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Sample records for excess reactivity control

  1. Analytical estimation of control rod shadowing effect for excess reactivity measurement of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masaaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    1999-01-01

    The fuel addition method is generally used for the excess reactivity measurement of the initial core. The control rod shadowing effect for the excess reactivity measurement has been estimated analytically for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). 3-dimensional whole core analyses were carried out. The movements of control rods in measurements were simulated in the calculation. It was made clear that the value of excess reactivity strongly depend on combinations of measuring control rods and compensating control rods. The differences in excess reactivity between combinations come from the control rod shadowing effect. The shadowing effect is reduced by the use of plural number of measuring and compensating control rods to prevent deep insertion of them into the core. The measured excess reactivity in the experiments is, however, smaller than the estimated value with shadowing effect. (author)

  2. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles. Part II: Utilization for excess reactivity control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto, E-mail: alby@anl.go [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    In high temperature reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this paper QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial excess reactivity of high temperature reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This mechanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the initial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, more neutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic high temperature reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  3. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles. Part II: Utilization for excess reactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    In high temperature reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this paper QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial excess reactivity of high temperature reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This mechanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the initial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, more neutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic high temperature reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  4. The feasibility study of using deuterated gadolinium nitrate for moderator-poisoned shutdown and excess reactivity control in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Everatt, A.

    2006-01-01

    Gadolinium nitrate is used in CANDU stations as moderator poison for reactor shutdowns and excess reactivity control. The use of the light-water hydrate introduces significant quantities of light water into the moderator system, which must be removed from the moderator by periodically upgrading the moderator (isotopic maintenance). The benefit of using a deuterated gadolinium nitrate would be a higher moderator isotopic and/or a lesser isotopic maintenance requirement. This study evaluated the economics of using deuterated gadolinium nitrate, as opposed to the light-water hydrate, for moderator-poisoned shutdowns and excess reactivity control in CANDU-6 reactors. Normal gadolinium nitrate (i.e., the light-water hydrate) is available from suppliers at ∼125 $/kg. Supplier quotes for deuterated gadolinium nitrate ranged from 1900 to 4000 $/kg. To examine the possibility of producing deuterated gadolinium nitrate in-house at a lower cost than commercially available, a three-stage dissolution/evaporation manufacturing process was conceived and costed. Depending on the assumed demand for the product (i.e., the number of reactors adopting the use of the product) and the capital recovery period, the estimated unit cost for the dissolution/evaporation process ranged from 730 to 2500 $/kg. The determination of economic benefit from using deuterated gadolinium nitrate in existing CANDU stations was based on the cost savings resulting from a higher fuel burn-up (i.e., the higher moderator isotopic would give a higher fuel burn-up). The net benefit of using deuterated gadolinium nitrate for most CANDU stations was determined to be marginal (i.e., <20 k$/a). Only for those CANDU stations where the moderator isotopic was relatively low (e.g., 99.85 wt%) was there a potential significant benefit (20-100 k$/a). However, if the reason for the low moderator isotopic is a relatively high moderator light-water ingress rate from sources other than the use of the light-water hydrate

  5. Application of B{sub 4}C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Burnable Absorber Rod to Control Excess Reactivity of SMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Boravy; Hah, C. J. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Soluble boron in a nuclear reactor coolant is one of the methods to control excess reactivity of the reactor. However, the use of soluble boron also causes some negative effects such as corrosion, more-positive tendency of Moderator Temperature Coefficient (MTC) and the requirement of Chemical Volume Control System (CVCS). One of the conceptual design features of SMR having been developed in Korea is soluble boron- free reactor to eliminate those drawbacks. Control rods and Burnable Absorber (BA) rods can be other methods than soluble to control excess reactivity. WABA (Wet Annular Burnable Absorber) and PYREX are such type. The other type is IFBA (Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber) in which fuel pellet surface is coated with BA. This paper compares nuclear characteristics of three types of BA as well as SLOBA in terms of k-infinite vs. burnup and explain design basis of SLOBA. This paper also presents the application of SLOBA rods to control long-term excess reactivity of SMR. The SMR loaded with SLOBA rods has been developed for the past few years in Korean. It is named as Bandi-50 with design features of 180 MWth, 37 FAs, fuel assembly height of 200 cm. Soluble-boron-free is one of nuclear design requirements of Bandi-50 and is achieved by controlling excess reactivity of the SMR using BAs and control rods only. To achieve this design requirement, LP is carefully determined in such way that CBC should be as low as possible. Fuel assembly cross-sections are generated by CASMO-3, and core depletion calculations are performed by MASTER.

  6. Managing the reactivity excess of the gas turbine-modular helium reactor by burnable poison and control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    The gas turbine-modular helium reactor coupled to the deep burn in-core fuel management strategy offers the extraordinary capability to incinerate over 50% of the initial inventory of fissile material. This extraordinary feature, coming from an advanced and well tested fuel element design, which takes advantage of the TRISO particles technology, is maintained while the reactor is loaded with the most different types of fuels. In the present work, we assumed the reactor operating at the equilibrium of the fuel composition, obtained by a 6 years irradiation of light water reactor waste, and we investigated the effects of the introduction of the burnable poison and the control rods; we equipped the core with all the three types of control rods: operational, startup and shutdown ones. We employed as burnable poison natural erbium, due to the 167 Er increasing neutron capture microscopic cross-section in the energy range where the neutron spectrum exhibits the thermal peak; in addition, we utilized boron carbide, with 90% enrichment in 1 B, as the absorption material of the control rods. Concerning the burnable poison studies, we focused on the k eff value, the 167 Er mass during burnup, the influence of modifying the radius of the BISO particles kernel and the fuel and moderator coefficients of temperature. Concerning the control rods studies, we investigated the reactivity worth, the changes in the neutron flux profile due to a partial insertion, the influence of modifying the radius of the BISO particles kernel and the β eff , at the beginning of the operation

  7. Managing the reactivity excess of the gas turbine-modular helium reactor by burnable poison and control rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@neutron.kth.se

    2006-01-15

    The gas turbine-modular helium reactor coupled to the deep burn in-core fuel management strategy offers the extraordinary capability to incinerate over 50% of the initial inventory of fissile material. This extraordinary feature, coming from an advanced and well tested fuel element design, which takes advantage of the TRISO particles technology, is maintained while the reactor is loaded with the most different types of fuels. In the present work, we assumed the reactor operating at the equilibrium of the fuel composition, obtained by a 6 years irradiation of light water reactor waste, and we investigated the effects of the introduction of the burnable poison and the control rods; we equipped the core with all the three types of control rods: operational, startup and shutdown ones. We employed as burnable poison natural erbium, due to the {sup 167}Er increasing neutron capture microscopic cross-section in the energy range where the neutron spectrum exhibits the thermal peak; in addition, we utilized boron carbide, with 90% enrichment in {sup 1}B, as the absorption material of the control rods. Concerning the burnable poison studies, we focused on the k {sub eff} value, the {sup 167}Er mass during burnup, the influence of modifying the radius of the BISO particles kernel and the fuel and moderator coefficients of temperature. Concerning the control rods studies, we investigated the reactivity worth, the changes in the neutron flux profile due to a partial insertion, the influence of modifying the radius of the BISO particles kernel and the {beta} {sub eff}, at the beginning of the operation.

  8. Method of controlling reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochihara, Hiroshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reactivity controlling characteristics by artificially controlling the leakage of neutron from a reactor and providing a controller for controlling the reactivity. Method: A reactor core is divided into several water gaps to increase the leakage of neutron, its reactivity is reduced, a gas-filled control rod or a fuel assembly is inserted into the gap as required, the entire core is coupled in a system to reduce the leakage of the neutron, and the reactivity is increased. The reactor shutdown is conducted by the conventional control rod, and to maintain critical state, boron density varying system is used together. Futher, a control rod drive is used with that similar to the conventional one, thereby enabling fast reactivity variation, and the positive reactivity can be obtained by the insertion, thereby improving the reactivity controlling characteristics. (Yoshihara, H.)

  9. Management of Excess Reactive Nitrogen in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, J. N.; Theis, T.; Doering, O.

    2011-12-01

    Managing the impacts of excessive reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the environment is a complex problem that begins with the recognition of the obligate dietary need for Nr by all living populations. The human solution to this need has been to devise ways to bring Nr into the biosphere (via the Haber-Bosch process) to grow food. Other Nr is created as a by-product of fossil-fuel combustion. The net result is the introduction of more than five times the Nr created by natural processes in the U.S., only a fraction of which is converted back to diatomic nitrogen through denitrification. This presentation summarizes findings and recommendations of the newly-released US EPA Science Advisory Board's Integrated Nitrogen Committee report, "Reactive Nitrogen in the United States: An Analysis of Flows, Consequences, and Management Options", that deal specifically with approaches for solving the excess Nr problem. These can be grouped into four general areas: (1) Recognition of the Problem. Until there is recognition that excess Nr is a serious problem with economic, health, and societal consequences, there will be little willingness to expend resources on this issue. Education, communication and outreach are critically important to engender in regulators, and the public at large, sufficient will to undertake the large scale effort needed to reduce Nr in the environment. (2) Development of Integrated Regulatory Approaches. Given what is known about the way Nr behaves, efforts to deal with excess Nr must be organized in a way that reflects the nature of the problem. Unfortunately, most approaches tend to conceive of Nr issues within a narrowly focused disciplinary model, and our policy and regulatory institutions are often bound by enabling legislation that stresses source-by-source, chemical-by-chemical, and media-by-media. The resulting regulatory structure that has evolved for problems such as Nr that affect human health and the environment is apt to miss the complex nature of the

  10. Brazilian air traffic controllers exhibit excessive sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Valdenilson Ribeiro; de Almeida, Cláudia Ângela Vilela; Martins, Hugo André de Lima; Alves, Carlos Frederico de Oliveira; Alves, Marcos José Pinheiro Cândido; Carneiro, Severino Marcos de Oliveira; Ribas, Valéria Ribeiro; de Vasconcelos, Carlos Augusto Carvalho; Sougey, Everton Botelho; de Castro, Raul Manhães

    2011-01-01

    Excessive sleepiness (ES) is an increased tendency to initiate involuntary sleep for naps at inappropriate times. The objective of this study was to assess ES in air traffic controllers (ATCo). 45 flight protection professionals were evaluated, comprising 30 ATCo, subdivided into ATCo with ten or more years in the profession (ATCo≥10, n=15) and ATCo with less than ten years in the profession (ATCoair traffic controllers exhibit excessive sleepiness.

  11. Determination of the design excess reactivity for the TREAT Upgrade reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Hanan, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The excess reactivity designed to be built into a reactor core is a primary determinant of the fissile loadings of the fuel rods in the core. For the TREAT Upgrade (TU) reactor the considerations that enter into the determination of the excess reactivity are different from those of conventional power reactors. The reactor is designed to operate in an adiabatic transient mode for reactor safety in-pile test programs. The primary constituent of the excess reactivity is the calculated reactivity required to perform the most demanding transient experiments. Because of the unavailability of supporting critical experiments for the core design, the uncertainty terms that add on to this basic constituent are rather large. The burnup effects in TU are negligible and no refueling is planned. In this paper the determination of the design excess reactivity of the TREAT Upgrade reactor is discussed

  12. Reactivity of Monolayer Protected Silver Clusters Towards Excess Ligand: A Calorimetric Study

    KAUST Repository

    Baksi, Ananya

    2017-10-31

    Reactivity of monolayer protected atomically precise clusters of noble metals is of significant research interest. Till date very few experimental data are available on the reaction thermodynamics of such clusters. Here we report a calorimetric study of the reaction of glutathione (GSH) protected silver clusters in presence of excess ligand, GSH using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). We have studied Ag11(SG)7 and Ag32(SG)19 clusters and compared their reactivity with GSH protected silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver ions. Clusters show intermediate reactivity towards excess ligand com-pared to nanoparticles and silver ions. Several control experiments were performed to understand the degradation mech-anism of these silver clusters and nanoparticles. Effect of dissolved oxygen in the degradation process was studied in de-tail and found that it did not have a significant role, although alternate pathways of degradation with the involvement of oxygen cannot be ruled out. Direct confirmation of the fact that functionalized metal clusters fall in-between NPs and atomic systems in their stability is obtained experimentally for the first time. Several other thermophysical parameters of these clusters were also determined including, density, speed of sound, isentropic compressibility and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  13. Control rod excess withdrawal prevention device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Yoshihito.

    1992-01-01

    Excess withdrawal of a control rod of a BWR type reactor is prevented. That is, the device comprises (1) a speed detector for detecting the driving speed of a control rod, (2) a judging circuit for outputting an abnormal signal if the driving speed is greater than a predetermined level and (3) a direction control valve compulsory closing circuit for controlling the driving direction of inserting and withdrawing a control rod based on an abnormal signal. With such a constitution, when the with drawing speed of a control rod is greater than a predetermined level, it is detected by the speed detector and the judging circuit. Then, all of the direction control valve are closed by way of the direction control valve compulsory closing circuit. As a result, the operation of the control rod is stopped compulsorily and the withdrawing speed of the control rod can be lowered to a speed corresponding to that upon gravitational withdrawal. Accordingly, excess withdrawal can be prevented. (I.S)

  14. Verification for excess reactivity on beginning equilibrium core of RSG GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daddy Setyawan; Budi Rohman

    2011-01-01

    BAPETEN is an institution authorized to control the use of nuclear energy in Indonesia. Control for the use of nuclear energy is carried out through three pillars: regulation, licensing, and inspection. In order to assure the safety of the operating research reactors, the assessment unit of BAPETEN is carrying out independent assessment in order to verify safety related parameters in the SAR including neutronic aspect. The work includes verification to the Power Peaking Factor in the equilibrium silicide core of RSG GAS reactor by computational method using MCNP-ORIGEN. This verification calculation results for is 9.4 %. Meanwhile, the RSG-GAS safety analysis report shows that the excess reactivity on equilibrium core of RSG GAS is 9.7 %. The verification calculation results show a good agreement with the report. (author)

  15. Nuclear reactivity control configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, B.E.; DeMars, R.V.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a neutron flux control component assembly for use in a nuclear reactor. It comprises: at least three V-shaped close fitting carrier sheets nested together to provide a Y-shaped cross section and which are movable relative to each other along their longitudinal axis; at least three substantially identical neutron poison segments, one of each of the carrier sheets, movable between overlapped and exposed positions in response to movement of the carrier sheets; and each of the poison segments having a width grater than three times the effective thickness of the assembly of overlapping poison segments and capable of absorbing at least eighty percent of the neutrons that strike its surface

  16. Neutronic characterization of cylindrical core of minor excess reactivity in the nuclear reactor IPEN/MB-01 from the measure of neutron flux distribution and its reactivity ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Aredes, Vitor O.G.; Mura, Luiz E.C.; Santos, Diogo F. dos; Silva, Alexandre P. da, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: vitoraredes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    When compared to a rectangular parallelepiped configuration the cylindrical configuration of a nuclear reactor core has a better neutron economy because in this configuration the probability of the neutron leakage is smaller, causing an increase in overall reactivity in the system to the same amount of fuel used. In this work we obtained a critical cylindrical configuration with the control rods 89.50% withdraw from the active region of the IPEN/MB-01 core. This is the cylindrical configuration minimum possible excess of reactivity. Thus we obtained a cylindrical configuration with a diameter of only 28 fuel rods with lowest possible excess of reactivity. For this purpose, 112 peripheral fuel rods are removed from standard reactor core (rectangular parallelepiped of 28x28 fuel rods). In this configuration the excesses of reactivity is approximated 279 pcm. From there, we characterize the neutron field by measuring the spatial distribution of the thermal and epithermal neutron flux for the reactor operating power of 83 watts measured by neutron noise analysis technique and 92.08± 0.07 watts measured by activation technique [10]. The values of thermal and epithermal neutron flux in different directions, axial, radial north-south and radial east-west, are obtained in the asymptotic region of the reactor core, away from the disturbances caused by the reflector and control bar, by irradiating thin gold foils infinitely diluted (1% Au - 99% Al) with and without (bare) cadmium cover. In addition to the distribution of neutron flux, the moderator temperature coefficient, the void coefficient, calibration of the control rods were measured. (author)

  17. JOYO MK-III performance test. Criticality test, excess reactivity measurement and burn-up coefficient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shigetaka; Sekine, Takashi; Kitano, Akihiro; Nagasaki, Hideaki

    2005-03-01

    The MK-III performance test began in June 2003 to fully characterize the upgraded core and heat transfer system of the experimental fast reactor JOYO. This paper describes the results of the approach to criticality, the excess reactivity evaluation and the burn-up coefficient measurement. In the approach to criticality test, the MK-III core achieved initial criticality at the control rod bank position of 412.8 mm on 14:03 July 2nd, 2003. Because the replacement of the outer two rows of reflector subassemblies with shielding subassemblies reduced the source range monitor signals by a factor of 3 at the same reactor power compared with those in the MK-II core, we measured the change of the monitor's response and determined the count rate 2x10 4 cps.' as an appropriate value judging the zero power criticality. In the excess reactivity evaluation, the zero power excess reactivity at 250degC was 2.99±0.10%Δk/kk' based on the measured critical rod bank position and the measured control rod worths. The predicted value by the JOYO core management code system HESTIA was 3.13±0.16%Δk/kk', showing good agreement with the measured value. The measured excess reactivity was within the safety requirement limit. In the burn-up coefficient measurement, the excess reactivity change versus the reactor burn-up was evaluated. The measurement method adopted was to measure the control rod positions during the rated power operation. A value of -2.12x10 -4 Δk/kk'/MWd was obtained as a measured burn-up coefficient. The value calculated by HESTIA was -2.12x10 -4 Δk/kk'/MWd, and it agreed well with the measured value. All technical safety requirements for MK-III core were satisfied and the calculation accuracy of the core management code system HESTIA was confirmed. (author)

  18. Insertion material for controlling reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Iwao.

    1994-01-01

    Moderators and a group of suspended materials having substantially the same density as the moderator are sealed in a hollow rod vertically inserted to a fuel assembly. Specifically, the group of suspended materials is adapted to have a density changing stepwise from density of the moderator at the exit temperature of the reactor core to that at the inlet temperature of the reactor core. Reactivity is selectively controlled for a portion of high power and a portion of high reactivity by utilizing the density of the moderator and the distribution of the density. That is, if the power distribution is flat, the density of the moderators changes at a constant rate over the vertical direction of the reactor core and the suspended materials stay at a portion of the same density, to form a uniform distribution. Further, upon reactor shutdown, since the liquid temperature of the moderators is lowered and the density is increased, all of beads are collected at the upper portion to remove water at the upper portion of the reactor core of low burnup degree thereby selectively controlling the reactivity at a portion of high power and a portion of high reactivity. (N.H.)

  19. Controlling material reactivity using architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kyle

    2017-06-01

    The reactivity of thermites can be tailored through selection of several parameters, and can range from very slow burns to rapid deflagrations. 3D printing is a rapidly emerging field, and offers the potential to build architected parts. Here we sought to explore whether controlling such features could be a suitable path forward for gaining additional control of the reactivity. This talk discusses several new methods for preparing thermite samples with controlled architectures using 3D printing. Additionally, we demonstrate that the architecture can play a role in the reactivity of an object. Our results suggest that architecture can be used to tailor the convective and/or advective energy transport during a deflagration, thus enhancing or retarding the reaction. The results are promising in that they give researchers an additional way of controlling the energy release rate without defaulting to the conventional approach of changing the formulation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-708525. In collaboration with: Cheng Zhu, Eric Duoss, Matt Durban, Alex Gash, Alexandra Golobic, Michael Grapes, David Kolesky, Joshua Kuntz, Jennifer Lewis, Christopher Spadaccini; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LAB.

  20. Optimal distribution of reactivity excess in a system of reactors operating at a variable loading schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolsunov, A.A.; Zagrebaev, A.M.; Naumov, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    Considered is the task of reactivity excess distribution optimization in the system of reactors for the purpose of minimazing the summary power production losses at the fixed loading schedule. Mathematical formulation of the task is presented. Given are the curves, characterizing the dependence of possible degree of the reactor power drop on reactivity excees for non-stationary Xe poisoning at different nominal density of neutron flux. Analyzing the results, it is concluded that in case, when the reactors differ only in neutron flux density the reactor with lower neutron flux density should be involved in the variable operation schedule first as the poisoning of this reactor will be less, and therefore, the losses of the system power production will be less. It is advisable to reserve the reactivity excess in the reactor with greater power or in the reactor with higher burnup rate. It is stressed that the obtained results of the optimization task solution point out the possibility of obtaining the certain ecomonic effect and permit to correct the requirements on mobility of separate power units at system approach to NPP operation in a variable loading schedule

  1. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  2. What controls deuterium excess in global precipitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pfahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The deuterium excess (d of precipitation is widely used in the reconstruction of past climatic changes from ice cores. However, its most common interpretation as moisture source temperature cannot directly be inferred from present-day water isotope observations. Here, we use a new empirical relation between d and near-surface relative humidity (RH together with reanalysis data to globally predict d of surface evaporation from the ocean. The very good quantitative agreement of the predicted hemispherically averaged seasonal cycle with observed d in precipitation indicates that moisture source relative humidity, and not sea surface temperature, is the main driver of d variability on seasonal timescales. Furthermore, we review arguments for an interpretation of long-term palaeoclimatic d changes in terms of moisture source temperature, and we conclude that there remains no sufficient evidence that would justify to neglect the influence of RH on such palaeoclimatic d variations. Hence, we suggest that either the interpretation of d variations in palaeorecords should be adapted to reflect climatic influences on RH during evaporation, in particular atmospheric circulation changes, or new arguments for an interpretation in terms of moisture source temperature will have to be provided based on future research.

  3. The Large Customer Reactive Power Control Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Małkowski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors wish to draw attention to the rationale for, and the possibility of, the use of local reactive power sources by the Transmission Node Master Controller (TNMC. Large Customers (LC are one of the possible reactive power sources. The paper presents the issues related to the need for coordination between the control systems installed in the LC network, and coordination between control systems of the LC as well as master control systems in the network.

  4. Analysis of excess reactivity of JOYO MK-III performance test core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shigetaka; Yokoyama, Kenji

    2003-10-01

    JOYO is currently being upgraded to the high performance irradiation bed JOYO MK-III core'. The MK-III core is divided into two fuel regions with different plutonium contents. To obtain a higher neutron flux, the active core height was reduced from 55 cm to 50 cm. The reflector subassemblies were replaced by shielding subassemblies in the outer two rows. Twenty of the MK-III outer core fuel subassemblies in the performance test core were partially burned in the transition core. Four irradiation test rigs, which do not contain any fuel material, were loaded in the center of the performance test core. In order to evaluate the excess reactivity of MK-III performance test core accurately, we evaluated it by applying not only the JOYO MK-II core management code system MAGI, but also the MK-III core management code system HESTIA, the JUPITER standard analysis method and the Monte Carlo method with JFS-3-J3.2R content set. The excess reactivity evaluations obtained by the JUPITER standard analysis method were corrected to results based on transport theory with zero mesh-size in space and angle. A bias factor based on the MK-II 35th core, which sensitivity was similar to MK-III performance test core's, was also applied, except in the case where an adjusted nuclear cross-section library was used. Exact three-dimensional, pin-by-pin geometry and continuous-energy cross sections were used in the Monte Carlo calculation. The estimated error components associated with cross-sections, methods correction factors and the bias factor were combined based on Takeda's theory. Those independently calculated values agree well and range from 2.8 to 3.4%Δk/kk'. The calculation result of the MK-III core management code system HESTLA was 3.13% Δk/kk'. The estimated errors for bias method range from 0.1 to 0.2%Δk/kk'. The error in the case using adjusted cross-section was 0.3%Δk/kk'. (author)

  5. High salt-induced excess reactive oxygen species production resulted in heart tube malformation during gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin-Rui; Wang, Guang; Zhang, Jing; Li, Shuai; Chuai, Manli; Bao, Yongping; Hocher, Berthold; Yang, Xuesong

    2018-09-01

    An association has been proved between high salt consumption and cardiovascular mortality. In vertebrates, the heart is the first functional organ to be formed. However, it is not clear whether high-salt exposure has an adverse impact on cardiogenesis. Here we report high-salt exposure inhibited basement membrane breakdown by affecting RhoA, thus disturbing the expression of Slug/E-cadherin/N-cadherin/Laminin and interfering with mesoderm formation during the epithelial-mesenchymal transition(EMT). Furthermore, the DiI + cell migration trajectory in vivo and scratch wound assays in vitro indicated that high-salt exposure restricted cell migration of cardiac progenitors, which was caused by the weaker cytoskeleton structure and unaltered corresponding adhesion junctions at HH7. Besides, down-regulation of GATA4/5/6, Nkx2.5, TBX5, and Mef2c and up-regulation of Wnt3a/β-catenin caused aberrant cardiomyocyte differentiation at HH7 and HH10. High-salt exposure also inhibited cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. Most importantly, our study revealed that excessive reactive oxygen species(ROS)generated by high salt disturbed the expression of cardiac-related genes, detrimentally affecting the above process including EMT, cell migration, differentiation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, which is the major cause of malformation of heart tubes. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Determination of the excess of reactivity in a nuclear configuration and its influence on the power level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga, Agustin; Tapia, Jose

    2014-01-01

    This work presents experimental results which show that the critical position of a given nuclear configuration changes with the reactor power (expressed by the current measurement). Thus, if the current is 0.6 x 10 -11 A (1 W), then the critical position is, BC1 = 0.0 % while 0.6 x 10 -9 A (100 W), BC1= 46.5 %. The difference is apparent because under a current of 10 -10 A, the reactivity is not significant. Therefore, it is recommended that for reactors like the RP-10 with a lot of neutrons at the 'background' level, the excess reactivity must be measured in current as 0.6 x 10 -9 A (100 W) not less. Finally, the excess of reactivity for the N o 42 configuration was determined, which was 3032 pcm with uncertainty less than 1 %. (authors).

  7. Calculation of the Reactivity Equivalence of Control Rods in the Second Charge of the HBWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissglas, P.

    1960-11-01

    Full text: Using current methods the reactivity equivalence of 19 31 and 37 centrally located control rods in the second charge of the HBWR has been calculated. An estimate of the available excess reactivity with clean cold core has also been made. Insertion depth was taken as 0, l/3, 2/3 and 3/3 of the core length

  8. Calculation of the Reactivity Equivalence of Control Rods in the Second Charge of the HBWR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissglas, P [The Swedish State Power Board, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1960-11-15

    Full text: Using current methods the reactivity equivalence of 19 31 and 37 centrally located control rods in the second charge of the HBWR has been calculated. An estimate of the available excess reactivity with clean cold core has also been made. Insertion depth was taken as 0, l/3, 2/3 and 3/3 of the core length.

  9. Multiagent voltage and reactive power control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Arkhipov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the research of multiagent voltage and reactive power control system development. The prototype of the system has been developed by R&D Center at FGC UES (Russia. The control system architecture is based on the innovative multiagent system theory application that leads to the achievement of several significant advantages (in comparison to traditional control systems implementation such as control system efficiency enhancement, control system survivability and cyber security.

  10. Percutaneous Biopsy and Radiofrequency Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma with Excess Reactive New Bone Formation and Cortical Thickening Using a Battery-Powered Drill for Access: A Technical Note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippiadis, D., E-mail: dfilippiadis@yahoo.gr; Gkizas, C., E-mail: chgkizas@gmail.com; Kostantos, C., E-mail: drkarpen@yahoo.gr; Mazioti, A., E-mail: argyromazioti@yahoo.gr; Reppas, L., E-mail: l.reppas@yahoo.com; Brountzos, E., E-mail: ebrountz@med.uoa.gr; Kelekis, N., E-mail: kelnik@med.uoa.gr; Kelekis, A., E-mail: akelekis@med.uoa.gr [University General Hospital “ATTIKON”, 2nd Radiology Department (Greece)

    2016-10-15

    PurposeTo report our experience with the use of a battery-powered drill in biopsy and radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma with excess reactive new bone formation. The battery-powered drill enables obtaining the sample while drilling.Materials and MethodsDuring the last 18 months, 14 patients suffering from painful osteoid osteoma with excess reactive new bone formation underwent CT-guided biopsy and radiofrequency ablation. In order to assess and sample the nidus of the osteoid osteoma, a battery-powered drill was used. Biopsy was performed in all cases. Then, coaxially, a radiofrequency electrode was inserted and ablation was performed with osteoid osteoma protocol. Procedure time (i.e., drilling including local anesthesia), amount of scans, technical and clinical success, and the results of biopsy are reported.ResultsAccess to the nidus through the excess reactive new bone formation was feasible in all cases. Median procedure time was 50.5 min. Histologic verification of osteoid osteoma was performed in all cases. Radiofrequency electrode was coaxially inserted within the nidus and ablation was successfully performed in all lesions. Median amount CT scans, performed to control correct positioning of the drill and precise electrode placement within the nidus was 11. There were no complications or material failure reported in our study.ConclusionsThe use of battery-powered drill facilitates access to the osteoid osteoma nidus in cases where excess reactive new bone formation is present. Biopsy needle can be used for channel creation during the access offering at the same time the possibility to extract bone samples.

  11. Buckling measurement in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor in cylindrical configuration of minor excess of reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purgato, Rafael Turrini; Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Aredes, Vitor Ottoni; Silva, Alexandre F. Povoa da; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work presents the results of experimental Buckling in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor in its cylindrical configuration with 28 fuel rods along its diameter. The IPEN/MB-01 is a zero power reactor designed to operate at a maximum power of 100 watts. It is a versatile nuclear facility, which allows for the simulation of all the characteristics of a nuclear power reactor making it an ideal test bed for this kind of measurement. A mapping of neutron flux inside the reactor is carried out in order to determine the total Buckling of the cylindrical configuration. The reactor was operated for one hour. Then, the activity of the fuel rods is measured by gamma ray spectrometry using a HPGe solid state detector and a suitable rod scanner. Photon energies of 276.6keV from {sup 239}Np (neutron capture (n,?) nuclear reaction) and 293.3keV from {sup 143}Ce (fission (n,f) nuclear reaction on both {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U) , are respectively along both axial and radial directions. Other measurements are performed using gold wires and foils along radial and axial directions of the reactor core. The three methods above resulted in a weighted average value of 93.18 ± 8.47 m-2 for the Total Buckling of this cylindrical core configuration with 28 control rods along its diameter with 568 fuel rods and only 271 pcm of excess reactivity. (author)

  12. Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of 3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the 3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the 3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the 3 He for spin-polarizing the 3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the 3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with 3 He to spin-polarize the 3 He atoms

  13. Reactivity of Monolayer Protected Silver Clusters Towards Excess Ligand: A Calorimetric Study

    KAUST Repository

    Baksi, Ananya; Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa; Chhotaray, Pratap K.; Chakraborty, Papri; Mondal, Biswajit; Bhat, Shridevi; Gardas, Ramesh L.; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2017-01-01

    Reactivity of monolayer protected atomically precise clusters of noble metals is of significant research interest. Till date very few experimental data are available on the reaction thermodynamics of such clusters. Here we report a calorimetric

  14. Reactive Nanocomposites for Controllable Adhesive Debonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    technologies include shape memory alloy (SMA)-based approach, a chemical foaming agent (CFA) approach, and a reactive nanocomposite (RNC) approach. SMA...anofoil (a) Component 1 Thermoset Adhesive Component 2 Nano-coating (b) Figure 2. Debonding approach where (a) freestanding...J. Controlled Adhesive Debonding of RAH-66 Comanche Chines Using Shape Memory Alloys ; ARL-TR-2937; U.S. Army Research Laboratory: Aberdeen Proving

  15. Application of revised procedure on determining large excess reactivity of operating reactor. Fuel addition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu

    2002-01-01

    The fuel addition method or the neutron absorption substitution method have been used for determination of large excess multiplication factor of large sized reactors. It has been pointed out, however, that all the experimental methods are possibly not free from the substantially large systematic error up to 20%, when the value of the excess multiplication factor exceeds about 15%Δk. Then, a basic idea of a revised procedure was proposed to cope with the problem, which converts the increase of multiplication factor in an actual core to that in a virtual core by calculation, because its value is in principle defined not for the former but the latter core. This paper proves that the revised procedure is able to be applicable for large sized research and test reactors through the theoretical analyses on the measurements undertaken at the JMTRC and JMTR cores. The values of excess multiplication factor are accurately determined utilizing the whole core calculation by the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A. (author)

  16. The interactive effects of excess reactive nitrogen and climate change on aquatic ecosystems and water resources of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jill S.; Hall, E.K.; Nolan, B.T.; Finlay, J.C.; Bernhardt, E.S.; Harrison, J.A.; Chan, F.; Boyer, E.W.

    2012-01-01

    Nearly all freshwaters and coastal zones of the US are degraded from inputs of excess reactive nitrogen (Nr), sources of which are runoff, atmospheric N deposition, and imported food and feed. Some major adverse effects include harmful algal blooms, hypoxia of fresh and coastal waters, ocean acidification, long-term harm to human health, and increased emissions of greenhouse gases. Nitrogen fluxes to coastal areas and emissions of nitrous oxide from waters have increased in response to N inputs. Denitrification and sedimentation of organic N to sediments are important processes that divert N from downstream transport. Aquatic ecosystems are particularly important denitrification hotspots. Carbon storage in sediments is enhanced by Nr, but whether carbon is permanently buried is unknown. The effect of climate change on N transport and processing in fresh and coastal waters will be felt most strongly through changes to the hydrologic cycle, whereas N loading is mostly climate-independent. Alterations in precipitation amount and dynamics will alter runoff, thereby influencing both rates of Nr inputs to aquatic ecosystems and groundwater and the water residence times that affect Nr removal within aquatic systems. Both infrastructure and climate change alter the landscape connectivity and hydrologic residence time that are essential to denitrification. While Nr inputs to and removal rates from aquatic systems are influenced by climate and management, reduction of N inputs from their source will be the most effective means to prevent or to minimize environmental and economic impacts of excess Nr to the nation’s water resources.

