposed in this thesis, in which very efficient heat exchange between the feed and product streams is achieved by using the reverse flow concept (i.e. periodic alternation of the flow direction of the gas through a fixed catalyst bed).

  15. Energy flow and the “grassification” of desert shrublands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Julio L.

    2015-01-01

    In our directionally and continuously changing world, history still matters, and it does so in increasingly novel and important ways. Human adaptation to global change will rely heavily on robust baselines of historic environmental variability and detailed understanding of how both past and modern ecosystems have responded to both individual and multiple stressors. The question of global change has motivated an upsurge in paleoecological studies that span the late Quaternary and the modern era, and has inspired a growing consideration of time as a fundamental axis in ecology (1). A major challenge in developing pertinent ecological baselines remains how to fuse, into continuous time series, observations and experiments from living systems with paleoecological reconstructions from the same sites (2, 3). Tracing and disentangling complex responses to environmental stress from paleological to present-day communities is especially daunting; for example, how climate change; accelerated land use; and biological invasions are influencing the flows of water, nutrients, and energy. The paper by Terry and Rowe in PNAS (4) is a shining example of how modern ecology and paleoecology can be spliced together to decipher how ecological processes unfold over time scales inaccessible to direct observation or experimentation, and how they can be disrupted by human impacts.

  16. Design Flexibility of Redox Flow Systems. [for energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics inherent in Redox flow systems permit considerable latitude in designing systems for specific storage applications. The first of these characteristics is the absence of plating/deplating reactions with their attendant morphology changes at the electrodes. This permits a given Redox system to operate over a wide range of depths of discharge and charge/discharge rates. The second characteristic is the separation of power generating components (stacks) from the energy storage components (tanks). This results in cost effective system design, ease of system growth via modularization, and freedom from sizing restraints so that the whole spectrum of applications, from utilities down to single residence can be considered. The final characteristic is the commonality of the reactant fluids which assures that all cells at all times are receiving reactants at the same state of charge. Since no cell can be out of balance with respect to any other cell, it is possible for some cells to be charged while others are discharging, in effect creating a DC to DC transformer. It is also possible for various groups of cells to be connected to separate loads, thus supplying a range of output voltages. Also, trim cells can be used to maintain constant bus voltage as the load is changed or as the depth of discharge increases. The commonality of reactant fluids also permits any corrective measures such as rebalancing to occur at the system level instead of at the single cell level.

  17. Coupled cluster calculations of mean excitation energies of the noble gas atoms He, Ne and Ar and of the H2 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Haq, Inam U.; Sabin, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Using an asymmetric-Lanczos-chain algorithm for the calculation of the coupled cluster linear response functions at the CCSD and CC2 levels of approximation, we have calculated the mean excitation energies of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar, and of the hydrogen molecule H2. Convergence with respect...

  18. Excited state potential energy surfaces and their interactions in FeIV[double bond, length as m-dash]O active sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, S. D.; Solomon, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 47 (2014), s. 17567-17577 ISSN 1477-9226 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : excited state potential energy * chemical analysis * Frontier molecular orbitals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  19. The water-water cycle in leaves is not a major alternative electron sink for dissipation of excess excitation energy when CO2 assimilation is restricted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driever, S.M.; Baker, N.R.

    2011-01-01

    Electron flux from water via photosystem II (PSII) and PSI to oxygen (water–water cycle) may provide a mechanism for dissipation of excess excitation energy in leaves when CO2 assimilation is restricted. Mass spectrometry was used to measure O2 uptake and evolution together with CO2 uptake in leaves

  20. Measurements of energy distribution and wall temperature in flowing hydrogen microwave plasma systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into translational energy of the flowing gas is being investigated. A calorimetric experimental system has been designed and built enclosing the microwave plasma system to accurately determine the net energy transferred to the flowing gas. For a flow rate of 8900 micromoles/sec, a pressure of 7.4 torr, and an absorbed power level of 80 W, an energy transfer efficiency of 50 percent has been measured. A heat transfer model that characterizes the energy transfer processes in the plasma is developed. A wall temperature for the plasma system is calculated.

  1. Hybrid AC-DC microgrids with energy storages and progressive energy flow tuning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poh Chiang; Li, Ding; Chai, Yi Kang

    2012-01-01

    Modern distributed sources and loads can either be ac or dc. It is thus possible to have ac and dc sub-grids inter-tied to form hybrid microgrids with lesser power conversion and hence higher efficiency. However, operation of hybrid microgrids to gain these advantages is not trivial, and is so far...... limited. It is therefore the theme here to develop a control scheme for the hybrid microgrids so that they can operate efficiently with progressive energy flow tuning and no requirement for fast communication links. A plug-in scheme is also proposed for progressive and selective charging / discharging...... of storages, which are likely to be present in the hybrid microgrids for energy smoothing and ride-through purposes. The overall scheme has already been verified in experiment....

