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Sample records for excessive cardiac insulin

  1. Cardiac Insulin Resistance and MicroRNA Modulators

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    Lakshmi Pulakat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac insulin resistance is a metabolic and functional disorder that is often associated with obesity and/or the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS, and this disorder may be accentuated by chronic alcohol consumption. In conditions of over-nutrition, increased insulin (INS and angiotensin II (Ang II activate mammalian target for rapamycin (mTOR/p70 S6 kinase (S6K1 signaling, whereas chronic alcohol consumption inhibits mTOR/S6K1 activation in cardiac tissue. Although excessive activation of mTOR/S6K1 induces cardiac INS resistance via serine phosphorylation of INS receptor substrates (IRS-1/2, it also renders cardioprotection via increased Ang II receptor 2 (AT2R upregulation and adaptive hypertrophy. In the INS-resistant and hyperinsulinemic Zucker obese (ZO rat, a rodent model for CRS, activation of mTOR/S6K1signaling in cardiac tissue is regulated by protective feed-back mechanisms involving mTOR↔AT2R signaling loop and profile changes of microRNA that target S6K1. Such regulation may play a role in attenuating progressive heart failure. Conversely, alcohol-mediated inhibition of mTOR/S6K1, down-regulation of INS receptor and growth-inhibitory mir-200 family, and upregulation of mir-212 that promotes fetal gene program may exacerbate CRS-related cardiomyopathy.

  2. Cardiac dysfunction induced by high-fat diet is associated with altered myocardial insulin signalling in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwens, D.M.; de Boer, C.; Fodor, M.; Galan, P.; Heine, R.J.; Maassen, J.A.; Diamant, M.

    2005-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is common in type 2 diabetes. In DCM, insulin resistance may alter cardiac substrate supply and utilisation leading to changes in myocardial metabolism and cardiac function. In rats, exposure to excessive alimentary fat, inducing a type 2 diabetic

  3. Intensive insulin therapy to maintain normoglycemia after cardiac surgery.

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    Van den Berghe, G

    2011-01-01

    Drugs used in the perioperative period could have an effect on survival as recently pointed out by an international consensus conference on the reduction in mortality in cardiac anesthesia and intensive care. Insulin infusion to achieve a strict glycemic control is the best example of how an ancillary (i.e. non-surgical) drug/technique/strategy might influence survival rates in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The author of this "expert opinion" presents her insights into the use of insulin in this setting and suggest that based on available evidence based medicine, insulin infusion, titrated to "normoglycemia" is a complex intervention, that not only requires the simple administration of a "drug", the hormone insulin, but also needs tools and skills to accurately measure and control blood glucose to achieve normoglycemia while avoiding hypoglycemia and large glucose fluctuations.

  4. [Cardiac performance during insulin clamp: its evaluation by bioimpedance measurement].

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    Ferraro, S; Bellarosa, I; Genovese, S; Desiderio, A; D'Alto, M; Trimigliozzi, P; Chiariello, M

    1997-02-01

    Ten patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, 7 ischemic heart disease and 3 idiopathic (7 males and 3 females, mean age 54.8 +/- 11 years), were studied. An insulin euglycemic clamp was performed to evaluate the influence of insulin infusion on cardiac performance. All the subjects were in NYHA functional class II-III and had an ejection fraction < 60% at a previous echocardiographic examination. They were submitted to a noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring by variations of thoracic impedance at three stops: a basal evaluation (T0); 1.2 mU/kg/min insulin infusion (T1); 5 mU/kg/min insulin infusion (T2). Moreover at the same times Na+, K+, hematocrit (Hct) and catecholamines were measured in the plasma. The total time required for the study was about 4 hours. Cardiac performance improved as shown by a significant increase in T1 and T2 with respect to the basal condition (T0), of ejection fraction: 57.87 +/- 11.3% (T1) vs 52.25 +/- 14.1% (T0; p < 0.01); 59.5 +/- 10.7% (T2) vs 52.25 +/- 14.1% (T0; p < 0.005); stroke volume: 2.61 +/- 0.5 l/min/m2 (T1) vs 2.01 +/- 0.75 l/min/m2 (T0; p < 0.001); 3.35 +/- 0.66 l/min/m2 (T2) vs 2.01 +/- 0.75 l/min/m2 (T0; p < 0.001) and cardiac output: 41.14 +/- 9.1 ml/m2 (T1) vs 38.83 +/- 7.1 ml/m2 (T0; p < 0.01); 46.45 +/- 8.56 ml/m2 (T2) vs 38.83 +/- 7.1 ml/m2 (T0; p < 0.001). This improvement in cardiac function was not due to an increase in preload because end diastolic volume, Hct, Na+ did not differ through the study. Similarly, afterload measured as mean blood pressure did not decrease. Cardiac function improvement was obtained in the presence of increased catecholamines. In conclusion, exogenous insulin infusion was able, in the presence of euglycemic condition, to improve cardiac performance. This improvement could be due to a direct inotropic effect of insulin perhaps mediated by its metabolic properties on cardiac muscular cells and/or by increasing the cellular intake of Ca+2.

  5. Prediction of Excessive Weight Gain in Insulin Treated Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

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    Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Johansen, Mette D

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Weight gain is an ongoing challenge when initiating insulin therapy in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, if prediction of insulin associated weight gain was possible on an individualized level, targeted initiatives could be implemented to reduce weight gain. The objective...... of this study was to identify predictors of weight gain in insulin treated patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A total of 412 individuals with Type 2 diabetes mellitus were, in addition to metformin or placebo, randomized into 18-month treatment groups with three different insulin analogue...... treatment regimens. Participants with excessive weight gain were defined as the group with weight gain in the 4(th) quartile. We developed a pattern classification method to predict individuals prone to excessive weight gain. RESULTS: The median weight gain among all patients (n = 412) was 2.4 (95...

  6. Ca(2+) mishandling and cardiac dysfunction in obesity and insulin resistance: role of oxidative stress.

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    Carvajal, Karla; Balderas-Villalobos, Jaime; Bello-Sanchez, Ma Dolores; Phillips-Farfán, Bryan; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilu; Aldana-Quintero, Hugo; Gómez-Viquez, Norma L

    2014-11-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance (IR) are strongly connected to the development of subclinical cardiac dysfunction and eventually can lead to heart failure, which is the main cause of morbidity and death in patients having these metabolic diseases. It has been considered that excessive fat tissue may play a critical role in producing systemic IR and enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This oxidative stress (OS) may elicit or exacerbate IR. On the other hand, evidence suggests that some of the cellular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of obesity and IR-related cardiomyopathy are excessive myocardial ROS production and abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that augmented ROS production may contribute to Ca(2+) mishandling by affecting the redox state of key proteins implicated in this process. In this review, we focus on the role of Ca(2+) mishandling in the development of cardiac dysfunction in obesity and IR and address the evidence suggesting that OS might also contribute to cardiac dysfunction by affecting Ca(2+) handling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Insulin receptor substrate signaling controls cardiac energy metabolism and heart failure.

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    Guo, Cathy A; Guo, Shaodong

    2017-06-01

    The heart is an insulin-dependent and energy-consuming organ in which insulin and nutritional signaling integrates to the regulation of cardiac metabolism, growth and survival. Heart failure is highly associated with insulin resistance, and heart failure patients suffer from the cardiac energy deficiency and structural and functional dysfunction. Chronic pathological conditions, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, involve various mechanisms in promoting heart failure by remodeling metabolic pathways, modulating cardiac energetics and impairing cardiac contractility. Recent studies demonstrated that insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS-1,-2) are major mediators of both insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling responsible for myocardial energetics, structure, function and organismal survival. Importantly, the insulin receptor substrates (IRS) play an important role in the activation of the phosphatidylinositide-3-dependent kinase (PI-3K) that controls Akt and Foxo1 signaling cascade, regulating the mitochondrial function, cardiac energy metabolism and the renin-angiotensin system. Dysregulation of this branch in signaling cascades by insulin resistance in the heart through the endocrine system promotes heart failure, providing a novel mechanism for diabetic cardiomyopathy. Therefore, targeting this branch of IRS→PI-3K→Foxo1 signaling cascade and associated pathways may provide a fundamental strategy for the therapeutic and nutritional development in control of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus on insulin signaling and resistance in the heart and the role energetics play in cardiac metabolism, structure and function. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  8. Exposure to excess insulin (glargine) induces type 2 diabetes mellitus in mice fed on a chow diet.

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    Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Gu, Haihua; Guo, Huailan; Zha, Longying; Cai, Junwei; Li, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi; Cao, Wenhong

    2014-06-01

    We have previously shown that insulin plays an important role in the nutrient-induced insulin resistance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic exposure to excess long-acting insulin (glargine) can cause typical type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in normal mice fed on a chow diet. C57BL/6 mice were treated with glargine once a day for 8 weeks, followed by evaluations of food intake, body weight, blood levels of glucose, insulin, lipids, and cytokines, insulin signaling, histology of pancreas, ectopic fat accumulation, oxidative stress level, and cholesterol content in mitochondria in tissues. Cholesterol content in mitochondria and its association with oxidative stress in cultured hepatocytes and β-cells were also examined. Results show that chronic exposure to glargine caused insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and relative insulin deficiency (T2DM). Treatment with excess glargine led to loss of pancreatic islets, ectopic fat accumulation in liver, oxidative stress in liver and pancreas, and increased cholesterol content in mitochondria of liver and pancreas. Prolonged exposure of cultured primary hepatocytes and HIT-TI5 β-cells to insulin induced oxidative stress in a cholesterol synthesis-dependent manner. Together, our results show that chronic exposure to excess insulin can induce typical T2DM in normal mice fed on a chow diet. © 2014 The authors.

  9. [Effect of combination of insulin and selenium on insulin signal transduction in cardiac muscle of STZ-induced diabetic rats].

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    Xu, Tian-Jiao; Yuan, Bing-Xiang; Zou, Ya-Min

    2011-03-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of low doses of insulin (1 u x kg(-1)) and selenium (180 microg x kg(-1)) in combination on general physiological parameters and insulin signal molecules in cardiac muscle of STZ-induced diabetic rats. The levels of blood glucose were estimated using One Touch SureStep Blood Glucose meter. HbA1c levels were estimated using microcolumn assay. TG and TC were estimated using enzymatic assay. The levels of PI3K and GLUT4 in cardiac muscle were examined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The result showed that insulin in combination with selenium could significantly lower blood glucose and blood lipid levels and markedly restored the PI3K and GLUT4 levels in cardiac muscle. It could be concluded that there was cooperation between insulin and selenium, and that treatment of diabetic rats with combined doses of insulin and selenium increased cardiac glucose uptake by upregulating the level of PI3K-mediated GLUT4 in cardiac muscle, eventually ameliorating myocardial dysfunction.

  10. Protective effects of garlic extract on cardiac function, heart rate variability, and cardiac mitochondria in obese insulin-resistant rats.

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    Supakul, Luerat; Pintana, Hiranya; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Siriporn; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2014-04-01

    Garlic has been shown to exhibit antioxidant effects and cardioprotective properties. However, the effects of garlic extract on the heart in insulin resistance induced by long-term high-fat-diet consumption are not well defined. Therefore, we sought to determine the effects of garlic extract in the obese insulin-resistant rats. Male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were divided into two groups: normal-diet or high-fat-diet (n = 24/group) fed for 12 weeks. Rats in each groups were divided into three subgroups (n = 8 each): vehicle or garlic extract (250 or 500 mg/kg/day, respectively) treated for 28 days. At the end of the treatment, the metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV), cardiac function, and cardiac mitochondrial function were determined. Rats that received a high-fat-diet for 12 weeks had increased body weight, visceral fat, plasma insulin levels, total cholesterol, oxidative stress levels, depressed HRV, and cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction. Garlic extract at both concentrations significantly decreased the plasma insulin, total cholesterol, homeostasis model assessment index, and oxidative stress levels. Furthermore, garlic extract at both doses restored the HRV, cardiac function, and cardiac mitochondrial function. We concluded that garlic extract at both concentrations exerted cardioprotective effects against cardiac dysfunction and mitochondrial dysfunction in obese insulin-resistant rats.

  11. Opposite Regulation of Insulin Sensitivity by Dietary Lipid Versus Carbohydrate Excess.

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    Lundsgaard, Anne-Marie; Sjøberg, Kim A; Høeg, Louise D; Jeppesen, Jacob; Jordy, Andreas B; Serup, Annette K; Fritzen, Andreas M; Pilegaard, Henriette; Myrmel, Lene S; Madsen, Lise; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Richter, Erik A; Kiens, Bente

    2017-10-01

    To understand the mechanisms in lipid-induced insulin resistance, a more physiological approach is to enhance fatty acid (FA) availability through the diet. Nine healthy men ingested two hypercaloric diets (in 75% excess of habitual caloric intake) for 3 days, enriched in unsaturated FA (78 energy % [E%] fat) (UNSAT) or carbohydrates (80 E% carbohydrate) (CHO) as well as a eucaloric control diet (CON). Compared with CON, the UNSAT diet reduced whole-body and leg glucose disposal during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, while decreasing hepatic glucose production. In muscle, diacylglycerol (DAG) and intramyocellular triacylglycerol were increased. The accumulated DAG was sn-1,3 DAG, which is known not to activate PKC, and insulin signaling was intact. UNSAT decreased PDH-E1α protein content and increased inhibitory PDH-E1α Ser(300) phosphorylation and FA oxidation. CHO increased whole-body and leg insulin sensitivity, while increasing hepatic glucose production. After CHO, muscle PDH-E1α Ser(300) phosphorylation was decreased, and glucose oxidation increased. After UNSAT, but not CHO, muscle glucose-6-phosphate content was 103% higher compared with CON during the clamp. Thus, PDH-E1α expression and covalent regulation, and hence the tricarboxylic acid cycle influx of pyruvate-derived acetyl-CoA relative to β-oxidation-derived acetyl-CoA, are suggested to impact on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Taken together, the oxidative metabolic fluxes of glucose and FA are powerful and opposite regulators of insulin action in muscle. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  12. Effects of glucocorticoid excess on the sensitivity of glucose transport and metabolism to insulin in rat skeletal muscle.

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    Dimitriadis, G; Leighton, B; Parry-Billings, M.; Sasson, S; Young, M; Krause, U.; Bevan, S.; Piva, T; Wegener, G.; Newsholme, E A

    1997-01-01

    GENBANK/dy examines the mechanisms of glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in rat soleus muscle. Glucocorticoid excess was induced by administration of dexamethasone to rats for 5 days. Dexamethasone decreased the sensitivity of 3-O-methylglucose transport, 2-deoxyglucose phosphorylation, glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation to insulin. The total content of GLUT4 glucose transporters was not decreased by dexamethasone; however, the increase in these transporters in the plasma membran...

  13. Insulin resistance and circadian rhythm of cardiac autonomic modulation

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    Cai Jianwen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance (IR has been associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD. Heart rate variability (HRV, an index of cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM, is also associated with CVD mortality and CVD morbidity. Currently, there are limited data about the impairment of IR on the circadian pattern of CAM. Therefore, we conducted this investigation to exam the association between IR and the circadian oscillations of CAM in a community-dwelling middle-aged sample. Method Homeostasis models of IR (HOMA-IR, insulin, and glucose were used to assess IR. CAM was measured by HRV analysis from a 24-hour electrocardiogram. Two stage modeling was used in the analysis. In stage one, for each individual we fit a cosine periodic model based on the 48 segments of HRV data. We obtained three individual-level cosine parameters that quantity the circadian pattern: mean (M, measures the overall average of a HRV index; amplitude (Â, measures the amplitude of the oscillation of a HRV index; and acrophase time (θ, measures the timing of the highest oscillation. At the second stage, we used a random-effects-meta-analysis to summarize the effects of IR variables on the three circadian parameters of HRV indices obtained in stage one of the analysis. Results In persons without type diabetes, the multivariate adjusted β (SE of log HOMA-IR and M variable for HRV were -0.251 (0.093, -0.245 (0.078, -0.19 (0.06, -4.89 (1.76, -3.35 (1.31, and 2.14 (0.995, for log HF, log LF, log VLF, SDNN, RMSSD and HR, respectively (all P Conclusion Elevated IR, among non-diabetics significantly impairs the overall mean levels of CAM. However, the  or θ of CAM were not significantly affected by IR, suggesting that the circadian mechanisms of CAM are not impaired. However, among persons with type 2 diabetes, a group clinically has more severe form of IR, the adverse effects of increased IR on all three HRV circadian parameters are much larger.

  14. Genetic factors modulate the impact of pubertal androgen excess on insulin sensitivity and fertility.

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    Abigail R Dowling

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder of reproductive age women. The syndrome is caused by a combination of environmental influences and genetic predisposition. Despite extensive efforts, the heritable factors contributing to PCOS development are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that genetic background contributes to the development of a PCOS-like reproductive and metabolic phenotype in mice exposed to excess DHEA during the pubertal transition. We tested whether the PCOS phenotype would be more pronounced on the diabetes-prone C57BL/6 background than the previously used strain, BALB/cByJ. In addition, we examined strain-dependent upregulation of the expression of ovarian and extra-ovarian candidate genes implicated in human PCOS, genes containing known strain variants, and genes involved with steroidogenesis or insulin sensitivity. These studies show that there are significant strain-related differences in metabolic response to excess androgen exposure during puberty. Additionally, our results suggest the C57BL/6J strain provides a more robust and uniform experimental platform for PCOS research than the BALB/cByJ strain.

  15. Excessive Refined Carbohydrates and Scarce Micronutrients Intakes Increase Inflammatory Mediators and Insulin Resistance in Prepubertal and Pubertal Obese Children Independently of Obesity

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    Mardia López-Alarcón; Otilia Perichart-Perera; Samuel Flores-Huerta; Patricia Inda-Icaza; Maricela Rodríguez-Cruz; Andrea Armenta-Álvarez; María Teresa Bram-Falcón; Marielle Mayorga-Ochoa

    2014-01-01

    Background. Low-grade inflammation is the link between obesity and insulin resistance. Because physiologic insulin resistance occurs at puberty, obese pubertal children are at higher risk for insulin resistance. Excessive diets in refined carbohydrates and saturated fats are risk factors for insulin resistance, but calcium, magnesium, vitamin-D, and the omega-3 fatty acids likely protect against inflammation and insulin resistance. Objective. To analyze interactions among dietary saturated fa...

  16. Serum cardiac troponin I analysis to determine the excessiveness of exercise intensity: A novel equation.

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    Voets, Philip J G M; Maas, Roderick P P W M

    2016-03-07

    Physical exertion is often promoted because of its beneficial health effects. This only holds true, however, as long as the optimal exercise intensity is not exceeded. If physical exertion becomes too strenuous or prolonged, cardiac injury or dysfunction may occur. Consequently, a significant elevation of the serum concentration of the sensitive and specific cardiac biomarker troponin I can be observed. In this article, we present the derivation of a novel equation that can be used to evaluate to what extent the intensity of conducted endurance exercise was excessive, based on a post-exercise assessment of serum cardiac troponin I. This is convenient, as exercise intensity is difficult for an athlete to quantify accurately and the currently used heart rate indices can be affected by various physiological and environmental factors. Serum cardiac troponin I, on the other hand, is a post-hoc parameter that directly reflects the actual effects on the myocardium and may therefore be a promising alternative. To our knowledge, this is the first method to determine relative exercise intensity in retrospect. We therefore believe that this equation can serve as a potentially valuable tool to objectively evaluate the benefits or harmful effects of physical exertion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Validation of a definition of excessive postoperative bleeding in infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

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    Bercovitz, Rachel S; Shewmake, Allison C; Newman, Debra K; Niebler, Robert A; Scott, John P; Stuth, Eckehard; Simpson, Pippa M; Yan, Ke; Woods, Ronald K

    2017-12-13

    To derive and validate an objective definition of postoperative bleeding in neonates and infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Using a retrospective cohort of 124 infants and neonates, we included published bleeding definitions and cumulative chest tube output over different postoperative periods (eg, 2, 12, or 24 hours after intensive care unit admission) in a classification and regression tree model to determine chest tube output volumes that were associated with red blood cell transfusions and surgical re-exploration for bleeding in the first 24 hours after intensive care unit admission. After the definition of excessive bleeding was determined, it was validated via a prospective cohort of 77 infants and neonates. Excessive bleeding was defined as ≥7 mL/kg/h for ≥2 consecutive hours in the first 12 postoperative hours and/or ≥84 mL/kg total for the first 24 postoperative hours and/or surgical re-exploration for bleeding or cardiac tamponade physiology in the first 24 postoperative hours. Excessive bleeding was associated with longer length of hospital stay, increased 30-day readmission rate, and increased transfusions in the postoperative period. The proposed standard definition of excessive bleeding is based on readily obtained objective data and relates to important early clinical outcomes. Application and validation by other institutions will help determine the extent to which our specialty should consider this definition for both clinical investigation and quality improvement initiatives. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

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    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra, E-mail: jmartyn@partners.org [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  19. Interaction between insulin and estradiol in regulation of cardiac glucose and free fatty acid transporters.

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    Tepavcevic, S; Koricanac, G; Zakula, Z; Milosavljevic, T; Stojiljkovic, M; Isenovic, E R

    2011-07-01

    The estrogen binding to specific extranuclear receptors (ER) activates several intracellular pathways that are activated by insulin as well. Moreover, insulin and estradiol (E2) influence cardiac energy substrates, blood glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs), and both hormones exert cardio-beneficial effects. In view of these facts, we suggest that cross-talk between their signaling pathways might have an important role in regulation of cardiac energy substrate transport. Ovariectomized rats were treated with insulin, estradiol (E2), or their combination 20, 30, or 40 min before analysis of blood glucose and FFA level, as well as cardiac plasma membranes (PM) and low density microsomes (LDM) content of glucose (GLUT4 and GLUT1) and FFA (CD36) transporters. Insulin, given alone, or in combination with E2, decreased plasma glucose level at all time points, but did not influence FFA level, while E2 treatment itself did not change glucose and FFA concentration. Insulin increased PM GLUT4 and GLUT1 content 30 and 40 min after treatment and the increases were partially accompanied by decrease in transporter LDM content. E2 increased PM content and decreased LDM content only of GLUT4 at 30 min. Insulin generally, and E2 at 20 min increased CD36 content in PM fraction. Both hormones decreased CD36 LDM content 20 min after administration. Effect of combined treatment mostly did not differ from single hormone treatment, but occasionally, particularly in distribution of GLUT4, combined treatment emphasized single hormone effect, suggesting that insulin and E2 act synergistically in regulation of energy substrate transporters in cardiac tissue. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · NewYork.

  20. Statin Intake Is Associated With Decreased Insulin Sensitivity During Cardiac Surgery

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    Sato, Hiroaki; Carvalho, George; Sato, Tamaki; Hatzakorzian, Roupen; Lattermann, Ralph; Codere-Maruyama, Takumi; Matsukawa, Takashi; Schricker, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical trauma impairs intraoperative insulin sensitivity and is associated with postoperative adverse events. Recently, preprocedural statin therapy is recommended for patients with coronary artery disease. However, statin therapy is reported to increase insulin resistance and the risk of new-onset diabetes. Thus, we investigated the association between preoperative statin therapy and intraoperative insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic, dyslipidemic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this prospective, nonrandomized trial, patients taking lipophilic statins were assigned to the statin group and hypercholesterolemic patients not receiving any statins were allocated to the control group. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the hyperinsulinemic-normoglycemic clamp technique during surgery. The mean, SD of blood glucose, and the coefficient of variation (CV) after surgery were calculated for each patient. The association between statin use and intraoperative insulin sensitivity was tested by multiple regression analysis. RESULTS We studied 120 patients. In both groups, insulin sensitivity gradually decreased during surgery with values being on average ∼20% lower in the statin than in the control group. In the statin group, the mean blood glucose in the intensive care unit was higher than in the control group (153 ± 20 vs. 140 ± 20 mg/dL; P statin group (SD, P statin use was independently associated with intraoperative insulin sensitivity (β = −0.16; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Preoperative use of lipophilic statins is associated with increased insulin resistance during cardiac surgery in nondiabetic, dyslipidemic patients. PMID:22829524

  1. Insulin resistance, adiponectin and adverse outcomes following elective cardiac surgery: a prospective follow-up study

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    Hjortdal Vibeke E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance and adiponectin are markers of cardio-metabolic disease and associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The present study examined whether preoperative insulin resistance or adiponectin were associated with short- and long-term adverse outcomes in non-diabetic patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods In a prospective study, we assessed insulin resistance and adiponectin levels from preoperative fasting blood samples in 836 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Population-based medical registries were used for postoperative follow-up. Outcomes included all-cause death, myocardial infarction or percutaneous coronary intervention, stroke, re-exploration, renal failure, and infections. The ability of insulin resistance and adiponectin to predict clinical adverse outcomes was examined using receiver operating characteristics. Results Neither insulin resistance nor adiponectin were statistically significantly associated with 30-day mortality, but adiponectin was associated with an increased 31-365-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio 2.9 [95% confidence interval 1.3-6.4] comparing the upper quartile with the three lower quartiles. Insulin resistance was a poor predictor of adverse outcomes. In contrast, the predictive accuracy of adiponectin (area under curve 0.75 [95% confidence interval 0.65-0.85] was similar to that of the EuroSCORE (area under curve 0.75 [95% confidence interval 0.67-0.83] and a model including adiponectin and the EuroSCORE had an area under curve of 0.78 [95% confidence interval 0.68-0.88] concerning 31-365-day mortality. Conclusions Elevated adiponectin levels, but not insulin resistance, were associated with increased mortality and appear to be a strong predictor of long-term mortality. Additional studies are warranted to further clarify the possible clinical role of adiponectin assessment in cardiac surgery. Trial Registration The Danish Data Protection Agency; reference no

  2. Cardiovascular action of insulin in health and disease: focus in endothelial L-arginine transport and cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels.

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    Sebastián eDubó

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The impairment of insulin signaling on diabetes mellitus has been related to cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure and sudden death. In human endothelium, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1 is related to the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO. Insulin has a vascular effect in endothelial cells through a signaling pathway that involved increases of hCAT-1 expression and L-arginine transport. This mechanism is disrupted in diabetes, a phenomenon potentiated by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which contributes to lower availability of NO and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, the electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes is considered a key factor in heart failure progression associated to diabetes mellitus, generating a challenge to understand the specific role of insulin and the pathways involved in cardiac function. Studies on isolated mammalian cardiomyocytes have shown a prolongated action potential in ventricular repolarization phase that produces a long QT interval. The long QT generated is well explained by attenuation in the repolarizing potassium currents in cardiac ventricles. The impaired insulin signaling causes specific changes in these currents, such a decrease amplitude of the transient outward K+ (Ito and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier (IKur currents where, together, a reduction of mRNA and protein expression levels of α-subunits (Ito, fast; Kv 4.2 and IKs; Kv 1.5 or β-subunits (KChIP2 and MiRP of K+ channels involved in these currents in a MAPK mediated pathway process have been described. These results support the hypothesis that the lack of insulin signaling can produce an abnormal repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the arrhythmogenic potential due to reduced Ito current can contribute to an increase in the incidence of sudden death in heart failure. This review aims to show, based on pathophysiological models, the regulatory function that would have insulin in vascular

  3. Rapid development of cardiac dysfunction in a canine model of insulin resistance and moderate obesity.

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    Broussard, Josiane L; Nelson, Michael D; Kolka, Cathryn M; Bediako, Isaac Asare; Paszkiewicz, Rebecca L; Smith, Laura; Szczepaniak, Edward W; Stefanovski, Darko; Szczepaniak, Lidia S; Bergman, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of obesity and diabetes continues to rise at an alarming rate. A major cause of the morbidity and mortality associated with obesity and diabetes is heart disease, yet the mechanisms that lead to cardiovascular complications remain unclear. We performed cardiac MRI to assess left ventricular morphology and function during the development of moderate obesity and insulin resistance in a well-established canine model (n = 26). To assess the influence of dietary fat composition, we randomised animals to a traditional lard diet (rich in saturated and monounsaturated fat; n = 12), a salmon oil diet (rich in polyunsaturated fat; n = 8) or a control diet (n = 6). High-fat feeding with lard increased body weight and fasting insulin and markedly reduced insulin sensitivity. Lard feeding also significantly reduced left ventricular function, evidenced by a worsening of circumferential strain and impairment in left ventricular torsion. High-fat feeding with salmon oil increased body weight; however, salmon oil feeding did not impair insulin sensitivity or cardiac function. These data emphasise the importance of dietary fat composition on both metabolic and cardiac function, and have important implications for the relationship between diet and health.

  4. Insulin and resveratrol act synergistically, preventing cardiac dysfunction in diabetes, but the advantage of resveratrol in diabetics with acute heart attack is antagonized by insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiung-Pang; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Deng, Jen-Ying; Chang, Chih-Chun; Day, Yuan-Ji; Hung, Li-Man

    2010-12-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), a natural phenolic compound, has been found to display cardiovascular protective and insulin-sensitizing properties. In this study, the effects of RSV and its combination with insulin on mortality, hemodynamics, insulin signaling, and nitrosative stress were compared in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with or without acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Under normoxic conditions, cardiac systolic and diastolic functions and insulin-mediated Akt/GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4) activation were impaired in STZ-diabetic rats. The combination of RSV and insulin significantly prevented the above diabetes-associated abnormalities. Notwithstanding that, the diabetic state rendered the animals more susceptible to myocardial I/R injury, and the mortality rate and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/nitrotyrosine protein expression and superoxide anion production were also further increased in I/R-injured diabetic hearts. In contrast, RSV treatment alone resulted in a lower mortality rate (from 62.5 to 18%) and better cardiac systolic function than its combination with insulin. RSV also inhibited iNOS/nitrotyrosine protein overexpression and superoxide anion overproduction in I/R-injured diabetic myocardium. Hyperglycemia, impairment of insulin signaling, overexpression of iNOS/nitrotyrosine, and superoxide anion overproduction were markedly rescued by the combination treatment, which did not show an improvement in mortality rate (30%) or cardiac performance over RSV treatment alone. These results indicate that insulin and RSV synergistically prevented cardiac dysfunction in diabetes and this may be in parallel with activation of the insulin-mediated Akt/GLUT4 signaling pathway. Although activation of the protective signal (Akt/GLUT4) and suppression of the adverse markers (iNOS, nitrotyrosine, and superoxide anion) were simultaneously observed in insulin and RSV combination treatment, insulin counteracted the advantage of RSV in

  5. Pharmacological strategies to decrease excessive blood loss in cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis of clinically relevant endpoints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Cromheecke, M. E.; de Jonge, E.; Prins, M. H.; de Mol, B. J.; Briët, E.; Büller, H. R.

    1999-01-01

    Excessive bleeding may complicate cardiac surgery, and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Pharmacological strategies to decrease perioperative bleeding have been investigated in a large number of controlled trials, most of which have shown a decrease in blood loss. However, most

  6. Effect of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Patients With Insulin-Treated Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szepietowska, Barbara; Kutyifa, Valentina; Ruwald, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    branch block in the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy trial. Treatment with CRT-D versus implantable cardioverter defibrillator was associated with 76% risk reduction in all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.24; 95% confidence interval 0.08 to 0...... by the presence of insulin treatment. We determined whether cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) versus implantable cardioverter defibrillator improves clinical outcomes in these 3 subgroups. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to analyze 1,278 patients with left bundle...

  7. The role of adipose tissue and excess of fatty acids in the induction of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Błachnio-Zabielska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the main tissue responsible for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Consumption of a high-fat diet rich in saturated fats (HFD and obesity are associated with accumulation of intramuscular lipids that leads to several disorders, e.g. insulin resistance (IRes and type 2 diabetes (T2D. The mechanism underlying the induction of IRes is still unknown. It was speculated that accumulation of intramuscular triacylglycerols (TAG is linked to induction of IRes. Now, research focuses on bioactive lipids: long-chain acyl-CoA (LCACoA, diacylglycerols (DAG and ceramides (Cer. It has been demonstrated that accumulation of each of the above-mentioned lipid classes negatively affects the insulin signaling pathway. It is not clear which of those lipids play the most important role in HFD-induced skeletal muscle IRes. The aim of the present work is to present the current knowledge of the role of adipose tissue and excess of fatty acids in the induction of insulin resistance.

  8. High thoracic epidural analgesia decreases stress hyperglycemia and insulin need in cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greisen, J; Nielsen, D V; Sloth, E; Jakobsen, C-J

    2013-02-01

    Assuming that high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) with the sympathetic block might decrease postoperative blood glucose (BG) level and reduce the need of insulin, the aim was to evaluate the effect of HTEA on the BG level and insulin requirement in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Forty-two low-risk patients age 65-79 years scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass grafting with or without aortic valve replacement were randomised to receive HTEA as supplement for general anaesthesia. BG and lactate were measured before and after cardiopulmonary bypass and postoperatively at least every 3 h together with administration of insulin. Postoperative pain was evaluated 30 min, 2, 4 and 6 h after extubation, and before discharge from the intensive care unit. Overall BG levels showed great variation over time (P insulin in postoperative period was significantly higher in HTEA group (9 vs. 2, P = 0.032). No differences were seen in lactate levels. Patients in the HTEA group had significant lower pain scores (P < 0.001). HTEA preserves glucose metabolism better and leads to a lesser degree of 'stress hyperglycaemia' in cardiac surgery patients. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  9. Opposite regulation of insulin sensitivity by dietary lipid versus carbohydrate excess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard, Annemarie; Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Høeg, Louise Dalgas

    2017-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms in lipid-induced insulin resistance, a more physiologic approach is to enhance FA availability through the diet. Nine healthy men ingested two hypercaloric diets (+75 E%) for three days, enriched in unsaturated FA (78 E% fat; UNSAT) or carbohydrates (80 E% carbohydrate...

  10. Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Possess Insulin-Mimetic and Antioxidant Activities in Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Cecilia; Zambonin, Laura; Rizzo, Benedetta; Maraldi, Tullia; Angeloni, Cristina; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Fiorentini, Diana; Hrelia, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a shrub having a high content of sweet diterpenoid glycosides in its leaves, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are used as noncaloric, natural sweeteners. The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the insulin-mimetic effect exerted by four different mixtures of steviol glycosides, rich in stevioside and rebaudioside A, in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The potential antioxidant activity of these steviol glycosides was also assessed, as oxidative stress is associated with diabetes. Likewise the insulin effect, steviol glycosides caused an increase in glucose uptake into rat fibroblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, thus inducing Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The presence of S961, an insulin antagonist, completely abolished these effects, allowing to hypothesize that steviol glycosides could act as ligands of the same receptor engaged by insulin. Moreover, steviol glycosides counteracted oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione intracellular levels and upregulating expression and activity of the two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. The present work unravels the insulin-mimetic effect and the antioxidant property exerted by steviol glycosides, suggesting their potential beneficial role in the cotreatment of diabetes and in health maintenance.

  11. Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Possess Insulin-Mimetic and Antioxidant Activities in Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Cecilia; Zambonin, Laura; Rizzo, Benedetta; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a shrub having a high content of sweet diterpenoid glycosides in its leaves, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are used as noncaloric, natural sweeteners. The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the insulin-mimetic effect exerted by four different mixtures of steviol glycosides, rich in stevioside and rebaudioside A, in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The potential antioxidant activity of these steviol glycosides was also assessed, as oxidative stress is associated with diabetes. Likewise the insulin effect, steviol glycosides caused an increase in glucose uptake into rat fibroblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, thus inducing Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The presence of S961, an insulin antagonist, completely abolished these effects, allowing to hypothesize that steviol glycosides could act as ligands of the same receptor engaged by insulin. Moreover, steviol glycosides counteracted oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione intracellular levels and upregulating expression and activity of the two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. The present work unravels the insulin-mimetic effect and the antioxidant property exerted by steviol glycosides, suggesting their potential beneficial role in the cotreatment of diabetes and in health maintenance. PMID:28947927

  12. Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Possess Insulin-Mimetic and Antioxidant Activities in Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Prata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a shrub having a high content of sweet diterpenoid glycosides in its leaves, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are used as noncaloric, natural sweeteners. The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the insulin-mimetic effect exerted by four different mixtures of steviol glycosides, rich in stevioside and rebaudioside A, in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The potential antioxidant activity of these steviol glycosides was also assessed, as oxidative stress is associated with diabetes. Likewise the insulin effect, steviol glycosides caused an increase in glucose uptake into rat fibroblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, thus inducing Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The presence of S961, an insulin antagonist, completely abolished these effects, allowing to hypothesize that steviol glycosides could act as ligands of the same receptor engaged by insulin. Moreover, steviol glycosides counteracted oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione intracellular levels and upregulating expression and activity of the two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. The present work unravels the insulin-mimetic effect and the antioxidant property exerted by steviol glycosides, suggesting their potential beneficial role in the cotreatment of diabetes and in health maintenance.

  13. Excessive refined carbohydrates and scarce micronutrients intakes increase inflammatory mediators and insulin resistance in prepubertal and pubertal obese children independently of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alarcón, Mardia; Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Inda-Icaza, Patricia; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Armenta-Álvarez, Andrea; Bram-Falcón, María Teresa; Mayorga-Ochoa, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation is the link between obesity and insulin resistance. Because physiologic insulin resistance occurs at puberty, obese pubertal children are at higher risk for insulin resistance. Excessive diets in refined carbohydrates and saturated fats are risk factors for insulin resistance, but calcium, magnesium, vitamin-D, and the omega-3 fatty acids likely protect against inflammation and insulin resistance. To analyze interactions among dietary saturated fat, refined carbohydrates, calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids on the risk of inflammation and insulin resistance in a sample of prepubertal and pubertal children. A sample of 229 children from Mexico City was analyzed in a cross-sectional design. Anthropometric measurements, 24 h recall questionnaires, and blood samples were obtained. Serum insulin, glucose, calcium, magnesium, 25-OHD3, C-reactive protein, leptin, adiponectin, and erythrocytes fatty acids were measured. Parametric and nonparametric statistics were used for analysis. While mean macronutrients intake was excessive, micronutrients intake was deficient (P insulin resistance were carbohydrates intake and circulating magnesium and adiponectin. Magnesium-deficient diets are determinants of inflammation, while high intake of refined carbohydrates is a risk factor for insulin resistance, independently of central adiposity.

  14. Excessive Refined Carbohydrates and Scarce Micronutrients Intakes Increase Inflammatory Mediators and Insulin Resistance in Prepubertal and Pubertal Obese Children Independently of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardia López-Alarcón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Low-grade inflammation is the link between obesity and insulin resistance. Because physiologic insulin resistance occurs at puberty, obese pubertal children are at higher risk for insulin resistance. Excessive diets in refined carbohydrates and saturated fats are risk factors for insulin resistance, but calcium, magnesium, vitamin-D, and the omega-3 fatty acids likely protect against inflammation and insulin resistance. Objective. To analyze interactions among dietary saturated fat, refined carbohydrates, calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids on the risk of inflammation and insulin resistance in a sample of prepubertal and pubertal children. Methods. A sample of 229 children from Mexico City was analyzed in a cross-sectional design. Anthropometric measurements, 24 h recall questionnaires, and blood samples were obtained. Serum insulin, glucose, calcium, magnesium, 25-OHD3, C-reactive protein, leptin, adiponectin, and erythrocytes fatty acids were measured. Parametric and nonparametric statistics were used for analysis. Results. While mean macronutrients intake was excessive, micronutrients intake was deficient (P<0.01. Inflammation determinants were central obesity and magnesium-deficient diets. Determinants of insulin resistance were carbohydrates intake and circulating magnesium and adiponectin. Conclusions. Magnesium-deficient diets are determinants of inflammation, while high intake of refined carbohydrates is a risk factor for insulin resistance, independently of central adiposity.

  15. Diuretics prevent thiazolidinedione-induced cardiac hypertrophy without compromising insulin-sensitizing effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cherng-Shyang; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Sung, Junne-Ming; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Li-Chun; Pandya, Kumar; Maeda, Nobuyo; Tsai, Yau-Sheng

    2014-02-01

    Much concern has arisen regarding critical adverse effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), including rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, on cardiac tissue. Although TZD-induced cardiac hypertrophy (CH) has been attributed to an increase in plasma volume or a change in cardiac nutrient preference, causative roles have not been established. To test the hypothesis that volume expansion directly mediates rosiglitazone-induced CH, mice were fed a high-fat diet with rosiglitazone, and cardiac and metabolic consequences were examined. Rosiglitazone treatment induced volume expansion and CH in wild-type and PPARγ heterozygous knockout (Pparg(+/-)) mice, but not in mice defective for ligand binding (Pparg(P465L/+)). Cotreatment with the diuretic furosemide in wild-type mice attenuated rosiglitazone-induced CH, hypertrophic gene reprogramming, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, hypertrophy-related signal activation, and left ventricular dysfunction. Similar changes were observed in mice treated with pioglitazone. The diuretics spironolactone and trichlormethiazide, but not amiloride, attenuated rosiglitazone effects on volume expansion and CH. Interestingly, expression of glucose and lipid metabolism genes in the heart was altered by rosiglitazone, but these changes were not attenuated by furosemide cotreatment. Importantly, rosiglitazone-mediated whole-body metabolic improvements were not affected by furosemide cotreatment. We conclude that releasing plasma volume reduces adverse effects of TZD-induced volume expansion and cardiac events without compromising TZD actions in metabolic switch in the heart and whole-body insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Converting continuous insulin infusion to subcutaneous insulin glargine after cardiac surgery using percentage-based versus weight-based dosing: a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silinskie, Kevin M; Kirshner, Ronald; Hite, Mindee S

    2013-01-01

    Most studies report using percentage of total daily insulin (TDI) for converting therapy from continuous insulin infusion to subcutaneous insulin in cardiac surgery patients. Few studies have evaluated the efficacy of using body weight to calculate the basal insulin dose. To compare the efficacy and safety of dosing insulin glargine by weight versus percentage of TDI in cardiac surgery patients transitioning from continuous insulin infusion to subcutaneous insulin. We conducted a prospective, randomized, open-label, pilot study. Study patients who had a preoperative weight less than 100 kg and were receiving at least 6 hours of a continuous insulin infusion were randomized to receive either 50% of their TDI requirement or 0.5 units/kg of glargine as a one-time dose 2 hours before stopping the continuous insulin infusion. All patients were administered subcutaneous corrective insulin. Blood glucose monitoring occurred before each meal, at bedtime, and with morning laboratory tests for 24 hours after administration of the glargine dose. A total of 200 blood glucose measurements were performed in each group. The percentage of blood glucose measurements in target range (80-140 mg/dL) was similar between the weight-based group and the percentage-based group (66% vs 64%, p = 0.75). Median blood glucose after transition was 120 mg/dL (interquartile range [IQR] 99-147) in the weight-based group compared to 127 mg/dL (IQR 107-149; p = 0.03) in the percentage-based group. The median glargine dose was higher in the weight-based group (41 units; IQR 36-44) than in the weight-based group (24 units; IQR 14-30, p weight proved to be safe, but larger scale studies are needed before adopting weight-based dosing in this patient population.

  17. Green tea polyphenols improve cardiac muscle mRNA, and protein levels of signal pathways related to insulin and lipid metabolism and inflammation in insulin-resistant rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that the consumption of green tea polyphenols (GTP) may reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. To explore the underlying mechanisms of action at the molecular level, we examined the effects of GTP on cardiac mRNA and protein levels of genes involved in insulin an...

  18. Role of glucocorticoids in the physiopathology of excessive fat deposition and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, C; Muzzin, P; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, F

    2004-12-01

    Glucocorticoids are important hormones in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis. We infused normal rats with dexamethasone given intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) for 3 days. This resulted in hyperphagia, hyperinsulinemia, and marked insulin resistance. Similar metabolic defects were observed following i.c.v. infusion of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in normal rats. As central dexamethasone infusion enhanced NPY content in the arcuate nucleus, it suggested that its metabolic effects are mediated by NPY. Moreover, due to the lack of effects observed in vagotomized animals, activation of the parasympathetic nervous system by central dexamethasone infusion is proposed. Glucocorticoid action is known to involve prereceptor metabolism by enzymes such as 11beta-HSD-1 that converts inactive into active glucocorticoids. Mice overexpressing 11beta-HSD-1 in adipose tissue were shown to be obese and insulin resistant. We recently observed that adipose tissue 11beta-HSD-1 mRNA expression is increased at the onset of high-fat diet-induced obesity and positively correlated with the degree of hyperglycemia. In human obesity, increased adipose tissue 11beta-HSD-1 expression and activity were also reported. Resistin is a new adipose tissue-secreted hormone shown to play a role in glucose homeostasis by increasing hepatic glucose production and inhibiting muscle and adipose tissue glucose utilization. We observed increased adipose tissue resistin expression in the early phase of high-fat diet-induced obesity as well as decreased resistin expression in response to leptin. A positive correlation between glycemia and adipose tissue resistin expression further suggested a role of this hormone in the development of insulin resistance. The melanocortin system is another important player in the regulation of energy balance. Peripheral administration of a melanocortin agonist decreased food intake and body weight and favored lipid oxidation, effects that were more marked in obese than in lean

  19. [Postoperative excessive blood loss after cardiac surgery can be predicted with International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis scoring system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Ji; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Joo, Beom Joon; Lee, Jung Man; Jeon, Yun-Seok; Lim, Young Jin; Lee, Jong Hwan; Ahn, Hyuk

    Prediction of postoperative excessive blood loss is useful for management of Intensive Care Unit after cardiac surgery. The aim of present study was to examine the effectiveness of International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis scoring system in patients with cardiac surgery. After obtaining approval from the institutional review board, the medical records of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery using Cardio-Pulmonary Bypass between March 2010 and February 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis score was calculated in intensive care unit and patients were divided with overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group and non-overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group. To evaluate correlation with estimated blood loss, student t-test and correlation analyses were used. Among 384 patients with cardiac surgery, 70 patients with overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group (n=20) or non-overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group (n=50) were enrolled. Mean disseminated intravascular coagulation scores at intensive care unit admission was 5.35±0.59 (overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group) and 2.66±1.29 (non-overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group) and overt disseminated intravascular coagulation was induced in 29% (20/70). Overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group had much more EBL for 24h (p=0.006) and maintained longer time of intubation time (p=0.005). In spite of limitation of retrospective design, management using International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis score in patients after cardiac surgery seems to be helpful for prediction of the post- cardio-pulmonary bypass excessive blood loss and prolonged tracheal intubation duration. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F.; Calle, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and goal of study: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with

  1. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... medicines. You can do it. Back to Top Insulin Safety Tips Never drink insulin. Do not share ...

  2. Aging impairs myocardial fatty acid and ketone oxidation and modifies cardiac functional and metabolic responses to insulin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyyti, Outi M; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han; Ge, Ming; Portman, Michael A

    2010-09-01

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4-6 mo) and aged (22-24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing (13)C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.

  3. Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and Modifies Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Responses to Insulin in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han; Ge, Ming; Portman, Michael A.

    2010-07-02

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.

  4. Transient gestational exposure to drinking water containing excess hexavalent chromium modifies insulin signaling in liver and skeletal muscle of rat progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobana, Navaneethabalakrishnan; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael; Tochhawng, Lalmuankimi; Loganathan, Ayyalu; Balaji, Sadhasivam; Kumar, Mani Kathiresh; Banu, Liaquat Alikhan Sheerin; Navin, Ajit Kumar; Mayilvanan, Chinnaiyan; Ilangovan, Ramachandran; Balasubramanian, Karundevi

    2017-11-01

    Chromium (Cr), an essential micronutrient potentiates insulin action, whereas excess hexavalent Cr (CrVI) acts as an endocrine disruptor. Pregnant mothers living in areas abutting industries using the metal and chromite ore dumps are exposed to ground water contaminated with Cr. Nevertheless, the impact of prenatal exposure to excess CrVI on insulin signaling in the progeny remains obscure. We tested the hypothesis "transient gestational exposure to drinking water containing excess CrVI may modify insulin signaling during postnatal life". Pregnant Wistar rats were given drinking water containing 50, 100 and 200 ppm CrVI (K2Cr2O7) from gestational day 9-14 encompassing the period of organogenesis; the male progenies were tested at postnatal day 60. Neither fasting blood glucose nor oral glucose tolerance was altered in CrVI treated progeny. Nevertheless, western blot detection pointed out attenuated expression level of insulin receptor (IR), its downstream signaling molecules (IRS-1, pIRS-1Tyr632, Akt and pAktSer473) and organ specific glucose transporters (GLUT2 in liver and GLUT4 in gastrocnemius muscle), along with a significant increase in serum insulin level in male progenies exposed to CrVI. While 14C-2-deoxy glucose uptake increased in the liver, the same decreased in the skeletal muscle whereas, 14C-glucose oxidation recorded a consistent decrease in both tissues of CrVI exposed rats. These findings support our hypothesis and suggest that transient gestational exposure to excess CrVI may affect insulin signaling and glucose oxidation in the progeny, predictably rendering them vulnerable to insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo assessment of cardiac insulin resistance by nuclear probes using an iodinated tracer of glucose transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briat, Arnaud; Slimani, Lotfi; Perret, Pascale; Villemain, Daniele; Fagret, Daniel; Ghezzi, Catherine [INSERM, E0340, Radiopharmaceutiques Biocliniques, Grenoble (France); Univ Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Halimi, Serge [Univ Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Hopital Michallon, Service de Diabetologie, CHRU Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Demongeot, Jacques [Univ Grenoble, Grenoble (France); CNRS, UMR 5525, Grenoble (France)

    2007-11-15

    Insulin resistance, implying depressed cellular sensitivity to insulin, is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study is the first step towards the development of a technique of insulin resistance measurement in humans with a new tracer of glucose transport, [{sup 123}I]6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose (6DIG). We investigated 6DIG kinetics in anaesthetised control rats and in three models of insulin-resistant rats: fructose fed, Zucker and ZDF. The study of myocardial 6DIG activity was performed under two conditions: first, 6DIG was injected under the baseline condition and then it was injected after a bolus injection of insulin. After each injection, radioactivity was measured over 45 min by external detection via NaI probes, in the heart and blood. A tri-compartment model was developed to obtain fractional transfer coefficients of 6DIG from the blood to the heart. These coefficients were significantly increased with insulin in control rats and did not change significantly in insulin-resistant rats. The ratio of the coefficient obtained under insulin to that obtained under basal conditions gave an index of cardiac insulin resistance for each animal. The mean values of these ratios were significantly lower in insulin-resistant than in control rats: 1.16 {+-} 0.06 vs 2.28 {+-} 0.18 (p < 0.001) for the fructose-fed group, 0.92 {+-} 0.05 vs 1.62 {+-} 0.25 (p < 0.01) for the Zucker group and 1.34 {+-} 0.06 vs 2.01 {+-} 0.26 (p < 0.05) for the ZDF group. These results show that 6DIG could be a useful tracer to image cardiac insulin resistance. (orig.)