  17. Controlling the excess heat from oxy-combustion of coal by blending with biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Turan, A.Z.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Two different biomass species such as sunflower seed shell and hazelnut shell were blended with Soma-Denis lignite to determine the effects of co-combustion on the thermal reactivity and the burnout of the lignite sample. For this purpose, Thermogravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry techniques were applied from ambient to 900 C with a heating rate of 40 C/min under dry air and pure oxygen conditions. It was found that the thermal reactivities of the biomass materials and the lignite are highly different from each other under each oxidizing medium. On the other hand, the presence of biomass in the burning medium led to important influences not only on the burnout levels but also on the heat flows. The heat flow from the burning of lignite increased fivefold when the oxidizing medium was altered from dry air to pure oxygen. But, in case of co-combustion under oxygen, the excess heat arising from combustion of lignite could be reduced and this may be helpful to control the temperature of the combustion chamber. Based on this, co-combustion of coal/biomass blends under oxygen may be suggested as an alternative method to the ''Carbon Dioxide Recycle Method'' encountered in the oxyfuel combustion systems. (author)

  18. Sweden: Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qvist, Staffan A.

    2015-01-01

    The next generation of nuclear energy systems must be licensed, constructed, and operated in a manner that will provide a competitively priced supply of energy, keeping in consideration an optimum use of natural resources, while addressing nuclear safety, waste, and proliferation resistance, and the public perception concerns of the countries in which those systems are deployed. These issues are tightly interconnected, and the implementation of passive and inherent safety features is a high priority in all modern reactor designs since it helps to tackle many of the issues at once. To this end, the Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) system was developed to ensure excellent inherent safety performance of Generation-IV reactors while having a minimal impact on core performance and economic viability. This paper covers the principles for ARC system design and analysis, the problem of ensuring ARC system response stability and gives examples of the impact of installing ARC systems in well-known fast reactor core systems. It is shown that even with a relatively modest ARC installation, having a near-negligible impact on core performance during standard operation, cores such as the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) can be made to survive any postulated unprotected transient without coolant boiling or fuel melting

  19. Analysis Influence of Mixing Gd2O3 in the Silicide Fuel Element to Core Excess Reactivity of RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susilo, Jati

    2004-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd 2 O 3 ) is a burnable poison material mixed in the pin fuel element of the LWR core used to decrease core excess reactivity. In this research, analysis influence of mixing Gd 2 O 3 in the silicide fuel element to excess reactivity of the RSG-GAS core had been done. Equivalent cell of the equilibrium core developed by L.E.Strawbridge from Westing House Co. burn-up calculation has been done using SRAC-PIJ computer code achieve infinite multiplication factor (k x ). Value of Gd 2 O 3 concentration in the fuel element (pcm) showed by mass ratio of Gd 2 O 3 (gram) to that U 3 Si 2 (gram) times 10 5 , that is 0 pcm ∼ 100 pcm. From the calculation results analysis showed that Gd 2 O 3 concentration added should be considered. because a large number of Gd 2 O 3 will result in not achieving criticality at the Beginning Of Cycle. The maximum concentration of Gd 2 O 3 for RSG-GAS equilibrium fueled silicide 2.96 grU/cc is 80 pcm or 52.02 mgram/fuel plate. Maximum reduction of core excess reactivity due to mixing of Gd 2 O 3 in the RSG-GAS silicide fuels was around 1.502 %Δk/k, and hence not achieving the standard nominal excess reactivity for RSG-GAS core using high density of U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel. (author)

  20. Integrated Design and Control of Reactive and Non-Reactive Distillation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    , an alternative approach is to tackle process design and controllability issues simultaneously, in the early stages of process design. This simultaneous synthesis approach provides optimal/near optimal operation and more efficient control of conventional (non-reactive binary distillation columns) (Hamid et al...... of methodologies have been proposed and applied on various problems to address the interactions between process design and control, and they range from optimization-based approaches to model-based methods (Sharifzadeh, 2013). In this work, integrated design and control of non-reactive distillation, ternary...... reactive distillation processes. The element concept (Pérez Cisneros et al., 1997) is used to translate a ternary system of compounds (A + B ↔ C) to a binary system of element (WA and WB). In the case of multicomponent reactive distillation processes the equivalent element concept is used to translate...

  1. Strategies for reactive power control in wind farms with STATCOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Gonzalez, Francisco [Catalonia Institute for Energy Research (IREC), Barcelona (Spain); Martinez-Rojas, Marcela [Centre d' Innovacio Tecnologica en Convertidors Estatics i Accionaments (CITCEA-UPC), Barcelona (Spain). Dept. d' Enginyeria Electrica; Sumper, Andreas; Gomis-Bellmunt, Oriol [Catalonia Institute for Energy Research (IREC), Barcelona (Spain); Centre d' Innovacio Tecnologica en Convertidors Estatics i Accionaments (CITCEA-UPC), Barcelona (Spain). Dept. d' Enginyeria Electrica

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents two strategies for reactive current control in wind farms with STATCOM under fault ride-through (FRT) situations. First, the technical requirements of the Spanish and German grid codes related to the reactive current under FRT situations are presented. Second, STATCOM and its control system are introduced. Third, the modeling done of the wind farm, the STATCOM, and the network are presented. Finally, control strategies for reactive current delivered by the park to the network under FRT situations are shown. The result of the implementation of each control strategy is shown by simulation. (orig.)

  2. Can we determine what controls the spatio-temporal distribution of d-excess and 17O-excess in precipitation using the LMDZ general circulation model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Risi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined measurements of the H218O and HDO isotopic ratios in precipitation, leading to second-order parameter D-excess, have provided additional constraints on past climates compared to the H218O isotopic ratio alone. More recently, measurements of H217O have led to another second-order parameter: 17O-excess. Recent studies suggest that 17O-excess in polar ice may provide information on evaporative conditions at the moisture source. However, the processes controlling the spatio-temporal distribution of 17O-excess are still far from being fully understood. We use the isotopic general circulation model (GCM LMDZ to better understand what controls d-excess and 17O-excess in precipitation at present-day (PD and during the last glacial maximum (LGM. The simulation of D-excess and 17O-excess is evaluated against measurements in meteoric water, water vapor and polar ice cores. A set of sensitivity tests and diagnostics are used to quantify the relative effects of evaporative conditions (sea surface temperature and relative humidity, Rayleigh distillation, mixing between vapors from different origins, precipitation re-evaporation and supersaturation during condensation at low temperature. In LMDZ, simulations suggest that in the tropics convective processes and rain re-evaporation are important controls on precipitation D-excess and 17O-excess. In higher latitudes, the effect of distillation, mixing between vapors from different origins and supersaturation are the most important controls. For example, the lower d-excess and 17O-excess at LGM simulated at LGM are mainly due to the supersaturation effect. The effect of supersaturation is however very sensitive to a parameter whose tuning would require more measurements and laboratory experiments. Evaporative conditions had previously been suggested to be key controlling factors of d-excess and 17O-excess, but LMDZ underestimates their role. More generally, some shortcomings in the simulation of 17O-excess

  3. Potential impact of reactive vaccination in controlling cholera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. To contain ongoing cholera outbreaks, the World Health Organization has suggested that reactive vaccination should be considered in addition to its previous control measures. Objectives. To explore the potential impact of a hypothetical reactive oral cholera vaccination using the example of the recent ...

  4. Neutron flux distribution inside the cylindrical core of minor excess of reactivity in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor and comparison with citation code and MCNP- 5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aredes, Vitor Ottoni; Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C.; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to determine the distribution of thermal neutron flux in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor core assembled with cylindrical core configuration of minor excess of reactivity with 568 fuel rods (28 fuel rods in diameter). The thermal neutron flux at the positions of irradiation derive from the method of reaction rate using gold foils. The experiment consists in inserting gold activations foils with and without cadmium coverage (cadmium boxes with 0.0502 cm thickness) in several positions throughout the active core. After irradiation, activity induced by nuclear reaction rates over gold foils is assessed by gamma ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Experimental results are compared to those derived from calculations performed using a three dimensional CITATION diffusion code and MCNP-5 code and a proper nuclear data library. While calculated neutron flux data shows good agreement with experimental values in regions with little disturbance in the neutron flux, also showing that in the region of the reflectors of neutrons and near the control rods, the diffusion theory is not very precise. The average value of thermal neutron flux obtained experimentally compared to the calculated value by CITATION code and MCNP-5 code respectively show a difference of 1.18% and 0.84% at a nuclear power level of 74.65 ± 3.28 % watts. The average measured value of thermal neutron flux is 4.10 10{sup 8} ± 5.25% n/cm{sup 2}s. (author)

  5. Neutron flux distribution inside the cylindrical core of minor excess of reactivity in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor and comparison with citation code and MCNP- 5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aredes, Vitor Ottoni; Bitelli, Ulysses d'Utra; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C.; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the distribution of thermal neutron flux in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor core assembled with cylindrical core configuration of minor excess of reactivity with 568 fuel rods (28 fuel rods in diameter). The thermal neutron flux at the positions of irradiation derive from the method of reaction rate using gold foils. The experiment consists in inserting gold activations foils with and without cadmium coverage (cadmium boxes with 0.0502 cm thickness) in several positions throughout the active core. After irradiation, activity induced by nuclear reaction rates over gold foils is assessed by gamma ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Experimental results are compared to those derived from calculations performed using a three dimensional CITATION diffusion code and MCNP-5 code and a proper nuclear data library. While calculated neutron flux data shows good agreement with experimental values in regions with little disturbance in the neutron flux, also showing that in the region of the reflectors of neutrons and near the control rods, the diffusion theory is not very precise. The average value of thermal neutron flux obtained experimentally compared to the calculated value by CITATION code and MCNP-5 code respectively show a difference of 1.18% and 0.84% at a nuclear power level of 74.65 ± 3.28 % watts. The average measured value of thermal neutron flux is 4.10 10 8 ± 5.25% n/cm 2 s. (author)

  6. Calculation of reactivity of control rods in graphite moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.

    1978-01-01

    A study about the method of calculation for the reactivity of control rods in graphite-moderated critical assemblies, is presented. The result of theoretical calculation, developed by super celles and Nordheim-Scalettar methods are compared with experimental results for the critical Assembly of General Atomic. The two methods are then applicable to reactivity calculation of the control rods of graphite moderated critical assemblies [pt

  7. Reactive power control with CHP plants - A demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyeng, Preben; Østergaard, Jacob; Andersen, Claus A.

    2010-01-01

    power rating of 7.3 MW on two synchronous generators. A closed-loop control is implemented, that remote controls the CHP plant to achieve a certain reactive power flow in a near-by substation. The solution communicates with the grid operator’s existing SCADA system to obtain measurements from...... lines to underground cables has changed the reactive power balance, and third, the TSO has introduced restrictions in the allowed exchange of reactive power between the transmission system and distribution grids (known as the Mvar-arrangement). The demonstration includes a CHP plant with an electric......In this project the potential for ancillary services provision by distributed energy resources is investigated. Specifically, the provision of reactive power control by combined heat and power plants is examined, and the application of the new standard for DER communication systems, IEC 61850...

  8. Reactor-core-reactivity control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Teruo; Sakuranaga, Tomonobu.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reactor safety upon failures of control rod drives by adapting a control rod not to drop out accidentally from the reactor core but be inserted into the reactor core. Constitution: The control rod is entered or extracted as usual from the bottom of the pressure vessel. A space is provided above the reactor core within the pressure vessel, in which the moving scope of the control rod is set between the space above the reactor core and the reactor core. That is, the control rod is situated above the reactor core upon extraction thereof and, if an accident occurs to the control rod drive mechanisms to detach the control rod and the driving rod, the control rod falls gravitationally into the reactor core to improve the reactor safety. In addition, since the speed limiter is no more required to the control rod, the driving force can be decreased to reduce the size of the rod drive mechanisms. (Ikeda, J.)

  9. Azoxystrobin-induced excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of photosynthesis in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the short-term toxicity of azoxystrobin (AZ), one of strobilurins used as an effective fungicidal agent to control the Asian soybean rust, on aquatic unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris. The median percentile inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) of AZ for C. vulgaris was found to be 510 μg L(-1). We showed that the algal cells were obviously depressed or shrunk in 300 and 600 μg L(-1) AZ treatments by using the electron microscopy. Furthermore, 19, 75, and 300 μg L(-1) AZ treatments decreased the soluble protein content and chlorophyll concentrations in C. vulgaris and altered the energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expression levels in 48- and 96-h exposure periods. Simultaneously, our results showed that AZ could increase the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) level and compromise superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, and glutathione (GSH) content. These situations might render C. vulgaris more vulnerable to oxidative damage. Overall, the present study indicated that AZ might be toxic to the growth of C. vulgaris, affect energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expressions, and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in C. vulgaris.

  10. Integrated Process Design and Control of Reactive Distillation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2015-01-01

    on the element concept, which is used to translate a system of compounds into elements. The operation of the reactive distillation column at the highest driving force and other candidate points is analyzed through analytical solution as well as rigorous open-loop and closed-loop simulations. By application...... of this approach, it is shown that designing the reactive distillation process at the maximum driving force results in an optimal design in terms of controllability and operability. It is verified that the reactive distillation design option is less sensitive to the disturbances in the feed at the highest driving...

  11. Skills Training via Smartphone App for University Students with Excessive Alcohol Consumption: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajecki, Mikael; Andersson, Claes; Rosendahl, Ingvar; Sinadinovic, Kristina; Fredriksson, Morgan; Berman, Anne H

    2017-10-01

    University students in a study on estimated blood alcohol concentration (eBAC) feedback apps were offered participation in a second study, if reporting continued excessive consumption at 6-week follow-up. This study evaluated the effects on excessive alcohol consumption of offering access to an additional skills training app. A total of 186 students with excessive alcohol consumption were randomized to an intervention group or a wait list group. Both groups completed online follow-ups regarding alcohol consumption after 6 and 12 weeks. Wait list participants were given access to the intervention at 6-week follow-up. Assessment-only controls (n = 144) with excessive alcohol consumption from the ongoing study were used for comparison. The proportion of participants with excessive alcohol consumption declined in both intervention and wait list groups compared to controls at first (p effects of app use from emailed feedback on excessive alcohol consumption and study participation. NCT02064998.

  12. Coordination of baseload power plant group control with static reactive power compensator control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Szczerba

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive power sources in power system nodes: generators and static reactive power compensators, are controlled by control systems. Generators – by generator node group controllers, compensators – by voltage controllers. The paper presents issues of these control systems’ coordination and proposals for its implementation.

  13. Neutronic characterization of cylindrical core of minor excess reactivity in the nuclear reactor IPEN/MB-01 from the measure of spatial and energetic distribution of neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aredes, Vitor Ottoni Garcia

    2014-01-01

    In this work was conducted the mapping of the thermal and epithermal neutrons flux and the energy spectrum of the neutrons in the reactor core IPEN/MB-01 for a cylindrical core configuration with minor excess reactivity, which is 28 x 28 fuel rods arranged in north-south and east-west directions. The calibration of control rods for this configuration determined their excess reactivity. The lower excess reactivity in the core decreased neutron flux disturbance caused by the neutron absorbing rods , given that the nuclear reactor was operated with the rods almost completely removed . Was used the 'Activation Analysis Technique' with the thin foil activation detectors ( infinitely diluted and hyper-pure), of different materials that work in different energy ranges, to calculate the saturation activity, used for determining the neutron flux and in the SANDBP code as input for the calculation of the neutrons energy spectrum. To discriminate thermal and epithermal flux , was used the 'Cadmium RatioTechnique' . The activation detectors were distributed in a total of 140 radial and axial positions in the reactor core and 16 irradiation, with bare and covered with cadmium activation foils. A model of this configuration was simulated by MCNP-5 code to determine the cadmium correction factor and comparison of the results obtained experimentally. The cylindrical configuration desired, with 17% less fuel than the standard rectangular configuration (28 x 26 fuel rods), reached criticality with the control rods approximately 90% removed, which decreased considerably the disturbance in neutron flux. Given the highest power density of the 28 x 28 cylindrical core, the neutron flux increased by over 50% in the central regions of the core compared to the values of the 28 x 26 standard rectangular core. (author)

  14. Joint excitation and reactive power control in thermal power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragosavac Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The coordinated voltage and reactive power controller, designed for the thermal power plant, is presented in the paper. A brief explanation of the need for such device is given and justification for commissioning of such equipment is outlined. After short description of the theoretical background of the proposed control design, the achieved features of the commissioned equipment are fully given. Achieved performances are illustrated by recorded reactive power and bus voltage responses after commissioning of the described equipment into the largest thermal power plant in Serbia. As it can be seen in presented records, all design targets are met.

  15. CpG methylation controls reactivation of HIV from latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Blazkova

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation of retroviral promoters and enhancers localized in the provirus 5' long terminal repeat (LTR is considered to be a mechanism of transcriptional suppression that allows retroviruses to evade host immune responses and antiretroviral drugs. However, the role of DNA methylation in the control of HIV-1 latency has never been unambiguously demonstrated, in contrast to the apparent importance of transcriptional interference and chromatin structure, and has never been studied in HIV-1-infected patients. Here, we show in an in vitro model of reactivable latency and in a latent reservoir of HIV-1-infected patients that CpG methylation of the HIV-1 5' LTR is an additional epigenetic restriction mechanism, which controls resistance of latent HIV-1 to reactivation signals and thus determines the stability of the HIV-1 latency. CpG methylation acts as a late event during establishment of HIV-1 latency and is not required for the initial provirus silencing. Indeed, the latent reservoir of some aviremic patients contained high proportions of the non-methylated 5' LTR. The latency controlled solely by transcriptional interference and by chromatin-dependent mechanisms in the absence of significant promoter DNA methylation tends to be leaky and easily reactivable. In the latent reservoir of HIV-1-infected individuals without detectable plasma viremia, we found HIV-1 promoters and enhancers to be hypermethylated and resistant to reactivation, as opposed to the hypomethylated 5' LTR in viremic patients. However, even dense methylation of the HIV-1 5'LTR did not confer complete resistance to reactivation of latent HIV-1 with some histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein kinase C agonists, TNF-alpha, and their combinations with 5-aza-2deoxycytidine: the densely methylated HIV-1 promoter was most efficiently reactivated in virtual absence of T cell activation by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. Tight but incomplete control of HIV-1 latency by Cp

  16. An accurate reactive power control study in virtual flux droop control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aimeng; Zhang, Jia

    2017-12-01

    This paper investigates the problem of reactive power sharing based on virtual flux droop method. Firstly, flux droop control method is derived, where complicated multiple feedback loops and parameter regulation are avoided. Then, the reasons for inaccurate reactive power sharing are theoretically analyzed. Further, a novel reactive power control scheme is proposed which consists of three parts: compensation control, voltage recovery control and flux droop control. Finally, the proposed reactive power control strategy is verified in a simplified microgrid model with two parallel DGs. The simulation results show that the proposed control scheme can achieve accurate reactive power sharing and zero deviation of voltage. Meanwhile, it has some advantages of simple control and excellent dynamic and static performance.

  17. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2014-10-07

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  18. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage

    2017-12-26

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  19. Control of the ambident reactivity of the nitrite ion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Hai; Rahm, Martin; Thota, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    of this difference was addressed. The ambident reactivity of the nitrite ion has been found to be the cause of the complex product formation observed, which can be controlled by a neighbouring equatorial ester group. Both N-attack and O-attack occur in the absence of the ester group, whereas O-attack is favoured...

  20. Possibilities and limits of the reactivity determination of control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenemann, D.

    1975-01-01

    Basic physical facts of the reactivity determination of control rods are presented. A survey of currrently applied methods is given, and the drawbacks of the various methods are pointed out. Special problems are presented by the interpretation of highly subcritical assemblies which are not really important in practical reactor operation but desirable for a consistant comparison between theory and experiments. (orig./AK) [de

  1. Reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    The reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) consists of a control rod system and a reserve shutdown system. During normal operation, reactivity is controlled by the control rod system, which consists of 32 control rods (16 pairs) and 16 control rod drive mechanisms except for the case when the center control rods are removed to perform an irradiation test. In an unlikely event that the control rods fail to be inserted, reserve shutdown system is provided to insert pellets of neutron-absorbing material into the core. Alloy 800H is chosen for the metallic parts of the control rods. Because the maximum temperature of the control rods reaches about 900 deg. C at reactor scrams, structural design guideline and design material data on Alloy 800H are needed for the high temperature design. The design guideline for the HTTR control rod is based on ASME Code Case N-47-21. Design material data is also determined and shown in this paper. Observing the guideline, temperature and stress analysis were conducted; it can be confirmed that the target life of the control rods of 5 years can be achieved. Various tests conducted for the control rod system and the reserve shutdown system are also described

  2. Study on chemical reactivity control of liquid sodium. Research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Jun-ichi; Ara, Kuniaki; Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Nobuki; Yoshioka, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Liquid sodium has the excellent properties as coolant of the fast breeder reactor (FBR). On the other hand, it reacts high with water and oxygen. So an innovative technology to suppress the reactivity is desired. The purpose of this study is to control the chemical reactivity of liquid sodium by dispersing the nanometer-size metallic particles (we call them Nano-particles) into liquid sodium. We focus on the atomic interaction between Nano-particles and sodium atoms. And we try to apply it to suppress the chemical reactivity of liquid sodium. Liquid sodium dispersing Nano-particles is named 'Nano-fluid'. Research programs of this study are the Nano-particles production, the evaluation of reactivity suppression of liquid sodium and the feasibility study to FBR plant. In this paper, the research programs and status are described. The important factors for particle production were understood. In order to evaluate the chemical reactivity of Nano-fluid the research programs were planned. The feasibility of the application of Nano-fluid to the coolant of FBR plant was evaluated preliminarily from the viewpoint of design and operation. (author)

  3. Reactive power management and voltage control in deregulated power markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Robert G.

    The research that is the subject of this dissertation is about the management of reactive power and voltage support in the wholesale open access power markets in the United States (US). The purpose of this research is to place decisions about open access market structures, as they relate to reactive power and voltage control, on a logical and consistent economic basis, given the engineering needs of a commercial electric power system. An examination of the electricity markets operating in the US today reveals that current approaches to reactive power management and voltage support are extensions of those based on historical, regulated monopoly electric service. A case for change is built by first looking at the subject of reactive power from an engineering viewpoint and then from an economic perspective. Ultimately, a set of market rules for managing reactive power and voltage support is proposed. The proposal suggests that cost recovery for static and dynamic VARs is appropriately accomplished through the regulated transmission cost of service. Static VAR cost recovery should follow traditional rate recovery methodologies. In the case of dynamic VARs, this work provides a methodology based on the microeconomic theory of the firm for determining such cost. It further suggests that an operational strategy that reduces and limits the use of dynamic VARs, during normal operations, is appropriate. This latter point leads to an increase in the fixed cost of the transmission network but prevents price spikes and short supply situations from affecting, or being affected by, the reactive capability limitations associated with dynamic VARs supplied from synchronous generators. The rules are consistent with a market structure that includes competitive generation and their application will result in the communication of a clear understanding of the responsibilities, related to voltage control, of each type of market entity. In this sense, their application will contribute to

  4. Reactivity control of nuclear power reactors: new options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala, F.

    1984-01-01

    Some actual aspects (referring to economy, non-proliferation and environmental impact) of nuclear power reactors has been analyzed from the point of view of the reactivity control physics. Specially studied have been the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on those aspects. The analysis carried out suggested the application of the above method of control to reactors with non-hydrogenous fuel cells, which are mainly characterized by their high moderator/fuel ratio. Finally three different types of such fuel cells are presented and some results about one of them (belonging to a PHWR controlled by graphite rods) are given. (author)

  5. Method of reactivity control in pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, Nobuo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method of controlling reactivity in a pressure tube reactor at high conversion ratio intended for high burn-up degree. Method: Control tubes are inserted in heavy water moderator. Light water is filled in the tubes at the initial burning stage. Along with the advance of the burning, the light water is gradually removed and replaced with gases of less reactive nuclear reactivity with neutrons such as air or gaseous carbon dioxide. The tubes are made of less neutron absorbing material such as aluminum. By filling light water, infinite multiplication factor is reduced to suppress the reactivity at the initial burning stage. As light water is gradually removed and replaced with air, etc., it provides an effect like that elimination of heavy water moderator to increase the conversion ratio. Accordingly, nuclear fission materials are produced additionally by so much to extend the burn-up degree. In this way, it can provide excellent effect in realizing high burn-up ratio and high conversion ratio. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Thiol-ene thermosets exploiting surface reactivity for layer-by-layer structures and control of penetration depth for selective surface reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Westh, Andreas; Pereira Rosinha Grundtvig, Ines

    Thiol-ene thermosets have been shown to be an efficient platform for preparation of functional polymer surfaces. Especially the effectiveness and versatility of the system has enabled a large variety of network properties to be obtained in a simple and straight-forward way. Due to its selectivity......, various thiols and allyl or other vinyl reactants can be used to obtain either soft and flexible1 or more rigid functional thermosets 2. The methodology permits use of etiher thermal or photochemical conditions both for matrix preparation as well as for surface functionalization. Due to excess reactive...... groups in thµe surface of thiol-ene thermosets, it is possible to prepare surface functional thermosets or to exploit the reactive groups for modular construction and subsequent chemical bonding. Here a different approach preparing monolithic layer-by-layer structures with controlled mechanical...

  7. The impact of fuel temperature reactivity coefficient on loss of reactivity control accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Ryu, E. H.; Song, Y. M.; Jung, J. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear reactors experience small power fluctuations or anticipated operational transients during even normal power operation. During normal operation, the reactivity is mainly controlled by liquid zone controllers, adjuster rods, mechanical control absorbers, and moderator poison. Even when the reactor power is increased abruptly and largely from an accident and when reactor control systems cannot be actuated quickly due to a fast transient, the reactor should be controlled and stabilized by its inherent safety parameter, such as a negative PCR (Power Coefficient of Reactivity) feedback. A PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), it is well designed for the reactor to have a negative PCR so that the reactor can be safely shut down or stabilized whenever an abrupt reactivity insertion into the reactor core occurs or the reactor power is abruptly increased. However, it is known that a CANDU reactor has a small amount of PCR, as either negative or positive, because of the different design basis and safety concepts from a PWR. CNSC's regulatory and safety regime has stated that; The PCR of CANDU reactors does not pose a significant risk. Consistent with Canadian nuclear safety requirements, nuclear power plants must have an appropriate combination of inherent and engineered safety features incorporated into the design of the reactor safety and control systems. A reactor design that has a PCR is quite acceptable provided that the reactor is stable against power fluctuations, and that the probability and consequences of any potential accidents that would be aggravated by a positive reactivity feedback are maintained within CNSCprescribed limits. Recently, it was issued licensing the refurbished Wolsong unit 1 in Korea to be operated continuously after its design lifetime in which the calculated PCR was shown to have a small positive value by applying the recent physics code systems, which are composed of WIMS IST, DRAGON IST, and RFSP IST. These code systems were transferred

  8. Control Rod Driveline Reactivity Feedback Model for Liquid Metal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young-Min; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Chang, Won-Pyo; Cho, Chung-Ho; Lee, Yong-Bum

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion of the control rod drivelines (CRDL) is one important passive mitigator under all unprotected accident conditions in the metal and oxide cores. When the CRDL are washed by hot sodium in the coolant outlet plenum, the CRDL thermally expands and causes the control rods to be inserted further down into the active core region, providing a negative reactivity feedback. Since the control rods are attached to the top of the vessel head and the core attaches to the bottom of the reactor vessel (RV), the expansion of the vessel wall as it heats will either lower the core or raise the control rods supports. This contrary thermal expansion of the reactor vessel wall pulls the control rods out of the core somewhat, providing a positive reactivity feedback. However this is not a safety factor early in a transient because its time constant is relatively large. The total elongated length is calculated by subtracting the vessel expansion from the CRDL expansion to determine the net control rod expansion into the core. The system-wide safety analysis code SSC-K includes the CRDL/RV reactivity feedback model in which control rod and vessel expansions are calculated using single-nod temperatures for the vessel and CRDL masses. The KALIMER design has the upper internal structures (UIS) in which the CRDLs are positioned outside the structure where they are exposed to the mixed sodium temperature exiting the core. A new method to determine the CRDL expansion is suggested. Two dimensional hot pool thermal hydraulic model (HP2D) originally developed for the analysis of the stratification phenomena in the hot pool is utilized for a detailed heat transfer between the CRDL mass and the hot pool coolant. However, the reactor vessel wall temperature is still calculated by a simple lumped model

  9. Reactive gas control of non-stable plasma conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellido-Gonzalez, V.; Daniel, B.; Counsell, J.; Monaghan, D.

    2006-01-01

    Most industrial plasma processes are dependant upon the control of plasma properties for repeatable and reliable production. The speed of production and range of properties achieved depend on the degree of control. Process control involves all the aspects of the vacuum equipment, substrate preparation, plasma source condition, power supplies, process drift, valves (inputs/outputs), signal and data processing and the user's understanding and ability. In many cases, some of the processes which involve the manufacturing of interesting coating structures, require a precise control of the process in a reactive environment [S.J. Nadel, P. Greene, 'High rate sputtering technology for throughput and quality', International Glass Review, Issue 3, 2001, p. 45. ]. Commonly in these circumstances the plasma is not stable if all the inputs and outputs of the system were to remain constant. The ideal situation is to move a process from set-point A to B in zero time and maintain the monitored signal with a fluctuation equal to zero. In a 'real' process that's not possible but improvements in the time response and energy delivery could be achieved with an appropriate algorithm structure. In this paper an advanced multichannel reactive plasma gas control system is presented. The new controller offers both high-speed gas control combined with a very flexible control structure. The controller uses plasma emission monitoring, target voltage or any process sensor monitoring as the input into a high-speed control algorithm for gas input. The control algorithm and parameters can be tuned to different process requirements in order to optimize response times

  10. Control of ZrH reactor reactivity perturbations during orbital maneuvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audette, R.F.

    1970-01-01

    Scheduled and inadvertent vehicle maneuvers in manned and unmanned space missions may result in reactivity perturbations to the ZrH reactor due to fuel and control drum motion from acceleration forces. Potential power and outlet coolant temperature excursions could result in interruptions of PCS power generation, or excessive coolant temperatures if uncontrolled. This analysis compares potential uncontrolled reactor transients with allowable transients for uninterrupted electrical power generation from a Brayton system, and presents a control scheme to limit transient reactor outlet temperatures to 1250 0 F for a system designed to operate at a nominal 1200 0 F reactor outlet. Potential uncontrolled transients could result in a reactor outlet temperature swing of +-77 0 F about a nominal 1200 0 F and a reactor power swing of +92 Kwt and -67 Kwt about a nominal 130 Kwt for the Brayton System. (U.S.)

  11. Robust Adaptive Reactive Power Control for Doubly Fed Induction Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huabin Wen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of reactive power control for mains-side inverter (MSI in doubly fed induction generator (DFIG is studied in this paper. To accommodate the modelling nonlinearities and inherent uncertainties, a novel robust adaptive control algorithm for MSI is proposed by utilizing Lyapunov theory that ensures asymptotic stability of the system under unpredictable external disturbances and significant parametric uncertainties. The distinguishing benefit of the aforementioned scheme consists in its capabilities to maintain satisfactory performance under varying operation conditions without the need for manually redesigning or reprogramming the control gains in contrast to the commonly used PI/PID control. Simulations are also built to confirm the correctness and benefits of the control scheme.

  12. Effects of the burnable poison heterogeneity on the long term control of excess of reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    According to the different geometry shape, the theory of black burnable particles predicts that the evolution of the poison macroscopic absorption cross section is exponentially, quadratic or linear when the burnable poison is displaced in homogeneous distribution, microspheres or needlecylinders heterogeneous distributions, respectively. In the present studies, we took advantage of the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code MCB to verify the black burnable particles theory on the Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor fuelled by military plutonium at the year the fuel reaches the equilibrium composition; we investigated 8 different burnable poisons, B, Cd, Er, Eu, Gd, Dy, Hf and Sm, in three different geometry configurations and we have found that the numerical results qualitatively match the theory predictions when burnable poisons are disposed in small particles

  13. Effects of the burnable poison heterogeneity on the long term control of excess of reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology - KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@neutron.kth.se

    2006-06-15

    According to the different geometry shape, the theory of black burnable particles predicts that the evolution of the poison macroscopic absorption cross section is exponentially, quadratic or linear when the burnable poison is displaced in homogeneous distribution, microspheres or needlecylinders heterogeneous distributions, respectively. In the present studies, we took advantage of the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code MCB to verify the black burnable particles theory on the Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor fuelled by military plutonium at the year the fuel reaches the equilibrium composition; we investigated 8 different burnable poisons, B, Cd, Er, Eu, Gd, Dy, Hf and Sm, in three different geometry configurations and we have found that the numerical results qualitatively match the theory predictions when burnable poisons are disposed in small particles.

  14. Quality control of photosystem II: lipid peroxidation accelerates photoinhibition under excessive illumination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffanie Chan

    Full Text Available Environmental stresses lower the efficiency of photosynthesis and sometimes cause irreversible damage to plant functions. When spinach thylakoids and Photosystem II membranes were illuminated with excessive visible light (100-1,000 µmol photons m(-1 s(-1 for 10 min at either 20°C or 30°C, the optimum quantum yield of Photosystem II decreased as the light intensity and temperature increased. Reactive oxygen species and endogenous cationic radicals produced through a photochemical reaction at and/or near the reaction center have been implicated in the damage to the D1 protein. Here we present evidence that lipid peroxidation induced by the illumination is involved in the damage to the D1 protein and the subunits of the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II. This is reasoned from the results that considerable lipid peroxidation occurred in the thylakoids in the light, and that lipoxygenase externally added in the dark induced inhibition of Photosystem II activity in the thylakoids, production of singlet oxygen, which was monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping, and damage to the D1 protein, in parallel with lipid peroxidation. Modification of the subunits of the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II by malondialdehyde as well as oxidation of the subunits was also observed. We suggest that mainly singlet oxygen formed through lipid peroxidation under light stress participates in damaging the Photosystem II subunits.

  15. From conservative to reactive transport under diffusion-controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babey, Tristan; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2016-05-01

    We assess the possibility to use conservative transport information, such as that contained in transit time distributions, breakthrough curves and tracer tests, to predict nonlinear fluid-rock interactions in fracture/matrix or mobile/immobile conditions. Reference simulated data are given by conservative and reactive transport simulations in several diffusive porosity structures differing by their topological organization. Reactions includes nonlinear kinetically controlled dissolution and desorption. Effective Multi-Rate Mass Transfer models (MRMT) are calibrated solely on conservative transport information without pore topology information and provide concentration distributions on which effective reaction rates are estimated. Reference simulated reaction rates and effective reaction rates evaluated by MRMT are compared, as well as characteristic desorption and dissolution times. Although not exactly equal, these indicators remain very close whatever the porous structure, differing at most by 0.6% and 10% for desorption and dissolution. At early times, this close agreement arises from the fine characterization of the diffusive porosity close to the mobile zone that controls fast mobile-diffusive exchanges. At intermediate to late times, concentration gradients are strongly reduced by diffusion, and reactivity can be captured by a very limited number of rates. We conclude that effective models calibrated solely on conservative transport information like MRMT can accurately estimate monocomponent kinetically controlled nonlinear fluid-rock interactions. Their relevance might extend to more advanced biogeochemical reactions because of the good characterization of conservative concentration distributions, even by parsimonious models (e.g., MRMT with 3-5 rates). We propose a methodology to estimate reactive transport from conservative transport in mobile-immobile conditions.