  2. Dynamical excitation in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledergerber, T.; Paltiel, Z.; Fraenkel, Z.; Pauli, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    The excitation mechanism of the fission process is studied in terms of a model of particles moving in a deformed time-dependent potential. A residual interaction of the pairing type is incoporated by means of the BCS approximation. Only 2-quasi-particle excitations up to some cutoff energy are included. The separation of the total excitation energy into intrinsic and translational parts is made at the scission point. The present calculations for 240 Pu show that, in the framework of this model, most of the available energy at scission is transformed into intrinsic excitation energy. However the convergence of the calculated value for the cutoff energy is unsatisfactory and hence a description in terms of a better model space is needed. The fact that very many channels are involved suggests that a statistical treatment may be useful. (author)

  3. A novel construction of complex-valued Gaussian processes with arbitrary spectral densities and its application to excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Cao, Jianshu; Silbey, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    The recent experimental discoveries about excitation energy transfer (EET) in light harvesting antenna (LHA) attract a lot of interest. As an open non-equilibrium quantum system, the EET demands more rigorous theoretical framework to understand the interaction between system and environment and therein the evolution of reduced density matrix. A phonon is often used to model the fluctuating environment and convolutes the reduced quantum system temporarily. In this paper, we propose a novel way to construct complex-valued Gaussian processes to describe thermal quantum phonon bath exactly by converting the convolution of influence functional into the time correlation of complex Gaussian random field. Based on the construction, we propose a rigorous and efficient computational method, the covariance decomposition and conditional propagation scheme, to simulate the temporarily entangled reduced system. The new method allows us to study the non-Markovian effect without perturbation under the influence of different spectral densities of the linear system-phonon coupling coefficients. Its application in the study of EET in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson model Hamiltonian under four different spectral densities is discussed. Since the scaling of our algorithm is linear due to its Monte Carlo nature, the future application of the method for large LHA systems is attractive. In addition, this method can be used to study the effect of correlated initial condition on the reduced dynamics in the future.

  4. Effect of neutron irradiation on the density of low-energy excitations in vitreous silica. [Neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Terry Lee [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Systematic low-temperature measurements of the thermal conductivity, specific heat, dielectric constant, and temperature-dependent ultrasound velocity were made on a single piece of vitreous silica. These measurements were repeated after fast neutron irradiation of the material. It was found that the irradiation produced changes of the same relative magnitude in the low-temperature excess specific heat Cex, the thermal conductivity κ the anomalous temperature dependence of the ultrasound velocity Δv/v. A corresponding change in the temperature dependent dielectric constant was not observed. It is therefore likely that kappa and Δv/v are determined by the same localized excitations responsible for Cex, but the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant may have a different, though possibly related, origin. A consistent account for the measured Cex, κ, and Δv/v of unirradiated silica is given by the tunneling-state model with a single, energy-dependent density of states. Changes in these three properties due to irradiation can be explained by altering only the density of tunneling states incorporated in the model.

  5. A new analysis procedure to extract fusion excitation function with large beam energy dispersions: application to the 6Li+120Sn and 7Li+119Sn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pietro Alessia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper it is described an analysis procedure suited for experiments where cross-sections strongly varying with energy are measured using beams having large energy dispersion. These cross-sections are typically the sub-barrier fusion excitation function of reactions induced by radioactive beams. The large beam energy dispersion, typical of these experiments, can lead to ambiguities in the association of the effective beam energy to the reaction product yields and consequently to an error in the determination of the excitation function. As a test case, the approach is applied to the experiments 6Li+120Sn and 7Li+119Sn measured in the energy range 14 MeV ≤ Ec.m. ≤28 MeV. The complete fusion cross sections are deduced from activation measurements using the stacked target technique. The results of these experiments, that employ the two weakly-bound stable Li isotopes, show that the complete fusion cross sections above the barrier are suppressed of about 70% and 85% with respect to the Universal Fusion Function, used as a standard reference, in the 6Li and 7Li induced reactions respectively. Moreover, the excitation functions of the two systems at energies below the barrier, do not show significant differences, despite the two systems have different n-transfer Qvalue.

  6. Excitation energy transfer from the bacteriochlorophyll Soret band to carotenoids in the LH2 light-harvesting complex from Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila is negligible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razjivin, A P; Lukashev, E P; Kompanets, V O; Kozlovsky, V S; Ashikhmin, A A; Chekalin, S V; Moskalenko, A A; Paschenko, V Z

    2017-09-01

    Pathways of intramolecular conversion and intermolecular electronic excitation energy transfer (EET) in the photosynthetic apparatus of purple bacteria remain subject to debate. Here we experimentally tested the possibility of EET from the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) Soret band to the singlet S 2 level of carotenoids using femtosecond pump-probe measurements and steady-state fluorescence excitation and absorption measurements in the near-ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges. The efficiency of EET from the Soret band of BChl to S 2 of the carotenoids in light-harvesting complex LH2 from the purple bacterium Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila appeared not to exceed a few percent.