  6. Intraoperative maintenance of normoglycemia with insulin and glucose preserves verbal learning after cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schricker

    Full Text Available The hyperglycemic response to surgery may be a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction. We hypothesize that strict maintenance of normoglycemia during cardiac surgery preserves postoperative cognitive function.As part of a larger randomized, single-blind, interventional efficacy study on the effects of hyperinsulinemic glucose control in cardiac surgery (NCT00524472, consenting patients were randomly assigned to receive combined administration of insulin and glucose, titrated to preserve normoglycemia (3.5-6.1 mmol L(-1; experimental group, or standard metabolic care (blood glucose 3.5-10 mmol L(-1; control group, during open heart surgery. The patients' cognitive function was assessed during three home visits, approximately two weeks before the operation, and two months and seven months after surgery. The following tests were performed: Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Task (RAVLT for verbal learning and memory, Digit Span Task (working memory, Trail Making A & B (visuomotor tracking and attention, and the Word Pair Task (implicit memory. Questionnaires measuring specific traits known to affect cognitive performance, such as self-esteem, depression, chronic stress and social support, were also administered. The primary outcome was to assess the effect of hyperinsulinemic-normoglycemic clamp therapy versus standard therapy on specific cognitive parameters in patients receiving normoglycemic clamp, or standard metabolic care.Twenty-six patients completed the study with 14 patients in the normoglycemia and 12 patients in the control group. Multiple analysis of covariance (MANCOVA for the RAVLT showed a significant effect for the interaction of group by visit (F = 4.07, p = 0.035, and group by visit by recall (F = 2.21, p = 0.04. The differences occurred at the second and third visit. MANCOVA for the digit span task, trail making and word pair association test showed no significant effect.Preserving intraoperative normoglycemia by

  7. Intraoperative maintenance of normoglycemia with insulin and glucose preserves verbal learning after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schricker, Thomas; Sato, Hiroaki; Beaudry, Thomas; Codere, Takumi; Hatzakorzian, Roupen; Pruessner, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    The hyperglycemic response to surgery may be a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction. We hypothesize that strict maintenance of normoglycemia during cardiac surgery preserves postoperative cognitive function. As part of a larger randomized, single-blind, interventional efficacy study on the effects of hyperinsulinemic glucose control in cardiac surgery (NCT00524472), consenting patients were randomly assigned to receive combined administration of insulin and glucose, titrated to preserve normoglycemia (3.5-6.1 mmol L(-1); experimental group), or standard metabolic care (blood glucose 3.5-10 mmol L(-1); control group), during open heart surgery. The patients' cognitive function was assessed during three home visits, approximately two weeks before the operation, and two months and seven months after surgery. The following tests were performed: Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Task (RAVLT for verbal learning and memory), Digit Span Task (working memory), Trail Making A & B (visuomotor tracking and attention), and the Word Pair Task (implicit memory). Questionnaires measuring specific traits known to affect cognitive performance, such as self-esteem, depression, chronic stress and social support, were also administered. The primary outcome was to assess the effect of hyperinsulinemic-normoglycemic clamp therapy versus standard therapy on specific cognitive parameters in patients receiving normoglycemic clamp, or standard metabolic care. Twenty-six patients completed the study with 14 patients in the normoglycemia and 12 patients in the control group. Multiple analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) for the RAVLT showed a significant effect for the interaction of group by visit (F = 4.07, p = 0.035), and group by visit by recall (F = 2.21, p = 0.04). The differences occurred at the second and third visit. MANCOVA for the digit span task, trail making and word pair association test showed no significant effect. Preserving intraoperative normoglycemia by intravenous

  8. Serum cardiac troponin I analysis to determine the excessiveness of exercise intensity: A novel equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voets, P.J.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    Physical exertion is often promoted because of its beneficial health effects. This only holds true, however, as long as the optimal exercise intensity is not exceeded. If physical exertion becomes too strenuous or prolonged, cardiac injury or dysfunction may occur. Consequently, a significant

  9. Prevalence of male secondary hypogonadism in moderate to severe obesity and its relationship with insulin resistance and excess body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Berniza; Gómez-Martín, Jesús M; Vega-Piñero, Belén; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia; Galindo, Julio; Luque-Ramírez, Manuel; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Botella-Carretero, José I

    2016-01-01

    To study the prevalence of male obesity-secondary hypogonadism (MOSH) in patients with moderate to severe obesity, we performed a prospective prevalence study including 100 male patients with moderate to severe obesity at a university tertiary hospital. Total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations among others were assayed in all patients. Serum-free testosterone (FT) concentration was calculated from TT and SHBG levels. Semen analysis was conducted in 31 patients. We found a prevalence of 45% (95% CI: 35-55%) when considering decreased TT and/or FT concentrations. Serum concentrations of TT were correlated negatively with glucose (r = -0.328, p body weight (ρ = -0.464, p = 0.010). Our data show the prevalence of MOSH in patients with moderate to severe obesity is high. Low circulating testosterone is associated with insulin resistance and low ejaculate volume with higher BMI and excess body weight. Semen analysis must be performed in these patients when considering fertility whether or not presenting low circulating testosterone. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  10. Catalase-dependent H2O2 consumption by cardiac mitochondria and redox-mediated loss in insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, Paul M; Cacciola, Angela; Kinter, Michael; Szweda, Luke I

    2016-11-01

    We have recently demonstrated that catalase content in mouse cardiac mitochondria is selectively elevated in response to high dietary fat, a nutritional state associated with oxidative stress and loss in insulin signaling. Catalase and various isoforms of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin each catalyze the consumption of H2O2 Catalase, located primarily within peroxisomes and to a lesser extent mitochondria, has a low binding affinity for H2O2 relative to glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin. As such, the contribution of catalase to mitochondrial H2O2 consumption is not well understood. In the current study, using highly purified cardiac mitochondria challenged with micromolar concentrations of H2O2, we found that catalase contributes significantly to mitochondrial H2O2 consumption. In addition, catalase is solely responsible for removal of H2O2 in nonrespiring or structurally disrupted mitochondria. Finally, in mice fed a high-fat diet, mitochondrial-derived H2O2 is responsible for diminished insulin signaling in the heart as evidenced by reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. While elevated mitochondrial catalase content (∼50%) enhanced the capacity of mitochondria to consume H2O2 in response to high dietary fat, the selective increase in catalase did not prevent H2O2-induced loss in cardiac insulin signaling. Taken together, our results indicate that mitochondrial catalase likely functions to preclude the formation of high levels of H2O2 without perturbing redox-dependent signaling. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Computerised insulin dosing calculators for the management of continuous insulin infusions after cardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Megan H; Fernandez, Ritin S

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of computerised insulin dosing calculators for the management of continuous insulin infusions in adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery. A systematic review was conducted. The CINAHL, MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched for primary studies that compared a computerised insulin dosing calculator to a paper protocol. The main outcome measures were mean Blood Glucose Level (BGL), time to achieve BGL target range, time spent within BGL target range, the incidence of hyperglycaemia and the incidence of hypoglycaemia. Five studies were included in the final review. Pooled data demonstrated significant improvements in mean BGL (MD -14.24, 95% CI -26.93 to -1.55), p=0.03 and significantly lower rates of hypoglycaemia (OR 0.038, 95% CI: 0.16-0.90), p=0.03 amongst the computer calculator groups in comparison to the paper protocol groups. No significant difference in the incidence of severe hypoglycaemia was demonstrated (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.02-1.79), p=0.15. No difference was found in time (hours) to reach target blood glucose range (MD -1.47, 95% CI -3.75 to 0.81), p=0.21. There is some evidence to support the use of computerised insulin dosing calculators for insulin infusion management within critical care environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tight Glycemic Control With Insulin Does Not Affect Skeletal Muscle Degradation During the Early Postoperative Period Following Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jeremy G; Sparks, Eric A; Khan, Faraz A; Alexander, Jamin L; Asaro, Lisa A; Wypij, David; Gaies, Michael; Modi, Biren P; Duggan, Christopher; Agus, Michael S D; Yu, Yong-Ming; Jaksic, Tom

    2015-07-01

    Critical illness is associated with significant catabolism, and persistent protein loss correlates with increased morbidity and mortality. Insulin is a potent anticatabolic hormone; high-dose insulin decreases skeletal muscle protein breakdown in critically ill pediatric surgical patients. However, insulin's effect on protein catabolism when given at clinically utilized doses has not been studied. The objective was to evaluate the effect of postoperative tight glycemic control and clinically dosed insulin on skeletal muscle degradation in children after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Secondary analysis of a two-center, prospective randomized trial comparing tight glycemic control with standard care. Randomization was stratified by study center. Children 0-36 months who were admitted to the ICU after cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. In the tight glycemic control arm, insulin was titrated to maintain blood glucose between 80 and 110 mg/dL. Patients in the control arm received standard care. Skeletal muscle breakdown was quantified by a ratio of urinary 3-methylhistidine to urinary creatinine. A total of 561 patients were included: 281 in the tight glycemic control arm and 280 receiving standard care. There was no difference in 3-methylhistidine to creatinine between groups (tight glycemic control, 249 ± 127 vs standard care, 253 ± 112, mean ± SD in μmol/g; p = 0.72). In analyses restricted to the patients in tight glycemic control arm, higher 3-methylhistidine to creatinine correlated with younger age, as well as lower weight, weight-for-age z score, length, and body surface area (p postoperative day 3 serum creatinine (r = -0.17; p = 0.02). Sex, prealbumin, and albumin were not associated with 3-methylhistidine to creatinine. During urine collection, 245 patients (87%) received insulin. However, any insulin exposure did not impact 3-methylhistidine to creatinine (t test, p = 0.45), and there was no dose-dependent effect of insulin

  13. Cardiac hypertrophy caused by peroxisome proliferator- activated receptor-gamma agonist treatment occurs independently of changes in myocardial insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Sandra; Rasmussen, Isaac R; Wende, Adam R; McQueen, Alfred P; Theobald, Heather A; Wilde, Nicole; Pereira, Renata Oliveira; Litwin, Sheldon E; Berger, Joel P; Abel, E Dale

    2007-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma ligands are insulin sensitizers, widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A consistent observation in preclinical species is the development of cardiac hypertrophy after short-term treatment with these agents. The mechanisms for this hypertrophy are incompletely understood. Given the important role of insulin signaling in the regulation of myocardial size, we tested the hypothesis that augmentation of myocardial insulin signaling may play a role in PPAR-gamma ligand-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We treated mice with cardiomyocyte-restricted knockout of insulin receptors (CIRKO) and littermate controls (wild type) with 2-(2-(4-phenoxy-2-propylphenoxy) ethyl) indole-5-acetic acid (COOH), which is a non-thiazolidinedione PPAR-gamma agonist for 2 wk. Two weeks of COOH treatment increased heart weights by 22% in CIRKO mice and 16% in wild type, and induced similar fold increase in the expression of hypertrophic markers such as alpha-skeletal actin, brain natriuretic peptide, and atrial natriuretic peptide in CIRKO and wild-type (WT) hearts. COOH treatment increased plasma volume by 10% in COOH-treated WT and CIRKO mice but did not increase systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Echocardiographic analysis was also consistent with volume overload, as evidenced by increased left ventricular diastolic diameters and cardiac output in COOH-treated CIRKO and WT mice. These data indicate that cardiac hypertrophy after PPAR-gamma agonist treatment can occur in the absence of myocardial insulin signaling and is likely secondary to the hemodynamic consequences of plasma volume expansion.

  14. The influence of reduced insulin sensitivity via short-term reductions in physical activity on cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during acute hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, S W; Reynolds, L J; Restaino, R M; Credeur, D P; Leidy, H J; Thyfault, J P; Fadel, P J

    2015-12-15

    Reduced insulin sensitivity and impaired glycemic control are among the consequences of physical inactivity and have been associated with reduced cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). However, the effect of reduced insulin sensitivity and acute hyperglycemia following glucose consumption on cardiac BRS in young, healthy subjects has not been well characterized. We hypothesized that a reduction in insulin sensitivity via reductions in physical activity would reduce cardiac BRS at rest and following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Nine recreationally active men (23 ± 1 yr; >10,000 steps/day) underwent 5 days of reduced daily physical activity (RA5) by refraining from planned exercise and reducing daily steps (insulin alone on cardiac BRS using a 120-min hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) was significantly reduced following RA5 (BL 9.2 ± 1.3 vs. RA5 6.4 ± 1.1, P insulin can impair spontaneous cardiac BRS in young, healthy subjects, and that reductions in cardiac BRS following acute hyperglycemia are unaffected by reduced insulin sensitivity via short-term reductions in physical activity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Peri-operative management of patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus undergoing non-cardiac surgery using liraglutide, glucose-insulin-potassium infusion or intravenous insulin bolus regimens: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polderman, J A W; van Steen, S C J; Thiel, B; Godfried, M B; Houweling, P L; Hollmann, M W; H DeVries, J; Preckel, B; Hermanides, J

    2017-12-12

    In this open-label multicentre randomised controlled trial, we investigated three peri-operative treatment strategies to lower glucose and reduce the need for rescue insulin in patients aged 18-75 years with type-2 diabetes mellitus undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Patients were randomly allocated using a web-based randomisation program to premedication with liraglutide (liraglutide group), glucose-insulin-potassium infusion (insulin infusion group) or insulin bolus regimen (insulin bolus group), targeting a glucose operative nausea in the liraglutide group, of which two had severe nausea, compared with no patients in the insulin infusion and insulin bolus groups (p = 0.007). The pre-operative administration of liraglutide stabilised peri-operative plasma glucose levels and reduced peri-operative insulin requirements, at the expense of increased pre-operative nausea rates. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Insulin/glucose induces natriuretic peptide clearance receptor in human adipocytes: a metabolic link with the cardiac natriuretic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordicchia, M; Ceresiani, M; Pavani, M; Minardi, D; Polito, M; Wabitsch, M; Cannone, V; Burnett, J C; Dessì-Fulgheri, P; Sarzani, R

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP) are involved in cardiorenal regulation and in lipolysis. The NP activity is largely dependent on the ratio between the signaling receptor NPRA and the clearance receptor NPRC. Lipolysis increases when NPRC is reduced by starving or very-low-calorie diet. On the contrary, insulin is an antilipolytic hormone that increases sodium retention, suggesting a possible functional link with NP. We examined the insulin-mediated regulation of NP receptors in differentiated human adipocytes and tested the association of NP receptor expression in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with metabolic profiles of patients undergoing renal surgery. Differentiated human adipocytes from VAT and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) adipocyte cell line were treated with insulin in the presence of high-glucose or low-glucose media to study NP receptors and insulin/glucose-regulated pathways. Fasting blood samples and VAT samples were taken from patients on the day of renal surgery. We observed a potent insulin-mediated and glucose-dependent upregulation of NPRC, through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, associated with lower lipolysis in differentiated adipocytes. No effect was observed on NPRA. Low-glucose medium, used to simulate in vivo starving conditions, hampered the insulin effect on NPRC through modulation of insulin/glucose-regulated pathways, allowing atrial natriuretic peptide to induce lipolysis and thermogenic genes. An expression ratio in favor of NPRC in adipose tissue was associated with higher fasting insulinemia, HOMA-IR, and atherogenic lipid levels. Insulin/glucose-dependent NPRC induction in adipocytes might be a key factor linking hyperinsulinemia, metabolic syndrome, and higher blood pressure by reducing NP effects on adipocytes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Differing endoplasmic reticulum stress response to excess lipogenesis versus lipid oversupply in relation to hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Ping Ren

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress have been implicated in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. The present study investigated their roles in the development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance during de novo lipogenesis (DNL compared to extrahepatic lipid oversupply. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a high fructose (HFru or high fat (HFat diet to induce DNL or lipid oversupply in/to the liver. Both HFru and HFat feeding increased hepatic triglyceride within 3 days (by 3.5 and 2.4 fold and the steatosis remained persistent from 1 week onwards (p<0.01 vs Con. Glucose intolerance (iAUC increased by ∼60% and blunted insulin-stimulated hepatic Akt and GSK3β phosphorylation (∼40-60% were found in both feeding conditions (p<0.01 vs Con, assessed after 1 week. No impairment of mitochondrial function was found (oxidation capacity, expression of PGC1α, CPT1, respiratory complexes, enzymatic activity of citrate synthase & β-HAD. As expected, DNL was increased (∼60% in HFru-fed mice and decreased (32% in HFat-fed mice (all p<0.05. Interestingly, associated with the upregulated lipogenic enzymes (ACC, FAS and SCD1, two (PERK/eIF2α and IRE1/XBP1 of three ER stress pathways were significantly activated in HFru-fed mice. However, no significant ER stress was observed in HFat-fed mice during the development of hepatic steatosis. Our findings indicate that HFru and HFat diets can result in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance without obvious mitochondrial defects via different lipid metabolic pathways. The fact that ER stress is apparent only with HFru feeding suggests that ER stress is involved in DNL per se rather than resulting from hepatic steatosis or insulin resistance.

  18. Differing endoplasmic reticulum stress response to excess lipogenesis versus lipid oversupply in relation to hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lu-Ping; Chan, Stanley M H; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Laybutt, D Ross; Iseli, Tristan J; Sun, Ruo-Qiong; Kraegen, Edward W; Cooney, Gregory J; Turner, Nigel; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been implicated in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. The present study investigated their roles in the development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance during de novo lipogenesis (DNL) compared to extrahepatic lipid oversupply. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a high fructose (HFru) or high fat (HFat) diet to induce DNL or lipid oversupply in/to the liver. Both HFru and HFat feeding increased hepatic triglyceride within 3 days (by 3.5 and 2.4 fold) and the steatosis remained persistent from 1 week onwards (p<0.01 vs Con). Glucose intolerance (iAUC increased by ∼60%) and blunted insulin-stimulated hepatic Akt and GSK3β phosphorylation (∼40-60%) were found in both feeding conditions (p<0.01 vs Con, assessed after 1 week). No impairment of mitochondrial function was found (oxidation capacity, expression of PGC1α, CPT1, respiratory complexes, enzymatic activity of citrate synthase & β-HAD). As expected, DNL was increased (∼60%) in HFru-fed mice and decreased (32%) in HFat-fed mice (all p<0.05). Interestingly, associated with the upregulated lipogenic enzymes (ACC, FAS and SCD1), two (PERK/eIF2α and IRE1/XBP1) of three ER stress pathways were significantly activated in HFru-fed mice. However, no significant ER stress was observed in HFat-fed mice during the development of hepatic steatosis. Our findings indicate that HFru and HFat diets can result in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance without obvious mitochondrial defects via different lipid metabolic pathways. The fact that ER stress is apparent only with HFru feeding suggests that ER stress is involved in DNL per se rather than resulting from hepatic steatosis or insulin resistance.

  19. Excess of the endocannabinoid anandamide during lactation induces overweight, fat accumulation and insulin resistance in adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre Carolina A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental conditions in early life can induce permanent physiological changes, sometimes increasing the risk of chronic diseases during adulthood. Neural and peripheral circuits controlling energy balance may be modulated during such a critical period. Since type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R have recently emerged as targets for modulating energy balance, their premature chronic activation during early life may result in long-term metabolic consequences associated to overweight/obesity. Endogenous activation of CB1R mainly occurs after binding to the endocannabinoid Anandamide (AEA. Objective To evaluate long-term effects of AEA treatment during lactation on body weight, epididymal fat accumulation and related metabolic parameters during adulthood. Design Male mice pups were orally treated with a solution of AEA (20 μg/g body weight in soy oil or vehicle during the whole lactation period. After weaning, food intake and body weight were recorded every 10 days. Adult animals were subjected to glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Subsequently, animals were sacrificed and epididymal fat pads were extracted. Circulating levels of plasma insulin, leptin, non-sterified fatty acids (NEFA, triglyceride and cholesterol were also evaluated. Results AEA-treated mice during lactation showed a significant increase in accumulated food intake, body weight and epididymal fat during adulthood when compared to control mice. When evaluating CB1R protein expression in epididymal fat, the AEA-treated group showed a 150 % increase in expression compared to the control mice. This group also displayed significantly higher levels of circulating glucose, insulin, leptin, triglycerides, cholesterol and NEFA. Moreover, a marked state of insulin resistance was an important finding in the AEA-treated group. Conclusion This study showed that overweight, accumulation of visceral fat and associated metabolic disturbances, such as a higher lipid

  20. Insulin upregulates GRIM-19 and protects cardiac mitochondrial morphology in type 1 diabetic rats partly through PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Guang; Dong, Zhi-Feng; Chen, Kan-Kai; He, Ya-Ping; Dai, Xiao-Yan; Li, Shuai; Li, Jing-Bo; Zhu, Wei; Wei, Meng

    2017-11-04

    Insulin is involved in the development of diabetic heart disease and is important in the activities of mitochondrial complex I. However, the effect of insulin on cardiac mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1 subunit of retinoic-interferon-induced mortality 19 (GRIM-19) has not been characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of insulin on the mitochondrial GRIM-19 in the hearts of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes. Protein changes of GRIM-19 were evaluated by western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the effects of insulin on mitochondrial complex I were detected in HeLa cells and H9C2 cardiac myocytes. During the development of diabetic heart disease, the cardiac function did not change within the 8 weeks, but the mitochondrial morphology was altered. The hearts from the rats with STZ-induced diabetes exhibited reduced expression of GRIM-19. Prior to the overt cardiac dilatation, mitochondrial alterations were already present. Following subcutaneous insulin injection, it was demonstrated that GRIM-19 protein was altered, as well as the mitochondrial morphology. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 had an effect on insulin signaling in H9C2 cardiacmyocytes, and decreased the level of GRIM-19 by half compared with that in the insulin group. The results indicate that insulin is essential for the control of cardiac mitochondrial morphology and the GRIM-19 expression partly via PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Muthuramu, Ilayaraja; Amin, Ruhul; Postnov, Andrey; Mishra, Mudit; Jacobs, Frank; Gheysens, Olivier; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; De Geest, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher (p < 0.05) in 0.2% cholesterol 10% coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (h...

  2. Predictive Value of Intraoperative Thromboelastometry for the Risk of Perioperative Excessive Blood Loss in Infants and Children Undergoing Congenital Cardiac Surgery: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunhee; Shim, Haeng Seon; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Sue-Young; Park, Sun-Kyung; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook; Kim, Chung Su

    2016-10-01

    Laboratory hemostatic variables and parameters of rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) were evaluated for their ability to predict perioperative excessive blood loss (PEBL) after congenital cardiac surgery. Retrospective and observational. Single, large university hospital. The study comprised 119 children younger than 10 years old undergoing congenital cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Intraoperative excessive blood loss was defined as estimated blood loss≥50% of estimated blood volume (EBV). Postoperative excessive blood loss was defined as measured postoperative chest tube and Jackson-Pratt drainage≥30% of EBV over 12 hours or≥50% of EBV over 24 hours in the intensive care unit. PEBL was defined as either intraoperative or postoperative excessive blood loss. External temogram (EXTEM) and fibrinogen temogram (FIBTEM) were analyzed before and after CPB with ROTEM and laboratory hemostatic variables. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Incidence of PEBL was 19.3% (n = 23). Independent risk factors for PEBL were CPB time>120 minutes, post-CPB FIBTEM alpha-angle, clot firmness after 10 minutes20%. Laboratory hemostatic variables were not significant in multivariate analysis. The risk prediction model was developed from the results of multivariate analysis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.94 (95% confidence interval: 0.90-0.99). Post-CPB ROTEM may be useful for predicting both intraoperative and postoperative excessive blood loss in congenital cardiac surgery. This study provided an accurate prediction model for PEBL and supported intraoperative transfusion guidance using post-CPB FIBTEM-A10 and EXTEM-A10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac insulin-resistance and decreased mitochondrial energy production precede the development of systolic heart failure after pressure-overload hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyan; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Ussher, John R; Sankaralingam, Sowndramalingam; Wagg, Cory; Zaugg, Michael; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2013-09-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is accompanied by significant alterations in energy metabolism. Whether these changes in energy metabolism precede and contribute to the development of heart failure in the hypertrophied heart is not clear. Mice were subjected to cardiac hypertrophy secondary to pressure-overload as a result of an abdominal aortic constriction (AAC). The rates of energy substrate metabolism were assessed in isolated working hearts obtained 1, 2, and 3 weeks after AAC. Mice subjected to AAC demonstrated a progressive development of cardiac hypertrophy. In vivo assessment of cardiac function (via echocardiography) demonstrated diastolic dysfunction by 2 weeks (20% increase in E/E'), and systolic dysfunction by 3 weeks (16% decrease in % ejection fraction). Marked cardiac insulin-resistance by 2 weeks post-AAC was evidenced by a significant decrease in insulin-stimulated rates of glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and plasma membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4. Overall ATP production rates were decreased at 2 and 3 weeks post-AAC (by 37% and 47%, respectively) because of a reduction in mitochondrial oxidation of glucose, lactate, and fatty acids that was not accompanied by an increase in myocardial glycolysis rates. Reduced mitochondrial complex V activity was evident at 3 weeks post-AAC, concomitant with a reduction in the ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP. The development of cardiac insulin-resistance and decreased mitochondrial oxidative metabolism are early metabolic changes in the development of cardiac hypertrophy, which create an energy deficit that may contribute to the progression from hypertrophy to heart failure.

  4. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuramu, Ilayaraja; Amin, Ruhul; Postnov, Andrey; Mishra, Mudit; Jacobs, Frank; Gheysens, Olivier; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; De Geest, Bart

    2017-07-18

    Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher ( p coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (hazard ratio 2.32, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 4.64) during eight weeks of follow-up. The effects of coconut oil on cardiac remodeling occurred in the absence of weight gain and of systemic insulin resistance. Wet lung weight was 1.76-fold ( p coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial capillary density ( p coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial glucose uptake was 1.86-fold ( p coconut oil mice and was accompanied by higher myocardial pyruvate dehydrogenase levels and higher acetyl-CoA carboxylase levels. The coconut oil diet increased oxidative stress. Myocardial triglycerides and free fatty acids were lower ( p coconut oil mice. In conclusion, coconut oil aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy.

  5. Exercise effects on cardiac size and left ventricular diastolic function: relationships to changes in fitness, fatness, blood pressure and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, K J; Ouyang, P; Bacher, A C; Lima, S; Shapiro, E P

    2006-07-01

    To determine exercise training effects on cardiac size and left ventricular (LV) diastolic function and relationships of exercise induced changes in physiological and body composition parameters with cardiac parameters. Prospective, randomised controlled trial. Men and women (63.6 (5.7) years, body mass index 29.5 (4.4) kg/m(2)) with untreated hypertension (systolic blood pressure (BP) 130-159 or diastolic BP 85-99 mm Hg). Cardiac size and LV diastolic function, peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2)), muscle strength, general and abdominal fatness, and insulin resistance. 6 months of exercise training versus usual care. When analysed by group at six months, cardiac size and LV diastolic function did not differ between exercisers (n = 51) and controls (n = 53), whereas exercisers had significantly higher peak Vo(2) (28 v 24 ml/kg/min) and strength (383 v 329 kg), and lower fatness (34% v 37%), diastolic BP (73 v 75 mm Hg) and insulin resistance (quantitative insulin sensitivity check index 0.35 v 0.34) versus controls (all p fitness and reductions in abdominal fatness, insulin resistance and BP showed a modest trend towards physiological hypertrophy characterised by increased cardiac size and improved LV diastolic function. These results suggest that decreased abdominal fatness may have a role in improving cardiovascular health.

  6. Candesartan restored cardiac Hsp72 expression and tolerance against reperfusion injury in hereditary insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yayoi; Takahashi, Naohiko; Fukui, Akira; Nagano-Torigoe, Yasuko; Thuc, Luong Cong; Teshima, Yasushi; Shinohara, Tetsuji; Wakisaka, Osamu; Ooie, Tatsuhiko; Murozono, Yukichi; Yufu, Kunio; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Hara, Masahide; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Saikawa, Tetsunori

    2011-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that candesartan, an angiotensin II (AII) type 1 receptor antagonist, would restore the depressed phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase-dependent Akt phosphorylation, an essential signal to induce heat-shock protein 72 (Hsp72) in response to hyperthermia, in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rats. At 14 weeks of age, male OLETF rats and Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were treated with candesartan (0.25 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks. Thereafter, hyperthermia (43°C for 20 min) was applied. We observed the following: (i) Candesartan did not improve insulin sensitivity in OLETF rats. (ii) Candesartan restored depressed PI3 kinase-dependent Akt phosphorylation and Hsp72 expression in OLETF rat hearts. (iii) Cardiac ventricular tissue contents of AII were greater in OLETF rats, which were suppressed by candesartan. (iv) Cardiac levels of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) phosphorylation were greater in OLETF rats, which were suppressed by candesartan. In cultured cardiomyocytes, application of AII induced PTEN phosphorylation, which was suppressed by candesartan. (v) In high-fat diet insulin-resistant rats, similar results were observed with respect to Hsp72 expression, Akt phosphorylation and PTEN phosphorylation. (vi) In isolated, perfused heart experiments, reperfusion-induced cardiac functional recovery was suppressed in OLETF rat hearts, which was improved by candesartan. Our results suggest that the depression of PI3 kinase-dependent Akt activation in response to hyperthermia in OLETF rats can be restored by candesartan. Substantial activation of the renin-angiotensin system, represented by increased myocardial AII content and subsequent PTEN phosphorylation, may underlie the pathogenesis which is ameliorated by candesartan.

  7. The Impact of Sleep Debt on Excess Adiposity and Insulin Sensitivity in Patients with Early Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Teresa; Chen, Mimi Z; Cooper, Ashley R; Andrews, Rob C; Taheri, Shahrad

    2016-05-15

    We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations between sleep debt and adiposity measures, as well as homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in early type 2 diabetes. Prospective data analysis from participants of a randomized controlled trial based on an intensive lifestyle intervention (usual care, diet, or diet and physical activity). Data were collected at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months post-intervention. The study was performed across five secondary care centers in the United Kingdom. Patients (n = 593) with a recent diagnosis of type 2 diabetes were recruited. Objective height and weight were ascertained for obesity status (body mass index [BMI]; ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), waist circumference (cm) for central adiposity, and fasting blood samples drawn to examine insulin resistance (IR). Seven-day sleep diaries were used to calculate weekday sleep debt at baseline, calculated as average weekend sleep duration minus average weekday sleep duration. At baseline, compared to those without weekday sleep debt, those with weekday sleep debt were 72% more likely to be obese (OR = 1.72 [95% CI:1.03-2.88]). At six months, weekday sleep debt was significantly associated with obesity and IR after adjustment, OR = 1.90 (95% CI:1.10-3.30), OR = 2.07 (95% CI:1.02-4.22), respectively. A further increase at 12 months was observed for sleep debt with obesity and IR: OR = 2.10 (95% CI:1.14-3.87), OR = 3.16 (95% CI:1.38-7.24), respectively. For every 30 minutes of weekday sleep debt, the risk of obesity and IR at 12 months increased by 18% and 41%, respectively. Sleep debt resulted in long-term metabolic disruption, which may promote the progression of type 2 diabetes in newly diagnosed patients. Sleep hygiene/education could be an important factor for future interventions to target early diabetes. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  8. Glucagon and a glucagon-GLP-1 dual-agonist increases cardiac performance with different metabolic effects in insulin-resistant hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Keung, Wendy; Pedersen, Henrik D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The prevalence of heart disease continues to rise, particularly in subjects with insulin resistance (IR), and improved therapies for these patients is an important challenge. In this study we evaluated cardiac function and energy metabolism in IR JCR:LA-cp rat hearts before...

  9. Effects of exenatide on cardiac function, perfusion, and energetics in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiomyopathy: a randomized controlled trial against insulin glargine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weena J Y; Diamant, Michaela; de Boer, Karin; Harms, Hendrik J; Robbers, Lourens F H J; van Rossum, Albert C; Kramer, Mark H H; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Knaapen, Paul

    2017-05-19

    Multiple bloodglucose-lowering agents have been linked to cardiovascular events. Preliminary studies showed improvement in left ventricular (LV) function during glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist administration. Underlying mechanisms, however, are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate myocardial perfusion and oxidative metabolism in type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients with LV systolic dysfunction as compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, effects of 26-weeks of exenatide versus insulin glargine administration on cardiac function, perfusion and oxidative metabolism in T2DM patients with LV dysfunction were explored. Twenty-six T2DM patients with LV systolic dysfunction (cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) derived LV ejection fraction (LVEF) of 47 ± 13%) and 10 controls (LVEF of 59 ± 4%, P efficiency, measured using [ 11 C]acetate PET and CMR derived stroke volume, were not different between the groups. Eleven patients in the exenatide group and 12 patients in the insulin glargine group completed the trial. Systemic metabolic control was improved after both treatments, although, no changes in cardiac function, perfusion and metabolism were seen after exenatide or insulin glargine. T2DM patients with LV systolic dysfunction did not have altered myocardial efficiency as compared to healthy controls. Exenatide or insulin glargine had no effects on cardiac function, perfusion or oxidative metabolism. Trial registration NCT00766857.

  10. Early origins of heart disease: low birth weight and the role of the insulin-like growth factor system in cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Botting, Kimberley J; Padhee, Monalisa; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I Caroline; Suter, Catherine M; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2012-11-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that poor growth before birth is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and an increased risk of death from heart disease later in life. In fetal life, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system has been implicated in physiological growth of the heart, whereas in postnatal life IGFs can be involved in both physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy. A reduction in substrate supply in fetal life, resulting in chronic hypoxaemia and intrauterine growth restriction, results in increased cardiac IGF-1R, IGF-2 and IGF-2R gene expression; and there is also evidence for a role of the IGF-2 receptor in the ensuing cardiac hypertrophy. The persistent high level of cardiac IGF-2R gene expression from fetal to postnatal life may be due to epigenetic changes in key cardiac hypertrophy regulatory pathways. © 2012 The Authors Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Factors associated with hyperglycemia and low insulin levels in children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass who received a single high dose of methylprednisolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkader, Ronaldo; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro; Yamamoto, Lidia; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2013-01-01

    Administering steroids before cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatric heart surgery modulates systemic inflammatory response syndrome and improves postoperative recovery. However, the use of steroids aggravates hyperglycemia, which is associated with a poor prognosis. Adult patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome usually evolve with hyperglycemia and high insulin levels, whereas >90% of pediatric patients exhibit hyperglycemia and low insulin levels. This study aims to determine: A) the metabolic and inflammatory factors that are associated with hyperglycemia and low insulin levels in children who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and who received a single high dose of methylprednisolone and B) the best predictors of insulin variation using a mathematical model. This preliminary study recruited 20 children who underwent heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and received methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg) immediately after anesthesia. Among the 20 patients initially recruited, one was excluded because of the absence of hyperglycemia and lower insulin levels after surgery. However, these abnormalities were confirmed in the remaining 19 children. The C-peptide, CRP, IL-6, and adrenomedullin levels were measured before surgery, immediately after cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the first, second, and third days after cardiac surgery. IL-6, CRP, and adrenomedullin increments were observed, whereas the C-peptide levels remained within reference intervals. The multiple regression model demonstrated that in addition to age and glycemia (two well-known factors that are directly involved in glucose metabolism), adrenomedullin and IL-6 levels were independent factors associated with lower insulin concentrations. These four parameters were responsible for 64.7% of the observed insulin variances. In addition, the fact that C-peptide levels did not fall together with insulin could have grounded the medical decision not to administer insulin to patients.

  12. The Intraoperative Glycemic Response to Intravenous Insulin during Non-cardiac Surgery: A Sub-analysis of the DeLiT Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, B.; Duncan, A. E.; Bonilla, A.; Yang, D.; Parra-Sanchez, I.; Fergany, A.; Irefin, S. A.; Sessler, D. I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patient characteristics may affect patients' response to insulin. We examined the impact of body weight, and presence of diabetes on the response to insulin during non-cardiac surgery. We studied 202 patients who were enrolled in the DeLiT Trial and received intraoperative intravenous insulin. Univariable and multivariable analyses (Bonferroni-corrected) assessed the relationship between patient's response to the initial intraoperative bolus of regular insulin and the factors of interest. Blood glucose concentrations decreased 8.3 ±10 mg dl-1 (0.46 ± 0.56 mmol litre-1) per unit of insulin in 30 minutes. The response to insulin was similar in patients with or without diabetes [adjusted mean difference (97.5% CI): 0.2 (-3.9, 4.2) mg dl-1, 0.01 (-0.22, 0.24) mmol litre-1, P = 0.93]. No relationship was found between insulin response and body weight. Our results suggest that adjustment for body weight and the presence of diabetes may not improve intraoperative insulin treatment algorithms. PMID:26897443

  13. The effect of insulin therapy algorithms on blood glucose levels in patients following cardiac surgery: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Megan; Fernandez, Ritin

    2015-06-12

    A number of insulin infusion algorithms, with varying methods and effects, have been developed to guide the management of postoperative hyperglycemia in critically ill patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of insulin therapy algorithms on blood glucose levels in patients in critical care environments following cardiac surgery. Types of participants: Adult patients aged 18 or older who were admitted to a critical care environment after cardiac surgery and who received insulin therapy for glycemic control during the acute postoperative phase of their admission. Types of intervention: The intervention of interest was continuous intravenous insulin therapy. Types of studies: Experimental study designs including randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled trials and controlled before and after studies published in the English language were included in this review. Types of outcomes: Primary outcomes of interest included objective measures of glycemic control and secondary outcomes of interest included the incidence of adverse events. The search aimed to find both published and unpublished studies through electronic databases, reference lists, key reports and the World Wide Web. An extensive search was undertaken for the following databases: Medline, CINAHL, PubMed, Embase, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, Dare, Social Science Index, ProQuest, and MedNar. Databases were searched up to March 2014. All studies selected were assessed by two reviewers independently for methodological quality prior to inclusion in the review using the standardized Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument critical appraisal tool. Any disagreements that arose between the reviewers were resolved through discussion. Quantitative data was extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument

  14. Wheat germ supplementation alleviates insulin resistance and cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction in an animal model of diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Babajide; Simenson, Ashley J; O'Hara, Crystal; Wu, Lei; Gou, Xin; Peterson, Sandra K; Lin, Daniel; Smith, Brenda J; Lucas, Edralin A

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with insulin resistance (IR), along with mitochondrial dysfunction to metabolically active tissues and increased production of reactive O2 species (ROS). Foods rich in antioxidants such as wheat germ (WG), protect tissues from damage due to ROS and modulate some negative effects of obesity. This study examined the effects of WG supplementation on markers of IR, mitochondrial substrate metabolism and innate antioxidant markers in two metabolically active tissues (i.e. liver and heart) of C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat-high-sucrose (HFS) diet. Male C57BL/6 mice, 6-week-old, were randomised into four dietary treatment groups (n 12 mice/group): control (C, 10 % fat kcal), C+10 % WG, HFS (60 % fat kcal) or HFS+10 % WG (HFS+WG). After 12 weeks of treatment, HFS+WG mice had significantly less visceral fat (-16 %, P=0·006) compared with the HFS group. WG significantly reduced serum insulin (P=0·009), the insulinotropic hormone, gastric inhibitory peptide (P=0·0003), and the surrogate measure of IR, homoeostatic model assessment of IR (P=0·006). HFS diet significantly elevated (45 %, P=0·02) cardiac complex 2 mitochondrial VO2, suggesting increased metabolic stress, whereas WG stabilised this effect to the level of control. Consequently, genes which mediate antioxidant defense and mitochondrial biogenesis (superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) and PPARγ coactivator 1-α (Pgc1a), respectively) were significantly reduced (Pheart of the HFS group, whereas WG supplementation tended to up-regulate both genes. WG significantly increased hepatic gene expression of Sod2 (P=0·048) but not Pgc1a. Together, these results showed that WG supplementation in HFS diet, reduced IR and improved cardiac mitochondrial metabolic functions.

  15. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilayaraja Muthuramu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher (p < 0.05 in 0.2% cholesterol 10% coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (hazard ratio 2.32, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 4.64 during eight weeks of follow-up. The effects of coconut oil on cardiac remodeling occurred in the absence of weight gain and of systemic insulin resistance. Wet lung weight was 1.76-fold (p < 0.01 higher in coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial capillary density (p < 0.001 was decreased, interstitial fibrosis was 1.88-fold (p < 0.001 higher, and systolic and diastolic function was worse in coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial glucose uptake was 1.86-fold (p < 0.001 higher in coconut oil mice and was accompanied by higher myocardial pyruvate dehydrogenase levels and higher acetyl-CoA carboxylase levels. The coconut oil diet increased oxidative stress. Myocardial triglycerides and free fatty acids were lower (p < 0.05 in coconut oil mice. In conclusion, coconut oil aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy.

  16. Loss of 50% of excess weight using a very low energy diet improves insulin-stimulated glucose disposal and skeletal muscle insulin signalling in obese insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jazet, I. M.; Schaart, G.; Gastaldelli, A.; Ferrannini, E.; Hesselink, M. K.; Schrauwen, P.; Romijn, J. A.; Maassen, J. A.; Pijl, H.; Ouwens, D. M.; Meinders, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Both energy restriction (ER) per se and weight loss improve glucose metabolism in obese insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients. Short-term ER decreases basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) but not glucose disposal. In contrast the blood glucose-lowering mechanism of long-term ER with

  17. Insulin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... involves changes in diet and lifestyle. The American Diabetes Association recommends losing excess weight, getting regular amounts of moderate intensity physical activity, and increasing dietary fiber to lower blood insulin levels and increase the ...

  18. Impairment of insulin-stimulated Akt/GLUT4 signaling is associated with cardiac contractile dysfunction and aggravates I/R injury in STZ-diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Jen-Ying

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, we established systemic in-vivo evidence from molecular to organism level to explain how diabetes can aggravate myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury and revealed the role of insulin signaling (with specific focus on Akt/GLUT4 signaling molecules. The myocardial I/R injury was induced by the left main coronary artery occlusion for 1 hr and then 3 hr reperfusion in control, streptozotocin (STZ-induced insulinopenic diabetes, and insulin-treated diabetic rats. The diabetic rats showed a significant decrease in heart rate, and a prolonged isovolumic relaxation (tau which lead to decrease in cardiac output (CO without changing total peripheral resistance (TPR. The phosphorylated Akt and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT 4 protein levels were dramatically reduced in both I/R and non-I/R diabetic rat hearts. Insulin treatment in diabetes showed improvement of contractile function as well as partially increased Akt phosphorylation and GLUT 4 protein levels. In the animals subjected to I/R, the mortality rates were 25%, 65%, and 33% in the control, diabetic, and insulin-treated diabetic group respectively. The I/R-induced arrhythmias and myocardial infarction did not differ significantly between the control and the diabetic groups. Consistent with its anti-hyperglycemic effects, insulin significantly reduced I/R-induced arrhythmias but had no effect on I/R-induced infarctions. Diabetic rat with I/R exhibited the worse hemodynamic outcome, which included systolic and diastolic dysfunctions. Insulin treatment only partially improved diastolic functions and elevated P-Akt and GLUT 4 protein levels. Our results indicate that cardiac contractile dysfunction caused by a defect in insulin-stimulated Akt/GLUT4 may be a major reason for the high mortality rate in I/R injured diabetic rats.

  19. Differential impact of selective GH deficiency and endogenous GH excess on insulin-mediated actions in muscle and liver of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Gahete, Manuel D; McGuinness, Owen P; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2014-11-15

    A reciprocal relationship between insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance has been reported in some mouse models and humans with isolated changes in growth hormone (GH) production and signaling. To determine if this could be explained in part by tissue-specific changes in insulin sensitivity, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed in mice with adult-onset, isolated GH deficiency and in mice with elevated endogenous GH levels due to somatotrope-specific loss of IGF-I and insulin receptors. Our results demonstrate that circulating GH levels are negatively correlated with insulin-mediated glucose uptake in muscle but positively correlated with insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production. A positive relationship was also observed between GH levels and endpoints of hepatic lipid metabolism known to be regulated by insulin. These results suggest hepatic insulin resistance could represent an early metabolic defect in GH deficiency.

  20. Cardiac expression of kinase-deficient 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase inhibits glycolysis, promotes hypertrophy, impairs myocyte function, and reduces insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donthi, Rajakumar V; Ye, Gang; Wu, Chaodong; McClain, Donald A; Lange, Alex J; Epstein, Paul N

    2004-11-12

    Glycolysis is important to cardiac metabolism and reduced glycolysis may contribute to diabetic cardiomyopathy. To understand its role independent of diabetes or hypoxic injury, we modulated glycolysis by cardiac-specific overexpression of kinase-deficient 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (kd-PFK-2). PFK-2 controls the level of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P(2)), an important regulator of glycolysis. Transgenic mice had over 2-fold reduced levels of Fru-2,6-P(2). Heart weight/body weight ratio indicated mild hypertrophy. Sirius red staining for collagen was significantly increased. We observed a 2-fold elevation in glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate levels, whereas fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was reduced 2-fold. Pathways branching off of glycolysis above phosphofructokinase were activated as indicated by over 2-fold elevated UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and glycogen. The kd-PFK-2 transgene significantly inhibited glycolysis in perfused hearts. Insulin stimulation of metabolism and Akt phosphorylation were sharply reduced. In addition, contractility of isolated cardiomyocytes was impaired during basal and hypoxic incubations. The present study shows that cardiac overexpression of kinase-deficient PFK-2 reduces cardiac glycolysis that produced negative consequences to the heart including hypertrophy, fibrosis, and reduced cardiomyocyte function. In addition, metabolic and signaling responses to insulin were significantly decreased.

  1. Effect of pioglitazone versus insulin glargine on cardiac size, function, and measures of fluid retention in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groop Leif

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both insulin and thiazolidinediones (TZDs are effective in the treatment of hyperglycaemia and amelioration of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes but have side effects including weight gain and fluid retention. The use of TZDs has been further hampered by the risk of adverse cardiovascular events including heart failure. The present study evaluated the effect of pioglitazone or insulin glargine on cardiac function and size as well as on surrogate markers of fluid retention such as weight, haemoglobin and natriuretic peptides. Methods Thirty patients with inadequate glycaemic control on metformin and sulfonylurea were randomised to receive add-on therapy with insulin glargine or pioglitazone for 26 weeks. Echocardiographic data and blood samples were collected from the two groups before the start of the treatment and after 26 weeks. Left ventricular end-diastolic and left atrial end-systolic volumes were quantified, weight measured and blood samples analyzed. Results After 26 weeks of treatment, the changes in HbA1c, weight and haemoglobin were similar between the two groups. HDL increased significantly in the pioglitazone group. While there was an increase in natriuretic peptides in the pioglitazone group (NT-proBNP 11.4 ± 19.6 to 22.8 ± 44.0, p = 0.046, the difference between the treatment groups was not significant. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume increased by 11% and left atrial end-systolic volume by 17% in the pioglitazone group (Both, p Conclusion This randomised pilot-study showed that six-month treatment with pioglitazone induced significant increases in natriuretic peptides and alterations of cardiac size. These changes were not observed with insulin glargine, which also is known to induce fluid retention. Larger randomised trials are warranted to confirm these findings.

  2. The cardiovascular system in growth hormone excess and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, G; Di Somma, C; Grasso, L F S; Savanelli, M C; Colao, A; Pivonello, R

    2012-12-01

    The clinical conditions associated with GH excess and GH deficiency (GHD) are known to be associated with an increased risk for the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, suggesting that either an excess or a deficiency in GH and/or IGF-I is deleterious for cardiovascular system. In patients with acromegaly, chronic GH and IGF-I excess commonly causes a specific cardiomyopathy characterized by a concentric cardiac hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction and, in later stages, with systolic dysfunction ending in heart failure if GH/IGF-I excess is not controlled. Abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and anomalies of cardiac valves can also occur. Moreover, the increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance, as well as dyslipidemia, confer an increased risk for vascular atherosclerosis. Successful control of the disease is accompanied by a decrease of the cardiac mass and improvement of cardiac function and an improvement in cardiovascular risk factors. In patients with hypopituitarism, GHD has been considered the under- lying factor of the increased mortality when appropriate standard replacement of the pituitary hormones deficiencies is given. Either childhood-onset or adulthood-onset GHD are characterized by a cluster of abnormalities associated with an increased cardiovascular risk, including altered body composition, unfavorable lipid profile, insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction and vascular atherosclerosis, a decrease in cardiac mass together with an impairment of systolic function mainly after exercise. Treatment with recombinant GH in patients with GHD is followed by an improvement of the cardiovascular risk factors and an increase in cardiac mass together with an improvement in cardiac performance. In conclusion, acromegaly and GHD are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the control of GH/IGF-I secretion reverses cardiovascular

  3. Glucose transporters and in vivo glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscle: fasting, insulin stimulation and immunoisolation studies of GLUT1 and GLUT4.

    OpenAIRE

    Kraegen, E. W.; Sowden, J A; Halstead, M B; Clark, P W; Rodnick, K J; Chisholm, D. J.; James, D E

    1993-01-01

    Our aim was to study glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4 in relation to in vivo glucose uptake in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. The levels of both transporters were of a similar order of magnitude in whole muscle tissue (GLUT1/GLUT4 ratio varied from 0.1 to 0.6), suggesting that both may have an important physiological role in regulating muscle glucose metabolism. GLUT4 correlated very strongly (r2 = 0.97) with maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (Rg' max., estimated using the gluco...

  4. Taurine exerts hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats, improves insulin-mediated glucose transport signaling pathway in heart and ameliorates cardiac oxidative stress and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Joydeep; Vasan, Vandana; Sil, Parames C., E-mail: parames@bosemain.boseinst.ac.in

    2012-01-15

    Hyperlipidemia, inflammation and altered antioxidant profiles are the usual complications in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of taurine in diabetes associated cardiac complications using a rat model. Rats were made diabetic by alloxan (ALX) (single i.p. dose of 120 mg/kg body weight) and left untreated or treated with taurine (1% w/v, orally, in water) for three weeks either from the day of ALX exposure or after the onset of diabetes. Animals were euthanized after three weeks. ALX-induced diabetes decreased body weight, increased glucose level, decreased insulin content, enhanced the levels of cardiac damage markers and altered lipid profile in the plasma. Moreover, it increased oxidative stress (decreased antioxidant enzyme activities and GSH/GSSG ratio, increased xanthine oxidase enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and ROS generation) and enhanced the proinflammatory cytokines levels, activity of myeloperoxidase and nuclear translocation of NFκB in the cardiac tissue of the experimental animals. Taurine treatment could, however, result to a decrease in the elevated blood glucose and proinflammatory cytokine levels, diabetes-evoked oxidative stress, lipid profiles and NFκB translocation. In addition, taurine increased GLUT 4 translocation to the cardiac membrane by enhanced phosphorylation of IR and IRS1 at tyrosine and Akt at serine residue in the heart. Results also suggest that taurine could protect cardiac tissue from ALX induced apoptosis via the regulation of Bcl2 family and caspase 9/3 proteins. Taken together, taurine supplementation in regular diet could play a beneficial role in regulating diabetes and its associated complications in the heart. Highlights: ► Taurine controls blood glucose via protection of pancreatic β cells in diabetic rat. ► Taurine controls blood glucose via increasing the insulin level in diabetic rat. ► Taurine improves cardiac AKT/GLUT4 signaling

  5. Effects of supplemental calcium salts of palm oil and chromium-propionate on insulin sensitivity and productive and reproductive traits of mid- to late-lactating Holstein × Gir dairy cows consuming excessive energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, T; Cooke, R F; Brandão, A P; Bertin, R D; Colombo, E A; Miranda, V F B; Lourenço, L A C; Rodrigues, S M B; Vasconcelos, J L M

    2017-10-25

    This experiment compared insulin sensitivity, milk production, and reproductive outcomes in dairy cows consuming excessive energy during mid to late lactation and receiving in a 2 × 2 factorial design (1) concentrate based on ground corn (CRN; n = 20) or including 8% (DM basis) of Ca salts of palm oil (CSPO; n = 20), and (2) supplemented (n = 20) or not (n = 20) with 2.5 g/d of Cr-propionate. During the experiment (d 0-203), 40 multiparous, nonpregnant, lactating 3/4 Holstein × 1/4 Gir cows (initial days in milk = 81 ± 2; mean ± SE) were offered corn silage for ad libitum consumption, and individually received concentrate formulated to allow diets to provide 160% of their daily net energy for lactation requirements. From d -15 to 203, milk production was recorded daily, blood samples collected weekly, and cow body weight (BW) and body condition score (BCS) recorded on d 0 and 203. For dry matter intake evaluation, cows from both treatments were randomly divided in 5 groups of 8 cows each, and allocated to 8 individual feeding stations for 3 d. Intake was evaluated 6 times/group. Glucose tolerance tests (GTT; 0.5 g of glucose/kg of BW) were performed on d -3, 100, and 200. Follicle aspiration for in vitro embryo production was performed via transvaginal ovum pick-up on d -1, 98, and 198. Mean DMI, net energy for lactation intake, as well as BW and BCS change were similar across treatments. On average, cows gained 40 kg of BW and 0.49 BCS during the experiment. Within weekly blood samples, CRN cows had lower serum concentrations of glucose, insulin, fatty acids, and insulin-to-glucose ratio compared with CSPO cows, suggesting increased insulin sensitivity in CRN cows. During the GTT, insulin-sensitivity traits were also greater in CRN versus CSPO cows. Supplemental Cr-propionate resulted in lower serum insulin concentrations and insulin-to-glucose ratio within CRN cows only, indicating that Cr-propionate improved basal insulin sensitivity in CRN but not in CSPO

  6. Partial deletion of eNOS gene causes hyperinsulinemic state, unbalance of cardiac insulin signaling pathways and coronary dysfunction independently of high fat diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Vecoli

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in eNOS gene, possibly interacting with high fat diet (HFD, affect peripheral vascular function and glucose metabolism. The relative role of eNOS gene, HFD and metabolic derangement on coronary function has not been fully elucidated. We test whether eNOS gene deficiency per se or in association with HFD modulates coronary function through mechanisms involving molecular pathways related to insulin signaling. Wild type (WT, eNOS-/- and eNOS+/- mice were studied. WT and eNOS+/- mice were fed with either standard or HF diet for 16 weeks and compared with standard diet fed eNOS-/-. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed during the last week of diet. Coronary resistance (CR was measured at baseline and during infusions of acetylcholine (Ach or sodium-nitroprusside (SNP to evaluate endothelium-dependent or independent vasodilation, in the Langendorff isolated hearts. Cardiac expression of Akt and ERK genes as evaluation of two major insulin-regulated signaling pathways involved in the control of vascular tone were assessed by western blot. HFD-fed mice developed an overt diabetic state. Conversely, chow-fed genetically modified mice (in particular eNOS-/- showed a metabolic pattern characterized by normoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia with a limited degree of insulin resistance. CR was significantly higher in animals with eNOS gene deletions than in WT, independently of diet. Percent decrease in CR, during Ach infusion, was significantly lower in both eNOS-/- and eNOS+/- mice than in WT, independently of diet. SNP reduced CR in all groups except eNOS-/-. The cardiac ERK1-2/Akt ratio, increased in animals with eNOS gene deletions compared with WT, independently of diet. These results suggest that the eNOS genetic deficiency, associated or not with HFD, has a relevant effect on coronary vascular function, possibly mediated by increase in blood insulin levels and unbalance in insulin-dependent signaling in coronary vessels

  7. Excess pressure integral predicts cardiovascular events independent of other risk factors in the conduit artery functional evaluation substudy of Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Justin E; Lacy, Peter; Tillin, Therese; Collier, David; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Francis, Darrel P; Malaweera, Anura; Mayet, Jamil; Stanton, Alice; Williams, Bryan; Parker, Kim H; McG Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-07-01

    Excess pressure integral (XSPI), a new index of surplus work performed by the left ventricle, can be calculated from blood pressure waveforms and may indicate circulatory dysfunction. We investigated whether XSPI predicted future cardiovascular events and target organ damage in treated hypertensive individuals. Radial blood pressure waveforms were acquired by tonometry in 2069 individuals (aged, 63±8 years) in the Conduit Artery Functional Evaluation (CAFE) substudy of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT). Measurements of left ventricular mass index (n=862) and common carotid artery intima media thickness (n=923) were also performed. XSPI and the integral of reservoir pressure were lower in people treated with amlodipine±perindopril than in those treated with atenolol±bendroflumethiazide, although brachial systolic blood pressure was similar. A total of 134 cardiovascular events accrued during a median 3.4 years of follow-up; XSPI was a significant predictor of cardiovascular events after adjustment for age and sex, and this relationship was unaffected by adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors or Framingham risk score. XSPI, central systolic blood pressure, central augmentation pressure, central pulse pressure, and integral of reservoir pressure were correlated with left ventricular mass index, but only XSPI, augmentation pressure, and central pulse pressure were associated positively with carotid artery intima media thickness. Associations between left ventricular mass index, XSPI, and integral of reservoir pressure and carotid artery intima media thickness and XSPI were unaffected by multivariable adjustment for other covariates. XSPI is a novel indicator of cardiovascular dysfunction and independently predicts cardiovascular events and targets organ damage in a prospective clinical trial. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Insulin Preconditioning Elevates p-Akt and Cardiac Contractility after Reperfusion in the Isolated Ischemic Rat Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaki Sato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin induces cardioprotection partly via an antiapoptotic effect. However, the optimal timing of insulin administration for the best quality cardioprotection remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that insulin administered prior to ischemia provides better cardioprotection than insulin administration after ischemia. Isolated rat hearts were prepared using Langendorff method and divided into three groups. The Pre-Ins group (Pre-Ins received 0.5 U/L insulin prior to 15 min no-flow ischemia for 20 min followed by 20 min of reperfusion. The Post-Ins group (Post-Ins received 0.5 U/L insulin during the reperfusion period only. The control group (Control was perfused with KH buffer throughout. The maximum of left ventricular derivative of pressure development (dP/dt(max was recorded continuously. Measurements of TNF-α and p-Akt in each time point were assayed by ELISA. After reperfusion, dP/dt(max in Pre-Ins was elevated, compared with Post-Ins at 10 minutes after reperfusion and Control at all-time points. TNF-α levels at 5 minutes after reperfusion in the Pre-Ins were lower than the others. After 5 minutes of reperfusion, p-Akt was elevated in Pre-Ins compared with the other groups. Insulin administration prior to ischemia provides better cardioprotection than insulin administration only at reperfusion. TNF-α suppression is possibly mediated via p-Akt leading to a reduction in contractile myocardial dysfunction.