  16. Development of a robust model-based reactivity control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovere, L.A.; Otaduy, P.J.; Brittain, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a digital model-based reactivity control system that incorporates a knowledge of the plant physics into the control algorithm to improve system performance. This controller is composed of a model-based module and modified proportional-integral-derivative (PID) module. The model-based module has an estimation component to synthesize unmeasurable process variables that are necessary for the control action computation. These estimated variables, besides being used within the control algorithm, will be used for diagnostic purposes by a supervisory control system under development. The PID module compensates for inaccuracies in model coefficients by supplementing the model-based output with a correction term that eliminates any demand tracking or steady state errors. This control algorithm has been applied to develop controllers for a simulation of liquid metal reactors in a multimodular plant. It has shown its capability to track demands in neutron power much more accurately than conventional controllers, reducing overshoots to almost negligible value while providing a good degree of robustness to unmodeled dynamics. 10 refs., 4 figs

  17. Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

    2013-10-01

    A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

  18. Calculation-measurement comparison for control rods reactivity in RA-3 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estryk, Guillermo; Gomez, Angel

    2002-01-01

    The RA-3 Nuclear Reactor of the Atomic Energy National Commission from Argentina, begun working with high enrichment fuel elements in 1967, and turned to low enrichment by 1990. During 1999 it was found out that several fuel elements had problems, so more than 50 % of them had to be removed from the core. Because of this, it was planned to go from core 93 to core 94 with special care from nuclear safety point of view. Core 94 was preceded by other five, T-1 to T-5, only as transitory ones. The care implied several nuclear parameters measurements: core reactivity excess, calibration of control rods, etc. Calculations were performed afterwards to simulate those measurements using the neutron diffusion code PUMA. The comparison shows a good agreement for more than 80% of the cases with differences lower than 10% in reactivity. The greatest differences were found in the last part of the control rods calibration and a better calculation of cell constants is planned to be done in order to improve the adjustment. (author)

  19. Basic study on dynamic reactive-power control method with PV output prediction for solar inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryunosuke Miyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To effectively utilize a photovoltaic (PV system, reactive-power control methods for solar inverters have been considered. Among the various methods, the constant-voltage control outputs less reactive power compared with the other methods. We have developed a constant-voltage control to reduce the reactive-power output. However, the developed constant-voltage control still outputs unnecessary reactive power because the control parameter is constant in every waveform of the PV output. To reduce the reactive-power output, we propose a dynamic reactive-power control method with a PV output prediction. In the proposed method, the control parameter is varied according to the properties of the predicted PV waveform. In this study, we performed numerical simulations using a distribution system model, and we confirmed that the proposed method reduces the reactive-power output within the voltage constraint.

  20. Excessive and addictive gaming control using counselling agent in online game design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ididi, Italumeh O.; Hassan, Sa'adah; Ghani, Abdul Azim Abd; Ali, Norhayati Mohd

    2017-10-01

    In recent times, online game play has become a food for thought to concerned individuals, researchers and authorities of various countries due to its excessive and addictive usage. Although, various government have taken certain measures such as shutting down internet cafe at certain hours of the day, censoring the most brutal, offensive and aggressive sections of certain games before they are released. Researchers have advised developers on ways of limiting harm on players by suggesting design changes on time limit. Furthermore, researchers have also suggested that online game distributors ought to make available appropriate referral services. The impart of the above are yet to make any remarkable impact on players. In this paper, we have proposed a Counseling Agent model integrating informative and self-appraisal messages in online game design as a control measure. Informative and self-appraisal messaging in games have proven optimistic through making positive impact on player's thoughts and behavior towards gaming. These messages are expected to remind players about the negative impact of excessive and addictive gaming habits, as well as suggesting possible reductive solutions through message streaming.

  1. Reactive power control of wind farm using facts devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashfaq, S.; Arif, A.; Shakeel, A.; Mahmood, T.

    2014-01-01

    Wind energy is an attainable option to complement other types of pollution-free green generation Grid connections of renewable energy resources are vital if they are to be effectively exploited, but grid connection brings problems of voltage fluctuation and harmonic distortion. FACTs devices are one of the power electronics revolutions to improve voltage profile, system stability, and reactive power control and to reduce transmission losses. The studied system here is a variable speed wind generation system based on Induction Generator (IG) with integration of different FACTs controllers in the wind farm. To harness the wind power efficiently the most reliable and expensive system in the present era is grid connected doubly fed induction generator. Induction generator with FACTs devices is a suitable economical replacement. The suggested scheme is implemented in MATLAB Simulink with real time parameters of GHARO wind power plant in Sind, and corresponding results and output waveforms proves the potential strength of proposed methodology. (author)

  2. Development of an alternative reactivity meter for nuclear reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, P.S.B.

    1991-01-01

    This work describes an alternative version of the IPEN-CNEN/SP reactivity-meter. This new version utilizes a programmable electrometer (to realize the data acquisition) and a IBM-PC microcomputer to process the reactivity calculation. The aim of development of this alternative reactivity-meter is to have available a equipment of measurements of reactivity in the case of the later version show any problem during an experiment. (author)

  3. Excessive sleep need following traumatic brain injury: a case-control study of 36 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerauer, Michael; Valko, Philipp O; Werth, Esther; Baumann, Christian R

    2013-12-01

    Increased sleep need following traumatic brain injury, referred to in this study as post-traumatic pleiosomnia, is common, but so far its clinical impact and therapeutic implications have not been characterized. We present a case-control study of 36 patients with post-traumatic pleiosomnia, defined by an increased sleep need of at least 2 h per 24 h after traumatic brain injury, compared to 36 controls. We assessed detailed history, sleep-activity patterns with sleep logs and actigraphy, nocturnal sleep with polysomnography and daytime sleep propensity with multiple sleep latency tests. Actigraphy recordings revealed that traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients had longer estimated sleep durations than controls (10.8 h per 24 h, compared to 7.3 h). When using sleep logs, TBI patients underestimated their sleep need. During nocturnal sleep, patients had higher amounts of slow-wave sleep than controls (20 versus 13.8%). Multiple sleep latency tests revealed excessive daytime sleepiness in 15 patients (42%), and 10 of them had signs of chronic sleep deprivation. We conclude that post-traumatic pleiosomnia may be even more frequent than reported previously, because affected patients often underestimate their actual sleep need. Furthermore, these patients exhibit an increase in slow-wave sleep which may reflect recovery mechanisms, intrinsic consequences of diffuse brain damage or relative sleep deprivation. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  4. Excess Sodium Tetraphenylborate and Intermediates Decomposition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-12-07

    The stability of excess amounts of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility depends on a number of variables. Concentration of palladium, initial benzene, and sodium ion as well as temperature provide the best opportunities for controlling the decomposition rate. This study examined the influence of these four variable on the reactivity of palladium-catalyzed sodium tetraphenylborate decomposition. Also, single effects tests investigated the reactivity of simulants with continuous stirring and nitrogen ventilation, with very high benzene concentrations, under washed sodium concentrations, with very high palladium concentrations, and with minimal quantities of excess NaTPB.

  5. Associations between Effortful Control, Psychological Control and Proactive and Reactive Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathert, Jamie; Fite, Paula J.; Gaertner, Alden E.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined relations between effortful control (ones ability to focus and shift attention in an adaptive manner), psychological control (caregiver attempts to manipulate the child's internal world) and proactive and reactive aggression. Participants were 69 children (54% male) ranging from 9 to 12 years of age (M = 10.35, SD =…

  6. Excessive use of WeChat, social interaction and locus of control among college students in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Hou

    Full Text Available In China, the number of college students using mobile phone based messaging and social networking applications like WeChat is increasing rapidly. However, there has been minimal research into the addictive nature of these applications and the psychological characteristics associate with their excessive use. There is also no published scale available for assessing excessive use of WeChat and similar applications. In the current study, we collected data from 1,245 college students in China (715 females and developed the WeChat Excessive Use Scale (WEUS. We then assessed the relationship between excessive use of WeChat and excessive use of a social networking application-Weibo, problematic use of mobile phones, external locus of control, and social interaction skills. Our 10-item scale featured three factors, namely- "mood modification," "salience" and ''conflict"- critical factors in assessing different forms of addiction. The WEUS was found to be a reliable instrument in assessing excessive use of WeChat as it showed good internal consistency and correlated with other measures of problematic use social networking and mobile phone addiction. Our results showed that excessive users of WeChat are more likely to excessively use Weibo than they are to problematically use mobile phones. Our study also showed that greater excessive use of WeChat is associated with higher external locus of control and greater online social interaction skills. These results reveal that WeChat has unique and strong appeal among college students in China. Further, practitioners should consider dealing with malleable factors like locus of control and real life social skills in treating people with problematic messaging and social networking.

  7. Excessive use of WeChat, social interaction and locus of control among college students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Juan; Ndasauka, Yamikani; Jiang, Yingying; Ye, Zi; Wang, Ying; Yang, Lizhuang; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yongjun; Pang, Liangjun; Kong, Yan; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2017-01-01

    In China, the number of college students using mobile phone based messaging and social networking applications like WeChat is increasing rapidly. However, there has been minimal research into the addictive nature of these applications and the psychological characteristics associate with their excessive use. There is also no published scale available for assessing excessive use of WeChat and similar applications. In the current study, we collected data from 1,245 college students in China (715 females) and developed the WeChat Excessive Use Scale (WEUS). We then assessed the relationship between excessive use of WeChat and excessive use of a social networking application-Weibo, problematic use of mobile phones, external locus of control, and social interaction skills. Our 10-item scale featured three factors, namely- "mood modification," "salience" and ''conflict"- critical factors in assessing different forms of addiction. The WEUS was found to be a reliable instrument in assessing excessive use of WeChat as it showed good internal consistency and correlated with other measures of problematic use social networking and mobile phone addiction. Our results showed that excessive users of WeChat are more likely to excessively use Weibo than they are to problematically use mobile phones. Our study also showed that greater excessive use of WeChat is associated with higher external locus of control and greater online social interaction skills. These results reveal that WeChat has unique and strong appeal among college students in China. Further, practitioners should consider dealing with malleable factors like locus of control and real life social skills in treating people with problematic messaging and social networking.

  8. Excessive use of WeChat, social interaction and locus of control among college students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yingying; Ye, Zi; Wang, Ying; Yang, Lizhuang; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yongjun; Pang, Liangjun; Kong, Yan; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2017-01-01

    In China, the number of college students using mobile phone based messaging and social networking applications like WeChat is increasing rapidly. However, there has been minimal research into the addictive nature of these applications and the psychological characteristics associate with their excessive use. There is also no published scale available for assessing excessive use of WeChat and similar applications. In the current study, we collected data from 1,245 college students in China (715 females) and developed the WeChat Excessive Use Scale (WEUS). We then assessed the relationship between excessive use of WeChat and excessive use of a social networking application-Weibo, problematic use of mobile phones, external locus of control, and social interaction skills. Our 10-item scale featured three factors, namely- “mood modification,” “salience” and ‘‘conflict”- critical factors in assessing different forms of addiction. The WEUS was found to be a reliable instrument in assessing excessive use of WeChat as it showed good internal consistency and correlated with other measures of problematic use social networking and mobile phone addiction. Our results showed that excessive users of WeChat are more likely to excessively use Weibo than they are to problematically use mobile phones. Our study also showed that greater excessive use of WeChat is associated with higher external locus of control and greater online social interaction skills. These results reveal that WeChat has unique and strong appeal among college students in China. Further, practitioners should consider dealing with malleable factors like locus of control and real life social skills in treating people with problematic messaging and social networking. PMID:28817710

  9. Establishment of analysis procedure for control rod reactivity worth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Young In

    2001-03-01

    As to the calculation method of control rod reactivity relating to hexagonal assembly, which are used generally in fast reactor, we have investigated the calculation method, the problems to rise during calculation, the degrees of calculation and the enhancement of calculation modeling so on, and estimated the application of calculation method through comparison and analysis of calculation result using the effective cross section generation system, TRANSX/TWODANT, and neutron flux calculation system, diffusion theory code DIF-3D, which are belonged to K-CORE System, and determined the basic calculation method, and extracted the present calculation problem in case of application in K-CORE System and the future improvement items so on.

  10. Establishment of analysis procedure for control rod reactivity worth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Young In

    2001-03-01

    As to the calculation method of control rod reactivity relating to hexagonal assembly, which are used generally in fast reactor, we have investigated the calculation method, the problems to rise during calculation, the degrees of calculation and the enhancement of calculation modeling so on, and estimated the application of calculation method through comparison and analysis of calculation result using the effective cross section generation system, TRANSX/TWODANT, and neutron flux calculation system, diffusion theory code DIF-3D, which are belonged to K-CORE System, and determined the basic calculation method, and extracted the present calculation problem in case of application in K-CORE System and the future improvement items so on

  11. Health coaching to prevent excessive gestational weight gain: A randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouteris, Helen; McPhie, Skye; Hill, Briony; McCabe, Marita; Milgrom, Jeannette; Kent, Bridie; Bruce, Lauren; Herring, Sharon; Gale, Janette; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Shih, Sophy; Teale, Glyn; Lachal, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of a health coaching (HC) intervention designed to prevent excessive gestational weight gain (GWG), and promote positive psychosocial and motivational outcomes in comparison with an Education Alone (EA) group. Randomized-controlled trial. Two hundred and sixty-one women who were <18 weeks pregnant consented to take part. Those allocated to the HC group received a tailored HC intervention delivered by a Health Coach, whilst those in the EA group attended two education sessions. Women completed measures, including motivation, psychosocial variables, sleep quality, and knowledge, beliefs and expectations concerning GWG, at 15 weeks of gestation (Time 1) and 33 weeks of gestation (Time 2). Post-birth data were also collected at 2 months post-partum (Time 3). There was no intervention effect in relation to weight gained during pregnancy, rate of excessive GWG or birth outcomes. The only differences between HC and EA women were higher readiness (b = 0.29, 95% CIs = 0.03-0.55, p < .05) and the importance to achieve a healthy GWG (b = 0.27, 95% CIs = 0.02-0.52, p < .05), improved sleep quality (b = -0.22, 95% CIs = -0.44 to -0.03, p < .05), and increased knowledge for an appropriate amount of GWG that would be best for their baby's health (b = -1.75, 95% CI = -3.26 to -0.24, p < .05) reported by the HC at Time 2. Whilst the HC intervention was not successful in preventing excessive GWG, several implications for the design of future GWG interventions were identified, including the burden of the intervention commitment and the use of weight monitoring. What is already known on the subject? Designing interventions to address gestational weight gain (GWG) continues to be a challenge. To date, health behaviour change factors have not been the focus of GWG interventions. What does this study add? Our health coaching (HC) intervention did not reduce GWG more so than education alone (EA). There was an intervention effect

  12. Combined Active and Reactive Power Control of Wind Farms based on Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Haoran; Wu, Qiuwei; Wang, Jianhui

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a combined wind farm controller based on Model Predictive Control (MPC). Compared with the conventional decoupled active and reactive power control, the proposed control scheme considers the significant impact of active power on voltage variations due to the low X=R ratio...... of wind farm collector systems. The voltage control is improved. Besides, by coordination of active and reactive power, the Var capacity is optimized to prevent potential failures due to Var shortage, especially when the wind farm operates close to its full load. An analytical method is used to calculate...... the sensitivity coefficients to improve the computation efficiency and overcome the convergence problem. Two control modes are designed for both normal and emergency conditions. A wind farm with 20 wind turbines was used to verify the proposed combined control scheme....

  13. Flow Management to Control Excessive Growth of Macrophytes - An Assessment Based on Habitat Suitability Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Konstantin; Rivaes, Rui P; Ferreira, Teresa; Egger, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Mediterranean rivers in intensive agricultural watersheds usually display outgrowths of macrophytes - notably alien species - due to a combination of high concentrations of nutrients in the water runoff and low flows resulting from water abstraction for irrigation. Standard mechanical and chemical control is used to mitigate the problems associated with excessive growth of plant biomass: mainly less drainage capacity and higher flood risk. However, such control measures are cost and labor-intensive and do not present long-term efficiency. Although the high sensitivity of aquatic vegetation to instream hydraulic conditions is well known, management approaches based on flow management remain relatively unexplored. The aim of our study was therefore to apply physical habitat simulation techniques promoted by the Instream Flow Incremental Method (IFIM) to aquatic macrophytes - the first time it has been applied in this context - in order to model shifts in habitat suitability under different flow scenarios in the Sorraia river in central Portugal. We used this approach to test whether the risk of invasion and channel encroachment by nuisance species can be controlled by setting minimum annual flows. We used 960 randomly distributed survey points to analyze the habitat suitability for the most important aquatic species (including the invasive Brazilian milfoil Myriophyllum aquaticum , Sparganium erectum , and Potamogeton crispus ) in regard to the physical parameters 'flow velocity,' 'water depth,' and 'substrate size'. We chose the lowest discharge period of the year in order to assess the hydraulic conditions while disturbances were at a low-point, thus allowing aquatic vegetation establishment and subsistence. We then used the two-dimensional hydraulic River2D software to model the potential habitat availability for different flow conditions based on the site-specific habitat suitability index for each physical parameter and species. Our results show that the growth

  14. Flow Management to Control Excessive Growth of Macrophytes – An Assessment Based on Habitat Suitability Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Konstantin; Rivaes, Rui P.; Ferreira, Teresa; Egger, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Mediterranean rivers in intensive agricultural watersheds usually display outgrowths of macrophytes – notably alien species – due to a combination of high concentrations of nutrients in the water runoff and low flows resulting from water abstraction for irrigation. Standard mechanical and chemical control is used to mitigate the problems associated with excessive growth of plant biomass: mainly less drainage capacity and higher flood risk. However, such control measures are cost and labor-intensive and do not present long-term efficiency. Although the high sensitivity of aquatic vegetation to instream hydraulic conditions is well known, management approaches based on flow management remain relatively unexplored. The aim of our study was therefore to apply physical habitat simulation techniques promoted by the Instream Flow Incremental Method (IFIM) to aquatic macrophytes – the first time it has been applied in this context – in order to model shifts in habitat suitability under different flow scenarios in the Sorraia river in central Portugal. We used this approach to test whether the risk of invasion and channel encroachment by nuisance species can be controlled by setting minimum annual flows. We used 960 randomly distributed survey points to analyze the habitat suitability for the most important aquatic species (including the invasive Brazilian milfoil Myriophyllum aquaticum, Sparganium erectum, and Potamogeton crispus) in regard to the physical parameters ‘flow velocity,’ ‘water depth,’ and ‘substrate size’. We chose the lowest discharge period of the year in order to assess the hydraulic conditions while disturbances were at a low-point, thus allowing aquatic vegetation establishment and subsistence. We then used the two-dimensional hydraulic River2D software to model the potential habitat availability for different flow conditions based on the site-specific habitat suitability index for each physical parameter and species. Our results show

  15. Reactive oxygen species and transcript analysis upon excess light treatment in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana vs a photosensitive mutant lacking zeaxanthin and lutein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roncaglia Enrica

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS are unavoidable by-products of oxygenic photosynthesis, causing progressive oxidative damage and ultimately cell death. Despite their destructive activity they are also signalling molecules, priming the acclimatory response to stress stimuli. Results To investigate this role further, we exposed wild type Arabidopsis thaliana plants and the double mutant npq1lut2 to excess light. The mutant does not produce the xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin, whose key roles include ROS scavenging and prevention of ROS synthesis. Biochemical analysis revealed that singlet oxygen (1O2 accumulated to higher levels in the mutant while other ROS were unaffected, allowing to define the transcriptomic signature of the acclimatory response mediated by 1O2 which is enhanced by the lack of these xanthophylls species. The group of genes differentially regulated in npq1lut2 is enriched in sequences encoding chloroplast proteins involved in cell protection against the damaging effect of ROS. Among the early fine-tuned components, are proteins involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, chlorophyll catabolism, protein import, folding and turnover, synthesis and membrane insertion of photosynthetic subunits. Up to now, the flu mutant was the only biological system adopted to define the regulation of gene expression by 1O2. In this work, we propose the use of mutants accumulating 1O2 by mechanisms different from those activated in flu to better identify ROS signalling. Conclusions We propose that the lack of zeaxanthin and lutein leads to 1O2 accumulation and this represents a signalling pathway in the early stages of stress acclimation, beside the response to ADP/ATP ratio and to the redox state of both plastoquinone pool. Chloroplasts respond to 1O2 accumulation by undergoing a significant change in composition and function towards a fast acclimatory response. The physiological implications of this signalling specificity are

  16. Meclofenamic Acid Reduces Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Apoptosis, Inhibits Excessive Autophagy, and Protects Hair Cell-Like HEI-OC1 Cells From Cisplatin-Induced Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in humans, and a significant number of cases is due to the ototoxicity of drugs such as cisplatin that cause hair cell (HC damage. Thus, there is great interest in finding agents and mechanisms that protect HCs from ototoxic drug damage. It has been proposed that epigenetic modifications are related to inner ear development and play a significant role in HC protection and HC regeneration; however, whether the m6A modification and the ethyl ester form of meclofenamic acid (MA2, which is a highly selective inhibitor of FTO (fatmass and obesity-associated enzyme, one of the primary human demethylases, can affect the process of HC apoptosis induced by ototoxic drugs remains largely unexplored. In this study, we took advantage of the HEI-OC1 cell line, which is a cochlear HC-like cell line, to investigate the role of epigenetic modifications in cisplatin-induced cell death. We found that cisplatin injury caused reactive oxygen species accumulation and increased apoptosis in HEI-OC1 cells, and the cisplatin injury was reduced by co-treatment with MA2 compared to the cisplatin-only group. Further investigation showed that MA2 attenuated cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in HEI-OC1 cells. We next found that the cisplatin-induced upregulation of autophagy was significantly inhibited after MA2 treatment, indicating that MA2 inhibited the cisplatin-induced excessive autophagy. Our findings show that MA2 has a protective effect and improves the viability of HEI-OC1 cells after cisplatin treatment, and they provide new insights into potential therapeutic targets for the amelioration of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  17. Reactive oxygen species and transcript analysis upon excess light treatment in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana vs a photosensitive mutant lacking zeaxanthin and lutein

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are unavoidable by-products of oxygenic photosynthesis, causing progressive oxidative damage and ultimately cell death. Despite their destructive activity they are also signalling molecules, priming the acclimatory response to stress stimuli. Results To investigate this role further, we exposed wild type Arabidopsis thaliana plants and the double mutant npq1lut2 to excess light. The mutant does not produce the xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin, whose key roles include ROS scavenging and prevention of ROS synthesis. Biochemical analysis revealed that singlet oxygen (1O2) accumulated to higher levels in the mutant while other ROS were unaffected, allowing to define the transcriptomic signature of the acclimatory response mediated by 1O2 which is enhanced by the lack of these xanthophylls species. The group of genes differentially regulated in npq1lut2 is enriched in sequences encoding chloroplast proteins involved in cell protection against the damaging effect of ROS. Among the early fine-tuned components, are proteins involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, chlorophyll catabolism, protein import, folding and turnover, synthesis and membrane insertion of photosynthetic subunits. Up to now, the flu mutant was the only biological system adopted to define the regulation of gene expression by 1O2. In this work, we propose the use of mutants accumulating 1O2 by mechanisms different from those activated in flu to better identify ROS signalling. Conclusions We propose that the lack of zeaxanthin and lutein leads to 1O2 accumulation and this represents a signalling pathway in the early stages of stress acclimation, beside the response to ADP/ATP ratio and to the redox state of both plastoquinone pool. Chloroplasts respond to 1O2 accumulation by undergoing a significant change in composition and function towards a fast acclimatory response. The physiological implications of this signalling specificity are discussed. PMID:21481232

  18. Auditory orientation in crickets: Pattern recognition controls reactive steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, James F. A.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2005-10-01

    Many groups of insects are specialists in exploiting sensory cues to locate food resources or conspecifics. To achieve orientation, bees and ants analyze the polarization pattern of the sky, male moths orient along the females' odor plume, and cicadas, grasshoppers, and crickets use acoustic signals to locate singing conspecifics. In comparison with olfactory and visual orientation, where learning is involved, auditory processing underlying orientation in insects appears to be more hardwired and genetically determined. In each of these examples, however, orientation requires a recognition process identifying the crucial sensory pattern to interact with a localization process directing the animal's locomotor activity. Here, we characterize this interaction. Using a sensitive trackball system, we show that, during cricket auditory behavior, the recognition process that is tuned toward the species-specific song pattern controls the amplitude of auditory evoked steering responses. Females perform small reactive steering movements toward any sound patterns. Hearing the male's calling song increases the gain of auditory steering within 2-5 s, and the animals even steer toward nonattractive sound patterns inserted into the speciesspecific pattern. This gain control mechanism in the auditory-to-motor pathway allows crickets to pursue species-specific sound patterns temporarily corrupted by environmental factors and may reflect the organization of recognition and localization networks in insects. localization | phonotaxis

  19. General Deficit in Inhibitory Control of Excessive Smartphone Users: Evidence from an Event-Related Potential Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingwei; Liang, Yunsi; Mai, Chunmiao; Zhong, Xiyun; Qu, Chen

    2016-01-01

    With the popularity of smartphones, the problem of excessive use has drawn increasing attention. However, it is not clear whether there is an inhibitory deficit in excessive smartphone users. Using a modified Go/NoGo task with three types of context (blank, neutral, and smartphone-related), the present study combined measures of behavior and electrophysiology [event-related potentials (ERPs)] to examine general and specific inhibitory control in an excessive smartphone use group and a normal use group. Results showed that participants in both groups had larger amplitude of N2 and P3 on NoGo trials than Go trials. NoGo N2, an ERP component associated with inhibitory control, was more negative in the excessive smartphone use group than the normal use group. These results suggest that in the early stage of inhibition processing, excessive smartphone users experience more conflicts and show a general deficit that does not depend on smartphone-related cues. Moreover, the study provides further neuroscience evidence of the physiological correlates of excessive smartphone use. PMID:27148120

  20. General deficit in inhibitory control of excessive smartphone users: Evidence from an event-related potential study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei eChen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the popularity of smartphones, the problem of excessive use has drawn increasing attention. However, it is not clear whether there is an inhibitory deficit in excessive smartphone users. Using a modified Go/NoGo task with three types of context (blank, neutral and smartphone-related, the present study combined measures of behavior and electrophysiology (event-related potentials, ERPs to examine general and specific inhibitory control in an excessive smartphone use group and a normal use group. Results showed that participants in both groups had larger amplitude of N2 and P3 on NoGo trials than Go trials. NoGo N2, an ERP component associated with inhibitory control, was more negative in the excessive smartphone use group than the normal use group. These results suggest that in the early stage of inhibition processing, excessive smartphone users experience more conflicts and show a general deficit that does not depend on smartphone-related cues. Moreover, the study provides further neuroscience evidence of the physiological correlates of excessive smartphone use.

  1. Reactive and Proactive Interference Control in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder across the Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Anne G.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Marsman, Maarten; Geurts, Hilde M.

    2017-01-01

    As a large heterogeneity is observed across studies on interference control in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), research may benefit from the use of a cognitive framework that models specific processes underlying reactive and proactive control of interference. Reactive control refers to the expression and suppression of responses and proactive…

  2. Development of automated controller system for controlling reactivity by using FPGA in research reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Izhar Abu Hussin; Mohd Idris Taib

    2012-01-01

    The scope for this research paper is to produce a detail design for Development of Automated Controller System for Controlling Reactivity by using FPGA in Research Reactor Application for high safety nuclear operation. The development of this project including design, purchasing, fabrication, installation, testing and validation and verification for one prototype automated controller system for controlling reactivity in industry local technology for human capacity and capability development towards the first Nuclear Power Programme (NPP) in Malaysia. The specific objectives of this research paper are to Development of Automated Controller System for Controlling Reactivity (ACSCR) in Research Reactor Application (PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor) by using simultaneous movement method; To design, fabricate and produce the accuracy of Control Rods Drive Mechanism to 0.1 mm resolution using a stepper motor as an actuator; To design, install and produce the system response to be more faster by using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and High Speed Computer; and to improve the Safety Level of the Research Reactor in high safety nuclear operation condition. (author)

  3. Desaturation of excess intramyocellular triacylglycerol in obesity: implications for glycemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, S B; Madsbad, S; Mu, Huiling

    2010-01-01

    Excess intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG), found especially in obese women, is slowly metabolized and, therefore, prone to longer exposure to intracellular desaturases. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that IMTG content correlates inversely with IMTG fatty acid (FA) saturation in sedentary...

  4. Dynamic Reactive Power Control in Offshore HVDC Connected Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakamuri, Jayachandra N.; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio; Rather, Zakir Hussain

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a coordinated reactive power control for a HVDC connected cluster of offshore wind power plants (WPPs). The reactive power reference for the WPP cluster is estimated by an optimization algorithm aiming at minimum active power losses in the offshore AC Grid. For each optimal......, such as wind turbine (WT) terminal, collector cable, and export cable, on the dynamic voltage profile of the offshore grid is investigated. Furthermore, the dynamic reactive power contribution from WTs from different WPPs of the cluster for such faults has also been studied....... reactive power set point, the OWPP cluster controller generates reactive power references for each WPP which further sends the AC voltage/ reactive power references to the associated WTs based on their available reactive power margin. The impact of faults at different locations in the offshore grid...

  5. Study on evaluating the reactivity worth of the control rods of the PWR 900 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan Quoc Vuong; Tran Vinh Thanh; Tran Viet Phu

    2015-01-01

    Control rods of a nuclear reactor are divided into two groups: shut down and power control. Reactivity worth of the control rods depends nonlinearly on the rods' compositions and positions where the rods are inserted into the core. Therefore, calculation of control rod worth is of high important. In this study, we calculated the reactivity worth of the power control rod bank of the Mitsubishi PWR 900 MWe. The results are integral and differential worth calibration of the control rods. (author)

  6. Integrated Process Design and Control of Multi-element Reactive Distillation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2016-01-01

    In this work, integrated process design and control of reactive distillation processes involving multi-elements is presented. The reactive distillation column is designed using methods and tools which are similar in concept to non-reactive distillation design methods, such as driving force approach....... The methods employed in this work are based on equivalent element concept. This concept facilitates the representation of a multi-element reactive system as equivalent binary light and heavy key elements. First, the reactive distillation column is designed at the maximum driving force where through steady...

  7. A Hybrid Cognitive-Reactive Multi-Agent Controller

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bugajska, Magdalena D; Schultz, Alan C; Trafton, J. G; Taylor, Matthew; Mintz, Farilee E

    2002-01-01

    ...). In this system, the learning algorithm handles reactive aspects of the task and provides an adaptation mechanism, while the cognitive model handles cognitive aspects of the task and ensures the realism of the behavior...

  8. Systematic Integrated Process Design and Control of Binary Element Reactive Distillation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2016-01-01

    In this work, integrated process design and control of reactive distillation processes is considered through a computer-aided framework. First, a set of simple design methods for reactive distillation column that are similar in concept to non-reactive distillation design methods are extended...... to design-control of reactive distillation columns. These methods are based on the element concept where the reacting system of compounds is represented as elements. When only two elements are needed to represent the reacting system of more than two compounds, a binary element system is identified....... It is shown that the same design-control principles that apply to a non-reacting binary system of compounds are also valid for a reactive binary system of elements for distillation columns. Application of this framework shows that designing the reactive distillation process at the maximum driving force...

  9. Active and reactive power control of a current-source PWM-rectifier using space vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, M.; Tuusa, H. [Tampere University of Technology (Finland). Department of Electrical Engineering, Power Electronics

    1997-12-31

    In this paper the current-source PWM-rectifier with active and reactive power control is presented. The control system is realized using space vector methods. Also, compensation of the reactive power drawn by the line filter is discussed. Some simulation results are shown. (orig.) 8 refs.

  10. Implementing Motivational Features in Reactive Blended Learning: Application to an Introductory Control Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, J. A.; Gonzalez, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a significant advance in a reactive blended learning methodology applied to an introductory control engineering course. This proposal was based on the inclusion of a reactive element (a fuzzy-logic-based controller) designed to regulate the workload for each student according to his/her activity and performance. The…

  11. Reducing Diesel Engine Emission Using Reactivity Controlled Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Hasib Ghazal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several automobile manufacturers are interested in investigating of dual fuel internal combustion engines, due to high efficiencand low emissions. Many alternative fuels have been used in dual fuel mode for IC engine, such as methane, hydrogen, and natural gas. In the present study, a reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI engine using gasoline/diesel (G/D dual fuel has been investigated. The effectof mixing gasoline with diesel fuel on combustion characteristic, engine performance and emissions has been studied. The gasoline was injected in the engine intake port, to produce a homogeneous mixture with air. The diesel fuel was injected directly to the combustion chamber during compression stroke to initiate the combustion process. A direct injection compression ignition engine has been built and simulated using ANSYS Forte professional code. The gasoline amount in the simulation varied from (50%-80% by volume. The diesel fuel was injected to the cylinder in two stages. The model has been validated and calibrated for neat diesel fuel using available data from the literature. The results show that the heat release rate and the cylinder pressure increased when the amount of added gasoline is between 50%-60% volume of the total injected fuels, compared to the neat diesel fuel. Further addition of gasoline will have a contrary effect. In addition, the combustion duration is extended drastically when the gasoline ratio is higher than 60% which results in an incomplete combustion. The NO emission decreased drastically as the gasoline ratio increased. Moreover, addition of gasoline to the mixture increased the engine power, thermal efficienc and combustion efficienc compared to neat diesel fuel.

  12. Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) — Principles, geometry and design process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qvist, Staffan A., E-mail: staffan.qvist@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California Berkeley (United States); Hellesen, Carl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Thiele, Roman [Division of Reactor Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Dubberley, Allen E. [General Electric Advanced Reactor Systems Department (retired), Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Gradecka, Malwina; Greenspan, Ehud [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Here we define the principles of the operation and design of ARC systems. • ARC systems can provide inherent safety during and following unprotected transients. • A manufacturing and assembly method was developed and presented. - Abstract: The Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) system was developed to ensure inherent safety performance of Generation-IV reactors while having a minimal impact on reactor performance and economic viability. Here we present in detail the principles of how the ARC system operates, what materials should be used, what components make up the system and how they are interconnected. The relevant equations regarding how to design the system for a certain response are developed and defined, and the most important aspects determining the speed of actuation of the systems are analyzed. Thus, this study serves as the general reference material for all of the fundamental principles behind the ARC idea. Finally, we present a step-by-step guide to how a fast reactor fuel subassembly with an ARC system installed would be manufactured, using a full 3D-CAD model. For an ARC installation in a 1000 MWth sodium-cooled oxide-fueled fast reactor core, the system constitutes a relatively minor adjustment to a typical fuel assembly, increasing its total axial extent by ∼5–10% and the total primary coolant pressure drop by ∼1%. The main finding of this study is that it is possible to design, manufacture (using existing methods) and implement ARC systems in the fuel assemblies of fast reactor cores to provide inherent safety in all anticipated unprotected transients with only a modest increase in the length of the assembly and the pressure drop across the core.

  13. Multiagent-Based Reactive Power Sharing and Control Model for Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Feixiong; Chen, Minyou; Li, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    of the control model, in which the uncertainty of intermittent DGs, variations in load demands, as well as impacts of time delays are considered. The simulation results demonstrate the eectiveness of the control model in proportional reactive power sharing, and the plug and play capability of the control model......In islanded microgrids (MGs), the reactive power cannot be shared proportionally among distributed generators (DGs) with conventional droop control, due to the mismatch in feeder impedances. For the purpose of proportional reactive power sharing, a multiagent system (MAS) based distributed control...