  7. Coupling nutrient uptake and energy flow in headwater streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Fellows, Christine [Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia; Valett, H. Maurice [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dahm, Cliff [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Thomas, Steve [University of Nebraska

    2006-08-01

    Nutrient cycling and energy flow in ecosystems are tightly linked through the metabolic processes of organisms. Greater uptake of inorganic nutrients is expected to be associated with higher rates of metabolism [gross primary production (GPP) and respiration (R)], due to assimilatory demand of both autotrophs and heterotrophs. However, relationships between uptake and metabolism should vary with the relative contribution of autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter. To investigate the relationship between metabolism and nutrient uptake, we used whole-stream and benthic chamber methods to measure rates of nitrate-nitrogen (NO{sub 3}-N) uptake and metabolism in four headwater streams chosen to span a range of light availability and therefore differing rates of GPP and contributions of autochthonous carbon. We coupled whole-stream metabolism with measures of NO{sub 3}-N uptake conducted repeatedly over the same stream reach during both day and night, as well as incubating benthic sediments under both light and dark conditions. NO{sub 3}-N uptake was generally greater in daylight compared to dark conditions, and although day-night differences in whole-stream uptake were not significant, light-dark differences in benthic chambers were significant at three of the four sites. Estimates of N demand indicated that assimilation by photoautotrophs could account for the majority of NO{sub 3}-N uptake at the two sites with relatively open canopies. Contrary to expectations, photoautotrophs contributed substantially to NO{sub 3}-N uptake even at the two closed-canopy sites, which had low values of GPP/R and relied heavily on allochthonous carbon to fuel R.

  8. Is the Bethe–Salpeter Formalism Accurate for Excitation Energies? Comparisons with TD-DFT, CASPT2, and EOM-CCSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Developing ab initio approaches able to provide accurate excited-state energies at a reasonable computational cost is one of the biggest challenges in theoretical chemistry. In that framework, the Bethe–Salpeter equation approach, combined with the GW exchange-correlation self-energy, which maintains the same scaling with system size as TD-DFT, has recently been the focus of a rapidly increasing number of applications in molecular chemistry. Using a recently proposed set encompassing excitation energies of many kinds [J. Phys. Chem. Lett.2016, 7, 586–591], we investigate here the performances of BSE/GW. We compare these results to CASPT2, EOM-CCSD, and TD-DFT data and show that BSE/GW provides an accuracy comparable to the two wave function methods. It is particularly remarkable that the BSE/GW is equally efficient for valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer excitations. In contrast, it provides a poor description of triplet excited states, for which EOM-CCSD and CASPT2 clearly outperform BSE/GW. This contribution therefore supports the use of the Bethe–Salpeter approach for spin-conserving transitions. PMID:28301726

  9. Strategies to enhance the excitation energy-transfer efficiency in a light-harvesting system using the intra-molecular charge transfer character of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihira, Nao [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Sugai, Yuko [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Fujiwara, Masazumi [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Kosumi, Daisuke [Institute of Pulsed Power Science; Kumamoto University; Kumamoto; Japan; Iha, Masahiko [South Product Co. Ltd.; Uruma-shi; Japan; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry; Graduate School of Science; Osaka City University; Osaka 558-8585; Japan; Katsumura, Shigeo [Department of Chemistry; Graduate School of Science; Osaka City University; Osaka 558-8585; Japan; Gardiner, Alastair T. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre; University of Glasgow; 126 University Place; Glasgow, G12 8QQ; UK; Cogdell, Richard J. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre; University of Glasgow; 126 University Place; Glasgow, G12 8QQ; UK; Hashimoto, Hideki [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan

    2017-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is a carotenoid that is mainly found in light-harvesting complexes from brown algae and diatoms. Due to the presence of a carbonyl group attached to polyene chains in polar environments, excitation produces an excited intra-molecular charge transfer. This intra-molecular charge transfer state plays a key role in the highly efficient (~95%) energy-transfer from fucoxanthin to chlorophyllain the light-harvesting complexes from brown algae. In purple bacterial light-harvesting systems the efficiency of excitation energy-transfer from carotenoids to bacteriochlorophylls depends on the extent of conjugation of the carotenoids. In this study we were successful, for the first time, in incorporating fucoxanthin into a light-harvesting complex 1 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium,Rhodospirillum rubrumG9+ (a carotenoidless strain). Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy was applied to this reconstituted light-harvesting complex in order to determine the efficiency of excitation energy-transfer from fucoxanthin to bacteriochlorophyllawhen they are bound to the light-harvesting 1 apo-proteins.

  10. Effect of local energy supply to a hypersonic flow on the drag of bodies with different nose bluntness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzov, V.Yu.; Rybka, I.V.; Yur'ev, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    Parameters of the axisymmetric flow around bodies with different bluntness are compared in the case of constant energy supply to the main hypersonic flow. Flow structures, drag coefficients, and expenditure of energy on overcoming drag are analyzed with the effect of thermal energy on the flow taken into account for different bodies with equal volume

  11. Observation of an energy threshold for large ΔE collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine (Evib=31 000-41 000 cm-1) by CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elioff, Michael S.; Wall, Mark C.; Lemoff, Andrew S.; Mullin, Amy S.