  9. Ameliorative effect of nicotine exposure on insulin resistance is accompanied by decreased cardiac glycogen synthase kinase-3 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 during oral oestrogen-progestin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Olugbenga S; Olatunji, Lawrence A

    2017-09-03

    Cigarette smoking is considered to be a major risk factor for the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Oestrogen-progestin combined oral contraceptive (COC) use has been associated with adverse cardiometabolic events. We hypothesized that nicotine would ameliorate insulin resistance (IR) that is accompanied by decreased cardiac glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Female Wistar rats received (po) low-(0.1 mg/kg) or high-nicotine (1.0 mg/kg) with or without COC containing 5.0 µg levonorgestrel plus 1.0 µg ethinylestradiol daily for 8 weeks. Data showed that COC treatment or nicotine exposure led to IR, glucose deregulation, atherogenic dyslipidemia, increased corticosterone, aldosterone, cardiac and circulating GSK-3 values and PAI-1. However, these effects with the exception of corticosterone and aldosterone were ameliorated in COC + nicotine-exposed rats. Amelioration of IR induced by COC treatment is accompanied by decreased circulating PAI-1, cardiac PAI-1 and GSK-3 instead of circulating aldosterone and corticosterone.

  10. Sustained delivery of insulin-like growth factor-1/hepatocyte growth factor stimulates endogenous cardiac repair in the chronic infarcted pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudstaal, Stefan; Bastings, Maartje M C; Feyen, Dries A M; Waring, Cheryl D; van Slochteren, Frebus J; Dankers, Patricia Y W; Torella, Daniele; Sluijter, Joost P G; Nadal-Ginard, Bernardo; Doevendans, Pieter A; Ellison, Georgina M; Chamuleau, Steven A J

    2014-03-01

    Activation of endogenous cardiac stem/progenitor cells (eCSCs) can improve cardiac repair after acute myocardial infarction. We studied whether the in situ activation of eCSCs by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) could be increased using a newly developed hydrogel in chronic myocardial infarction (MI). One-month post-MI pigs underwent NOGA-guided intramyocardial injections of IGF-1/HGF (GF: both 0.5 μg/mL, n = 5) or IGF-1/HGF incorporated in UPy hydrogel (UPy-GF; both 0.5 μg/mL, n = 5). UPy hydrogel without added growth factors was administered to four control (CTRL) pigs. Left ventricular ejection fraction was increased in the UPy-GF and GF animals compared to CTRLs. UPy-GF delivery reduced pathological hypertrophy, led to the formation of new, small cardiomyocytes, and increased capillarization. The eCSC population was increased almost fourfold in the border zone of the UPy-GF-treated hearts compared to CTRL hearts. These results show that IGF-1/HGF therapy led to an improved cardiac function in chronic MI and that effect size could be further increased by using UPy hydrogel.

  11. Increased cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain in left atria and decreased myocardial insulin-like growth factor (Igf-I) expression accompany low heart rate in hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, N D; Nelson, O L; Robbins, C T; Rourke, B C

    2011-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extended periods of extremely low heart rate during hibernation without developing congestive heart failure or cardiac chamber dilation. Left ventricular atrophy and decreased left ventricular compliance have been reported in this species during hibernation. We evaluated the myocardial response to significantly reduced heart rate during hibernation by measuring relative myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform expression and expression of a set of genes important to muscle plasticity and mass regulation in the left atria and left ventricles of active and hibernating bears. We supplemented these data with measurements of systolic and diastolic function via echocardiography in unanesthetized grizzly bears. Atrial strain imaging revealed decreased atrial contractility, decreased expansion/reservoir function (increased atrial stiffness), and decreased passive-filling function (increased ventricular stiffness) in hibernating bears. Relative MyHC-α protein expression increased significantly in the atrium during hibernation. The left ventricle expressed 100% MyHC-β protein in both groups. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) mRNA expression was reduced by ∼50% in both chambers during hibernation, consistent with the ventricular atrophy observed in these bears. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (MAFBx) and Muscle Ring Finger 1 did not increase, nor did expression of myostatin or hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). We report atrium-specific decreases of 40% and 50%, respectively, in MAFBx and creatine kinase mRNA expression during hibernation. Decreased creatine kinase expression is consistent with lowered energy requirements and could relate to reduced atrial emptying function during hibernation. Taken together with our hemodynamic assessment, these data suggest a potential downregulation of atrial chamber function during hibernation to prevent fatigue and dilation

  12. Excessive somnolence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Tavares

    Full Text Available Excessive somnolence can be quite a incapacitating manifestation, and is frequently neglected by physicians and patients. This article reviews the determinant factors, the evaluation and quantification of diurnal somnolence, and the description and treatment of the main causes of excessive somnolence.

  13. Excessive somnolence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, S; Alóe, F; Gentil, V; Scaff, M

    1996-01-01

    Excessive somnolence can be quite a incapacitating manifestation, and is frequently neglected by physicians and patients. This article reviews the determinant factors, the evaluation and quantification of diurnal somnolence, and the description and treatment of the main causes of excessive somnolence.

  14. Evaluation of the influence on the cardiac function after excessive exercise is loaded at the wheelchair marathon; Kurumaisu marathon no undo fukago no shinkino eno eikyo hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshihara, S. [Oita Prefectural Education Center, Oita (Japan); Nishimura, T. [Oita University, Oita (Japan); Hosokawa, H. [Oita Medical University, Oita (Japan); Hamamoto, K. [Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, M. [Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-20

    To grasp dynamic cardiac function physiologically and biochemically before, during and after the wheelchair marathon for physically handicapped persons, the safety of athletic sports rapidly diffused for physically handicapped persons and the significance of cooperation among health, medical treatment and welfare are medically evaluated. There were no changes on the echocardiogram. Decrease in left ventricular function, which was observed in the triathlon race, was not recognized. From the results of biochemical test of blood, no damages of cardiac muscle were suggested. The findings of dehydration, which were anticipated in the biochemical test of blood, were not recognized after the race. It was suggested that stricter prevention of atherosclerosis, such as sufficient supply of water, is required for older persons. It is possible that these subjects who have hardly atherosclerosis, if they enter the race after full training and with supplying water, do safely without the bad influence to the heart. 9 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Novel all-extremity high-intensity interval training improves aerobic fitness, cardiac function and insulin resistance in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chueh-Lung; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Kim, Han-Kyul; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Handberg, Eileen M; Petersen, John W; Christou, Demetra D

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with decreased aerobic fitness and cardiac remodeling leading to increased risk for cardiovascular disease. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) on the treadmill has been reported to be more effective in ameliorating these risk factors compared with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in patients with cardiometabolic disease. In older adults, however, weight-bearing activities are frequently limited due to musculoskeletal and balance problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and safety of non-weight-bearing all-extremity HIIT in older adults. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that all-extremity HIIT will be more effective in improving aerobic fitness, cardiac function, and metabolic risk factors compared with all-extremity MICT. Fifty-one healthy sedentary older adults (age: 65±1years) were randomized to HIIT (n=17), MICT (n=18) or non-exercise control (CONT; n=16). HIIT (4×4min 90% of peak heart rate; HRpeak) and isocaloric MICT (70% of HRpeak) were performed on a non-weight-bearing all-extremity ergometer, 4×/week for 8weeks under supervision. All-extremity HIIT was feasible in older adults and resulted in no adverse events. Aerobic fitness (peak oxygen consumption; VO2peak) and ejection fraction (echocardiography) improved by 11% (PHIIT, while no changes were observed in MICT and CONT (P≥0.1). Greater improvements in ejection fraction were associated with greater improvements in VO2peak (r=0.57; PHIIT by 26% (P=0.016). Diastolic function, body composition, glucose and lipids were unaffected (P≥0.1). In conclusion, all-extremity HIIT is feasible and safe in older adults. HIIT, but not MICT, improved aerobic fitness, ejection fraction, and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fetal growth restriction and the programming of heart growth and cardiac insulin-like growth factor 2 expression in the lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Zhang, Lei; McMillen, I Caroline; Botting, Kimberley J; Duffield, Jaime A; Zhang, Song; Suter, Catherine M; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2011-10-01

    Reduced growth in fetal life together with accelerated growth in childhood, results in a ~50% greater risk of coronary heart disease in adult life. It is unclear why changes in patterns of body and heart growth in early life can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the role of the insulin-like growth factors in heart growth in the growth-restricted fetus and lamb. Hearts were collected from control and placentally restricted (PR) fetuses at 137-144 days gestation and from average (ABW) and low (LBW) birth weight lambs at 21 days of age. We quantified cardiac mRNA expression of IGF-1, IGF-2 and their receptors, IGF-1R and IGF-2R, using real-time RT-PCR and protein expression of IGF-1R and IGF-2R using Western blotting. Combined bisulphite restriction analysis was used to assess DNA methylation in the differentially methylated region (DMR) of the IGF-2/H19 locus and of the IGF-2R gene. In PR fetal sheep, IGF-2, IGF-1R and IGF-2R mRNA expression was increased in the heart compared to controls. LBW lambs had a greater left ventricle weight relative to body weight as well as increased IGF-2 and IGF-2R mRNA expression in the heart, when compared to ABW lambs. No changes in the percentage of methylation of the DMRs of IGF-2/H19 or IGF-2R were found between PR and LBW when compared to their respective controls. In conclusion, a programmed increased in cardiac gene expression of IGF-2 and IGF-2R may represent an adaptive response to reduced substrate supply (e.g. glucose and/or oxygen) in order to maintain heart growth and may be the underlying cause for increased ventricular hypertrophy and the associated susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to ischaemic damage later in life.

  17. Use of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy to assess cardiac sympathetic denervation and the impact of hypertension in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Koji; Nakatani, Yuko; Onishi, Satoshi [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Keihanna Hospital, Hirakata City, Osaka (Japan); Utsunomiya, Keita; Saika, Yoshinori [Dept. of Radiology, Keihanna Hospital, Hirakata City (Japan); Iwasaka, Toshiji [Cardiovascular Center, Kansai Medical University, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    The objectives of this clinical study using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy were (a) to evaluate cardiac sympathetic denervation in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients with and without hypertension and (b) to investigate the relation between cardiac sympathetic denervation and prognosis in NIDDM patients. We compared clinical characteristics and MIBG data [heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio and % washout rate (WR)] in a control group and NIDDM patients with and without hypertension. MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 11 controls and 82 NIDDM patients without overt cardiovascular disease except for hypertension (systolic blood pressure {>=}140 and/or diastolic blood pressure {>=}90 mmHg). After MIBG examination, blood pressure was measured regularly in all NIDDM patients. There were significant differences between 65 normotensive and 17 hypertensive NIDDM patients with respect to age (55{+-}11 vs 63{+-}12 years, respectively, P<0.05), prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (12% vs 35%, respectively, P<0.05) and systolic blood pressure (120{+-}12 vs 145{+-}16 mmHg, respectively, P<0.001). The H/M ratio in hypertensive NIDDM patients was significantly lower than in the control group (1.81{+-}0.29 vs 2.27{+-}0.20, respectively, P<0.01). During the follow-up period (18{+-} 12 months), 17 NIDDM patients newly developed hypertension after MIBG examination. There were no significant differences in their clinical characteristics compared with persistently normotensive or hypertensive NIDDM patients. %WR in patients with new onset hypertension was significantly higher than in the control group (30.88%{+-}16.87% vs 12.89%{+-}11.94%, respectively, P<0.05). Moreover, in these patients %WR correlated with duration from the date of MIBG scintigraphy to the onset of hypertension (r=-0.512, P<0.05). Five NIDDM patients died during the follow-up period (four newly hypertensive patients and one normotensive patient). There were significant

  18. Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Tang Protects Rats from Cardiac Damages Induced by Metabolic Disorder by Improving Inflammation-Mediated Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan Bao; Li, Xiao Xing; Chen, Yu Guo; Gao, Hai Qing; Bu, Pei Li; Zhang, Yun; Ji, Xiao Ping

    2013-01-01

    Huang-lian-jie-du-tang (HLJDT), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been shown to improve insulin resistance (IR) induced by inflammation, a key event in the development of metabolic syndrome (MS). The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of HLJDT on MS and explore the underlying mechanism. MS rats were established with obese-diets and treated with normal saline, aspirin or HLJDT. The myocardial lesions were identified by echocardiogram, transmission electron microscope, and Sirius-red staining. The inflammatory cytokines were measured by ELISA and real-time PCR. The activation of NF-κB, JNK, SOCS3, IRS1 and AKT in the heart was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Compared with the controls, MS rats developed obvious obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, IR, inflammation, and cardiac damage. Moreover, phosphorylated IRS-1 at Ser307 was correlated with the activation of NF-κB, JNK and SOCS3 and the inhibition of AKT in the heart from MS rats. These data suggest that serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in response to inflammation is mediated, in part, by NF-κB, JNK and SOCS3. Notably, HLJDT inhibited the activation of NF-κB and reduced serine phosphorylation of IRS-1. In summary, HLJDT protects myocardium from IR-mediated injury by inhibiting serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in MS rats. PMID:23840732

  19. Cardiac Overexpression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor I (IGF-1) Attenuates Chronic Alcohol Intake-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction But Not Hypertrophy: Role of Akt, mTOR, GSK3β and PTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingfang; Turdi, Subat; Li, Quan; Lopez, Faye L.; Eason, Anna R.; Anversa, Piero; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Chronic alcohol intake leads to the development of alcoholic cardiomyopathy manifested by cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction. This study was designed to examine the effect of transgenic overexpression of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) on alcohol-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction. Wild-type FVB and cardiac-specific IGF-1 mice were placed on a 4% alcohol or control diet for 16 weeks. Cardiac geometry and mechanical function were evaluated by echocardiography, cardiomyocyte and intracellular Ca2+ properties. Histological analyses for cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis were evaluated by Masson trichrome staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. Expression and/or phosphorylation of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), Ca2+ handling proteins, key signaling molecules for survival including Akt, mTOR, GSK3β, Foxo3a and the negative regulator of Akt phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome ten (PTEN) as well as mitochondrial proteins UCP-2 and PGC1α were evaluated by western blot analysis. Chronic alcohol intake led to cardiac hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, reduced mitochondrial number, compromised cardiac contractile function and intracellular Ca2+ handling, decreased SOD1 expression, elevated superoxide production and overt apoptosis, all of which with the exception of cardiac hypertrophy were abrogated by the IGF-1 transgene. Immunoblotting data showed reduced phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, GSK3β and Foxo3a, upregulated Foxo3a and PTEN, as well as dampened SERCA2a, PGC1α and UCP-2 following alcohol intake. All these alcohol-induced changes in survival and mitochondrial proteins were alleviated by IGF-1. Taken together, these data favor a beneficial role of IGF-1 in alcohol-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction independent of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:20678571

  20. Cardiac catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; ...

  1. Insulin Secretagogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Spikes Is mealtime insulin right for you? Insulin Secretagogues September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... Additional Resources Affordable Insulin Project FDA What are insulin secretagogues? Insulin secretagogues are one type of medicine ...

  2. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  3. Insulin Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Insulin Basics There are different types of insulin depending ... you may be experiencing a reaction. Types of Insulin Rapid-acting insulin , begins to work about 15 ...

  4. EXCESS PRESSURE INTEGRAL PREDICTS CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS INDEPENDENT OF OTHER RISK FACTORS IN THE CONDUIT ARTERY FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION (CAFE) SUB-STUDY OF ANGLO-SCANDINAVIAN CARDIAC OUTCOMES TRIAL (ASCOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Justin E; Lacy, Peter; Tillin, Therese; Collier, David; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Francis, Darrel P; Malaweera, Anura; Mayet, Jamil; Stanton, Alice; Williams, Bryan; Parker, Kim H; McG Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-01-01

    Excess pressure integral (XSPI), a new index of surplus work performed by the left ventricle, can be calculated from blood pressure (BP) waveforms and may indicate circulatory dysfunction. We investigated whether XSPI predicted future cardiovascular (CV) events and target organ damage in treated hypertensive individuals. Radial BP waveforms were acquired by tonometry in 2069 individuals (63±8y) in the Conduit Artery Functional Evaluation sub-study of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes trial. Measurements of left ventricular mass index (LVMI; n = 862) and common carotid artery intima media thickness (cIMT; n = 923) were also performed. XSPI and the integral of reservoir pressure (PRI) were lower in people treated with amlodipine ± perindopril than atenolol ± bendroflumethiazide, although brachial systolic BP was similar. A total of 134 CV events accrued over a median 3.4 years of follow-up; XSPI was a significant predictor of CV events after adjustment for age and sex and this relationship was unaffected by adjustment for conventional CV risk factors or Framingham risk score. XSPI, central systolic BP, central augmentation pressure (AP), central pulse pressure (cPP) and PRI were correlated with LVMI, but only XSPI, AP and cPP were positively associated with cIMT. Associations between LVMI and XSPI and PRI, and cIMT and XSPI were unaffected by multivariable adjustment for other covariates. XSPI is a novel indicator of CV dysfunction and independently predicts CV events and target organ damage in a prospective clinical trial. PMID:24821941

  5. Insulin resistance and chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Matulewicz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a condition of reduced biological response to insulin. Growing evidence indicates the role of the chronic low-grade inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Adipose tissue in obesity is characterized by increased lipolysis with the excessive release of free fatty acids, and is also a source of proinflammatory cytokines. Both these factors may inhibit insulin action. Proinflammatory cytokines exert their effect by stimulating major inflammatory NFκB and JNK pathways within the cells. Inflammatory processes in other insulin responsive tissues may also play a role in inducing insulin resistance. This paper is an overview of the chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, liver and endothelial cells during the development of insulin resistance.

  6. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  7. Greater body mass index is a better predictor of subclinical cardiac damage at long-term follow-up in men than is insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Lundgren; Pareek, Manan; Gerke, Oke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine whether lower insulin sensitivity as determined by homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-%S) was associated with increased left ventricular mass (LVM) and presence of LV diastolic dysfunction at long-term follow-up, independently of body mass index (BMI), in middle-aged, other...

  8. Sitagliptin reduces cardiac apoptosis, hypertrophy and fibrosis primarily by insulin-dependent mechanisms in experimental type-II diabetes. Potential roles of GLP-1 isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Picatoste

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardial fibrosis is a key process in diabetic cardiomyopathy. However, their underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated, leading to a lack of therapy. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 enhancer, sitagliptin, reduces hyperglycemia but may also trigger direct effects on the heart. METHODS: Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats developed type-II diabetes and received sitagliptin, an anti-hyperglycemic drug (metformin or vehicle (n=10, each. After cardiac structure and function assessment, plasma and left ventricles were isolated for biochemical studies. Cultured cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts were used for in vitro assays. RESULTS: Untreated GK rats exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, plasma GLP-1 decrease, and cardiac cell-death, hypertrophy, fibrosis and prolonged deceleration time. Moreover, cardiac pro-apoptotic/necrotic, hypertrophic and fibrotic factors were up-regulated. Importantly, both sitagliptin and metformin lessened all these parameters. In cultured cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, high-concentration of palmitate or glucose induced cell-death, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Interestingly, GLP-1 and its insulinotropic-inactive metabolite, GLP-1(9-36, alleviated these responses. In addition, despite a specific GLP-1 receptor was only detected in cardiomyocytes, GLP-1 isoforms attenuated the pro-fibrotic expression in cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts. In addition, GLP-1 receptor signalling may be linked to PPARδ activation, and metformin may also exhibit anti-apoptotic/necrotic and anti-fibrotic direct effects in cardiac cells. CONCLUSIONS: Sitagliptin, via GLP-1 stabilization, promoted cardioprotection in type-II diabetic hearts primarily by limiting hyperglycemia e hyperlipidemia. However, GLP-1 and GLP-1(9-36 promoted survival and anti-hypertrophic/fibrotic effects on cultured cardiac cells, suggesting cell-autonomous cardioprotective actions.

  9. Green tea Improves Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism and Regulates Cardiac mRNA Expression Related to Insulin, Lipid and Inflammatory Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green tea has multiple benefits to human health. Epidemiologic studies demonstrate that the consumption of green tea polyphenols (GTP) reduces the risk of coronary artery disease and cardiac events. To explore the underlying mechanisms of action at a molecular level, we examined the effects of GTP o...

  10. [Insulin edema in hepatic glycogenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahévas, T; Gobert, D; Gatfossé, M; Mekinian, A; Fain, O

    2017-03-01

    Hepatic glycogenosis is a rare syndrome, which includes poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, hepatomegaly, delayed puberty, and growth delay. Insulin edema is sometimes associated. An 18-year-old woman presented with diffuse edema, hepatomegaly, amenorrhea, uncontrolled diabetes, and elevated transaminases and cholestasis. Hepatic ultrasonography and abdominal computed tomographic scan confirmed the hepatomegaly. The liver biopsy showed a massive glycogenosis and the diagnosis of hepatic glycogenosis was confirmed. Too large doses of insulin were responsible of diffuse edema. Diabetes equilibration and diminution of insulin intakes allow correction of this disorder. Excess of insulin can lead to excessive hepatic glycogen storage by activation of glycogenosis enzymes. Biological manifestations consist on elevated liver enzymes and hyperlactatemia. There is a link between administration of high dose of insulin and edema. Hepatic glycogenosis should be suspected when diabetes is uncontrolled and be considered as a differential diagnosis of steatosis. It may be associated and revealed by insulin edema directly related to excessive insulin intakes. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancing the [13C]bicarbonate signal in cardiac hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate MRS studies by infusion of glucose, insulin and potassium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Mette Hauge; Laustsen, Christoffer; Butt, Sadia Asghar

    2013-01-01

    fasting, the myocardial glucose oxidation is low and the fatty acid oxidation (β‐oxidation) is high, which complicates the interpretation of pyruvate metabolism with the technique. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the infusion of glucose, insulin and potassium (GIK) could increase......A change in myocardial metabolism is a known effect of several diseases. MRS with hyperpolarized 13C‐labelled pyruvate is a technique capable of detecting changes in myocardial pyruvate metabolism, and has proven to be useful for the evaluation of myocardial ischaemia in vivo. However, during...

  12. Cardiac-specific ablation of glutaredoxin 3 leads to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental and clinical investigations have demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is increased during cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Excess ROS can directly impair cardiac contraction through modification of Ca2+ handling proteins or activate multiple effectors and sig...

  13. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E. Dale

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin resistant states such as type 2 diabetes and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead (FOXO) transcriptional signaling or glucose transport which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  14. Role of mitochondrial function in insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, Myrte; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2012-01-01

    The obesity pandemic increases the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (DM2).DM2 develops when pancreatic β-cells fail and cannot compensate for the decrease in insulin sensitivity. How excessive caloric intake and weight gain cause insulin resistance has not completely been elucidated.Skeletal muscle is

  15. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Selvi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive daytime sleepiness is one of the most common sleep-related patient symptoms, with preva-lence in the community estimated to be as high as 18%. Patients with excessive daytime sleepiness may exhibit life threatening road and work accidents, social maladjustment, decreased academic and occupational performance and have poorer health than comparable adults. Thus, excessive daytime sleepiness is a serious condition that requires investigation, diagnosis and treatment primarily. As with most medical condition, evaluation of excessive daytime sleepiness begins a precise history and various objective and subjective tools have been also developed to assess excessive daytime sleepiness. The most common causes of excessive daytime sleepiness are insufficient sleep hygiene, chronic sleep deprivation, medical and psychiatric conditions and sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, medications, and narcolepsy. Treatment option should address underlying contributors and promote sleep quantity by ensuring good sleep hygiene. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 114-132

  16. Insulin supplementation attenuates cancer-induced cardiomyopathy and slows tumor disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; Pietzsch, Stefan; Stapel, Britta; Ricke-Hoch, Melanie; Lee, Chun-Wei; Bankstahl, Jens P; Scherr, Michaela; Heineke, Jörg; Scharf, Gesine; Haghikia, Arash; Bengel, Frank M; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise

    2017-05-18

    Advanced cancer induces fundamental changes in metabolism and promotes cardiac atrophy and heart failure. We discovered systemic insulin deficiency in cachectic cancer patients. Similarly, mice with advanced B16F10 melanoma (B16F10-TM) or colon 26 carcinoma (C26-TM) displayed decreased systemic insulin associated with marked cardiac atrophy, metabolic impairment, and function. B16F10 and C26 tumors decrease systemic insulin via high glucose consumption, lowering pancreatic insulin production and producing insulin-degrading enzyme. As tumor cells consume glucose in an insulin-independent manner, they shift glucose away from cardiomyocytes. Since cardiomyocytes in both tumor models remained insulin responsive, low-dose insulin supplementation by subcutaneous implantation of insulin-releasing pellets improved cardiac glucose uptake, atrophy, and function, with no adverse side effects. In addition, by redirecting glucose to the heart in addition to other organs, the systemic insulin treatment lowered glucose usage by the tumor and thereby decreased tumor growth and volume. Insulin corrected the cancer-induced reduction in cardiac Akt activation and the subsequent overactivation of the proteasome and autophagy. Thus, cancer-induced systemic insulin depletion contributes to cardiac wasting and failure and may promote tumor growth. Low-dose insulin supplementation attenuates these processes and may be supportive in cardio-oncologic treatment concepts.

  17. Insulin Resistance Induced by Hyperinsulinemia Coincides with a Persistent Alteration at the Insulin Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Karyn J.; Maddux, Betty A.; Szary, Jaroslaw; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Schaufele, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, the diminished response of target tissues to insulin, is associated with the metabolic syndrome and a predisposition towards diabetes in a growing proportion of the worldwide population. Under insulin resistant states, the cellular response of the insulin signaling pathway is diminished and the body typically responds by increasing serum insulin concentrations to maintain insulin signaling. Some evidence indicates that the increased insulin concentration may itself further dampen insulin response. If so, insulin resistance would worsen as the level of circulating insulin increases during compensation, which could contribute to the transition of insulin resistance to more severe disease. Here, we investigated the consequences of excess insulin exposure to insulin receptor (IR) activity. Cells chronically exposed to insulin show a diminished the level of IR tyrosine and serine autophosphorylation below that observed after short-term insulin exposure. The diminished IR response did not originate with IR internalization since IR amounts at the cell membrane were similar after short- and long-term insulin incubation. Förster resonance energy transfer between fluorophores attached to the IR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain showed that a change in the TK domain occurred upon prolonged, but not short-term, insulin exposure. Even though the altered ‘insulin refractory’ IR TK FRET and IR autophosphorylation levels returned to baseline (non-stimulated) levels after wash-out of the original insulin stimulus, subsequent short-term exposure to insulin caused immediate re-establishment of the insulin-refractory levels. This suggests that some cell-based ‘memory’ of chronic hyperinsulinemic exposure acts directly at the IR. An improved understanding of that memory may help define interventions to reset the IR to full insulin responsiveness and impede the progression of insulin resistance to more severe disease states. PMID:25259572

  18. Prevention of excess gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J; Truesdale, K P; Wang, C-H; Cai, J

    2009-11-01

    Obesity prevention trials are designed to promote healthy weight. The success of these trials is often assessed using one of three metrics--means, incidence or prevalence. In this study, we point out conceptual shortcomings of these metrics and introduce an alternative that we call 'excess gain'. A mathematical demonstration using simulated data shows a scenario in which the statistical power of excess gain compares favorably with that of incidence and prevalence. Prevention of excess gain communicates an easily understood public health message that is applicable to all individuals regardless of weight status.

  19. Insulin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to come strictly from animal sources (cow and pig pancreas cells). Most insulin used today is synthetic, ... developing type 2 diabetes , hypertension , hyperlipidemia , and/or heart disease several years down the road. Abdominal obesity, ...

  20. Excess wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2005-01-01

    analyses it is analysed how excess productions are better utilised; through conversion into hydrogen of through expansion of export connections thereby enabling sales. The results demonstrate that particularly hydrogen production is unviable under current costs but transmission expansion could...

  1. Renin and the IGFII/M6P Receptor System in Cardiac Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Jacqueline; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Nonenzymatic cardiac activities of renin are well described during the last years and contribute either to cardiac-specific effects of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) or to the pharmacological effects of RAAS inhibition. The interaction of renin with insulin-like growth factor II/mannose-6-phosphate (IGFII/M6P) receptors participates in nonclassical renin effects and contributes to cardiac remodelling caused by RAAS activation. The current findings suggest an important role for renin IGFII/M6P receptor interaction in cardiac adaptation to stress and support the idea that excessive accumulation of renin during inhibition of RAAS directly contributes to blood pressure-independent effects of these pharmacological interventions. It becomes a challenge for future studies focussing on chronic hypertension or myocardial infarction to comprise regulatory adaptations of the kidney, the main source of plasma renin and prorenin, because they directly contribute to key steps in regulation of cardiac (mal)adaptation via IGFII/M6P receptors. This receptor system is part of peptide/receptor interactions that modifies and possibly limits adverse remodelling effects caused by angiotensin II. Evaluation of interactions of renin with other pro-hypertrophic agonists is required to decide whether this receptor may become a target of pharmacological intervention. PMID:24288471

  2. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary ...

  3. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  4. Insulin Resistance, Obesity and Lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazıcı, Dilek; Sezer, Havva

    2017-01-01

    Lipotoxicity , originally used to describe the destructive effects of excess fat accumulation on glucose metabolism, causes functional impairments in several metabolic pathways, both in adipose tissue and peripheral organs, like liver, heart, pancreas and muscle. Lipotoxicity has roles in insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. Increased circulating levels of lipids and the metabolic alterations in fatty acid utilization and intracellular signaling, have been related to insulin resistance in muscle and liver. Different pathways, like novel protein kinase c pathways and the JNK-1 pathway are involved as the mechanisms of how lipotoxicity leads to insulin resistance in nonadipose tissue organs, such as liver and muscle. Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum stress, through mainly increased oxidative stress, also plays important role in the etiology of insulin resistance, especially seen in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Visceral adiposity and insulin resistance both increase the cardiometabolic risk and lipotoxicity seems to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of these associations.

  5. Excessive crying in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Halpern

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Review the literature on excessive crying in young infants, also known as infantile colic, and its effects on family dynamics, its pathophysiology, and new treatment interventions. Data source: The literature review was carried out in the Medline, PsycINFO, LILACS, SciELO, and Cochrane Library databases, using the terms “excessive crying,” and “infantile colic,” as well technical books and technical reports on child development, selecting the most relevant articles on the subject, with emphasis on recent literature published in the last five years. Summary of the findings: Excessive crying is a common symptom in the first 3 months of life and leads to approximately 20% of pediatric consultations. Different prevalence rates of excessive crying have been reported, ranging from 14% to approximately 30% in infants up to 3 months of age. There is evidence linking excessive crying early in life with adaptive problems in the preschool period, as well as with early weaning, maternal anxiety and depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and other behavioral problems. Several pathophysiological mechanisms can explain these symptoms, such as circadian rhythm alterations, central nervous system immaturity, and alterations in the intestinal microbiota. Several treatment alternatives have been described, including behavioral measures, manipulation techniques, use of medication, and acupuncture, with controversial results and effectiveness. Conclusion: Excessive crying in the early months is a prevalent symptom; the pediatrician's attention is necessary to understand and adequately manage the problem and offer support to exhausted parents. The prescription of drugs of questionable action and with potential side effects is not a recommended treatment, except in extreme situations. The effectiveness of dietary treatments and use of probiotics still require confirmation. There is incomplete evidence regarding alternative

  6. Diabetes and Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the abdomen just behind the stomach, produces insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes glucose from the ... occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body doesn’t use insulin ...

  7. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Your Baby is Born Monogenic Diabetes Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, ... body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose ...

  8. Perilipin 2 improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle despite elevated intramuscular lipid levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, Madeleen; Hesselink, Matthijs; Sparks, Lauren; Timmers, Silvie; Ferraz, Maria; Mattijssen, Frits; Beurden, van Denis; Schaart, Gert; DeBaets, Marc; Verheyen, Fons; Kersten, Sander; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by excessive lipid storage in skeletal muscle. Excessive intramyocellular lipid storage exceeds intracellular needs and induces lipotoxic events ultimately contributing to the development of insulin resistance. Lipid droplet (LD)-coating proteins may control proper

  9. Obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Mota Martins

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available White adipose tissue (WAT is considered an endocrine organ. When present in excess, WAT can influence metabolism via biologically active molecules. Following unregulated production of such molecules, adipose tissue dysfunction results, contributing to complications associated with obesity. Previous studies have implicated pro- and anti-inflammatory substances in the regulation of inflammatory response and in the development of insulin resistance. In obese individuals, pro-inflammatory molecules produced by adipose tissue contribute to the development of insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, the molecules with anti-inflammatory action, that have been associated with the improvement of insulin sensitivity, have your decreased production. Imbalance of these substances contributes significantly to metabolic disorders found in obese individuals. The current review aims to provide updated information regarding the activity of biomolecules produced by WAT.

  10. Mechanical stress regulates insulin sensitivity through integrin-dependent control of insulin receptor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung; Bilder, David; Neufeld, Thomas P

    2018-01-15

    Insulin resistance, the failure to activate insulin signaling in the presence of ligand, leads to metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes. Physical activity and mechanical stress have been shown to protect against insulin resistance, but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we address this relationship in the Drosophila larval fat body, an insulin-sensitive organ analogous to vertebrate adipose tissue and livers. We found that insulin signaling in Drosophila fat body cells is abolished in the absence of physical activity and mechanical stress even when excess insulin is present. Physical movement is required for insulin sensitivity in both intact larvae and fat bodies cultured ex vivo. Interestingly, the insulin receptor and other downstream components are recruited to the plasma membrane in response to mechanical stress, and this membrane localization is rapidly lost upon disruption of larval or tissue movement. Sensing of mechanical stimuli is mediated in part by integrins, whose activation is necessary and sufficient for mechanical stress-dependent insulin signaling. Insulin resistance develops naturally during the transition from the active larval stage to the immotile pupal stage, suggesting that regulation of insulin sensitivity by mechanical stress may help coordinate developmental programming with metabolism. © 2018 Kim et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Reducing Excessive Television Viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard A.; Rooney-Rebeck, Patty

    1984-01-01

    A youngster who excessively watched television was placed on a modified token economy: earned tokens were used to activate the television for set periods of time. Positive effects resulted in the child's school work, in the amount of time his family spent together, and in his mother's perception of family social support. (KH)

  12. HIV Excess Cancers JNCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2010, an estimated 7,760 new cancers were diagnosed among the nearly 900,000 Americans known to be living with HIV infection. According to the first comprehensive study in the United States, approximately half of these cancers were in excess of what wo

  13. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...

  14. Protocol-directed insulin infusion sliding scales improve perioperative hyperglycaemia in critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Man Lin; Kumar, Arun; Adama, Gary G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Perioperative hyperglycaemia is associated with poor outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Frequent postoperative hyperglycaemia in cardiac surgery patients has led to the initiation of an insulin infusion sliding scale for quality improvement. A systematic review was conducted to determine whether a protocol-directed insulin infusion sliding scale is as safe and effective as a conventional practitioner-directed insulin infusion sliding scale, within target blood glucose r...

  15. The otherness of sexuality: excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Ruth

    2008-03-01

    The present essay, the second of a series of three, aims at developing an experience-near account of sexuality by rehabilitating the idea of excess and its place in sexual experience. It is suggested that various types of excess, such as excess of excitation (Freud), the excess of the other (Laplanche), excess beyond symbolization and the excess of the forbidden object of desire (Leviticus; Lacan) work synergistically to constitute the compelling power of sexuality. In addition to these notions, further notions of excess touch on its transformative potential. Such notions address excess that shatters psychic structures and that is actively sought so as to enable new ones to evolve (Bersani). Work is quoted that regards excess as a way of dealing with our lonely, discontinuous being by using the "excessive" cosmic energy circulating through us to achieve continuity against death (Bataille). Two contemporary analytic thinkers are engaged who deal with the object-relational and intersubjective vicissitudes of excess.

  16. Excessive crying in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Halpern

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: Excessive crying in the early months is a prevalent symptom; the pediatrician's attention is necessary to understand and adequately manage the problem and offer support to exhausted parents. The prescription of drugs of questionable action and with potential side effects is not a recommended treatment, except in extreme situations. The effectiveness of dietary treatments and use of probiotics still require confirmation. There is incomplete evidence regarding alternative treatments such as manipulation techniques, acupuncture, and use of the herbal supplements and behavioral interventions.

  17. ACTIVATION PARAMETERS AND EXCESS THERMODYANAMIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying these data, viscosity-B-coefficients, activation parameters (Δμ10≠) and (Δμ20≠) and excess thermodynamic functions, viz., excess molar volume (VE), excess viscosity, ηE and excess molar free energy of activation of flow, (GE) were calculated. The value of interaction parameter, d, of Grunberg and Nissan ...

  18. The Insuline Analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido Carrasco, Elizabeth; Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Insulin analogues are a new pharmaceutical family, designed to overcome deficiencies that still exist with the rDNA insulin. There are rapid-acting insulin analogues such as lispro insulin and insulin aspart. They avoid postprandial and nocturnal hypoglycemia. There are also intermediate-acting insulin analogues like NPL and Mix 25 (a mixture between NPL and lispro), which join the neutral protamine insulin length of action and the fast onset of the rapid-acting analogue lispro. Finally, ther...

  19. Coagulopathy and hemostatic monitoring in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Sølbeck, Sacha; Genet, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) causes severe derangements in the hemostatic system, which in turn puts the patient at risks of microvascular bleeding. Excessive transfusion and surgical re-exploration after cardiac surgery are potentially associated with a number of adverse...

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sandhya S.; Zhang, Liping; Mitch, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance refers to reduced sensitivity of organs to insulin-initiated biologic processes that result in metabolic defects. Insulin resistance is common in patients with end-stage renal disease but also occurs in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), even when the serum creatinine is minimally increased. Following insulin binding to its receptor, auto-phosphorylation of the insulin receptor is followed by kinase reactions that phosphorylate insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. In fact, low levels of Akt phosphorylation (p-Akt) identifies the presence of the insulin resistance that leads to metabolic defects in insulin-initiated metabolism of glucose, lipids and muscle proteins. Besides CKD, other complex conditions (e.g., inflammation, oxidative stress, metabolic acidosis, aging and excess angiotensin II) reduce p-Akt resulting in insulin resistance. Insulin resistance in each of these conditions is due to activation of different, E3 ubiquitin ligases which specifically conjugate ubiquitin to IRS-1 marking it for degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Consequently, IRS-1 degradation suppresses insulin-induced intracellular signaling, causing insulin resistance. Understanding mechanisms of insulin resistance could lead to therapeutic strategies that improve the metabolism of patients with CKD. PMID:26444029

  1. [Intravenous self administration of insulin in the rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhaneau, J

    1976-05-10

    Using a chronically implanted cardiac catheter, the ability of Rats to learn and to sustain a self-injection of regular insulin was demonstrated. During 12 days or more, 10 normal rats were shown to self-inject a daily amount of insulin averaging 7.7 I.U./kg body weight. The temporal pattern of the daily insulin self-administration was related to the recorded meal pattern. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between the periprandial amount of self-injected insulin and the meal size.

  2. Direct Evidence that Myocardial Insulin Resistance following Myocardial Ischemia Contributes to Post-Ischemic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Feng; Zhao, Kun; Li, Jia; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Chengfeng; Yang, Weidong; Gao, Chao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Yan; Cui, Qin; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling; Wang, Jing; Quon, Michael J; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    A close link between heart failure (HF) and systemic insulin resistance has been well documented, whereas myocardial insulin resistance and its association with HF are inadequately investigated. This study aims to determine the role of myocardial insulin resistance in ischemic HF and its underlying mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to myocardial infarction (MI) developed progressive left ventricular dilation with dysfunction and HF at 4 wk post-MI. Of note, myocardial insulin sensitivity was decreased as early as 1 wk after MI, which was accompanied by increased production of myocardial TNF-α. Overexpression of TNF-α in heart mimicked impaired insulin signaling and cardiac dysfunction leading to HF observed after MI. Treatment of rats with a specific TNF-α inhibitor improved myocardial insulin signaling post-MI. Insulin treatment given immediately following MI suppressed myocardial TNF-α production and improved cardiac insulin sensitivity and opposed cardiac dysfunction/remodeling. Moreover, tamoxifen-induced cardiomyocyte-specific insulin receptor knockout mice exhibited aggravated post-ischemic ventricular remodeling and dysfunction compared with controls. In conclusion, MI induces myocardial insulin resistance (without systemic insulin resistance) mediated partly by ischemia-induced myocardial TNF-α overproduction and promotes the development of HF. Our findings underscore the direct and essential role of myocardial insulin signaling in protection against post-ischemic HF. PMID:26659007

  3. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...... with IR independent of weight gain. In conclusion, the data presented in the current thesis, supported by a thorough review of available literature, advocate that 1) Inflammation is a triggering event fueling IR; 2) Commensal microbes can, when mistreated, aggravate IR and glucose intolerance; and 3) Diet...

  4. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  5. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    de Luca, Carl; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2007-01-01

    Obesity-induced chronic inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the Metabolic syndrome. In this review, we focus on the interconnection between obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause insulin resistance in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver by inhibiting insulin signal transduction. The sources of cytokines in insulin resistant states are the insulin target tissue themselves, primarily fat and liver, but t...

  6. Topiramate Induced Excessive Sialorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersel Dag

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that drugs such as clozapine and lithium can cause sialorrhea. On the other hand, topiramate has not been reported to induce sialorrhea. We report a case of a patient aged 26 who was given antiepileptic and antipsychotic drugs due to severe mental retardation and intractable epilepsy and developed excessive sialorrhea complaint after the addition of topiramate for the control of seizures. His complaints continued for 1,5 years and ended after giving up topiramate. We presented this case since it was a rare sialorrhea case induced by topiramate. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of sialorrhea development which causes serious hygiene and social problems when they want to give topiramate to the patients using multiple drugs.

  7. Inhibition of the Unfolded Protein Response Mechanism Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jody Groenendyk; Dukgyu Lee; Joanna Jung; Dyck, Jason R B; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Agellon, Luis B.; Marek Michalak

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac fibrosis attributed to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins is a major cause of heart failure and death. Cardiac fibrosis is extremely difficult and challenging to treat in a clinical setting due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to cardiac fibrosis and effective anti-fibrotic therapies. The objective in this study was to examine whether unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway mediates cardiac fibrosis and whether a pharmacological in...

  8. Episodic Excessive Blinking in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Yasmin Poustchi; Simon, John W; Chaudhri, Imran; Zobal-Ratner, Jitka; Barry, Gerard P

    2016-01-01

    Many children present with excessive blinking. Categorization, associated conditions, and prognosis are controversial. All children with excessive blinking were reviewed, excluding those with known uveitis, glaucoma, or obvious eyelid abnormalities. Parents were telephoned for follow-up. No ocular pathology was identified in 31 of 34 children with excessive blinking (91%). Parents were able to report a specific cause of blinking in 7 (21%). In 24 of 34 (71%), parents reported complete resolution of excessive blinking. No new ophthalmologic diagnoses were uncovered on follow-up. Episodes of excessive blinking rarely indicate neurologic disorders and frequently resolve spontaneously. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Desaturation of excess intramyocellular triacylglycerol in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, S B; Madsbad, S; Mu, Huiling

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Excess intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG), found especially in obese women, is slowly metabolized and, therefore, prone to longer exposure to intracellular desaturases. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that IMTG content correlates inversely with IMTG fatty acid (FA) saturation...... in sedentary subjects. In addition, it was validated if IMTG palmitic acid is associated with insulin resistance as suggested earlier. DESIGN: Cross-sectional human study. SUBJECTS: In skeletal muscle biopsies, which were obtained from sedentary subjects (34 women, age 48+/-2 years (27 obese including 7 type 2...... diabetes (T2DM), body mass index (BMI)=35.5+/-0.8 kg m(-2)) and 25 men, age 49+/-2 years (20 obese including 6 T2DM, BMI=35.8+/-0.8 kg m(-2))), IMTG FA composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography after separation from phospholipids by thin-layer chromatography. RESULTS: Independently of gender...

  10. Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance in Endocrine Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melpomeni Peppa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the existing literature data concerning the involvement of skeletal muscle (SM in whole body glucose homeostasis and the contribution of SM insulin resistance (IR to the metabolic derangements observed in several endocrine disorders, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, adrenal disorders and thyroid function abnormalities. IR in PCOS is associated with a unique postbinding defect in insulin receptor signaling in general and in SM in particular, due to a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Adrenal hormone excess is also associated with disrupted insulin action in peripheral tissues, such as SM. Furthermore, both hyper- and hypothyroidism are thought to be insulin resistant states, due to insulin receptor and postreceptor defects. Further studies are definitely needed in order to unravel the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms. In summary, the principal mechanisms involved in muscle IR in the endocrine diseases reviewed herein include abnormal phosphorylation of insulin signaling proteins, altered muscle fiber composition, reduced transcapillary insulin delivery, decreased glycogen synthesis, and impaired mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.

  11. Lipodystrophy: Syndrome of severe insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindlish, Shagun; Presswala, Lubaina S; Schwartz, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Lipodystrophy (LD) is a relatively rare complex collection of diseases that can be congenital or acquired. It is commonly missed in the clinical setting. Thus, the spectrum of disease presentation mandates clinician expertise in the pathophysiology and management of all forms of LD, obesity, and insulin resistance. An extensive literature search of clinical trials, systematic reviews, and narrative reviews was completed in PubMed for the years 1970 to 2013. The search terms were lipodystrophy, congenital LD, acquired LD, HIV-associated LD, severe insulin resistance, adiposity, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Lipodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of disorders with abnormal adipose tissue distribution, utilization, and metabolism. Adipose tissue can undergo significant changes in composition (hypertrophy and atrophy) in response to a nutritional state. Paradoxically, both excess and deficient adipose tissue is associated with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Bone density scan (DEXA) for body fat composition analysis or magnetic resonance imaging are optimal modalities for the assessment of abnormal adipose tissue distribution. Ongoing clinical studies suggest thiazolidinediones, insulin like growth factor-1, leptin, and growth hormone-releasing hormone as possible treatment for LPD; however, none of them is approved to reverse fat loss or treat severe insulin resistance due to LPD. The underlying mechanisms for LPD causing insulin resistance may be lipotoxicity and derangements in adipose tissue-derived proteins (adipocytokines). However, the lack of evidence to support this model means that clinicians are on their own as they navigate through the phenotypic presentation of lipodystrophies, obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome.

  12. Cardiac Malpositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Shi Joon; Im, Chung Gie; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Hasn, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    Cardiac Malposition refers to any position of the heart other than a left-sided heart in a situs solitus individual. Associated cardiac malformations are so complex that even angiocardiographic and autopsy studies may not afford an accurate information. Although the terms and classifications used to describe the internal cardiac anatomy and their arterial connections in cardiac malpositions differ and tend to be confusing, common agreement exists on the need for a segmental approach to diagnosis. Authors present 18 cases of cardiac malpositions in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between 1971 and 1979. Authors analyzed the clinical, radiographic, operative and autopsy findings with the emphasis on the angiocardiographic findings. The results are as follows: 1. Among 18 cases with cardiac malpositions, 6 cases had dextrocardia with situs inversus, 9 cases had dextrocardia with situs solitus and 3 cases had levocardia with situs inversus. 2. There was no genuine exception to visceroatrial concordance rule. 3. Associated cardiac malpositions were variable and complex with a tendency of high association of transposition and double outlet varieties with dextrocardia in situs solitus and levocardia in situs inversus. Only one in 6 cases of dextrocardia with situs inversus had pure transposition. 4. In two cases associated pulmonary atresia was found at surgery which was not predicted by angiocardiography. 5. Because many of the associated complex lesions can be corrected surgically provided the diagnosis is accurate, the selective biplane angiocardiography with or without cineradiography is essential.

  13. [Adverse reactions to insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñana, J J; Montoro, F J; Hernández, M D; Basomba, A

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of allergic reactions to insuline has decreased during the last few years. Probably this is due to the use of the newly-developed recombinant human insuline. At present, adverse reactions to insuline occur in 5-10% of patients on therapy with insuline. Adverse reactions may be local (more frequent) or systemic (rare). Insuline resistance consists in a different type of immunological reaction. Diagnosis of allergy to insuline is based on clinical history and cutaneous and serological tests. Treatment depends upon the severity of the reaction. When insuline is indispensable despite a previous allergic reaction, a desensitization protocol may be implemented.

  14. Abnormalities in insulin secretion in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillausseau, P-J; Meas, T; Virally, M; Laloi-Michelin, M; Médeau, V; Kevorkian, J-P

    2008-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a multifactorial disease, due to decreased glucose peripheral uptake, and increased hepatic glucose production, due to reduced both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. Multiple insulin secretory defects are present, including absence of pulsatility, loss of early phase of insulin secretion after glucose, decreased basal and stimulated plasma insulin concentrations, excess in prohormone secretion, and progressive decrease in insulin secretory capacity with time. beta-cell dysfunction is genetically determined and appears early in the course of the disease. The interplay between insulin secretory defect and insulin resistance is now better understood. In subjects with normal beta-cell function, increase in insulin is compensated by an increase in insulin secretion and plasma glucose levels remain normal. In subjects genetically predisposed to type 2 diabetes, failure of beta-cell to compensate leads to a progressive elevation in plasma glucose levels, then to overt diabetes. When permanent hyperglycaemia is present, progressive severe insulin secretory failure with time ensues, due to glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity, and oxidative stress. A marked reduction in beta-cell mass at post-mortem examination of pancreas of patients with type 2 diabetes has been reported, with an increase in beta-cell apoptosis non-compensated by neogenesis.

  15. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costello BT

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting system disease, and arrhythmias predisposing to sudden cardiac death. A number of investigations are available to assist in making the diagnosis. The diagnosis may be made from the clinical history and evidence of inflammation on imaging modalities in the active phase and evidence of myocardial scarring in the chronic phase. Keywords: cardiac magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography, sarcoidosis, sudden cardiac death

  16. Insulin causes insulin-receptor internalization in human erythrocyte ghosts.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelleher, R S; Murray, E F; Peterson, S W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of incubation with insulin on insulin-receptor internalization by erythrocyte ghosts was investigated. The number of surface insulin receptors decreased by 30-40% after incubation of ghosts with insulin. Total insulin-receptor binding to solubilized ghosts was the same in insulin-incubated and control ghosts, whereas insulin binding to an internal vesicular fraction was substantially increased in insulin-incubated ghosts. Our findings suggest that erythrocyte-ghost insulin receptor...

  17. Cardiac ablation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheter ablation; Radiofrequency catheter ablation; Cryoablation - cardiac ablation; AV nodal reentrant tachycardia - cardiac ablation; AVNRT - cardiac ablation; Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome - cardiac ablation; Atrial fibrillation - cardiac ablation; Atrial flutter - ...

  18. Insulin and the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  19. A high-sugar diet produces obesity and insulin resistance in wild-type Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Palanker Musselman

    2011-11-01

    Insulin-resistant, ‘type 2’ diabetes (T2D results from a complex interplay between genes and environment. In particular, both caloric excess and obesity are strongly associated with T2D across many genetic backgrounds. To gain insights into how dietary excess affects insulin resistance, we studied the simple model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Larvae reared on a high-sugar diet were hyperglycemic, insulin resistant and accumulated fat – hallmarks of T2D – compared with those reared on control diets. Excess dietary sugars, but not fats or proteins, elicited insulin-resistant phenotypes. Expression of genes involved in lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis and β-oxidation was upregulated in high-sugar-fed larvae, as were FOXO targets, consistent with known mechanisms of insulin resistance in humans. These data establish a novel Drosophila model of diet-induced insulin resistance that bears strong similarity to the pathophysiology of T2D in humans.