  14. Effect of montelukast on excessive airway narrowing response to methacholine in adult asthmatic patients not on controller therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Diamant, Zuzana

    2009-01-01

    -response plateau to Mtc in adult asthmatic patients not on controller therapy, and, hence, protects against excessive airway narrowing. Thirty-one asthmatic patients (13 male patients, 18-50 years old; forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV(1)], >70% predicted; PD(20), ...Excessive airway narrowing is an important determinant of fatal asthma. This pathophysiological feature is characterized by the absence of a dose-response plateau to methacholine (Mtc). We investigated if the leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) montelukast (Mont) can induce a dose...... of treatment with Mont neither induced a plateau response nor affected maximum FEV(1) response or PD(20). Our findings, therefore, suggest that monotherapy with a LTRA does not protect against excessive airway narrowing in adult asthmatic patients not on inhaled corticosteroids....

  15. Vascular smooth muscle modulates endothelial control of vasoreactivity via reactive oxygen species production through myoendothelial communications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Billaud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial control of vascular smooth muscle plays a major role in the resulting vasoreactivity implicated in physiological or pathological circulatory processes. However, a comprehensive understanding of endothelial (EC/smooth muscle cells (SMC crosstalk is far from complete. Here, we have examined the role of gap junctions and reactive oxygen species (ROS in this crosstalk and we demonstrate an active contribution of SMC to endothelial control of vasomotor tone. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In small intrapulmonary arteries, quantitative RT-PCR, Western Blot analyses and immunofluorescent labeling evidenced connexin (Cx 37, 40 and 43 in EC and/or SMC. Functional experiments showed that the Cx-mimetic peptide targeted against Cx 37 and Cx 43 ((37,43Gap27 (1 reduced contractile and calcium responses to serotonin (5-HT simultaneously recorded in pulmonary arteries and (2 abolished the diffusion in SMC of carboxyfluorescein-AM loaded in EC. Similarly, contractile and calcium responses to 5-HT were decreased by superoxide dismutase and catalase which, catabolise superoxide anion and H(2O(2, respectively. Both Cx- and ROS-mediated effects on the responses to 5-HT were reversed by L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor or endothelium removal. Electronic paramagnetic resonance directly demonstrated that 5-HT-induced superoxide anion production originated from the SMC. Finally, whereas 5-HT increased NO production, it also decreased cyclic GMP content in isolated intact arteries. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that agonist-induced ROS production in SMC targeting EC via myoendothelial gap junctions reduces endothelial NO-dependent control of pulmonary vasoreactivity. Such SMC modulation of endothelial control may represent a signaling pathway controlling vasoreactivity under not only physiological but also pathological conditions that often implicate excessive ROS production.

  16. Combustion Mode Design with High Efficiency and Low Emissions Controlled by Mixtures Stratification and Fuel Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixture stratification that have been conducted in the authors’ group, including the charge reactivity controlled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion, stratification controlled premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI combustion, and dual-fuel combustion concepts controlled by both fuel reactivity and mixture stratification. The review starts with the charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion, and the works on HCCI fuelled with both high cetane number fuels, such as DME and n-heptane, and high octane number fuels, such as methanol, natural gas, gasoline and mixtures of gasoline/alcohols, are reviewed and discussed. Since single fuel cannot meet the reactivity requirements under different loads to control the combustion process, the studies related to concentration stratification and dual-fuel charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion are then presented, which have been shown to have the potential to achieve effective combustion control. The efforts of using both mixture and thermal stratifications to achieve the auto-ignition and combustion control are also discussed. Thereafter, both charge reactivity and mixture stratification are then applied to control the combustion process. The potential and capability of thermal-atmosphere controlled compound combustion mode and dual-fuel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI/highly premixed charge combustion (HPCC mode to achieve clean and high efficiency combustion are then presented and discussed. Based on these results and discussions, combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixtures stratification in the whole operating range is proposed.

  17. Armodafinil for Treatment of Excessive Sleepiness Associated With Shift Work Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Study

    OpenAIRE

    Czeisler, Charles A.; Walsh, James K.; Wesnes, Keith A.; Arora, Sanjay; Roth, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of armodafinil, 150 mg, on the physiologic propensity for sleep and cognitive performance during usual night shift hours in patients with excessive sleepiness associated with chronic (≥3 months) shift work disorder (SWD) of moderate or greater severity.

  18. Effects of an alternating work shift on air traffic controllers and the relationship with excessive daytime sleepiness and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ângela M; Portuguez, Mirna Wetters; Russomano, Thaís; Freitas, Marcos de; Silvello, Silvio Luis da Silva; Costa, Jaderson Costa da

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate symptoms of stress and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in air traffic control (ATC) officers in Brazil. Fifty-two ATC officers participated, based at three air traffic control units, identified as A, B and C. Stress symptoms were assessed using the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults, and EDS by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The sample mean age was 37 years, 76.9% of whom were male. Excessive daytime sleepiness was identified in 25% of the ATC officers, with 84.6% of these based at air traffic control unit A, which has greater air traffic flow, operating a 24-hour alternating work shift schedule. A total of 16% of the ATC officers had stress symptoms, and of these, 62% showed a predominance of physical symptoms. The high percentage of ATC officers with EDS identified in group A may be related to chronodisruption due to night work and alternating shifts.

  19. Excess control rights: a study about its reflex on the cost of debt of publicly traded Brazilian companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Marlon Konraht

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effect of excess control on the cost of debt in publicly traded Brazilian companies. Its objective is to determine whether a higher misalignment between voting rights and cash flow rights held by controlling shareholder causes an increase in agency cost of debt. For the analysis of the research problem, it was used panel data regression with random effects, in which was compared the level of excess control and the firms cost of debt. The results indicate that there is a positive and statistically significant association between excess control and the cost of debt. This suggests that creditors interpret this misalignment as a control entrenchment, which increases the credit risk, and thereby, increases the cost of debt. From the scientific point of view, the contribution to the literature provided by this study is the finding that ownership structure bears an impact in the creditor perceptions of risk, and thus, the cost of debt. These results can assist in developing actions to reduce the cost of debt, which implies the maximization of the economic performance of firms that have third-party capital in its capital structure. Its social contribution is the distinction of the firms exposed to a higher level of cost of debt, identifying ways to maximize resources, that is a relevant aspect especially in times of crisis whose effects can be very varied, such as bankruptcies, massive layoffs and default.

  20. Electrical engineering unit for the reactive power control of the load bus at the voltage instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotenev, A. V.; Kotenev, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. V.; Elkin, D. A.

    2018-01-01

    For the purpose of reactive power control error reduction and decrease of the voltage sags in the electric power system caused by the asynchronous motors started the mathematical model of the load bus was developed. The model was built up of the sub-models of the following elements: a transformer, a transmission line, a synchronous and an asynchronous loads and a capacitor bank load, and represents the automatic reactive power control system taking into account electromagnetic processes of the asynchronous motors started and reactive power changing of the electric power system elements caused by the voltage fluctuation. The active power/time and reactive power/time characteristics based on the recommended procedure of the equivalent electric circuit parameters calculation were obtained. The derived automatic reactive power control system was shown to eliminate the voltage sags in the electric power system caused by the asynchronous motors started.

  1. Temperature and Stresses Estimation in Reactivity Control Rods for CAREM-25 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, Mario; Estevez, Esteban

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control rods are a critical component regarding safety.Its correct operation when required must be ensured.For this purpose, this component must maintain its operating capacity during all its residence time and under any foreseen operation condition.To evaluate the behaviour of reactivity control rods, it is necessary to analyse the demands they are exposed to, determining from the mechanical point of view, the residence time in the reactor core.In this report, using analytical calculations, the parameters affecting the performance of the reactivity control rods are analysed, with the objective of determine from the mechanical point of view, its behaviour and residence time

  2. Prevention and control of zebra mussels: proactive and reactive strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Most plant people would agree that having zebra mussels in any raw water system is not desirable. System blockage, loss of heat transfer and other associated safety hazards are not pleasant to deal with. Therefore most industries strive to minimise the effect of infestation. Opinions differ as to how to do this most efficiently and economically. Some facilities are committed to preventing the settlement of veligers in their piping systems and on some of the external structures they consider critical. This is the proactive approach. Others allow settlement and only treat the system or surface after fouling has occurred. This is the reactive approach. Which is the best and most economical treatment will depend on the individual facility and sometimes on the individual system. The paper examines the different proactive and reactive strategies available to-date and how they are being used. It will also discuss some of the criteria for choosing a proactive vs. reactive approach and why the decision has to be made individually by each facility. (author)

  3. Prevention and control of zebra mussels: proactive and reactive strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudi, R. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    Most plant people would agree that having zebra mussels in any raw water system is not desirable. System blockage, loss of heat transfer and other associated safety hazards are not pleasant to deal with. Therefore most industries strive to minimise the effect of infestation. Opinions differ as to how to do this most efficiently and economically. Some facilities are committed to preventing the settlement of veligers in their piping systems and on some of the externalstructures they consider critical. This is the proactive approach. Others allow settlement and only treat the system or surface after fouling has occurred. This is the reactive approach. Which is the best and most economical treatment will depend on the individual facility and sometimes on the individual system. The paper examines the different proactive and reactive strategies available to-date and how they are being used. It will also discuss some of the criteria for choosing a proactive vs. reactive approach and why the decision has to be made individually by each facility. (author)

  4. Use of reactivity constraints for the automatic control of reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.A.; Lanning, D.D.; Ray, A.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical framework for the automatic control of reactor power has been developed and experimentally evaluated on the 5 MWt Research Reactor that is operated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The controller functions by restricting the net reactivity so that it is always possible to make the reactor period infinite at the desired termination point of a transient by reversing the direction of motion of whatever control mechanism is associated with the controller. This capability is formally designated as ''feasibility of control''. It has been shown experimentally that maintenance of feasibility of control is a sufficient condition for the automatic control of reactor power. This research should be of value in the design of closed-loop controllers, in the creation of reactivity displays, in the provision of guidance to operators regarding the timing of reactivity changes, and as an experimental envelope within which alternate control strategies can be evaluated

  5. Neutronic characterization of cylindrical core of minor excess reactivity in the nuclear reactor IPEN/MB-01 from the measure of spatial and energetic distribution of neutron flux distribution; Caracterizacao do nucleo cilindrico de menor excesso de reatividade do reator IPEN/MB-01, pela medida da distribuicao espacial e energetica do fluxo de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aredes, Vitor Ottoni Garcia

    2014-07-01

    In this work was conducted the mapping of the thermal and epithermal neutrons flux and the energy spectrum of the neutrons in the reactor core IPEN/MB-01 for a cylindrical core configuration with minor excess reactivity, which is 28 x 28 fuel rods arranged in north-south and east-west directions. The calibration of control rods for this configuration determined their excess reactivity. The lower excess reactivity in the core decreased neutron flux disturbance caused by the neutron absorbing rods , given that the nuclear reactor was operated with the rods almost completely removed . Was used the 'Activation Analysis Technique' with the thin foil activation detectors ( infinitely diluted and hyper-pure), of different materials that work in different energy ranges, to calculate the saturation activity, used for determining the neutron flux and in the SANDBP code as input for the calculation of the neutrons energy spectrum. To discriminate thermal and epithermal flux , was used the 'Cadmium RatioTechnique' . The activation detectors were distributed in a total of 140 radial and axial positions in the reactor core and 16 irradiation, with bare and covered with cadmium activation foils. A model of this configuration was simulated by MCNP-5 code to determine the cadmium correction factor and comparison of the results obtained experimentally. The cylindrical configuration desired, with 17% less fuel than the standard rectangular configuration (28 x 26 fuel rods), reached criticality with the control rods approximately 90% removed, which decreased considerably the disturbance in neutron flux. Given the highest power density of the 28 x 28 cylindrical core, the neutron flux increased by over 50% in the central regions of the core compared to the values of the 28 x 26 standard rectangular core. (author)

  6. Controls on the Environmental Fate of Compounds Controlled by Coupled Hydrologic and Reactive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixson, J.; Ward, A. S.; McConville, M.; Remucal, C.

    2017-12-01

    Current understanding of how compounds interact with hydrologic processes or reactive processes have been well established. However, the environmental fate for compounds that interact with hydrologic AND reactive processes is not well known, yet critical in evaluating environmental risk. Evaluations of risk are often simplified to homogenize processes in space and time and to assess processes independently of one another. However, we know spatial heterogeneity and time-variable reactivities complicate predictions of environmental transport and fate, and is further complicated by the interaction of these processes, limiting our ability to accurately predict risk. Compounds that interact with both systems, such as photolytic compounds, require that both components are fully understood in order to predict transport and fate. Release of photolytic compounds occurs through both unintentional releases and intentional loadings. Evaluating risks associated with unintentional releases and implementing best management practices for intentional releases requires an in-depth understanding of the sensitivity of photolytic compounds to external controls. Lampricides, such as 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), are broadly applied in the Great Lakes system to control the population of invasive sea lamprey. Over-dosing can yield fish kills and other detrimental impacts. Still, planning accounts for time of passage and dilution, but not the interaction of the physical and chemical systems (i.e., storage in the hyporheic zone and time-variable decay rates). In this study, we model a series of TFM applications to test the efficacy of dosing as a function of system characteristics. Overall, our results demonstrate the complexity associated with photo-sensitive compounds through stream-hyporheic systems, and highlight the need to better understand how physical and chemical systems interact to control transport and fate in the environment.

  7. Influence of control and physical effort on cardiovascular reactivity to a video game task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Suzanne E; Quigley, Karen S; Mordkoff, J Toby

    2002-09-01

    This study investigated the influences of both perceived control and physical effort on cardiovascular reactivity. Undergraduates (N = 32) played a video game task interrupted by aversive noise. Perceived control of the noise was manipulated by instructions indicating the presence or absence of a contingency between performance and noise presentations. Physical effort was manipulated by controlling the physical force required to perform the task. There was a significant main effect of control on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and total peripheral resistance (TPR), with both increasing more during low than high control conditions. The results suggest that high perceived control over aversive noise in an effortful task reduces SBP and TPR reactivity relative to low perceived control. The results are consistent with the idea that control buffers the reactivity associated with task performance under aversive conditions.

  8. Power and reactive power simultaneous control by 0.5 MJ superconducting magnet energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Toshifumi; Tsuji, Kiichiro; Murakami, Yoshishige

    1984-01-01

    Superconducting magnet energy storage (SMES) is expected to be widely applied to the pulsed sources for fusion reactor research and to the energy storage substituting for pumping-up power stations, because of its fast energy storing and discharging and very high efficiency. Some results have been obtained so far. In this paper, however, the simultaneous control of power and reactive power is considered for an energy storage composed of two sets of thyristorized power conversion system and superconducting magnets in series connection, and a direct digital control system is described on the principle, design and configuration including the compensator, and on the experiment using the 0.5 MJ superconducting magnet energy storage installed in the Superconduction Engineering Experiment Center, Osaka University. The results obtained are as follows: (1) P control priority mode and Q control priority mode (in which power and reactive power control has priority, respectively) were proposed as the countermeasures when the simultaneous control of power and reactive power became impossible; (2) the design method was established, by which power and reactive power control loops can independently be designed as a result of simulation; (3) the achievement of the simultaneous control of power and reactive power was confirmed by using P-control priority mode and Q-control priority mode, in the experiment using the control system designed by simulation. The validity of simulation model was also confirmed by actual response waveforms. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. A Hierarchical Control Scheme for Reactive Power and Harmonic Current Sharing in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorzadeh, Iman; Firoozabadi, Mehdi Savaghebi; Askarian Abyaneh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a hierarchical control scheme consisting of primary and secondary levels is proposed for achieving accurate reactive power and harmonic currents sharing among interface inverters of distributed generators (DGs) in islanded microgrids. Firstly, fundamental and main harmonic componen...

  10. Reactive power and voltage control strategy based on dynamic and adaptive segment for DG inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jianwei; Lin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yongjun

    2018-03-01

    The inverter of distributed generation (DG) can support reactive power to help solve the problem of out-of-limit voltage in active distribution network (ADN). Therefore, a reactive voltage control strategy based on dynamic and adaptive segment for DG inverter is put forward to actively control voltage in this paper. The proposed strategy adjusts the segmented voltage threshold of Q(U) droop curve dynamically and adaptively according to the voltage of grid-connected point and the power direction of adjacent downstream line. And then the reactive power reference of DG inverter can be got through modified Q(U) control strategy. The reactive power of inverter is controlled to trace the reference value. The proposed control strategy can not only control the local voltage of grid-connected point but also help to maintain voltage within qualified range considering the terminal voltage of distribution feeder and the reactive support for adjacent downstream DG. The scheme using the proposed strategy is compared with the scheme without the reactive support of DG inverter and the scheme using the Q(U) control strategy with constant segmented voltage threshold. The simulation results suggest that the proposed method has a significant improvement on solving the problem of out-of-limit voltage, restraining voltage variation and improving voltage quality.

  11. A Reactive Blended Learning Proposal for an Introductory Control Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Juan A.; Gonzalez, Evelio J.

    2010-01-01

    As it happens in other fields of engineering, blended learning is widely used to teach process control topics. In this paper, the inclusion of a reactive element--a Fuzzy Logic based controller--is proposed for a blended learning approach in an introductory control engineering course. This controller has been designed in order to regulate the…

  12. An Improved Droop Control Strategy for Reactive Power Sharing in Islanded Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Hua; Liu, Yao; Sun, Yao

    2015-01-01

    For microgrid in islanded operation, due to the effects of mismatched line impedance, the reactive power could not be shared accurately with the conventional droop method. To improve the reactive power sharing accuracy, this paper proposes an improved droop control method. The proposed method...... in output voltage amplitude. Therefore, the voltage recovery operation is proposed to compensate the decrease. The needed communication in this method is very simple, and the plug-and-play is reserved. Simulations and experimental results show that the improved droop controller can share load active...... and reactive power, improve the power quality of the microgrid, and also have a good dynamic performance....

  13. Re-Active Passive devices for control of noise transmission through a panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive devices have been developed to control low-frequency (transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The Re-Active Passive device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover relatively high-frequency range (>150 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber to cover the medium-frequency range (50-200 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (transmission through a panel mounted in the Transmission Loss Test Facility at Virginia Tech. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three Re-Active Passive devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 g to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  14. Probabilistic analysis on the failure of reactivity control for the PWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sony Tjahyani, D. T.; Deswandri; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    The fundamental safety function of the power reactor is to control reactivity, to remove heat from the reactor, and to confine radioactive material. The safety analysis is used to ensure that each parameter is fulfilled during the design and is done by deterministic and probabilistic method. The analysis of reactivity control is important to be done because it will affect the other of fundamental safety functions. The purpose of this research is to determine the failure probability of the reactivity control and its failure contribution on a PWR design. The analysis is carried out by determining intermediate events, which cause the failure of reactivity control. Furthermore, the basic event is determined by deductive method using the fault tree analysis. The AP1000 is used as the object of research. The probability data of component failure or human error, which is used in the analysis, is collected from IAEA, Westinghouse, NRC and other published documents. The results show that there are six intermediate events, which can cause the failure of the reactivity control. These intermediate events are uncontrolled rod bank withdrawal at low power or full power, malfunction of boron dilution, misalignment of control rod withdrawal, malfunction of improper position of fuel assembly and ejection of control rod. The failure probability of reactivity control is 1.49E-03 per year. The causes of failures which are affected by human factor are boron dilution, misalignment of control rod withdrawal and malfunction of improper position for fuel assembly. Based on the assessment, it is concluded that the failure probability of reactivity control on the PWR is still within the IAEA criteria.

  15. Modelling and automatic reactive power control of isolated wind-diesel hybrid power systems using ANN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN) based approach to tune the parameters of the static var compensator (SVC) reactive power controller over a wide range of typical load model parameters. The gains of PI (proportional integral) based SVC are optimised for typical values of the load voltage characteristics (n q ) by conventional techniques. Using the generated data, the method of multi-layer feed forward ANN with error back propagation training is employed to tune the parameters of the SVC. An ANN tuned SVC controller has been applied to control the reactive power of a variable slip/speed isolated wind-diesel hybrid power system. It is observed that the maximum deviations of all parameters are more for larger values of n q . It has been shown that initially synchronous generator supplies the reactive power required by the induction generator and/or load, and the latter reactive power is purely supplied by the SVC

  16. Modelling and automatic reactive power control of isolated wind-diesel hybrid power systems using ANN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, R.C. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Division, School of Engineering and Physics, The University of the South Pacific, Suva (Fiji)

    2008-02-15

    This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN) based approach to tune the parameters of the static var compensator (SVC) reactive power controller over a wide range of typical load model parameters. The gains of PI (proportional integral) based SVC are optimised for typical values of the load voltage characteristics (n{sub q}) by conventional techniques. Using the generated data, the method of multi-layer feed forward ANN with error back propagation training is employed to tune the parameters of the SVC. An ANN tuned SVC controller has been applied to control the reactive power of a variable slip/speed isolated wind-diesel hybrid power system. It is observed that the maximum deviations of all parameters are more for larger values of n{sub q}. It has been shown that initially synchronous generator supplies the reactive power required by the induction generator and/or load, and the latter reactive power is purely supplied by the SVC. (author)

  17. Reactive Flow Control of Delta Wing Vortex (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    wing aircraft. A substantial amount of research has been dedicated to the control of aerodynamic flows using both passive and active control mechanisms...Passive vortex control devices such as vortex generators and winglets attach to the wing and require no energy input. Passive vortex control...leading edges is also effective for changing the aerodynamic characteristics of delta wings [2] [3]. Gutmark and Guillot [5] proposed controlling

  18. Anode reactive bleed and injector shift control strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun [Rochester, NY; Chowdhury, Akbar [Pittsford, NY; Lerner, Seth E [Honeoye Falls, NY; Marley, William S [Rush, NY; Savage, David R [Rochester, NY; Leary, James K [Rochester, NY

    2012-01-03

    A system and method for correcting a large fuel cell voltage spread for a split sub-stack fuel cell system. The system includes a hydrogen source that provides hydrogen to each split sub-stack and bleed valves for bleeding the anode side of the sub-stacks. The system also includes a voltage measuring device for measuring the voltage of each cell in the split sub-stacks. The system provides two levels for correcting a large stack voltage spread problem. The first level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack well before a normal reactive bleed would occur, and the second level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack and opening the bleed valve of the other sub-stack when the cell voltage spread is close to stack failure.

  19. Mineralogy controls on reactive transport of Marcellus Shale waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhang; Wen, Hang; Komarneni, Sridhar; Li, Li

    2018-07-15

    Produced or flowback waters from Marcellus Shale gas extraction (MSWs) typically are highly saline and contain chemicals including trace metals, which pose significant concerns on water quality. The natural attenuation of MSW chemicals in groundwater is poorly understood due to the complex interactions between aquifer minerals and MSWs, limiting our capabilities to monitor and predict. Here we combine flow-through experiments and process-based reactive transport modeling to understand mechanisms and quantify the retention of MSW chemicals in a quartz (Qtz) column, a calcite-rich (Cal) column, and a clay-rich (Vrm, vermiculite) column. These columns were used to represent sand, carbonate, and clay-rich aquifers. Results show that the types and extent of water-rock interactions differ significantly across columns. Although it is generally known that clay-rich media retard chemicals and that quartz media minimize water-rock interactions, results here have revealed insights that differ from previous thoughts. We found that the reaction mechanisms are much more complex than merely sorption and mineral precipitation. In clay rich media, trace metals participate in both ion exchange and mineral precipitation. In fact, the majority of metals (~50-90%) is retained in the solid via mineral precipitation, which is surprising because we typically expect the dominance of sorption in clay-rich aquifers. In the Cal column, trace metals are retained not only through precipitation but also solid solution partitioning, leading to a total of 75-99% retention. Even in the Qtz column, trace metals are retained at unexpectedly high percentages (~20-70%) due to precipitation. The reactive transport model developed here quantitatively differentiates the relative importance of individual processes, and bridges a limited number of experiments to a wide range of natural conditions. This is particularly useful where relatively limited knowledge and data prevent the prediction of complex rock

  20. Working principle and structure characteristics analysis of the reactivity control drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Tianyu; Huang Zhiyong; Chen Feng; He Xuedong

    2010-01-01

    The startup, power regulation and safety shutdown of the nuclear reactor are operated by the reactivity control devices. Reactivity control drive mechanism is a key mechanical transmission component, which directly control the location of the neutron absorber in the core. Its working condition is complex, and its service life should be long., which requires high reliability. PWR as well as newly developed different type of reactors have different control devices drive mechanism. This paper mainly do analysis and comparison about the working environment, mechanical transmission principle, structure, performance, service life and other aspects of PWR, HTR control devices drive mechanism. In addition, this paper is also based on the working principles of reactive control devices drive mechanism, also consider the trends of its design and test verification by the international countries, and discussed the method and feasibility of improving and perfecting the structure and function of drive mechanism. (authors)

  1. Multivariable model predictive control design of reactive distillation column for Dimethyl Ether production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, A.; Putra, I. G. E. P.

    2018-03-01

    Dimethyl ether (DME) as an alternative clean energy has attracted a growing attention in the recent years. DME production via reactive distillation has potential for capital cost and energy requirement savings. However, combination of reaction and distillation on a single column makes reactive distillation process a very complex multivariable system with high non-linearity of process and strong interaction between process variables. This study investigates a multivariable model predictive control (MPC) based on two-point temperature control strategy for the DME reactive distillation column to maintain the purities of both product streams. The process model is estimated by a first order plus dead time model. The DME and water purity is maintained by controlling a stage temperature in rectifying and stripping section, respectively. The result shows that the model predictive controller performed faster responses compared to conventional PI controller that are showed by the smaller ISE values. In addition, the MPC controller is able to handle the loop interactions well.

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of a smartphone app to reduce excessive alcohol consumption: protocol for a factorial randomised control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Garnett

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide and interventions to help people reduce their consumption are needed. Interventions delivered by smartphone apps have the potential to help harmful and hazardous drinkers reduce their consumption of alcohol. However, there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of existing smartphone interventions. A systematic review, amongst other methodologies, identified promising modular content that could be delivered by an app: self-monitoring and feedback; action planning; normative feedback; cognitive bias re-training; and identity change. This protocol reports a factorial randomised controlled trial to assess the comparative potential of these five intervention modules to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. Methods A between-subject factorial randomised controlled trial. Hazardous and harmful drinkers aged 18 or over who are making a serious attempt to reduce their drinking will be randomised to one of 32 (25 experimental conditions after downloading the ‘Drink Less’ app. Participants complete baseline measures on downloading the app and are contacted after 1-month with a follow-up questionnaire. The primary outcome measure is change in past week consumption of alcohol. Secondary outcome measures are change in AUDIT score, app usage data and usability ratings for the app. A factorial between-subjects ANOVA will be conducted to assess main and interactive effects of the five intervention modules for the primary and secondary outcome measures. Discussion This study will establish the extent to which the five intervention modules offered in this app can help reduce hazardous and harmful drinking. This is the first step in optimising and understanding what component parts of an app could help to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. The findings from this study will be used to inform the content of a future integrated treatment app and

  3. Evaluating the effectiveness of a smartphone app to reduce excessive alcohol consumption: protocol for a factorial randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Claire; Crane, David; Michie, Susan; West, Robert; Brown, Jamie

    2016-07-08

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide and interventions to help people reduce their consumption are needed. Interventions delivered by smartphone apps have the potential to help harmful and hazardous drinkers reduce their consumption of alcohol. However, there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of existing smartphone interventions. A systematic review, amongst other methodologies, identified promising modular content that could be delivered by an app: self-monitoring and feedback; action planning; normative feedback; cognitive bias re-training; and identity change. This protocol reports a factorial randomised controlled trial to assess the comparative potential of these five intervention modules to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. A between-subject factorial randomised controlled trial. Hazardous and harmful drinkers aged 18 or over who are making a serious attempt to reduce their drinking will be randomised to one of 32 (2(5)) experimental conditions after downloading the 'Drink Less' app. Participants complete baseline measures on downloading the app and are contacted after 1-month with a follow-up questionnaire. The primary outcome measure is change in past week consumption of alcohol. Secondary outcome measures are change in AUDIT score, app usage data and usability ratings for the app. A factorial between-subjects ANOVA will be conducted to assess main and interactive effects of the five intervention modules for the primary and secondary outcome measures. This study will establish the extent to which the five intervention modules offered in this app can help reduce hazardous and harmful drinking. This is the first step in optimising and understanding what component parts of an app could help to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. The findings from this study will be used to inform the content of a future integrated treatment app and evaluated against a minimal control in a definitive randomised

  4. Mechanisms and neuronal networks involved in reactive and proactive cognitive control of interference in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlbacher, Kerstin; Kraft, Antje; Kehrer, Stefanie; Brandt, Stephan A

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive control can be reactive or proactive in nature. Reactive control mechanisms, which support the resolution of interference, start after its onset. Conversely, proactive control involves the anticipation and prevention of interference prior to its occurrence. The interrelation of both types of cognitive control is currently under debate: Are they mediated by different neuronal networks? Or are there neuronal structures that have the potential to act in a proactive as well as in a reactive manner? This review illustrates the way in which integrating knowledge gathered from behavioral studies, functional imaging, and human electroencephalography proves useful in answering these questions. We focus on studies that investigate interference resolution at the level of working memory representations. In summary, different mechanisms are instrumental in supporting reactive and proactive control. Distinct neuronal networks are involved, though some brain regions, especially pre-SMA, possess functions that are relevant to both control modes. Therefore, activation of these brain areas could be observed in reactive, as well as proactive control, but at different times during information processing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  6. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Per; Greenspan, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m 3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m 3 . This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X-PREX facility uses novel

  7. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration

  8. Application of Newton's optimal power flow in voltage/reactive power control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelogrlic, M.; Babic, B.S. (Electric Power Board of Serbia, Belgrade (YU)); Calovic, M.S. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (YU)); Ristanovic, P. (Institute Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (YU))

    1990-11-01

    This paper considers an application of Newton's optimal power flow to the solution of the secondary voltage/reactive power control in transmission networks. An efficient computer program based on the latest achievements in the sparse matrix/vector techniques has been developed for this purpose. It is characterized by good robustness, accuracy and speed. A combined objective function appropriate for various system load levels with suitable constraints, for treatment of the power system security and economy is also proposed. For the real-time voltage/reactive power control, a suboptimal power flow procedure has been derived by using the reduced set of control variables. This procedure is based on the sensitivity theory applied to the determination of zones for the secondary voltage/reactive power control and corresponding reduced set of regulating sources, whose reactive outputs represent control variables in the optimal power flow program. As a result, the optimal power flow program output becomes a schedule to be used by operators in the process of the real-time voltage/reactive power control in both normal and emergency operating states.

  9. Abnormal proactive and reactive cognitive control during conflict processing in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne; De Raedt, Rudi; De Paepe, Annick; Aarts, Kristien; Otte, Georges; Van Dorpe, Jan; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-02-01

    According to the Dual Mechanisms of Control framework, cognitive control consists of two complementary components: proactive control refers to anticipatory maintenance of goal-relevant information, whereas reactive control acts as a correction mechanism that is activated when a conflict occurs. Possibly, the well-known diminished inhibitory control in response to negative stimuli in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) patients stems from a breakdown in proactive control, and/or anomalies in reactive cognitive control. In our study, MDD patients specifically showed increased response latencies when actively inhibiting a dominant response to a sad compared with a happy face. This condition was associated with a longer duration of a dominant ERP topography (800-900 ms poststimulus onset) and a stronger activity in the bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, reflecting abnormal reactive control when inhibiting attention to a negative stimulus. Moreover, MDD patients showed abnormalities in proactive cognitive control when preparing for the upcoming imperative stimulus (abnormal modulation of the contingent negative variation component), accompanied by more activity in brain regions belonging to the default mode network. All together, deficits to inhibit attention to negative information in MDD might originate from an abnormal use of both proactive resources and reactive control processes. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Design of Simulink module for dynamic reactivity simulation of marine reactor automatic control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhiyun; Luo Lei; Chen Wenzhen; Gui Xuewen

    2010-01-01

    The power of marine reactor varies frequently and acutely, which induces the frequent and acute adjustment of the automatic control rod. According to the characteristics of marine reactor and the problem of improper control rod reactivity insertion in previous literatures, the Simulink module for dynamic reactivity simulation of automatic control rod was designed and adopted as a sub-module of Simulink program for the fast calculation of the physical and thermal parameters of marine reactor. A typical dynamic process of the marine reactor was used as the benchmark, which indicates that the designed Simulink module is capable of the dynamic simulation of automatic control rod position and reactivity, and is adequate to the fast calculation of physic and thermal parameters. The Simulink module is of significant meaning to the simulation of the dynamic process of marine reactor and the fast calculation of the operating parameters. (authors)

  11. Controlled Growth of ZnSe Nanocrystals by Tuning Reactivity and Amount of Zinc Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai-Jun Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc selenide (ZnSe nanocrystals were synthesized via a phosphine-free route using the highly reactive alkylamine-H2Se complex as selenium precursor and zinc precursors with different reactivity. The reactivity of zinc precursor was tuned by using three kinds of zinc carboxylates with different alkyl chain lengths, including zinc acetate, zinc nonanoate, and zinc stearate. The effect of the reactivity and the amount of zinc precursor on nucleation and growth of ZnSe nanocrystals were investigated by ultraviolet-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectra. Result indicates that the growth and optical property of the resulting ZnSe nanocrystals are strongly dependent on the alkyl chain length and the amount of the zinc carboxylates and both shorter alkyl chain length, and more amount of zinc carboxylate will lead to faster growth of ZnSe nanocrystals. This allows that the controlled growth and excellent optical property of high-quality ZnSe nanocrystals can be achieved by combining the different reactivity and the used amount of zinc precursor, such as by using stoichiometric and reactive Zn precursor and Se precursor or by using larger amount of more unreactive Zn precursor relative to the highly reactive alkylamine-H2Se complex precursor.

  12. An iterative method for controlling reactive power flow in boundary transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, Angel L.; Martinez, Jose L.; Riquelme, Jesus; Romero, Esther [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Seville (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents an operational tool designed to help the system operator to control the reactive power flow in transmission-subtransmission boundary transformers. The main objective is to determine the minimum number of control actions necessary to ensure that reactive power flows in transmission/subtransmission transformers remain within limits. The proposed iterative procedure combines the use of a linear programming problem and a load flow tool. The linear programming assumes a linear behaviour between dependent and control variables around an operating point, modelled with sensitivities. Experimental results regarding IEEE systems are provided comparing the performance of the proposed approach with that of a conventional optimal power flow. (author)

  13. Excess Sodium Tetraphenylborate and Intermediates Decomposition Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.; Peterson, R.A.