    1999-03-01

    Energy dependent studies of the collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine through collisions with CO2 were performed for initial pyrazine energies Evib=31 000-35 000 cm-1. These studies are presented along with earlier results for pyrazine with Evib=36 000-41 000 cm-1. High-resolution transient IR laser absorption of individual CO2 (0000) rotational states (J=56-80) was used to investigate the magnitude and partitioning of energy gain into CO2 rotation and translation, which comprises the high energy tail of the energy transfer distribution function. Highly vibrationally excited pyrazine was prepared by absorption of pulsed UV light at seven wavelengths in the range λ=281-324 nm, followed by radiationless decay to pyrazine's ground electronic state. Nascent CO2 (0000) rotational populations were measured for each UV excitation wavelength and distributions of nascent recoil velocities for individual rotational states of CO2 (0000) were obtained from Doppler-broadened transient linewidth measurements. Measurements of energy transfer rate constants at each UV wavelength yield energy-dependent probabilities for collisions involving large ΔE values. These results reveal that the magnitude of large ΔE collisional energy gain in CO2 (0000) is fairly insensitive to the amount of vibrational energy in pyrazine for Evib=31 000-35 000 cm-1. A comparison with earlier studies on pyrazine with Evib=36 000-41 000 cm-1 indicates that the V→RT energy transfer increases both in magnitude and probability for Evib>36 000 cm-1. Implications of incomplete intramolecular vibrational relaxation, electronic state coupling, and isomerization barriers are discussed in light of these results.

  12. Excitation relaxation dynamics and energy transfer in fucoxanthin-chlorophyll a/c-protein complexes, probed by time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Seiji; Teshigahara, Ayaka; Yokono, Makio; Mimuro, Mamoru; Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya

    2014-09-01

    In algae, light-harvesting complexes contain specific chlorophylls (Chls) and keto-carotenoids; Chl a, Chl c, and fucoxanthin (Fx) in diatoms and brown algae; Chl a, Chl c, and peridinin in photosynthetic dinoflagellates; and Chl a, Chl b, and siphonaxanthin in green algae. The Fx-Chl a/c-protein (FCP) complex from the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis contains Chl c1, Chl c2, and the keto-carotenoid, Fx, as antenna pigments, in addition to Chl a. In the present study, we investigated energy transfer in the FCP complex associated with photosystem II (FCPII) of C. gracilis. For these investigations, we analyzed time-resolved fluorescence spectra, fluorescence rise and decay curves, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data. Chl a exhibited different energy forms with fluorescence peaks ranging from 677 nm to 688 nm. Fx transferred excitation energy to lower-energy Chl a with a time constant of 300fs. Chl c transferred excitation energy to Chl a with time constants of 500-600fs (intra-complex transfer), 600-700fs (intra-complex transfer), and 4-6ps (inter-complex transfer). The latter process made a greater contribution to total Chl c-to-Chl a transfer in intact cells of C. gracilis than in the isolated FCPII complexes. The lower-energy Chl a received excitation energy from Fx and transferred the energy to higher-energy Chl a. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. High-energy double photoeffect and photoionization with excitation from 2 {sup 1}S and 2 {sup 3}S states of helium-like ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Ya. [The Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); A F Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194921 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mikhailov, A.I.; Mikhailov, I.A. [St Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, 188350 St Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1999-10-28

    Double ionization and ionization with excitation of helium-like ions with Z>>1 from 2 {sup 1}S and 2 {sup 3}S states on the absorption of a high-frequency photon have been considered. The analytical calculation is performed in the non-relativistic photon energy range in the lowest order of perturbation theory in the inter-electron interaction. Coulomb wavefunctions and the Coulomb Green function are used as a zeroth-order approximation. Differential and total cross sections of the processes are expressed via the corresponding values for the single photoionization. The photoelectron energy spectrum is obtained in the marginal energy range (i.e. for p{sub 1}>>p{sub 2}, p{sub 1} and p{sub 2} momenta of photoelectrons) for the double-ionization process. Simple relations between the cross sections of double ionization and ionization with excitation are derived. (author)

  14. Reverse flow catalytic membrane reactors for energy efficient syngas production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Joris

    2006-01-01

    To improve the recuperative heat exchange, a Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactor (RFCMR) with porous membranes is proposed in this thesis, in which very efficient heat exchange between the feed and product streams is achieved by using the reverse flow concept (i.e. periodic alternation of the

  15. Study of low-energy magnetic excitations in single-crystalline CeIn sub 3 by inelastic neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Knafo, W; Fak, B; Lapertot, G; Canfield, P C; Flouquet, J

    2003-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments were performed on single crystals of the heavy-fermion compound CeIn sub 3 for temperatures below and above the Neel temperature, T sub N. In the antiferromagnetically ordered phase, well-defined spin-wave excitations with a bandwidth of 2 meV are observed. The spin waves coexist with quasielastic (QE) Kondo-type spin fluctuations and broadened crystal-field (CF) excitations below T sub N. Above T sub N , only the QE and CF excitations persist, with a weak temperature dependence.

  16. Using Sankey diagrams to map energy flow from primary fuel to end use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanyam, Veena; Paramshivan, Deepak; Kumar, Amit; Mondal, Md. Alam Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy flows from both supply and demand sides shown through Sankey diagrams. • Energy flows from reserves to energy end uses for primary and secondary fuels shown. • Five main energy demand sectors in Alberta are analyzed. • In residential/commercial sectors, highest energy consumption is in space heating. • In the industrial sector, highest energy use is in the mining subsector. - Abstract: The energy sector is the largest contributor to gross domestic product (GDP), income, employment, and government revenue in both developing and developed nations. But the energy sector has a significant environmental footprint due to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Efficient production, conversion, and use of energy resources are key factors for reducing the environmental footprint. Hence it is necessary to understand energy flows from both the supply and the demand sides. Most energy analyses focus on improving energy efficiency broadly without considering the aggregate energy flow. We developed Sankey diagrams that map energy flow for both the demand and supply sides for the province of Alberta, Canada. The diagrams will help policy/decision makers, researchers, and others to understand energy flow from reserves through to final energy end uses for primary and secondary fuels in the five main energy demand sectors in Alberta: residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation. The Sankey diagrams created for this study show total energy consumption, useful energy, and energy intensities of various end-use devices. The Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) model is used in this study. The model showed that Alberta’s total input energy in the five demand sectors was 189 PJ, 186 PJ, 828.5PJ, 398 PJ, and 50.83 PJ, respectively. On the supply side, the total energy input and output were found to be 644.84 PJ and 239 PJ, respectively. These results, along with the associated energy flows were depicted pictorially using