  20. [Relationship between blood pressure, heart rate and cardiac autonomic dysfunction in non-diabetic obese patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, I; Nguyen, M T; Hamo-Tchatchouang, E; Cosson, E; Valensi, P

    2015-06-01

    Some studies suggest that a high heart rate (HR) would be predictive of the incidence of an elevated blood pressure (BP). Cardiac autonomic dysfunction (CAD) affects a high proportion of obese patients. CAD could be involved in BP increase. Our aim was to examine the relationship between CAD, HR and BP in obese patients without known diabetes. We included 428 overweight or obese patients. CAD was assessed by analyzing HR variations during three standard tests (Valsalva, deep breathing, lying-to-standing), which are mostly dependent on vagal control. An oral load in glucose was performed and the Matsuda index was calculated. The population was separated in 4 groups according to the grade of CAD (no or only one abnormal test, 2 or 3 abnormal tests) and HR (heart rate, which is indicative of a more marked insulin resistance and probably an excess in sympathetic activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Alteration in insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanti, J F; Gual, P; Grémeaux, T

    2004-01-01

    Insulin resistance, when combined with impaired insulin secretion, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is characterised by a decrease in insulin effect on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tIssue. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS......-1) and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) are critical events in the insulin signalling cascade leading to insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Modification of IRS-1 by serine phosphorylation could be one of the mechanisms leading to a decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine...... to phosphorylate these serine residues have been identified. These exciting results suggest that serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a possible hallmark of insulin resistance in biologically insulin responsive cells or tIssues. Identifying the pathways by which "diabetogenic" factors activate IRS-1 kinases...

  2. Acromegaly with Normal Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Levels and Congestive Heart Failure as the First Clinical Manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyae Min Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with acromegaly is cardiovascular complications. Myocardial exposure to excessive growth hormone can cause ventricular hypertrophy, hypertension, arrhythmia, and diastolic dysfunction. However, congestive heart failure as a result of systolic dysfunction is observed only rarely in patients with acromegaly. Most cases of acromegaly exhibit high levels of serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1. Acromegaly with normal IGF-1 levels is rare and difficult to diagnose. Here, we report a rare case of an acromegalic patient whose first clinical manifestation was severe congestive heart failure, despite normal IGF-1 levels. We diagnosed acromegaly using a glucose-loading growth hormone suppression test. Cardiac function and myocardial hypertrophy improved 6 months after transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary adenoma.

  3. Measuring Excess Noise in SDL's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, S. J.; Kowitz, H. R.; Rowland, C. W.; Shull, T. A.; Ruggles, S. L.; Matthews, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    New instrument gives quantitive information on "excess noise" in semiconductor-diode laser (SDL's). By proper selection of detector, instrument tests any SDL from visible wavelengths through thermal infrared. Lasers determine excess noise in SKL source by measuring photocurrent generated in photodetector exposed first to reference laser then to SKL under test.

  4. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25503364 . Balady GJ, Williams MA, Ades PA, et al. Core components of ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22070836 . Thompson PD. Exercise-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation. In: Mann DL, Zipes ...

  6. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also run other tests, depending on your health history and the results of these tests. Treatment Cardiac arrest needs emergency treatment right away to get the heart started again. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) . This is often the first type of ...

  7. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil D Bartels

    Full Text Available Obesity causes lipid accumulation in the heart and may lead to lipotoxic heart disease. Traditionally, the size of the cardiac triglyceride pool is thought to reflect the balance between uptake and beta-oxidation of fatty acids. However, triglycerides can also be exported from cardiomyocytes via secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP; the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism remain unknown, we investigated how cardiac lipoprotein synthesis affects cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes, insulin sensitivity, and function in obese mice. Heart-specific ablation of MTP-A in mice using Cre-loxP technology impaired upregulation of MTP expression in response to increased fatty acid availability during fasting and fat feeding. This resulted in cardiac triglyceride accumulation but unaffected cardiac insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Long-term fat-feeding of male C57Bl/6 mice increased cardiac triglycerides, induced cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and attenuated heart function. Abolishing cardiac triglyceride accumulation in fat-fed mice by overexpression of an apoB transgene in the heart prevented the induction of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and improved heart function. The results suggest that in obesity, the physiological increase of cardiac MTP expression serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation albeit without major effects on cardiac insulin sensitivity. Nevertheless, the data suggest that genetically increased lipoprotein secretion prevents development of obesity-induced lipotoxic heart disease.

  8. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Esteves Cardoso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis.

  9. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Monique Esteves; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Salvador Junior, Edson da Silva; Lachtermacher, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis.

  10. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Monique Esteves; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Salvador Junior, Edson da Silva; Lachtermacher, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis. PMID:24826214

  11. Parasympathetic involvement in rapid meal-associated conditioned insulin secretion in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strubbe, J.H.

    Blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations were measured in blood sampled via a cardiac catheter in freely moving rats. To obtain a rapid conditioned cephalic phase of insulin secretion, rats were habituated to one of two feeding schedules. Clock-activated opening of doors in front of the food

  12. Suicide by Insulin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165701.html Suicide by Insulin? Self-harm and suicidal behavior may ... higher rates of depression, the researchers explained. And suicide or suicide attempts using insulin or other diabetes ...

  13. Insulin C-peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003701.htm Insulin C-peptide test To use the sharing features ... a product that is created when the hormone insulin is produced and released into the body. The ...

  14. High-mix insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use.

  15. Insulin pump (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  16. Classifying insulin regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neu, A; Lange, K; Barrett, T

    2015-01-01

    defined. The proposed new classification for insulin management will be comprehensive, simple, and catchy. Currently available terms were included. This classification may offer the opportunity to compare therapeutic strategies without the currently existing confusion on the insulin regimen....

  17. Does Excessive Pronation Cause Pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Christian Gammelgaard; Nielsen, RG; Rathleff, M

    Excessive pronation could be an inborn abnormality or an acquired foot disorder caused by overuse, inadequate supported shoes or inadequate foot training. When the muscles and ligaments of the foot are insufficient it can cause an excessive pronation of the foot. The current treatment consist...... of antipronation shoes or insoles, which latest was studied by Kulce DG., et al (2007). So far there have been no randomized controlled studies showing methods that can measure the effect of treatments with insoles. Some of the excessive pronation patients recieve antipronation training often if the patient...

  18. Fatty Acid Induced Insulin Resistance in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Hyoung Il

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity, which is considered as a disease, has been increasing uncontrollably over the last two decades. Obesity is a state of disregulated energy homeostasis characterized by hypothalamic resistance to adiposity signals (insulin and leptin). While many factors are involved in the development of obesity, excess dietary fat has been proposed as one of the main causal factors. This causes disrupted energy homeostasis by inducing both leptin and insulin resistance in the centra...

  19. Insulin sensitivity and albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Stefan; Rutters, Femke; Nijpels, Giel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence suggests an association between insulin sensitivity and albuminuria, which, even in the normal range, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated whether insulin sensitivity is associated with albuminuria in healthy subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN...... albuminuria. This finding suggests that reduced insulin sensitivity either is simply related to or might causally contribute to the initial pathogenesis of albuminuria....

  20. Carcinogenicity of insulin analogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, Sebastiaan Johannes ter

    2015-01-01

    There is epidemiological evidence that the use of some insulin analogues by diabetic patients is correlated with an increased cancer risk. In vitro exposure experiments revealed that insulin glargine (LANTUS) was the only commercial insulin analogue with an increased mitogenic potential. In the

  1. Glycosphingolipids and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, Mirjam; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for insulin resistance, a state characterized by impaired responsiveness of liver, muscle and adipose tissue to insulin. One class of lipids involved in the development of insulin resistance are the (glyco)sphingolipids. Ceramide, the most simple

  2. Insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchison, Samantha Kate

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 8-18% of women, presenting a major public health and economic burden. Women with PCOS have insulin resistance (IR) independent of obesity. IR has an integral aetiological role in the reproductive and metabolic consequences of PCOS including obesity, type 2 diabetes (diabetes) and cardiovascular risk factors. Excess weight exacerbates IR and increases PCOS severity. PCOS combined with obesity presents a useful model to study IR before confounding hyperg...

  3. Does Excessive Pronation Cause Pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Carsten Møller; Olesen Gammelgaard, Christian; Nielsen, R. G.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive pronation could be an inborn abnormality or an acquired foot disorder caused by overuse, inadequate supported shoes or inadequate foot training. When the muscles and ligaments of the foot are insufficient it can cause an excessive pronation of the foot. The current treatment consist of ...... pronation patients recieve antipronation training often if the patient is in pain but wanted to investigate if it was possible to measure a change in foot posture after af given treatment....

  4. Visceral adiposity, insulin resistance and cancer risk

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, Claire L

    2011-06-22

    Abstract Background There is a well established link between obesity and cancer. Emerging research is characterising this relationship further and delineating the specific role of excess visceral adiposity, as opposed to simple obesity, in promoting tumorigenesis. This review summarises the evidence from an epidemiological and pathophysiological perspective. Methods Relevant medical literature was identified from searches of PubMed and references cited in appropriate articles identified. Selection of articles was based on peer review, journal and relevance. Results Numerous epidemiological studies consistently identify increased risk of developing carcinoma in the obese. Adipose tissue, particularly viscerally located fat, is metabolically active and exerts systemic endocrine effects. Putative pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and carcinogenesis include the paracrine effects of adipose tissue and systemic alterations associated with obesity. Systemic changes in the obese state include chronic inflammation and alterations in adipokines and sex steroids. Insulin and the insulin-like growth factor axis influence tumorigenesis and also have a complex relationship with adiposity. There is evidence to suggest that insulin and the IGF axis play an important role in mediating obesity associated malignancy. Conclusions There is much evidence to support a role for obesity in cancer progression, however further research is warranted to determine the specific effect of excess visceral adipose tissue on tumorigenesis. Investigation of the potential mechanisms underpinning the association, including the role of insulin and the IGF axis, will improve understanding of the obesity and cancer link and may uncover targets for intervention.

  5. Lifecourse childhood adiposity trajectories associated with adolescent insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rae-Chi; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Smith, Anne; Kendall, Garth E; Landau, Louis I; Mori, Trevor A; Newnham, John P; Stanley, Fiona J; Oddy, Wendy H; Hands, Beth; Beilin, Lawrence J

    2011-04-01

    In light of the obesity epidemic, we aimed to characterize novel childhood adiposity trajectories from birth to age 14 years and to determine their relation to adolescent insulin resistance. A total of 1,197 Australian children with cardiovascular/metabolic profiling at age 14 years were studied serially from birth to age 14 years. Semiparametric mixture modeling was applied to anthropometric data over eight time points to generate adiposity trajectories of z scores (weight-for-height and BMI). Fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were compared at age 14 years between adiposity trajectories. Seven adiposity trajectories were identified. Three (two rising and one chronic high adiposity) trajectories comprised 32% of the population and were associated with significantly higher fasting insulin and HOMA-IR compared with a reference trajectory group (with longitudinal adiposity z scores of approximately zero). There was a significant sex by trajectory group interaction (P rising trajectory from low to moderate adiposity did not show increased insulin resistance. Maternal obesity, excessive weight gain during pregnancy, and gestational diabetes were more prevalent in the chronic high adiposity trajectory. A range of childhood adiposity trajectories exist. The greatest insulin resistance at age 14 years is seen in those with increasing trajectories regardless of birth weight and in high birth weight infants whose adiposity remains high. Public health professionals should urgently target both excessive weight gain in early childhood across all birth weights and maternal obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy.

  6. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  7. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas tranplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, K; Karlsson, HRK; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied....... In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients may arise from a negative feedback regulation of the canonical insulin-signaling cascade from excessive serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, possibly as a consequence of immunosuppressive therapy and hyperinsulinemia....... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  8. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussabah, Elhem; Zakhama, Lilia; Ksontini, Iméne; Ibn Elhadj, Zied; Boukhris, Besma; Naffeti, Sana; Thameur, Moez; Ben Youssef, Soraya

    2008-09-01

    PREREQUIS: Amyloidosis is a rare infiltrative disease characterized by multiple clinical features. Various organs are involved and the cardiovascular system is a common target of amyloidosis. Cardiac involvement may occur with or without clinical manifestations and is considered as a major prognostic factor. To analyze the clinical features of cardiac involvement, to review actual knowledgement concerning echocardiographic diagnostic and to evaluate recent advances in treatment of the disease. An electronic search of the relevant literature was carried out using Medline and Pubmed. Keys words used for the final search were amyloidosis, cardiopathy and echocardiography. We considered for analysis reviews, studies and articles between 1990 and 2007. Amyloidosis represents 5 to 10% of non ischemic cardiomyoparhies. Cardiac involvement is the first cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy witch must be evoked in front of every inexplained cardiopathy after the age of forty. The amyloid nature of cardiopathy is suggered if some manifestations were associated as a peripheric neuropathy, a carpal tunnel sydrome and proteinuria > 3g/day. Echocardiography shows dilated atria, a granular sparkling appearance of myocardium, diastolic dysfunction and thickened left ventricle contrasting with a low electric voltage. The proof of amyloidosis is brought by an extra-cardiac biopsy, the indications of endomyocardial biopsy are very limited. The identification of the amyloid nature of cardiopathy has an direct therapeutic implication: it indicates the use of digitalis, calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers. Today the treatment of amyloidosis remains very unsatisfactory especially in the cardiac involvement. An early diagnosis before the cardiac damage may facilitate therapy and improve prognosis.

  9. Probing cardiac repolarization reserve in drug safety assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalos, L.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive prolongation of cardiac repolarization, manifested as QT prolongation on ECG, is common unwanted side effect of many drugs and drug candidates. Prolongation of QT interval may lead to life threatening cardiac arrhythmia – Torsade de Point (TdP). Number of drugs was withdrawn from the

  10. Myocardial Dysfunction and Shock after Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentzer, Jacob C.; Chonde, Meshe D.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Postarrest myocardial dysfunction includes the development of low cardiac output or ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction after cardiac arrest. Impaired left ventricular systolic function is reported in nearly two-thirds of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Hypotension and shock requiring vasopressor support are similarly common after cardiac arrest. Whereas shock requiring vasopressor support is consistently associated with an adverse outcome after cardiac arrest, the association between myocardial dysfunction and outcomes is less clear. Myocardial dysfunction and shock after cardiac arrest develop as the result of preexisting cardiac pathology with multiple superimposed insults from resuscitation. The pathophysiology involves cardiovascular ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiovascular toxicity from excessive levels of inflammatory cytokine activation and catecholamines, among other contributing factors. Similar mechanisms occur in myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass, in sepsis, and in stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Hemodynamic stabilization after resuscitation from cardiac arrest involves restoration of preload, vasopressors to support arterial pressure, and inotropic support if needed to reverse the effects of myocardial dysfunction and improve systemic perfusion. Further research is needed to define the role of postarrest myocardial dysfunction on cardiac arrest outcomes and identify therapeutic strategies. PMID:26421284

  11. Metformin and insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded.

  12. [Insulin resistance in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Joanna; Witek, Przemysław; Pańkowska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance is characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to insulin. The hallmark of insulin resistance is decreased tissue glucose uptake despite normal or elevated insulin concentration. There has been an upward trend in the incidence of insulin resistance in developed countries, although in pediatric population it is difficult to assess. Both genetic and environmental factors play an important role in the etiology of insulin resistance, namely increased diet caloricity and decreased physical activity. Gradually, this leads to adipose tissue build-up. The role of visceral adipose tissue is of particular importance, mainly due to its significant endocrine activity, leading to adverse metabolic effects. The most important consequences of insulin resistance in children include increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, atherogenic dyslipidemia and arterial hypertension, which lead to increased cardiovascular risk. Children with insulin resistance can develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and sleep apnea syndrome. In case of female pediatric patients a higher incidence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is observed. Furthermore, the authors reviewed opinions on risk factors for insulin resistance, as well as direct and indirect insulin resistance assessment methods. The article presents the principles of primary and secondary prevention of insulin resistance in children, with particular allowance for dietary recommendations and recommendations to increase physical activity, and, in selected cases, current guidelines on pharmacological treatment.

  13. Can prokineticin prevent obesity and insulin resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Hunolstein, Jean-Jacques; Nebigil, Canan G

    2015-10-01

    Because of its increasing prevalence and morbi-mortality, obesity is a major health problem. Obesity etiology includes a combination of excess dietary calories and decreased physical activity, coupled with either predisposing genetic factors or metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance. Adipose tissue secretes several metabolically important proteins known as 'adipokines' that play a major role in obesity and insulin resistance. High levels of a newly identified group of adipokines, called prokineticins, have been found in obese adipose tissues. Prokineticins are peptide hormones released principally from macrophages and reproductive organs. They act on the G protein-coupled receptors PKR1 and PKR2. This review aims to provide an overview of current knowledge of the role of prokineticins and their receptors in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. The principal biological effect of prokineticins in the central nervous system is the control of food intake. Nevertheless, peripheral biological effects of prokineticin are associated with increasing insulin sensitivity and suppressing the adipose tissue expansion. We outline the biological significance of the central and peripheral effects of prokineticins, and the potential of their receptors as targets for the treatment of obesity and insulin resistance.

  14. Intrauterine hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory signalling via the receptor for advanced glycation end products in the cardiac muscle of the infants of diabetic mother rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaharada, Ritsuko; Masuda, Haruna; Chen, Zhenyi; Blough, Eric; Kohama, Tomoko; Nakamura, Akio

    2017-09-23

    Gestational diabetes is associated with increased risk to the health of the mother and her offspring. In particular, the infants of diabetic mothers (IDMs) exhibit elevated levels of preterm birth, macrosomia, hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, and cardiomyopathy. We have previously reported that IDMs showed abnormalities in cardiac Akt-related insulin signalling, and that these deficiencies in Akt-related signalling were attenuated by supplementing the maternal diet with fish-oil. Herein, we investigated whether the eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) found in fish oil can be used to attenuate diabetes associated impairments in cardiomyocyte signalling. Pregnant diabetic rats were administered streptozotocin before receiving EPA or water, and their infants were designated IDM/EPA, IDM/W. We assessed the potential molecular pathway for this effect in the primary cardiac cell from newborn rat hearts. Insulin resistance as determined by diminished GLUT4 translocation following insulin stimulation, the levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and reactive oxygen species were elevated in the neonatal hearts of IDM/W compared with that seen in the offspring born from non-diabetic control animals. Similarly, the receptor of AGEs (RAGE) mRNA levels, reactive oxygen species and the amount of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) mRNA were higher in the hearts from the IDM/W when compared to that observed in the hearts of offspring born to non-diabetic animals. These deleterious effects of gestational diabetes were significantly decreased in the offspring of diabetic mothers receiving EPA supplementation. Taken together, our data suggest that the EPA in fish oil may improve the impaired signalling and the excessive protein glycation in the cardiac muscles of infants exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia.

  15. Recombinant-activated factor VII in the paediatric cardiac surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    V Agarwal, KE Okonta, PS Lal. Abstract. Background: The control of excessive bleeding after paediatric cardiac surgery can be challenging. This may make the use of recombinant-activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in preventing this excessive bleeding, after adopted conventional methods have failed, desirable. Our aim is to ...

  16. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 regulates glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Stuart A

    2009-11-01

    Glucocorticoid excess is characterized by increased adiposity, skeletal myopathy, and insulin resistance, but the precise molecular mechanisms are unknown. Within skeletal muscle, 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) converts cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone in rodents) to active cortisol (corticosterone in rodents). We aimed to determine the mechanisms underpinning glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle and indentify how 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors improve insulin sensitivity.

  17. Kinetics of insulin disappearance from plasma in cortisone-treated normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellemann, K; Thorsteinsson, B; Fugleberg, S

    1987-01-01

    The effect of glucocorticoid excess on insulin disappearance from plasma was examined in eight normal men during cortisone treatment (50 mg orally twice daily for 4 d) and in the absence of any medication (control) in random order. Constant infusion of insulin (1-5 mU/kg/min) was used to achieve ...

  18. INSULIN THERAPY TODAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Živić

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The insulin classification regarding the duration of its effect gradually be-comes outdated; it is necessary to speak first about the insulin therapy regimes. The intensified insulin therapy regarding the type of multiple daily insulin injections be-comes an indisputable standard. The progress in the "protein engineering" with the formation of a wide spectrum of insulin analogues provides for moving forward to-wards modern diabetology and the concept of strict individualization of the insulin therapy. The experience becomes a pattern in creating two existing formulas of the insulin "short" analogues, namely HUMALAG with the replacement of the proline and lysinane places with those of 28 and 29, and NOVORAPID with aspartic acid at the 28th place in the B chain. The most recent long-effect analogues are created by amino acid changes with the glycine residual at the position A21 and two ariginines added to the positions B31 and B32 - insulin "glargin" - LANTUS. The development of short and long effect analogues imposed the logical need for formulating "new" fixed insulin combination's as well. New combination's are made of two kinds of ac-tual insulin, namely, the fast-effect analogues of the aspart type or lystroinsulin and protamine-retarded preparations - neutral protamine - lystroinsulin. Three kinds of combinations are made.

  19. The role of fibrinogen in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilecen, S

    2016-01-01

    Excessive bleeding is one of the most common complications in cardiac surgery and is caused most frequently by insufficient surgical hemostasis or impairments of the coagulation system or a combination of both. A substantial number of patients consume disproportionately high amounts of blood

  20. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  1. Excessive weight gain during full breast-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Maria; Hellmuth, Christian; Demmelmair, Hans; Koletzko, Berthold

    2014-01-01

    Breast-feeding is considered to offer optimal nutrition for healthy infant growth and development. Observational studies have linked breast-feeding to reduced obesity. CASE OBSERVATION: We observed an infant who was born macrosomic (4.56 kg) and showed excessive weight gain markedly exceeding the 97th percentile of weight during full breast-feeding. At the age of 4 months, the weight was greater than 11 kg. Clinical evaluation did not reveal any underlying pathology. After the introduction of complementary feeding and hence reduction of the breast milk intake, the excessive weight gain was attenuated and the slope of the percentile curve paralleled upper percentiles. Since this pattern suggested full breast-feeding as the driver of excessive weight gain, we analyzed the human milk composition at the infant age of 1 year and compared the results with published data on composition at this stage of lactation. The milk contents of lactose, fat, fatty acids, polar lipids, carnitine species, and insulin were similar to the reference data. The adiponectin content was increased. The most remarkable alteration was a high milk protein content (mean 1.25 g/dl, reference 0.8 g/dl). A very high protein supply in infancy has been previously shown to increase plasma concentrations of the growth factors insulin and IGF-1, weight gain, and later obesity. We speculate that interindividual variations in human milk adiponectin and protein contents may contribute to modulation of the growth of fully breast-fed infants and in this case may have contributed to excessive weight gain during full breast-feeding. This hypothesis merits being tested in future cohort studies. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. [Insulin therapy and sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, A

    1997-01-01

    Physical work effects a transitory enhanced affinity of insulin to its receptor in the stressed muscles and thereby a better efficiency. Therefore, in sports lasting for 30 min and more the basal and/or bolus doses of insulin have to be reduced in order to prevent hypoglycemia. An alternative supply of additional carbohydrates prior to physical work is often not practicable. Injections of insulin into areas of the body not involved in muscular work do not give sufficient warranty against hypoglycemic reactions. A new short-acting insulin-analogue (Lispro) shows a reduced effect on blood glucose levels after 3 h as compared to regular insulin. Therefore, it could be of advantage for insulin dependent diabetics doing their exercise at this time.

  3. Insulin aspart pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Roge, Rikke Meldgaard; Ma, Zhulin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insulin aspart (IAsp) is used by many diabetics as a meal-time insulin to control postprandial glucose levels. As is the case with many other insulin types, the pharmacokinetics (PK), and consequently the pharmacodynamics (PD), is associated with clinical variability, both between...... to investigate and quantify the properties of the subcutaneous depot. Data from Brange et al. (1990) are used to determine the effects of insulin chemistry in subcutis on the absorption rate. Intravenous (i.v.) bolus and infusion PK data for human insulin are used to understand and quantify the systemic...... distribution and elimination (Porksen et al., 1997; Sjostrand et al., 2002). PK and PD profiles for type 1 diabetics from Chen et al. (2005) are analyzed to demonstrate the effects of IAsp antibodies in terms of bound and unbound insulin. PK profiles from Thorisdottir et al. (2009) and Ma et al. (2012b...

  4. Diabetes, insulin and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    The metabolic and hormonal adaptations to single exercise sessions and to exercise training in normal man and in patients with insulin-dependent as well as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are reviewed. In insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes good metabolic control is best obtained...... of the patient's reaction to exercise is desirable, which necessitates frequent self-monitoring of plasma glucose. It may often be necessary to diminish the insulin dose before exercise, and/or to ingest additional carbohydrate during or after exercise. In non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes, exercise...... by a regular pattern of life which will lead to a fairly constant demand for insulin from day to day. Exercise is by nature a perturbation that makes treatment of diabetes difficult: Muscle contractions per se tend to decrease the plasma glucose concentration whereas the exercise-induced response of the so...

  5. Flexibility in insulin prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication explores the concept of flexibility, a propos insulin preparations and insulin regimes used in the management of type 2 diabetes. The flexibility of an insulin regime or preparation is defined as their ability to be injected at variable times, with variable injection-meal time gaps, in a dose frequency and quantum determined by shared decision making, with a minimal requirement of glucose monitoring and health professional consultation, with no compromise on safety, efficiency and tolerability. The relative flexibility of various basal, prandial and dual action insulins, as well as intensive regimes, is compared. The biopsychosocial model of health is used to assess the utility of different insulins while encouraging a philosophy of flexible insulin usage.

  6. Excessive masturbation after epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Mine; Erdogan, Ayten; Duvenci, Sirin; Ozyurt, Emin; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-02-01

    Sexual behavior changes as well as depression, anxiety, and organic mood/personality disorders have been reported in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients before and after epilepsy surgery. The authors describe a 14-year-old girl with symptoms of excessive masturbation in inappropriate places, social withdrawal, irritability, aggressive behavior, and crying spells after selective amygdalohippocampectomy for medically intractable TLE with hippocampal sclerosis. Since the family members felt extremely embarrassed, they were upset and angry with the patient which, in turn, increased her depressive symptoms. Both her excessive masturbation behavior and depressive symptoms remitted within 2 months of psychoeducative intervention and treatment with citalopram 20mg/day. Excessive masturbation is proposed to be related to the psychosocial changes due to seizure-free status after surgery as well as other possible mechanisms such as Kluver-Bucy syndrome features and neurophysiologic changes associated with the cessation of epileptic discharges. This case demonstrates that psychiatric problems and sexual changes encountered after epilepsy surgery are possibly multifactorial and in adolescence hypersexuality may be manifested as excessive masturbation behavior.

  7. History of insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste C. Quianzon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of diabetes treatment has gone from crude extracts of insulin and accidental discovery of sulfa-like drugs in antibiotics to the development of drugs based on improved understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus. This article will review the history of the discovery and development of insulin. A companion focusing on non-insulin diabetes agents will follow in the next issue of JCHIMP.

  8. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the association between insulin resistance and vascular disease, and this has led to wide acceptance of the clustering of hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and obesity as a clinical entity, the metabolic syndrome. While insulin resistance, by promoting dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities, is part of the proatherogenic milieu, it is possible that insulin resistance itself in the vascular wall does not promote atherosclerosis. Recent fi...

  9. Crying - excessive (0-6 months)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provider will check the infant's growth and development. Antibiotics may be prescribed if the baby has a bacterial infection. Alternative Names Infants - excessive crying; Well child - excessive crying ...

  10. Insulin, cognition, and dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholerton, Brenna; Baker, Laura D.; Craft, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive disorders of aging represent a serious threat to the social and economic welfare of current society. It is now widely recognized that pathology related to such conditions, particularly Alzheimer’s disease, likely begins years or decades prior to the onset of clinical dementia symptoms. This revelation has led researchers to consider candidate mechanisms precipitating the cascade of neuropathological events that eventually lead to clinical Alzheimer’s disease. Insulin, a hormone with potent effects in the brain, has recently received a great deal of attention for its potential beneficial and protective role in cognitive function. Insulin resistance, which refers to the reduced sensitivity of target tissues to the favorable effects of insulin, is related to multiple chronic conditions known to impact cognition and increase dementia risk. With insulin resistance-associated conditions reaching epidemic proportions, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders will continue to rise exponentially. Fortunately, these chronic insulin-related conditions are amenable to pharmacological intervention. As a result, novel therapeutic strategies that focus on increasing insulin sensitivity in the brain may be an important target for protecting or treating cognitive decline. The following review will highlight our current understanding of the role of insulin in brain, potential mechanisms underlying the link between insulin resistance and dementia, and current experimental therapeutic strategies aimed at improving cognitive function via modifying the brain’s insulin sensitivity. PMID:24070815

  11. Lipid-mediated muscle insulin resistance: different fat, different pathways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Olesja; Jelenik, Tomas; Roden, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Increased dietary fat intake and lipolysis result in excessive lipid availability, which relates to impaired insulin sensitivity. Over the last years, several mechanisms possibly underlying lipid-mediated insulin resistance evolved. Lipid intermediates such as diacylglycerols (DAG) associate with changes in insulin sensitivity in many models. DAG activate novel protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms followed by inhibitory serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1). Activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) raises another lipid class, ceramides (CER), which induce pro-inflammatory pathways and lead to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of glucosylceramide and ganglioside synthesis results in improved insulin sensitivity and increased activatory tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS1 in the muscle. Incomplete fat oxidation can increase acylcarnitines (ACC), which in turn stimulate pro-inflammatory pathways. This review analyzed the effects of lipid metabolites on insulin action in skeletal muscle of humans and rodents. Despite the evidence for the association of both DAG and CER with insulin resistance, its causal relevance may differ depending on the subcellular localization and the tested cohorts, e.g., athletes. Nevertheless, recent data indicate that individual lipid species and their degree of fatty acid saturation, particularly membrane and cytosolic C18:2 DAG, specifically activate PKCθ and induce both acute lipid-induced and chronic insulin resistance in humans.

  12. Suppression of Insulin Production and Secretion by a Decretin Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfa, Ronald W.; Park, Sangbin; Skelly, Kathleen-Rose; Poffenberger, Gregory; Jain, Nimit; Gu, Xueying; Kockel, Lutz; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yinghua; Powers, Alvin C.; Kim, Seung K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Decretins, hormones induced by fasting that suppress insulin production and secretion, have been postulated from classical human metabolic studies. From genetic screens, we identified Drosophila Limostatin (Lst), a peptide hormone that suppresses insulin secretion. Lst is induced by nutrient restriction in gut-associated endocrine cells. limostatin deficiency led to hyperinsulinemia, hypoglycemia and excess adiposity. A conserved 15-residue polypeptide encoded by limostatin suppressed secretion by insulin-producing cells. Targeted knockdown of CG9918, a Drosophila orthologue of Neuromedin U receptors (NMUR), in insulin-producing cells phenocopied limostatin deficiency, and attenuated insulin suppression by purified Lst, suggesting CG9918 encodes an Lst receptor. NMUR1 is expressed in islet β-cells, and purified NMU suppresses insulin secretion from human islets. A human mutant NMU variant that co-segregates with familial early-onset obesity and hyperinsulinemia fails to suppress insulin secretion. We propose Lst as an index member of an ancient hormone class called decretins, which suppress insulin output. PMID:25651184

  13. Modeling the cardiac surgery workforce in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderby, Sonia A; Carter, Michael W; Latham, Timothy; Ouzounian, Maral; Hassan, Ansar; Tang, Gilbert H; Teng, Carolyn J; Kingsbury, Kori; Feindel, Christopher M

    2010-08-01

    Limited employment opportunities for recently trained cardiac surgeons are deterring medical students from entering cardiac surgery residency programs. Given the lengthy training period and the aging of both the general population and currently practicing cardiac surgeons, this reduced enrollment raises concerns about the adequacy of the future cardiac surgery workforce. A workforce model was developed to explore the future need for cardiac surgeons in Canada. A novel system dynamics model was developed to simulate the supply and demand for cardiac surgery in Canada between 2008 and 2030 to identify whether an excess or shortage of surgeons would exist. Several different scenarios were examined, including varying surgeon productivity, revascularization rates, and residency enrollment rates. The simulation results of various scenarios are presented. In the base case, a surgeon shortage is expected to develop by 2025, although this depends on surgeons' response to demand-supply gap changes. An alternative scenario in which residency enrollment directly relates to the presence of unemployed surgeons also projects substantial shortages after 2021. The model results indicate that if residency enrollment rates remain at the 2009 level an alarming shortage may develop soon, possibly reaching almost 50% of the Canadian cardiac surgical workforce. These workforce model results project an eventual cardiac surgeon shortage in Canada. This study highlights the possibility of a crisis in cardiac surgery and emphasizes the urgency with which enrollment into cardiac surgery training programs and the employability of recently trained cardiac surgery graduates need to be addressed. Copyright 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cortisol response to critical illness: Effect of intensive insulin therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Vanhorebeek (Ilse); R.P. Peeters (Robin); S.V. Perre (Sarah Vander); I. Jans (Ivo); P.J. Wouters (Pieter); K. Skogstrand (Kristin); T.K. Hansen (Troels); R. Bouillon (Roger); G. van den Berghe (Greet)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractContext: Both excessive and insufficient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to critical illness is associated with increased mortality. Objective: The objective of the study was to study the effect of intensive insulin therapy, recently shown to reduce

  15. Severe rhabdomyolysis after excessive bodybuilding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, J; Zuntner, G; Fuchs, M; Weinberger, A

    2007-12-01

    A 46-year-old male subject performed excessive physical exertion during 4-6 h in a studio for body builders during 5 days. He was not practicing sport prior to this training and denied the use of any aiding substances. Despite muscle aching already after 1 day, he continued the exercises. After the last day, he recognized tiredness and cessation of urine production. Two days after discontinuation of the training, a Herpes simplex infection occurred. Because of acute renal failure, he required hemodialysis. There were absent tendon reflexes and creatine kinase (CK) values up to 208 274 U/L (normal: <170 U/L). After 2 weeks, CK had almost normalized and, after 4 weeks, hemodialysis was discontinued. Excessive muscle training may result in severe, hemodialysis-dependent rhabdomyolysis. Triggering factors may be prior low fitness level, viral infection, or subclinical metabolic myopathy.

  16. Perilipin 2 improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle despite eleveted intramuscular lipid levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, M.; Hesselink, M.K.; Sparks, L.M.; Timmers, S.; Ferraz, M.J.; Mattijssen, F.B.J.; Beurden, van F.; Schaart, G.; Baets, de M.H.; Verheyen, F.K.; Kersten, A.H.; Schrauwen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by excessive lipid storage in skeletal muscle. Excessive intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) storage exceeds intracellular needs and induces lipotoxic events, ultimately contributing to the development of insulin resistance. Lipid droplet (LD)–coating proteins may control

  17. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall be entitled to such Excess Capacity to integrate the operation of the Boulder City Area Projects and other... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF...

  18. 12 CFR 925.23 - Excess stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess stock. 925.23 Section 925.23 Banks and... BANKS Stock Requirements § 925.23 Excess stock. (a) Sale of excess stock. Subject to the restriction in paragraph (b) of this section, a member may purchase excess stock as long as the purchase is approved by the...

  19. Nutritional Status and Cardiac Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihyun Ahn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is necessary for the degradation of long-lasting proteins and nonfunctional organelles, and is activated to promote cellular survival. However, overactivation of autophagy may deplete essential molecules and organelles responsible for cellular survival. Lifelong calorie restriction by 40% has been shown to increase the cardiac expression of autophagic markers, which suggests that it may have a cardioprotective effect by decreasing oxidative damage brought on by aging and cardiovascular diseases. Although cardiac autophagy is critical to regulating protein quality and maintaining cellular function and survival, increased or excessive autophagy may have deleterious effects on the heart under some circumstances, including pressure overload-induced heart failure. The importance of autophagy has been shown in nutrient supply and preservation of energy in times of limitation, such as ischemia. Some studies have suggested that a transition from obesity to metabolic syndrome may involve progressive changes in myocardial inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, fibrosis, apoptosis, and myocardial autophagy.

  20. [Ventricular tachycardia and cardiac hemochromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis Moríñigo, J; Martín Luengo, C; Ledesma, C; Arribas, A; Nieto, A A; Rodríguez, J

    2001-11-01

    Hemochromatosis is characterized by an excessive iron deposit in different tissues. Cardiac involvement may be observed in one third of the patients due to hemochromatosis and occurs as a consequence of ferritin accumulation in the heart which on one hand induces alterations in systolic and diastolic ventricular function and on the other hand, an arrythmogenic substrate. The clinical manifestations can be indistinctly related to atrial tachyarrhythmia, ventricular tachyarrhythmia, atrio-ventricular blockade and congestive heart failure, with the first being the most frequent. We present the case of one patient with secondary hemochromatosis to repeated transfusions due to sideroblastic anemia with cardiac involvement, whose initial heart manifestations were recurrent atrial tachyarrhythmia and sustained ventricular tachycardia with syncope for which an automatic defibrillator was implanted.

  1. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the ... contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle of ...

  2. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrest (SCA) Back to Heart Diseases & Disorders Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Sudden Cardiac Arrest ( SCA ) occurs when the heart stops beating, abruptly ... to saving someone who is having a sudden cardiac arrest , it is important to understand the difference. The ...

  3. Insulin regulates its own delivery to skeletal muscle by feed-forward actions on the vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Upchurch, Charles T.; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-01-01

    Insulin, at physiological concentrations, regulates the volume of microvasculature perfused within skeletal and cardiac muscle. It can also, by relaxing the larger resistance vessels, increase total muscle blood flow. Both of these effects require endothelial cell nitric oxide generation and smooth muscle cell relaxation, and each could increase delivery of insulin and nutrients to muscle. The capillary microvasculature possesses the greatest endothelial surface area of the body. Yet, whether insulin acts on the capillary endothelial cell is not known. Here, we review insulin's actions at each of three levels of the arterial vasculature as well as recent data suggesting that insulin can regulate a vesicular transport system within the endothelial cell. This latter action, if it occurs at the capillary level, could enhance insulin delivery to muscle interstitium and thereby complement insulin's actions on arteriolar endothelium to increase insulin delivery. We also review work that suggests that this action of insulin on vesicle transport depends on endothelial cell nitric oxide generation and that insulin's ability to regulate this vesicular transport system is impaired by inflammatory cytokines that provoke insulin resistance. PMID:21610226

  4. Dietary Fat – Insulin Sensitivity and Molecular Substrate Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard, Annemarie

    metabolism in skeletal muscle. The high-fat diet was primarily comprised of unsaturated FA. We demonstrated in lean, healthy and moderately trained men that three days’ intake of 78 E% dietary fat coupled with 75% energy excess was sufficient to reduce whole-body insulin sensitivity by 17% and insulin...... in both study I and II. Several indices of improved hepatic metabolism and function were observed after the highfat interventions. In contrast, the three-day hypercaloric carbohydrate-rich diet (study I) increased basal and insulin-stimulated glucose production, increased post-absorptive plasma TG...... metabolism in skeletal muscle and in the liver. A period of high fat (and low carbohydrate) intake may furthermore change hepatic glucoregulation and metabolism in a non-diabetic direction. Insulin´s action on glucose uptake in skeletal muscle seems, however, to be impaired when a high fat intake was coupled...

  5. The role of autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanfang; Xu, Jin; He, Lu; Peng, Lijun; Zhong, Qiaoqing; Chen, Linxi; Jiang, Zhisheng

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is conserved in nature from lower eukaryotes to mammals and is an important self-cannibalizing, degradative process that contributes to the elimination of superfluous materials. Cardiac hypertrophy is primarily characterized by excess protein synthesis, increased cardiomyocyte size, and thickened ventricular walls and is a major risk factor that promotes arrhythmia and heart failure. In recent years, cardiomyocyte autophagy has been considered to play a role in controlling the hypertrophic response. However, the beneficial or aggravating role of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy remains controversial. The exact mechanism of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy requires further study. In this review, we summarize the controversies associated with autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy and provide insights into the role of autophagy in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. We conclude that future studies should emphasize the relationship between autophagy and the different stages of cardiac hypertrophy, as well as the autophagic flux and selective autophagy. Autophagy will be a potential therapeutic target for cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27084518

  6. The role of autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanfang; Xu, Jin; He, Lu; Peng, Lijun; Zhong, Qiaoqing; Chen, Linxi; Jiang, Zhisheng

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is conserved in nature from lower eukaryotes to mammals and is an important self-cannibalizing, degradative process that contributes to the elimination of superfluous materials. Cardiac hypertrophy is primarily characterized by excess protein synthesis, increased cardiomyocyte size, and thickened ventricular walls and is a major risk factor that promotes arrhythmia and heart failure. In recent years, cardiomyocyte autophagy has been considered to play a role in controlling the hypertrophic response. However, the beneficial or aggravating role of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy remains controversial. The exact mechanism of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy requires further study. In this review, we summarize the controversies associated with autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy and provide insights into the role of autophagy in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. We conclude that future studies should emphasize the relationship between autophagy and the different stages of cardiac hypertrophy, as well as the autophagic flux and selective autophagy. Autophagy will be a potential therapeutic target for cardiac hypertrophy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Differential effects of insulin injections and insulin infusions on levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies have shown that while injections of insulin cause an increase in fat mass, infusions of insulin increase fat mass. The aim of this paper was to test the hypothesis that if an increase in glycogen is an indicator of an impending increase in adipose mass, then insulin infusions should not increase glycogen, while insulin ...

  8. Diphoton excess through dark mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chien-Yi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, ON N2J 2W9 (Canada); Lefebvre, Michel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Pospelov, Maxim [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, ON N2J 2W9 (Canada); Zhong, Yi-Ming [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University,Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Preliminary ATLAS and CMS results from the first 13 TeV LHC run have encountered an intriguing excess of events in the diphoton channel around the invariant mass of 750 GeV. We investigate a possibility that the current excess is due to a heavy resonance decaying to light metastable states, which in turn give displaced decays to very highly collimated e{sup +}e{sup −} pairs. Such decays may pass the photon selection criteria, and successfully mimic the diphoton events, especially at low counts. We investigate two classes of such models, characterized by the following underlying production and decay chains: gg→S→A{sup ′}A{sup ′}→(e{sup +}e{sup −})(e{sup +}e{sup −}) and qq̄→Z{sup ′}→sa→(e{sup +}e{sup −})(e{sup +}e{sup −}), where at the first step a heavy scalar, S, or vector, Z{sup ′}, resonances are produced that decay to light metastable vectors, A{sup ′}, or (pseudo-)scalars, s and a. Setting the parameters of the models to explain the existing excess, and taking the ATLAS detector geometry into account, we marginalize over the properties of heavy resonances in order to derive the expected lifetimes and couplings of metastable light resonances. We observe that in the case of A{sup ′}, the suggested range of masses and mixing angles ϵ is within reach of several new-generation intensity frontier experiments.

  9. Excess Early Mortality in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Nordentoft, Merete; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is often referred to as one of the most severe mental disorders, primarily because of the very high mortality rates of those with the disorder. This article reviews the literature on excess early mortality in persons with schizophrenia and suggests reasons for the high mortality...... as well as possible ways to reduce it. Persons with schizophrenia have an exceptionally short life expectancy. High mortality is found in all age groups, resulting in a life expectancy of approximately 20 years below that of the general population. Evidence suggests that persons with schizophrenia may...

  10. Insulin in diabetes prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiya, V K; Maclaren, N K

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes (IDD) is a chronic immune-endocrine disease in which there is a progressive destruction of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells, caused primarily by autoreactive T cells. Many islet cell proteins including insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, and tyrosine phosphatase antigens (IA-2) are targeted by the autoimmune responses in IDD patients. Since its discovery 75 years ago, insulin has been the major player in the clinical management of hyperglycaemia in these patients. The morbidity and mortality associated with IDD derives mainly from the complications of the disease. However, routine insulin injections seldom achieve a consistent, near-normal glucose level, where multiple daily doses of the hormone involve considerable restrictions to a normal lifestyle. In terms of economics, the management of diabetes is expensive, and in the USA diabetes alone accounts for one seventh of the healthcare budget. These clinical, lifestyle and economic issues emphasize the need to investigate alternative preventative measures in IDD treatment. Recent reports suggest a pivotal role for insulin in various aspects of the immune system. In this study, insulin and B-chain were used to modulate autoimmune responses in non-obese diabetic mice, findings which have therapeutic implications in man.

  11. What Causes Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Sudden Cardiac Arrest Sudden Cardiac Arrest Also known as Cardiac Arrest , Sudden Cardiac Death ... the condition For People Who Have Survived Sudden Cardiac Arrest If you've already had SCA, you're ...

  12. What Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Sudden Cardiac Arrest Sudden Cardiac Arrest Also known as Cardiac Arrest , Sudden Cardiac Death ... the condition For People Who Have Survived Sudden Cardiac Arrest If you've already had SCA, you're ...

  13. Cardiomyocyte-specific ablation of CD36 accelerates the progression from compensated cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Miranda M; Byrne, Nikole J; Kim, Ty T; Levasseur, Jody; Masson, Grant; Boisvenue, Jamie J; Febbraio, Maria; Dyck, Jason R B

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that loss of CD36 protects the heart from dysfunction induced by pressure overload in the presence of diet-induced insulin resistance and/or obesity. The beneficial effects of CD36 ablation in this context are mediated by preventing excessive cardiac fatty acid (FA) entry and reducing lipotoxic injury. However, whether or not the loss of CD36 can prevent pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction in the absence of chronic exposure to high circulating FAs is presently unknown. To address this, we utilized a tamoxifen-inducible cardiomyocyte-specific CD36 knockout (icCD36KO) mouse and genetically deleted CD36 in adulthood. Control mice (CD36 floxed/floxed mice) and icCD36KO mice were treated with tamoxifen and subsequently subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) surgery to generate pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Consistent with CD36 mediating a significant proportion of FA entry into the cardiomyocyte and subsequent FA utilization for ATP production, hearts from icCD36KO mice were metabolically inefficient and displayed signs of energetic stress, including activation of the energetic stress kinase, AMPK. In addition, impaired energetics in icCD36KO mice contributed to a rapid progression from compensated hypertrophy to heart failure. However, icCD36KO mice fed a medium-chain FA diet, whereby medium-chain FAs can enter into the cardiomyocyte independent from CD36, were protected from TAC-induced heart failure. Together these data suggest that limiting FA uptake and partial inhibition of FA oxidation in the heart via CD36 ablation may be detrimental for the compensated hypertrophic heart in the absence of sufficiently elevated circulating FAs to provide an adequate energy source. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Limiting CD36-mediated fatty acid uptake in the setting of obesity and/or insulin resistance protects the heart from cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. However, cardiomyocyte-specific CD36 ablation in the absence of

  14. Excessive hoarding in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Sean S; Djamshidian, Atbin; Evans, Andrew H; Loane, Clare M; Lees, Andrew J; Lawrence, Andrew D

    2010-06-15

    Hoarding is seen in several psychiatric conditions, but has not been specifically assessed in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study investigates hoarding tendency amongst patients with PD, and its association with impulsive-compulsive spectrum behaviors (ICBs). We compare clinical features, measures of hoarding, impulse buying, self-control, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, depression, and anxiety in 39 patients with PD with ICBs (PD + ICB), 61 patients with PD without ICBs (PD - ICB), and 50 healthy controls. A much higher proportion of PD + ICB (27.8%) than PD - ICB (3.5%) were hoarders (P = 0.001). 6% of healthy controls were hoarders. Compulsive shoppers scored higher than other varieties of ICB on excessive acquisition measures. Hoarding correlated positively with impulsive buying, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, PD duration, and negatively with self-control measures. Using multivariate regression analyzes, the presence of ICBs and measures of impulsive buying were the only variables independently associated with hoarding in PD. The association of hoarding with other ICBs and low trait impulse control suggests that excessive hoarding is related to the spectrum of impulsive behaviors in PD. (c) 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    studies in β cell-specific IR knockout mice, which develop peripheral insulin resistance and diabetes, most probably due to the changes in the pattern of insulin secretion (Kulkarni et al 1999). FFA also affects downstream insulin signalling molecules. It inhibits insulin activation of IRS-1-associated PI3K activity in muscle.

  16. Safety and efficacy of normalizing fasting glucose with bedtime NPH insulin alone in NIDDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusi, K; Cunningham, G R; Comstock, J P

    1995-06-01

    To examine the safety and overall clinical effects of normalizing the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level with bedtime NPH insulin alone in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) that is poorly controlled with maximal doses of sulfonylureas. Twelve obese male NIDDM subjects were treated for 16 weeks with bedtime insulin after a 4-week sulfonylurea washout. The insulin dosage was increased until the FPG level was normalized. The 24-h plasma glucose profiles and lipid and HbA1c levels were measured at the beginning and end of the study, and the incidence and severity of hypoglycemic episodes were closely monitored. In addition, hyperglycemic clamp studies were performed to assess insulin secretion and provide an indirect measurement of insulin sensitivity. FPG (14.6 +/- 0.9 mmol/l at week 0) was normalized ( Bedtime insulin significantly improved total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels (P Weight gain was 2.4 +/- 0.7 kg, and blood pressure was unchanged. During the hyperglycemic clamp, there was an improvement in the first phase (P bedtime in amounts sufficient to achieve a normal FPG level does not cause excessive or severe hypoglycemia and does lead to good glycemic and lipid control in NIDDM. Bedtime insulin therapy also is accompanied by improved insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. We conclude that a single dose of insulin alone at bedtime merits consideration as a therapeutic strategy in patients with poorly controlled NIDDM.

  17. AMPK and insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Jeppesen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is considered "a metabolic master-switch" in skeletal muscle reducing ATP- consuming processes whilst stimulating ATP regeneration. Within recent years, AMPK has also been proposed as a potential target to attenuate insulin resistance, although the exact...... role of AMPK is not well understood. Here we hypothesized that mice lacking a2AMPK activity in muscle would be more susceptible to develop insulin resistance associated with ageing alone or in combination with high fat diet. Young (~4 month) or old (~18 month) wild type and muscle specific a2AMPK...... kinase-dead mice on chow diet as well as old mice on 17 weeks of high fat diet were studied for whole body glucose homeostasis (OGTT, ITT and HOMA-IR), insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle. We demonstrate that high fat diet in old mice results in impaired glucose homeostasis...

  18. Cardiac metabolism in myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Fini, Massimo; Caminiti, Giuseppe; Barbaro, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia occurs for a mismatch between blood flow and metabolic requirements, when the rate of oxygen and metabolic substrates delivery to the myocardium is insufficient to meet the myocardial energy requirements for a given myocardial workload. During ischemia, substantial changes occur in cardiac energy metabolism, as a consequence of the reduced oxygen availability. Some of these metabolic changes are beneficial and may help the heart adapt to the ischemic condition. However, most of the changes are maladaptive and contribute to the severity of the ischemic injury leading stunned or hibernating myocardium, cell death and ultimately to contractile disfunction. Dramatic changes in cardiac metabolism and contractile function, also occur during myocardial reperfusion as a consequence of the generation of oxygen free radicals, loss of cation homeostasis, depletion of energy stores, and changes in subcellular activities. The reperfusion injury may cause in the death of cardiac myocytes that were still viable immediately before myocardial reperfusion. This form of myocardial injury, by itself can induce cardiomyocyte death and increase infarct size. During acute ischemia the relative substrate concentration is the prime factor defining preference and utilization rate. Allosteric enzyme regulation and protein phosphorylation cascades, partially controlled by hormones such as insulin, modulate the concentration effect; together they provide short-term adjustments of cardiac energy metabolism. The expression of metabolic genes is also dynamically regulated in response to developmental and (patho)physiological conditions, leading to long-term adjustments. Specific nuclear receptor transcription factors and co-activators regulate the expression of these genes. Understanding the functional role of these changes is critical for developing the concept of metabolic intervention for heart disease. The paper will review the alterations in energy metabolism that occur

  19. Insulin and insulin signaling play a critical role in fat induction of insulin resistance in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jie; Hong, Tao; Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Liu, Zhenqi; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The primary player that induces insulin resistance has not been established. Here, we studied whether or not fat can cause insulin resistance in the presence of insulin deficiency. Our results showed that high-fat diet (HFD) induced insulin resistance in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. The HFD-induced insulin resistance was prevented largely by the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced moderate insulin deficiency. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD-induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and gastrocnemius. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD- or insulin-induced increase in hepatic expression of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which are necessary for fatty acid activation. HFD increased mitochondrial contents of long-chain acyl-CoAs, whereas it decreased mitochondrial ADP/ATP ratio, and these HFD-induced changes were prevented by the STZ-induced insulin deficiency. In cultured hepatocytes, we observed that expressions of ACSL1 and -5 were stimulated by insulin signaling. Results in cultured cells also showed that blunting insulin signaling by the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 prevented fat accumulation, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to either insulin or oleate plus sera that normally contain insulin. Finally, knockdown of the insulin receptor prevented the oxidative stress and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to insulin or oleate plus sera. Together, our results show that insulin and insulin signaling are required for fat induction of insulin resistance in mice and cultured mouse hepatocytes. PMID:21586696

  20. About Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Mar 10,2017 What is cardiac arrest? ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Cardiac Arrest • Home • About Cardiac Arrest • Understand Your Risk for ...

  1. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with

  2. Insulin and the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Suchita; Prakash, Y S; Linneberg, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and asthma are all rapidly increasing globally. Substantial emerging evidence suggests that these three conditions are epidemiologically and mechanistically linked. Since the link between obesity and asthma appears to extend beyond mechanical pulmonary disadvantage...... and highlights the molecular consequences of insulin-related metabolic signaling cascades that could adversely affect lung structure and function. Examples include airway smooth muscle proliferation and contractility and regulatory signaling networks that are associated with asthma. These aspects of insulin...

  3. Insulin and Glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Holland, William; Gromada, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    In August 2016, several leaders in glucagon biology gathered for the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Hagedorn Workshop in Oxford, England. A key point of discussion focused on the need for basal insulin to allow for the therapeutic benefit of glucagon blockade in the treatment...... of the discussion as a consensus was reached. Agents that antagonize glucagon may be of great benefit for the treatment of diabetes; however, sufficient levels of basal insulin are required for their therapeutic efficacy....