    1998-04-01

    The stability of excess amounts of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility depends on a number of variables. Concentration of palladium, initial benzene, and sodium ion as well as temperature provide the best opportunities for controlling the decomposition rate. This study examined the influence of these four variables on the reactivity of palladium-catalyzed sodium tetraphenylborate decomposition. Also, single effects tests investigated the reactivity of simulants with continuous stirring and nitrogen ventilation, with very high benzene concentrations, under washed sodium concentrations, with very high palladium concentrations, and with minimal quantities of excess NaTPB. These tests showed the following.The testing demonstrates that current facility configuration does not provide assured safety of operations relative to the hazards of benzene (in particular to maintain the tank headspace below 60 percent of the lower flammability limit (lfl) for benzene generation rates of greater than 7 mg/(L.h)) from possible accelerated reaction of excess NaTPB. Current maximal operating temperatures of 40 degrees C and the lack of protection against palladium entering Tank 48H provide insufficient protection against the onset of the reaction. Similarly, control of the amount of excess NaTPB, purification of the organic, or limiting the benzene content of the slurry (via stirring) and ionic strength of the waste mixture prove inadequate to assure safe operation

  14. Excess Sodium Tetraphenylborate and Intermediates Decomposition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Peterson , R.A.

    1998-04-01

    The stability of excess amounts of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility depends on a number of variables. Concentration of palladium, initial benzene, and sodium ion as well as temperature provide the best opportunities for controlling the decomposition rate. This study examined the influence of these four variables on the reactivity of palladium-catalyzed sodium tetraphenylborate decomposition. Also, single effects tests investigated the reactivity of simulants with continuous stirring and nitrogen ventilation, with very high benzene concentrations, under washed sodium concentrations, with very high palladium concentrations, and with minimal quantities of excess NaTPB. These tests showed the following.The testing demonstrates that current facility configuration does not provide assured safety of operations relative to the hazards of benzene (in particular to maintain the tank headspace below 60 percent of the lower flammability limit (lfl) for benzene generation rates of greater than 7 mg/(L.h)) from possible accelerated reaction of excess NaTPB. Current maximal operating temperatures of 40 degrees C and the lack of protection against palladium entering Tank 48H provide insufficient protection against the onset of the reaction. Similarly, control of the amount of excess NaTPB, purification of the organic, or limiting the benzene content of the slurry (via stirring) and ionic strength of the waste mixture prove inadequate to assure safe operation.

  15. Closely Supervised Reactive Control of an Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassco, Roy

    2000-01-01

    ...) or by using the Global Positioning System (GPS). This thesis proposes an alternative control method that incorporates some of the beneficial aspect of both fully manual and fully autonomous operation...

  16. Experimental evaluation of reactivity constraints for the closed-loop control of reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.A.; Lanning, D.D.; Ray, A.

    1984-01-01

    General principles for the closed-loop, digital control of reactor power have been identified, quantitatively enumerated, and experimentally demonstrated on the 5 MWt Research Reactor, MITR-II. The basic concept is to restrict the net reactivity so that it is always possible to make the reactor period infinite at the desired termination point of a transient by reversing the direction of motion of whatever control mechanism is associated with the controller. This capability is formally referred to as ''feasibility of control''. A series of ten experiments have been conducted over a period of eighteen months to demonstrate the efficacy of this property for the automatic control of reactor power. It has been shown that a controller which possesses this property is capable of both raising and lowering power in a safe, efficient manner while using a control rod of varying differential worth, that the reactivity constraints are a sufficient condition for the automatic control of reactor power, and that the use of a controller based on reactivity constraints can prevent overshoots either due to attempts to control a transient with a control rod of insufficient differential worth or due to failure to properly estimate when to commence rod insertion. Details of several of the more significant tests are presented together with a discussion of the rationale for the development of closed-loop control in large commercial power systems. Specific consideration is given to the motivation for designing a controller based on feasibility of control and the associated licensing issues

  17. A Hybrid Optimization Method for Reactive Power and Voltage Control Considering Power Loss Minimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chengxi; Qin, Nan; Bak, Claus Leth

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid optimization method to optimally control the voltage and reactive power with minimum power loss in transmission grid. This approach is used for the Danish automatic voltage control (AVC) system which is typically a non-linear non-convex problem mixed with both...

  18. Control excess stock and calculating damaged products as the effort to increase revenue (case study of SME FBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhasanah, N.; Mardhika, D. A.; Tanjung, W.; Gayatri, A. M.; Suri, Q. A.; Jingga; Safitri, R.; Supriyanto, A.

    2017-12-01

    Of small and medium scale (SME) is a business engaged in production. The growth product innovation of each year to year made competitiveness every SME very tight, and the sales must be high that avoid goods the product last year will be tough sold in the following year. Forecasting demand is needed so that no its production. In production process, besides products should also be considered about damaged products, resulting in a loss. In this study, researchers conducted a observations on SME FBS producing pants, shirts and shirts. SME FBS not having planning previous production, also in any period of production there always products be damaged. This study attempts to increase their SME FBS by controlling waste products, and those damaged products. According to the research conducted other products in some excess pants 1609 unit, and the shirts 187911 unit, and increase the income through control over the excess product obtained by 1% to the pants, and 52% to the shirts. For damaged product on period last year and future, increase 0.07% if the damaged on shirts can be sold, and 0.29% on pants if the broken sold.

  19. A heuristic technique to determine corrective control actions for reactive power flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, Angel L.; Martinez, Jose L.; Riquelme, Jesus; Romero, Esther [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Sevilla (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    This paper presents a sensitivity-based heuristic tool designed to help the system operator in the reactive power flow control problem. The objective of the proposed technique is to determine control actions to ensure that reactive power flows in transmission-subtransmission boundary transformers remain within specified limits, satisfying the new regulatory constraints imposed in most of deregulated markets. With this new constraint the utilities want to guarantee that the utility is able to satisfy its own reactive power requirements, avoiding reactive power flows through long distances in order to reduce the well known disadvantages that reactive power circulation has in the system. A 5-bus tutorial system is used to present the proposed algorithm. The results of the application of the proposed technique to the IEEE 118 buses system and to a regional subtransmission network of the South of Spain are reported and analyzed. In this last actual case, the aim is to maintain reactive power flows in transmission/distribution transformers between those limits set by the Spanish Regulation. A comparison between the proposed tool and a conventional OPF is discussed. (author)

  20. Distributed Reactive Power Control based Conservation Voltage Reduction in Active Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMIROGLU, S.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a distributed reactive power control based approach to deploy Volt/VAr optimization (VVO / Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR algorithm in a distribution network with distributed generations (DG units and distribution static synchronous compensators (D-STATCOM. A three-phase VVO/CVR problem is formulated and the reactive power references of D-STATCOMs and DGs are determined in a distributed way by decomposing the VVO/CVR problem into voltage and reactive power control. The main purpose is to determine the coordination between voltage regulator (VR and reactive power sources (Capacitors, D-STATCOMs and DGs based on VVO/CVR. The study shows that the reactive power injection capability of DG units may play an important role in VVO/CVR. In addition, it is shown that the coordination of VR and reactive power sources does not only save more energy and power but also reduces the power losses. Moreover, the proposed VVO/CVR algorithm reduces the computational burden and finds fast solutions. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the VVO/CVR is performed on the IEEE 13-node test system feeder considering unbalanced loading and line configurations. The tests are performed taking the practical voltage-dependent load modeling and different customer types into consideration to improve accuracy.

  1. Do measures of reactive balance control predict falls in people with stroke returning to the community?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, A; Wong, J S; McIlroy, W E; Biasin, L; Brunton, K; Bayley, M; Inness, E L

    2015-12-01

    To determine if reactive balance control measures predict falls after discharge from stroke rehabilitation. Prospective cohort study. Rehabilitation hospital and community. Independently ambulatory individuals with stroke who were discharged home after inpatient rehabilitation (n=95). Balance and gait measures were obtained from a clinical assessment at discharge from inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Measures of reactive balance control were obtained: (1) during quiet standing; (2) when walking; and (3) in response to large postural perturbations. Participants reported falls and activity levels up to 6 months post-discharge. Logistic and Poisson regressions were used to identify measures of reactive balance control that were related to falls post-discharge. Decreased paretic limb contribution to standing balance control [rate ratio 0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7 to 1.0; P=0.011], reduced between-limb synchronisation of quiet standing balance control (rate ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.8 to 0.9; Pfall rates when controlling for age, stroke severity, functional balance and daily walking activity. Impaired reactive balance control in standing and walking predicted increased risk of falls post-discharge from stroke rehabilitation. Specifically, measures that revealed the capacity of both limbs to respond to instability were related to increased risk of falls. These results suggest that post-stroke rehabilitation strategies for falls prevention should train responses to instability, and focus on remediating dyscontrol in the more-affected limb. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauul J. Tikalsky

    2004-10-31

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: (1) a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, (2) a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and (3) the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at N{sub ini}, N{sub des}, and N{sub max}. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  3. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikalsky, Paul J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Bahia, Hussain U. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Deng, An [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Snyder, Thomas [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2004-10-15

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at Nini, Ndes, and Nmax. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  4. Feasibility of a controlled trial aiming to prevent excessive pregnancy-related weight gain in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiderpass Elisabete

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention may predispose women to long-term overweight and other health problems. Intervention studies aiming at preventing excessive pregnancy-related weight gain are needed. The feasibility of implementing such a study protocol in primary health care setting was evaluated in this pilot study. Methods A non-randomized controlled trial was conducted in three intervention and three control maternity and child health clinics in primary health care in Finland. Altogether, 132 pregnant and 92 postpartum women and 23 public health nurses (PHN participated in the study. The intervention consisted of individual counselling on physical activity and diet at five routine visits to a PHN and of an option for supervised group exercise until 37 weeks' gestation or ten months postpartum. The control clinics continued their usual care. The components of the feasibility evaluation were 1 recruitment and participation, 2 completion of data collection, 3 realization of the intervention and 4 the public health nurses' experiences. Results 1 The recruitment rate was slower than expected and the recruitment period had to be prolonged from the initially planned three months to six months. The average participation rate of eligible women at study enrolment was 77% and the drop-out rate 15%. 2 In total, 99% of the data on weight, physical activity and diet and 96% of the blood samples were obtained. 3 In the intervention clinics, 98% of the counselling sessions were realized, their contents and average durations were as intended, 87% of participants regularly completed the weekly records for physical activity and diet, and the average participation percentage in the group exercise sessions was 45%. 4 The PHNs regarded the extra training as a major advantage and the high additional workload as a disadvantage of the study. Conclusion The study protocol was mostly feasible to implement, which

  5. Parametric study of a reactivity accident in a pressurized water reactor: control rod cluster ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnel, A.

    1985-01-01

    This research thesis concerns a class 4 accident in a PWR: the ejection of a control rod cluster from the reactor core. It aims at defining, for such an accident, the envelope values which relate the reactivity to the hot spot factor within the frame of a mode A control. The report describes the physical phenomena and their modelling during the considered transient. It presents a simple mathematical solution of the accident which shows that the main neutron parameters are the released reactivity, the delayed neutron fraction, the Doppler coefficient, and the hot spot factor. It reports a temperature sensitivity study, and discusses three-dimensional calculations of irradiation distributions

  6. Exploring the Potential for Increased Production from the Wave Energy Converter Lifesaver by Reactive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Molinas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fred Olsen is currently testing their latest wave energy converter (WEC, Lifesaver, outside of Falmouth Bay in England, preparing it for commercial operation at the Wavehub test site. Previous studies, mostly focusing on hydrodynamics and peak to average power reduction, have shown that this device has potential for increased power extraction using reactive control. This article extends those analyses, adding a detailed model of the all-electric power take-off (PTO system, consisting of a permanent magnet synchronous generator, inverter and DC-link. Time domain simulations are performed to evaluate the PTO capabilities of the modeled WEC. However, when tuned towards reactive control, the generator losses become large, giving a very low overall system efficiency. Optimal control with respect to electrical output power is found to occur with low added mass, and when compared to pure passive loading, a 1% increase in annual energy production is estimated. The main factor reducing the effect of reactive control is found to be the minimum load-force constraint of the device. These results suggest that the Lifesaver has limited potential for increased production by reactive control. This analysis is nevertheless valuable, as it demonstrates how a wave-to-wire model can be used for investigation of PTO potential, annual energy production estimations and evaluations of different control techniques for a given WEC device.

  7. Re-active Passive (RAP) Devices for Control of Noise Transmission through a Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive (RAP) devices have been developed to control low frequency (transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The RAP device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover the relatively high frequency range (>200 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber) to cover the medium frequency range (75 to 250 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (transmission through a panel mounted in a transmission loss test facility. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three RAP devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 grams to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  8. Control Rod Reactivity Measurements in the Aagesta Reactor with the Pulsed Neutron Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoereus, K

    1969-07-01

    An extensive series of control rod measurements was made in the Aagesta reactor during the low power experimental period following the first criticality. This report describes the part of these investigations made with the pulsed neutron method, comprising nearly 300 measurements. The main objective was the determination of control rod reactivity worths for different rods and groups of rods, but some supplementary measurements were also made, e.g. a determination of the prompt neutron decay constant for the delayed critical condition and four different cores. The cores consisted of 20, 32, 68, and 140 fuel elements respectively, and measurements were made at room temperature and with the moderator level close to critical for each core, and for the 140-element core also with full moderator height and at the temperatures 140 deg C and 215 deg C. Both fully and partly inserted control rod groups were investigated. The measurements at critical water level give directly the control rod reactivity worths, whereas those with full water height give the shut-down reactivity. A comparison was made between measured reactivity worths for a number of rod groups and those calculated with the HETERO code. The prompt neutron decay constant at delayed criticality {alpha}{sub 0}={beta}/l, for the full core at 215 deg C was found to be 9.60 {+-} 0.30/sec, corresponding to l = 0.76 {+-} 0.02 msec. The shut-down reactivity with 16 coarse control rods in pos. A-D 22, 40-04, 44, 26 is -5% at 25 deg C and -13% at 215 deg C. The relative error is usually around 8% in the reactivity worths, originating mainly from the higher harmonics content in the measured curves.

  9. The Effect of Aging on the Dynamics of Reactive and Proactive Cognitive Control of Response Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ling; Zhang, Baoqiang; Wang, Baoxi; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Fenghua; Hu, Zhujing

    2016-01-01

    A prime-target interference task was used to investigate the effects of cognitive aging on reactive and proactive control after eliminating frequency confounds and feature repetitions from the cognitive control measures. We used distributional analyses to explore the dynamics of the two control functions by distinguishing the strength of incorrect response capture and the efficiency of suppression control. For reactive control, within-trial conflict control and between-trial conflict adaption were analyzed. The statistical analysis showed that there were no reliable between-trial conflict adaption effects for either young or older adults. For within-trial conflict control, the results revealed that older adults showed larger interference effects on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that the decline mainly stemmed from inefficient suppression rather than from stronger incorrect responses. For proactive control, older adults showed comparable proactive conflict resolution to young adults on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that older adults were as effective as younger adults in adjusting their responses based on congruency proportion information to minimize automatic response capture and actively suppress the direct response activation. The results suggest that older adults were less proficient at suppressing interference after conflict was detected but can anticipate and prevent inference in response to congruency proportion manipulation. These results challenge earlier views that older adults have selective deficits in proactive control but intact reactive control.

  10. The effect of aging on the dynamics of reactive and proactive cognitive control of response interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Xiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A prime-target interference task was used to investigate the effects of cognitive aging on reactive and proactive control in which frequency confounds and feature repetitions were eliminated from the cognitive control measures. We used distributional analyses to explore the dynamics of the two control functions by distinguishing the strength of incorrect response capture and the efficiency of suppression control. For reactive control, within-trial conflict control and between-trial conflict adaption were analyzed. The statistical analysis showed that there were no reliable between-trial conflict adaption effects for both young and older adults. For within-trial conflict control, the results revealed that older adults showed larger interference effects on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that the decline mainly stemmed from inefficient suppression rather than from stronger incorrect responses. For proactive control, older adults showed comparable proactive conflict resolution than young adults on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed older adults were as effective as younger adults in adjusting their responses to minimize automatic response capture and actively suppress the direct response activation based on congruency proportion information. The results suggest that older adults were less proficient at suppressing interference after conflict was detected but can anticipate and prevent inference in response to congruency proportion manipulation. The results challenge earlier views that older adults have selective deficits in proactive control but are spared in reactive control.

  11. Reactivity control system of a passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wols, F.J.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Lathouwers, D.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A worth of over 15,000 pcm ensures achieving long-term cold shutdown in thorium PBR. • Control rod worth in side reflector is insufficient due to low-power breeder zone. • 20 control rods, just outside the driver zone, can achieve long-term cold shutdown. • BF 3 gas can be inserted for reactor shutdown, but only in case of emergency. • Perturbation theory accurately predicts absorber gas worth for many concentrations. - Abstract: This work investigates the neutronic design of the reactivity control system for a 100 MW th passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor (PBR), a conceptual design introduced previously by the authors. The thorium PBR consists of a central driver zone of 100 cm radius, surrounded by a breeder zone with 300 cm outer radius. The fissile content of the breeder zone is low, leading to low fluxes in the radial reflector region. Therefore, a significant decrease of the control rod worth at this position is anticipated. The reactivity worth of control rods in the side reflector and at alternative in-core positions is calculated using different techniques, being 2D neutron diffusion, perturbation theory and more accurate 3D Monte Carlo models. Sensitivity coefficients from perturbation theory provide a first indication of effective control rod positions, while the 2D diffusion models provide an upper limit on the reactivity worth achievable at a certain radial position due to the homogeneous spreading of the absorber material over the azimuthal domain. Three dimensional forward calculations, e.g. in KENO, are needed for an accurate calculation of the total control rod worth. The two dimensional homogeneous calculations indicate that the reactivity worth in the radial reflector is by far insufficient to achieve cold reactor shutdown, which requires a control rod worth of over 15 000 pcm. Three dimensional heterogeneous KENO calculations show that placing 20 control rods just outside the driver channel, between 100 cm

  12. Reactivity control system of a passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wols, F.J., E-mail: f.j.wols@tudelft.nl; Kloosterman, J.L.; Lathouwers, D.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A worth of over 15,000 pcm ensures achieving long-term cold shutdown in thorium PBR. • Control rod worth in side reflector is insufficient due to low-power breeder zone. • 20 control rods, just outside the driver zone, can achieve long-term cold shutdown. • BF{sub 3} gas can be inserted for reactor shutdown, but only in case of emergency. • Perturbation theory accurately predicts absorber gas worth for many concentrations. - Abstract: This work investigates the neutronic design of the reactivity control system for a 100 MW{sub th} passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor (PBR), a conceptual design introduced previously by the authors. The thorium PBR consists of a central driver zone of 100 cm radius, surrounded by a breeder zone with 300 cm outer radius. The fissile content of the breeder zone is low, leading to low fluxes in the radial reflector region. Therefore, a significant decrease of the control rod worth at this position is anticipated. The reactivity worth of control rods in the side reflector and at alternative in-core positions is calculated using different techniques, being 2D neutron diffusion, perturbation theory and more accurate 3D Monte Carlo models. Sensitivity coefficients from perturbation theory provide a first indication of effective control rod positions, while the 2D diffusion models provide an upper limit on the reactivity worth achievable at a certain radial position due to the homogeneous spreading of the absorber material over the azimuthal domain. Three dimensional forward calculations, e.g. in KENO, are needed for an accurate calculation of the total control rod worth. The two dimensional homogeneous calculations indicate that the reactivity worth in the radial reflector is by far insufficient to achieve cold reactor shutdown, which requires a control rod worth of over 15 000 pcm. Three dimensional heterogeneous KENO calculations show that placing 20 control rods just outside the driver channel

  13. Review of Active and Reactive Power Sharing Strategies in Hierarchical Controlled Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yang; Li, Hong; Shen, Pan

    2017-01-01

    Microgrids consist of multiple parallel-connected distributed generation (DG) units with coordinated control strategies, which are able to operate in both grid-connected and islanded mode. Microgrids are attracting more and more attention since they can alleviate the stress of main transmission...... systems, reduce feeder losses, and improve system power quality. When the islanded microgrids are concerned, it is important to maintain system stability and achieve load power sharing among the multiple parallel-connected DG units. However, the poor active and reactive power sharing problems due...... in this paper for active power sharing. Moreover, nonlinear and unbalanced loads could further affect the reactive power sharing when regulating the active power, and it is difficult to share the reactive power accurately only by using the enhanced virtual impedance method. Therefore, the hierarchical control...

  14. Excessive growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Vasudha; Rettig, Kenneth R; Bhowmick, Samar K

    2008-09-01

    Tall stature and excessive growth syndrome are a relatively rare concern in pediatric practice. Nevertheless, it is important to identify abnormal accelerated growth patterns in children, which may be the clue in the diagnosis of an underlying disorder. We present a case of pituitary gigantism in a 2 1/2-year-old child and discuss the signs, symptoms, laboratory findings, and the treatment. Brief discussions on the differential diagnosis of excessive growth/tall stature have been outlined. Pituitary gigantism is very rare in the pediatrics age group; however, it is extremely rare in a child that is less than 3 years of age. The nature of pituitary adenoma and treatment options in children with this condition have also been discussed.

  15. EKF composition estimation and GMC control of a reactive distillation column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintavon, Sirivimon; Kittisupakorn, Paisan

    2017-08-01

    This research work proposes an extended Kalman filter (EKF) estimator to give estimates of product composition and a generic model controller (GMC) to control the temperature of a reactive distillation column (RDC). One of major difficulties to control the RDC is large time delays of product composition measurement. Therefore, the estimates of the product composition are needed and determined based on available and reliable measured tray temperature via the extended Kalman Filter (EKF). With these estimates, the GMC controller is applied to control the RDC's temperature. The performance of the EKF estimator under the GMC control is evaluated in various disturbances and set point change.

  16. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  17. Systematic Integrated Process Design and Control of Reactive Distillation Processes Involving Multi-elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2016-01-01

    driving force approach. Next, through analytical, steady-state and closed-loop dynamic analysis it is verified that the control structure, disturbance rejection and energy requirement of the reactive distillation column is better than any other operation point that is not at the maximum driving force...

  18. Reactive Neural Control for Phototaxis and Obstacle Avoidance Behavior of Walking Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Pasemann, Frank; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2007-01-01

    as a sensory fusion unit. It filters sensory noise and shapes sensory data to drive the corresponding reactive behavior. On the other hand, modular neural control based on a central pattern generator is applied for locomotion of walking machines. It coordinates leg movements and can generate omnidirectional...

  19. Reactive Power Control for Improving Wind Turbine System Behavior Under Grid Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, P.; Timbus, A.; Teodorescu, Remus

    2009-01-01

    This letter aims to present a generalized vector-based formulation for calculating the grid-side current reference to control reactive power delivered to the grid. Strategies for current reference generation were implemented on the abc stationary reference frame, and their effectivenesswas...... demonstrated experimentally, perhaps validating the theoretical analysis even under grid fault conditions....

  20. Consensus-based Distributed Control for Accurate Reactive, Harmonic and Imbalance Power Sharing in Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Jianguo; Kim, Sunghyok; Zhang, Huaguang

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the issue of accurate reactive, harmonic and imbalance power sharing in a microgrid. Harmonic and imbalance droop controllers are developed to proportionally share the harmonic power and the imbalance power among distributed generation (DG) units and improve the voltage...... voltage. With the proposed methods, the microgrid system reliability and flexibility can be enhanced and the knowledge of the line impedance is not required. And the reactive, harmonic and imbalance power can be proportionally shared among the DG units. Moreover, the quality of the voltage at PCC can...

  1. Local Reactive Power Control Methods for Overvoltage Prevention of Distributed Solar Inverters in Low-Voltage Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirok, Erhan; Gonzalez, Pablo Casado; Frederiksen, Kenn H. B.

    2011-01-01

    on sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity analysis shows that the same amount of reactive power becomes more effective for grid voltage support if the solar inverter is located at the end of a feeder. Based on this fundamental knowledge, a location-dependent power factor set value can be assigned to each inverter......voltage (LV) grids by means of solar inverters with reactive power control capability. This paper underlines weak points of standard reactive power strategies which are already imposed by certain grid codes, and then, the study introduces a new reactive power control method that is based......, and the grid voltage support can be achieved with less total reactive power consumption. In order to prevent unnecessary reactive power absorption from the grid during admissible voltage range or to increase reactive power contribution from the inverters that are closest to the transformer during grid...

  2. Hedonic orientation moderates the association between cognitive control and affect reactivity to daily hassles in adolescent boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipker, Kathrin; Wrzus, Cornelia; Rauers, Antje; Riediger, Michaela

    2017-04-01

    People often seek to regulate their affective reactions when confronted with hassles. Hassle reactivity is lower for people with higher cognitive control, presumably because of better affect regulation. Many adolescents, however, show higher hassle reactivity than children, despite better cognitive control. The present study aims to understand whether motivational differences when seeking to regulate affective experiences moderate the association between cognitive control and hassle reactivity in adolescence. We hypothesized that higher cognitive control is related to lower hassle reactivity only for adolescents with a strong hedonic orientation, that is, for adolescents who seek to maintain or enhance positive or to dampen negative affect. We investigated 149 boys' (age range: 10-20 years) hedonic orientation and affect reactivity toward daily hassles during 2 weeks of experience sampling. Higher cognitive control, assessed with a working memory battery in the laboratory, was associated with stronger hassle reactivity in individuals with low hedonic orientation. The more hedonic-oriented individuals were, the lower was their hassle reactivity, but only in combination with high cognitive control. Our findings illustrate that higher cognitive control is not always related to lower hassle reactivity. Rather, when daily hassles compromise affect balance, hedonic orientation is equally important to understand affect reactivity in adolescent boys. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Determination of the most reactivity control rod by pseudo-harmonics perturbation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Fernando S.; Silva, Fernando C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.

    2005-01-01

    Frequently it is necessary to compute the change in core multiplication caused by a change in the core temperature or composition. Even when this perturbation is localized, such as a control rod inserted into the core, one does not have to repeat the original criticality calculation, but instead we can use the well-known pseudo-harmonics perturbation method to express the corresponding change in the multiplication factor in terms of the neutron flux expanded in the basis vectors characterizing the unperturbed core. Therefore we may compute the control rod worth to find the most reactivity control rod to calculate the fast shutdown margin. In this thesis we propose a simple and precise method to identify the most reactivity control rod. (author)

  4. Coordinated control of active and reactive power of distribution network with distributed PV cluster via model predictive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yu; Sheng, Wanxing; Jin, Wei; Wu, Ming; Liu, Haitao; Chen, Feng

    2018-02-01

    A coordinated optimal control method of active and reactive power of distribution network with distributed PV cluster based on model predictive control is proposed in this paper. The method divides the control process into long-time scale optimal control and short-time scale optimal control with multi-step optimization. The models are transformed into a second-order cone programming problem due to the non-convex and nonlinear of the optimal models which are hard to be solved. An improved IEEE 33-bus distribution network system is used to analyse the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed control method

  5. Study of the controllable reactivity of aluminum alloys and their promising application for hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Meiqiang; Sun Lixian; Xu Fen

    2010-01-01

    The hydrolysis performances of two aluminum alloys are investigated as their reactivity can be controlled via the different additives. The additive of NaCl has the positive effect to improve the hydrolysis properties of the aluminum alloys with quicker hydrolysis kinetic and lower hydrolysis temperature. For examples, in 6 min of hydrolysis reaction, the Al-5 wt%Hg-5 wt%NaCl can produce 971 mL g -1 hydrogen, higher than 917 mL g -1 hydrogen from Al-10 wt%Hg alloy. The Al-In-NaCl alloy has lower hydrolysis temperature about 10 K than that of Al-In alloy. Meanwhile, the reactivity of Al alloys can be improved or reduced via the additive metals. It can be found that the additive cadmium can reduce the reactivity of Al-Hg alloy. The Al-Hg-Cd alloys can keep good stability at the moist atmosphere below 343 K and have excellent hydrolysis performance around 343-373 K. The debased reactivity of Al-Hg-Cd composite comes from the formation of CdHg 2 compounds in the milling process. But the additive Zn and Ga doped into the Al-In-NaCl alloys can quickly increase the reactivity of the alloy which can quickly react with water at room temperature and have high hydrogen yield up to the theoretic value. Therefore, it is a promising possibility that the controllable reactivity of aluminum alloys can be obtained through the different additive according to the practical request, and the Al alloys can produce pure hydrogen for the fuel cell via the hydrolysis reaction.

  6. Reactivity control in HTR power plants with respect to passive safety system. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnert, H; Kugeler, K [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik

    1996-12-01

    The R and D and Demonstration of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is described in overview. The HTR-MODULE power plant, as the most advanced concept, is taken for the description of the reactivity control in general. The idea of the ``modularization of the core`` of the HTR has been developed as the answer on the experiences of the core melt accident at Three Miles Island. The HTR module has two shutdown systems: The ``6 rods``-system for hot shutdown at the ``18 small absorber pebbles units`` - system for cold shutdown. With respect to the definition of ``Passive Systems`` of IAEA-TECDOC-626 the total reactivity control system of the HTR-MODULE is a passive system of category D, because it is an emergency reactor shutdown system based on gravity driven rods, and devices, activated by fail-safe trip logic. But reactivity control of the HTR does not only consist of these engineered safety system but does have a self-acting stabilization by the negative temperature coefficient of the reactivity, being rather effective in reactivity control. Examples from computer calculations are presented, and, in addition, experimental results from the ``Stuck Rod Experiment`` at the AVR reactor in Juelich. On the basis of this the proposal is made that ``self-acting stabilization as a quality of the function`` should be discussed as a new category in addition to the active and passive engineered safety systems, structures and components of IAEA-TECDOC-626. The requirements for a future ``catastrophe-free`` nuclear technology are presented. In the appendix the 7th amendment of the atomic energy act of the Federal Republic of Germany, effective 28 July 94, is given. (author).

  7. The effects of trait impulsivity on proactive and reactive interference control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ling; Chen, Yan; Chen, Antao; Zhang, Fenghua; Xu, Fuming; Wang, Baoxi

    2018-02-01

    The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to explore whether self-reported trait impulsivity in healthy individuals might be differentially related to proactive and reactive interference control. Participants with high and low impulsivity (HI and LI, respectively) performed a modified version of the prime-target interference task. Proactive interference control was induced in the mostly incongruent (MI) context and reactive interference control was induced in the mostly congruent (MC) context. Although the behavioral data revealed no difference between HI and LI individuals in terms of the interference effects (incongruent - congruent) under both contexts, the ERP results showed that impulsivity has a different influence on the interference effects under different task contexts. In the MC context, the interference effects on the medial frontal negativity (MFN) and the negative sustained potential (N-SP) were greater, while that on the positive sustained potential (P-SP) were smaller in the HI compared to those in the LI group. This suggests that high levels of impulsivity might be associated with a reduced efficiency of the processes supporting reactive control to resolve interference when interference is not expected. In contrast, the three ERP indices (MFN, P-SP, and N-SP) of interference processing in the MI context were insensitive to variations in impulsivity. This suggests that HI individuals might be as effective as LI individuals in recruiting proactive control for sustained active maintenance of task goals to anticipate and prevent interference throughout the experimental blocks where interference occurs frequently. In conclusion, these results indicate that impulsivity has a more negative influence on reactive interference control than on proactive interference control. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Food product health warnings promote dietary self-control through reductions in neural signals indexing food cue reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Daniel H; Summerell, Patrick; Ng, Alyssa; Dixon, Helen; Murawski, Carsten; Wakefield, Melanie; Bode, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Modern societies are replete with palatable food cues. A growing body of evidence suggests that food cue exposure activates conditioned appetitive physiological and psychological responses that may override current metabolic needs and existing eating goals, such as the desire to maintain a healthy diet. This conditioned response results in unhealthy dietary choices and is a contributing factor in the current obesity epidemic. Prime based obesity prevention measures such as health warnings at point-of-sale or on product packaging may have the potential to counteract the influence of the obesogenic environment at the crucial moment when people make food purchasing or consumption decisions. Existing research into the efficacy of these intervention strategies has predominantly employed self-report and population level measures, and little evidence exists to support the contention that these measures counteract food cue reactivity at the time of decision making. Using a dietary self-control priming paradigm, we demonstrated that brief exposure to food product health warnings enhanced dietary self-control. Further, we analysed electroencephalographic correlates of selective attention and food cue evoked craving (N1, P3, LPP) to show that health warning exposure reduced the automatic appetitive response towards palatable food cues. These findings contribute to existing evidence that exogenous information can successfully prime latent goals, and substantiate the notion that food product health warnings may provide a new avenue through which to curb excessive energy intake and reduce rising obesity rates.

  9. The interactions of design, control and operability in reactive distillation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiadis, M.C.; Schenk, Myrian Andrea; Pistikopoulos, Stratos

    2002-01-01

    is a strong function of the process design and potential operability bottlenecks are identified. In the second approach, the process design and the control system are optimized simultaneously leading to a more economically beneficial and better controlled system than that obtained using the sequential......In this work the design and control of a reactive distillation column, described by a rigorous dynamic model, is tackled via two different optimization approaches. In the first, the steady-state process design and the control system are optimized sequentially. It is shown that operability...

  10. A Hybrid Estimator for Active/Reactive Power Control of Single-Phase Distributed Generation Systems with Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pahlevani, Majid; Eren, Suzan; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new active/reactive power closed-loop control system for a hybrid renewable energy generation system used for single-phase residential/commercial applications. The proposed active/reactive control method includes a hybrid estimator, which is able to quickly and accurately es...

  11. Voltage Control of Distribution Grids with Multi-Microgrids Using Reactive Power Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WLODARCZYK, P.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Low-voltage Microgrids can be valuable sources of ancillary services for the Distribution System Operators (DSOs. The aim of this paper was to study if and how multi-microgrids can contribute to Voltage Control (VC in medium-voltage distribution grids by means of reactive power generation and/or absorption. The hierarchical control strategy was proposed with the main focus on the tertiary control which was defined as optimal power flow problem. The interior-point algorithm was applied to optimise experimental benchmark grid with the presence of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs. Moreover, two primary objectives were formulated: active power losses and amount of reactive power used to reach the voltage profile. As a result the active power losses were minimised to the high extent achieving the savings around 22% during entire day.

  12. Proactive and reactive control depends on emotional valence: a Stroop study with emotional expressions and words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Bhoomika Rastogi; Srinivasan, Narayanan; Nehabala, Yagyima; Nigam, Richa

    2018-03-01

    We examined proactive and reactive control effects in the context of task-relevant happy, sad, and angry facial expressions on a face-word Stroop task. Participants identified the emotion expressed by a face that contained a congruent or incongruent emotional word (happy/sad/angry). Proactive control effects were measured in terms of the reduction in Stroop interference (difference between incongruent and congruent trials) as a function of previous trial emotion and previous trial congruence. Reactive control effects were measured in terms of the reduction in Stroop interference as a function of current trial emotion and previous trial congruence. Previous trial negative emotions exert greater influence on proactive control than the positive emotion. Sad faces in the previous trial resulted in greater reduction in the Stroop interference for happy faces in the current trial. However, current trial angry faces showed stronger adaptation effects compared to happy faces. Thus, both proactive and reactive control mechanisms are dependent on emotional valence of task-relevant stimuli.