  17. Reversible inactivation and excitation of nucleus raphe magnus can modulate tail blood flow of male Wistar rats in response to hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakouti, Seyed Mansour; Kourosh Arami, Masoomeh; Sarihi, Abdorahman; Hajizadeh, Sohrab; Behzadi, Gila; Shahidi, Siamak; Komaki, Alireza; Heshmatian, Behnam; Vahabian, Mehrangiz

    2008-10-01

    The nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) is involved in thermoregulatory processing. There is a correlation between changes in the firing rates of the cells in the NRM and the application of the peripheral thermal stimulus. we examined the effect of reversible inactivation and excitation of NRM on mechanisms involved in tail blood flow (TBF) regulation in hypothermia. Hypothermia was induced in Male Wistar rats and cannula was implanted above the NRM. To evaluate the effect of nucleus inactivation on TBF, the amount of TBF was measured by Laser Doppler in hypothermic rats, before and after lidocaine microinjection into NRM. TBF was also measured after glutamate microinjection to assess the effect of nucleus excitation in hypothermic rats. Results indicated that after dropping TBF by hypothermia, microinjection of lidocaine into NRM significantly decreased TBF from 54.43 +- 5.7 to 46.81 +- 3.4, whereas glutamate microinjection caused a significant increase from 44.194 +- 0.6 to 98 +- 10.0 CONCLUSION: These data suggest that NRM have thermoregulatory effect in response to hypothermia.

  18. Why do TD-DFT excitation energies of BODIPY/Aza-BODIPY families largely deviate from experiment? Answers from electron correlated and multireference methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Mohammad R; Brown, Alex

    2015-06-09

    The vertical excitation energies of 17 boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) core structures with a variety of substituents and ring sizes are benchmarked using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) with nine different functionals combined with the cc-pVTZ basis set. When compared to experimental measurements, all functionals provide mean absolute errors (mean AEs) greater than 0.3 eV, larger than the 0.1-0.3 eV differences typically expected from TD-DFT. Due to the high linear correlation of TD-DFT results with experiment, most functionals can be used to predict excitation energies if corrected empirically. Using the CAM-B3LYP functional, 0-0 transition energies are determined, and while the absolute difference is improved (mean AE = 0.478 eV compared to 0.579 eV), the correlation diminishes substantially (R(2) = 0.961 to 0.862). Two very recently introduced charge transfer (CT) indices, q(CT) and d(CT), and electron density difference (EDD) plots demonstrate that CT does not play a significant role for most of the BODIPYs examined and, thus, cannot be the source of error in TD-DFT. To assess TD-DFT methods, vertical excitation energies are determined utilizing TD-HF, configuration interaction CIS and CIS(D), equation of motion EOM-CCSD, SAC-CI, and Laplace-transform based local coupled-cluster singles and approximate doubles LCC2* methods. Moreover, multireference CASSCF and CASPT2 vertical excitation energies were also obtained for all species (except CASPT2 was not feasible for the four largest systems). The SAC-CI/cc-pVDZ, LCC2*/cc-pVDZ, and CASPT2/cc-pVDZ approaches are shown to have the smallest mean AEs of 0.154, 0.109, and 0.100 eV, respectively; the utility of the LCC2* approach is demonstrated for eight extended BODIPYs and aza-BODIPYs. We found that the problems with TD-DFT arise from difficulties in dealing with the differential electron correlation (as assessed by comparing CCS, CC2, LR-CCSD, CCSDR(T), and CCSDR(3) vertical excitation energies for

  19. Extracting the cross section angular distributions for 15C high-energy resonance excited via the (18O,16O two-neutron transfer reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbone D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 13C(18O,16O15C reaction has been studied at 84 MeV incident energy. The ejectiles have been momentum analized by the MAGNEX spectrometer and 15C excitation energy spectra have been obtained up to about 20 MeV. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a bump has been observed at 13.7 MeV. The extracted cross section angular distribution for this structure, obtained by using different models for background, displays a clear oscillating pattern, typical of resonant state of the residual nucleus.

  20. Low-energy electron-impact excitation of the 3,1A2(n→π*) states of formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Q.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.; Germano, J.S.E.; Lima, M.A.P.