  4. Antibody-Mediated Insulin Resistance: When Insulin and Insulin Receptor Act as Autoantigens in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liminet, Christelle; Vouillarmet, Julien; Chikh, Karim; Disse, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of a patient with diabetes presenting a severe insulin-resistance syndrome due to the production of insulin autoantibodies by a lymphocytic lymphoma. We describe the various mechanisms leading to the production of insulin autoantibodies and insulin receptor autoantibodies and review the therapeutic possibilities. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adipose extracellular matrix remodelling in obesity and insulin resistance☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, De; Chun, Tae-Hwa; Kang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipose tissues undergoes constant remodelling to allow adipocytes and their precursor cells to change cell shape and function in adaptation to nutritional cues. Abnormal accumulation of ECM components and their modifiers in adipose tissues has been recently demonstrated to cause obesity-associated insulin resistance, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Integrins and other ECM receptors (e.g. CD44) that are expressed in adipose tissues have been shown to regulate insulin sensitivity. It is well understood that a hypoxic response is observed in adipose tissue expansion during obesity progression and that hypoxic response accelerates fibrosis and inflammation in white adipose tissues. The expansion of adipose tissues should require angiogenesis; however, the excess deposition of ECM limits the angiogenic response of white adipose tissues in obesity. While recent studies have focused on the metabolic consequences and the mechanisms of adipose tissue expansion and remodelling, little attention has been paid to the role played by the interaction between peri-adipocyte ECM and their cognate cell surface receptors. This review will address what is currently known about the roles played by adipose ECM, their modifiers, and ECM receptors in obesity and insulin resistance. Understanding how excess ECM deposition in the adipose tissue deteriorates insulin sensitivity would provide us hints to develop a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27179976

  6. Serological analysis of human IgG and IgE anti-insulin antibodies by solid-phase radioimmunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, R.G.; Rendell, M.; Adkinson, N.F. Jr.

    1980-12-01

    A single solid-phase assay system which is useful for quantitative measurement of both IgG and IgE anti-insulin antibodies in human serum has been developed. Insulin-specific immunoglobulins are absorbed from human serum by excess quantities of insulin-agarose. After washes to remove unbound immunoglobulins, radioiodinated Staph A or rabbit anti-human IgE is added to detect bound IgG or IgE anbitodies, respectively.

  7. The effects of excessive humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R B

    1998-06-01

    Humidification devices and techniques can expose the airway mucosa to a wide range of gas temperatures and humidities, some of which are excessive and may cause injury. Humidified gas is a carrier of both water and energy. The volume of water in the gas stream depends on whether the water is in a molecular form (vapor), particulate form (aerosol), or bulk form (liquid). The energy content of gas stream is the sum of the sensible heat (temperature) of the air and any water droplets in it and the heat of vaporization (latent energy) of any water vapor present. Latent heat energy is much larger than sensible heat energy, so saturated air contains much more energy than dry air. Thus every breath contains a water volume and energy (thermal) challenge to the airway mucosa. When the challenge exceeds the homeostatic mechanisms airway dysfunction begins, starting at the cellular and secretion level and progressing to whole airway function. A large challenge will result in quick progression of dysfunction. Early dysfunction is generally reversible, however, so large challenges with short exposure times may not cause irreversible injury. The mechanisms of airway injury owing to excess water are not well studied. The observation of its effects lends itself to some general conclusions, however. Alterations in the ventilation-perfusion ratio, decrease in vital capacity and compilance, and atelectasis are suggestive of partial or full occlusion of small airways. Changes in surface tension and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient are consistent with flooding of alveoli. There also may be osmotic challenges to mucosal cell function as evidenced by the different reaction rates with hyper- and hypotonic saline. The reaction to nonisotonic saline also may partly explain increases in specific airway resistance. Aerosolized water and instilled water may be hazardous because of their demonstrated potential for delivering excessive water to the airway. Their use for airway humidification or

  8. Insulin Resistance: Causes And Metabolic Implications | Igharo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin is an anabolic hormone that plays key roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin resistance is a decreased biological response to normal concentration of circulating insulin. In insulin resistance, normal amounts of insulin are inadequate to produce a normal insulin response from fat, muscle and liver cells. Insulin ...

  9. Myocardial autophagy activation and suppressed survival signaling is associated with insulin resistance in fructose-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Kimberley M; Bell, James R; Young, Morag J; Ritchie, Rebecca H; Delbridge, Lea M D

    2011-06-01

    Fructose intake is linked with the increasing prevalence of insulin resistance and there is now evidence for a specific insulin-resistant cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to determine the cardiac-specific myocardial remodeling effects of high fructose dietary intake. Given the links between insulin signaling, reactive oxygen species generation and autophagy induction, we hypothesized that autophagy contributes to pathologic remodeling in the insulin-resistant heart, and in particular may be a feature of high fructose diet-induced cardiac phenotype. Male C57Bl/6 mice were fed a high fructose (60%) diet or nutrient-matched control diet for 12 weeks. Systemic and myocardial insulin-resistant status was characterized. Superoxide production (lucigenin) and cellular growth and death signaling pathways were examined in myocardial tissue. Myocardial structural remodeling was evaluated by measurement of heart weight indices and histological analysis of collagen deposition (picrosirius red). Fructose-fed mice exhibited hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, but plasma insulin and blood pressure were unchanged. High fructose intake suppressed the myocardial Akt cell survival signaling coincident with increased cardiac superoxide generation (21% increase, pFructose feeding induced elevated autophagy (LC3B-II: LC3B-I ratio: 46% increase, pfructose-fed mice. We provide the first evidence that myocardial autophagy activation is associated with systemic insulin resistance, and that high level fructose intake inflicts direct cardiac damage. Upregulated autophagy is associated with elevated cardiac superoxide production, suppressed cell survival signaling and fibrotic infiltration in fructose-fed mice. The novel finding that autophagy contributes to cardiac pathology in insulin resistance identifies a new therapeutic target for diabetic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 10 CFR 904.10 - Excess energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess energy. 904.10 Section 904.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.10 Excess energy. (a) If excess Energy is determined by the United States to be available...

  11. 7 CFR 985.56 - Excess oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess oil. 985.56 Section 985.56 Agriculture... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Volume Limitations § 985.56 Excess oil. Oil of any class in excess of a producer's applicable annual allotment shall be identified as...

  12. 43 CFR 426.12 - Excess land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excess land. 426.12 Section 426.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACREAGE LIMITATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 426.12 Excess land. (a) The process of designating excess and...

  13. Excess water dynamics in hydrotalcite: QENS study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Results of the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements on the dynamics of excess water in hydrotalcite sample with varied content of excess water are reported. Translational motion of excess water can be best described by random transla- tional jump diffusion model. The observed increase in ...

  14. Haemodynamic changes in insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in normal man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Bonde-Petersen, F; Nørgaard, M B

    1984-01-01

    Haemodynamic variables (plasma volume, heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, stroke volume, pulmonary tissue volume, total peripheral vascular resistance, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, lower extremity vascular resistance and plasma catecholamines) were measured before and after......-adrenal activity. Total peripheral vascular resistance as well as lower extremity vascular resistance decreased, whereas hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance was unaffected. Thus insulin-induced hypoglycaemia has marked transient effects on the circulation....

  15. Molecular biocoding of insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutvo Kuric

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Lutvo KuricNovi Travnik, Kalinska, Bosnia and Herzegovina Abstract: This paper discusses cyberinformation studies of the amino acid composition of insulin, in particular the identification of scientific terminology that could describe this phenomenon, ie, the study of genetic information, as well as the relationship between the genetic language of proteins and theoretical aspects of this system and cybernetics. The results of this research show that there is a matrix code for insulin. It also shows that the coding system within the amino acid language gives detailed information, not only on the amino acid “record”, but also on its structure, configuration, and various shapes. The issue of the existence of an insulin code and coding of the individual structural elements of this protein are discussed. Answers to the following questions are sought. Does the matrix mechanism for biosynthesis of this protein function within the law of the general theory of information systems, and what is the significance of this for understanding the genetic language of insulin? What is the essence of existence and functioning of this language? Is the genetic information characterized only by biochemical principles or it is also characterized by cyberinformation principles? The potential effects of physical and chemical, as well as cybernetic and information principles, on the biochemical basis of insulin are also investigated. This paper discusses new methods for developing genetic technologies, in particular more advanced digital technology based on programming, cybernetics, and informational laws and systems, and how this new technology could be useful in medicine, bioinformatics, genetics, biochemistry, and other natural sciences.Keywords: human insulin, insulin model, biocode, genetic code, amino acids

  16. Sleepiness or excessive daytime somnolence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edd, Ethel Mitty; Flores, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    Excessive daytime somnolence (EDS) is associated with age-related changes, environment, circadian rhythm or sleep pattern disorder, insomnia, medications, lifestyle factors, depression, pain, and illness. The notion of "sleep architecture" connotes a structure that describes the sleep cycle (i.e., stages) and wakefulness during a single sleep period-that is, rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM sleep. Circadian rhythms perform a variety of functions including regulation of the quality and distribution of the stages of sleep. Insomnia includes delayed sleep onset as well as premature wakening; sleep is nonrestorative. Comorbidities associated with insomnia are Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, delirium, depression, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease, pain, degenerative diseases of the neurological system, and sleep apnea. Continuous inadequate sleep affects cognitive function, physical performance, overall well-being, and quality of life. There is a greater risk of falls from insomnia than is the use of hypnotics to manage it. Sleep disruption among older adults is underrecognized and undertreated. Assessment using valid tools can be performed rapidly. There are a variety of treatment options, including sleep hygiene and pharmacological and alternative modalities.

  17. Insulin aspart in diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2008-01-01

    in insulin requirements during pregnancy necessitate short-acting insulins for postprandial control of hyperglycemia. The fast-acting insulin analogue insulin aspart has been tested in a large, randomized trial of pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes and offers benefits in control of postprandial......Pregnancy in women with diabetes is associated with an increased risk of obstetric complications and perinatal mortality. Maintenance of near-normal glycemia during pregnancy can bring the prevalence of fetal, neonatal and maternal complications closer to that of the nondiabetic population. Changes...... and no increase in insulin antibodies was found. Thus, the use of insulin aspart in pregnancy is regarded safe....

  18. Cafeteria diet-induced insulin resistance is not associated with decreased insulin signaling or AMPK activity and is alleviated by physical training in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; De Bock, Katrien; Richter, Erik

    2010-01-01

    ) among the groups. In conclusion, surplus energy intake of a palatable but low-fat cafeteria diet resulted in obesity and insulin resistance that was rescued by exercise training. Interestingly, insulin resistance was not accompanied by major defects in the insulin-signaling cascade or in altered AMPK......Excess energy intake via a palatable low-fat diet (cafeteria diet) is known to induce obesity and glucose intolerance in rats. However, the molecular mechanisms behind this adaptation are not known, and it is also not known whether exercise training can reverse it. Male Wistar rats were assigned...... expression or phosphorylation. Thus, compared with previous studies of high-fat feeding, where insulin signaling is significantly impaired, the mechanism by which CAF diet induces insulin resistance seems different....

  19. Diet reduction to requirements in obese/overfed ewes from early gestation prevents glucose/insulin dysregulation and returns fetal adiposity and organ development to control levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuersunjiang, Nuermaimaiti; Odhiambo, John F.; Long, Nathan M.; Shasa, Desiree R.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity at conception and excess gestational weight gain pose significant risks for adverse health consequences in human offspring. This study evaluated the effects of reducing dietary intake of obese/overfed ewes beginning in early gestation on fetal development. Sixty days prior to conception, ewes were assigned to a control diet [CON: 100% of National Research Council (NRC) recommendations], a diet inducing maternal obesity (MO: 150% of NRC recommendations), or a maternal obesity intervention diet (MOI: 150% of NRC recommendations to day 28 of gestation, then 100% NRC) until necropsy at midgestation (day 75) or late (day 135) gestation. Fetal size and weight, as well as fetal organ weights, were greater (P gestation, whereas fetal size and weight did not differ among dietary groups, cardiac ventricular weights and wall thicknesses as well as liver and perirenal fat weights remained elevated in fetuses from MO ewes compared with those from CON and MOI ewes. MO ewes and fetuses exhibited elevated (P gestation, whereas plasma triglycerides and cholesterol, insulin, and cortisol remained elevated in MO vs. CON and MOI ewes and fetuses, glucose concentrations were elevated in both MO and MOI fetuses compared with CON fetuses, which was associated with elevated placental GLUT3 expression in both groups. These data are consistent with the concept that reducing maternal diet of obese/overfed ewes to requirements from early gestation can prevent subsequent alterations in fetal growth, adiposity, and glucose/insulin dynamics. PMID:23921140

  20. Salt, aldosterone, and insulin resistance: impact on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastra, Guido; Dhuper, Sonal; Johnson, Megan S; Sowers, James R

    2010-10-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are powerful risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), both of which are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of CVD and CKD risk factors has identified salt sensitivity and insulin resistance as key elements underlying the relationship between hypertension and T2DM. Excess dietary salt and caloric intake, as commonly found in westernized diets, is linked not only to increased blood pressure, but also to defective insulin sensitivity and impaired glucose homeostasis. In this setting, activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), as well as increased signaling through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), result in increased production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, which in turn contribute to insulin resistance and impaired vascular function. In addition, insulin resistance is not limited to classic insulin-sensitive tissues such as skeletal muscle, but it also affects the cardiovascular system, where it participates in the development of CVD and CKD. Current clinical knowledge points towards an impact of salt restriction, RAAS blockade, and MR antagonism on cardiovascular and renal protection, but also on improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis.

  1. Skeletal muscle and plasma lipidomic signatures of insulin resistance and overweight/obesity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, Katherine T; Coster, Adelle Cf; Christopher, Michael J; Chaudhuri, Rima; Xu, Aimin; Gagnon-Bartsch, Johann; Chisholm, Donald J; James, David E; Meikle, Peter J; Greenfield, Jerry R; Samocha-Bonet, Dorit

    2016-04-01

    Alterations in lipids in muscle and plasma have been documented in insulin-resistant people with obesity. Whether these lipid alterations are a reflection of insulin resistance or obesity remains unclear. Nondiabetic sedentary individuals not treated with lipid-lowering medications were studied (n = 51). Subjects with body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg/m(2) (n = 28) were stratified based on median glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp into insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant groups (above and below median, obesity/insulin-sensitive and obesity/insulin-resistant, respectively). Lean individuals (n = 23) served as a reference group. Lipidomics was performed in muscle and plasma by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Pathway analysis of gene array in muscle was performed in a subset (n = 35). In muscle, insulin resistance was characterized by higher levels of C18:0 sphingolipids, while in plasma, higher levels of diacylglycerol and cholesterol ester, and lower levels of lysophosphatidylcholine and lysoalkylphosphatidylcholine, indicated insulin resistance, irrespective of overweight/obesity. The sphingolipid metabolism gene pathway was upregulated in muscle in insulin resistance independent of obesity. An overweight/obesity lipidomic signature was only apparent in plasma, predominated by higher triacylglycerol and lower plasmalogen species. Muscle C18:0 sphingolipids may play a role in insulin resistance independent of excess adiposity. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  2. Reoperation for bleeding in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Rauer, Line Juul; Mortensen, Poul Erik

    2012-01-01

    At Odense University Hospital (OUH), 5-9% of all unselected cardiac surgical patients undergo reoperation due to excessive bleeding. The reoperated patients have an approximately three times greater mortality than non-reoperated. To reduce the rate of reoperations and mortality due to postoperative...... bleeding, we aim to identify risk factors that predict reoperation. A total of 1452 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery using extracorporeal circulation (ECC) between November 2005 and December 2008 at OUH were analysed. Statistical tests were used to identify risk factors for reoperation. We...... after cardiac surgery was low ejection fraction, high EuroSCORE, procedures other than isolated CABG, elongated time on ECC, low body mass index, diabetes mellitus and preoperatively elevated s-creatinine. Reoperated patients significantly had a greater increase in postoperative s-creatinine and higher...

  3. Androgen excess and metabolic disorders in women with PCOS: beyond the body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condorelli, R A; Calogero, A E; Di Mauro, M; Mongioi', L M; Cannarella, R; Rosta, G; La Vignera, S

    2017-09-23

    Insulin resistance is a common feature among women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), especially in those patients with hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation. PCOS women are at risk for developing metabolic syndrome, impaired glucose tolerance and type II diabetes mellitus (DM II). The aim of this review is to explore the existing knowledge of the interplay between androgen excess, pancreatic β-cell function, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), intra-abdominal and subcutaneous (SC) abdominal adipocytes in PCOS, providing a better comprehension of the molecular mechanisms of diabetologic interest. A comprehensive MEDLINE ® search was performed using relevant key terms for PCOS and DM II. Insulin-induced hyperandrogenism could impair pancreatic β-cell function, the SC abdominal adipocytes' lipid storage capacity, leading to intra-abdominal adipocyte hypertrophy and lipotoxicity, which in turn promotes insulin resistance, and could enhance NAFLD. Fetal hyperandrogenism exposure prompts to metabolic disorders. Treatment with flutamide showed to partially reverse insulin resistance. Metabolic impairment seems not to be dependent only on the total fat mass content and body weight in women with PCOS and might be ascribed to the androgen excess.

  4. New Insulins and New Aspects in Insulin Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Vincent C

    2015-08-01

    The major abnormality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is insulin deficiency. The methods of replacing insulin have improved throughout the decades, but hypoglycemia is still the limiting factor for many individuals with diabetes, and it prevents them from achieving ideal glycemic targets. New insulin and newer delivery systems are being developed that can improve some of the limitations of current insulins or make the delivery of insulins more acceptable for some patients. Extending the duration of action of basal insulins and shortening the peak of fast-acting insulins may have advantages for individuals with diabetes. Different delivery systems may make insulin more acceptable to patients and may have other advantages, which may aid in attaining better glycemic control. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved insulin sensitivity after exercise: focus on insulin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    After a single bout of exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake is markedly improved locally in the previously active muscles. This makes exercise a potent stimulus counteracting insulin resistance characterizing type 2 diabetes (T2D). It is believed that at least part...... of the mechanism relates to an improved ability of insulin to stimulate translocation of glucose transporters (GLUT4) to the muscle membrane after exercise. How this is accomplished is still unclear; however, an obvious possibility is that exercise interacts with the insulin signaling pathway to GLUT4...... translocation allowing for a more potent insulin response. Parallel to unraveling of the insulin signaling cascade, this has been investigated within the past 25 years. Reviewing existing studies clearly indicates that improved insulin action can occur independent of interactions with proximal insulin signaling...

  6. Insulin detemir versus insulin glargine for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, Sanne G.; Simon, Airin C. R.; Holleman, Frits; Hoekstra, Joost B.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2011-01-01

    Chronically elevated blood glucose levels are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Many diabetes patients will eventually require insulin treatment to maintain good glycaemic control. There are still uncertainties about the optimal insulin treatment regimens for type 2 diabetes, but

  7. Excess postexercise oxygen consumption after aerobic exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlock, Darlene A; Lee, Man-Gyoon; Flynn, Michael G; Park, Kyung-Shin; Kamimori, Gary H

    2010-08-01

    Literature examining the effects of aerobic exercise training on excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) is sparse. In this study, 9 male participants (19-32 yr) trained (EX) for 12 wk, and 10 in a control group (CON) maintained normal activity. VO(2max), rectal temperature (T(re)), epinephrine, norepinephrine, free fatty acids (FFA), insulin, glucose, blood lactate (BLA), and EPOC were measured before (PRE) and after (POST) the intervention. EPOC at PRE was measured for 120 min after 30 min of treadmill running at 70% VO(2max). EX completed 2 EPOC trials at POST, i.e., at the same absolute (ABS) and relative (REL) intensity; 1 EPOC test for CON served as both the ABS and REL trial because no significant change in VO(2max) was noted. During the ABS trial, total EPOC decreased significantly (p EPOC during the REL trial; however, epinephrine was significantly lower, and norepinephrine and FFA, significantly higher, at endexercise after training. Results indicate that EPOC varies as a function of relative rather than absolute metabolic stress and that training improves the efficiency of metabolic regulation during recovery from exercise. Mechanisms for the decreased magnitude of EPOC in the ABS trial include decreases in BLA, T(re), and perhaps epinephrine-mediated hepatic glucose production and insulin-mediated glucose uptake.

  8. Effect of insulin pump and continuous intravenous insulin on ketone body metabolism, blood gas indexes and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jin Shi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of insulin pump and continuous intravenous insulin on ketone body metabolism, blood gas indexes and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. Methods: Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis who were treated in Meizhou Maternal and Child Heath Hospital between May 2014 and March 2017 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into the group A who received subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump and the group B who received intravenous small-dose insulin injection by micropump. The indexes of ketone body, blood gas and stress were measured before and after treatment. Results: 12 h and 24 h after treatment, serum β-hydroxybutyrate, MDA, NE, ACTH and Cor contents of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those before treatment while pH, HCO3 - and base excess levels as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and TAC contents were significantly higher than those before treatment, and serum β-hydroxybutyrate, MDA, NE, ACTH and Cor contents of group A were significantly lower than those of group B while pH, HCO3 - and base excess levels as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and TAC contents were significantly higher than those of group B. Conclusion: Subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump can improve ketone body metabolism, acidosis status and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

  9. 75 FR 27572 - Monthly Report of Excess Income and Annual Report of Uses of Excess Income

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Monthly Report of Excess Income and Annual Report of Uses of Excess Income AGENCY... subject proposal. Project owners are permitted to retain Excess Income for projects under terms and conditions established by HUD. Owners must request to retain some or all of their Excess Income. The request...

  10. Development of insulin delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, N I; Siddiqui, Ni; Rahman, S; Nessa, A

    2008-01-01

    Delivery system of insulin is vital for its acceptance and adherence to therapy for achieving the glycemic targets. Enormous developments have occurred in the delivery system of insulin during the last twenty years and each improvement was aimed at two common goals: patients convenience and better glycemic control. Till to date, the various insulin delivery systems are: syringes/vials, injection aids, jet injectors, transmucosal delivery, transdermal delivery, external insulin infusion pump, implantable insulin pumps, insulin pens and insulin inhalers. Syringe/vial is the oldest and conventional method, still widely used and relatively cheaper. Modern plastic syringes are disposable, light weight with microfine needle for patients convenience and comfort. Oral route could be the most acceptable and viable, if the barriers can be overcome and under extensive trial. Insulin pen device is an important milestone in the delivery system of insulin as it is convenient, discrete, painless, attractive, portable with flexible life style and improved quality of life. More than 80% of European diabetic patients are using insulin pen. Future digital pen will have better memory option, blood glucose monitoring system, insulin dose calculator etc. Insulin infusion pump is a good option for the children, busy patients with flexible lifestyle and those who want to avoid multiple daily injections. Pulmonary route of insulin delivery is a promising, effective, non-invasive and acceptable alternative method. Exubera, the world first insulin inhaler was approved by FDA in 28 January 2006. But due to certain limitations, it has been withdrawn from the market in October 2007. The main concern of inhaled insulin are: long term pulmonary safety issues, cost effectiveness and user friendly device. In future, more acceptable and cost effective insulin inhaler will be introduced. Newer avenues are under extensive trial for better future insulin delivery systems.

  11. Heart Rate Variability, Insulin Resistance, and Insulin Sensitivity in Japanese Adults: The Toon Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Saito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although impaired cardiac autonomic function is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians, evidence in Asian populations with a lower body mass index is limited. Methods: Between 2009–2012, the Toon Health Study recruited 1899 individuals aged 30–79 years who were not taking medication for diabetes. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was used to diagnose type 2 diabetes, and fasting and 2-h-postload glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. We assessed the homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and Gutt’s insulin sensitivity index (ISI. Pulse was recorded for 5 min, and time-domain heart rate variability (HRV indices were calculated: the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN and the root mean square of successive difference (RMSSD. Power spectral analysis provided frequency domain measures of HRV: high frequency (HF power, low frequency (LF power, and the LF:HF ratio. Results: Multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models showed decreased SDNN, RMSSD, and HF, and increased LF:HF ratio were associated significantly with increased HOMA-IR and decreased ISI. When stratified by overweight status, the association of RMSSD, HF, and LF:HF ratio with decreased ISI was also apparent in non-overweight individuals. The interaction between LF:HF ratio and decreased ISI in overweight individuals was significant, with the odds ratio for decreased ISI in the highest quartile of LF:HF ratio in non-overweight individuals being 2.09 (95% confidence interval, 1.41–3.10. Conclusions: Reduced HRV was associated with insulin resistance and lower insulin sensitivity. Decreased ISI was linked with parasympathetic dysfunction, primarily in non-overweight individuals.

  12. Chemical and thermal stability of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huus, Kasper; Havelund, Svend; Olsen, Helle B

    2006-01-01

    To study the correlation between the thermal and chemical stability of insulin formulations with various insulin hexamer ligands.......To study the correlation between the thermal and chemical stability of insulin formulations with various insulin hexamer ligands....

  13. PACAP stimulates insulin secretion but inhibits insulin sensitivity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipsson, K; Pacini, G; Scheurink, AJW; Ahren, B

    Although pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) stimulates insulin secretion, its net influence on glucose homeostasis in vivo has not been established. We therefore examined the action of PACAP-27 and PACAP-38 on insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, and glucose disposal as

  14. High Dietary Fat Selectively Increases Catalase Expression within Cardiac Mitochondria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, Paul M.; Plafker, Scott M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a predictor of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. One consequence of obesity is dyslipidemia characterized by high blood triglycerides. It has been proposed that oxidative stress, driven by utilization of lipids for energy, contributes to these diseases. The effects of oxidative stress are mitigated by an endogenous antioxidant enzyme network, but little is known about its response to high fat utilization. Our experiments used a multiplexed quantitative proteomics method to measure antioxidant enzyme expression in heart tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. This experiment showed a rapid and specific up-regulation of catalase protein, with subsequent assays showing increases in activity and mRNA. Catalase, traditionally considered a peroxisomal protein, was found to be present in cardiac mitochondria and significantly increased in content and activity during high fat feeding. These data, coupled with the fact that fatty acid oxidation enhances mitochondrial H2O2 production, suggest that a localized catalase increase is needed to consume excessive mitochondrial H2O2 produced by increased fat metabolism. To determine whether the catalase-specific response is a common feature of physiological conditions that increase blood triglycerides and fatty acid oxidation, we measured changes in antioxidant expression in fasted versus fed mice. Indeed, a similar specific catalase increase was observed in mice fasted for 24 h. Our findings suggest a fundamental metabolic process in which catalase expression is regulated to prevent damage while preserving an H2O2-mediated sensing of diet composition that appropriately adjusts insulin sensitivity in the short term as needed to prioritize lipid metabolism for complete utilization. PMID:23204527

  15. Excessive daytime sleepiness and metabolic syndrome in men with obstructive sleep apnea: a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yiqun; Xu, Huajun; Xia, Yunyan; Qian, Yingjun; Li, Xinyi; Zou, Jianyin; Wang, Yuyu; Meng, Lili; Tang, Xulan; Zhu, Huaming; Zhou, Huiqun; Su, Kaiming; Yu, Dongzhen; Yi, Hongliang; Guan, Jian; Yin, Shankai

    2017-10-03

    Excessive daytime sleepiness is a common symptom in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Previous studies have showed that excessive daytime sleepiness is associated with some individual components of metabolic syndrome. We performed a large cross-sectional study to explore the relationship between excessive daytime sleepiness and metabolic syndrome in male OSA patients. A total of 2241 suspected male OSA patients were consecutively recruited from 2007 to 2013. Subjective daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth sleepiness scale. Anthropometric, metabolic, and polysomnographic parameters were measured. Metabolic score was used to evaluate the severity of metabolic syndrome. Among the male OSA patients, most metabolic parameters varied by excessive daytime sleepiness. In the severe group, male OSA patients with excessive daytime sleepiness were more obese, with higher blood pressure, more severe insulin resistance and dyslipidemia than non-sleepy patients. Patients with metabolic syndrome also had a higher prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness and scored higher on the Epworth sleepiness scale. Excessive daytime sleepiness was independently associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (odds ratio =1.242, 95% confidence interval: 1.019-1.512). No substantial interaction was observed between excessive daytime sleepiness and OSA/ obesity. Excessive daytime sleepiness was related to metabolic disorders and independently associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in men with OSA. Excessive daytime sleepiness should be taken into consideration for OSA patients, as it may be a simple and useful clinical indicator for evaluating the risk of metabolic syndrome.

  16. Insulin/NFκB protects against ischemia-induced necrotic cardiomyocyte death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Ariel; Humeres, Claudio; González, Verónica; Gómez, María Teresa; Montt, Natalia; Sanchez, Gina; Chiong, Mario; García, Lorena

    2015-11-13

    In the heart, insulin controls key functions such as metabolism, muscle contraction and cell death. However, all studies have been focused on insulin action during reperfusion. Here we explore the cardioprotective action of this hormone during ischemia. Rat hearts were perfused ex vivo with an ischemia/reperfusion Langendorff model in absence or presence of insulin. Additionally, cultured rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to simulated ischemia in the absence or presence of insulin. Cytoprotective effects were measured by myocardial infarct size, trypan blue exclusion, released LDH and DNA fragmentation by flow cytometry. We found that insulin protected against cardiac ischemia ex vivo and in vitro. Moreover, insulin protected cardiomyocytes from simulated ischemia by reducing necrotic cell death. Protective effects of insulin were dependent of Akt and NFκB. These novel results show that insulin reduces ischemia-induced cardiomyocyte necrosis through an Akt/NF-κB dependent mechanism. These novel findings clarify the role of insulin during ischemia and further support its use in early GIK perfusion to treat myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Insulin edema in the twenty-first century: review of the existing literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelliah, Aruna; Burge, Mark R

    2004-03-01

    Generalized insulin edema, although rare, is a well-recognized complication of insulin therapy. It is mainly appreciated in patients with newly diagnosed or poorly controlled diabetes mellitus after starting intensive insulin therapy. Although the condition is self-limiting, progression to overt cardiac failure and development of pleural effusion have been reported. With current trends toward intensive insulin therapy, clinicians should be aware of the existence of the insulin edema syndrome, and its occurrence should be documented and differentiated from other causes of edema. In this article, we present a recent case that illustrates the clinical features of insulin edema. Specifically, a young male with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus developed significant, reversible peripheral edema after starting insulin therapy. A detailed case description is accompanied by the only known published photographs of insulin edema. The overall purpose of this article is to review the scanty existing medical literature surrounding the topic of insulin edema and to raise awareness about its continued occurrence.

  18. Aldosterone and cortisol affect the risk of sudden cardiac death in haemodialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drechsler, C.; Ritz, E.; Tomaschitz, A.; Pilz, S.; Schonfeld, S.; Blouin, K.; Bidlingmaier, M.; Hammer, F.; Krane, V.; Marz, W.; Allolio, B.; Fassnacht, M.; Wanner, C.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundSudden cardiac death is common and accounts largely for the excess mortality of patients on maintenance dialysis. It is unknown whether aldosterone and cortisol increase the incidence of sudden cardiac death in dialysis patients.Methods and resultsWe analysed data from 1255 diabetic

  19. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  20. Cardiac Syndrome X

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Sudden Cardiac Arrest Valve Disease Vulnerable Plaque Coronary Microvascular Disease (CMD) Related terms: angina, cardiac syndrome X, CMD, MVD, microvascular angina Coronary Microvascular Disease (CMD or MVD) is a type of heart ...

  1. Oral Insulin - Fact or Fiction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Insulin is a major protein hormone secreted by the p-cells of the pancreas and is important for the control of diabetes. Insulin is usually administered to diabetic patients through subcutaneous injection. This mode of therapy has certain inherent disadvantages such as local pain, itching and insulin lipodystrophy around the ...

  2. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Free fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting loss of insulin sensitivity, thereby causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism involved is still unclear. In searching for the cause of the mechanism, it has been found that palmitate inhibits insulin receptor (IR) gene expression, ...

  3. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  4. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    basis of insulin resistance could ultimately lead to a better understanding of the causation of these conditions and the design of rational therapy to ameliorate them. Here, particular attention is devoted to the initial events that follow the binding of insulin to its receptor, including changes in insulin receptor phosphorylation.

  5. Prokineticin receptor-1 is a new regulator of endothelial insulin uptake and capillary formation to control insulin sensitivity and cardiovascular and kidney functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormishian, Mojdeh; Turkeri, Gulen; Urayama, Kyoji; Nguyen, Thu Lan; Boulberdaa, Mounia; Messaddeq, Nadia; Renault, Gilles; Henrion, Daniel; Nebigil, Canan G

    2013-10-23

    insulin resistance. We show a novel role for endothelial PKR1 signaling in cardiac, renal, and metabolic functions by regulating transendothelial insulin uptake and endothelial cell proliferation. Targeting endothelial PKR1 may serve as a therapeutic strategy for ameliorating these disorders.

  6. Insulin som trickster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    2011-01-01

    grænser nedbrydes i en konstant penetrering af huden, når blodsukkeret måles eller insulinen indsprøjtes. Insulin analyseres som en tricksterfigur, der udøver et grænsearbejde på kroppen, leger med dens kategorier og vender forholdet mellem gift og medicin, frihed og ufrihed, kunstighed og naturlighed...

  7. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Ahmad S.; Asghari-Roodsari, Alaleh; Tan, Hanno L.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  8. Insulin resistance: the link between obesity and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaven, Gerald M

    2011-09-01

    There seems to be general agreement that the prevalence of obesity is increasing in the United States and that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic. The disease-related implications of this epidemic have received an enormous amount of publicity in the popular media, but public awareness of the untoward effects of excess weight has not led to an effective approach to dealing with the dilemma. The gravity of the problem is accentuated in light of the report that only approximately 50% of physicians polled provided weight loss counseling. Given the importance of excess adiposity as increasing the risk of CVD, 2DM, and hypertension and the combination of an increase in the prevalence of overweight/obesity and a health care system unprepared to deal with this situation, it is essential that considerable thought be given as to how to best address this dilemma. In this context, it must be emphasized that CVD, 2DM, and hypertension are characterized by resistance to insulin-mediated glucose disposal and that insulin resistance and the compensatory hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance have been shown to be independent predictors of all three clinical syndromes. It has also been apparent for many years that overweight/obese individuals tend to be insulin resistant and become more insulin sensitive with weight loss.25 In light of these observations, it seems reasonable to suggest that insulin resistance is the link between overweight/obesity and the adverse clinical syndromes related to excess adiposity. The evidence summarized in this review shows that the more overweight an individual, the more likely he or she is insulin resistant and at increased risk to develop all the abnormalities associated with this defect in insulin action. Not all overweight/obese individuals are insulin resistant, however, any more than all insulin resistant individuals are overweight/obese. More important, there is compelling evidence that CVD risk factors are present to a

  9. Insulin Resistance and Hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahana Shermin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Backgound: The number of hypogonads is increasing day by day. It may be due to sedentary life style with increased obesity, increased tension or stressed lifestyle among all groups of populations. Visceral obesity is associated with insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and also with hypogonadism.Objective: This study was carried out to determine the proportion of insulin resistance among male subjects with hypogonadism in different age groups along with status of erectile quality among diabetics and non diabetics.Materials and method: This cross sectional study among 161 adult male subjects aged ≥ 20 to ≤ 60 years were purposively selected from Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh between May 2009 to September 2010. Glycemic status and insulin resistance (by HOMA-R were done and relevant history were documented.Results: The highest proportion (38.9% of hypogonadism was in ≥ 50 years age group whereas highest proportion (39.6% of the eugonads was in the age group of 40 to 49 years. More than half of the hypogonad subjects had weak erectile quality (54.0% which were followed by absent erectile quality in 32.7% and 13.3% subjects had normal erectile quality. Among the eugonad subjects 41.7% had normal erectile quality, 41.6% subjects had weak erectile quality and 16.7% subjects had no erectile quality. More than ninety percent of the hypogonad subjects and about 60% of the eugonad subjects had insulin resistance. The average HOMA-R was more in the subjects with hypogonadism with diabetes which was highly significant (p-value < 0.001.Conclusion: Hypogonadism is associated with insulin resistance.

  10. New developments in insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan Ghilzai, Naushad M

    2003-03-01

    A vigorous research effort has been undertaken worldwide to replace injectable insulin by a more comfortable and painless delivery method. Several routes have been explored for their suitability with respect to insulin degradation in the human body. Considerable progress has been made in achieving the common goal for a convenient and equally effective insulin delivery. This article reviews the different routes available for insulin administration and the many successful developments that have been made in recent years for improving that particular route for a much better insulin delivery.

  11. Adipokines and Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adipose tissue is now considered to be an active endocrine organ that secretes various adipokines such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin, tumour necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Recent studies have shown that these factors might provide a molecular link between increased adiposity and impaired insulin sensitivity. Since hepatic insulin resistance plays the key role in the whole body insulin resistance, clarification of the regulatory processes about hepatic insulin resistance by adipokines in rodents and human would seem essential in order to understand the mechanism of type 2 diabetes and for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat it. PMID:23762871

  12. Circulating concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-1 in dogs with naturally occurring mitral regurgitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Duelund; Falk, Bo Torkel; Häggström, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), which mediates most effects of growth hormone, has effects on cardiac mass and function, and plays an important role in the regulation of vascular tone. In humans, an inverse relationship between degree of heart failure (HF) and circulating IGF-1 concentratio...

  13. Beneficial effects of ethanol consumption on insulin resistance are only applicable to subjects without obesity or insulin resistance; drinking is not necessarily a remedy for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hirokazu

    2011-07-01

    Although moderate drinking has been shown to lower insulin resistance levels, it is still unclear whether alcoholic beverages could be remedies for insulin resistance. To elucidate this, the correlation between levels of ethanol consumption and insulin resistance were cross-sectionally examined in 371 non-diabetic male Japanese workers. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the ethanol consumption level was inversely correlated with the insulin resistance level assessed by homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR, p = 0.0014), the serum insulin level (p = 0.0007), and pancreatic β-cell function, also assessed by HOMA (HOMA-β, p = 0.0002), independently from age, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure, liver function tests, and lipid profiles status, as well as serum adiponectin. The correlations were true in subjects with normal BMIs (up to 25.0 kg/m(2), n = 301) or normal HOMA-IR (up to 2.0 μIU·mg/μL·dL n = 337), whereas all of them were non-significant in those with excessive BMIs (n = 70) or in those with HOMA-IR of more than 2.0 (n = 34). Although it is still unclear whether the reductions of these parameters by ethanol consumption are truly due to the improvement of insulin resistance, at least, these effects are not applicable to subjects with obesity and/or insulin resistance. Thus, alcoholic beverages could not be remedies for insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome.

  14. Evaluation of insulin resistance in idiopathic hirsutism compared with polycystic ovary syndrome patients and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdaran, Shokoufeh; Kiafar, Bita; Barazandeh Ahmadabadi, Fatemeh

    2016-02-01

    Hirsutism is defined as the excessive male-pattern growth of hair in women. Hirsutism is often idiopathic or the consequence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Insulin resistance is common in PCOS (especially in obese patients) but the association between insulin resistance and idiopathic hirsutism (IH) is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of insulin resistance in IH, compared with healthy individuals and patients with PCOS. The study included three groups, patients with idiopathic hirsutism, PCOS and healthy women. Each group included 30 non-obese women. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), insulin level and insulin resistance (estimated by the homeostasis model assessment [HOMA-IRIR]) were compared in the three groups. There was a significant difference between the age of the women with IH compared with two other groups. There were no significant difference in levels of serum insulin (P = 0.49, HOMA-IR (P = 0.47) and prevalence of insulin resistance (P = 0.07) in the three groups. The age-adjusted prevalence of insulin resistance was similar in the three groups. Insulin resistance was no more frequent in IH patients than in healthy control groups. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  15. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-12-28

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of /sup 125/I-insulin was carried out at 15/sup 0/C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  16. Selective Insulin Resistance in Adipocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Ng, Yvonne; Pant, Himani; Li, Jia; Meoli, Christopher C.; Coster, Adelle C. F.; Stöckli, Jacqueline; James, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Aside from glucose metabolism, insulin regulates a variety of pathways in peripheral tissues. Under insulin-resistant conditions, it is well known that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is impaired, and many studies attribute this to a defect in Akt signaling. Here we make use of several insulin resistance models, including insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 adipocytes and fat explants prepared from high fat-fed C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice, to comprehensively distinguish defective from unaffected aspects of insulin signaling and its downstream consequences in adipocytes. Defective regulation of glucose uptake was observed in all models of insulin resistance, whereas other major actions of insulin such as protein synthesis and anti-lipolysis were normal. This defect corresponded to a reduction in the maximum response to insulin. The pattern of change observed for phosphorylation in the Akt pathway was inconsistent with a simple defect at the level of Akt. The only Akt substrate that showed consistently reduced phosphorylation was the RabGAP AS160 that regulates GLUT4 translocation. We conclude that insulin resistance in adipose tissue is highly selective for glucose metabolism and likely involves a defect in one of the components regulating GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface in response to insulin. PMID:25720492

  17. Excessive libido in a woman with rabies.

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, J. K.

    1996-01-01

    Rabies is endemic in India in both wildlife and humans. Human rabies kills 25,000 to 30,000 persons every year. Several types of sexual manifestations including excessive libido may develop in cases of human rabies. A laboratory proven case of rabies in an Indian woman who manifested excessive libido is presented below. She later developed hydrophobia and died.

  18. Understand Your Risk for Excessive Blood Clotting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vascular Health Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Understand Your Risk for Excessive Blood Clotting Updated:Nov 2,2015 Many factors can lead to excessive blood clotting, leading to limited or blocked blood flow. Blood clots can travel to the arteries or ...

  19. Bladder calculus presenting as excessive masturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Alwis, A C D; Senaratne, A M R D; De Silva, S M P D; Rodrigo, V S D

    2006-09-01

    Masturbation in childhood is a normal behaviour which most commonly begins at 2 months of age, and peaks at 4 years and in adolescence. However excessive masturbation causes anxiety in parents. We describe a boy with a bladder calculus presenting as excessive masturbation.

  20. 30 CFR 57.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 57.6902 Section 57.6902... Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature... shall— (1) Measure an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific mine...

  1. 30 CFR 56.6902 - Excessive temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excessive temperatures. 56.6902 Section 56.6902... Requirements § 56.6902 Excessive temperatures. (a) Where heat could cause premature detonation, explosive... an appropriate number of blasthole temperatures in order to assess the specific mine conditions prior...

  2. Excess Based Allocation of Risk Capital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulick, G.; De Waegenaere, A.M.B.; Norde, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new rule to allocate risk capital to portfolios or divisions within a firm. Specifically, we determine the capital allocation that minimizes the excesses of sets of portfolios in lexicographical sense. The excess of a set of portfolios is defined as the expected loss of

  3. The excessively crying infant : etiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akhnikh, S.; Engelberts, A.C.; Sleuwen, B.E. van; Hoir, M.P. L’; Benninga, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive crying, often described as infantile colic, is the cause of 10% to 20% of all early pediatrician visits of infants aged 2 weeks to 3 months. Although usually benign and selflimiting, excessive crying is associated with parental exhaustion and stress. However, and underlying organic cause

  4. Triboson interpretations of the ATLAS diboson excess

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS excess in fat jet pair production is kinematically compatible with the decay of a heavy resonance into two gauge bosons plus an extra particle. This possibility would explain the absence of such a localised excess in the analogous CMS analysis of fat dijet final states, as well as the negative results of diboson resonance searches in the semi-leptonic decay modes.

  5. Insulin Sensitivity and Inflammation Mediate the Impact of Fitness on Cerebrovascular Health in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Po Lai; Ross, Naima; Tirsi, Andrew; Arif, Arslan; Ozinci, Zeynep; Convit, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    To investigate in adolescents the relationships between retinal vessel diameter, physical fitness, insulin sensitivity, and systemic inflammation. We evaluated 157 adolescents, 112 with excessive weight and 45 lean, all without type 2 diabetes mellitus. All received detailed evaluations, including measurements of retinal vessel diameter, insulin sensitivity, levels of inflammation, and physical fitness. Overweight/obese adolescents had significantly narrower retinal arteriolar and wider venular diameters, significantly lower insulin sensitivity, and physical fitness. They also had decreased levels of anti-inflammatory and increased levels of proinflammatory markers as well as an overall higher inflammation balance score. Fitness was associated with larger retinal arteriolar and narrower venular diameters and these relationships were mediated by insulin sensitivity. We demonstrate that inflammation also mediates the relationship between fitness and retinal venular, but not arterial diameter; insulin sensitivity and inflammation balance score jointly mediate this relationship with little overlap in their effects. Increasing fitness and insulin sensitivity and reducing inflammation among adolescents carrying excess weight may improve microvascular integrity. Interventions to improve physical fitness and insulin function and reduce inflammation in adolescents, a group likely to benefit from such interventions, may reduce not only cardiovascular disease in middle age, but also improve cerebrovascular function later in life.

  6. Patch in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Alizadeh Ghavidel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Excessive bleeding presents a risk for the patient in cardiovascular surgery. Local haemostatic agents are of great value to reduce bleeding and related complications. TachoSil (Nycomed, Linz, Austria is a sterile, haemostatic agent that consists of an equine collagen patchcoated with human fibrinogen and thrombin. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of TachoSil compared to conventional technique.Methods: Forty-two patients scheduled for open heart surgeries, were entered to this study from August 2010 to May 2011. After primary haemostatic measures, patients divided in two groups based on surgeon’s judgment. Group A: 20 patients for whom TachoSil was applied and group B: 22 patients that conventional method using Surgicel (13 patients or wait and see method (9 cases, were performed in order to control the bleeding. In group A, 10 patients were male with mean age of 56.95±15.67 years and in group B, 9 cases were male with mean age of 49.95±14.41 years. In case group 70% (14/20 of the surgeries were redo surgeries versus 100% (22/22 in control group.Results: Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. In TachoSil group 75% of patients required transfusion versus 90.90% in group B (P=0.03.Most transfusions consisted of packed red blood cell; 2±1.13 units in group A versus 3.11±1.44 in group B (P=0.01, however there were no significant differences between two groups regarding the mean total volume of intra and post-operative bleeding. Re-exploration was required in 10% in group A versus 13.63% in group B (P=0.67.Conclusion: TachoSil may act as a superior alternative in different types of cardiac surgery in order to control the bleeding and therefore reducing transfusion requirement.

  7. Periodontal disease decreases insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Natalia H; Shirakashi, Daisy J; Chiba, Fernando Y; Coutinho, Maria Sara de Lima; Ervolino, Edilson; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Sumida, Doris H

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether local inflammatory events, such as periodontal disease, are able to increase tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plasmatic concentration and decrease insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling in non-diabetic rats. Forty-eight male Wistar rats (2 months old) were divided into two groups, with either ligature-induced periodontal disease (LPD) or control conditions (CN). Experiments were performed in both groups 28 days after ligature placement. Plasmatic concentration of glycemia and TNF-α (n = 10) were analyzed by the glucose oxidase and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method, respectively. Insulin sensitivity (n = 7) was measured using the insulin tolerance test. Insulin signal transduction (n = 7) was measured by pp185 tyrosine phosphorylation status in insulin-sensitive tissues using the Western blotting method. The LPD group showed decreased insulin sensitivity (P 0.05). TNF-α plasmatic concentration was higher in LPD rats compared to CN rats. In addition, a decrease in the pp185 tyrosine phosphorylation status was observed after insulin stimulus in both white adipose and skeletal muscle tissues of the LPD group compared with the CN group. LPD is able to cause alterations to both insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity, probably because of the elevation of TNF-α plasmatic concentration. Thus, the present results emphasize the importance of the prevention of local inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis, to prevent diabetes mellitus.

  8. Candesartan acutely recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Matthew A; Liu, Jia; Jahn, Linda A; Fowler, Dale E; Chai, Weidong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2012-07-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) tone restricts muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV) and decreases muscle insulin delivery and glucose use. The objective of the study was to examine whether acute AT(1)R blockade alters microvascular perfusion in skeletal and cardiac muscle in humans. The study was conducted at the General Clinical Research Center at the University of Virginia. Eight overnight-fasted healthy young adults were studied thrice in random order. In study 1, each subject received candesartan (32 mg) orally at time 0. In study 2, each subject received placebo at time 0 and a 1 mU/min · kg euglycemic insulin clamp from time 240 to 360 min. In study 3, each subject received candesartan (32 mg) orally at time 0 and insulin infusion from 240 to 360 min. Forearm skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV, microvascular flow velocity, and microvascular blood flow (MBF) were determined at baseline and at 240 and 360 min. Candesartan treatment acutely recruited microvasculature in both skeletal and cardiac muscle by significantly increasing MBV (P candesartan ingestion did not further recruit microvasculature. Insulin-mediated whole-body glucose disposal did not differ with or without candesartan pretreatment. Acute AT(1)R blockade with candesartan recruits skeletal as well as cardiac muscle microvasculature in healthy humans without altering insulin-mediated whole-body glucose disposal. This may contribute to the observed improvement in the cardiovascular outcomes in patients receiving prolonged treatment with AT(1)R blockers.

  9. Exercise and obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Bum Kwak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscle in our body is a major site for bioenergetics and metabolism during exercise. Carbohydrates and fats are the primary nutrients that provide the necessary energy required to maintain cellular activities during exercise. The metabolic responses to exercise in glucose and lipid regulation depend on the intensity and duration of exercise. Because of the increasing prevalence of obesity, recent studies have focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Accumulation of intramyocellular lipid may lead to insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. In addition, lipid intermediates (e.g., fatty acyl-coenzyme A, diacylglycerol, and ceramide impair insulin signaling in skeletal muscle. Recently, emerging evidence linking obesity-induced insulin resistance to excessive lipid oxidation, mitochondrial overload, and mitochondrial oxidative stress have been provided with mitochondrial function. This review will provide a brief comprehensive summary on exercise and skeletal muscle metabolism, and discuss the potential mechanisms of obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  10. Insulin suppresses IKs (KCNQ1/KCNE1) currents, which require β-subunit KCNE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minghua; Obara, Yutaro; Norota, Ikuo; Nagasawa, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Kuniaki

    2014-05-01

    Abnormal QT prolongation in diabetic patients has become a clinical problem because it increases the risk of lethal ventricular arrhythmia. In an animal model of type 1 diabetes mellitus, several ion currents, including the slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium current (IKs), are altered. The IKs channel is composed of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits, whose genetic mutations are well known to cause long QT syndrome. Although insulin is known to affect many physiological and pathophysiological events in the heart, acute effects of insulin on cardiac ion channels are poorly understood at present. This study was designed to investigate direct electrophysiological effects of insulin on IKs (KCNQ1/KCNE1) currents. KCNQ1 and KCNE1 were co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and whole cell currents were measured by a two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method. Acute application of insulin suppressed the KCNQ1/KCNE1 currents and phosphorylated Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the two major downstream effectors, in a concentration-dependent manner. Wortmannin (10(-6) M), a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, attenuated the suppression of the currents and phosphorylation of Akt by insulin, whereas U0126 (10(-5) M), a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor, had no effect on insulin-induced suppression of the currents. In addition, insulin had little effect on KCNQ1 currents without KCNE1, which indicated an essential role of KCNE1 in the acute suppressive effects of insulin. Mutagenesis studies revealed amino acid residues 111-118 within the distal third C-terminus of KCNE1 as an important region. Insulin has direct electrophysiological effects on IKs currents, which may affect cardiac excitability.

  11. Insulin and Glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Holland, William; Gromada, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    In August 2016, several leaders in glucagon biology gathered for the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Hagedorn Workshop in Oxford, England. A key point of discussion focused on the need for basal insulin to allow for the therapeutic benefit of glucagon blockade in the treatment...... of diabetes. Among the most enlightening experimental results presented were findings from studies in which glucagon receptor-deficient mice were administered streptozotocin to destroy pancreatic β cells or had undergone diphtheria toxin-induced β cell ablation. This article summarizes key features...... of the discussion as a consensus was reached. Agents that antagonize glucagon may be of great benefit for the treatment of diabetes; however, sufficient levels of basal insulin are required for their therapeutic efficacy....

  12. Over-nutrition, obesity and insulin resistance in the development of β-cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepashree; Krueger, Charles B; Lastra, Guido

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) has increased dramatically over the last several decades, largely driven by equally worrisome growing rates of obesity. Chronic diabetic complications are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Key players in the pathophysiology of DM2 are insulin resistance and β cell dysfunction, which in turn is a result of both β cell functional abnormality as well as reduced β cell mass. The mechanisms implicated are multifactorial and include genetic and environmental factors related to obesity. Glucose homeostasis is critically dependent on a finely regulated balance between insulin sensitivity and output in the pancreas, and insulin resistance demands a corresponding rise in insulin output in order to maintain normal glycemia. However, this compensation is lost in individuals predisposed to DM2, resulting in overt hyperglycemia. Furthermore, insulin resistance related to excess adiposity is linked to several abnormalities which impact β cell function and viability. These include glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, increased oxidative stress, and inflammation. In addition, insulin signaling in the β cell is essential to its own functionality and viability, and obesity-related abnormalities in insulin signaling are known to induce failure of insulin secretion and hyperglycemia. Insulin resistance in the β cell arises from defects in phosphorylation/activation of insulin receptor substrates (IRS) proteins, which result in impairment in glucose sensing, glucose stimulated insulin secretion, and also in increased loss of β cells. This review intends to provide an update on the main characteristics and mechanisms that link obesity and insulin resistance to β cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of DM2. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers

  13. Habitual shortened sleep and insulin resistance: an independent relationship in obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Alice; Kushida, Clete A; Reaven, Gerald M

    2013-11-01

    Short sleep duration has been reported to be associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and pre-diabetes. Since excess weight, glucose abnormalities, and insulin resistance tend to cluster, the individual role insulin resistance may have in habitual shortened sleep is unclear. The study purpose was to assess whether habitual sleep curtailment is independently related to insulin resistance in obese individuals. Non-diabetic, overweight/obese individuals from the community were stratified as insulin-resistant (n=35) or insulin-sensitive (n=21) based on steady-state plasma glucose concentrations (SSPG) during the insulin suppression test. Seventy-five gram oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Participants were asked, "On average, how many hours of sleep do you get per night?" Shortened sleep duration was defined as less than 7h of sleep per night. SSPG concentrations differed 2.5-fold (P40%); however, body mass index, waist circumference, mean fasting or 2-h post-glucola glucose concentrations were not significantly different. Insulin-resistant individuals reported (mean±SD) fewer hours of sleep than did insulin-sensitive individuals (6.53±1.1 vs. 7.24±0.9 h, Psleep duration was more prevalent among insulin-resistant as compared with insulin-sensitive individuals (60% vs. 24%, Psleep and were more likely to report shortened sleep duration as compared with similarly obese insulin-sensitive individuals. There appears to be an independent association between habitual shortened sleep and insulin resistance among obese, dysglycemic adults without diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 26 CFR 54.4979-1 - Excise tax on certain excess contributions and excess aggregate contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excise tax on certain excess contributions and excess aggregate contributions. 54.4979-1 Section 54.4979-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.4979-1 Excise tax on certain excess...