  13. Associations between respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) reactivity and effortful control in preschool-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulik, Michael J; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; Silva, Kassondra M

    2015-07-01

    We tested whether respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) reactivity in response to each of three self-regulation tasks (bird and dragon; knock-tap; and gift wrap) would predict self-regulation performance in a sample of 101 preschool-age children (M age = 4.49, SD = .64). While controlling for baseline RSA, decreases in RSA from bird and dragon to knock-tap (but not from baseline to bird and dragon) predicted a latent variable measuring self-regulation. Furthermore, increases in RSA from the knock-tap to gift wrap-the only task involving delay of gratification-were related to concurrent task performance while controlling for the relation between RSA reactivity and the latent self-regulation variable. Results suggest that the relations between RSA reactivity and self-regulatory ability are influenced by task-specific demands and possibly by task order. Furthermore, RSA reactivity appears to relate differently to performance on motivationally salient self-regulation tasks such as delay of gratification relative to cool executive function tasks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Autonomous Control of Current and Voltage Controlled DG Interface Inverters for Reactive Power Sharing and Harmonics Compensation in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousazadeh, Seyyed Yousef; Jalilain, Alireza; Savaghebi, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    In microgrids, Voltage Source Inverters (VSIs) interfacing Distributed Generation (DG) units can be operated in Voltage or Current Controlled Modes (VCM/CCM). In this paper, a coordinated control of CCM and VCM units for reactive power sharing and voltage harmonics compensation is proposed....... This decentralized control scheme is based on the local measurement of signals. In this way, the need for communication links is removed which results in a simpler and more reliable structure compared to the communication based control structures. To be more exact, the VCM units contribute to harmonics compensation....... Experimental and simulation studies show that the harmonics compensation is achieved by using only local measurements in presence of virtual admittance/impedance schemes of CCM/VCM units. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the reactive power sharing among the CCM and VCM units is obtained based...

  15. Potential impact of reactive vaccination in controlling cholera outbreaks: an exploratory analysis using a Zimbabwean experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Young; Choi, Yeongchull; Mason, Peter R; Rusakaniko, Simbarashe; Goldie, Sue J

    2011-09-05

    To contain ongoing cholera outbreaks, the World Health Organization has suggested that reactive vaccination should be considered in addition to its previous control measures. To explore the potential impact of a hypothetical reactive oral cholera vaccination using the example of the recent large-scale cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe. This was a retrospective cost-effectiveness analysis calculating the health and economic burden of the cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe with and without reactive vaccination. The primary outcome measure was incremental cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted. Under the base-case assumptions (assuming 50% coverage among individuals aged ≥2 years), reactive vaccination could have averted 1 320 deaths and 23 650 DALYs. Considering herd immunity, the corresponding values would have been 2 920 deaths and 52 360 DALYs averted. The total vaccination costs would have been ~$74 million and ~$21 million, respectively, with per-dose vaccine price of US$5 and $1. The incremental costs per DALY averted of reactive vaccination were $2 770 and $370, respectively, for vaccine price set at $5 and $1. Assuming herd immunity, the corresponding cost was $980 with vaccine price of $5, and the programme was cost-saving with a vaccine price of $1. Results were most sensitive to case-fatality rate, per-dose vaccine price, and the size of the outbreak. Reactive vaccination has the potential to be a cost-effective measure to contain cholera outbreaks in countries at high risk. However, the feasibility of implementation should be further evaluated, and caution is warranted in extrapolating the findings to different settings in the absence of other in-depth studies.

  16. Neural mechanisms of proactive and reactive cognitive control in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Petra C; Kleiman, Tali; Amodio, David M

    2015-09-01

    Social anxiety--the fear of social embarrassment and negative evaluation by others--ranks among people's worst fears, and it is often thought to impair task performance. We investigated the neurocognitive processes through which trait social anxiety relates to task performance, proposing a model of the joint contributions of reactive control, theoretically associated with conflict monitoring and activity of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), and proactive control, theoretically associated with top-down regulation and activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Participants varying in their degree of trait social anxiety completed the Eriksen flanker task while electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded. Task-related left dlPFC activity was indexed by relative left prefrontal EEG (inverse alpha), and conflict-related dACC activity was indexed by the N2r component of the event-related potential. Stronger activity in both regions predicted better response control, and greater social anxiety was associated with worse response control. Furthermore, for all participants, greater left prefrontal EEG activity predicted better behavioral control, but for high social anxiety participants only, greater N2r responses also predicted behavioral control. This pattern suggests that low social anxiety individuals engaged a proactive control process, driven by dlPFC activity, whereas high social anxiety individuals relied additionally on a reactive control process, driven by conflict-related dACC activity. These findings support a model of control that involves different patterns of interplay between proactive and reactive strategies and may help to explain self-regulatory impairments in social anxiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi-dose Romidepsin Reactivates Replication Competent SIV in Post-antiretroviral Rhesus Macaque Controllers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B Policicchio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses that persist despite seemingly effective antiretroviral treatment (ART and can reinitiate infection if treatment is stopped preclude definitive treatment of HIV-1 infected individuals, requiring lifelong ART. Among strategies proposed for targeting these viral reservoirs, the premise of the "shock and kill" strategy is to induce expression of latent proviruses [for example with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis] resulting in elimination of the affected cells through viral cytolysis or immune clearance mechanisms. Yet, ex vivo studies reported that HDACis have variable efficacy for reactivating latent proviruses, and hinder immune functions. We developed a nonhuman primate model of post-treatment control of SIV through early and prolonged administration of ART and performed in vivo reactivation experiments in controller RMs, evaluating the ability of the HDACi romidepsin (RMD to reactivate SIV and the impact of RMD treatment on SIV-specific T cell responses. Ten RMs were IV-infected with a SIVsmmFTq transmitted-founder infectious molecular clone. Four RMs received conventional ART for >9 months, starting from 65 days post-infection. SIVsmmFTq plasma viremia was robustly controlled to <10 SIV RNA copies/mL with ART, without viral blips. At ART cessation, initial rebound viremia to ~106 copies/mL was followed by a decline to < 10 copies/mL, suggesting effective immune control. Three post-treatment controller RMs received three doses of RMD every 35-50 days, followed by in vivo experimental depletion of CD8+ cells using monoclonal antibody M-T807R1. RMD was well-tolerated and resulted in a rapid and massive surge in T cell activation, as well as significant virus rebounds (~104 copies/ml peaking at 5-12 days post-treatment. CD8+ cell depletion resulted in a more robust viral rebound (107 copies/ml that was controlled upon CD8+ T cell recovery. Our results show that RMD can reactivate SIV in vivo in the setting of post-ART viral control

  18. MP98, an innovative reactivity control system for LWR and VHTR, tests results on prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, M.; Gagne, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    MP98' Reactivity Control System is now a technology tested on a real scale prototypes. Demonstrator is working at PWR real conditions (155 bars, 320 degree C), and many accidents configurations could be simulated. This paper presents the technology, describes the demonstrator design and presents some results. Mock up and demonstrator have permitted to optimize the design of MP98' devices to prepare industrialization. (authors)

  19. Acceptance lowers stress reactivity: Dismantling mindfulness training in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Emily K; Young, Shinzen; Smyth, Joshua M; Brown, Kirk Warren; Creswell, J David

    2018-01-01

    Mindfulness interventions, which train practitioners to monitor their present-moment experience with a lens of acceptance, are known to buffer stress reactivity. Little is known about the active mechanisms driving these effects. We theorize that acceptance is a critical emotion regulation mechanism underlying mindfulness stress reduction effects. In this three-arm parallel trial, mindfulness components were dismantled into three structurally equivalent 15-lesson smartphone-based interventions: (1) training in both monitoring and acceptance (Monitor+Accept), (2) training in monitoring only (Monitor Only), or (3) active control training (Coping control). 153 stressed adults (mean age=32years; 67% female; 53% white, 21.5% black, 21.5% Asian, 4% other race) were randomly assigned to complete one of three interventions. After the intervention, cortisol, blood pressure, and subjective stress reactivity were assessed using a modified Trier Social Stress Test. As predicted, Monitor+Accept training reduced cortisol and systolic blood pressure reactivity compared to Monitor Only and control trainings. Participants in all three conditions reported moderate levels of subjective stress. This study provides the first experimental evidence that brief smartphone mindfulness training can impact stress biology, and that acceptance training drives these effects. We discuss implications for basic and applied research in contemplative science, emotion regulation, stress and coping, health, and clinical interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adsorption-controlled growth of Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} by reactive MBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theis, C.D.; Yeh, J.; Schlom, D.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802-5005 (United States); Hawley, M.E.; Brown, G.W. [Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Jiang, J.C.; Pan, X.Q. [University of Michigan, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Adsorption-controlled conditions have been identified and utilized to grow epitaxial bismuth titanate thin films by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. Growth of stoichiometric, phase pure, c-axis oriented, epitaxial films is achieved by supplying a large overabundance of bismuth and ozone continuously to the surface of the depositing film. Titanium is supplied to the film in the form of shuttered bursts each containing a three monolayer dose of titanium to grow one formula unit of Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}. It is seen from measured film thickness, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry composition measurements, monitoring of reflection high-energy electron diffraction half-order intensity oscillations during growth, and {ital in situ} flux measurements using atomic absorption spectroscopy that at suitable temperature and ozone background pressure, the titanium sticking coefficient approaches one and the excess bismuth desorbs from the surface. Film growth proceeds by the formation of mounds whose step heights are predominantly integral multiples of a half-unit cell.{copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Active-Reactive Additional Damping Control of a Doubly-Fed Induction Generator Based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfeng Ma

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale wind power interfacing to the power grid has an impact on the stability of the power system. However, with an additional damping controller of the wind generator, new ways for improving system damping and suppressing the low frequency oscillation (LFO of power systems can be put forward. In this paper, an active-reactive power additional damping controller based on active disturbance rejection control (ADRC is proposed. In order to improve the precision of the controller, the theory of data driven control is adopted, using the numerical algorithms for subspace state space system identification (N4SID to obtain the two order model of the ADRC controlled object. Based on the identification model, the ADRC additional damping controller is designed. Taking a 2-area 4-machine system containing the doubly fed induction generator (DFIG wind farm as an example, it is verified that the active-reactive additional damping controller designed in this paper performs well in suppressing negative-damping LFO and forced power oscillation. When the operation state of the power system changes, it can still restrain the LFO effectively, showing stronger robustness and better effectiveness compared to the traditional proportional–integral–derivative (PID additional damping controller.

  2. Tissue-specific control of latent CMV reactivation by regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Almanan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV causes a persistent, lifelong infection. CMV persists in a latent state and undergoes intermittent subclinical viral reactivation that is quelled by ongoing T cell responses. While T cells are critical to maintain control of infection, the immunological factors that promote CMV persistence remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Treg in a mouse model of latent CMV infection using Foxp3-diphtheria toxin receptor (Foxp3-DTR mice. Eight months after infection, MCMV had established latency in the spleen, salivary gland, lung, and pancreas, which was accompanied by an increased frequency of Treg. Administration of diphtheria toxin (DT after establishment of latency efficiently depleted Treg and drove a significant increase in the numbers of functional MCMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Strikingly, Treg depletion decreased the number of animals with reactivatable latent MCMV in the spleen. Unexpectedly, in the same animals, ablation of Treg drove a significant increase in viral reactivation in the salivary gland that was accompanied with augmented local IL-10 production by Foxp3-CD4+T cells. Further, neutralization of IL-10 after Treg depletion significantly decreased viral load in the salivary gland. Combined, these data show that Treg have divergent control of MCMV infection depending upon the tissue. In the spleen, Treg antagonize CD8+ effector function and promote viral persistence while in the salivary gland Treg prevent IL-10 production and limit viral reactivation and replication. These data provide new insights into the organ-specific roles of Treg in controlling the reactivation of latent MCMV infection.

  3. Randomized controlled clinical trial of behavioral lifestyle intervention with partial meal replacement to reduce excessive gestational weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Suzanne; Wing, Rena R; Brannen, Anna; McHugh, Angelica; Hagobian, Todd A; Schaffner, Andrew; Jelalian, Elissa; Hart, Chantelle N; Scholl, Theresa O; Munoz-Christian, Karen; Yin, Elaine; Phipps, Maureen G; Keadle, Sarah; Abrams, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    Behavioral lifestyle interventions during pregnancy can prevent excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) in women with normal weight; however, effective interventions to reduce GWG in ethnically diverse women with obesity are lacking. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to test whether a behavioral lifestyle intervention with partial meal replacement reduces GWG rate in Hispanic and non-Hispanic women with overweight or obesity relative to enhanced usual care. Participants (n = 257) were recruited in San Luis Obispo, California, and Providence, Rhode Island, between November 2012 and May 2016. Participants were pregnant (mean ± SD: 13.6 ± 1.8 wk of gestation) with overweight or obesity and had a mean age of 30.3 y; 41.6% of participants were Hispanic. Women were randomly assigned within site and by ethnicity to enhanced usual care (n = 128) or to a behavioral lifestyle intervention with partial meal replacement (n = 129). The primary outcome was GWG per week of observation. Secondary outcomes were proportions exceeding Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines for total GWG, changes in weight-control behaviors and cardiovascular disease risk factors, and incidence of pregnancy complications. Study retention was 99.6% (256 of 257). The intervention compared with usual care resulted in less mean ± SD weekly GWG (0.33 ± 0.25 compared with 0.39 ± 0.23 kg/wk; P = 0.02) and total GWG (9.4 ± 6.9 compared with 11.2 ± 7.0 kg; P = 0.03) and reduced the proportion of women who exceeded IOM guidelines for total GWG (41.1% compared with 53.9%; P = 0.03). No significant group × time × demographic subgroup (ethnicity, BMI, age, parity, and income) interactions were observed. Among intervention participants, greater meal replacement intake was related to reduced GWG rate (β = -0.07; 95% CI:-0.12, -0.03; P = 0.002). The intervention compared with usual care increased weight-control strategies (P meal replacement significantly reduced GWG in Hispanic

  4. Potential link between excess added sugar intake and ectopic fat: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiantao; Karlsen, Micaela C; Chung, Mei; Jacques, Paul F; Saltzman, Edward; Smith, Caren E; Fox, Caroline S; McKeown, Nicola M

    2016-01-01

    The effect of added sugar intake on ectopic fat accumulation is a subject of debate. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to examine the potential effect of added sugar intake on ectopic fat depots. MEDLINE, CAB Abstracts, CAB Global Health, and EBM (Evidence-Based Medicine) Reviews - Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched for studies published from 1973 to September 2014. RCTs with a minimum of 6 days' duration of added sugar exposure in the intervention group were selected. The dosage of added sugar intake as a percentage of total energy was extracted or calculated. Means and standard deviations of pre- and post-test measurements or changes in ectopic fat depots were collected. Fourteen RCTs were included. Most of the studies had a medium to high risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that, compared with eucaloric controls, subjects who consumed added sugar under hypercaloric conditions likely increased ectopic fat, particularly in the liver (pooled standardized mean difference = 0.9 [95%CI, 0.6-1.2], n = 6) and muscles (pooled SMD = 0.6 [95%CI, 0.2-1.0], n = 4). No significant difference was observed in liver fat, visceral adipose tissue, or muscle fat when isocaloric intakes of different sources of added sugars were compared. Data from a limited number of RCTs suggest that excess added sugar intake under hypercaloric diet conditions likely increases ectopic fat depots, particularly in the liver and in muscle fat. There are insufficient data to compare the effect of different sources of added sugars on ectopic fat deposition or to compare intake of added sugar with intakes of other macronutrients. Future well-designed RCTs with sufficient power and duration are needed to address the role of sugars on ectopic fat deposition. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For

  5. Analogical study of the servo-control of a reactivity modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bot, Michel

    1969-03-01

    In the context of the study of the transfer functions related to the Cabri reactor, this paper presents: the objective of the servo-control (reactivity modulator, reasons for the analogical study), the principles of the servo-control (description of the servo-controlled system, elaboration of the error signal, principles of the phase meter, critical analysis of different types of phase meters), the analogical formulation (transfer diagram of the process, analogical simulation of the process, analogical realization of the phase meter, simulation of the Low Frequency generator), study of the controlled system and results (system responses to echelon and ramp signals, responses of the controlled system with the phase meter in feedback)

  6. Food product health warnings promote dietary self-control through reductions in neural signals indexing food cue reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Rosenblatt

    Full Text Available Modern societies are replete with palatable food cues. A growing body of evidence suggests that food cue exposure activates conditioned appetitive physiological and psychological responses that may override current metabolic needs and existing eating goals, such as the desire to maintain a healthy diet. This conditioned response results in unhealthy dietary choices and is a contributing factor in the current obesity epidemic. Prime based obesity prevention measures such as health warnings at point-of-sale or on product packaging may have the potential to counteract the influence of the obesogenic environment at the crucial moment when people make food purchasing or consumption decisions. Existing research into the efficacy of these intervention strategies has predominantly employed self-report and population level measures, and little evidence exists to support the contention that these measures counteract food cue reactivity at the time of decision making. Using a dietary self-control priming paradigm, we demonstrated that brief exposure to food product health warnings enhanced dietary self-control. Further, we analysed electroencephalographic correlates of selective attention and food cue evoked craving (N1, P3, LPP to show that health warning exposure reduced the automatic appetitive response towards palatable food cues. These findings contribute to existing evidence that exogenous information can successfully prime latent goals, and substantiate the notion that food product health warnings may provide a new avenue through which to curb excessive energy intake and reduce rising obesity rates. Keywords: Health warnings, Dietary decision making, Self-control, Electroencephalogram, EEG, N1, P3, LPP

  7. Sensory organisation and reactive balance control of amateur rugby players: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Gary C C; Chung, Joanne W Y; Ma, Ada W W; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Fong, Shirley S M

    2017-05-01

    This study compared the sensory organisation and reactive balance control of amateur rugby players and a control group. Forty-one amateur rugby players (22 males: 19 females; mean height ± SD = 168.8 ± 8.8 cm; mean weight ± SD = 63.9 ± 12.5 kg) and 31 control participants (22 males: 9 females; mean height ± SD = 171.5 ± 10.3 cm; mean weight ± SD = 63.8 ± 10.3 kg) completed the study. Their sensory organisation and standing balance performance were evaluated using a sensory organisation test (SOT), and their reactive balance performance was quantified using a motor control test (MCT). The SOT equilibrium scores (ES) and sensory ratios and the MCT motor response latencies were the major outcome measures. The results revealed that compared to the controls, amateur rugby players had lower SOT ESs under different sensory environments (P rugby group (P = .005, [Formula: see text] = 0.107 and 0.108, respectively). No significant difference was found in the somatosensory ratio (P = .853, [Formula: see text] rugby players demonstrated inferior standing balance performance compared to their non-trained counterparts. They relied less heavily on vestibular and visual inputs to maintain standing balance under different sensory environments. In addition, they reacted more slowly to postural disturbance, reflecting their suboptimal reactive balance ability in standing.

  8. Extended reactivity trace curves for nuclear power control with no power shooting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratemi, W. M.; Elbuni, M. S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces a new concept of reactivity trace curve (RTC) for nuclear power control with no power shooting. The concept is based on recent work of bernard et al. on the dynamic period of nuclear reactors. RTC-method is simulated for both a static effective decay constant corresponding to a one-group delayed neutrons model, and a dynamic effective decay constant corresponding to a six-group delayed neutrons model. A fitting to the RTC of a six-group reactor model resulted in a closed from formula for the RTC that couples the effect of both static and dynamic decay constants. Hence, introducing two 'fingerprints' for the reactor in concern to identify a closed from RTC formula capable of controlling the reactor power. Integration of the RTC with control rod integral curves results in the ρ-z-t diagram. This diagram relates the amount of recommended reactivity (RTC), the position of control rod, and the time required for power control. 8 figs

  9. Extended reactivity trace curves for nuclear power control with no power shooting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratemi, W M; Elbuni, M S [Faculty of engineering, Al Fateh universty Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-10-01

    This paper introduces a new concept of reactivity trace curve (RTC) for nuclear power control with no power shooting. The concept is based on recent work of bernard et al. on the dynamic period of nuclear reactors. RTC-method is simulated for both a static effective decay constant corresponding to a one-group delayed neutrons model, and a dynamic effective decay constant corresponding to a six-group delayed neutrons model. A fitting to the RTC of a six-group reactor model resulted in a closed from formula for the RTC that couples the effect of both static and dynamic decay constants. Hence, introducing two `fingerprints` for the reactor in concern to identify a closed from RTC formula capable of controlling the reactor power. Integration of the RTC with control rod integral curves results in the {rho}-z-t diagram. This diagram relates the amount of recommended reactivity (RTC), the position of control rod, and the time required for power control. 8 figs.

  10. Skin Conductance Level Reactivity Moderates the Association Between Parental Psychological Control and Relational Aggression in Emerging Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Caitlin R; Abaied, Jamie L

    2016-04-01

    When studying factors that may heighten risk for relational aggression in youth, it is important to consider characteristics of both the individual and their environment. This research examined the associations between parental psychological control and reactive and proactive relational aggression in emerging adults in college. Given that sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation may underlie differences between reactive and proactive aggression and has been shown to moderate the effects of parenting on youth development, the moderating role of SNS reactivity [indexed by skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR)] was also examined. Emerging adults (N = 180; 77.2 % female) self-reported on perceptions of parental psychological control and reactive and proactive relational aggression. SCLR was assessed in response to an interpersonal laboratory challenge task. Parental psychological control was positively associated with reactive relational aggression only for emerging adults who exhibited high SCLR. Parental psychological control was positively associated with proactive relational aggression only among emerging adults who showed low SCLR. This study extends previous research on parenting and aggression and suggests that parental psychological control is differentially associated with reactive versus proactive relational aggression, depending on emerging adults' SCLR to interpersonal stress.

  11. Operational experience with reactive power control methods optimized for tokamak power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihler, C.; Huart, M.; Kaesemann, C.-P.; Streibl, B.

    2003-01-01

    The power and energy of the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak are provided by two separate 10.5 kV, 110-85 Hz networks based on the flywheel generators EZ3-EZ4 in addition to the generator EZ2 dedicated to the toroidal field coil. The 10.5 kV networks supply the thyristor converters allowing fast control of the DC currents in the AUG poloidal field coils. Two methods for improving the load power factor in the present experimental campaign of AUG have been investigated, namely the control of the phase-to-neutral voltage in thyristor converters fitted with neutral thyristors, such as the new 145 MVA modular thyristor converter system (Group 6), and reactive power control achieved by means of static VAr compensators (SVC). The paper shows that reliable compensation up to 90 MVAr was regularly achieved and that electrical transients in SVC modules can be kept at an acceptable level. The paper will discuss the results from the reactive power reduction by SVC and neutral thyristor control and draw a comparative conclusion

  12. Distributed control of hybrid AC microgrids with dynamic active and reactive power capacity tuning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nutkani, Inam Ullah; Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    Microgrids comprise of emerging generation technologies such as fuel cell, solar PV, wind turbine generator, storage and loads. They can, in principle, operate at different voltages and frequencies. Tying them either to the mains grid or among themselves would certainly require some interlinking...... power converters, whose control should preferably be done autonomously without demanding communication links. This paper proposes distributed control for power management between two Microgrids interlinked through inverters. The control scheme aims to reduce the reactive power loading stress on DERs...... and also allows active power transfer from overloaded grid to under- loaded grid. The performance of proposed control has been verified in simulation and through a scaled-down experimental system....

  13. Optimising Reactive Control in non-ideal Efficiency Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strager, Thomas; Lopez, Pablo Fernandez; Giorgio, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    When analytically optimising the control strategy in wave energy converters which use a point absorber, the efficiency aspect is generally neglected. The results presented in this paper provide an analytical expression for the mean harvested electrical power in non-ideal efficiency situations....... These have been derived under the assumptions of monochromatic incoming waves and linear system behaviour. This allows to establish the power factor of a system with non-ideal efficiency. The locus of the optimal reactive control parameters is then studied and an alternative method of representation...... is developed to model the optimal control parameters. Ultimately we present a simple method of choosing optimal control parameters for any combination of efficiency and wave frequency....

  14. Further development of the Dynamic Control Assemblies Worth Measurement Method for Advanced Reactivity Computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petenyi, V.; Strmensky, C.; Jagrik, J.; Minarcin, M.; Sarvaic, I.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic control assemblies worth measurement technique is a quick method for validation of predicted control assemblies worth. The dynamic control assemblies worth measurement utilize space-time corrections for the measured out of core ionization chamber readings calculated by DYN 3D computer code. The space-time correction arising from the prompt neutron density redistribution in the measured ionization chamber reading can be directly applied in the advanced reactivity computer. The second correction concerning the difference of spatial distribution of delayed neutrons can be calculated by simulation the measurement procedure by dynamic version of the DYN 3D code. In the paper some results of dynamic control assemblies worth measurement applied for NPP Mochovce are presented (Authors)

  15. Trends vs. reactor size of passive reactivity shutdown and control performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    For LMR concepts, the goal of passive reactivity shutdown has been approached in the US by designing the reactors for favorable relationships among the power, power/flow, and inlet temperature coefficients of reactivity, for high internal conversion ratio (yielding small burnup control swing), and for a primary pump coastdown time appropriately matched to the delayed neutron hold back of power decay upon negative reactivity input. The use of sodium bonded metallic fuel pins has facilitated the achievement of the massive shutdown design goals as a consequence of their high thermal conductivity and high effective heavy metal density. Alternately, core designs based on derated oxide pins may be able to achieve the passive shutdown features at the cost of larger core volume and increased initial fissile inventory. For LMR concepts, the passive decay heat removal goal of inherent safety has been approached in US designs by use of pool layouts, larger surface to volume ratio of the reactor vessel with natural draft air cooling of the vessel surface, elevations and redans which promote natural circulation through the core, and thermal mass of the pool contents sufficient to absorb that initial transient decay heat which exceeds the natural draft air cooling capacity. This paper describes current US ''inherently safe'' reactor design

  16. On the Rod Drop technique in integral reactivity measures in control banks and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, Giovanni Laranjo

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study on the effect of shading in neutron detectors, when used in measures of reactivity with the rod drop technique. Shading can be understood as a change in the efficiency of the detectors, when it is given in detected neutrons fission occurred in the reactor, more evident in the detectors closest to the bank being inserted. The method of analysis was based on simulations of reactor IPEN/MB-01, using the code CITATION and MCNP program. In both cases, the results were static, showing Neutronic flows in only two situations: before insertion of the control rod and after insertion. The measure of reactivity in this case was achieved using the expression derived from the source jerk technique. In addition to theoretical study, data from a rod drop experiment conducted in the reactor IPEN/MB-01 were also used. In this case, the reactivity was obtained using inverse kinetic method, since experimental data were set of values that vary with time. In all cases, correction factors for the shadowing effect have been proposed. (author)

  17. plasmatis Center for Innovation Competence: Controlling reactive component output of atmospheric pressure plasmas in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    The novel approach of using plasmas in order to alter the local chemistry of cells and cell environment presents a significant development in biomedical applications. The plasmatis center for innovation competence at the INP Greifswald e.V. performs fundamental research in plasma medicine in two interdisciplinary research groups. The aim of our plasma physics research group ``Extracellular Effects'' is (a) quantitative space and time resolved diagnostics and modelling of plasmas and liquids to determine distribution and composition of reactive species (b) to control the plasma and apply differing plasma source concepts in order to produce a tailored output of reactive components and design the chemical composition of the liquids/cellular environment and (c) to identify and understand the interaction mechanisms of plasmas with liquids and biological systems. Methods to characterize the plasma generated reactive species from plasma-, gas- and liquid phase and their biological effects will be presented. The diagnostic spectrum ranges from absorption/emission/laser spectroscopy and molecular beam mass spectrometry to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and cell biological diagnostic techniques. Concluding, a presentation will be given of the comprehensive approach to plasma medicine in Greifswald where the applied and clinical research of the Campus PlasmaMed association is combined with the fundamental research at plasmatis center.

  18. Trends vs. reactor size of passive reactivity shutdown and control performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.

    1988-01-01

    The focus of the US advanced reactor program since the cancellation of CRBR has been on inherent safety and cost reduction. The notion is to so design the reactor that in the event of an off normal condition, it brings itself to a safe shutdown condition and removes decay heat by reliance on ''inherent processes'' i.e., without reliance on devices requiring switching and outside sources of power. Such a reactor design would offer the potential to eliminate costly ''Engineered Safety Features,'' to lower capital costs, and to assuage public unease concerning reactor safety. For LMR concepts, the goal of passive reactivity shutdown has been approached in the US by designing the reactors for favorable relationships among the power, power/flow, and inlet temperature coefficients of reactivity, for high internal conversion ratio (yielding small burnup control swing), and for a primary pump coastdown time appropriately matched to the delayed neutron hold back of power decay upon negative reactivity input. The use of sodium bonded metallic fuel pins has facilitated the achievement of the passive shutdown design goals as a consequence of their high thermal conductivity and high effective heavy metal density. Alternately, core designs based on derated oxide pins may be able to achieve the passive shutdown features at the cost of larger core volume and increased initial fissile inventory. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  19. Lithospheric controls on crustal reactivation and intraplate mountain building in the Gobi Corridor, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, D.

    2017-12-01

    This talk will review the Permian-Recent tectonic history of the Gobi Corridor region which includes the actively deforming Gobi Altai-Altai, Eastern Tien Shan, Beishan and North Tibetan foreland. Since terrane amalgamation in the Permian, Gobi Corridor crust has been repeatedly reactivated by Triassic-Jurassic contraction/transpression, Late Cretaceous extension and Late Cenozoic transpression. The tectonic history of the region suggests the following basic principle for intraplate continental regions: non-cratonized continental interior terrane collages are susceptible to repeated intraplate reactivation events, driven by either post-orogenic collapse and/or compressional stresses derived from distant plate boundary convergence. Thus, important related questions are: 1) what lithospheric pre-conditions favor intraplate crustal reactivation in the Gobi Corridor (simple answer: crustal thinning, thermal weakening, strong buttressing cratons), 2) what are the controls on the kinematics of deformation and style of mountain building in the Gobi-Altai-Altai, Beishan and North Tibetan margin (simple answer: many factors, but especially angular relationship between SHmax and `crustal grain'), 3) how does knowledge of the array of Quaternary faults and the historical earthquake record influence our understanding of modern earthquake hazards in continental intraplate regions (answer: extrapolation of derived fault slip rates and recurrence interval determinations are problematic), 4) what important lessons can we learn from the Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic history of Central Asia that is applicable to the tectonic evolution of all intraplate continental regions (simple answer: ancient intraplate deformation events may be subtly expressed in the rock record and only revealed by low-temperature thermochronometers, preserved orogen-derived sedimentary sequences, fault zone evidence for younger brittle reactivation, and recognition of a younger class of cross-cutting tectonic

  20. ERP Correlates of Proactive and Reactive Cognitive Control in Treatment-Naïve Adult ADHD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venke Arntsberg Grane

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether treatment naïve adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; n = 33; 19 female differed from healthy controls (n = 31; 17 female in behavioral performance, event-related potential (ERP indices of preparatory attention (CueP3 and late CNV, and reactive response control (Go P3, NoGo N2, and NoGo P3 derived from a visual cued Go/NoGo task. On several critical measures, Cue P3, late CNV, and NoGo N2, there were no significant differences between the groups. This indicated normal preparatory processes and conflict monitoring in ADHD patients. However, the patients had attenuated Go P3 and NoGoP3 amplitudes relative to controls, suggesting reduced allocation of attentional resources to processes involved in response control. The patients also had a higher rate of Go signal omission errors, but no other performance decrements compared with controls. Reduced Go P3 and NoGo P3 amplitudes were associated with poorer task performance, particularly in the ADHD group. Notably, the ERPs were not associated with self-reported mood or anxiety. The results provide electrophysiological evidence for reduced effortful engagement of attentional resources to both Go and NoGo signals when reactive response control is needed. The absence of group differences in ERP components indexing proactive control points to impairments in specific aspects of cognitive processes in an untreated adult ADHD cohort. The associations between ERPs and task performance provided additional support for the altered electrophysiological responses.

  1. Soft sensor based composition estimation and controller design for an ideal reactive distillation column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Raghavan, S R; Radhakrishnan, T K; Srinivasan, K

    2011-01-01

    In this research work, the authors have presented the design and implementation of a recurrent neural network (RNN) based inferential state estimation scheme for an ideal reactive distillation column. Decentralized PI controllers are designed and implemented. The reactive distillation process is controlled by controlling the composition which has been estimated from the available temperature measurements using a type of RNN called Time Delayed Neural Network (TDNN). The performance of the RNN based state estimation scheme under both open loop and closed loop have been compared with a standard Extended Kalman filter (EKF) and a Feed forward Neural Network (FNN). The online training/correction has been done for both RNN and FNN schemes for every ten minutes whenever new un-trained measurements are available from a conventional composition analyzer. The performance of RNN shows better state estimation capability as compared to other state estimation schemes in terms of qualitative and quantitative performance indices. Copyright © 2010 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Requirements Engineering for Reactive Systems: Coloured Petri Nets for an Elevator Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens Bæk; Fernandes, Joao Miguel; Tjell, Simon

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach to requirements engineering for reactive systems; we use an elevator controller as case study. We identify and justify two key properties that a model which we construct must have, namely: (1) controller-and-environment-partitioned, which means...... constituting a description of both the controller and the environment, and distinguishing between these two domains and between desired and assumed behaviour; (2) use case-based, which means constructed on the basis of a given use case diagram and reproducing the behaviour described in accompanying scenario...... descriptions. For the case study, we build an executable model in the formal modelling language Coloured Petri Nets. We demonstrate how this model is useful for requirements engineering, since it provides a solid basis for addressing behavioural issues early in the development process, for example regarding...