    1992-01-01

    A three-state calculation of electron-impact excitation of formaldehyde to the a 3 A 2 and A 1 A 2 states is carried out using the Schwinger multichannel variational method. The integral and differential cross sections so obtained agree fairly well with theoretical results obtained using the complex Kohn method. Though agreement between the calculated integral cross section and the single available experimental measurement is qualitative, similar conclusions regarding the excitation mechanism are reached. A generalization of the selection rule for (Σ + ↔Σ - ) electron-impact excitation of diatomic molecules is used to explain the shape of the differential cross sections for the a 3 A 2 and A 1 A 2 excitations

  1. Symposium on Flow-Induced Vibrations Held in New Orleans, Louisiana on 9-14 December 1984. Volume 1. Excitation and Vibration of Bluff Bodies in Cross Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-14

    F.J. Fischer, W.T. Jones and R. King, "Current-induced Oscillations of Cognac Piles During Installa- tion," in Practical Experiences with Flow...Cable Suspended and Cantilevered Piles for the Cognac Platform," BHRA Fluid Engineering Report RR 1453, January 1978. 28. T. Overvik, "Hydroelastic Motion

  2. Suppression of chaos via control of energy flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shengli Guo

    2018-02-19

    Feb 19, 2018 ... Abstract. Continuous energy supply is critical and important to support oscillating behaviour; otherwise, the oscil- lator will die. For nonlinear and chaotic circuits, enough energy supply is also important to keep electric devices working. In this paper, Hamilton energy is calculated for dimensionless ...

  3. Free electrons and ionic liquids: study of excited states by means of electron-energy loss spectroscopy and the density functional theory multireference configuration interaction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan; Allan, Michael

    2015-06-28

    The technique of low energy (0-30 eV) electron impact spectroscopy, originally developed for gas phase molecules, is applied to room temperature ionic liquids (IL). Electron energy loss (EEL) spectra recorded near threshold, by collecting 0-2 eV electrons, are largely continuous, assigned to excitation of a quasi-continuum of high overtones and combination vibrations of low-frequency modes. EEL spectra recorded by collecting 10 eV electrons show predominantly discrete vibrational and electronic bands. The vibrational energy-loss spectra correspond well to IR spectra except for a broadening (∼0.04 eV) caused by the liquid surroundings, and enhanced overtone activity indicating a contribution from resonant excitation mechanism. The spectra of four representative ILs were recorded in the energy range of electronic excitations and compared to density functional theory multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations, with good agreement. The spectra up to about 8 eV are dominated by π-π* transitions of the aromatic cations. The lowest bands were identified as triplet states. The spectral region 2-8 eV was empty in the case of a cation without π orbitals. The EEL spectrum of a saturated solution of methylene green in an IL band showed the methylene green EEL band at 2 eV, indicating that ILs may be used as a host to study nonvolatile compounds by this technique in the future.

  4. Suppression of chaos via control of energy flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shengli; Ma, Jun; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2018-03-01

    Continuous energy supply is critical and important to support oscillating behaviour; otherwise, the oscillator will die. For nonlinear and chaotic circuits, enough energy supply is also important to keep electric devices working. In this paper, Hamilton energy is calculated for dimensionless dynamical system (e.g., the chaotic Lorenz system) using Helmholtz's theorem. The Hamilton energy is considered as a new variable and then the dynamical system is controlled by using the scheme of energy feedback. It is found that chaos can be suppressed even when intermittent feedback scheme is applied. This scheme is effective to control chaos and to stabilise other dynamical systems.

  5. Wave energy flow conservation for propagation in inhomogeneous Vlasov-Maxwell equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kull, H.J.; Berk, H.L.; Morrison, P.J.

    1988-02-01

    Wave energy flow conservation is demonstrated for Hermitian differential operators that arise in the Vlasov-Maxwell theory for propagation perpendicular to a magnetic field. The energy flow can be related to the bilinear concomitant, for a solution and its complex conjugate, by using the Lagrange identity of the operator. This bilinear form obeys a conservation law and is shown to describe the usual WKB energy flow for asymptotically homogeneous regions. The additivity and uniqueness of the energy flow expression is discussed for a general superposition of waves with real and complex wave numbers. Furthermore, a global energy conservation theorem is demonstrated for an inhomogeneity in one-dimension and generalized reflection and transmission coefficients are thereby obtained. 9 refs

  6. Elliptic flow in a hadron-string cascade model at 130 GeV energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    On the other hand, this model does not explain 2 at high T or in peripheral collisions and thus generally, it underestimates the elliptic flow at RHIC energy. ... Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan; Nuclear Data Center, Department of Nuclear Energy System, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, ...

  7. Excitation function studies for deep inelastic processes in 19 F + 27 Al collision in the energy interval (113.5 - 130) MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berceanu, I.; Andronic, A.; Duma, A.; Moisa, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pop, A.; Simion, V.; Del Zoppo, A.; Imme, G.; Lanzano, G.; Pagano, A.; Raciti, G.; D'Erasmo, G.; Pantaleo, A.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental evidence of fluctuation in the excitation function of dissipative heavy ion collision offered a new method to investigate the time evolution of the di-nuclear system (DNS), formed in the first stage of the collision, based on statistical analysis. The study of the excitation function for 19 F + 27 Al in the energy interval E lab = (113.5 - 130) MeV has been performed to complete the information about time evolution of this system obtained from previous measurements. The experiment was performed at the SMP Tandem accelerator from LNS-Catania. The outgoing fragments were detected using experimental device DRACULA having as main components two large area position sensitive ionization chambers. The used experimental arrangement allowed the study of the dependence of the energy coherence width, Γ, of this α-nonconjugate DNS as a function of Z, θ cm and total energy loss (TKEL), in contrast with previous works in this domain which studied the dependence of Γ as a function of the first two variables, integrating on TKEL. In this work we present the results relative to the excitation functions versus six windows depending on Z, θ cm and TKEL. The Γ values can be considered as grouped around the average Γ bar (calculated by energy autocorrelation function method (EAF)) which equals (170 ± 65) keV. The corresponding lifetime of DNS, τ EAF = (3.9 ± 1.1) · 10 -21 s. The experimental period agrees with the calculated one, considering deformed outgoing fragments. Experimental evidences from the present work support the idea of a reaction mechanism involving the excitation of the DNS in intermediate states of molecular origin