  15. Insulin impairs the maturation of chondrocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres E.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise nature of hormones and growth factors directly responsible for cartilage maturation is still largely unclear. Since longitudinal bone growth occurs through endochondral bone formation, excess or deficiency of most hormones and growth factors strongly influences final adult height. The structure and composition of the cartilaginous extracellular matrix have a critical role in regulating the behavior of growth plate chondrocytes. Therefore, the maintenance of the three-dimensional cell-matrix interaction is necessary to study the influence of individual signaling molecules on chondrogenesis, cartilage maturation and calcification. To investigate the effects of insulin on both proliferation and induction of hypertrophy in chondrocytes in vitro we used high-density micromass cultures of chick embryonic limb mesenchymal cells. Culture medium was supplemented with 1% FCS + 60 ng/ml (0.01 µM insulin and cultures were harvested at regular time points for later analysis. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunoreactivity was widely detected in insulin-treated cultures and persisted until day 21 and [³H]-thymidine uptake was highest on day 14. While apoptosis increased in control cultures as a function of culture time, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL-labeled cells were markedly reduced in the presence of insulin. Type II collagen production, alkaline phosphatase activity and cell size were also lower in insulin-treated cultures. Our results indicate that under the influence of 60 ng/ml insulin, chick chondrocytes maintain their proliferative potential but do not become hypertrophic, suggesting that insulin can affect the regulation of chondrocyte maturation and hypertrophy, possibly through an antiapoptotic effect.

  16. [Insulin-requiring diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, M; Gross, A; Ostermann, G; Grulet, H; Pasqual, C; Dijoux, B

    1988-01-01

    The insulinorequiring diabetes is a notion which deserves a clear definition, essentially clinical, because it covers a wide range of physiopathological situations. The progressive degradation of Diabetes type II means a progressive discrepancy of insulinosecretion and above all an increase of insulinoresistance. The noxious part of chronical hyperglycemia is at present well known. The present therapeutical prospects tend to delay or limit insulinotherapy, by trying to obtain remission of insulinorequiring and some attempt to give a combined treatment associating insulin and hypoglycemic drugs.

  17. Post-transcriptional gene silencing of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 restores insulin action in leucine-treated skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, A; Salehzadeh, F; Metayer-Coustard, S

    2009-01-01

    Excessive nutrients, especially amino acids, impair insulin action on glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that the branched-chain amino acid leucine reduces acute insulin action in primary myotubes via a negative feedback mechanism involving ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1...

  18. Plasma sCD36 is associated with markers of atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and fatty liver in a nondiabetic healthy population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, A; Højlund, K; Gastaldelli, A

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with increased CD36 expression in a number of tissues. Moreover, excess macrophage CD36 may initiate atherosclerotic lesions. The aim of this study was to determine whether plasma soluble CD36 (sCD36) was associated with insulin resistance, fatty liver and carotid...

  19. Inhibition of the Unfolded Protein Response Mechanism Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody Groenendyk

    Full Text Available Cardiac fibrosis attributed to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins is a major cause of heart failure and death. Cardiac fibrosis is extremely difficult and challenging to treat in a clinical setting due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to cardiac fibrosis and effective anti-fibrotic therapies. The objective in this study was to examine whether unfolded protein response (UPR pathway mediates cardiac fibrosis and whether a pharmacological intervention to modulate UPR can prevent cardiac fibrosis and preserve heart function.We demonstrate here that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse with increased expression of calreticulin, a model of heart failure, stems from impairment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis, transient activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR pathway and stimulation of the TGFβ1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Remarkably, sustained pharmacologic inhibition of the UPR pathway by tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA is sufficient to prevent cardiac fibrosis, and improved exercise tolerance.We show that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse model of heart failure stems from transient activation of UPR pathway leading to persistent remodelling of cardiac tissue. Blocking the activation of the transiently activated UPR pathway by TUDCA prevented cardiac fibrosis, and improved prognosis. These findings offer a window for additional interventions that can preserve heart function.

  20. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  1. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  2. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  3. Insulin therapy normalizes reduced myocardial β-adrenoceptors at both the onset and after sustained hyperglycemia in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, James M; Thackeray, James T; Kolajova, Maria; Thorn, Stephanie L; DaSilva, Jean N

    2015-07-01

    Reduced cardiac β-adrenoceptors (β-AR) and cardiovascular (CV) dysfunction occur in diabetes mellitus (DM) and can be normalized by insulin. It is unclear how the duration of untreated hyperglycemia prior to intervention impacts insulin's effects. This study assesses insulin's effect on reduced myocardial β-AR and CV function, comparing insulin therapy at the onset of hyperglycemia and after a sustained period of hyperglycemia in streptozotocin (STZ) rats. Ex vivo biodistribution experiments with [(3)H]CGP12177 were performed in high-fat fed STZ rats after 8 weeks of hyperglycemia evaluating cardiac β-AR expression. Western blotting of β-AR subtypes was completed in parallel. Serial echocardiography at 0, 6, and 8 weeks post-STZ investigated CV function. Sub-groups of hyperglycemic rats were treated with insulin early, at 1 week post-STZ (InsE) for 7 weeks, or late at 6 weeks post-STZ (InsL) for 2 weeks to observe how the duration of hyperglycemia prior to insulin impacts its effects. Reduced myocardial [(3)H]CGP12177 binding occurred 8 weeks post-STZ in hyperglycemics, but was normal in both insulin treatments. Western blotting supported reduced β1-AR in hyperglycemics, but not in either treatment. InsE and InsL treatments improved prolonged mitral valve deceleration (MVD) observed in hyperglycemic animals, but hyperglycemic and InsL still displayed reduced heart rates (HR). This work supports that glycemic control with insulin normalizes cardiac β-AR effectively regardless of prior hyperglycemia but HR may not recover as readily, indirectly supporting the utility of [(11)C]CGP12177 positron emission tomography (PET) in assessing cardiac β-AR and their modulation with glycemic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiac involvement in total generalized lipodystrophy (Berardinelli- Seip syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viégas Ruy Felipe Melo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Total generalized lipodystrophy (Berardinelli--Seip Syndrome is a rare hereditary disease characterized by insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus and a small quantity of adipose tissue and is of unknown origin. Common cardiovascular alterations related to this syndrome are cardiac hypertrophy and arterial hypertension. This article reports a case of Berardinelli--Seip syndrome and reviews the literature with special emphasis on the cardiovascular manifestations of this syndrome.

  5. [Alcohol, steatohepatitis, insulin resistance and hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzigou, P; Mathurin, P; Serfaty, L; Cacoub, P; Moussalli, J; Pialoux, G; Chossegros, P; Cattan, L; Pol, S

    2008-03-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C have frequently other morbidities, either because they are frequent in the general population (metabolic syndrome) and/or because the route of contamination (chronic alcohol consumption succeeding to drug abuse). These co-morbidities have a harmfull impact on fibrosis progression during the natural history of HCV infection and reduce the efficacy of antiviral treatments. Thus, it is crucial to diagnose early and treat these different diseases which may be combined. They are the metabolic syndrome and/or chronic alcohol consumption resulting in insuline resistance, infection by the human immune deficiency virus or by the hepatitis B virus as well as chronic tobacco use or excessive consumption of cannabis. An optimal is based on a multidisciplinary approach to reduce fibrosis progression and improve the efficiency of antiviral therapies. However, the hepatologist has to come back to a global care, which is mandatory at the individual level as well as for the public health.

  6. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, K. W.; Gilijamse, P. W.; Koopman, K. E.; de Weijer, B. A.; Brands, M.; Kootte, R. S.; Romijn, J. A.; Ackermans, M. T.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Soeters, M. R.; Serlie, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely

  7. Predictors of excessive use of social media and excessive online gaming in Czech teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilková, Jana; Chomynová, Pavla; Csémy, Ladislav

    2017-12-01

    Background and aims Young people's involvement in online gaming and the use of social media are increasing rapidly, resulting in a high number of excessive Internet users in recent years. The objective of this paper is to analyze the situation of excessive Internet use among adolescents in the Czech Republic and to reveal determinants of excessive use of social media and excessive online gaming. Methods Data from secondary school students (N = 4,887) were collected within the 2015 European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs. Logistic regression models were constructed to describe the individual and familial discriminative factors and the impact of the health risk behavior of (a) excessive users of social media and (b) excessive players of online games. Results The models confirmed important gender-specific distinctions - while girls are more prone to online communication and social media use, online gaming is far more prevalent among boys. The analysis did not indicate an influence of family composition on both the excessive use of social media and on excessive online gaming, and only marginal effects for the type of school attended. We found a connection between the excessive use of social media and binge drinking and an inverse relation between excessive online gaming and daily smoking. Discussion and conclusion The non-existence of significant associations between family environment and excessive Internet use confirmed the general, widespread of this phenomenon across the social and economic strata of the teenage population, indicating a need for further studies on the topic.

  8. Additional disulfide bonds in insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Tine N; Pettersson, Ingrid; Huus, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    The structure of insulin, a glucose homeostasis-controlling hormone, is highly conserved in all vertebrates and stabilized by three disulfide bonds. Recently, we designed a novel insulin analogue containing a fourth disulfide bond located between positions A10-B4. The N-terminus of insulin's B......-chain is flexible and can adapt multiple conformations. We examined how well disulfide bond predictions algorithms could identify disulfide bonds in this region of insulin. In order to identify stable insulin analogues with additional disulfide bonds, which could be expressed, the Cβ cut-off distance had...... in comparison to analogues with additional disulfide bonds that were more difficult to predict. In contrast, addition of the fourth disulfide bond rendered all analogues resistant to fibrillation under stress conditions and all stable analogues bound to the insulin receptor with picomolar affinities. Thus...

  9. Explaining CMS lepton excesses with supersymmetry

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Prof. Allanach, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    1) Kostas Theofilatos will give an introduction to CMS result 2) Ben Allanach: Several CMS analyses involving di-leptons have recently reported small 2.4-2.8 sigma local excesses: nothing to get too excited about, but worth keeping an eye on nonetheless. In particular, a search in the $lljj p_T$(miss) channel, a search for $W_R$ in the $lljj$ channel and a di-leptoquark search in the $lljj$ channel and $ljj p_T$(miss) channel have all yielded small excesses. We interpret the first excess in the MSSM, showing that the interpretation is viable in terms of other constraints, despite only having squark masses of around 1 TeV. We can explain the last three excesses with a single R-parity violating coupling that predicts a non-zero contribution to the neutrinoless double beta decay rate.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: aromatase excess syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ogata T. Genomic basis of aromatase excess syndrome: recombination- and replication-mediated rearrangements leading to CYP19A1 overexpression. ... 2013 Oct 18. Citation on PubMed More from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins Rare Disease Day 2018 Darwin ...

  11. Prevention of modern teenager's computer excessive gambling

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsutdinova, D.

    2011-01-01

    This article is devoted to the prevention of young people's excessive gambling. The article organized and convincingly derived the prevention strategies dependent gaming behavior among young people and teenagers.

  12. Excessive deforestation of Gishwati Mountainous forest ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    sigp1. Excessive deforestation of Gishwati. Mountainous forest & biodiversity changes. Introduction. The Change in Forest cover in. Rwanda is result of the high growth of population density. The latter has doubled between 1978 and 2002. Over.

  13. Insulin Resistance, Hyperglycemia, and Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Tabas, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Progress in preventing atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) has been stalled by the epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Further advances in this area demand a thorough understanding of how two major features of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia, impact atherosclerosis. Insulin resistance is associated with systemic CAD risk factors, but increasing evidence suggests that defective insulin signaling in atherosclerotic lesional cells also plays an important role. The role o...

  14. Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    of SM and LPC and the amount of alcohol consumption during the past month. The proposal has both scientific and practical significance in... alcohol use (EAU). Drinking becomes excessive when it causes or elevates the risk for alcohol -related problems or complicates the management of other...the quantity of alcohol consumption during the past month. 2. KEYWORDS: Excessive alcohol use, lipidomics, timeline follow back 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  15. Romanian welfare state between excess and failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ciuraru-Andrica

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Timely or not, our issue can bring back to life some prolific discussions, sometimes diametrical. We strike the social assistance, where, at this moment, is still uncertain if, once unleashed the excess, the failure will come inevitably or there is a “Salvation Ark”. However, the difference between the excess and the failure of the welfare state is almost intangible, the reason of his potential failure being actually the abuses made until the start of depression.

  16. Organizational Inertia and Excessive Product Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Sakuraki, Rie

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the internal factors of excessive product proliferation. Since empirical literature on product over-proliferation focused on how to optimize existing product portfolio, the causes of excessive product proliferation have so far attracted little attention. This study employs a case study of Shiseido, a famous Japanese cosmetics company, with particular attention to product proliferation in the Shiseido chain store channel, because external factors are mostly absent from ...

  17. Basal insulin analogues in diabetic pregnancy: a literature review and baseline results of a randomised, controlled trial in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter; Jovanovic, Lois

    2011-01-01

    hagedorn insulin, both with insulin aspart, in women with type 1 diabetes planning a pregnancy (n = 306) or are already pregnant (n = 164). Inclusion criteria include type 1 diabetes > 12 months' duration; screening HbA1c = 9.0% (women recruited prepregnancy), or pregnant with gestational age 8-12 weeks...... and HbA1c = 8.0% at randomization. At confirmation of pregnancy all subjects must have HbA1c = 8.0%. Exclusion criteria include impaired hepatic function, cardiac problems, and uncontrolled hypertension. Subjects are randomized to either insulin detemir or neutral protamine hagedorn insulin, both...

  18. Cardioprotection of dapagliflozin and vildagliptin in cardiac reperfusion injury rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanajak, Pongpan; Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Sivasinprasan, Sivaporn; Thummasorn, Savitree; Siri-Angkul, Natthaphat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2017-11-15

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor (SGLT2-i) effects on cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are unclear. Unlike SGLT2-i, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP4-i) have shown effective cardioprotection in cardiac I/R injury. We aimed to investigate whether SGLT2-i reduces myocardial dysfunction and myocardial injury to a greater extent than DPP4-i in obese-insulin resistant rats with/without cardiac I/R injury. The high fat (HF) diet induced obese-insulin resistant rats were divided into 4 groups and received the following treatments for 28 days: vehicle (HFV); vildagliptin at a dosage of 3 mg/kg/day (HFVil); dapagliflozin at a dosage of 1 mg/kg/day (HFDa); and combination drugs (HFDaVil). At the end, I/R injury was induced by a 30-minute left anterior descending coronary occlusion and 120-minute reperfusion. Dapagliflozin showed a greater efficacy than vildagliptin in improving the metabolic impairments, low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio, systolic blood pressure and left ventricular (LV) function in comparison to HFV rats. In cardiac I/R injury, Dapagliflozin had a greater efficacy than vildagiptin in decreasing mitochondrial DRP1, cleaved caspase 3, LV dysfunction and infarct size in comparison to HFV rats. However, the combined therapy showed the greatest efficacy in attenuating LV dysfunction, mitochondrial DRP1 and infarct size in comparison to HFV rats. In conclusion, dapagliflozin has a more pronounced effect than vildagliptin in obese-insulin resistant rats for the improvement of LV function. In rats with cardiac I/R injury, although dapagliflozin had a greater efficacy on cardioprotection than vildagliptin, the combined therapy exerted the highest cardioprotective effects potentially through reducing mitochondrial fission.

  19. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues, increased hepatic glucose production, increased lipolysis in adipose tissue, and altered insulin secretion. Studies of individuals with insulin resistance, both with established T2D and high-risk individuals, have consistently demonstrated a diverse array of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D.

  20. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glu......Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin...... of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion...... present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D....

  1. Echocardiography and cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Constantinos H; Oikonomidis, Dimitrios; Lazaris, Efstathios; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2017-12-05

    Cardiac arrhythmias refer to any abnormality or disturbance in the normal activation sequence of the myocardium and may be indicative of structural heart disease and the cause of significant cardiovascular complications and sudden cardiac death. The following review summarizes the current state-of-the-art knowledge on the role of echocardiography in the management of cardiac arrhythmias and focuses on atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias where echocardiography presents a particular diagnostic and prognostic interest. Moreover, a brief reference is made to the effect of cardiac arrhythmias and conduction abnormalities on echocardiographic examination. Copyright © 2017 Hellenic Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger

    1999-08-01

    Great strides have been made in the approach to the management of sudden cardiac death. Patients who have been successfully resuscitated from an episode of sudden cardiac death are at high risk of recurrence. Much larger groups of patients who have not had episodes of sudden cardiac death are also at substantial risk for this event, however. Because the survival rates associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are dismal, these high-risk populations must be targeted for prophylaxis. Beta-blockers have been shown to be an effective pharmacologic therapy in patients who have had myocardial infarction and, most recently, in patients with congestive heart failure. When possible, these agents should be used in these populations. No class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs, with the possible exception of amiodarone, have been shown to have efficacy as prophylactic agents for the reduction of mortality in these populations. In patients who have hemodynamically significant sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias or an aborted episode of sudden cardiac death, the current therapy of choice is an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). For prophylaxis of sudden cardiac death in patients who have not had a previous event, several approaches may be considered. Currently, the best therapeutic approach for prophylaxis of sudden cardiac death seems to be the ICD; however, use of this device can be justified only in patients at substantial risk of sudden cardiac death. Defining the high-risk populations that will benefit from ICDs is critical in managing the problem of sudden cardiac death.

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    right ventricular fibrosis); (d) idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. (midwall fibrosis); (e) infiltrative cardiomyopathies (cardiac sarcoidosis); and (f) systemic vasculitides (Churg Strauss Syndrome). LV = left ventricle;. RV = right ...

  4. Insulin-mediated FFA suppression is associated with triglyceridemia and insulin sensitivity independent of adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nikki C; Basu, Rita; Rizza, Robert A; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Khosla, Sundeep; Jensen, Michael D

    2012-11-01

    A central/visceral fat distribution and excess free fatty acid (FFA) availability are associated with dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. However, these two characteristics often coexist, making it difficult to detect the independent contributions of each. Whether FFA suppression is more closely linked to metabolic abnormalities is not clear. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between FFA suppression, body fat distribution, and fitness as contributors toward insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia. We measured systemic palmitate turnover using an iv infusion of [9,10-(3)H]palmitate; upper body sc adipose tissue (UBSQ) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and a single-slice abdominal computed tomography scan; fitness with a graded exercise treadmill test; and insulin sensitivity with both the iv glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) (SI(IVGTT)) and mixed meal tolerance test (SI(Meal)). The study was conducted at a General Clinical Research Center. Baseline data were obtained from 140 elderly adults (age, 60-88 yr; 83 males) and 60 young adults (age, 18-31 yr; 31 males) who participated in a previously published trial assessing the effects of 2-yr supplementation of dehydroepiandrosterone or testosterone on body composition, glucose metabolism, and bone density. There were no interventions. We measured fasting plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations, SI(IVGTT), and SI(Meal). Using multivariate regression analysis, the strongest combined predictors of TG concentrations were VAT, postmeal nadir FFA concentrations, sex, and age. The best predictors of SI(IVGTT) were IVGTT nadir palmitate concentration, VAT, UBSQ fat, fitness, and age, whereas the best predictors of SI(Meal) were meal nadir palmitate concentration, UBSQ fat, fitness, and sex. FFA suppression is associated with both fasting TG concentrations and insulin sensitivity, independent of measures of adiposity.

  5. Significance of glucagon for insulin secretion and hepatic glycogenolysis during exercise in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H; Holst, J J

    1981-01-01

    The significance of glucagon and of the sympatho-adrenal system for insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen depletion during exercise was studied. Male rats were either adrenodemedullated and chemically sympathectomized with 6-hydroxydopamine (SX) or sham-treated (C). During light ether anesthesia...... attached (2% of body weight). Then cardiac blood was drawn for analysis of glucose, insulin and glucagon, and a sample of the liver was collected. In both CA and CN rats, the blood glucose concentration tended to increase (p less than 0.1) during exercise, whereas hepatic glycogen depletion and the plasma...... insulin concentration were lower in CA rats compared to CN rats. In SX rats, the blood glucose concentration did not increase during exercise, and in SXA but not in SXN rats, the hepatic glucogen depletion was lower than in CN rats. The plasma insulin concentration was consistently higher in SX rats than...

  6. A Small Insulinomimetic Molecule Also Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Diabetic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Dramatic increase of diabetes over the globe is in tandem with the increase in insulin requirement. This is because destruction and dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells are of common occurrence in both Type1 diabetes and Type2 diabetes, and insulin injection becomes a compulsion. Because of several problems associated with insulin injection, orally active insulin mimetic compounds would be ideal substitute. Here we report a small molecule, a peroxyvanadate compound i.e. DmpzH[VO(O22(dmpz], henceforth referred as dmp, which specifically binds to insulin receptor with considerable affinity (KD-1.17μM thus activating insulin receptor tyrosine kinase and its downstream signaling molecules resulting increased uptake of [14C] 2 Deoxy-glucose. Oral administration of dmp to streptozotocin treated BALB/c mice lowers blood glucose level and markedly stimulates glucose and fatty acid uptake by skeletal muscle and adipose tissue respectively. In db/db mice, it greatly improves insulin sensitivity through excess expression of PPARγ and its target genes i.e. adiponectin, CD36 and aP2. Study on the underlying mechanism demonstrated that excess expression of Wnt3a decreased PPARγ whereas dmp suppression of Wnt3a gene increased PPARγ expression which subsequently augmented adiponectin. Increased production of adiponectin in db/db mice due to dmp effected lowering of circulatory TG and FFA levels, activates AMPK in skeletal muscle and this stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics. Decrease of lipid load along with increased mitochondrial activity greatly improves energy homeostasis which has been found to be correlated with the increased insulin sensitivity. The results obtained with dmp, therefore, strongly indicate that dmp could be a potential candidate for insulin replacement therapy.

  7. FoxO6 integrates insulin signaling with gluconeogenesis in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Perdomo, German; Zhang, Ting; Slusher, Sandra; Lee, Sojin; Phillips, Brett E; Fan, Yong; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gramignoli, Roberto; Strom, Stephen; Ringquist, Steven; Dong, H Henry

    2011-11-01

    Excessive endogenous glucose production contributes to fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes. This effect stems from inept insulin suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we studied the ability of forkhead box O6 (FoxO6) to mediate insulin action on hepatic gluconeogenesis and its contribution to glucose metabolism. We characterized FoxO6 in glucose metabolism in cultured hepatocytes and in rodent models of dietary obesity, insulin resistance, or insulin-deficient diabetes. We determined the effect of FoxO6 on hepatic gluconeogenesis in genetically modified mice with FoxO6 gain- versus loss-of-function and in diabetic db/db mice with selective FoxO6 ablation in the liver. FoxO6 integrates insulin signaling to hepatic gluconeogenesis. In mice, elevated FoxO6 activity in the liver augments gluconeogenesis, raising fasting blood glucose levels, and hepatic FoxO6 depletion suppresses gluconeogenesis, resulting in fasting hypoglycemia. FoxO6 stimulates gluconeogenesis, which is counteracted by insulin. Insulin inhibits FoxO6 activity via a distinct mechanism by inducing its phosphorylation and disabling its transcriptional activity, without altering its subcellular distribution in hepatocytes. FoxO6 becomes deregulated in the insulin-resistant liver, accounting for its unbridled activity in promoting gluconeogenesis and correlating with the pathogenesis of fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes. These metabolic abnormalities, along with fasting hyperglycemia, are reversible by selective inhibition of hepatic FoxO6 activity in diabetic mice. Our data uncover a FoxO6-dependent pathway by which the liver orchestrates insulin regulation of gluconeogenesis, providing the proof-of-concept that selective FoxO6 inhibition is beneficial for curbing excessive hepatic glucose production and improving glycemic control in diabetes.

  8. [Cardiac magnetic resonance and uremic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lullo, L; Gorini, A; Rivera, R; De Pascalis, A; Bellasi, A; Russo, D; Barbera, V; Ronco, C; Balducci, A; Santoboni, A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CV) represents the main risk factor for morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Large epidemiological studies have shown direct association between severity of CKD and CV event rates. Although patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), including dialysis ones, are at greater CV risk, cardiovascular involvement is already evident at the early stages of CKD. End-stage CKD is characterized conventional atherosclerotic risk factor but they cannot account for CV risk as reflected in high rates of sudden cardiac death, heart failure and myocardial infarction. Non-atherosclerotic processes, including left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, mostly account for the excess risk of CV. Employment of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in CKD has brought an improved understanding of the adverse CV changes, known as uremic cardiomyopathy. It is due to ability of cardiac magnetic resonance to provide a comprehensive non - invasive examination of cardiac structure and function, arterial function, myocardial tissue characterization (T1 mapping and inversion recovery imaging), and myocardial metabolic function (spectroscopy).

  9. Prolonged fasting induces peripheral insulin resistance, which is not ameliorated by high-dose salicylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Crabben, Saskia N.; Allick, Gideon; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Endert, Erik; Romijn, Johannes A.; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Elevated plasma free fatty acids, excess reactive oxygen species, inflammation, and gluco-counterregulatory hormones induce insulin resistance (IR) through activation of Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor kappaB kinase, which leads to hyperphosphorylation of the

  10. The role of hepatic lipids in hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Rachel J; Samuel, Varman T.; Petersen, Kitt Mia Falck

    2014-01-01

    of the mechanisms by which excess hepatic lipid develops and causes hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Proposed mechanisms implicate various lipid species, inflammatory signalling and other cellular modifications. Studies in mice and humans have elucidated a key role for hepatic diacylglycerol...

  11. Body trunk fat and insulin resistance in post-pubertal obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Caroline dos Santos

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Insulin resistance is a metabolic disorder commonly associated with excess body fat accumulation that may increase chronic disease risk. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between body composition and insulin resistance among obese adolescents. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study, at the Adolescence Center, Pediatric Department, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Body composition was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Dietary intake was evaluated using a three-day dietary record. The biochemical evaluation comprised glucose, insulin, serum lipid, leptin and ghrelin measurements. Insulin resistance was calculated by means of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. RESULTS: Forty-nine post-pubertal obese adolescents participated in the study: 12 boys and 37 girls of mean age 16.6 (1.4 years and mean body mass index (BMI of 35.0 (3.9 kg/m². The mean glucose, insulin and HOMA values were 90.3 (6.4 mg/dl, 16.6 (8.1 µIU/ml and 3.7 (1.9, respectively. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance were observed in 40.2% and 57.1% of the subjects, respectively. Adolescents with insulin resistance had higher BMI and body trunk fat. There was a trend towards higher leptin concentration in obese individuals with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance was positively correlated with body trunk fat, BMI, body fat mass (kg, leptin and body fat percentage. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between HOMA-IR and lean body mass. The body composition predicted 30% of the HOMA-IR levels, according to linear regression models. CONCLUSION: Body trunk fat was significantly associated with insulin resistance, demonstrating the clinical importance of abdominal obesity during adolescence.

  12. Cardiac pacing systems and implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs): a radiological perspective of equipment, anatomy and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burney, K. E-mail: apqz59@dsl.pipex.comk1511@hotmail.com; Burchard, F.; Papouchado, M.; Wilde, P

    2004-08-01

    Cardiac pacing is a proven and effective treatment in the management of many cardiac arrhythmias. Implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) are beneficial for certain patient groups with a history of serious, recurrent ventricular dysrhythmias, with a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Pacemaker devices take many forms and are highly visible on the chest radiograph. The radiographic appearances of ICDs and pacemakers can be similar and are subject to similar complications. The anatomical approach to the implantation, the type of device used and anatomical variations will all affect the appearance of these devices on the chest film. Pacemaker complications identified radiographically include pneumothorax, lead malpositioning, lead displacement or fracture, fracture of outer conductor coil, loose connection between the lead and pacemaker connector block, lack of redundant loops in paediatric patients and excessive manipulation of the device by the patient (Twiddler's syndrome). This pictorial review highlights the role of chest radiography in the diagnosis of post-cardiac pacing and ICD insertion complications, as well as demonstrating the normal appearances of the most frequently implanted devices.

  13. Cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and brain angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Zhang, Le; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Insulin performs unique non-metabolic functions within the brain. Broadly speaking, two major areas of these functions are those related to brain endothelial cells and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, and those related to behavioral effects, like cognition in disease states (Alzheimer's disease, AD) and in health. Recent studies showed that both these functions are associated with brain angiogenesis. These findings raise interesting questions such as how they are linked to each other and whether modifying brain angiogenesis by targeting certain insulin signaling pathways could be an effective strategy to treat dementia as in AD, or even to help secure healthy longevity. The two canonical downstream pathways involved in mediating the insulin signaling pathway, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, in the brain are supposed to be similar to those in the periphery. PI3K and MAPK pathways play important roles in angiogenesis. Both are involved in stimulating hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in angiogenesis and could be activated by the insulin signaling pathway. This suggests that PI3K and MAPK pathways might act as cross-talk between the insulin signaling pathway and the angiogenesis pathway in brain. But the cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and the detailed mechanism in the connection of insulin signaling pathway, brain angiogenesis pathway, and healthy aging or dementias are still mostly not clear and need further studies.

  14. The evolutionary benefit of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeters, Maarten R.; Soeters, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is perceived as deleterious, associated with conditions as the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus and critical illness. However, insulin resistance is evolutionarily well preserved and its persistence suggests that it benefits survival. Insulin resistance is important in

  15. [What nosographic framework for excessive tanning?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, A; Karila, L; Lejoyeux, M

    2014-04-01

    Socially valorised tanning, like other forms of behaviour, can take on an addictive aspect. Excessive tanning, defined by the presence of impulsivity and repetition of tanning that leads to personal distress, is a psychiatric disorder that has only recently been recognized. This finding is based on the observations of many dermatologists who report an addictive relationship in their patients with tanning cabins despite announcement of the diagnosis of malignant melanoma. This article attempts to synthesize the existing literature on excessive tanning and addiction to investigate possible associations. This review focuses on the prevalence, clinical features, aetiology, and treatment of this disorder. The literature review was conducted from 1983 to 2012, using PubMed, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and PsycInfo, using the following keywords alone or combined: Tanning, Addiction, Sunbeds, Skin cancer prevention, and Treatment. We investigated different models to determine how excessive tanning met these criteria. Excessive Tanning was described in the 2000s by an American dermatologist, Carolyn Heckman. Wartham et al. were the first to have proposed a theoretical framework for addiction to sunbathing, as well as two scales (m CAGE and m DSM IV) for the diagnosis and to assess the degree of addiction. These diagnostic criteria describe the craving like-symptoms, the feeling of losing control, or the continuation of the behavior despite knowledge of negative consequences. Excessive Tanning is not present in the classifications of the DSM or ICD, but may be related to Addiction, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Impulse control disorders, Anorexia, or Body Dysmorphic Disorder. Excessive tanning can be included in the spectrum of behavioural addictions due its clinical characteristics in common with classics addictive disorders. They are a variety of other models, which may offer an explanation for or insight into tanning behaviour. Further studies must be controlled, notably on

  16. Insulin resistance, insulin sensitization and inflammation in polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhindsa G

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 5-10% of women of reproductive age have polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. While insulin resistance is not part of the diagnostic criteria for PCOS, its importance in the pathogenesis of PCOS cannot be denied. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance independent of total or fat-free body mass. Post-receptor defects in the action of insulin have been described in PCOS which are similar to those found in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Treatment with insulin sensitizers, metformin and thiazolidinediones, improve both metabolic and hormonal patterns and also improve ovulation in PCOS. Recent studies have shown that PCOS women have higher circulating levels of inflammatory mediators like C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor- , tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 . It is possible that the beneficial effect of insulin sensitizers in PCOS may be partly due to a decrease in inflammation.

  17. Use of Modified Glucose-Insulin-Potassium Mixture in Cardiosurgical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was undertaken to study the hemodynamic and metabolic effects of modified (with elevated glucose and insulin levels glucose-insulin-potassium (GIP mixture in the correction of acute heart failure in cardiosurgical patients. After infusion of the modified GIP mixture (0.9 g of glucose per kg body weight and 3.75 units of insulin per g glucose, in 15 patients (12 males and 3 females aged 35 to 72 (54±5 years the increase (p<0.05 in cardiac index and stroke volume index was 21% with simultaneous 20 and 17% decreases in pulmonary wedge pressure and mean pulmonary pressure, respectively (p<0.05. The duration of infusion was 5 hours. A steady-state improvement of cardiac pump function and metabolic parameters could reduce the dosage of cardiotonic drugs 12 hours after administration of the modified GIP mixture. During and after administration of the mixture, the blood levels of glucose and potassium were substantially unchanged. In the study group, all the patients survived. The duration of a resuscitative period was 2.4±0.2 days. With the management protocol used, infusion of the modified GIP mixture was favorable to the steady-state improvement of cardiac pump function without carbohydrate and electrolyte homeostatic impairments.acute heart failure; glucose-insulin-potassium mixture

  18. [Advances in cardiac pacing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carranza, María-José Sancho-Tello; Fidalgo-Andrés, María Luisa; Ferrer, José Martínez; Mateas, Francisco Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a review of the current status of remote monitoring and follow-up involving cardiac pacing devices and of the latest developments in cardiac resynchronization therapy. In addition, the most important articles published in the last year are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  20. Pregnancy and cardiac disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosing cardiac disease. History and examination. Many disorders can be identified by a clinical examination and a patient's history, but in the majority, if not all cases, an echocardiogram is required to confirm clinical suspicions. ARTICLE. Pregnancy and cardiac disease. C Elliott,1 MB ChB, FCOG (SA), MMed; K Sliwa ...

  1. Severe insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia after childhood total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayson, Sarah E; Parker, Victoria E R; Schutta, Mark H; Semple, Robert K; Rickels, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the metabolic phenotype of 2 cases of normal weight young women who developed type 2 diabetes (T2D), severe insulin resistance (insulin requirement >200 units/day), marked hypertriglyceridemia (>2000 mg/dL), and hepatic steatosis beginning 9 years after undergoing total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation for childhood cancer. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acids (FFAs), leptin, adiponectin, resistin, TNFα, and IL-6 were measured in each case and in 8 healthy women; Case 1 was also assessed after initiating pioglitazone. Coding regions and splice junctions of PPARG, LMNA, and AKT2 were sequenced in Case 1 and of PPARG in Case 2 to evaluate for familial partial lipodystrophies. Genotyping of APOE was performed in Case 1 to rule out type III hyperlipoproteinemia. Both cases had elevated plasma levels of insulin, leptin, resistin, and IL-6, high-normal to elevated TNFα, and low to low-normal adiponectin in keeping with post-receptor insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation. Case 1 experienced a biochemical response to pioglitazone. No causative mutations for partial lipodystrophies or type III hyperlipoproteinemia were identified. Though metabolic derangements have previously been reported in association with TBI, few cases have described insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia as severe as that seen in our patients. We speculate that early childhood TBI may impede adipose tissue development leading to metabolic complications from an attenuated ability of adipose tissue to accommodate caloric excess, and propose that this extreme metabolic syndrome be evaluated for as a late complication of TBI.

  2. The AMPK gamma1 R70Q mutant regulates multiple metabolic and growth pathways in neonatal cardiac myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although mutations in the gamma-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) can result in excessive glycogen accumulation and cardiac hypertrophy, the mechanisms by which this occurs have not been well defined. Because >65% of cardiac AMPK activity is associated with the gamma1-subunit of AMPK, w...

  3. Intradermal Insulin Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultström, Michael; Roxhed, Niclas

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of insulinopenic diabetes mellitus is constantly increasing, and in addition, approximately a third of all hyperinsulinemic diabetic patients develop insulinopenia. Optimal glycemic control is essential to minimize the risk for diabetes-induced complications, but the majority of diabetic patients fail to achieve proper long-term glucose levels even in clinical trials, and even more so in clinical practice. Compliance with a treatment regimen is likely to be higher if the procedure is simple, painless, and discreet. Thus, insulin has been suggested for nasal, gastrointestinal, and inhalation therapy, but so far with considerable downsides in effect, side effects, or patient acceptance. The stratum corneum is the main barrier preventing convenient drug administration without the drawbacks of subcutaneous injections. Recently, devices with miniaturized needles have been developed that combine the simplicity and discretion of patch-based treatments, but with the potential of peptide and protein administration. As this review describes, initial comparisons with subcutaneous administration now suggest microneedle patches for active insulin delivery are efficient in maintaining glycemic control. Hollow microneedle technology could also prove to be efficient in systemic as well as local delivery of other macromolecular drugs, such as vaccines. PMID:24876605

  4. Antidepressant induced excessive yawning and indifference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Palazzo Nazar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Antidepressant induced excessive yawning has been described as a possible side effect of pharmacotherapy. A syndrome of indifference has also been described as another possible side effect. The frequency of those phenomena and their physiopathology are unknown. They are both considered benign and reversible after antidepressant discontinuation but severe cases with complications as temporomandibular lesions, have been described. Methods We report two unprecedented cases in which excessive yawning and indifference occurred simultaneously as side effects of antidepressant therapy, discussing possible physiopathological mechanisms for this co-occurrence. Case 1: A male patient presented excessive yawning (approximately 80/day and apathy after venlafaxine XR treatment. Symptoms reduced after a switch to escitalopram, with a reduction to 50 yawns/day. Case 2: A female patient presented excessive yawning (approximately 25/day and inability to react to environmental stressors with desvenlafaxine. Conclusion Induction of indifference and excessive yawning may be modulated by serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms. One proposal to unify these side effects would be enhancement of serotonin in midbrain, especially paraventricular and raphe nucleus.

  5. Cardiometabolic risk markers of normal weight and excess body weight in Brazilian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroeni, Silmara Salete de Barros Silva; Mastroeni, Marco Fabio; Gonçalves, Muryel de Carvalho; Debortoli, Guilherme; da Silva, Nilza Nunes; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata; Adamovski, Maristela; Veugelers, Paul J; Rondó, Patrícia Helen de Carvalho

    2016-06-01

    Excess body weight leads to a variety of metabolic changes and increases the risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in adulthood. The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of risk markers for CVD among Brazilian adolescents of normal weight and with excess body weight. The markers included blood pressure, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, tumor necrosis factor alpha, fibrinogen, fasting insulin and glucose, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), leptin, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), and triglycerides. We calculated odds ratios (OR) using logistic regression and adjusted for potential confounders such as age, sex, physical activity, and socioeconomic background. Compared with normal weight subjects, overweight/obese adolescents were more likely to have higher systolic blood pressure (OR = 3.49, p insulin (OR = 8.03, p < 0.001), HOMA-IR (OR = 8.03, p < 0.001), leptin (OR = 5.55, p < 0.001), and LDL-c (OR = 5.50, p < 0.001) and lower serum HDL-c concentrations (OR = 2.76, p = 0.004). After adjustment for confounders, the estimates did not change substantially, except for leptin for which the risk associated with overweight increased to 11.09 (95% CI: 4.05-30.35). In conclusion, excess body weight in adolescents exhibits strong associations with several markers that are established as causes of CVD in adults. This observation stresses the importance of primary prevention and of maintaining a healthy body weight throughout adolescence to reduce the global burden of CVD.

  6. The cardiovascular effects of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younk, Lisa M; Lamos, Elizabeth M; Davis, Stephen N

    2014-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetes mellitus. A causal link between insulin, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk has been investigated at the basic science level and studied in large clinical trials. The cardiovascular actions of insulin and its role at the level of the endothelium will be reviewed. Cardiovascular outcomes in several large diabetes trials where insulin management was prominent will be summarized. The vascular actions of insulin are complex and mediated primarily via nitric oxide and endothelin-1. It appears that insulin resistance, rather than hyperinsulinemia itself, increases cardiovascular risk. In fact, hyperinsulinemia in the setting of normal beta cell function protects obese and insulin-resistant individuals from type 2 diabetes. Large clinical trials have supported that insulin management is not associated with increased adverse outcomes. A multifactorial approach targeting modifiable risk factors, including smoking cessation, blood pressure and lipid management, reduces cardiovascular risk. Therapy goals should be individualized and hypoglycemia, especially in individuals receiving insulin management, should be strictly avoided.

  7. Direct Activation of Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptors Enhances Muscle Microvascular Perfusion, Oxygenation, and Insulin Delivery in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Yuan, Zhaoshun; Wang, Nasui; Carey, Robert M; Aylor, Kevin W; Chen, Li; Zhou, Xinmin; Liu, Zhenqi

    2018-02-01

    Angiotensin II receptors regulate muscle microvascular recruitment and the delivery of nutrients, oxygen, and insulin to muscle. Although angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonism increases muscle microvascular perfusion and insulin action, angiotensin type 2 receptor blockade markedly restricts muscle microvascular blood volume and decreases muscle delivery of insulin. To examine the effects of direct type 2 receptor stimulation using Compound 21 (C21) on microvascular perfusion, insulin delivery and action, and tissue oxygenation in muscle, overnight-fasted adult male rats were infused with C21 systemically. C21 potently increased microvascular blood volume without altering microvascular flow velocity or blood pressure, resulting in a net increase in microvascular blood flow in muscle. This was associated with a substantial increase in muscle interstitial oxygen saturation and insulin delivery into the skeletal and cardiac muscle. These effects were neutralized by coinfusion of the type 2 receptor antagonist or nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Superimposing C21 infusion on insulin infusion increased insulin-mediated whole body glucose disposal by 50%. C21 significantly relaxed the preconstricted distal saphenous artery ex vivo. We have concluded that direct type 2 receptor stimulation markedly increases muscle microvascular perfusion through nitric oxide biosynthesis and enhances insulin delivery and action in muscle. These findings provide a physiologic mechanistic insight into type 2 receptor modulation of insulin action and suggest that type 2 receptor agonists might have therapeutic potential in the management of diabetes and its associated complications. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  8. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Parakh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is one of the most common cause of mortality worldwide. Despite significant advances in the medical science, there is little improvement in the sudden cardiac death related mortality. Coronary artery disease is the most common etiology behind sudden cardiac death, in the above 40 years population. Even in the apparently healthy population, there is a small percentage of patients dying from sudden cardiac death. Given the large denominator, this small percentage contributes to the largest burden of sudden cardiac death. Identification of this at risk group among the apparently healthy individual is a great challenge for the medical fraternity. This article looks into the causes and methods of preventing SCD and at some of the Indian data. Details of Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, Genetics of SCD are discussed. Recent guidelines on many of these causes are summarised.

  9. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  10. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  11. Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    protein enhances hepatic insulin sensitivity by direct activation of the mTORC2-Akt signaling. Diabetes . 2015 Apr;64(4):1211-23. doi: 10.2337/db14-0539...cardiomyopathy: review of pathophysiology and treatment. Hepatol Int. 2014 Jul;8(3):308-15. doi: 10.1007/s12072- 014-9531-y. PubMed PMID: 25221635; PubMed

  12. Limiting law excess sum rule for polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Jonathan; Lee, YongJin; Jho, YongSeok

    2013-11-01

    We revisit the mean-field limiting law screening excess sum rule that holds for rodlike polyelectrolytes. We present an efficient derivation of this law that clarifies its region of applicability: The law holds in the limit of small polymer radius, measured relative to the Debye screening length. From the limiting law, we determine the individual ion excess values for single-salt electrolytes. We also consider the mean-field excess sum away from the limiting region, and we relate this quantity to the osmotic pressure of a dilute polyelectrolyte solution. Finally, we consider numerical simulations of many-body polymer-electrolyte solutions. We conclude that the limiting law often accurately describes the screening of physical charged polymers of interest, such as extended DNA.

  13. How Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Sudden Cardiac Arrest Sudden Cardiac Arrest Also known as Cardiac Arrest , Sudden Cardiac Death ... the condition For People Who Have Survived Sudden Cardiac Arrest If you've already had SCA, you're ...

  14. How Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Sudden Cardiac Arrest Sudden Cardiac Arrest Also known as Cardiac Arrest , Sudden Cardiac Death ... the condition For People Who Have Survived Sudden Cardiac Arrest If you've already had SCA, you're ...

  15. Insulin's discovery: new insights on its ninetieth birthday.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jesse; Qureshi, Sana; Whitford, Ian; Vranic, Mladen; Kahn, C Ronald; Fantus, I George; Dirks, John H

    2012-05-01

    2012 marks the 90th year since the purification of insulin and the miraculous rescue from death of youngsters with type 1 diabetes. In this review, we highlight several previously unappreciated or unknown events surrounding the discovery. (i) We remind readers of the essential contributions of each of the four discoverers--Banting, Macleod, Collip, and Best. (ii) Banting and Best (each with his own inner circle) worked not only to accrue credit for himself but also to minimize credit to the other discoverers. (iii) Banting at the time of the insulin research was very likely suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that originated during his heroic service as a surgeon in World War I on the Western Front in 1918, including an infected shrapnel wound that threatened amputation of his arm. His war record along with the newly discovered evidence of a suicide threat goes along with his paranoia, combativeness, alcohol excess, and depression, symptoms we associate with PTSD. (iv) Banting's eureka idea, ligation of the pancreatic duct to preserve the islets, while it energized the early research, was unnecessary and was bypassed early. (v) Post discovery, Macleod uncovered many features of insulin action that he summarized in his 1925 Nobel Lecture. Macleod closed by raising the question--what is the mechanism of insulin action in the body?--a challenge that attracted many talented investigators but remained unanswered until the latter third of the 20th century. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Genetic, physiological and comparative genomic studies of hypertension and insulin resistance in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Coan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously mapped hypertension-related insulin resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs to rat chromosomes 4, 12 and 16 using adipocytes from F2 crosses between spontaneously hypertensive (SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats, and subsequently identified Cd36 as the gene underlying the chromosome 4 locus. The identity of the chromosome 12 and 16 genes remains unknown. To identify whole-body phenotypes associated with the chromosome 12 and 16 linkage regions, we generated and characterised new congenic strains, with WKY donor segments introgressed onto an SHR genetic background, for the chromosome 12 and 16 linkage regions. We found a >50% increase in insulin sensitivity in both the chromosome 12 and 16 strains. Blood pressure and left ventricular mass were reduced in the two congenic strains consistent with the congenic segments harbouring SHR genes for insulin resistance, hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Integrated genomic analysis, using physiological and whole-genome sequence data across 42 rat strains, identified variants within the congenic regions in Upk3bl, RGD1565131 and AABR06087018.1 that were associated with blood pressure, cardiac mass and insulin sensitivity. Quantitative trait transcript analysis across 29 recombinant inbred strains showed correlation between expression of Hspb1, Zkscan5 and Pdgfrl with adipocyte volume, systolic blood pressure and cardiac mass, respectively. Comparative genome analysis showed a marked enrichment of orthologues for human GWAS-associated genes for insulin resistance within the syntenic regions of both the chromosome 12 and 16 congenic intervals. Our study defines whole-body phenotypes associated with the SHR chromosome 12 and 16 insulin-resistance QTLs, identifies candidate genes for these SHR QTLs and finds human orthologues of rat genes in these regions that associate with related human traits. Further study of these genes in the congenic strains will lead to robust identification of the

  17. Genetic, physiological and comparative genomic studies of hypertension and insulin resistance in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, Philip M; Hummel, Oliver; Garcia Diaz, Ana; Barrier, Marjorie; Alfazema, Neza; Norsworthy, Penny J; Pravenec, Michal; Petretto, Enrico; Hübner, Norbert; Aitman, Timothy J

    2017-03-01

    We previously mapped hypertension-related insulin resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) to rat chromosomes 4, 12 and 16 using adipocytes from F2 crosses between spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, and subsequently identified Cd36 as the gene underlying the chromosome 4 locus. The identity of the chromosome 12 and 16 genes remains unknown. To identify whole-body phenotypes associated with the chromosome 12 and 16 linkage regions, we generated and characterised new congenic strains, with WKY donor segments introgressed onto an SHR genetic background, for the chromosome 12 and 16 linkage regions. We found a >50% increase in insulin sensitivity in both the chromosome 12 and 16 strains. Blood pressure and left ventricular mass were reduced in the two congenic strains consistent with the congenic segments harbouring SHR genes for insulin resistance, hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Integrated genomic analysis, using physiological and whole-genome sequence data across 42 rat strains, identified variants within the congenic regions in Upk3bl, RGD1565131 and AABR06087018.1 that were associated with blood pressure, cardiac mass and insulin sensitivity. Quantitative trait transcript analysis across 29 recombinant inbred strains showed correlation between expression of Hspb1, Zkscan5 and Pdgfrl with adipocyte volume, systolic blood pressure and cardiac mass, respectively. Comparative genome analysis showed a marked enrichment of orthologues for human GWAS-associated genes for insulin resistance within the syntenic regions of both the chromosome 12 and 16 congenic intervals. Our study defines whole-body phenotypes associated with the SHR chromosome 12 and 16 insulin-resistance QTLs, identifies candidate genes for these SHR QTLs and finds human orthologues of rat genes in these regions that associate with related human traits. Further study of these genes in the congenic strains will lead to robust identification of the underlying genes and

  18. Excessive nitrite affects zebrafish valvulogenesis through yielding too much NO signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo Li

    Full Text Available Sodium nitrite, a common food additive, exists widely not only in the environment but also in our body. Excessive nitrite causes toxicological effects on human health; however, whether it affects vertebrate heart valve development remains unknown. In vertebrates, developmental defects of cardiac valves usually lead to congenital heart disease. To understand the toxic effects of nitrite on valvulogenesis, we exposed zebrafish embryos with different concentrations of sodium nitrite. Our results showed that sodium nitrite caused developmental defects of zebrafish heart dose dependently. It affected zebrafish heart development starting from 36 hpf (hour post fertilization when heart initiates looping process. Comprehensive analysis on the embryos at 24 hpf and 48 hpf showed that excessive nitrite did not affect blood circulation, vascular network, myocardium and endocardium development. But development of endocardial cells in atrioventricular canal (AVC of the embryos at 48 hpf was disrupted by too much nitrite, leading to defective formation of primitive valve leaflets at 76 hpf. Consistently, excessive nitrite diminished expressions of valve progenitor markers including bmp4, has2, vcana and notch1b at 48 hpf. Furthermore, 3', 5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP, downstream of nitric oxide (NO signaling, was increased its level significantly in the embryos exposed with excessive nitrite and microinjection of soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1], [2], [4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one, an antagonist of NO signaling, into nitrite-exposed embryos could partly rescue the cardiac valve malformation. Taken together, our results show that excessive nitrite affects early valve leaflet formation by producing too much NO signaling.

  19. The High Price of Excessive Alcohol Consumption

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-17

    This podcast is based on the October 2011 release of a report estimating the economic cost of excessive drinking. Excessive alcohol consumption cost the U. S. $223.5 billion in 2006, or about $1.90 per drink. Over three-quarters (76%) of these costs were due to binge drinking, defined as consuming 4 or more alcoholic beverages per occasion for women or 5 or more drinks per occasion for men.  Created: 10/17/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.   Date Released: 10/17/2011.