  3. Flood-controlled excess-air formation favors aerobic respiration and limits denitrification activity in riparian groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone ePeter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The saturated riparian zones of rivers act as spatially and temporally variable biogeochemical reactors. This complicates the assessment of biogeochemical transport and transformation processes. During a flood event, excess-air formation, i.e. the inclusion and dissolution of air bubbles into groundwater, can introduce high amounts of dissolved O2 and thereby affect biogeochemical processes in groundwater. With the help of a field-installed membrane-inlet mass-spectrometer we resolved the effects of flood induced excess-air formationon organic carbon and nitrogen transformations in groundwater of different riparian zones of a restored section of the River Thur, Switzerland. The results show that the flood event triggered high aerobic respiration activity in the groundwater below a zone densely populated with willow plants. The flood introduced high concentrations of O2 (230 µmol L–1 to the groundwater through the formation of excess air and transported up to ~400 µmol L 1 organic carbon from the soil/root layer into groundwater during the movement of the water table. A rapid respiration process, quantified via the measurements of O2, CO2 and noble-gas concentrations, led to fast depletion of the introduced O2 and organic carbon and to high CO2 concentration (590 µmol L–1 in the groundwater shortly after the flood. The synchronous analysis of different nitrogen species allowed studying the importance of denitrification activity. The results indicate that in the willow zone excess-air formation inhibited denitrification through high O2 concentration input. Instead, the observed decrease in nitrate concentration (~50 µmol N L 1 may be related to fostered nitrate uptake by plants. In the other riparian zones closer to the river, no significant excess-air formation and corresponding respiration activity was observed. Overall, analyzing the dissolved gases in the groundwater significantly contributed to deciphering biogeochemical processes in

  4. SULEU NTP Core with Passive Reactivity Control and Enhanced Submersion Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yong Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Eades, Michael J [The Ohio State University, Ohio (United States)

    2016-05-15

    In this summary, SULEU has been adapted to implement some of the latest developments of LEUNTP design efforts. These include the implementation of a rapid depletion burnable absorber to flatten the reactivity profile during operation and the addition of a lower axial reflector to help minimize the reactivity increase during the full submersion criticality accident. The purpose of this study is to show the state of current LEU-NTP designs in terms of resolving key issues such as minimizing control drum usage and resolving the full submersion criticality accident. Future work will include integrating the rapid depletion poison with other passive reactivity control devices (such as hydrogen density in the tie-tubes) and developing additional systems for mitigating the full submersion criticality accident. It is widely acknowledged that nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is an enabling technology for manned missions to Mars and other locations beyond low-Earth orbit. Without nuclear thermal propulsion, manned space travel will be severely limited by the propellant requirements of chemical propulsion and significantly longer travel times of electric propulsion. While the performance superiority of NTP is clear, its implementation has been to date unsuccessful due to the significant costs of development, implementation, and regulations associated with the heritage NTP designs. These new systems take heritage designs and experimental results and adapt them to use LEU fuel with minimum impact on the heritage system. This is done in order to ensure their continued relevance with existing NTP research efforts and enable their rapid implementation into existing NASA efforts for human Mars mission planning. Of the current baseline NTP designs being studied, this paper concerns itself with the improvement of the Superb Use of Low Enriched (SULEU) core.

  5. Evaluating the effectiveness of a smartphone app to reduce excessive alcohol consumption: protocol for a factorial randomised control trial

    OpenAIRE

    Garnett, Claire; Crane, David; Michie, Susan; West, Robert; Brown, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Background Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide and interventions to help people reduce their consumption are needed. Interventions delivered by smartphone apps have the potential to help harmful and hazardous drinkers reduce their consumption of alcohol. However, there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of existing smartphone interventions. A systematic review, amongst other methodologies, identified promising modular content that cou...

  6. Reactivity costs in MARIA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowska, Zuzanna E.; Pytel, Krzysztof M.; Frydrysiak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The methodology for calculating consumed fuel cost of excess reactivity is proposed. • Correlation between time integral of the core excess reactivity and released energy. • Reactivity price gives number of fuel elements required for given excess reactivity. - Abstract: For the reactor operation at high power level and carrying out experiments and irradiations the major cost of reactor operation is the expense of nuclear fuel. In this paper the methodology for calculating consumed fuel cost-relatedness of excess reactivity is proposed. Reactivity costs have been determined on the basis of operating data. A number of examples of calculating the reactivity costs for processes such as: strong absorbing material irradiation, molybdenium-99 production, beryllium matrix poisoning and increased moderator temperature illustrates proposed method.

  7. A new algorithm for optimum voltage and reactive power control for minimizing transmission lines losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoudjehbaklou, H.; Danai, B.

    2001-01-01

    Reactive power dispatch for voltage profile modification has been of interest to power utilities. Usually local bus voltages can be altered by changing generator voltages, reactive shunts, ULTC transformers and SVCs. Determination of optimum values for control parameters, however, is not simple for modern power system networks. Heuristic and rather intelligent algorithms have to be sought. In this paper a new algorithm is proposed that is based on a variant of a genetic algorithm combined with simulated annealing updates. In this algorithm a fuzzy multi-objective a approach is used for the fitness function of the genetic algorithm. This fuzzy multi-objective function can efficiently modify the voltage profile in order to minimize transmission lines losses, thus reducing the operating costs. The reason for such a combination is to utilize the best characteristics of each method and overcome their deficiencies. The proposed algorithm is much faster than the classical genetic algorithm and cna be easily integrated into existing power utilities software. The proposed algorithm is tested on an actual system model of 1284 buses, 799 lines, 1175 fixed and ULTC transformers, 86 generators, 181 controllable shunts and 425 loads

  8. Investigation of Reactive Power Control Effects on Flicker and Harmonics Emission of a DFIG Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Nagizadeh Ghoogdareh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important power quality aspects in wind farms is voltage fluctuation or flicker which should be investigated due to the nature of wind speed variations. These variations result in power and voltage fluctuations at the load bus. Moreover, the wind generation systems may be assumed as a harmonics source because of their power electronic converters. There are numerous factors that affect flicker and harmonic emission of grid-connected wind turbines during continuous operation, such as wind characteristics (e.g. mean wind speed, turbulence intensity, type of generator and grid conditions (e.g. short circuit capacity, grid impedance angle. In this paper, an IEC based flickermeter is first modeled and then a variable speed wind turbine has been simulated by Matlab/Simulink software. The flicker and harmonics emissions of wind turbines equipped with DFIG during continuous operation and using output reactive control are investigated. The simulation results show that control of wind turbine output reactive power is an effective means for flicker mitigation during continuous operation. However, there should be a compromise between flicker reduction and harmonics level increase to enhance the whole power quality of wind turbine.

  9. Coupling/Tradeoff Analysis and Novel Containment Control for Reactive Power, Output Voltage in Islanded Micro-Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Renke; Meng, Lexuan; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the hierarchical control structure in islanded Micro-Grid (MG) systems, the coupling/tradeoff effects in different control levels are analyzed in details. In the primary level, analyses of the coupling effects among droop control gains, line impedance differences, output reactive power...

  10. Coordinated Volt/Var Control in Distribution Systems with Distributed Generations Based on Joint Active and Reactive Powers Dispatch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouzar Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant control schemes in optimal operation of distribution networks is Volt/Var control (VVC. Owing to the radial structure of distribution systems and distribution lines with a small X/R ratio, the active power scheduling affects the VVC issue. A Distribution System Operator (DSO procures its active and reactive power requirements from Distributed Generations (DGs along with the wholesale electricity market. This paper proposes a new operational scheduling method based on a joint day-ahead active/reactive power market at the distribution level. To this end, based on the capability curve, a generic reactive power cost model for DGs is developed. The joint active/reactive power dispatch model presented in this paper motivates DGs to actively participate not only in the energy markets, but also in the VVC scheme through a competitive market. The proposed method which will be performed in an offline manner aims to optimally determine (i the scheduled active and reactive power values of generation units; (ii reactive power values of switched capacitor banks; and (iii tap positions of transformers for the next day. The joint active/reactive power dispatch model for daily VVC is modeled in GAMS and solved with the DICOPT solver. Finally, the plausibility of the proposed scheduling framework is examined on a typical 22-bus distribution test network over a 24-h period.

  11. Analysis of RSG-GAS Control Rod Worth Due to Perturbation Reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taswanda Taryo

    2004-01-01

    The control rod interaction effect of RSG-GAS typical working core was studied using a method based on the exact perturbation theory with three simplifying assumptions which require only N+1 criticality calculations. The interaction effect between two interacting rods reached up to 19 % while the interaction effect of multiple interacting rods reached up to 32 % for all (8) control rods involved. The accuracy of the adopted method were extensively investigated to determine the error sources and the magnitude of the error. Through comparison of the present results with ones of the simple summation method, it was obvious that the adopted method was superior in that a significant improvement on the accuracy of the calculated reactivity worth can be achieved with a small number of criticality calculations. (author)

  12. Controlling of Nitriding Process on Reactive Plasma Spraying of Al Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahien, Mohammed [Graduate Student, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan); Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro, E-mail: mo.shahien@yahoo.com [Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) has been considered as a promising technology for in-situ formation of aluminum nitride (AlN) thermally sprayed coatings. To fabricate thick A lN coatings in RPS process, controlling and improving the in-flight nitriding reaction of Al particles is required. In this study, it was possible to control the nitriding reaction by using ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) powders. Thick and dense AlN coating (more than 300 {mu}m thickness) was successfully fabricated with small addition of NH{sub 4}Cl powders. Thus, addition of NH{sub 4}Cl prevented the Al aggregation by changing the reaction pathway to a mild way with no explosive mode (relatively low heating rates) and it acts as a catalyst, nitrogen source and diluent agent.

  13. Controlling of Nitriding Process on Reactive Plasma Spraying of Al Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) has been considered as a promising technology for in-situ formation of aluminum nitride (AlN) thermally sprayed coatings. To fabricate thick A lN coatings in RPS process, controlling and improving the in-flight nitriding reaction of Al particles is required. In this study, it was possible to control the nitriding reaction by using ammonium chloride (NH 4 Cl) powders. Thick and dense AlN coating (more than 300 μm thickness) was successfully fabricated with small addition of NH 4 Cl powders. Thus, addition of NH 4 Cl prevented the Al aggregation by changing the reaction pathway to a mild way with no explosive mode (relatively low heating rates) and it acts as a catalyst, nitrogen source and diluent agent.

  14. Redox-controlled memristive switching in the junctions employing Ti reactive electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Li

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a kind of memristive device based on the junctions employing Ti as the reactive electrodes. The role of electrically-derived redox of Ti in such memristive switching is shown. The structural and chemical evidence of the electrically-derived oxidation is presented by TEM and XPS experiment, respectively. Due to the redox of the top electrode Ti and the consequent drift of oxygen vacancies, the device shows two distinct resistance states under a sweeping voltage loading. ON state is controlled by tunneling process, while OFF state is controlled by Schottky emission conductive mechanism. The failure behaviors of such memristive junctions are also discussed. In the light of the redox principle, we demonstrate that the devices could be recovered by loading a long electrical reduction treatment.

  15. Control of a reactive batch distillation process using an iterative learning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyunsoo; Lee, Kwang Soon; Kim, Mansuk; Lee, Juhyun

    2014-01-01

    Quadratic criterion-based iterative learning control (QILC) was applied to a numerical reactive batch distillation process, in which methacrylic anhydride (MAN) is produced through the reaction of methacrylic acid with acetic anhydride. The role of distillation is to shift the equilibrium conversion toward the direction of the product by removing acetic acid (AcH), a by-product of the reaction. Two temperatures at both ends of the column were controlled by individual control loops. A nonlinear PID controller manipulating the reflux ratio was employed to regulate the top temperature at the boiling point of AcH. A constrained QILC was used for the tracking of the reactor temperature. A time-varying reference trajectory for the reactor temperature that satisfies the target conversion and purity of MAN was obtained through repeated simulations and confirmation experiments in the pilot plant. The QILC achieved satisfactory tracking in several batch runs with gentle control movements, while the PID control as a substitute of the QILC in a comparative study exhibited unacceptable performance

  16. Reactivity and structural evolution of urchin-like Co nanostructures under controlled environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, K; Moldovan, S; Hirlimann, Ch; Harmel, J; Soulantica, K; Serp, P; Chaudret, B; Gay, A-S; Maury, S; Berliet, A; Fecant, A; Ersen, O

    2018-02-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of samples in a controlled gas environment allows for the real time study of the dynamical changes in nanomaterials at high temperatures and pressures up to the ambient pressure (10 5 Pa) with a spatial resolution close to the atomic scale. In the field of catalysis, the implementation and quantitative use of in situ procedures are fundamental for a better understanding of the behaviour of catalysts in their environments and operating conditions. By using a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-based atmospheric gas cell, we have studied the thermal stability and the reactivity of crystalline cobalt nanostructures with initial 'urchin-like' morphologies sustained by native surface ligands that result from their synthesis reaction. We have evidenced various behaviors of the Co nanostructures that depend on the environment used during the observations. At high temperature under vacuum or in an inert atmosphere, the migration of Co atoms towards the core of the particles is activated and leads to the formation of carbon nanostructures using as a template the initial multipods morphology. In the case of reactive environments, for example, pure oxygen, our investigation allowed to directly monitor the voids formation through the Kirkendall effect. Once the nanostructures were oxidised, it was possible to reduce them back to the metallic phase using a dihydrogen flux. Under a pure hydrogen atmosphere, the sintering of the whole structure occurred, which illustrates the high reactivity of such structures as well as the fundamental role of the present ligands as morphology stabilisers. The last type of environmental study under pure CO and syngas (i.e. a mixture of H 2 :CO = 2:1) revealed the metal particles carburisation at high temperature. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. Method for reducing excess heat supply experienced in typical Chinese district heating systems by achieving hydraulic balance and improving indoor air temperature control at the building level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lipeng; Gudmundsson, Oddgeir; Thorsen, Jan Eric

    2016-01-01

    A common problem with Chinese district heating systems is that they supply more heat than the actual heat demand. The reason for this excess heat supply is the general failure to use control devices to adjust the indoor temperature and flow in the building heating systems in accordance with the a......A common problem with Chinese district heating systems is that they supply more heat than the actual heat demand. The reason for this excess heat supply is the general failure to use control devices to adjust the indoor temperature and flow in the building heating systems in accordance...... with the actual heat demand. This results in 15-30% of the total supplied heat being lost. This paper proposes an integrated approach that aims to reduce the excess heat loss by introducing pre-set thermostatic radiator valves combined with automatic balancing valves. Those devices establish hydraulic balance...... that once the hydraulic balance is achieved and indoor temperatures are controlled with this integrated approach, 17% heat savings and 42.8% pump electricity savings can be achieved. The energy savings will also have a positive environmental effect with seasonal reductions of 11 kg CO2, 0.1 kg SO2, and 0...

  18. Reactivity-based industrial volatile organic compounds emission inventory and its implications for ozone control strategies in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoming; Chen, Xiaofang; Zhang, Jiani; Shi, Tianli; Sun, Xibo; Fan, Liya; Wang, Liming; Ye, Daiqi

    2017-08-01

    Increasingly serious ozone (O3) pollution, along with decreasing NOx emission, is creating a big challenge in the control of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in China. More efficient and effective measures are assuredly needed for controlling VOCs. In this study, a reactivity-based industrial VOCs emission inventory was established in China based on the concept of ozone formation potential (OFP). Key VOCs species, major VOCs sources, and dominant regions with high reactivity were identified. Our results show that the top 15 OFP-based species, including m/p-xylene, toluene, propene, o-xylene, and ethyl benzene, contribute 69% of the total OFP but only 30% of the total emission. The architectural decoration industry, oil refinery industry, storage and transport, and seven other sources constituted the top 10 OFP subsectors, together contributing a total of 85%. The provincial and spatial characteristics of OFP are generally consistent with those of mass-based inventory. The implications for O3 control strategies in China are discussed. We propose a reactivity-based national definition of VOCs and low-reactive substitution strategies, combined with evaluations of health risks. Priority should be given to the top 15 or more species with high reactivity through their major emission sources. Reactivity-based policies should be flexibly applied for O3 mitigation based on the sensitivity of O3 formation conditions.

  19. Reactive arthritis in relation to internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Bodil; Holmlund, Anders; Wretlind, Bengt; Jalal, Shah; Rosén, Annika

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if reactive arthritis was involved in the aetiology of chronic closed lock of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by looking for bacterial antigens in the synovial membrane of the TMJ, and by studying the antibody serology and carriage of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 in patients with chronic closed lock. Patients with reciprocal clicking and healthy subjects acted as controls. We studied a total of 43 consecutive patients, 15 with chronic closed lock, 13 with reciprocal clicking, and 15 healthy controls with no internal derangements of the TMJ. Venous blood samples were collected from all subjects for measurement of concentrations of HLA tissue antigen and serology against Chlamydia trachomatis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Samples of synovial tissue from patients with closed lock and reciprocal clicking were obtained during discectomy and divided into two pieces, the first of which was tested by strand displacement amplification for the presence of C trachomatis, and the second of which was analysed for the presence of species-specific bacterial DNA using 16s rRNA pan-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of antibodies against M pneumoniae, Salmonella spp. or Y enterocolitica. No patient had antibodies towards C trachomatis or C jejuni. We found no bacterial DNA in the synovial fluid from any patient. The HLA B27 antigen was present in 2/15 subjects in both the closed lock and control groups, and none in the reciprocal clicking group. In conclusion, reactive arthritis does not seem to be the mechanism of internal derangement of the TMJ. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Cognitive Impairments in Occupational Burnout – Error Processing and Its Indices of Reactive and Proactive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Golonka

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The presented study refers to cognitive aspects of burnout as the effects of long-term work-related stress. The purpose of the study was to investigate electrophysiological correlates of burnout to explain the mechanisms of the core burnout symptoms: exhaustion and depersonalization/cynicism. The analyzed error-related electrophysiological markers shed light on impaired cognitive mechanisms and the specific changes in information-processing in burnout. In the EEG study design (N = 80, two components of error-related potential (ERP, error-related negativity (ERN, and error positivity (Pe, were analyzed. In the non-clinical burnout group (N = 40, a significant increase in ERN amplitude and a decrease in Pe amplitude were observed compared to controls (N = 40. Enhanced error detection, indexed by increased ERN amplitude, and diminished response monitoring, indexed by decreased Pe amplitude, reveal emerging cognitive problems in the non-clinical burnout group. Cognitive impairments in burnout subjects relate to both reactive and unconscious (ERN and proactive and conscious (Pe aspects of error processing. The results indicate a stronger ‘reactive control mode’ that can deplete resources for proactive control and the ability to actively maintain goals. The analysis refers to error processing and specific task demands, thus should not be extended to cognitive processes in general. The characteristics of ERP patterns in burnout resemble psychophysiological indexes of anxiety (increased ERN and depressive symptoms (decreased Pe, showing to some extent an overlapping effect of burnout and related symptoms and disorders. The results support the scarce existing data on the psychobiological nature of burnout, while extending and specifying its cognitive characteristics.

  1. Fuzzy-TLBO optimal reactive power control variables planning for energy loss minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghadam, Ahmad; Seifi, Ali Reza

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new approach to the problem of optimal reactive power control variables planning is proposed. • The energy loss minimization problem has been formulated by modeling the load of system as a Load Duration Curve. • To solving the energy loss problem, the classic methods and the evolutionary methods are used. • A new proposed fuzzy teaching–learning based algorithm is applied to energy loss problem. • Simulations are done to show the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed algorithm compared with other methods. - Abstract: This paper offers a new approach to the problem of optimal reactive power control variables planning (ORPVCP). The basic idea is division of Load Duration Curve (LDC) into several time intervals with constant active power demand in each interval and then solving the energy loss minimization (ELM) problem to obtain an optimal initial set of control variables of the system so that is valid for all time intervals and can be used as an initial operating condition of the system. In this paper, the ELM problem has been solved by the linear programming (LP) and fuzzy linear programming (Fuzzy-LP) and evolutionary algorithms i.e. MHBMO and TLBO and the results are compared with the proposed Fuzzy-TLBO method. In the proposed method both objective function and constraints are evaluated by membership functions. The inequality constraints are embedded into the fitness function by the membership function of the fuzzy decision and the problem is modeled by fuzzy set theory. The proposed Fuzzy-TLBO method is performed on the IEEE 30 bus test system by considering two different LDC; and it is shown that using this method has further minimized objective function than original TLBO and other optimization techniques and confirms its potential to solve the ORPCVP problem with considering ELM as the objective function

  2. Method for reducing excess heat supply experienced in typical Chinese district heating systems by achieving hydraulic balance and improving indoor air temperature control at the building level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lipeng; Gudmundsson, Oddgeir; Thorsen, Jan Eric; Li, Hongwei; Li, Xiaopeng; Svendsen, Svend

    2016-01-01

    A common problem with Chinese district heating systems is that they supply more heat than the actual heat demand. The reason for this excess heat supply is the general failure to use control devices to adjust the indoor temperature and flow in the building heating systems in accordance with the actual heat demand. This results in 15–30% of the total supplied heat being lost. This paper proposes an integrated approach that aims to reduce the excess heat loss by introducing pre-set thermostatic radiator valves combined with automatic balancing valves. Those devices establish hydraulic balance, and stabilize indoor temperatures. The feasibility and the energy consumption reduction of this approach were verified by means of simulation and a field test. By moving the system from centrally planned heat delivery to demand-driven heat delivery, excess heat loss can be significantly reduced. Results show that once the hydraulic balance is achieved and indoor temperatures are controlled with this integrated approach, 17% heat savings and 42.8% pump electricity savings can be achieved. The energy savings will also have a positive environmental effect with seasonal reductions of 11 kg CO_2, 0.1 kg SO_2, and 0.03 kg NO_x per heating square meter for a typical case in Harbin. - Highlights: • Two real cases reflect the temperature and flow control situation of heating systems in China. • Pre-set radiator valves with automatic balancing valves create dynamic hydraulic balance. • IDA-ICE simulation shows 17% heat saving and 48% pump electricity saving. • This approach can improve the comfort level of multi-storey/high-rise residential buildings. • This approach can reduce excess heat supply and bring out positive environmental impacts.

  3. Reduction of DC-link Capacitor in Case of Cascade Multilevel Converters by means of Reactive Power Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohil, Ghanshyamsinh Vijaysinh; Wang, Huai; Liserre, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A method to selectively control the amount of dc link voltage ripple by processing desired reactive power by a DC/DC converter in isolated AC/DC or AC/DC/AC system is proposed. The concept can reduce the dc link capacitors used for balancing the input and output power and thereby limiting...... the voltage ripple. It allows the use of smaller dc link capacitor and hence a longer lifetime and at the same time high power density and low cost can be achieved. The isolated DC/DC converter is controlled to process the desired reactive power in addition to the active power. The control system to achieve...

  4. Development of inspection and maintenance program for reactor and reactivity control units in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yeong-Garp

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes the overall program for inspection and maintenance of reactor structure and Reactivity Control Units (RCU) of HANARO during lifetime. The long-term plan for in-service inspection is introduced in the viewpoint of the structural integrity of reactor and RCU, and the operability of RCU mechanism. This program includes the list of components to be inspected, the schedule of inspection and maintenance, and the development of special tools and test rig that are required for the remote inspection and maintenance of reactor and RCU components. Preliminary results of the evaluation on the lifetime of RCU components are summarized based on the operation history since the installation of reactor. A test rig will be designed and constructed for the purposes of verifying the prolonged lifetime of RCU components being used, the performance of special tools, and the rehearsal of maintenance work as well. (author)

  5. Secondary Control for Reactive Power Sharing in Droop-Controlled Islanded MicroGrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micallef, A.; Apap, M.; Spiteri-Staines, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the islanded operation of microgrids. In this mode of operation, the microsources are required to cooperate autonomously to regulate the local grid voltage and frequency. Droop control is typically used to achieve this autonomous voltage and frequency regulation. However...

  6. Excess Entropy and Diffusivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Excess Entropy and Diffusivity. Excess entropy scaling of diffusivity (Rosenfeld,1977). Analogous relationships also exist for viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  7. Control rod drive of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuchkov, I.I.; Gorjunov, V.S.; Zaitsev, B.I.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to nuclear reactors and, more particularly, to a drive of a control rod of a nuclear reactor and allows power control, excess reactivity compensation, and emergency shut-down of a reactor. (author)

  8. Development of novel control system to grow ZnO thin films by reactive evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Gordillo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a novel system implemented to grow ZnO thin films by plasma assisted reactive evaporation with adequate properties to be used in the fabrication of photovoltaic devices with different architectures. The innovative aspect includes both an improved design of the reactor used to activate the chemical reaction that leads to the formation of the ZnO compound as an electronic system developed using the virtual instrumentation concept. ZnO thin films with excellent opto-electrical properties were prepared in a reproducible way, controlling the deposition system through a virtual instrument (VI with facilities to control the amount of evaporated zinc involved in the process that gives rise to the formation of ZnO, by means of the incorporation of PID (proportional integral differential and PWM (pulse width modulation control algorithms. The effectiveness and reliability of the developed system was verified by obtaining with good reproducibility thin films of n+-ZnO and i-ZnO grown sequentially in situ with thicknesses and resistivities suitable for use as window layers in chalcopyrite based thin film solar cells.

  9. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Andrea S; Chauhan, Veeren M; Zen, Amer Alhaj; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D Rhodri E; Boyle, Ross W; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C; Aylott, Jonathan W

    2015-09-14

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(II) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(II) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(II) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.

  10. Reactive control processes contributing to residual switch cost and mixing cost across the adult lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Lisa R; Karayanidis, Frini; Fulham, Ross; Provost, Alexander; Michie, Patricia T; Heathcote, Andrew; Hsieh, Shulan

    2014-01-01

    In task-switching paradigms, performance is better when repeating the same task than when alternating between tasks (switch cost) and when repeating a task alone rather than intermixed with another task (mixing cost). These costs remain even after extensive practice and when task cues enable advanced preparation (residual costs). Moreover, residual reaction time mixing cost has been consistently shown to increase with age. Residual switch and mixing costs modulate the amplitude of the stimulus-locked P3b. This mixing effect is disproportionately larger in older adults who also prepare more for and respond more cautiously on these "mixed" repeat trials (Karayanidis et al., 2011). In this paper, we analyze stimulus-locked and response-locked P3 and lateralized readiness potentials to identify whether residual switch and mixing cost arise from the need to control interference at the level of stimulus processing or response processing. Residual mixing cost was associated with control of stimulus-level interference, whereas residual switch cost was also associated with a delay in response selection. In older adults, the disproportionate increase in mixing cost was associated with greater interference at the level of decision-response mapping and response programming for repeat trials in mixed-task blocks. These findings suggest that older adults strategically recruit greater proactive and reactive control to overcome increased susceptibility to post-stimulus interference. This interpretation is consistent with recruitment of compensatory strategies to compensate for reduced repetition benefit rather than an overall decline on cognitive flexibility.

  11. National supply of reactivity control rods for Embalse nuclear power plant (CNE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondo, C.D.; Carloni, J.G.; Aba, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The manufacture and supply on industrial scale of reactivity control rods for CNE (Embalse nuclear power plant) were developed by the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) together with the private industry, as part of a program aimed to the substitution of imported supplies used in the operation of power plants by materials manufactured in Argentina. So far, the control rods were imported from Canada. In this work, the different development stages performed by CNEA and CONUAR S.A. are described, leading to the supply of a set of 21 cobalt rods to be included in a reactor of CNE in order to qualify this component. Among the main activities performed, the following stand out: specifications development, particularly those concerning to cobalt cores, evaluation of design documentation and elaboration of bidding conditions and a plan of manufacture and control. According to the results obtained during the service and the post-irradiation measurements, the design will be reviewed in order to undertake new manufacturing plans. (Author)

  12. How valid is the prenatal estrogen excess hypothesis of testicular germ cell cancer? A case control study on hormone-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, K P; Endsin, G; Pichlmeier, U

    2001-12-01

    The prenatal estrogen excess hypothesis postulates abnormally high estrogen levels during pregnancy which predispose the developing gonad to testicular germ cell cancer (GCT) in adulthood. As no direct measurements are possible to support this hypothesis, evidence must come from clinical and epidemiological observations. The present study looked to surrogate parameters that purportedly point to high estrogenic influence in utero. In a case-control study design, 418 cases with GCT were compared to 636 controls having fractures, injuries or nephrolithiasis. A second comparison was done with 120 men suffering from malignant melanoma. The following factors were investigated: maternal and paternal age at birth of proband, birth-order, distribution of brothers and sisters in sibs of patients, sibship size, status of being a twin, status of being a singleton child, handedness, and frequency of breast cancer in mothers and sisters. Status of being a twin was significantly associated with GCT risk (OR 2.41; 95% CI 1.04- 5.63) if compared to men with fractures or stones. Comparison with melanoma controls showed only a nonsignificant trend. Frequency of breast cancer was insignificantly higher in mothers of GCT patients. Maternal age above 30 years was associated with decreased risk of GCT, which is contradictory to the hypothesis. No other parameter was significantly different in cases and controls. The present investigation failed to produce evidence for the estrogen excess hypothesis. Obviously, the parameters tested are only weak indicators of estrogenic influence during embryogenesis. Thus, the sample size and statistical power of the trial might have been too low to show any significant association. But, assessing the negative results of this study in light of equally negative results in previous investigations, the estrogen excess hypothesis still remains to be hypothetic.

  13. A controlled intervention to promote a healthy body image, reduce eating disorder risk and prevent excessive exercise among trainee health education and physical education teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Zali; O'Dea, Jennifer

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the impact of two interventions on body image, eating disorder risk and excessive exercise among 170 (65% female) trainee health education and physical education (HE&PE) teachers of mean (standard deviation) age 21.6 (2.3) who were considered an 'at-risk' population for poor body image and eating disorders. In the first year of the study, the control group cohort (n = 49 females, 20 males) received the regular didactic health education curriculum; in the second year of the study, the Intervention 1 cohort (n = 31 females, 21 males) received a self-esteem and media literacy health education program and in the third year of the study, the Intervention 2 cohort (n = 30 females, 19 males) received a combined self-esteem, media literacy and dissonance program using online and computer-based activities. Intervention 2 produced the best results, with males improving significantly in self-esteem, body image and drive for muscularity. Intervention 2 females improved significantly on Eating Disorders Inventory Drive for Thinness, Eating Disorder Examination and excessive exercise. The improvements were consistent at 6-month follow-up for females. It is feasible to promote body image, reduce body dissatisfaction and reduce excessive exercise among trainee HE&PE teachers via a health education curriculum.

  14. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  15. Comprehensive Cost Minimization in Distribution Networks Using Segmented-time Feeder Reconfiguration and Reactive Power Control of Distributed Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shuheng; Hu, Weihao; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an efficient methodology is proposed to deal with segmented-time reconfiguration problem of distribution networks coupled with segmented-time reactive power control of distributed generators. The target is to find the optimal dispatching schedule of all controllable switches...... and distributed generators’ reactive powers in order to minimize comprehensive cost. Corresponding constraints, including voltage profile, maximum allowable daily switching operation numbers (MADSON), reactive power limits, and so on, are considered. The strategy of grouping branches is used to simplify...... (FAHPSO) is implemented in VC++ 6.0 program language. A modified version of the typical 70-node distribution network and several real distribution networks are used to test the performance of the proposed method. Numerical results show that the proposed methodology is an efficient method for comprehensive...

  16. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao, E-mail: haohe@tju.edu.cn; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2014-02-24

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca{sup 2+} release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  17. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca2+ release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  18. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca 2+ release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging

  19. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Andrea S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Alhaj Zen, Amer; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D. Rhodri E.; Boyle, Ross W.; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn

  20. Implementation of reactive and predictive real-time control strategies to optimize dry stormwater detention ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaborit, Étienne; Anctil, François; Vanrolleghem, Peter A.; Pelletier, Geneviève

    2013-04-01

    Dry detention ponds have been widely implemented in U.S.A (National Research Council, 1993) and Canada (Shammaa et al. 2002) to mitigate the impacts of urban runoff on receiving water bodies. The aim of such structures is to allow a temporary retention of the water during rainfall events, decreasing runoff velocities and volumes (by infiltration in the pond) as well as providing some water quality improvement from sedimentation. The management of dry detention ponds currently relies on static control through a fixed pre-designed limitation of their maximum outflow (Middleton and Barrett 2008), for example via a proper choice of their outlet pipe diameter. Because these ponds are designed for large storms, typically 1- or 2-hour duration rainfall events with return periods comprised between 5 and 100 years, one of their main drawbacks is that they generally offer almost no retention for smaller rainfall events (Middleton and Barrett 2008), which are by definition much more common. Real-Time Control (RTC) has a high potential for optimizing retention time (Marsalek 2005) because it allows adopting operating strategies that are flexible and hence more suitable to the prevailing fluctuating conditions than static control. For dry ponds, this would basically imply adapting the outlet opening percentage to maximize water retention time, while being able to open it completely for severe storms. This study developed several enhanced RTC scenarios of a dry detention pond located at the outlet of a small urban catchment near Québec City, Canada, following the previous work of Muschalla et al. (2009). The catchment's runoff quantity and TSS concentration were simulated by a SWMM5 model with an improved wash-off formulation. The control procedures rely on rainfall detection and measures of the pond's water height for the reactive schemes, and on rainfall forecasts in addition to these variables for the predictive schemes. The automatic reactive control schemes implemented

  1. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the control of energy metabolism and food intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eDrougard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC and agouti-related protein (AgRP/neuropeptide Y (NPY neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,..., neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,.... The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders.

  2. Variability in proactive and reactive cognitive control processes across the adult lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frini eKarayanidis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Task-switching paradigms produce a highly consistent age-related increase in mixing cost (longer RT on repeat trials in mixed-task than single task blocks but a less consistent age effect on switch cost (longer RT on switch than repeat trials in mixed-task blocks. We use two approaches to examine the adult lifespan trajectory of control processes contributing to mixing cost and switch cost: latent variables derived from an evidence accumulation model of choice, and event-related potentials (ERP that temporally differentiate proactive (cue-driven and reactive (target-driven control processes. Under highly practiced and prepared task conditions, ageing was associated with increasing RT mixing cost but reducing RT switch cost. Both effects were largely due to the same cause: an age effect for mixed-repeat trials. In terms of latent variables, increasing age was associated with slower non-decision processes, slower rate of evidence accumulation about the target, and higher response criterion. Age effects on mixing costs were evident only on response criterion, the amount of evidence required to trigger a decision, whereas age effects on switch cost were present for all three latent variables. ERPs showed age-related increases in preparation for mixed-repeat trials, anticipatory attention, and post-target interference. Cue-locked ERPs that are linked to proactive control were associated with early emergence of age differences in response criterion. These results are consistent with age effects on strategic processes controlling decision caution. Consistent with an age-related decline in cognitive flexibility, younger adults flexibly adjusted response criterion from trial-to-trial on mixed-task blocks, whereas older adults maintained a high criterion for all trials.

  3. Reactive control processes contributing to residual switch cost and mixing cost in young and old adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Rebecca Whitson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In task-switching paradigms, performance is better when repeating the same task than when alternating between tasks (switch cost and when repeating a task alone rather than intermixed with another task (mixing cost. These costs remain even after extensive practice and when task cues enable advanced preparation (residual costs. Moreover, residual RT mixing cost has been consistently shown to increase with age. Residual switch and mixing costs modulate the amplitude of the stimulus-locked P3b. This mixing effect is disproportionately larger in older adults who also prepare more for and respond more cautiously on these ‘mixed’ repeat trials (Karayanidis et al., 2011. In this study, we examine stimulus-locked and response-locked P3 and lateralized readiness potentials to identify whether residual switch and mixing cost arise from the need to control interference at the level of stimulus processing or response processing. Residual mixing cost was associated with control of stimulus-level interference, whereas residual switch cost was also associated with a delay in response selection. In older adults, the disproportionate increase in mixing cost was associated with greater interference at the level of decision-response mapping and response programming for repeat trials in mixed-task blocks. We argue that, together with evidence of greater proactive control and more cautious responding for these trials, these findings suggest that older adults strategically recruit greater proactive and reactive control to overcome increased susceptibility to post-stimulus interference. This interpretation is consistent with recruitment of compensatory strategies to compensate for reduced repetition benefit rather than an overall decline on cognitive flexibility.