  8. Collision geometry dependence of the thermal excitation-energy deposition in 8-15 GeV/c hadron-Au reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltz, R; Newby, R J; Klay, J; Heffner, M; Beaulieu, L; Lefort, T; Kwiatkowski, K; Viola, V E

    2008-05-08

    The mean number of primary hadron-nucleon scatterings (<{nu}>) and mean impact parameter () are extracted from the distribution of fast protons in 14.6 GeV p-Au and 8.0 GeV {pi}-Au and {bar p}-Au collisions. The mean excitation energy per residue nucleon (E*/A) and fast and thermal light particle multiplicities are studied as a function of collision geometry.

  9. Generalized Energy Flow Analysis Considering Electricity Gas and Heat Subsystems in Local-Area Energy Systems Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Shi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To alleviate environmental pollution and improve the efficient use of energy, energy systems integration (ESI—covering electric power systems, heat systems and natural gas systems—has become an important trend in energy utilization. The traditional power flow calculation method, with the object as the power system, will prove difficult in meeting the requirements of the coupled energy flow analysis. This paper proposes a generalized energy flow (GEF analysis method which is suitable for an ESI containing electricity, heat and gas subsystems. First, the models of electricity, heat, and natural gas networks in the ESI are established. In view of the complexity of the conventional method to solve the gas network including the compressor, an improved practical equivalent method was adopted based on different control modes. On this basis, a hybrid method combining homotopy and the Newton-Raphson algorithm was executed to compute the nonlinear equations of GEF, and the Jacobi matrix reflecting the coupling relationship of multi-energy was derived considering the grid connected mode and island modes of the power system in the ESI. Finally, the validity of the proposed method in multi-energy flow calculation and the analysis of interacting characteristics was verified using practical cases.

  10. Suppression of chaos via control of energy flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shengli Guo

    2018-02-19

    Feb 19, 2018 ... working. In this paper, Hamilton energy is calculated for dimensionless dynamical system (e.g., the chaotic Lorenz system) using Helmholtz's theorem. The Hamilton energy is considered as a new variable ... the mechanism may be the memory effect associated with memristor [21,22]. The chaotic oscillator ...

  11. Energy and materials flows in the iron and steel industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparrow, F.T.

    1983-06-01

    Past energy-consumption trends and future energy-conservation opportunities are investigated for the nation's iron and steel industry. It is estimated that, in 1980, the industry directly consumed approximately 2.46 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy (roughly 3% of total US energy consumption) to produce 111 million tons of raw steel and to ship 84 million tons of steel products. Direct plus indirect consumption is estimated to be about 3.1 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. Of the set of conservation technologies identified, most are judged to be ready for commercialization if and when the industry's capital formation and profitability problems are solved and the gradual predicted increase in energy prices reduces the payback periods to acceptable levels.

  12. Energy-based upscaling of immiscible two-phase flow in porous media: flow regimes and applicability conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchi, Davide; Battiato, Ilenia

    2017-11-01

    Empirical or theoretical extensions of Darcy's law for immiscible two-phase flow have shown significant limitations in properly modelling the flow at the continuum-scale. We tackle this problem by proposing a set of upscaled equations based on pore-scale flow regimes, i.e., the topology of flowing phases. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is upscaled by means of multi-scale expansions and its closures derived from the mechanical energy balance for different flow regimes at the pore-scale. We also derive the applicability conditions of the upscaled equations based on the order of magnitude of relevant dimensionless numbers, i.e., Eotvos, Reynolds, Capillary, Froude numbers, and the viscosity and density ratio of the system. We demonstrate that the classical two-phase Darcy law is recovered for a limited range of operative conditions and it is compatible only with the connected-pathway flow regime, while additional terms accounting for interfacial and wall interactions should be incorporated to model accurately ganglia or drop traffic flow.

  13. Influence of the nuclear symmetry energy on the collective flows of charged pions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Yong, Gao-Chan; Zhang, Lei; Zuo, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Based on the isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (IBUU) transport model, we studied charged pion transverse and elliptic flows in semicentral 197Au+197Au collisions at 600 MeV/nucleon. It is found that π+-π- differential transverse flow and the difference of π+ and π- transverse flows almost show no effects of the symmetry energy. Their corresponding elliptic flows are largely affected by the symmetry energy, especially at high transverse momenta. The isospin-dependent pion elliptic flow at high transverse momenta thus provides a promising way to probe the high-density behavior of the symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt or at the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) at HIRFL, Lanzhou.