  20. Contrast induced hyperthyroidism due to iodine excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Usman; Price, Timothy; Laddipeerla, Narsing; Townsend, Amanda; Broadbridge, Vy

    2009-01-01

    Iodine induced hyperthyroidism is a thyrotoxic condition caused by exposure to excessive iodine. Historically this type of hyperthyroidism has been described in areas of iodine deficiency. With advances in medicine, iodine induced hyperthyroidism has been observed following the use of drugs containing iodine—for example, amiodarone, and contrast agents used in radiological imaging. In elderly patients it is frequently difficult to diagnose and control contrast related hyperthyroidism, as most of these patients do not always present with typical signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism. Treatment can be very challenging as drugs commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism have little effect on already formed thyroid hormone due to iodine excess. PMID:22053166

  1. Insulin: discovery and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Louis

    2002-12-01

    During the first two decades of the 20th century, several investigators prepared extracts of pancreas that were often successful in lowering blood sugar and reducing glycosuria in test animals. However, they were unable to remove impurities, and toxic reactions prevented its use in humans with diabetes. In the spring of 1921, Frederick G. Banting, a young Ontario orthopedic surgeon, was given laboratory space by J.J.R. Macleod, the head of physiology at the University of Toronto, to investigate the function of the pancreatic islets. A student assistant, Charles Best, and an allotment of dogs were provided to test Banting's hypothesis that ligation of the pancreatic ducts before extraction of the pancreas, destroys the enzyme-secreting parts, whereas the islets of Langerhans, which were believed to produce an internal secretion regulating sugar metabolism, remained intact. He believed that earlier failures were attributable to the destructive action of trypsin. The name "insuline" had been introduced in 1909 for this hypothetic substance. Their experiments produced an extract of pancreas that reduced the hyperglycemia and glycosuria in dogs made diabetic by the removal of their pancreases. They next developed a procedure for extraction from the entire pancreas without the need for duct ligation. This extract, now made from whole beef pancreas, was successful for treating humans with diabetes. Facilitating their success was a development in clinical chemistry that allowed blood sugar to be frequently and accurately determined in small volumes of blood. Success with purification was largely the work of J.B. Collip. Yield and standardization were improved by cooperation with Eli Lilly and Company. When the Nobel Prize was awarded to Banting and Macleod for the discovery of insulin, it aggravated the contentious relationship that had developed between them during the course of the investigation. Banting was outraged that Macleod and not Best had been selected, and he

  2. The Impact of Organokines on Insulin Resistance, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Mook Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Immoderate energy intake, a sedentary lifestyle, and aging have contributed to the increased prevalence of obesity, sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. There is an urgent need for the development of novel pharmacological interventions that can target excessive fat accumulation and decreased muscle mass and/or strength. Adipokines, bioactive molecules derived from adipose tissue, are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, inflammation, energy expenditure, insulin resistance and secretion, glucose and lipid metabolism, and atherosclerosis. Recently, there is emerging evidence that skeletal muscle and the liver also function as endocrine organs that secrete myokines and hepatokines, respectively. Novel discoveries and research into these organokines (adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines may lead to the development of promising biomarkers and therapeutics for cardiometabolic disease. In this review, I summarize recent data on these organokines and focus on the role of adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines in the regulation of insulin resistance, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

  3. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Mankad MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series. They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1 thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2 cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3 primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  4. Naturally occurring cardiac glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D J; Gillies, A D; Hinds, J A; Duffy, P

    1986-05-12

    Cardiac glycoside poisoning from the ingestion of plants, particularly of oleanders, occurs with reasonable frequency in tropical and subtropical areas. We have assessed a variety of plant specimens for their cardiac glycoside content by means of radioimmunoassays with antibodies that differ in their specificity for cardiac glycosides. Significant amounts of immunoreactive cardiac glycoside were found to be present in the ornamental shrubs: yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana); oleander (Nerium oleander); wintersweet (Carissa spectabilis); bushman's poison (Carissa acokanthera); sea-mango (Cerbera manghas); and frangipani (Plumeria rubra); and in the milkweeds: redheaded cotton-bush (Asclepias curassavica); balloon cotton (Asclepias fruiticosa); king's crown (Calotropis procera); and rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandifolia). The venom gland of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) also contained large quantities of cardiac glycosides. The competitive immunoassay method permits the rapid screening of specimens that are suspected to contain cardiac glycosides. Awareness of the existence of these plant and animal toxins and their dangers allows them to be avoided and poisoning prevented. The method is also useful for the confirmation of the presence of cardiac glycosides in serum in cases of poisoning.

  5. Imaging for cardiac electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Desjardins

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical cardiac electrophysiology is the study of the origin and treatment of arrhythmia. There has been considerable recent development in this field, where imaging has had a transformational impact. In this invited review, we offer a global overview of the most important developments in the use of imaging in cardiac electrophysiology. We first describe the radiological imaging modalities involved in cardiac electrophysiology, to assess cardiac anatomy, function and scar. We then introduce an imaging modality with which readers are probably unfamiliar (electroanatomical mapping [EAM], but which is routinely used by electrophysiologists to plan and guide cardiac mapping and cardiac ablation therapy by catheter, a therapy which can reduce or even cure arrhythmia. We identify the limitations of EAM and describe how radiological imaging modalities can complement this technique. We then describe and illustrate how imaging has helped the diagnosis of arrhythmogenic conditions, and how imaging is used to plan and guide clinical cardiac electrophysiologic procedures and assess their results and complications. We focus on the two most common arrhythmias for which imaging has the greatest impact: atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia.

  6. Basal insulin analogues in diabetic pregnancy: a literature review and baseline results of a randomised, controlled trial in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter; Jovanovic, Lois

    2011-01-01

    and HbA1c ≤ 8.0% at randomization. At confirmation of pregnancy all subjects must have HbA1c ≤ 8.0%. Exclusion criteria include impaired hepatic function, cardiac problems, and uncontrolled hypertension. Subjects are randomized to either insulin detemir or neutral protamine hagedorn insulin, both...... of the current literature concerning basal insulin analogue use in diabetic pregnancy, and to present the design and preliminary, non-validated baseline characteristics of a currently ongoing randomized, controlled, open-label, multicentre, multinational trial comparing insulin detemir with neutral protamine...... hagedorn insulin, both with insulin aspart, in women with type 1 diabetes planning a pregnancy (n = 306) or are already pregnant (n = 164). Inclusion criteria include type 1 diabetes > 12 months' duration; screening HbA1c ≤ 9.0% (women recruited prepregnancy), or pregnant with gestational age 8-12 weeks...

  7. In vivo cardiac glucose metabolism in the high-fat fed mouse: Comparison of euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp derived measures of glucose uptake with a dynamic metabolomic flux profiling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Greg M., E-mail: greg.kowalski@deakin.edu.au [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); De Souza, David P. [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Risis, Steve [Cellular and Molecular Metabolism Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia); Burch, Micah L. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Hamley, Steven [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); Kloehn, Joachim [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Selathurai, Ahrathy [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); Lee-Young, Robert S. [Cellular and Molecular Metabolism Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia); Tull, Dedreia; O' Callaghan, Sean; McConville, Malcolm J. [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bruce, Clinton R. [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia)

    2015-08-07

    Rationale: Cardiac metabolism is thought to be altered in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our understanding of the regulation of cardiac substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity has largely been derived from ex vivo preparations which are not subject to the same metabolic regulation as in the intact heart in vivo. Studies are therefore required to examine in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism under physiologically relevant conditions. Objective: To determine the temporal pattern of the development of cardiac insulin resistance and to compare with dynamic approaches to interrogate cardiac glucose and intermediary metabolism in vivo. Methods and results: Studies were conducted to determine the evolution of cardiac insulin resistance in C57Bl/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for between 1 and 16 weeks. Dynamic in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism was determined following oral administration of [U-{sup 13}C] glucose. Hearts were collected after 15 and 60 min and flux profiling was determined by measuring {sup 13}C mass isotopomers in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Cardiac insulin resistance, determined by euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp, was evident after 3 weeks of HFD. Despite the presence of insulin resistance, in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism following oral glucose administration was not compromised in HFD mice. This contrasts our recent findings in skeletal muscle, where TCA cycle activity was reduced in mice fed a HFD. Similar to our report in muscle, glucose derived pyruvate entry into the TCA cycle in the heart was almost exclusively via pyruvate dehydrogenase, with pyruvate carboxylase mediated anaplerosis being negligible after oral glucose administration. Conclusions: Under experimental conditions which closely mimic the postprandial state, the insulin resistant mouse heart retains the ability to stimulate glucose metabolism. - Highlights: • Insulin clamp was used to determine the evolution of cardiac

  8. Stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose uptake by muscle involves the central nervous system in insulin-sensitive mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, C.P.; Biermasz, N.R.; Geerling, J.J.; Guigas, B.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Insulin inhibits endogenous glucose production (EGP) and stimulates glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. Hypothalamic insulin signaling is required for the inhibitory effects of insulin on EGP. We examined the contribution of central insulin signaling on circulating insulin-stimulated

  9. Temporal changes in sphingolipids and systemic insulin sensitivity during the transition from gestation to lactation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Eduardo Rico

    Full Text Available Reduced insulin action develops naturally during the peripartum to ensure maternal nutrient delivery to the fetus and neonate. However, increased insulin resistance can facilitate excessive lipolysis which in turn promotes metabolic disease in overweight dairy cattle. Increased fatty acid availability favors the accumulation of the sphingolipid ceramide and is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, however, the relationship between sphingolipid metabolism and insulin resistance during the peripartum remains largely unknown. Our objectives were to characterize temporal responses in plasma and tissue sphingolipids in lean and overweight peripartal cows and to establish the relationships between sphingolipid supply and lipolysis, hepatic lipid deposition, and systemic insulin action. Twenty-one multiparous lean and overweight Holstein cows were enrolled in a longitudinal study spanning the transition from gestation to lactation (d -21 to 21, relative to parturition. Plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle samples were obtained, and sphingolipids were profiled using LC/MS/MS. Insulin sensitivity was assessed utilizing intravenous insulin and glucose challenges. Our results demonstrated the following: first, insulin resistance develops postpartum concurrently with increased lipolysis and hepatic lipid accumulation; second, ceramides and glycosylated ceramides accumulate during the transition from gestation to lactation and are further elevated in overweight cows; third, ceramide accrual is associated with lipolysis and liver lipid accumulation, and C16:0- and C24:0-ceramide are inversely associated with systemic insulin sensitivity postpartum; fourth, plasma sphingomyelin, a potential source of ceramides reaches a nadir at parturition and is closely associated with feed intake; fifth, select sphingomyelins are lower in the plasma of overweight cows during the peripartal period. Our results demonstrate that dynamic changes occur in

  10. Insulin and Leptin Signaling Interact in the Mouse Kiss1 Neuron during the Peripubertal Period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Qiu

    Full Text Available Reproduction requires adequate energy stores for parents and offspring to survive. Kiss1 neurons, which are essential for fertility, have the potential to serve as the central sensors of metabolic factors that signal to the reproductive axis the presence of stored calories. Paradoxically, obesity is often accompanied by infertility. Despite excess circulating levels of insulin and leptin, obese individuals exhibit resistance to both metabolic factors in many neuron types. Thus, resistance to insulin or leptin in Kiss1 neurons could lead to infertility. Single deletion of the receptors for either insulin or the adipokine leptin from Kiss1 neurons does not impair adult reproductive dysfunction. However, insulin and leptin signaling pathways may interact in such a way as to obscure their individual functions. We hypothesized that in the presence of genetic or obesity-induced concurrent insulin and leptin resistance, Kiss1 neurons would be unable to maintain reproductive function. We therefore induced a chronic hyperinsulinemic and hyperleptinemic state in mice lacking insulin receptors in Kiss1 neurons through high fat feeding and examined the impact on fertility. In an additional, genetic model, we ablated both leptin and insulin signaling in Kiss1 neurons (IR/LepRKiss mice. Counter to our hypothesis, we found that the addition of leptin insensitivity did not alter the reproductive phenotype of IRKiss mice. We also found that weight gain, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance were normal in mice of both genders. Nonetheless, leptin and insulin receptor deletion altered pubertal timing as well as LH and FSH levels in mid-puberty in a reciprocal manner. Our results confirm that Kiss1 neurons do not directly mediate the critical role that insulin and leptin play in reproduction. However, during puberty kisspeptin neurons may experience a critical window of susceptibility to the influence of metabolic factors that can modify the onset of

  11. Insulin resistance vs. hyperinsulinemia in hypertension: insulin regulation of Ca2+ transport and Ca(2+)-regulation of insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, M B

    1995-06-01

    Hypertension in obesity and insulin resistance has been attributed to insulin stimulation of sympathetic neural output and renal sodium retention. However, recent data demonstrates a significant vasodilatory effect of insulin and suggests that vascular smooth muscle resistance to this action may instead be the cause of hypertension in insulin resistance. This concept is supported by the observation that pharmacological amplification of peripheral insulin sensitivity results in reduced arterial pressure. Insulin attenuates vasoconstrictor responses to pressor agonists and accelerates vascular smooth muscle relaxation, while these effects are blunted in obesity and insulin resistance. Insulin regulation of vasoconstriction and vascular relaxation appears to be secondary to regulation of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), as insulin attenuates both voltage- and receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx and stimulates both the transcription and activity of Ca(2+)-ATPase in vascular smooth muscle cells. Further, these effects are also blunted in insulin resistance. Although [Ca2+]i plays a poorly understood role in insulin signalling, increases beyond an optimal range results in impaired insulin sensitivity, possibly by Ca(2+)-inhibition of insulin-induced dephosphorylation of insulin-sensitive substrates. Consistent with this concept, ectopic overexpression of the agouti gene in the viable yellow (Avy) mouse results in increased skeletal myocyte [Ca2+]i. Accordingly, increased [Ca2+]i in primary insulin target tissues appears to result in peripheral insulin resistance which then results in aberrant regulation of vascular smooth muscle [Ca2+]i and increases in arterial pressure.

  12. 34 CFR 300.16 - Excess costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excess costs. 300.16 Section 300.16 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  13. Excessive Positivism in Person-Centered Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holburn, Steve; Cea, Christine D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper illustrates the positivistic nature of person-centered planning (PCP) that is evident in the planning methods employed, the way that individuals with disabilities are described, and in portrayal of the outcomes of PCP. However, a confluence of factors can lead to manifestation of excessive positivism that does not serve PCP…

  14. Excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal sleep duration and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives. Short nocturnal sleep duration resulting in sleep debt may be a cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Severity of depression (psychopathology) has been found to be directly related to EDS. There is an association between sleep duration and mental health, so there may therefore be an ...

  15. Excessive prices as abuse of dominance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Lisbeth; Møllgaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    firm abused its position by charging excessive prices. We also test whether tightening of the Danish competition act has altered the pricing behaviour on the market. We discuss our results in the light of a Danish competition case against the dominant cement producer that was abandoned by the authority...

  16. Surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation we study the surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis. For heterogeneous reactions, such as gas-solid catalytic reactions, the reactions take place at the interfaces between the two phases: the gas and the solid catalyst. Large amount of reaction heats are released

  17. Origin of excess 176Hf in meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Kristine; Connelly, James; Bizzarro, Martin

    2010-01-01

    with Lu/Hf elemental ratios in meteorites older than similar to 4.56 Ga meteorites unresolved. We attribute (176)Hf excess in older meteorites to an accelerated decay of (176)Lu caused by excitation of the long-lived (176)Lu ground state to a short-lived (176m)Lu isomer. The energy needed to cause...

  18. Excessive nitrogen and phosphorus in European rivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaas, Harry; Kroeze, Carolien

    2016-01-01

    Rivers export nutrients to coastal waters. Excess nutrient export may result in harmful algal blooms and hypoxia, affecting biodiversity, fisheries, and recreation. The purpose of this study is to quantify for European rivers (1) the extent to which N and P loads exceed levels that minimize the

  19. Excessive infant crying : definitions determine risk groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, SA; Brugman, E; Hirasing, RA

    We assessed risk groups for excessive infant crying using 10 published definitions, in 3179 children aged 1-6 months (response: 96.5%). Risk groups regarding parental employment, living area, lifestyle, and obstetric history varied by definition. This may explain the existence of conflicting

  20. Low excess air operations of oil boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y.; Litzke, Wai Lin [Brookhaven National Labs., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-09-01

    To quantify the benefits which operation at very low excess air operation may have on heat exchanger fouling BNL has recently started a test project. The test allows simultaneous measurement of fouling rate, flue gas filterable soot, flue gas sulfuric acid content, and flue gas sulfur dioxide.

  1. Weight loss reduces liver fat and improves hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitola, Bernadette E; Deivanayagam, Sheela; Stein, Richard I; Mohammed, Balsamanirina S; Magkos, Faidon; Kirk, Erik P; Klein, Samuel

    2009-09-01

    Obesity in adolescents is associated with metabolic risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly insulin resistance and excessive accumulation of intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of moderate weight loss on IHTG content and insulin sensitivity in obese adolescents who had normal oral glucose tolerance. Insulin sensitivity, assessed by using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique in conjunction with stable isotopically labeled tracer infusion, and IHTG content, assessed by using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, were evaluated in eight obese adolescents (BMI >or=95th percentile for age and sex; age 15.3 +/- 0.6 years) before and after moderate diet-induced weight loss (8.2 +/- 2.0% of initial body weight). Weight loss caused a 61.6 +/- 8.5% decrease in IHTG content (P = 0.01), and improved both hepatic (56 +/- 18% increase in hepatic insulin sensitivity index, P = 0.01) and skeletal muscle (97 +/- 45% increase in insulin-mediated glucose disposal, P = 0.01) insulin sensitivity. Moderate diet-induced weight loss decreases IHTG content and improves insulin sensitivity in the liver and skeletal muscle in obese adolescents who have normal glucose tolerance. These results support the benefits of weight loss therapy in obese adolescents who do not have evidence of obesity-related metabolic complications during a standard medical evaluation.

  2. Investigation of insulin resistance in narcoleptic patients: dependent or independent of body mass index?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engel A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Alice Engel1,2, Jana Helfrich1, Nina Manderscheid1, Petra B Musholt3, Thomas Forst3, Andreas Pfützner3, Norbert Dahmen1,21Department of Psychiatry, University of Mainz, Germany; 2Fachklinik Katzenelnbogen, Katzenelnbogen, Germany; 3IKFE, Institute for Clinical Research and Development, Mainz, GermanyBackground: Narcolepsy is a severe sleep-wake cycle disorder resulting in most cases from a lack of orexin, the energy balance-regulating hormone. Narcoleptic patients have been reported to suffer from an excess morbidity of Type 2 diabetes, even after correction for their often elevated body mass index.Methods: To explore whether narcolepsy is specifically associated with a propensity to develop insulin resistance, we measured fasting glucose, insulin, and intact proinsulin levels in 43 narcoleptic patients and 47 controls matched for body mass index and age. The proinsulin-to-insulin ratio was calculated. Insulin resistance was determined using the homeostatic model assessment method.Results: Narcoleptic patients did not show elevated insulin resistance parameters.Conclusion: In contrast with earlier reports, we found no evidence that narcolepsy specifically elevates the risk of insulin resistance (and consequently of type 2 diabetes independently of body mass index.Keywords: fasting glucose, insulin, intact proinsulin, narcolepsy, obesity

  3. Genetics of sudden cardiac death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezzina, Connie R.; Lahrouchi, Najim; Priori, Silvia G.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death occurs in a broad spectrum of cardiac pathologies and is an important cause of mortality in the general population. Genetic studies conducted during the past 20 years have markedly illuminated the genetic basis of the inherited cardiac disorders associated with sudden cardiac

  4. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics and morphology in high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance: focus on dietary fat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba ePutti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that skeletal muscle mitochondria play a key role in high fat diet induced insulin resistance. Two opposite views are debated on mechanisms by which mitochondrial function could be involved in skeletal muscle insulin resistance. In one theory, mitochondrial dysfunction is suggested to cause intramyocellular lipid accumulation leading to insulin resistance. In the second theory, excess fuel within mitochondria in the absence of increased energy demand stimulates mitochondrial oxidant production and emission, ultimately leading to the development of insulin resistance. Noteworthy, mitochondrial bioenergetics is strictly associated with the maintenance of normal mitochondrial morphology by maintaining the balance between the fusion and fission processes. A shift towards mitochondrial fission with reduction of fusion protein, mainly mitofusin 2, has been associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and inflammation in obesity and insulin resistance development. However, dietary fat source during chronic overfeeding differently affects mitochondrial morphology. Saturated fatty acids induce skeletal muscle insulin resistance and inflammation associated with fission phenotype, whereas ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids improve skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and inflammation, associated with a shift toward mitochondrial fusion phenotype. The present minireview focuses on mitochondrial bioenergetics and morphology in skeletal muscle insulin resistance, with particular attention to the effect of different dietary fat sources on skeletal muscle mitochondria morphology and fusion/fission balance.

  5. Relationship of Cardiac Structures and Functions with Adiponectin, C-Reactive Protein and Interleukin-6 Levels in Obese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuran Aşan, Güzide Doğan, Sadi Türkay, Meki Bilici,

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Obesity in childhood is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in adulthood due to cardiovascular disease. C-Reactive protein (CRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6 levels are elevated in obese patients, whereas the adiponectin level is negatively correlated. This study was conducted to determine the effects of obesity on cardiac structure and functions and to investigate the relationship of cardiac structures and functions with CRP, Il-6, and adiponectin levels. Patients and Methods: A total of 38 obese and 30 healthy non-obese children were included. The anthropometric profiles of all the children were recorded. CRP, IL-6, adiponectin, and fasting glucose insulin levels were measured. The Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated. The children were assessed using conventional transthoracic echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Serum CRP, IL-6, insulin, and HOMA-IR were higher, and adiponectin levels were lower in obese subjects. Left ventricular wall thickness and dimensions, and left atrial diameter were greater in the obese group and the myocardial performance index (MPI was measured higher (P=0.001. These alterations of cardiac structure were found to be positively correlated with body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, insulin and HOMA-IR, and negatively correlated with adiponectin. Conclusion: These alterations in cardiac structure and functions in obese children indicate cardiovascular diseases in adulthood, and can be measured by Doppler echocardiography. In addition, BMI, waist circumference, insulin, and HOMA-IR are useful parameters for both cardiac structure and cardiac functions. Adiponectin, should also be considered as a new parameter for cardiac structure.

  6. Glucoseinsulin Mixture as a Cardioprotective Agent in Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kozlov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review presents an analysis of publications describing the use of a glucose%insulin mixture as a cardioprotective agent in acute myocardial infarction and in cardiac surgeries with extracorporeal circulation (ECC. It summarizes historical aspects of implementation of the glucose%insulin therapy in cardiology and car%diac surgery. Possible mechanisms of action of the glucose-insulin-potassium mixture in acute ischemia and myocardial infarction were analyzed (normalization of electrical processes on the cardiomyocyte membrane, replenishment of metabolic substrates and increased production rate of adenosine triphosphoric acid due to glycolysis, decreased intensity of non%esterified fatty acid oxidation, decreased apoptosis, etc.. It discusses results of clinical studies evaluating prescription of the mixture for acute myocardial infarction, including data from metaanalyses. It demonstrated that the role and the clinical efficacy of the preventive and therapeutic measure under consideration in acute myocardial infarction are still the subject of discussion and require further research. It also analyzed modern concepts explaining the cardioprotective effects of insulin and glucose during surgeries with ECC (decreased insulin resistance, activation of anaplerosis, stimulation of intracellular signaling pathways maintaining the viability of cells, reduction of the severity of systemic inflammatory response, immunomodulatingeffect, etc.. Review discusses results of clinical studies including data from randomized clinical trials and metaanalyses performed over the last 5 years that demonstrated the absence of the effect of the glucose%insulin therapy on the hospital mortality. Various studies demonstrated its positive effects including decreased incidence of peri%operative myocardial infarctions and intensity of inotropic support, increased values of postoperative cardiac index, decreased duration of postoperative mechanical ventilation

  7. Engineering of insulin receptor isoform-selective insulin analogues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glendorf, Tine; Stidsen, Carsten E; Norrman, Mathias; Nishimura, Erica; Sørensen, Anders R; Kjeldsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of the C-terminus of the B chain in IR isoform binding in order to explore the possibility of engineering tissue-specific/liver-specific insulin analogues...

  8. Insulin Resistance, Hyperglycemia, and Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Tabas, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Progress in preventing atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) has been stalled by the epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Further advances in this area demand a thorough understanding of how two major features of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia, impact atherosclerosis. Insulin resistance is associated with systemic CAD risk factors, but increasing evidence suggests that defective insulin signaling in atherosclerotic lesional cells also plays an important role. The role of hyperglycemia in CAD associated with type 2 diabetes is less clear. Understanding the mechanisms whereby type 2 diabetes exacerbates CAD offers hope for new therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22055501

  9. Autoantibodies to Insulin Receptor Spontaneously Develop as Anti-Idiotypes in Mice Immunized with Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Yoram; Maron, Ruth; Elias, Dana; Cohen, Irun R.

    1982-04-01

    Mice immunized with insulin developed antibodies to both insulin and the insulin receptor. The antibodies to insulin receptor displaced labeled insulin from insulin receptors and mimicked the actions of insulin in stimulating the oxidation of glucose and its incorporation into lipids, and in inhibiting lipolysis. The antibodies to insulin receptor could be blocked by or bound to the antibodies to insulin, and therefore were identified as anti-idiotypes. Thus, immunization against a hormone may activate spontaneously an idiotype-anti-idiotype network resulting in antibodies to the hormone receptor.

  10. Cardiac lipid content is unresponsive to a physical activity training intervention in type 2 diabetic patients, despite improved ejection fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiner Tim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased cardiac lipid content has been associated with diabetic cardiomyopathy. We recently showed that cardiac lipid content is reduced after 12 weeks of physical activity training in healthy overweight subjects. The beneficial effect of exercise training on cardiovascular risk is well established and the decrease in cardiac lipid content with exercise training in healthy overweight subjects was accompanied by improved ejection fraction. It is yet unclear whether diabetic patients respond similarly to physical activity training and whether a lowered lipid content in the heart is necessary for improvements in cardiac function. Here, we investigated whether exercise training is able to lower cardiac lipid content and improve cardiac function in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Eleven overweight-to-obese male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (age: 58.4 ± 0.9 years, BMI: 29.9 ± 0.01 kg/m2 followed a 12-week training program (combination endurance/strength training, three sessions/week. Before and after training, maximal whole body oxygen uptake (VO2max and insulin sensitivity (by hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp was determined. Systolic function was determined under resting conditions by CINE-MRI and cardiac lipid content in the septum of the heart by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Results VO2max increased (from 27.1 ± 1.5 to 30.1 ± 1.6 ml/min/kg, p = 0.001 and insulin sensitivity improved upon training (insulin stimulated glucose disposal (delta Rd of glucose improved from 5.8 ± 1.9 to 10.3 ± 2.0 μmol/kg/min, p = 0.02. Left-ventricular ejection fraction improved after training (from 50.5 ± 2.0 to 55.6 ± 1.5%, p = 0.01 as well as cardiac index and cardiac output. Unexpectedly, cardiac lipid content in the septum remained unchanged (from 0.80 ± 0.22% to 0.95 ± 0.21%, p = 0.15. Conclusions Twelve weeks of progressive endurance/strength training was effective in improving VO2max, insulin sensitivity

  11. Structural Perspectives of Insulin Receptor Isoform-Selective Insulin Analogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Jul 27 (2017), č. článku 167. ISSN 1664-2392 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : insulin receptor * insulin binding * analog * diabetes * glucose Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.675, year: 2016 http:// journal .frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fendo.2017.00167/full

  12. [Role of intestinal flora in insulin resistance and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazigi, Amal; Gaborit, Bénédicte; Nogueira, Juan Patricio; Butiler, Maria-Elena; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2008-10-01

    Intestinal flora can be modified by diet in both humans and rodents. Excess caloric intake in obese humans and rodents promotes proliferation of the bacterial phylum Firmicutes. Bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum permit more efficient intestinal extraction of nutrients. Oral transplantation of Firmicutes flora into axenic mice is sufficient to make them obese. The translocation towards the general circulation of the lipopolysaccharides released by lysis of Gram-negative intestinal bacilli promotes systemic inflammation. This inflammation plays a role in the genesis of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in rodents. Pharmacological or dietary manipulation of intestinal flora may be a new strategy for treatment of overweight and its complications.

  13. Continuation versus discontinuation of insulin secretagogues when initiating insulin in type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, S. G.; Dain, M.-P.; Mauricio, D.; DeVries, J. H.; Hoekstra, J. B.; Holleman, F.

    2010-01-01

    We compared the combined use of basal insulin, metformin and insulin secretagogues with a combination of basal insulin and metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes starting basal insulin analogue therapy. This analysis was part of a 24-week trial, in which 964 insulin-naive patients with type 2

  14. The impact of FOXO-1 to cardiac pathology in diabetes mellitus and diabetes-related metabolic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2017-10-15

    Diabetic heart pathology has a serious social impact due to high prevalence worldwide and significant mortality/invalidation of diabetic patients suffered from cardiomyopathy. The pathogenesis of diabetic and diabetes-related cardiomyopathy is associated with progressive loss and impairment of cardiac function due to adverse effects of metabolic, prooxidant, proinflammatory, and pro-apoptotic stress factors. In the adult heart, the transcriptional factor forkhead box-1 (FOXO-1) is involved in maintaining cardiomyocytes in the homeostatic state and induction of their adaptation to metabolic and pro-oxidant stress stimuli. Insulin inhibits cardiac FOXO-1 expression/activity through the IRS1/Akt signaling in order to prevent gluconeogenesis. In diabetes and insulin resistance, both insulin production and insulin-dependent signaling is weakened or absent. Indeed, FOXO-1 becomes overproduced/overactivated in response to stress stimuli. In diabetic cardiac tissue, FOXO-1 overactivity induces the metabolic switch from the glucose uptake to the predominant lipid uptake. FOXO-1 limits mitochondrial glucose oxidation by stimulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) and increases the lipid uptake through up-regulation of surface expression of CD36. In cardiac muscle cells, lipid accumulation leads to lipotoxicity via increased lipid oxidation, oxidative stress, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Indeed, cardiac FOXO-1 levels and activity should be strictly regulated. FOXO-1 deregulation (that is observed in the diabetic heart) causes detrimental effects that finally lead to heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme after myocardial infarction (MI) improves quality of life and results in reduced cardiac mortality and recurrence of MI. Hospitals worldwide face problems with low participation rates in rehabilitation programmes. Inequality...... cardiac rehabilitation programme. Methods: From 1 September 2002 to 31 December 2005, 388 first-incidence MI patients ≤75 years were hospitalised. Register check for newly hospitalised MI patients, screening interview, and systematic referral were conducted by a project nurse. Patients were referred...... to a standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements...

  16. Quantitative cardiac ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Rijsterborgh (Hans)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about the various aspects of quantitative cardiac ultrasound. The first four chapters are mainly devoted to the reproducibility of echocardiographic measurements. These . are focussed on the variation of echocardiographic measurements within patients. An important

  17. Cardiac Tumors; Tumeurs cardiaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laissy, J.P.; Fernandez, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bichat Claude Bernard, Service d' Imagerie, 76 - Rouen (France); Mousseaux, E. [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Service de Radiologie Cardio Vasculaire et Interventionnelle, 75 - Paris (France); Dacher, J.N. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Charles Nicolle, 75 - Rouen (France); Crochet, D. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Laennec, Centre Hemodynamique, Radiologie Thoracique et Vasculaire, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2004-04-01

    Metastases are the most frequent tumors of the heart even though they seldom are recognized. Most primary cardiac tumors are benign. The main role of imaging is to differentiate a cardiac tumor from thrombus and rare pseudo-tumors: tuberculoma, hydatid cyst. Echocardiography is the fist line imaging technique to detect cardiac tumors, but CT and MRl arc useful for further characterization and differential diagnosis. Myxoma of the left atrium is the most frequent benign cardiac tumor. It usually is pedunculated and sometimes calcified. Sarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant tumor and usually presents as a sessile infiltrative tumor. Lymphoma and metastases are usually recognized by the presence of known tumor elsewhere of by characteristic direct contiguous involvement. Diagnosing primary and secondary pericardial tumors often is difficult. Imaging is valuable for diagnosis, characterization, pre-surgical evaluation and follow-up. (author)

  18. Cardiac Catheterization (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... will do the cardiac catheterization in a catheterization lab . The lab contains X-ray and imaging machines ...

  19. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these “non-classical” cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  20. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  1. Cardiac imaging in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  2. [Cardiac CT: new applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesenti-Rossi, D; Baron, N; Allouch, P; Convers, R; Gibault-Genty, G; Aubert, S

    2014-11-01

    Since the introduction of the 64-generation scanners, the accuracy and robustness of the diagnosis of coronary artery disease has progressed. The main advantage of cardiac CT is the exclusion of coronary artery disease by its excellent negative predictive value. Currently, cardiac CT applications extend thanks to innovations both in terms of technological development systems scanner or stents implanted, that the evolution of surgical procedures such as TAVI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac T1 Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    T1 mapping of the heart has evolved into a valuable tool to evaluate myocardial tissue properties, with or without contrast injection, including assessment of myocardial edema and free water content, extra-cellular volume (expansion), and most recently cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The MRI pulse sequence techniques developed for these applications have had to address at least two important considerations for cardiac applications: measure magnetization inversion recoveries during cardiac motion w...

  4. New ways of insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, L

    2011-02-01

    The predominant number of papers published from the middle of 2009 to the middle of 2010 about alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA) were still about inhaled insulin. Long-term experience with Exubera was the topic of a number of publications that are also of relevance for inhaled insulin in general. The clinical trials performed with AIR insulin by Eli Lilly were published in a supplement issue of one diabetes technology journal and most of these will be presented. A number of other publications (also one in a high ranked journal) about their inhaled insulin were from another company: MannKind. The driving force behind Technosphere insulin (TI) - which is the only one still in clinical development - is Al Mann; he has put a lot of his personal fortune in this development. We will know the opinion of the regulatory authorities about TI in the near future; however, I am personally relatively confident that the Food and Drug Administration will provide TI with market approval. The more critical question for me is: will diabetologists and patients jump on this product once it becomes commercially available? Will it become a commercial success? In view of many negative feelings in the scientific community about inhaled insulin, it might be of help that MannKind publish their studies with TI systematically. Acknowledging being a believer in this route of insulin administration myself, one has to state that Exubera and AIR insulin had not offered profound advantages in terms of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties in comparison with subcutaneously (SC) applied regular human insulin (RHI) and rapid-acting insulin analogues. The time-action profiles of these inhaled insulins were more or less comparable with that of rapid-acting insulin analogues. This is clearly different with TI which exhibits a strong metabolic effect shortly after application and a rapid decline in the metabolic effect thereafter; probably the duration of action is

  5. Insulin receptor signaling in cones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rajala, Ammaji; Dighe, Radhika; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rajala, Raju V S

    2013-01-01

    .... To date there are no studies on the insulin receptor signaling in cones; however, mRNA levels of IR signaling proteins are significantly higher in cone-dominant neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl...

  6. Eating habits of preschool children and the risk of obesity, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Kostecka, Ma?gorzata

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objective : Nutrient excess and nutrient deficiency in the diets of preschool children can lead to permanent modification of metabolic pathways and increased risk of diet-dependent diseases in adults. Children are most susceptible to the adverse consequences of bad eating habits.The objective of this study was to evaluate the eating habits and the diets of preschool children as risk factors for excessive weight, obesity, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Methods : Th...

  7. Therapeutic actions of an insulin receptor activator and a novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist in the spontaneously hypertensive obese rat model of metabolic syndrome X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velliquette, Rodney A; Friedman, Jacob E; Shao, J; Zhang, Bei B; Ernsberger, Paul

    2005-07-01

    Insulin resistance clusters with hyperlipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and hypertension as metabolic syndrome X. We tested a low molecular weight insulin receptor activator, demethylasterriquinone B-1 (DMAQ-B1), and a novel indole peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist, 2-(2-(4-phenoxy-2-propylphenoxy)ethyl)indole-5-acetic acid (PPEIA), in spontaneously hypertensive obese rats (SHROB), a genetic model of syndrome X. Agents were given orally for 19 days. SHROB showed fasting normoglycemia but impaired glucose tolerance after an oral load, as shown by increased glucose area under the curve (AUC) [20,700 mg x min/ml versus 8100 in lean spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)]. Insulin resistance was indicated by 20-fold excess fasting insulin and increased insulin AUC (6300 ng x min/ml versus 990 in SHR). DMAQ-B1 did not affect glucose tolerance (glucose AUC = 21,300) but reduced fasting insulin 2-fold and insulin AUC (insulin AUC = 4300). PPEIA normalized glucose tolerance (glucose AUC = 9100) and reduced insulin AUC (to 3180) without affecting fasting insulin. PPEIA also increased food intake, fat mass, and body weight gain (81 +/- 12 versus 45 +/- 8 g in untreated controls), whereas DMAQ-B1 had no effect on body weight but reduced subscapular fat mass. PPEIA but not DMAQ-B1 reduced blood pressure. In skeletal muscle, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate protein 1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity were decreased by 40 to 55% in SHROB relative to lean SHR. PPEIA, but not DMAQ-B1, enhanced both insulin actions. SHROB also showed severe hypertriglyceridemia (355 +/- 42 mg/dl versus 65 +/- 3 in SHR) attenuated by both agents (DMAQ-B1, 228 +/- 18; PPEIA, 79 +/- 3). Both these novel antidiabetic agents attenuate insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia associated with metabolic syndrome but via distinct mechanisms.

  8. Loss of Adult Cardiac Myocyte GSK-3 Leads to Mitotic Catastrophe Resulting in Fatal Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jibin; Ahmad, Firdos; Parikh, Shan; Hoffman, Nichole E.; Rajan, Sudarsan; Verma, Vipin K.; Song, Jianliang; Yuan, Ancai; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Guo, Yuanjun; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter; Woodgett, James R.; Muniswamy, Madesh; Kishore, Raj; Lal, Hind; Force, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac myocyte-specific deletion of either Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)3A or GSK3B leads to cardiac protection following myocardial infarction, suggesting that deletion of both isoforms may provide synergistic protection. This is an important consideration due to the fact that all GSK-3–targeted drugs including the drugs already in clinical trial target both isoforms of GSK-3 and none are isoform specific. Objective To identify the consequences of combined deletion of cardiac myocyte GSK3A and GSK3B in heart function. Methods and Results We generated tamoxifen-inducible cardiac myocyte-specific mice lacking both GSK-3 isoforms (double knockout, DKO). We unexpectedly found that cardiac myocyte GSK-3 is essential for cardiac homeostasis and overall survival. Serial echocardiographic analysis reveals that within 2 weeks of tamoxifen treatment, DKO hearts leads to excessive dilatative remodeling and ventricular dysfunction. Further experimentation with isolated adult cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts from DKO implicated cardiac myocytes intrinsic factors responsible for observed phenotype. Mechanistically, loss of GSK-3 in adult cardiac myocytes resulted in induction of mitotic catastrophe, a previously unreported event in cardiac myocytes. DKO cardiac myocytes showed cell cycle progression resulting in increased DNA content and multi-nucleation. However, increased cell cycle activity was rivaled by marked activation of DNA damage, cell cycle checkpoint activation, and mitotic catastrophe induced apoptotic cell death. Importantly, mitotic catastrophe was also confirmed in isolated adult cardiac myocytes. Conclusion Together, our findings suggest that cardiac myocyte GSK-3 is required to maintain normal cardiac homeostasis and its loss is incompatible with life due to cell cycle dysregulation that ultimately results in a severe fatal dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:26976650

  9. Metabolic flexibility and insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Galgani, Jose E.; Moro, Cedric; Ravussin, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the capacity for the organism to adapt fuel oxidation to fuel availability. The inability to modify fuel oxidation in response to changes in nutrient availability has been implicated in the accumulation of intramyocellular lipid and insulin resistance. The metabolic flexibility assessed by the ability to switch from fat to carbohydrate oxidation is usually impaired during a hyperinsulinemic clamp in insulin-resistant subjects; however, this “metabolic inflexibility” i...

  10. [Insulin secretion: mechanisms of regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosavljević, Tatjana; Todorović, Vera; Sikić, Branka

    2004-01-01

    REGULATION OF INSULIN SECRETION: Beta cells are unique endocrine cells. They respond positively, in terms of insulin secretion, not only to changes in the extracellular glucose concentration, but also to activators of the phospholipase C (cholecystokinin or acetylcholine), and to activators of adenylate cyclase (glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1, or gastric inhibitory polypeptide). Major messengers which mediate glucose action for insulin release are Ca2+, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and diacylglycerol (DAG). MAJOR PATHWAYS OF INSULIN RELEASE STIMULATION: There are four major pathways involved in stimulation of insulin release. The first pathway is KATP channel-dependent pathway in which increased blood glucose concentrations and increased b-cell metabolism result in a change in intracellular ATP/ADP ratio. This is a contributory factor in closure of ATP-dependent K+ channels, depolarization of b-cell membrane, in increased voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Increased Ca2+ influx results in increased intracellular Ca2+ and stimulated insulin release. KATP channel-independent pathway augments Ca(2+) -stimulated insulin secretion of KATP channel-dependent pathway. Major potentiation of release results from hormonal and peptidergic activation of receptors linked to adenylyl cyclase. Adenylyl cyclase activity is stimulated by hormones such as vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and so on. These hormones, acting via G protein, stimulate adenylyl cyclase, thus causing a rise in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Increased activity of PKA results in potentiation of insulin secretion.

  11. Cardiac tamponade masquerading as gastritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abuzaid; Harsha, Tella Sri; Hamza, Tantoush; Allen, Ameri; Mohamed, Elkhashab

    2014-07-30

    Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade can develop in patients with virtually any condition that affects the pericardium. A high index of suspicion with proper diagnostic scheme can lessen the concomitant morbidity and mortality. Although cardiac tamponade mimics many medical conditions, internists and primary care physicians should be aware of the physiological and clinical aspects of the disease spectrum. A 31-year-old Caucasian man, with no significant past medical history, presented to our emergency room with acute upper abdominal heaviness of 2 hours' duration after drinking excessive amounts of alcohol in a short period of time (binge drinking). The coexistence of recent alcohol binge drinking and nonspecific abdominal complaints usually presume a diagnosis of gastritis in our daily encounters in the absence of hepatic, biliary or pancreatic derangements. We present a case in which the presenting abdominal pain turned out to be related to cardiac tamponade. Cardiac tamponade is a sort of cardiogenic shock and is a medical emergency. Clinicians should understand the cardiac tamponade physiology, especially in cases without large pericardial effusion, and correlate the signs of clinical tamponade together with the echocardiographic findings. Drainage of cardiac tamponade is life-saving. A high index of suspicion with proper diagnostic arcades lessens the concomitant morbidity and mortality.

  12. The role of dietary fat in obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Denise E; Lazaro, Raul G; Li, Pingping; Johnson, Andrew; Hernandez-Carretero, Angelina; Weber, Natalie; Vorobyova, Ivetta; Tsukomoto, Hidekazu; Osborn, Olivia

    2016-12-01

    Consumption of excess calories results in obesity and insulin resistance and has been intensively studied in mice and humans. The objective of this study was to determine the specific contribution of dietary fat rather than total caloric intake to the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance. We used an intragastric feeding method to overfeed excess calories from a low-fat diet (and an isocalorically matched high-fat diet) through a surgically implanted gastric feeding tube to generate obesity in wild-type mice followed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies to assess the development of insulin resistance. We show that overfeeding a low-fat diet results in levels of obesity similar to high-fat diet feeding in mice. However, despite a similar body weight, obese high-fat diet-fed mice are more insulin resistant than mice fed an isocaloric low-fat diet. Therefore, increased proportion of calories from dietary fat further potentiates insulin resistance in the obese state. Furthermore, crossover diet studies revealed that reduction in dietary fat composition improves glucose tolerance in obesity. In the context of the current obesity and diabetes epidemic, it is particularly important to fully understand the role of dietary macronutrients in the potentiation and amelioration of disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement in a Caucasian man.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2009-09-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is a potentially fatal complication of hyperthyroidism, more common in Asian races, which is defined by a massive intracellular flux of potassium. This leads to profound hypokalaemia and muscle paralysis. Although the paralysis is temporary, it may be lethal if not diagnosed and treated rapidly, as profound hypokalaemia may induce respiratory muscle paralysis or cardiac arrest. The condition is often misdiagnosed in the west due to its comparative rarity in Caucasians; however it is now increasingly described in Caucasians and is also being seen with increasing frequency in western hospitals due to increasing immigration and population mobility. Here we describe the case of a patient with panhypopituitarism due to a craniopharyngioma, who developed thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement. This disorder has been described in Asian subjects but, to our knowledge, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis secondary to excessive L-thyroxine replacement has never been described in Caucasians.

  14. Risk factors for perioperative ischemic stroke in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Augusto Cray da Costa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.Methods:From January 2010 to December 2012, 519 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery were analyzed prospectively. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with stroke per and postoperative were allocated in Group GS (n=22 and the other patients in the group CCONTROL (n=497. The following variables were compared between the groups: gender, age, carotid stenosis > 70%, diabetes on insulin, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, peripheral arteriopathy, unstable angina, kidney function, left ventricular function, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Ischemic stroke was defined as symptoms lasting over 24 hours associated with changes in brain computed tomography scan. The variables were compared using Fisher’s exact test, Chi square, Student’s t-test and logistic regression.Results:Stroke occurred in 4.2% of patients and the risk factors statistically significant were: carotid stenosis of 70% or more (P=0.03; OR 5.07; IC 95%: 1.35 to 19.02, diabetes on insulin (P=0.04; OR 2.61; IC 95%: 1.10 to 6.21 and peripheral arteriopathy (P=0.03; OR 2.61; 95% CI: 1.08 to 6.28.Conclusion:Risk factors for ischemic stroke were carotid stenosis of 70% or more, diabetes on insulin and peripheral arteriopathy.

  15. Personalized Recommendation via Suppressing Excessive Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilin Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient recommendation algorithms are fundamental to solve the problem of information overload in modern society. In physical dynamics, mass diffusion is a powerful tool to alleviate the long-standing problems of recommendation systems. However, popularity bias and redundant similarity have not been adequately studied in the literature, which are essentially caused by excessive diffusion and will lead to similarity estimation deviation and recommendation performance degradation. In this paper, we penalize the popular objects by appropriately dividing the popularity of objects and then leverage the second-order similarity to suppress excessive diffusion. Evaluation on three real benchmark datasets (MovieLens, Amazon, and RYM by 10-fold cross-validation demonstrates that our method outperforms the mainstream baselines in accuracy, diversity, and novelty.

  16. ILLUSION OF EXCESSIVE CONSUMPTION AND ITS EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNGIU-PUPĂZAN MARIANA CLAUDIA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to explore, explain and describe this phenomenon to a better understanding of it and also the relationship between advertising and the consumer society members. This paper aims to present an analysis of excessive and unsustainable consumption, the evolution of a phenomenon, and the ability to find a way to combat. Unfortunately, studies show that this tendency to accumulate more than we need to consume excess means that almost all civilizations fined and placed dogmatic among the values that children learn early in life. This has been perpetuated since the time when the goods or products does not get so easy as today. Anti-consumerism has emerged in response to this economic system, not on the long term. We are witnessing the last two decades to establish a new phase of consumer capitalism: society hiperconsumtion.

  17. Conservative treatment of excessive anterior pelvic tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    , DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark ABSTRACT (1795 anslag) Background: Excessive anterior pelvic tilt has been linked to pain and dysfunction of the hip and pelvic region. Conservative treatment (e.g. manual therapy and physical training) is suggested in correcting the tilt and eventually related symptoms...... demonstrated a significant reduction in anterior pelvic tilt. The two studies intervening on symptomatic subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in pain and disability, respectively. Conclusions: Very low quality of evidence suggests that further studies are needed to clarify whether conservative......Conservative treatment of excessive anterior pelvic tilt: A systematic review Anders Falk Brekke1,2,3, Søren Overgaard1,2, Asbjørn Hróbjartsson4, Anders Holsgaard-Larsen1,2 1Orthopaedic Research Unit, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital 2Department...

  18. Impaired left-ventricular function in insulin-dependent diabetic patients with increased urinary albumin excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H; Jensen, T; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1991-01-01

    Cardiac function was studied in 30 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Three groups, matched for age and diabetes duration, were defined as: group I (n = 10), normal urinary albumin excretion less than 30 mg 24 h-1; group II (n = 10), incipient diabetic nephropathy (urinary albumin...... excretion in the range of 30-300 mg 24 h-1); and group III (n = 10), clinical diabetic nephropathy (urinary albumin excretion greater than 300 mg 24 h-1). Ten non-diabetic subjects matched for sex and age served as controls. The left-ventricular end-diastolic volume measured by radionuclide cardiography was...... of coronary heart disease. Our results might suggest that insulin-dependent diabetic patients with slightly but persistently elevated urinary albumin excretion have reduced diastolic compliance of the left-ventricle leading to impaired cardiac performance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  19. The effect of metabolic control on hemodynamics in short-term insulin-dependent diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, E R; Hilsted, J; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1985-01-01

    Hemodynamics variables (heart rate, arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, hepato-splanchnic blood flow, forearm blood flow, and plasma catecholamines) were measured during good (median blood glucose 4.7 mmol/L) and poor (median blood glucose 16.3 mmol/L) metabolic control in eight young, short......-term, insulin-dependent diabetic patients. The measurements were performed twice within 2 wk, in random order. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) was applied for 1 wk in order to obtain good control. All eight patients had elevated cardiac output (median 9%) and forearm blood flow (median 34......%) during poor compared with good metabolic control, P less than 0.01. In contrast, hepato-splanchnic blood flow was lower (median 12%) during poor compared with good metabolic control, P less than 0.05. Heart rate remained unchanged, while mean arterial blood pressure was slightly higher during poor...

  20. Insulin therapy in special conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    León E Litwak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia during hospitalization is a common condition associated with poor prognosis. To date, insulin is the best strategy to treat hyperglycemia in these patients. An adequate glycemic control is associated with better clinical results. Nevertheless, glycemic goals are still controversial due to the increase of hypoglycemia and other adverse events. Diabetes mellitus is still the main cause of chronic renal failure in our country and its treatment deserves a special analysis considering that insulin pharmacokinetics is altered. Recommendations in this setting are based in expert panel opinions, focusing mainly in intermediate or long acting insulins combined with regular insulin and/or rapid acting analogues. During pregnancy, NPH and regular insulin are safe and effective. It is worth mentioning that the development of new long and rapid acting molecules yielded lower glycemic variability, better post-prandial control and less hypoglycemia. The aim of this study is to provide a review of the proper use of insulin in these special conditions.

  1. Mechanisms linking excess adiposity and carcinogenesis promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Pérez-Hernández

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity constitutes one of the most important metabolic diseases being associated to insulin resistance development and increased cardiovascular risk. Association between obesity and cancer has also been well-established for several tumor types, such as breast cancer in postmenopausal women, colorectal and prostate cancer. Cancer is the first death cause in developed countries and the second one in developing countries, with high incidence rates around the world. Furthermore, it has been estimated that 15-20% of all cancer deaths may be attributable to obesity. Tumor growth is regulated by interactions between tumor cells and their tissue microenvironment. In this sense, obesity may lead to cancer development through dysfunctional adipose tissue and altered signaling pathways. In this review, three main pathways relating obesity and cancer development are examined: i inflammatory changes leading to macrophage polarization and altered adipokine profile; ii insulin resistance development; and iii adipose tissue hypoxia. Since obesity and cancer present a high prevalence, the association between these conditions is of great public health significance and studies showing mechanisms by which obesity lead to cancer development and progression are needed to improve prevention and management of these diseases.

  2. Mechanisms Linking Excess Adiposity and Carcinogenesis Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Hernández, Ana I.; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Obesity constitutes one of the most important metabolic diseases being associated to insulin resistance development and increased cardiovascular risk. Association between obesity and cancer has also been well established for several tumor types, such as breast cancer in post-menopausal women, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Cancer is the first death cause in developed countries and the second one in developing countries, with high incidence rates around the world. Furthermore, it has been estimated that 15–20% of all cancer deaths may be attributable to obesity. Tumor growth is regulated by interactions between tumor cells and their tissue microenvironment. In this sense, obesity may lead to cancer development through dysfunctional adipose tissue and altered signaling pathways. In this review, three main pathways relating obesity and cancer development are examined: (i) inflammatory changes leading to macrophage polarization and altered adipokine profile; (ii) insulin resistance development; and (iii) adipose tissue hypoxia. Since obesity and cancer present a high prevalence, the association between these conditions is of great public health significance and studies showing mechanisms by which obesity lead to cancer development and progression are needed to improve prevention and management of these diseases. PMID:24829560

  3. Neurological manifestations of excessive alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas-Ballvé, Anna; Grau-López, Laia; Morillas, Rosa María; Planas, Ramón

    2017-12-01

    This article reviews the different acute and chronic neurological manifestations of excessive alcohol consumption that affect the central or peripheral nervous system. Several mechanisms can be implicated depending on the disorder, ranging from nutritional factors, alcohol-related toxicity, metabolic changes and immune-mediated mechanisms. Recognition and early treatment of these manifestations is essential given their association with high morbidity and significantly increased mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of diet-induced insulin resistance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Siti Nur Sarah; Coogan, Claire; Chamseddin, Khalil; Fernandez-Kim, Sun Ok; Kolli, Santharam; Keller, Jeffrey N; Bauer, Johannes H

    2012-08-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is increasingly utilized as an alternative to costly rodent models to study human diseases. Fly models exist for a wide variety of human conditions, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease, or cardiac function. Advantages of the fly system are its rapid generation time and its low cost. However, the greatest strength of the fly system are the powerful genetic tools that allow for rapid dissection of molecular disease mechanisms. Here, we describe the diet-dependent development of metabolic phenotypes in adult fruit flies. Depending on the specific type of nutrient, as well as its relative quantity in the diet, flies show weight gain and changes in the levels of storage macromolecules. Furthermore, the activity of insulin-signaling in the major metabolic organ of the fly, the fat body, decreases upon overfeeding. This decrease in insulin-signaling activity in overfed flies is moreover observed when flies are challenged with an acute food stimulus, suggesting that overfeeding leads to insulin resistance. Similar changes were observed in aging flies, with the development of the insulin resistance-like phenotype beginning at early middle ages. Taken together, these data demonstrate that imbalanced diet disrupts metabolic homeostasis in adult D. melanogaster and promotes insulin-resistant phenotypes. Therefore, the fly system may be a useful alternative tool in the investigation of molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance and the development of pharmacologic treatment options. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tendon rupture associated with excessive smartphone gaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Luke; Cage, Dori N; Horn, Adam; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P; Doan, Andrew P

    2015-06-01

    Excessive use of smartphones has been associated with injuries. A 29-year-old, right hand-dominant man presented with chronic left thumb pain and loss of active motion from playing a Match-3 puzzle video game on his smartphone all day for 6 to 8 weeks. On physical examination, the left extensor pollicis longus tendon was not palpable, and no tendon motion was noted with wrist tenodesis. The thumb metacarpophalangeal range of motion was 10° to 80°, and thumb interphalangeal range of motion was 30° to 70°. The clinical diagnosis was rupture of the left extensor pollicis longus tendon. The patient subsequently underwent an extensor indicis proprius (1 of 2 tendons that extend the index finger) to extensor pollicis longus tendon transfer. During surgery, rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon was seen between the metacarpophalangeal and wrist joints. The potential for video games to reduce pain perception raises clinical and social considerations about excessive use, abuse, and addiction. Future research should consider whether pain reduction is a reason some individuals play video games excessively, manifest addiction, or sustain injuries associated with video gaming.

  6. [Mortality attributable to excess weight in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Ramiro, José Javier; Álvarez-Martín, Elena; Gil-Prieto, Ruth

    2014-06-16

    Estimate the mortality attributable to higher than optimal body mass index in the Spanish population in 2006. Excess body weight prevalence data were obtained from the 2006 National Health Survey, while data on associated mortality were extracted from the National Statistic Institute. Population attributable fractions were applied and mortality attributable to higher than optimal body mass index was calculated for people between 35 and 79 years. In 2006, among the Spanish population aged 35-79 years, 25,671 lives (16,405 males and 9,266 women) were lost due to higher than optimal body mass index. Mortality attributable was 15.8% of total deaths in males and 14.8% in women, but if we refer to those causes where excess body weight is a risk factor, it is about a 30% of mortality (31.6% in men and 28% in women). The most important individual cause was cardiovascular disease (58%), followed by cancer. The individual cause with a major contribution to deaths was type 2 diabetes; nearly 70% in males and 80% in women. Overweight accounted for 54.9% deaths in men and 48.6% in women. Excess body weight is a major public health problem, with an important associated mortality. Attributable deaths are a useful tool to know the real situation and to monitor for disease control interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Earnings Quality Measures and Excess Returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Pietro; Wagenhofer, Alfred

    2014-06-01

    This paper examines how commonly used earnings quality measures fulfill a key objective of financial reporting, i.e., improving decision usefulness for investors. We propose a stock-price-based measure for assessing the quality of earnings quality measures. We predict that firms with higher earnings quality will be less mispriced than other firms. Mispricing is measured by the difference of the mean absolute excess returns of portfolios formed on high and low values of a measure. We examine persistence, predictability, two measures of smoothness, abnormal accruals, accruals quality, earnings response coefficient and value relevance. For a large sample of US non-financial firms over the period 1988-2007, we show that all measures except for smoothness are negatively associated with absolute excess returns, suggesting that smoothness is generally a favorable attribute of earnings. Accruals measures generate the largest spread in absolute excess returns, followed by smoothness and market-based measures. These results lend support to the widespread use of accruals measures as overall measures of earnings quality in the literature.

  8. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    NASA seeks to transfer the NASA developed microwave ablation technology, designed for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (irregular heart beat), to industry. After a heart attack, many cells surrounding the resulting scar continue to live but are abnormal electrically; they may conduct impulses unusually slowly or fire when they would typically be silent. These diseased areas might disturb smooth signaling by forming a reentrant circuit in the muscle. The objective of microwave ablation is to heat and kill these diseased cells to restore appropriate electrical activity in the heart. This technology is a method and apparatus that provides for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In comparison with other methods that involve direct-current pulses or radio frequencies below 1 GHz, this method may prove more effective in treating ventricular tachycardia. This is because the present method provides for greater control of the location, cross-sectional area, and depth of a lesion via selection of the location and design of the antenna and the choice of microwave power and frequency.

  9. Diet reduction to requirements in obese/overfed ewes from early gestation prevents glucose/insulin dysregulation and returns fetal adiposity and organ development to control levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuersunjiang, Nuermaimaiti; Odhiambo, John F; Long, Nathan M; Shasa, Desiree R; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ford, Stephen P

    2013-10-01

    Obesity at conception and excess gestational weight gain pose significant risks for adverse health consequences in human offspring. This study evaluated the effects of reducing dietary intake of obese/overfed ewes beginning in early gestation on fetal development. Sixty days prior to conception, ewes were assigned to a control diet [CON: 100% of National Research Council (NRC) recommendations], a diet inducing maternal obesity (MO: 150% of NRC recommendations), or a maternal obesity intervention diet (MOI: 150% of NRC recommendations to day 28 of gestation, then 100% NRC) until necropsy at midgestation (day 75) or late (day 135) gestation. Fetal size and weight, as well as fetal organ weights, were greater (P dietary groups, cardiac ventricular weights and wall thicknesses as well as liver and perirenal fat weights remained elevated in fetuses from MO ewes compared with those from CON and MOI ewes. MO ewes and fetuses exhibited elevated (P requirements from early gestation can prevent subsequent alterations in fetal growth, adiposity, and glucose/insulin dynamics.

  10. [Psychosomatic aspects of cardiac arrhythmias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, Martin; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2010-07-01

    Emotional stress facilitates the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. The prevalence of anxiety and depression is increased in cardiac patients as compared to the normal population. The risk of cardiovascular mortality is enhanced in patients suffering from depression. Comorbid anxiety disorders worsen the course of cardiac arrhythmias. Disturbance of neurocardiac regulation with predominance of the sympathetic tone is hypothesized to be causative for this. The emotional reaction to cardiac arrhythmias is differing to a large extent between individuals. Emotional stress may result from coping with treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias may influence each other in the sense of a vicious circle. Somatoform cardiac arrhythmias are predominantly of psychogenic origin. Instrumental measures and frequent contacts between physicians and patients may facilitate disease chronification. The present review is dealing with the multifaceted relationships between cardiac arrhythmias and emotional stress. The underlying mechanisms and corresponding treatment modalities are discussed.

  11. Effects of weight loss and insulin reduction on arterial stiffness in the SAVE trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Timothy M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic arterial stiffness contributes to the negative health effects of obesity and insulin resistance, which include hypertension, stroke, and increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity are individually associated with improved central arterial stiffness; however, their combined effects on arterial stiffness are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine how insulin levels modify the improvements in arterial stiffness seen with weight loss in overweight and obese young adults. Methods To assess the effects of weight loss and decreased fasting insulin on vascular stiffness, we studied 339 participants in the Slow the Adverse Effects of Vascular Aging (SAVE trial. At study entry, the participants were aged 20–45, normotensive, non-diabetic, and had a body-mass index of 25–39.9 kg/m2. Measures of pulse wave velocity (PWV in the central (carotid-femoral (cfPWV, peripheral (femoral-ankle (faPWV, and mixed (brachial-ankle (baPWV vascular beds were collected at baseline and 6 months. The effects of 6-month change in weight and insulin on measures of PWV were estimated using multivariate regression. Results After adjustment for baseline risk factors and change in systolic blood pressure, 6-month weight loss and 6-month change in fasting insulin independently predicted improvement in baPWV but not faPWV or cfPWV. There was a significant interaction between 6-month weight change and change in fasting insulin when predicting changes in baPWV (p baPWV. Conclusions Young adults with excess weight who both lower their insulin levels and lose weight see the greatest improvement in vascular stiffness. This improvement in vascular stiffness with weight loss and insulin declines may occur throughout the vasculature and may not be limited to individual vascular beds. Trial registration NCT00366990

  12. Cardiac fatty acid oxidation in heart failure associated with obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Arata; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems, and are linked to the development of heart failure. Emerging data highlight the importance of alterations in cardiac energy metabolism as a major contributor to cardiac dysfunction related to obesity and diabetes. Increased rates of fatty acid oxidation and decreased rates of glucose utilization are two prominent changes in cardiac energy metabolism that occur in obesity and diabetes. This metabolic profile is probably both a cause and consequence of a prominent cardiac insulin resistance, which is accompanied by a decrease in both cardiac function and efficiency, and by the accumulation of potentially toxic lipid metabolites in the heart that can further exaggerate insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction. The high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in obesity and diabetes are attributable to several factors, including: 1) increased fatty acid supply and uptake into the cardiomyocyte, 2) increased transcription of fatty acid metabolic enzymes, 3) decreased allosteric control of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake and fatty acid oxidation, and 4) increased post-translational acetylation control of various fatty acid oxidative enzymes. Emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic approaches aimed at switching the balance of cardiac energy substrate preference from fatty acid oxidation to glucose use can prevent cardiac dysfunction associated with obesity and diabetes. Modulating acetylation control of fatty acid oxidative enzymes is also a potentially attractive strategy, although presently this is limited to precursors of nicotinamide adenine or nonspecific activators of deacetylation such as resveratrol. This review will focus on the metabolic alterations in the heart that occur in obesity and diabetes, as well as on the molecular mechanisms controlling these metabolic changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  13. Role of adipose tissue in the pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Rahul; Pouliopoulos, Jim; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Kovoor, Pramesh

    2016-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue is present in normal healthy individuals. It is a unique fat depot that, under physiologic conditions, plays a cardioprotective role. However, excess epicardial adipose tissue has been shown to be associated with prevalence and severity of atrial fibrillation. In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and myotonic dystrophy, fibrofatty infiltration of the myocardium is associated with ventricular arrhythmias. In the ovine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy, the presence of intramyocardial adipose or lipomatous metaplasia has been associated with increased propensity to ventricular tachycardia. These observations suggest a role of adipose tissue in the pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias. In this article, we review the role of cardiac adipose tissue in various cardiac arrhythmias and discuss the possible pathophysiologic mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitochondrial and cellular mechanisms for managing lipid excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Aon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Current scientific debates center on the impact of lipids and mitochondrial function on diverse aspects of human health, nutrition and disease, among them the association of lipotoxicity with the onset of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, and with heart dysfunction in obesity and diabetes. Mitochondria play a fundamental role in aging and in prevalent acute or chronic diseases. Lipids are main mitochondrial fuels however these molecules can also behave as uncouplers and inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Knowledge about the functional composition of these contradictory effects and their impact on mitochondrial-cellular energetics/redox status is incomplete.Cells store fatty acids (FAs as triacylglycerol and package them into cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs. New emerging data shows the LD as a highly dynamic storage pool of FAs that can be used for energy reserve. Lipid excess packaging into LDs can be seen as an adaptive response to fulfilling energy supply without hindering mitochondrial or cellular redox status and keeping low concentration of lipotoxic intermediates.Herein we review the mechanisms of action and utilization of lipids by mitochondria reported in liver, heart and skeletal muscle under relevant physiological situations, e.g. exercise. We report on perilipins, a family of proteins that associate with LDs in response to loading of cells with lipids. Evidence showing that in addition to physical contact, mitochondria and LDs exhibit metabolic interactions is presented and discussed. A hypothetical model of channeled lipid utilization by mitochondria is proposed. Direct delivery and channeled processing of lipids in mitochondria could represent a reliable and efficient way to maintain ROS within levels compatible with signaling while ensuring robust and reliable energy supply.

  15. Pioglitazone acutely reduces energy metabolism and insulin secretion in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamontagne, Julien; Jalbert-Arsenault, Elise; Pepin, Emilie; Peyot, Marie-Line; Ruderman, Neil B; Nolan, Christopher J; Joly, Erik; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Poitout, Vincent; Prentki, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if the insulin-sensitizing drug pioglitazone acutely reduces insulin secretion and causes metabolic deceleration in vivo independently of change in insulin sensitivity...

  16. Bioavailability and variability of biphasic insulin mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeborg, Tue; Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Mosekilde, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of subcutaneously administered insulin is associated with considerable variability. Some of this variability was quantitatively explained for both soluble insulin and insulin suspensions in a recent contribution to this journal (Søeborg et al., 2009). In the present article......, the absorption kinetics for mixtures of insulins is described. This requires that the bioavailability of the different insulins is considered. A short review of insulin bioavailability and a description of the subcutaneous depot thus precede the presentation of possible mechanisms associated with subcutaneous...... insulin degradation. Soluble insulins are assumed to be degraded enzymatically in the subcutaneous tissue. Suspended insulin crystals form condensed heaps that are assumed to be degraded from their surface by invading macrophages. It is demonstrated how the shape of the heaps affects the absorption...

  17. High-dose insulin therapy in beta-blocker and calcium channel-blocker poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretsen, Kristin M; Kaczmarek, Kathleen M; Morgan, Jenifer; Holger, Joel S

    2011-04-01

    INTRODUCTION. High-dose insulin therapy, along with glucose supplementation, has emerged as an effective treatment for severe beta-blocker and calcium channel-blocker poisoning. We review the experimental data and clinical experience that suggests high-dose insulin is superior to conventional therapies for these poisonings. PRESENTATION AND GENERAL MANAGEMENT. Hypotension, bradycardia, decreased systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and cardiogenic shock are characteristic features of beta-blocker and calcium-channel blocker poisoning. Initial treatment is primarily supportive and includes saline fluid resuscitation which is essential to correct vasodilation and low cardiac filling pressures. Conventional therapies such as atropine, glucagon and calcium often fail to improve hemodynamic status in severely poisoned patients. Catecholamines can increase blood pressure and heart rate, but they also increase SVR which may result in decreases in cardiac output and perfusion of vascular beds. The increased myocardial oxygen demand that results from catecholamines and vasopressors may be deleterious in the setting of hypotension and decreased coronary perfusion. METHODS. The Medline, Embase, Toxnet, and Google Scholar databases were searched for the years 1975-2010 using the terms: high-dose insulin, hyperinsulinemia-euglycemia, beta-blocker, calcium-channel blocker, toxicology, poisoning, antidote, toxin-induced cardiovascular shock, and overdose. In addition, a manual search of the Abstracts of the North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology and the Congress of the European Association of Poisons Centres and Clinical Toxicologists published in Clinical Toxicology for the years 1996-2010 was undertaken. These searches identified 485 articles of which 72 were considered relevant. MECHANISMS OF HIGH-DOSE INSULIN BENEFIT. There are three main mechanisms of benefit: increased inotropy, increased intracellular glucose transport, and vascular dilatation. EFFICACY OF HIGH

  18. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  19. Insulin-like growth factor-1 overexpression in cardiomyocytes diminishes ex vivo heart functional recovery after acute ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prêle, Cecilia M; Reichelt, Melissa E; Mutsaers, Steven E; Davies, Marilyn; Delbridge, Lea M; Headrick, John P; Rosenthal, Nadia; Bogoyevitch, Marie A; Grounds, Miranda D

    2012-01-01

    Acute insulin-like growth factor-1 administration has been shown to have beneficial effects in cardiac pathological conditions. The aim of the present study was to assess the structural and ex vivo functional impacts of long-term cardiomyocyte-specific insulin-like growth factor-1 overexpression in hearts of transgenic αMHC-IGF-1 Ea mice. Performance of isolated transgenic αMHC-IGF-1 Ea and littermate wild-type control hearts was compared under baseline conditions and in response to 20-min ischemic insult. Cardiac desmin and laminin expression patterns were determined histologically, and myocardial hydroxyproline was measured to assess collagen content. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-1 did not modify expression patterns of desmin or laminin but was associated with a pronounced increase (∼30%) in cardiac collagen content (from ∼3.7 to 4.8 μg/mg). Baseline myocardial contractile function and coronary flow were unaltered by insulin-like growth factor-1 overexpression. In contrast to prior evidence of acute cardiac protection, insulin-like growth factor-1 overexpression was associated with significant impairment of acute functional response to ischemia-reperfusion. Insulin-like growth factor-1 overexpression did not modify ischemic contracture development, but postischemic diastolic dysfunction was aggravated (51±5 vs. 22±6 mmHg in nontransgenic littermates). Compared with wild-type control, recovery of pressure development and relaxation indices relative to baseline performance were significantly reduced in transgenic αMHC-IGF-1 Ea after 60-min reperfusion (34±7% vs. 62±7% recovery of +dP/dt; 35±11% vs. 57±8% recovery of -dP/dt). Chronic insulin-like growth factor-1 overexpression is associated with reduced functional recovery after acute ischemic insult. Collagen deposition is elevated in transgenic αMHC-IGF-1 Ea hearts, but there is no change in expression of the myocardial structural proteins desmin and laminin. These findings suggest

  20. Excessive sleep duration and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohayon, Maurice M; Reynolds, Charles F; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-06-01

    Using population-based data, we document the comorbidities (medical, neurologic, and psychiatric) and consequences for daily functioning of excessive quantity of sleep (EQS), defined as a main sleep period or 24-hour sleep duration ≥ 9 hours accompanied by complaints of impaired functioning or distress due to excessive sleep, and its links to excessive sleepiness. A cross-sectional telephone study using a representative sample of 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals living in the United States, aged ≥ 18 years (participation rate = 83.2%). The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; and sleep, mental, and organic disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision; International Classification of Sleep Disorders: Diagnostic and Coding Manual II, International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition). Sleeping at least 9 hours per 24-hour period was reported by 8.4% (95% confidence interval = 8.0-8.8%) of participants; EQS (prolonged sleep episode with distress/impairment) was observed in 1.6% (1.4-1.8%) of the sample. The likelihood of EQS was 3 to 12× higher among individuals with a mood disorder. EQS individuals were 2 to 4× more likely to report poor quality of life than non-EQS individuals as well as interference with socioprofessional activities and relationships. Although between 33 and 66% of individuals with prolonged sleep perceived it as a major problem, only 6.3 to 27.5% of them reported having sought medical attention. EQS is widespread in the general population, co-occurring with a broad spectrum of sleep, medical, neurologic, and psychiatric disorders. Therefore, physicians must recognize EQS as a mixed clinical entity indicating careful assessment and specific treatment planning. © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  1. Autoantibodies and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hon-Chi; Huang, Kristin T. L.; Wang, Xiao-Li; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, afflicting about 5% of the population of the United States. They encompass a wide range of disorders that affect all organs of the human body and have a predilection for women. In the past, autoimmune pathogenesis was not thought to be a major mechanism for cardiovascular disorders, and potential relationships remain understudied. However, accumulating evidence suggests that a number of vascular and cardiac conditions are autoimmune-mediated. Recent studies indicate that autoantibodies play an important role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation, modulation of autonomic influences on heart rate and rhythm, conduction system abnormalities, and ventricular arrhythmias. This manuscript will review the current evidence for the role of autoantibodies in the development of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:21740882

  2. Assessing Cardiac Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Young, Martin E.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Abel, E. Dale; Brunengraber, Henri; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Des Rosiers, Christine; Gerszten, Robert; Glatz, Jan F.; Griffin, Julian L.; Gropler, Robert J.; Holzhuetter, Hermann-Georg; Kizer, Jorge R.; Lewandowski, E. Douglas; Malloy, Craig R.; Neubauer, Stefan; Peterson, Linda R.; Portman, Michael A.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In a complex system of interrelated reactions, the heart converts chemical energy to mechanical energy. Energy transfer is achieved through coordinated activation of enzymes, ion channels, and contractile elements, as well as structural and membrane proteins. The heart’s needs for energy are difficult to overestimate. At a time when the cardiovascular research community is discovering a plethora of new molecular methods to assess cardiac metabolism, the methods remain scattered in the literature. The present statement on “Assessing Cardiac Metabolism” seeks to provide a collective and curated resource on methods and models used to investigate established and emerging aspects of cardiac metabolism. Some of those methods are refinements of classic biochemical tools, whereas most others are recent additions from the powerful tools of molecular biology. The aim of this statement is to be useful to many and to do justice to a dynamic field of great complexity. PMID:27012580

  3. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  4. Fetal Cardiac Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to highlight fetal cardiac interventions (FCIs in terms of indications, strategies, and fetal prognoses. FCIs of the early years were predominantly pharmacological therapies for fetal arrhythmia or heart block. A transplacental transmission of therapeutic agents has now become the main route of pharmacological FCIs. There have been various FCI strategies, which can be categorized into three types: pharmacological, open FCIs, and closed FCIs. Rather than as a routine management for materno-fetal cardiac disorders, however, FCIs are only applied in those fetal cardiac disorders that are at an increased risk of mortality and morbidity and warrant an interventional therapy. Pharmacological FCIs have been well applied in fetal arrhythmias but require further investigations for novel therapeutic agents. The development of open FCI in humans is an issue for the long run. Closed FCIs may largely rely on advanced imaging techniques. Hybrid FCIs might be the future goal in the treatment of fetal heart diseases.

  5. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... for the situation at hand. Due to challenging circumstances, the cost assessment turned out to be ex-post and top-down. RESULTS: Cost per treatment sequence is estimated to be approximately euro 976, whereas the incremental cost (compared with usual care) is approximately euro 682. The cost estimate is uncertain...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  6. First excess levels of vector processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jewgeni H. Dshalalow

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the behavior of a point process marked by a two-dimensional renewal process with dependent components about some fixed (two-dimensional level. The compound process evolves until one of its marks hits (i.e. reaches or exceeds its associated level for the first time. The author targets a joint transformation of the first excess level, first passage time, and the index of the point process which labels the first passage time. The cases when both marks are either discrete or continuous or mixed are treated. For each of them, an explicit and compact formula is derived. Various applications to stochastic models are discussed.

  7. Cardiac Arrest: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Blood Institute Start Here About Cardiac Arrest (American Heart Association) Sudden Cardiac Arrest (Texas Heart Institute) Also in ... Blood Institute) Understand Your Risk for Cardiac Arrest (American Heart Association) Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke and Cardiac ...

  8. Oral insulin--a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, N K Kavitha; Sharma, Chandra P

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is generally controlled quite well with the administration of oral medications or by the use of insulin injections. The current practice is the use of one or more doses, intermediate or long acting insulin per day. Oral insulin is a promising yet experimental method providing tight glycemic control for patients with diabetes. A biologically adhesive delivery systems offer important advantage over conventional drug delivery systems. The engineered polymer microspheres made of erodable polymer display strong adhesive interactions with gastrointestinal mucus and cellular lining can traverse both the mucosal epithelium and the follicle associated epithelium covering the lymphoid tissue of Peyer's patches. Alginate, a natural polymer recovered from seaweed is being developed as a nanoparticle for the delivery of insulin without being destroyed in the stomach. Alginate is in fact finding application in biotechnology industry as thickening agent, a gelling agent and a colloid stabilizer. Alginate has in addition, several other properties that have enabled it to be used as a matrix for entrapment and for the delivery of a variety of proteins such as insulin and cells. These properties include: a relatively inert aqueous environment within the matrix; a mild room temperature encapsulation process free of organic solvents; a high gel porosity which allows for high diffusion rates of macromolecules; the ability to control this porosity with simple coating procedures and dissolution and biodegradation of the system under normal physiological conditions.

  9. Cancer risk among insulin users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    But, Anna; De Bruin, Marie L.; Bazelier, Marloes T.

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between use of certain insulins and risk for cancer, when addressing the limitations and biases involved in previous studies. METHODS: National Health Registries from Denmark (1996-2010), Finland (1996-2011), Norway (2005......-2010) and Sweden (2007-2012) and the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink database (1987-2013) were used to conduct a cohort study on new insulin users (N = 327,112). By using a common data model and semi-aggregate approach, we pooled individual-level records from five cohorts and applied Poisson regression...... models. For each of ten cancer sites studied, we estimated the rate ratios (RRs) by duration (≤0.5, 0.5-1, 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, 4-5, 5-6 and >6 years) of cumulative exposure to insulin glargine or insulin detemir relative to that of human insulin. RESULTS: A total of 21,390 cancer cases occurred during a mean...

  10. Insulin Analogs Applied with Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (Pump in the Treatment of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan Tuncel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is an important health problem that should be treated efficiently because of its high prevalence and high morbidity and mortality due to its complications. In patients with DM, the application of a treatment which provides physiologic insulin secretion as such in healthy individuals is directly related with the prevention of diabetes complications. Insulin analogs, which were developed in recent years and shown to have pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic superiority to human insulin, have made it possible to obtain natural insulin pattern in the body. In addition to development of insulin analogs, introduction of insulin application method of “continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion” (insulin pump has led a new era in the treatment of DM. In this review, treatment of type 1 and 2 DM patients with insulin analogs, particularly insulin aspart, applied with insulin pump was discussed in the light of the current literature.

  11. Fitness, insulin sensitivity, and frontal lobe integrity in adults with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mary Grace; Venutolo, Christopher; Yau, Po Lai; Convit, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    To formally test whether insulin sensitivity mediates the relationship between fitness and brain integrity. Eighty-four middle-aged participants without diabetes received a 6-min walk test from which maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) was derived, a structural magnetic resonance scan, and a medical evaluation including fasting glucose and insulin levels. This study showed significant associations between fitness, abdominal obesity, and insulin sensitivity and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) volume as well as between ACC thickness and quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI). The relationship between ACC volume and VO2 max was completely mediated through QUICKI. Further, this strong association was confirmed by a single and very significant cluster on the ACC linking gray matter volume and QUICKI in a voxel-based morphometry analysis. As expected, increased abdominal obesity was associated with reductions in fitness, ACC volumes, and insulin sensitivity. Importantly, this study demonstrated a significant mediation of the relationship between VO2 max and ACC volume by QUICKI. This suggests that the links between impaired insulin sensitivity and brain abnormalities in adults carrying excess weight could be alleviated through increased physical activity and fitness. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  12. Fitness, Insulin Sensitivity and Frontal Lobe Integrity in Overweight and Obese Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mary Grace; Venutolo, Christopher; Yau, Po Lai; Convit, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To formally test whether insulin sensitivity mediates the relationship between fitness and brain integrity. Methods Eighty-four non-diabetic, middle-aged participants received a 6-minute walk test from which maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) was derived, a structural MR scan, and a medical evaluation including fasting glucose and insulin levels. Results We showed significant associations between fitness, abdominal obesity, and insulin sensitivity and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) volume as well as between ACC thickness and quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI). We showed that the relationship between ACC volume and VO2 max was completely mediated through QUICKI, see Figure 3. Further, this strong association was confirmed by a single and very significant cluster on the ACC linking gray matter volume and QUICKI in a voxel-based morphometry analysis. Conclusions As expected, increased abdominal obesity was associated with reductions in fitness, ACC volumes, and insulin sensitivity. Importantly, we demonstrate a significant mediation of the relationship between VO2 max and ACC volume by QUICKI. This suggests that the links between impaired insulin sensitivity and brain abnormalities in adults carrying excess weight could be alleviated through increased physical activity and fitness. PMID:27123868

  13. Prolactin Promotes Adipose Tissue Fitness and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Herrera, Xarubet; de Los Ríos, Ericka A; Díaz, Juan M; Lerma-Alvarado, Ricardo M; Martínez de la Escalera, Lucía; López-Barrera, Fernando; Lemini, María; Arnold, Edith; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Clapp, Carmen; Macotela, Yazmín

    2017-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of body fat triggers insulin resistance and features of the metabolic syndrome. Recently, evidence has accumulated that obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome are associated with reduced levels of serum prolactin (PRL) in humans and rodents, raising the question of whether low PRL levels contribute to metabolic dysfunction. Here, we have addressed this question by investigating the role of PRL in insulin sensitivity and adipose tissue fitness in obese rodents and humans. In diet-induced obese rats, treatment with PRL delivered via osmotic mini-pumps, improved insulin sensitivity, prevented adipocyte hypertrophy, and reduced inflammatory cytokine expression in visceral fat. PRL also induced increased expression of Pparg and Xbp1s in visceral adipose tissue and elevated circulating adiponectin levels. Conversely, PRL receptor null mice challenged with a high-fat diet developed greater insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and increased adipocyte hypertrophy compared with wild-type mice. In humans, serum PRL values correlated positively with systemic adiponectin levels and were reduced in insulin-resistant patients. Furthermore, PRL circulating levels and PRL produced by adipose tissue correlated directly with the expression of PPARG, ADIPOQ, and GLUT4 in human visceral and sc adipose tissue. Thus, PRL, acting through its cognate receptors, promotes healthy adipose tissue function and systemic insulin sensitivity. Increasing the levels of PRL in the circulation may have therapeutic potential against obesity-induced metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  14. Adipose tissue inflammation: a cause or consequence of obesity-related insulin resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüher, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    The worldwide obesity epidemic has become a major health concern, because it contributes to higher mortality due to an increased risk for noncommunicable diseases including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders and some cancers. Insulin resistance may link accumulation of adipose tissue in obesity to metabolic diseases, although the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In the past decades, data from human studies and transgenic animal models strongly suggested correlative, but also causative associations between activation of proinflammatory pathways and insulin resistance. Particularly chronic inflammation in adipose tissue seems to play an important role in the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. On the other hand, adipose tissue inflammation has been shown to be essential for healthy adipose tissue expansion and remodelling. However, whether adipose tissue inflammation represents a consequence or a cause of impaired insulin sensitivity remains an open question. A better understanding of the molecular pathways linking excess adipose tissue storage to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance may provide the basis for the future development of anti-inflammatory treatment strategies to improve adverse metabolic consequences of obesity. In this review, potential mechanisms of adipose tissue inflammation and how adipose tissue inflammation may cause insulin resistance are discussed. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. DHA at nutritional doses restores insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle by preventing lipotoxicity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, Frédéric; Acquaviva, Cécile; Pitois, Elodie; Laillet, Brigitte; Rigaudière, Jean-Paul; Jouve, Chrystèle; Pouyet, Corinne; Gladine, Cècile; Comte, Blandine; Vianey Saban, Christine; Morio, Bèatrice

    2015-09-01

    Skeletal muscle plays a major role in the control of whole body glucose disposal in response to insulin stimulus. Excessive supply of fatty acids to this tissue triggers cellular and molecular disturbances leading to lipotoxicity, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunctions, impaired insulin response and decreased glucose uptake. This study was conducted to analyze the preventive effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acid, against insulin resistance, lipotoxicity and inflammation in skeletal muscle at doses compatible with nutritional supplementation. DHA (30 μM) prevented insulin resistance in C2C12 myotubes exposed to palmitate (500 μM) by decreasing protein kinase C (PKC)-θ activation and restoring cellular acylcarnitine profile, insulin-dependent AKT phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Furthermore, DHA protected C2C12 myotubes from palmitate- or lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in Ptgs2, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA level, probably through the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase. In LDLR -/- mice fed a high-cholesterol-high-sucrose diet, supplementation with DHA reaching up to 2% of daily energy intake enhanced the insulin-dependent AKT phosphorylation and reduced the PKC-θ activation in skeletal muscle. Therefore, DHA used at physiological doses participates in the regulation of muscle lipid and glucose metabolisms by preventing lipotoxicity and inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. DHEA treatment reduces fat accumulation and protects against insulin resistance in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D H; Hansen, P A; Chen, M M; Holloszy, J O

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) protects male rats against the accumulation of body fat the development of insulin resistance with advancing age. We found that supplementation of the diet with 0.3% DHEA between the ages of 5 months and approximately 25 months resulted in a significantly lower final body weight (DHEA, 593 +/- 18 g vs control, 668 +/- 12 g, p food intake. Lean body mass was unaffected by the DHEA, and the lower body weight was due to a approximately 25% reduction in body fat. The rate of glucose disposal during a euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp was 30% higher in the DHEA group than in the sedentary controls due to a greater insulin responsiveness. The DHEA administration was as effective in reducing body fat content and maintaining insulin responsiveness as exercise in the form of voluntary wheel running. The DHEA had no significant effect on muscle GLUT4 content. A preliminary experiment provided evidence suggesting that muscle insulin signaling, as reflected in binding of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to the insulin receptor substrate-1, was enhanced in the DHEA-treated and wheel running groups as compared to controls. These results provide evidence that DHEA, like exercise, protects against excess fat accumulation and development of insulin resistance in rats.

  17. Carotid body, insulin and metabolic diseases: unravelling the links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia V Conde

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The carotid bodies (CB are peripheral chemoreceptors that sense changes in arterial blood O2, CO2 and pH levels. Hypoxia, hypercapnia and acidosis activate the CB, which respond by increasing the action potential frequency in their sensory nerve, the carotid sinus nerve (CSN. CSN activity is integrated in the brain stem to induce a panoply of cardiorespiratory reflexes aimed, primarily, to normalize the altered blood gases, via hyperventilation, and to regulate blood pressure and cardiac performance, via sympathetic nervous system (SNS activation. Besides its role in the cardiorespiratory control the CB has been proposed as a metabolic sensor implicated in the control of energy homeostasis and, more recently, in the regulation of whole body insulin sensitivity. Hypercaloric diets cause CB overactivation in rats, which seems to be at the origin of the development of insulin resistance and hypertension, core features of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Consistent with this notion, CB sensory denervation prevents metabolic and hemodynamic alterations in hypercaloric feed animal. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is another chronic disorder characterized by increased CB activity and intimately related with several metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities. In this manuscript we review in a concise manner the putative pathways linking CB chemoreceptors deregulation with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and arterial hypertension. Also, the link between chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH and insulin resistance is discussed. Then, a final section is devoted to debate strategies to reduce CB activity and its use for prevention and therapeutics of metabolic diseases with an emphasis on new exciting research in the modulation of bioelectronic signals, likely to be central in the future.

  18. Cardiac optogenetics : using light to monitor cardiac physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Charlotte D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41375491X; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Knöpfel, Thomas; de Boer, Teun P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481878X

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of cardiac excitation and its coupling to contraction is largely based on ex vivo studies utilising fluorescent organic dyes to assess cardiac action potentials and signal transduction. Recent advances in optogenetic sensors open exciting new possibilities for cardiac

  19. Exercise-related cardiac arrest in cardiac rehabilitation - The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to establish the safety of cardiac rehabilitation as a medical intervention at the Johannesburg Cardiac Rehabilitation Centre from its inception in September 1982 to July 1988, and analyses the medical status of patients who suffered a cardiac arrest (CA) in order to determine possible factors predictive of sudden death.

  20. THE CARDIAC ANXIETY QUESTIONNAIRE : CROSS-VALIDATION AMONG CARDIAC INPATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, M. H. C. T.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude; van Deelen, F. M.; van Balkom, A. J. L. M.; Pop, G.; Speckens, A. E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: General anxiety symptoms are common in patients with cardiac disease and considered to have an adverse effect on cardiac prognosis. The role of specific cardiac anxiety, however, is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the

  1. The cardiac anxiety questionnaire: cross-validation among cardiac inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, M.H. van; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; van Deelen, F.M.; Balkom, A.J. van; Pop, G.A.; Speckens, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: General anxiety symptoms are common in patients with cardiac disease and considered to have an adverse effect on cardiac prognosis. The role of specific cardiac anxiety, however, is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the

  2. The Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire: cross-validation among cardiac inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, M.H.C.T.; Voshaar, R.C.O.; van Deelen, F.M.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; Pop, G.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: General anxiety symptoms are common in patients with cardiac disease and considered to have an adverse effect on cardiac prognosis. The role of specific cardiac anxiety, however, is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the

  3. Exercise-related cardiac cardiac rehabilitation arrest In

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    most important being myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest. (CA).1,2. 'Normal' ... myocardial infarction and CA in cardiac rehabilitation pro- ..... The acute risk of. Strenuous exercise.JAMA 1980; 244: 1799-1801. 5. Siscovick DS, Weiss NS, Fletcber RH et al. The incidence of primary cardiac arrest during vigorous exercise.

  4. Engineering of insulin receptor isoform-selective insulin analogues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Glendorf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The insulin receptor (IR exists in two isoforms, A and B, and the isoform expression pattern is tissue-specific. The C-terminus of the insulin B chain is important for receptor binding and has been shown to contact the IR just adjacent to the region where the A and B isoforms differ. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of the C-terminus of the B chain in IR isoform binding in order to explore the possibility of engineering tissue-specific/liver-specific insulin analogues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Insulin analogue libraries were constructed by total amino acid scanning mutagenesis. The relative binding affinities for the A and B isoform of the IR were determined by competition assays using scintillation proximity assay technology. Structural information was obtained by X-ray crystallography. Introduction of B25A or B25N mutations resulted in analogues with a 2-fold preference for the B compared to the A isoform, whereas the opposite was observed with a B25Y substitution. An acidic amino acid residue at position B27 caused an additional 2-fold selective increase in affinity for the receptor B isoform for analogues bearing a B25N mutation. Furthermore, the combination of B25H with either B27D or B27E also resulted in B isoform-preferential analogues (2-fold preference even though the corresponding single mutation analogues displayed no differences in relative isoform binding affinity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have discovered a new class of IR isoform-selective insulin analogues with 2-4-fold differences in relative binding affinities for either the A or the B isoform of the IR compared to human insulin. Our results demonstrate that a mutation at position B25 alone or in combination with a mutation at position B27 in the insulin molecule confers IR isoform selectivity. Isoform-preferential analogues may provide new opportunities for developing insulin analogues with improved clinical benefits.

  5. Engineering of Insulin Receptor Isoform-Selective Insulin Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendorf, Tine; Stidsen, Carsten E.; Norrman, Mathias; Nishimura, Erica; Sørensen, Anders R.; Kjeldsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background The insulin receptor (IR) exists in two isoforms, A and B, and the isoform expression pattern is tissue-specific. The C-terminus of the insulin B chain is important for receptor binding and has been shown to contact the IR just adjacent to the region where the A and B isoforms differ. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of the C-terminus of the B chain in IR isoform binding in order to explore the possibility of engineering tissue-specific/liver-specific insulin analogues. Methodology/Principal Findings Insulin analogue libraries were constructed by total amino acid scanning mutagenesis. The relative binding affinities for the A and B isoform of the IR were determined by competition assays using scintillation proximity assay technology. Structural information was obtained by X-ray crystallography. Introduction of B25A or B25N mutations resulted in analogues with a 2-fold preference for the B compared to the A isoform, whereas the opposite was observed with a B25Y substitution. An acidic amino acid residue at position B27 caused an additional 2-fold selective increase in affinity for the receptor B isoform for analogues bearing a B25N mutation. Furthermore, the combination of B25H with either B27D or B27E also resulted in B isoform-preferential analogues (2-fold preference) even though the corresponding single mutation analogues displayed no differences in relative isoform binding affinity. Conclusions/Significance We have discovered a new class of IR isoform-selective insulin analogues with 2–4-fold differences in relative binding affinities for either the A or the B isoform of the IR compared to human insulin. Our results demonstrate that a mutation at position B25 alone or in combination with a mutation at position B27 in the insulin molecule confers IR isoform selectivity. Isoform-preferential analogues may provide new opportunities for developing insulin analogues with improved clinical benefits. PMID:21625452

  6. SORLA facilitates insulin receptor signaling in adipocytes and exacerbates obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Vanessa; Schulz, Nadja; Yan, Xin; Schürmann, Annette; Kempa, Stefan; Kern, Matthias; Blüher, Matthias; Poy, Matthew N; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Willnow, Thomas E

    2016-07-01

    In humans, genetic variation of sortilin-related receptor, L(DLR class) A repeats containing (SORL1), which encodes the intracellular sorting receptor SORLA, is a major genetic risk factor for familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease. Recent GWAS analysis has also associated SORL1 with obesity in humans and in mouse models, suggesting that this receptor may play a role in regulating metabolism. Here, using mouse models with genetic loss or tissue-specific overexpression of SORLA as well as data from obese human subjects, we observed a gene-dosage effect that links SORLA expression to obesity and glucose tolerance. Overexpression of human SORLA in murine adipose tissue blocked hydrolysis of triacylglycerides and caused excessive adiposity. In contrast, Sorl1 gene inactivation in mice accelerated breakdown of triacylglycerides in adipocytes and protected animals from diet-induced obesity. We then identified the underlying molecular mechanism whereby SORLA promotes insulin-induced suppression of lipolysis in adipocytes. Specifically, we determined that SORLA acts as a sorting factor for the insulin receptor (IR) that redirects internalized receptor molecules from endosomes to the plasma membrane, thereby enhancing IR surface expression and strengthening insulin signal reception in target cells. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism for the association of SORL1 with human obesity and confirm a genetic link between neurodegeneration and metabolism that converges on the receptor SORLA.

  7. Pneumothorax in cardiac pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors for pneumothorax treated with a chest tube after cardiac pacing device implantation in a population-based cohort.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nationwide cohort study was performed based on data on 28 860 patients from the Danish Pacemaker Register, which included all Danish...... patients who received their first pacemaker (PM) or cardiac resynchronization device from 1997 to 2008. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals for the association between risk factors and pneumothorax treated with a chest tube. The median...

  8. Cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Möller Petrun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developments in the measuring of cardiac output and other haemodynamic variables are focused on the so-called minimally invasive methods. The aim of these methods is to simplify the management of high-risk and haemodynamically unstable patients. Due to the need of invasive approach and the possibility of serious complications the use of pulmonary artery catheter has decreased. This article describes the methods for measuring cardiac output, which are based on volume measurement (Fick method, indicator dilution method, pulse wave analysis, Doppler effect, and electrical bioimpedance.

  9. Diabetes Alters the Expression and Translocation of the Insulin-Sensitive Glucose Transporters 4 and 8 in the Atria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Maria

    Full Text Available Although diabetes has been identified as a major risk factor for atrial fibrillation, little is known about glucose metabolism in the healthy and diabetic atria. Glucose transport into the cell, the rate-limiting step of glucose utilization, is regulated by the Glucose Transporters (GLUTs. Although GLUT4 is the major isoform in the heart, GLUT8 has recently emerged as a novel cardiac isoform. We hypothesized that GLUT-4 and -8 translocation to the atrial cell surface will be regulated by insulin and impaired during insulin-dependent diabetes. GLUT protein content was measured by Western blotting in healthy cardiac myocytes and type 1 (streptozotocin-induced, T1Dx diabetic rodents. Active cell surface GLUT content was measured using a biotinylated photolabeled assay in the perfused heart. In the healthy atria, insulin stimulation increased both GLUT-4 and -8 translocation to the cell surface (by 100% and 240%, respectively, P<0.05. Upon insulin stimulation, we reported an increase in Akt (Th308 and s473 sites and AS160 phosphorylation, which was positively (P<0.05 correlated with GLUT4 protein content in the healthy atria. During diabetes, active cell surface GLUT-4 and -8 content was downregulated in the atria (by 70% and 90%, respectively, P<0.05. Akt and AS160 phosphorylation was not impaired in the diabetic atria, suggesting the presence of an intact insulin signaling pathway. This was confirmed by the rescued translocation of GLUT-4 and -8 to the atrial cell surface upon insulin stimulation in the atria of type 1 diabetic subjects. In conclusion, our data suggest that: 1 both GLUT-4 and -8 are insulin-sensitive in the healthy atria through an Akt/AS160 dependent pathway; 2 GLUT-4 and -8 trafficking is impaired in the diabetic atria and rescued by insulin treatment. Alterations in atrial glucose transport may induce perturbations in energy production, which may provide a metabolic substrate for atrial fibrillation during diabetes.

  10. N-Acetylcysteine Attenuates Diabetic Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion Injury through Inhibiting Excessive Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Excessive autophagy is a major mechanism of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (I/RI in diabetes with enhanced oxidative stress. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC reduces myocardial I/RI. It is unknown if inhibition of autophagy may represent a mechanism whereby NAC confers cardioprotection in diabetes. Methods and Results. Diabetes was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats with streptozotocin and they were treated without or with NAC (1.5 g/kg/day for four weeks before being subjected to 30-minute coronary occlusion and 2-hour reperfusion. The results showed that cardiac levels of 15-F2t-Isoprostane were increased and that autophagy was evidenced as increases in ratio of LC3 II/I and protein P62 and AMPK and mTOR expressions were significantly increased in diabetic compared to nondiabetic rats, concomitant with increased postischemic myocardial infarct size and CK-MB release but decreased Akt and eNOS activation. Diabetes was also associated with increased postischemic apoptotic cell death manifested as increases in TUNEL positive cells, cleaved-caspase-3, and ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 protein expression. NAC significantly attenuated I/RI-induced increases in oxidative stress and cardiac apoptosis, prevented postischemic autophagy formation in diabetes, and reduced postischemic myocardial infarction (all p<0.05. Conclusions. NAC confers cardioprotection against diabetic heart I/RI primarily through inhibiting excessive autophagy which might be a major mechanism why diabetic hearts are less tolerant to I/RI.

  11. Vildagliptin reduces cardiac ischemic-reperfusion injury in obese orchiectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pintana, Hiranya; Jaiwongkam, Thidarat; Kredphoo, Sasiwan; Sivasinprasasn, Sivaporn; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and testosterone deprivation are associated with coronary artery disease. Testosterone and vildagliptin (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) exert cardioprotection during ischemic-reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the effect of these drugs on I/R heart in a testosterone-deprived, obese, insulin-resistant model is unclear. This study investigated the effects of testosterone and vildagliptin on cardiac function, arrhythmias and the infarct size in I/R heart of testosterone-deprived rats with obese insulin resistance. Orchiectomized (O) or sham operated (S) male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups to receive normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Orchiectomized rats in each diet were divided to receive testosterone (2 mg/kg), vildagliptin (3 mg/kg) or the vehicle daily for 4 weeks. Then, I/R was performed by a 30-min left anterior descending coronary artery ligation, followed by a 120-min reperfusion. LV function, arrhythmia scores, infarct size and cardiac mitochondrial function were determined. HFD groups developed insulin resistance at week 12. At week 16, cardiac function was impaired in NDO, HFO and HFS rats, but was restored in all testosterone- and vildagliptin-treated rats. During I/R injury, arrhythmia scores, infarct size and cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction were prominently increased in NDO, HFO and HFS rats, compared with those in NDS rats. Treatment with either testosterone or vildagliptin similarly attenuated these impairments during I/R injury. These finding suggest that both testosterone replacement and vildagliptin share similar efficacy for cardioprotection during I/R injury by decreasing the infarct size and attenuating cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction caused by I/R injury in testosterone-deprived rats with obese insulin resistance. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. The functional role of insulin in fertility and embryonic development-What can we learn from the bovine model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, D; Sjunnesson, Y; Humblot, P; Andersson, G; Gustafsson, H; Båge, R

    2016-07-01

    Insulin is a key metabolic hormone that plays a crucial role in regulating energy homeostasis in the body. In addition, insulin-dependent signaling has important functions in reproduction and early embryo development. As metabolism and reproduction are closely linked, metabolic challenges may be the source of reproductive disorders and decreased fertility. This is known for the dairy cow and for other species including the human. Although metabolic disorders in the dairy cow often derive from a failure to adapt to a high milk production, the situation in the human is often linked to emerging conditions and associated diseases in our modern society such as obesity and diabetes, where an excess energy intake causes decreased fertility in women. Both energy excess and energy deficit are associated with a deviation of insulin concentrations in serum and follicular fluid from normal levels. Although many studies have shown that extreme variation in energy supply can negatively influence early embryo development by inducing changes in circulating concentrations of several metabolites or hormones like insulin, several in vitro culture media are still supplemented with insulin in high concentrations. In this review, direct and indirect effects of insulin on fertility will be described. Differences between the in vivo and in vitro situations will also be discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Insulin and leptin levels in overweight and normal-weight Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Bahrami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, we aim to compare insulin and leptin levels in adolescents with or without excess weight and in those with or without abdominal obesity. Materials and Methods : This case-control study was conducted among 486 samples. We randomly selected 243 overweight and an equal number of normal-weight adolescents from among participants of the third survey of a national surveillance program entitled "Childhood and Adolescence Surveillance and PreventIon of Adult Non-communicable diseases study." Serum insulin and leptin were compared between two groups and their correlation was determined with other variables. Results: The mean age and body mass index (BMI of participants were 14.10 ± 2.82 years and 22.12 ± 6.49 kg/m 2 , respectively. Leptin and insulin levels were higher in overweight than in normal-weight adolescents (P < 0.05. Leptin level was higher in children with abdominal obesity than in their other counterparts (P < 0.001. Leptin level was correlated with age, fasting blood glucose, BMI, and insulin level. Conclusion: Insulin and leptin levels were higher among overweight and obese children, which may reflect insulin and leptin-resistance. Given the complications of excess weight from early life, prevention and controlling childhood obesity should be considered as a health priority.

  14. [Disability attributable to excess weight in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Ramiro, José Javier; Alvarez-Martín, Elena; Gil-Prieto, Ruth

    2014-08-19

    To estimate the disability attributable to higher than optimal body mass index in the Spanish population in 2006. Excess body weight prevalence data were obtained from the 2006 National Health Survey (NHS), while the prevalence of associated morbidities was extracted from the 2006 NHS and from a national hospital data base. Population attributable fractions were applied and disability attributable was expressed as years life with disability (YLD). In 2006, in the Spanish population aged 35-79 years, 791.650 YLD were lost due to higher than optimal body mass index (46.7% in males and 53.3% in females). Overweight (body mass index 25-29.9) accounted for 45.7% of total YLD. Males YLD were higher than females under 60. The 35-39 quinquennial group showed a difference for males of 16.6% while in the 74-79 group the difference was 23.8% for women. Osteoarthritis and chronic back pain accounted for 60% of YLD while hypertensive disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus were responsible of 37%. Excess body weight is a health risk related to the development of various diseases with an important associated disability burden and social and economical cost. YLD analysis is a useful monitor tool for disease control interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Effective interpretations of a diphoton excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthier, Laure [Niels Bohr International Academy & Discovery Center,Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100, Copenhagen (Denmark); Cline, James M. [Niels Bohr International Academy & Discovery Center,Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Physics, McGill University,3600 Rue University, Montréal, Québec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Shepherd, William; Trott, Michael [Niels Bohr International Academy & Discovery Center,Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-04-14

    We discuss some consistency tests that must be passed for a successful explanation of a diphoton excess at larger mass scales, generated by a scalar or pseudoscalar state, possibly of a composite nature, decaying to two photons. Scalar states at mass scales above the electroweak scale decaying significantly into photon final states generically lead to modifications of Standard Model Higgs phenomenology. We characterise this effect using the formalism of Effective Field Theory (EFT) and study the modification of the effective couplings to photons and gluons of the Higgs. The modification of Higgs phenomenology comes about in a variety of ways. For scalar 0{sup +} states, a component of the Higgs and the heavy boson can mix. Lower energy phenomenology gives a limit on the mixing angle, which gets generated at one loop in any theory explaining the diphoton excess. Even if the mixing angle is set to zero, we demonstrate that a relation exists between lower energy Higgs data and a massive scalar decaying to diphoton final states. If the new boson is a pseudoscalar, we note that if it is composite, it is generic to have an excited scalar partner that can mix with a component of the Higgs, which has a stronger coupling to photons. In the case of a pseudoscalar, we also characterize how lower energy Higgs phenomenology is directly modified using EFT, even without assuming a scalar partner of the pseudoscalar state. We find that naturalness concerns can be accommodated, and that pseudoscalar models are more protected from lower energy constraints.

  16. Nonintrusive verification attributes for excess fissile materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, N.J.; Eccleston, G.W.; Fearey, B.L. [and others

    1997-10-01

    Under US initiatives, over two hundred metric tons of fissile materials have been declared to be excess to national defense needs. These excess materials are in both classified and unclassified forms. The US has expressed the intent to place these materials under international inspections as soon as practicable. To support these commitments, members of the US technical community are examining a variety of nonintrusive approaches (i.e., those that would not reveal classified or sensitive information) for verification of a range of potential declarations for these classified and unclassified materials. The most troublesome and potentially difficult issues involve approaches for international inspection of classified materials. The primary focus of the work to date has been on the measurement of signatures of relevant materials attributes (e.g., element, identification number, isotopic ratios, etc.), especially those related to classified materials and items. The authors are examining potential attributes and related measurement technologies in the context of possible verification approaches. The paper will discuss the current status of these activities, including their development, assessment, and benchmarking status.

  17. Prokineticin Receptor‐1 Is a New Regulator of Endothelial Insulin Uptake and Capillary Formation to Control Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular and Kidney Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormishian, Mojdeh; Turkeri, Gulen; Urayama, Kyoji; Nguyen, Thu Lan; Boulberdaa, Mounia; Messaddeq, Nadia; Renault, Gilles; Henrion, Daniel; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2013-01-01

    recruitment and insulin uptake and improved heart and kidney function and insulin resistance. Conclusions We show a novel role for endothelial PKR1 signaling in cardiac, renal, and metabolic functions by regulating transendothelial insulin uptake and endothelial cell proliferation. Targeting endothelial PKR1 may serve as a therapeutic strategy for ameliorating these disorders. PMID:24152983

  18. Insulin poisoning with suicidal intent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay Gundgurthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 27-year-old paramedical lady with no known comorbidities, who presented with rapid-onset coma with hypoglycemia (plasma glucose at admission was 35 mg/dL. Clinical alertness suspected and confirmed the diagnosis of exogenous insulin administration probably with suicidal intent. During the course of her ICU stay, she developed bradycardia and hypotension which required ionotropic support. She remained in coma for 90 hours. A total of 470 g of dextrose was infused until she regained consciousness. No other complications of insulin overdose were observed during her stay in the hospital. Recovery was complete without any residual neurological deficits. Insulin administration should be kept in differential diagnosis when any case presents with coma and hypoglycemia, especially in paramedical personnel.

  19. Comparison of insulin degludec with insulin glargine in insulin-naive subjects with Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodbard, H W; Cariou, B; Zinman, B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare long-term safety and efficacy of the basal insulin analogue degludec with glargine in insulin-naive subjects with Type 2 diabetes.......The aim of this study was to compare long-term safety and efficacy of the basal insulin analogue degludec with glargine in insulin-naive subjects with Type 2 diabetes....

  20. Relationship among nocturnal sleep deficit, excess weight and metabolic alterations in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Nelina; Rangel, Airam; Rodríguez, Carla; Rodríguez, Lisette; Rodríguez, Valeria

    2014-12-01

    Sleep modulates neuroendocrine function and metabolism; therefore, changes in sleep duration may lead to developing obesity during adolescence. To assess the possible association among nocturnal sleep duration, the presence of overweight and metabolic alterations in a group of adolescents. Cross-sectional, analytical study conducted at a school in Valencia, Venezuela, during the 2012-2013 school year. Participants were 12 to 17 year-old adolescents. A survey on nocturnal sleep duration was administered; weight, height and waist circumference were recorded; and glycemia, lipid profile and insulinemia levels were measured. Body mass index and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index were calculated. Ninety adolescents were included. Compared to the group with normal weight, adolescents with excessive weight had, in average, fewer sleep hours Sundays through Thursdays (p sleep deficit and sleep debt (p sleep debt (p sleep debt, the risk of having excess weight was 2.70 times higher (95% CI= 1.09-6.72; p= 0.032) regardless of age, gender, sexual maturity, sleep deficit Sundays through Thursdays, and history of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in first-degree relatives. Nocturnal sleep deficit and sleep debt were significantly associated with excess weight and metabolic alterations related to a high cardiometabolic risk.