  14. Brain energy metabolism and blood flow differences in healthy aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) are important indices of healthy aging of the brain. Although a frequent topic of study, changes of CBF and CMRO(2) during normal aging are still controversial, as some authors...

  15. Energy efficient SDN commodity switch based practical flow forwarding method

    KAUST Repository

    AlGhadhban, Amer

    2016-07-04

    Recent SDN researches suffer from over-accumulation of unhealthy flow-load. Instead, we leverage the SDN controller network view to encode the end-to-end path information into the packet address. Our solution EncPath significantly reduces the flow-table size and the number of control messages. Consequently, the power consumption of network switches is in orders of magnitude less than other evaluated solutions. It also provides flow management flexibility and scalability. We compare EncPath with single and multipath routing solutions and single path solution. Also, we operated them in proactive and reactive modes. We find that EncPath flow entries in core switches in a multihomed fat-tree with 144 hosts is approximately 1000 times smaller than Equal-Cost MultiPath (ECMP) and random routing. Additionally, the number of control messages to setup the network is reduced by a factor of 200×. This, consequently, affords data-plane and control-plane devices space to process other tasks. © 2016 IEEE.

  16. Excitation functions of natZn(p,x) nuclear reactions with proton beam energy below 18 MeV

    OpenAIRE

    Asad, A. H.; Chan, S.; Morandeau, L.; Cryer, D.; Smith, S. V.; Price, R. I.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We measured the excitation functions of natZn (p,x) reactions up to 17.6 MeV using the stacked-foils activation technique. High-purity natural zinc (and copper) foils were irradiated with proton beams from an 18MeV medical cyclotron, the predominant purpose of which is to provide a routine regional service for clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals. Thick-target integral yields were also deduced from the measured excitation functions of the produced radioisotopes. These results we...

  17. Concepts for dynamic modelling of energy-related flows in manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.J.; Oates, M.R.; Greenough, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Modelling of the thermal flows in factories and processes is usually separate. ► We propose a set of key features for an integrated thermal model. ► Such models can be used to improve the efficiency of manufacturing processes. - Abstract: Industry uses around one third of the world’s energy, and accounts for about 40% of global carbon dioxide emissions. There is increasing economic and social pressure to improve efficiency and create closed-loop industrial systems, in which energy efficiency plays a key role. This paper describes some of the key concepts involved in modelling the energy flows in manufacturing, both for the building services and the industrial processes. Detailed dynamic energy simulation of buildings is well established and routinely used, working on a time series basis – but current tools are inadequate to model the energy flows of many industrial processes. There are also well-established models of manufacturing flows, used to optimise production efficiency, but typically not modelling energy, and usually representing production and material flows as event-driven processes. The THERM project has developed new software tools to model energy-related and other utility flows in manufacturing, incorporating these into existing thermal models of factory buildings. This makes it possible to map out the whole energy system, and hence to test efficiency measures, to understand the effect of processes on building energy use, to investigate recycling of heat or cooling into other processes or building conditioning, and so on. The paper describes some of the key concepts and modelling approaches involved in developing these models, and gives examples of some real processes modelled in factories. It concludes that such models are entirely feasible and potentially very useful, although to develop a tool which comprehensively models both energy and manufacturing flows would be a major undertaking

  18. An Axisymmetric Hydrodynamical Model for the Torus Wind in AGN. 2; X-ray Excited Funnel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.; Proga, D.

    2008-01-01

    We have calculated a series of models of outflows from the obscuring torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling assumes that the inner face of a rotationally supported torus is illuminated and heated by the intense X-rays from the inner accretion disk and black hole. As a result of such heating a strong biconical outflow is observed in our simulations. We calculate 3-dimensional hydrodynamical models, assuming axial symmetry, and including the effects of X-ray heating, ionization, and radiation pressure. We discuss the behavior of a large family of these models, their velocity fields, mass fluxes and temperature, as functions of the torus properties and X-ray flux. Synthetic warm absorber spectra are calculated, assuming pure absorption, for sample models at various inclination angles and observing times. We show that these models have mass fluxes and flow speeds which are comparable to those which have been inferred from observations of Seyfert 1 warm absorbers, and that they can produce rich absorption line spectra.

  19. Transverse and radial flow in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestfall, D. Gary

    1997-01-01

    We have studied transverse and radial flow in nucleus-nucleus collisions ranging in energy from 15 to 155 MeV/nucleon. We have measured the impact parameter dependence of the balance energy for Ar + Sc and compared the results with Quantum Molecular Dynamics calculations with and without momentum dependence. We have shown that transverse flow and the balance energy dependence on the isospin of the system using the systems 58 Fe + 58 Fe, 58 Ni + 58 Ni, and 58 Mn + 58 Fe. These results are compared with Boltzmann-Uehling-Uehlenbeck calculations incorporating isospin-dependence. We have measured radial flow for Ar + Sc and find that about 50% of the observed energy is related to radial flow. (author)

  20. New Alkali Metal Flow Battery for Terrestrial and Aerospace Energy Storage Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This seedling task is to develop new lithium-based flow batteries that will provide several fold improvements in specific energy, cost, simplicity and lifetimes,...