  4. Development of a digital reactivity meter for criticality prediction and control rod worth evaluation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Renato Y.R.; Miranda, Anselmo F.; Valladares, Gastao Lommez; Prado, Adelk C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we have proposed the development of a digital reactivity meter in order to monitor subcriticality continuously during criticality approach in a PWR. A subcritical reactivity meter can provide an easy prediction of the estimated critical point prior to reactor criticality, without complicated hand calculation. Moreover, in order to reduce the interval of the Physics Tests from the economical point of view, a subcritical reactivity meter can evaluate the control rod worth from direct subcriticality measurement. In other words, count rate of Source Range (SR) detector recorded during the criticality approach could be used for subcriticality evaluation or control rod worth evaluation. Basically, a digital reactivity meter is based on the inverse solution of the kinetic equations of a reactor with the external neutron source in one-point reactor model. There are some difficulties in the direct application of a digital reactivity meter to the subcriticality measurement. When the Inverse Kinetic method is applied to a sufficiently high power level or to a core without an external neutron source, the neutron source term may be neglected. When applied to a lower power level or in the sub-critical domain, however, the source effects must be taken in account. Furthermore, some treatments are needed in using the count rate of Source Range (SR) detector as input signal to the digital reactivity meter. To overcome these difficulties, we have proposed a digital reactivity meter combined with a methodology of the modified Neutron Source Multiplication (NSM) method with correction factors for subcriticality measurements in PWR. (author)

  5. Development of a digital reactivity meter for criticality prediction and control rod worth evaluation in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Renato Y.R.; Miranda, Anselmo F.; Valladares, Gastao Lommez; Prado, Adelk C. [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. - ELETRONUCLEAR, Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil). Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto], e-mail: kuramot@eletronuclear.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we have proposed the development of a digital reactivity meter in order to monitor subcriticality continuously during criticality approach in a PWR. A subcritical reactivity meter can provide an easy prediction of the estimated critical point prior to reactor criticality, without complicated hand calculation. Moreover, in order to reduce the interval of the Physics Tests from the economical point of view, a subcritical reactivity meter can evaluate the control rod worth from direct subcriticality measurement. In other words, count rate of Source Range (SR) detector recorded during the criticality approach could be used for subcriticality evaluation or control rod worth evaluation. Basically, a digital reactivity meter is based on the inverse solution of the kinetic equations of a reactor with the external neutron source in one-point reactor model. There are some difficulties in the direct application of a digital reactivity meter to the subcriticality measurement. When the Inverse Kinetic method is applied to a sufficiently high power level or to a core without an external neutron source, the neutron source term may be neglected. When applied to a lower power level or in the sub-critical domain, however, the source effects must be taken in account. Furthermore, some treatments are needed in using the count rate of Source Range (SR) detector as input signal to the digital reactivity meter. To overcome these difficulties, we have proposed a digital reactivity meter combined with a methodology of the modified Neutron Source Multiplication (NSM) method with correction factors for subcriticality measurements in PWR. (author)

  6. Quality control of Photosystem II: reversible and irreversible protein aggregation decides the fate of Photosystem II under excessive illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasusi eYamamoto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In response to excessive light, the thylakoid membranes of higher plant chloroplasts show dynamic changes including the degradation and reassembly of proteins, a change in the distribution of proteins, and large-scale structural changes such as unstacking of the grana. Here, we examined the aggregation of light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complexes and Photosystem II core subunits of spinach thylakoid membranes under light stress with 77K chlorophyll fluorescence; aggregation of these proteins was found to proceed with increasing light intensity. Measurement of changes in the fluidity of thylakoid membranes with fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene showed that membrane fluidity increased at a light intensity of 500–1,000 µmol photons m-2 s-1, and decreased at very high light intensity (1,500 µmol photons m-2 s-1. The aggregation of light-harvesting complexes at moderately high light intensity is known to be reversible, while that of Photosystem II core subunits at extremely high light intensity is irreversible. It is likely that the reversibility of protein aggregation is closely related to membrane fluidity: increases in fluidity should stimulate reversible protein aggregation, whereas irreversible protein aggregation might decrease membrane fluidity. When spinach leaves were pre-illuminated with moderately high light intensity, the qE component of non-photochemical quenching and the optimum quantum yield of Photosystem II increased, indicating that Photosystem II/ light-harvesting complexes rearranged in the thylakoid membranes to optimize Photosystem II activity. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the thylakoids underwent partial unstacking under these light stress conditions. Thus, protein aggregation is involved in thylakoid dynamics and regulates photochemical reactions, thereby deciding the fate of Photosystem II.

  7. EXCESS RF POWER REQUIRED FOR RF CONTROL OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC, A PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY SUPERCONDUCTING PROTON ACCELERATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.; Kwon, S.

    2001-01-01

    A high-intensity proton linac, such as that being planned for the SNS, requires accurate RF control of cavity fields for the entire pulse in order to avoid beam spill. The current design requirement for the SNS is RF field stability within ±0.5% and ±0.5 o [1]. This RF control capability is achieved by the control electronics using the excess RF power to correct disturbances. To minimize the initial capital costs, the RF system is designed with 'just enough' RF power. All the usual disturbances exist, such as beam noise, klystron/HVPS noise, coupler imperfections, transport losses, turn-on and turn-off transients, etc. As a superconducting linac, there are added disturbances of large magnitude, including Lorentz detuning and microphonics. The effects of these disturbances and the power required to correct them are estimated, and the result shows that the highest power systems in the SNS have just enough margin, with little or no excess margin

  8. Does Excessive Pronation Cause Pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Carsten Møller; Olesen Gammelgaard, Christian; Nielsen, R. G.

    Excessive pronation could be an inborn abnormality or an acquired foot disorder caused by overuse, inadequate supported shoes or inadequate foot training. When the muscles and ligaments of the foot are insufficient it can cause an excessive pronation of the foot. The current treatment consist...... of antipronation shoes or insoles, which latest was studied by Kulce DG., et al (2007). So far there have been no randomized controlled studies showing methods that the effect of this treatment has not been documented. Therefore the authors can measure the effect of treatments with insoles. Some of the excessive...

  9. Transient voltage control of a DFIG-based wind power plant for suppressing overvoltage using a reactive current reduction loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geon Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a transient voltage control scheme of a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG-based wind power plant (WPP using a reactive current reduction loop to suppress the overvoltage at a point of interconnection (POI and DFIG terminal after a fault clearance. The change of terminal voltage of a DFIG is monitored at every predefined time period to detect the fault clearance. If the voltage change exceeds a set value, then the reactive current reduction loop reduces the reactive current reference in the DFIG controller using the step function. The reactive current injection of DFIGs in a WPP is rapidly reduced, and a WPP can rapidly suppress the overvoltage at a fault clearance because the reactive current reference is reduced. Using an electromagnetic transients program–released version (EMTP–RV simulator, the performance of the proposed scheme was validated for a model system comprising 20 units of a 5-MW DFIG considering various scenarios, such as fault and wind conditions. Test results show that the proposed scheme enables a WPP to suppress the overvoltage at the POI and DFIG terminal within a short time under grid fault conditions.

  10. Reactive power control methods for improved reliability of wind power inverters under wind speed variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    method to relieve the thermal cycling of power switching devices under severe wind speed variations, by circulating reactive power among the parallel power converters in a WTS or among the WTS's in a wind park. The amount of reactive power is adjusted to limit the junction temperature fluctuation...

  11. Containment and Consensus-based Distributed Coordination Control for Voltage Bound and Reactive Power Sharing in AC Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Renke; Meng, Lexuan; Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers a highly flexible and reliable control strategy to achieve voltage bounded regulation and accurate reactive power sharing coordinately in AC Micro-Grids. A containment and consensus-based distributed coordination controller is proposed, by which each output voltage magnitude can...... be bounded within a reasonable range and the accurate reactive power sharing among distributed generators can be also achieved. Combined with the two proposed controllers and electrical part of the AC Micro-Grid, a small signal model is fully developed to analyze the sensitivity of different control...... parameters. The effectiveness of the proposed controller in case of load variation, communication failure, plug-and-play capability are verified by the experimental setup as an islanded Micro-Grid....

  12. Moderate alcohol consumption reduces plasma C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels : a randomized, diet-controlled intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierksma, A.; Gaag, M.S. van der; Kluft, C.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of moderate alcohol consumption on the acute phase proteins C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. Design: Randomized, diet-controlled, cross-over study. Setting: The study was performed at TNO Nutrition and Food Research, Zeist, The Netherlands. Subjects: Ten

  13. Active video games as a tool to prevent excessive weight gain in adolescents: rationale, design and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Excessive body weight, low physical activity and excessive sedentary time in youth are major public health concerns. A new generation of video games, the ones that require physical activity to play the games –i.e. active games- may be a promising alternative to traditional non-active games to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviors in youth. The aim of this manuscript is to describe the design of a study evaluating the effects of a family oriented active game intervention, incorporating several motivational elements, on anthropometrics and health behaviors in adolescents. Methods/Design The study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT), with non-active gaming adolescents aged 12 – 16 years old randomly allocated to a ten month intervention (receiving active games, as well as an encouragement to play) or a waiting-list control group (receiving active games after the intervention period). Primary outcomes are adolescents’ measured BMI-SDS (SDS = adjusted for mean standard deviation score), waist circumference-SDS, hip circumference and sum of skinfolds. Secondary outcomes are adolescents’ self-reported time spent playing active and non-active games, other sedentary activities and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. In addition, a process evaluation is conducted, assessing the sustainability of the active games, enjoyment, perceived competence, perceived barriers for active game play, game context, injuries from active game play, activity replacement and intention to continue playing the active games. Discussion This is the first adequately powered RCT including normal weight adolescents, evaluating a reasonably long period of provision of and exposure to active games. Next, strong elements are the incorporating motivational elements for active game play and a comprehensive process evaluation. This trial will provide evidence regarding the potential contribution of active games in prevention of excessive weight gain in

  14. Objective Provision Trees of Reactivity Control Safety Function for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Bongsuk; Yang, Huichang; Suh, Namduk

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this OPT is first to assure the DiD design during the licensing of Sf, but it will also contribute in evaluating the completeness of regulatory requirements under development by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS). Based on the definition of Defense-in-Depth (DiD) levels and safety functions for KALIMER Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), suggested in the reference and, Objective Provision Trees (OPTs) of reactivity control function for level 1, 2, 3 and 4 DiD were developed and suggested in this paper. The challenges and mechanisms and provisions were briefly explained in this paper. Comparing the mechanisms and provisions with the requirements will contribute in identifying the missing requirements. Since the design of Prototype Gen-IV Sf (PGSFR) is not mature yet, the OPT is developed for KALIMER design. Developed level 1 to 4 OPTs in this study can be used for the identification of potential design vulnerabilities. When detailed identification of provisions in terms of design features were achieved through the next step of this study, it can contribute to the establishment of defense-in-depth evaluation frame for the regulatory reviews for the licensing process. In the next stage of this study, other safety function will be researched and findings can be suggested as recommendations for the safety improvement

  15. EFFECTS OF AGE AND ACUTE MUSCLE FATIGUE ON REACTIVE POSTURAL CONTROL IN HEALTHY ADULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Evan V.; Foreman, K. Bo; Dibble, Lee E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries such as hip fractures and head trauma in older adults. While declines in muscle strength and sensory function contribute to increased falls in older adults, skeletal muscle fatigue is often overlooked as an additional contributor to fall risk. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of acute lower extremity muscle fatigue and age on reactive postural control in healthy adults. METHODS A sample of 16 individuals participated in this study (8 healthy older adults and 8 healthy young persons). Whole body kinematic and kinetic data were collected during anterior and posterior reproducible fall tests before (T0) and immediately after (T1) eccentric muscle fatiguing exercise, as well as after 15-minutes (T15) and 30-minutes (T30) of rest. FINDINGS Lower extremity joint kinematics of the stepping limb during the support (landing) phase of the anterior fall were significantly altered by the presence of acute muscle fatigue. Step velocity was significantly decreased during the anterior falls. Statistically significant main effects of age were found for step length in both fall directions. Effect sizes for all outcomes were small. No statistically significant interaction effects were found. INTERPRETATION Muscle fatigue has a measurable effect on lower extremity joint kinematics during simulated falls. These alterations appear to resolve within 15 minutes of recovery. The above deficits, coupled with a reduced step length, may help explain the increased fall risk in older adults. PMID:26351001

  16. Objective Provision Trees of Reactivity Control Safety Function for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Bongsuk; Yang, Huichang [TUEV Rheinland Korea Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Namduk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this OPT is first to assure the DiD design during the licensing of Sf, but it will also contribute in evaluating the completeness of regulatory requirements under development by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS). Based on the definition of Defense-in-Depth (DiD) levels and safety functions for KALIMER Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), suggested in the reference and, Objective Provision Trees (OPTs) of reactivity control function for level 1, 2, 3 and 4 DiD were developed and suggested in this paper. The challenges and mechanisms and provisions were briefly explained in this paper. Comparing the mechanisms and provisions with the requirements will contribute in identifying the missing requirements. Since the design of Prototype Gen-IV Sf (PGSFR) is not mature yet, the OPT is developed for KALIMER design. Developed level 1 to 4 OPTs in this study can be used for the identification of potential design vulnerabilities. When detailed identification of provisions in terms of design features were achieved through the next step of this study, it can contribute to the establishment of defense-in-depth evaluation frame for the regulatory reviews for the licensing process. In the next stage of this study, other safety function will be researched and findings can be suggested as recommendations for the safety improvement.

  17. Multi-scale modeling of diffusion-controlled reactions in polymers: renormalisation of reactivity parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaers, Ralf; Rosa, Angelo

    2012-01-07

    The quantitative description of polymeric systems requires hierarchical modeling schemes, which bridge the gap between the atomic scale, relevant to chemical or biomolecular reactions, and the macromolecular scale, where the longest relaxation modes occur. Here, we use the formalism for diffusion-controlled reactions in polymers developed by Wilemski, Fixman, and Doi to discuss the renormalisation of the reactivity parameters in polymer models with varying spatial resolution. In particular, we show that the adjustments are independent of chain length. As a consequence, it is possible to match reactions times between descriptions with different resolution for relatively short reference chains and to use the coarse-grained model to make quantitative predictions for longer chains. We illustrate our results by a detailed discussion of the classical problem of chain cyclization in the Rouse model, which offers the simplest example of a multi-scale descriptions, if we consider differently discretized Rouse models for the same physical system. Moreover, we are able to explore different combinations of compact and non-compact diffusion in the local and large-scale dynamics by varying the embedding dimension.

  18. Oscillatory brain activity related to control mechanisms during laboratory-induced reactive aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike M Krämer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive behavior is a common reaction in humans after an interpersonal provocation, but little is known about the underlying brain mechanisms. The present study analyzed oscillatory brain activity while participants were involved in an aggressive interaction to examine the neural processes subserving the associated decision and evaluation processes. Participants were selected from a larger sample because of their high scores in trait aggressiveness. We used a competitive reaction time task that induces aggressive behavior through provocation. Each trial is separated in a decision phase, during which the punishment for the opponent is set, and an outcome phase, during which the actual punishment is applied or received. We observed provocation-related differences during the decision phase in the theta band which differed depending on participants’ aggressive behavior: High provocation was associated with an increased frontal theta response in participants refraining from retaliation, but with reduced theta power in those who got back to the opponent. Moreover, more aggressive decisions after being punished were associated with a decrease of frontal theta power. Non-aggressive and aggressive participants differed also in their outcome-related response: Being punished led to an increased frontal theta power compared to win trials in the latter only, pointing to differences in evaluation processes associated with their different behavioral reactions. The data thus support previous evidence for a role of prefrontal areas in the control of reactive aggression and extend behavioral studies on associations between aggression or violence and impaired prefrontal functions.

  19. Effects of age and acute muscle fatigue on reactive postural control in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Evan V; Foreman, K Bo; Dibble, Leland E

    2015-12-01

    Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries such as hip fractures and head trauma in older adults. While declines in muscle strength and sensory function contribute to increased falls in older adults, skeletal muscle fatigue is often overlooked as an additional contributor to fall risk. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of acute lower extremity muscle fatigue and age on reactive postural control in healthy adults. A sample of 16 individuals participated in this study (8 healthy older adults and 8 healthy young persons). Whole body kinematic and kinetic data were collected during anterior and posterior reproducible fall tests before (T0) and immediately after (T1) eccentric muscle fatiguing exercise, as well as after 15-min (T15) and 30-min (T30) of rest. Lower extremity joint kinematics of the stepping limb during the support (landing) phase of the anterior fall were significantly altered by the presence of acute muscle fatigue. Step velocity was significantly decreased during the anterior falls. Statistically significant main effects of age were found for step length in both fall directions. Effect sizes for all outcomes were small. No statistically significant interaction effects were found. Muscle fatigue has a measurable effect on lower extremity joint kinematics during simulated falls. These alterations appear to resolve within 15 min of recovery. The above deficits, coupled with a reduced step length, may help explain the increased fall risk in older adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ghrelin potentiates cardiac reactivity to stress by modulating sympathetic control and beta-adrenergic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo-Silva, Gabriel; Turones, Larissa Córdova; da Cruz, Kellen Rosa; Gomes, Karina Pereira; Mendonça, Michelle Mendanha; Nunes, Allancer; de Jesus, Itamar Guedes; Colugnati, Diego Basile; Pansani, Aline Priscila; Pobbe, Roger Luis Henschel; Santos, Robson; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky; Guatimosim, Silvia; de Castro, Carlos Henrique; Ianzer, Danielle; Ferreira, Reginaldo Nassar; Xavier, Carlos Henrique

    2018-03-01

    Prior evidence indicates that ghrelin is involved in the integration of cardiovascular functions and behavioral responses. Ghrelin actions are mediated by the growth hormone secretagogue receptor subtype 1a (GHS-R1a), which is expressed in peripheral tissues and central areas involved in the control of cardiovascular responses to stress. In the present study, we assessed the role of ghrelin - GHS-R1a axis in the cardiovascular reactivity to acute emotional stress in rats. Ghrelin potentiated the tachycardia evoked by restraint and air jet stresses, which was reverted by GHS-R1a blockade. Evaluation of the autonomic balance revealed that the sympathetic branch modulates the ghrelin-evoked positive chronotropy. In isolated hearts, the perfusion with ghrelin potentiated the contractile responses caused by stimulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor, without altering the amplitude of the responses evoked by acetylcholine. Experiments in isolated cardiomyocytes revealed that ghrelin amplified the increases in calcium transient changes evoked by isoproterenol. Taken together, our results indicate that the Ghrelin-GHS-R1a axis potentiates the magnitude of stress-evoked tachycardia by modulating the autonomic nervous system and peripheral mechanisms, strongly relying on the activation of cardiac calcium transient and beta-adrenergic receptors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Microcomputer-based equipment-control and data-acquisition system for fission-reactor reactivity-worth measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, W.P.; Bucher, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Material reactivity-worth measurements are one of the major classes of experiments conducted on the Zero Power research reactors (ZPR) at Argonne National Laboratory. These measurements require the monitoring of the position of a servo control element as a sample material is positioned at various locations in a critical reactor configuration. In order to guarantee operational reliability and increase experimental flexibility for these measurements, the obsolete hardware-based control unit has been replaced with a microcomputer based equipment control and data acquisition system. This system is based on an S-100 bus, dual floppy disk computer with custom built cards to interface with the experimental system. To measure reactivity worths, the system accurately positions samples in the reactor core and acquires data on the position of the servo control element. The data are then analyzed to determine statistical adequacy. The paper covers both the hardware and software aspects of the design

  2. Microcomputer-based equipment-control and data-acquisition system for fission-reactor reactivity-worth measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, W.P.; Bucher, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Material reactivity-worth measurements are one of the major classes of experiments conducted on the Zero Power research reactors (ZPR) at Argonne National Laboratory. These measurements require the monitoring of the position of a servo control element as a sample material is positioned at various locations in a critical reactor configuration. In order to guarantee operational reliability and increase experimental flexibility for these measurements, the obsolete hardware-based control unit has been replaced with a microcomputer based equipment control and data acquisition system. This system is based on an S-100 bus, dual floppy disk computer with custom built cards to interface with the experimental system. To measure reactivity worths, the system accurately positions samples in the reactor core and acquires data on the position of the servo control element. The data are then analyzed to determine statistical adequacy. The paper covers both the hardware and software aspects of the design.

  3. Entropy-based critical reaction time for mixing-controlled reactive transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiogna, Gabriele; Rolle, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Entropy-based metrics, such as the dilution index, have been proposed to quantify dilution and reactive mixing in solute transport problems. In this work, we derive the transient advection dispersion equation for the entropy density of a reactive plume. We restrict our analysis to the case where...... the concentration distribution of the transported species is Gaussian and we observe that, even in case of an instantaneous complete bimolecular reaction, dilution caused by dispersive processes dominates the entropy balance at early times and results in the net increase of the entropy density of a reactive species...

  4. Pentose Phosphate Shunt Modulates Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide Production Controlling Trypanosoma cruzi in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-jie Koo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism provides substrates for reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO generation, which are a part of the macrophage (Mφ anti-microbial response. Mφs infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc produce insufficient levels of oxidative species and lower levels of glycolysis compared to classical Mφs. How Mφs fail to elicit a potent ROS/NO response during infection and its link to glycolysis is unknown. Herein, we evaluated for ROS, NO, and cytokine production in the presence of metabolic modulators of glycolysis and the Krebs cycle. Metabolic status was analyzed by Seahorse Flux Analyzer and mass spectrometry and validated by RNAi. Tc infection of RAW264.7 or bone marrow-derived Mφs elicited a substantial increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-α expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine release, and moderate levels of ROS/NO by 18 h. Interferon (IFN-γ addition enhanced the Tc-induced ROS/NO release and shut down mitochondrial respiration to the levels noted in classical Mφs. Inhibition of PPAR-α attenuated the ROS/NO response and was insufficient for complete metabolic shift. Deprivation of glucose and inhibition of pyruvate transport showed that Krebs cycle and glycolysis support ROS/NO generation in Tc + IFN-γ stimulated Mφs. Metabolic profiling and RNAi studies showed that glycolysis-pentose phosphate pathway (PPP at 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was essential for ROS/NO response and control of parasite replication in Mφ. We conclude that IFN-γ, but not inhibition of PPAR-α, supports metabolic upregulation of glycolytic-PPP for eliciting potent ROS/NO response in Tc-infected Mφs. Chemical analogs enhancing the glucose-PPP will be beneficial in controlling Tc replication and dissemination by Mφs.

  5. Context-dependent switching between proactive and reactive working memory control mechanisms in the right inferior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Petter; Persson, Jonas

    2012-11-15

    A critical feature of higher cognitive functioning is the capacity to flexibly tailor information processing and behaviors to current situational demands. Recent neurocognitive models have been postulated to account for the dynamic nature of human executive processing by invoking two dissociable cognitive control modes, proactive and reactive control. These may involve partially overlapping, but temporally distinct neural implementation in the prefrontal cortex. Prior brain imaging studies exploring proactive control have mainly used tasks requiring only information about single-items to be retained over unfilled delays. Whether proactive control can also be utilized to facilitate performance in more complex working memory tasks, in which concurrent processing of intervening items and updating is mandatory during contextual cue maintenance remains an open question. To examine this issue and to elucidate the extent to which overlapping neural substrates underlie proactive and reactive control we used fMRI and a modified verbal 3-back paradigm with embedded cues predictive of high-interference trials. This task requires context information to be retained over multiple intervening trials. We found that performance improved with item-specific cues predicting forthcoming lures despite increased working memory load. Temporal dynamics of activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus suggest flexible switching between proactive and reactive control in a context-dependent fashion, with greater sustained responses elicited in the 3-back task involving context maintenance of cue information and greater transient responses elicited in the 3-back task absent of cues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Design report on the guide box-reactivity and safety control plates for MPR reactor under normal operation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, M.

    1999-01-01

    The reactivity control system for the MPR reactor (Multi Purpose Reactor) is a critical component regarding safety, it must ensure a fast shut down, maintaining the reactor in subcritical condition under normal or accidental operation condition. For this purpose, this core component must be designed to maintain its operating capacity during all the residence time and under any foreseen operation condition. The mechanical design of control plates and guide boxes must comply with structural integrity, maintaining its geometric and dimensional stability within the pre-established limits to prevent interferences with other core components. For this, the heat generation effect, mechanical loads and environment and irradiation effects were evaluated during the mechanical design. The reactivity control system is composed of guide boxes, manufactured from Aluminium alloy, located between the fuel elements, and control absorber plates of Ag-In-Cd alloy hermetically enclosed by a cladding of stainless steel sliding inside de guide boxes. The upward-downward movement is transmitted by a rod from the motion device located at the reactor lower part. The design requirements, criteria and limits were established to fulfill with the normal and abnormal operation conditions. The design verifications were performed by analytical method, estimating the guide box and control plates residence time. The result of the analysis performed, shows that the design of the reactivity control system and the material selected, are appropriate to fulfill the functional requirements, with no failures attributed to the mechanical design. (author)

  7. Estimation of reactive power sources dynamic limits for Volt / VAr control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco Alvarado, Juan Jose

    2013-01-01

    A generic model of capacity curves is obtained from the theoretical capacity curves of the distribution generators and reactive compensation elements. The obtained generic model is structured in a simplified method of points, taking eight strategic points of two detailed curves of a generator and through a series of interpolations, achieving the estimation of limits of capacity of delivery / consumption of the generator. The theory of electric generation elements and reactive power compensation is reviewed. The curves of capacity 'Reactive Power / Active Power' are achieved for different values of tension: from wind generators with complete converter and doubly fed, photovoltaic generators with inverter and synchronous generators. The 'Reactive Power / Line Tension' capacity curves are acquired from static var compensators (SVC). The generic limits of generators and SVC are estimated from the capacity curves [es

  8. Reactive Distillation and Air Stripping Processes for Water Recycling and Trace Contaminant Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin E.; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Reactive distillation designs are considered to reduce the presence of volatile organic compounds in the purified water. Reactive distillation integrates a reactor with a distillation column. A review of the literature in this field has revealed a variety of functional reactive columns in industry. Wastewater may be purified by a combination of a reactor and a distiller (e.g., the EWRS or VPCAR concepts) or, in principle, through a design which integrates the reactor with the distiller. A review of the literature in reactive distillation has identified some different designs in such combinations of reactor and distiller. An evaluation of reactive distillation and reactive air stripping is presented with regards to the reduction of volatile organic compounds in the contaminated water and air. Among the methods presented, an architecture is presented for the evaluation of the simultaneous oxidation of organics in air and water. These and other designs are presented in light of potential improvements in power consumptions and air and water purities for architectures which include catalytic activity integrated into the water processor. In particular, catalytic oxidation of organics may be useful as a tool to remove contaminants that more traditional distillation and/or air stripping columns may not remove. A review of the current leading edge at the commercial level and at the research frontier in catalytically active materials is presented. Themes and directions from the engineering developments in catalyst design are presented conceptually in light of developments in the nanoscale chemistry of a variety of catalyst materials.

  9. Towards a Reactive Power Oscillation Damping Controller for Wind Power Plant Based on Full Converter Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüppel, Thyge; Kumar, Sathess; Thuring, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a power oscillation damping controller (POD) based on modulation of reactive power (Q POD) is analyzed where the modular and distributed characteristics of the wind power plant (WPP) are considered. For a Q POD it is essential that the phase of the modulated output is tightly...... contributes to a collective response. This ability is shown with a 150 wind turbine (WT) WPP with all WTs represented, and it is demonstrated that the WPP contributes to the inter-area damping. The work is based on a nonlinear, dynamic model of the 3.6 MW Siemens Wind Power WT....... controlled to achieve a positive damping contribution. It is investigated how a park level voltage, reactive power, and power factor control at different grid strengths interact with the Q POD in terms of a resulting phase shift. A WPP is modular and distributed and a WPP Q POD necessitate that each WT...

  10. Control of Reactive Species Generated by Low-frequency Biased Nanosecond Pulse Discharge in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    The control of hydroxyl radical and the other gas phase species generation in the ejected gas through air plasma (air plasma effluent) has been experimentally studied, which is a key to extend the range of plasma treatment. Nanosecond pulse discharge is known to produce high reduced electric field (E/N) discharge that leads to efficient generation of the reactive species than conventional low frequency discharge, while the charge-voltage cycle in the low frequency discharge is known to be well-controlled. In this study, the nanosecond pulse discharge biased with AC low frequency high voltage is used to take advantages of these discharges, which allows us to modulate the reactive species composition in the air plasma effluent. The utilization of the gas-liquid interface and the liquid phase chemical reactions between the modulated long-lived reactive species delivered from the air plasma effluent could realize efficient liquid phase chemical reactions leading to short-lived reactive species production far from the air plasma, which is crucial for some plasma agricultural applications.

  11. Reactivity considerations for the on-line refuelling of a pebble bed modular reactor—Illustrating safety for the most reactive core fuel load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    In the multi-pass fuel management scheme employed for the pebble bed modular reactor the fuel pebbles are re-circulated until they reach the target burn-up. The rate at which fresh fuel is loaded and burned fuel is discharged is a result of the core neutronics cycle analysis but in practice (on the plant) this has to be controlled and managed by the fuel handling and storage system and use of the burnup measurement system. The excess reactivity is the additional reactivity available in the core during operating conditions that is the result of loading a fuel mixture in the core that is more reactive (less burned) than what is required to keep the reactor critical at full power operational conditions. The excess reactivity is balanced by the insertion of the control rods to keep the reactor critical. The excess reactivity allows flexibility in operations, for example to overcome the xenon build up when power is decreased as part of load follow. In order to limit reactivity excursions and to ensure safe shutdown the excess reactivity and thus the insertion depth of the control rods at normal operating conditions has to be managed. One way to do this is by operational procedures. The reactivity effect of long-term operation with the control rods inserted deeper than the design point is investigated and a control rod insertion limit is proposed that will not limit normal operations. The effects of other phenomena that can increase the power defect, such as higher-than-expected fuel temperatures, are also introduced. All of these cases are then evaluated by ensuring cold shutdown is still achievable and where appropriate by reactivity insertion accident analysis. These aspects are investigated on the PBMR 400 MW design.

  12. Transient Control of Synchronous Machine Active and Reactive Power in Micro-grid Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Luke G.

    There are two main topics associated with this dissertation. The first is to investigate phase-to-neutral fault current magnitude occurring in generators with multiple zero-sequence current sources. The second is to design, model, and tune a linear control system for operating a micro-grid in the event of a separation from the electric power system. In the former case, detailed generator, AC8B excitation system, and four-wire electric power system models are constructed. Where available, manufacturers data is used to validate the generator and exciter models. A gain-delay with frequency droop control is used to model an internal combustion engine and governor. The four wire system is connected through a transformer impedance to an infinite bus. Phase-to-neutral faults are imposed on the system, and fault magnitudes analyzed against three-phase faults to gauge their severity. In the latter case, a balanced three-phase system is assumed. The model structure from the former case - but using data for a different generator - is incorporated with a model for an energy storage device and a net load model to form a micro-grid. The primary control model for the energy storage device has a high level of detail, as does the energy storage device plant model in describing the LC filter and transformer. A gain-delay battery and inverter model is used at the front end. The net load model is intended to be the difference between renewable energy sources and load within a micro-grid system that has separated from the grid. Given the variability of both renewable generation and load, frequency and voltage stability are not guaranteed. This work is an attempt to model components of a proposed micro-grid system at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, and design, model, and tune a linear control system for operation in the event of a separation from the electric power system. The control module is responsible for management of frequency and active power, and voltage and reactive

  13. Measurements of negative reactivity in Masurca and Phenix control rods: Prospects for Superphenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.C.; Petiot, R.; Coulon, P.; Giese, H.; West, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental assessment of the negative reactivity of the control rods in an industrial reactor has recently been the subject of numerous studies conducted in the light of forthcoming startup tests on the core of Superphenix. Representative tests have been carried out both on Phenix and on the Masurca critical mockup, and a test programme for Superphenix has been drawn up. Subcritical measurements (source multiplication technique) have been carried out on Phenix without absolute measurement of a standard. However, a precise relative interpretation using two counters demonstrates good agreement following the correction of spatial effects. The chief value of the rod drop measurements conducted on Masurca was that it provided a means of cross-checking the kinetic method to be validated against a standard source multiplication method. The results demonstrate complete agreement between the two methods. The acceptability of the rod drop method is therefore considered to be established. The programme foreseen for startup of Superphenix and the objectives which have been set are briefly indicated. The calculation methods to be used in respect of the startup tests have been established on the basis of experience gained through interpreting the experiments conducted in the course of the Racine (Masurca) programme. An analysis of these experiments included, among other things, a parametric study that has made it possible to devise a standard calculation method for predicting Superphenix rod worth values. The main feature is a scattering calculation with three energy groups and three dimensions. Two-dimensional scattering and transport calculations are therefore necessary in order to define the corrective factors to be applied to this initial result. The final result of this analysis is thus made equivalent to a 25-energy-group transport calculation with an extremely small spatial mesh

  14. Topiramate Induced Excessive Sialorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersel Dag

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that drugs such as clozapine and lithium can cause sialorrhea. On the other hand, topiramate has not been reported to induce sialorrhea. We report a case of a patient aged 26 who was given antiepileptic and antipsychotic drugs due to severe mental retardation and intractable epilepsy and developed excessive sialorrhea complaint after the addition of topiramate for the control of seizures. His complaints continued for 1,5 years and ended after giving up topiramate. We presented this case since it was a rare sialorrhea case induced by topiramate. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of sialorrhea development which causes serious hygiene and social problems when they want to give topiramate to the patients using multiple drugs.

  15. Thermoset polymers chemo-rheology dedicated to reactive rotational moulding (RRM) understanding and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viale, J.

    2009-12-01

    This study comes within the scope of New Technology for Energy, particularly for high pressure hydrogen storage. Reactive Rotational Moulding has been identified as an adapted process for hydrogen-tight liners manufacturing. Thus the Reactive Rotational Moulding process has been studied in order to find theoretical tools dedicated to the understanding of such a reactive forming process. Chemical kinetics of four polyurethanes and poly-epoxides reactive systems have been determined on classical isothermal conditions and original aniso-thermal conditions i.e. on temperature ramps. Aniso-thermal conditions have been selected because they corresponds better to real process conditions. Rheological behaviour have also been characterized on two different approaches, an isothermal one and on temperature ramps. In particular, viscosity have been described as a function of heating rate. These physical and chemical results have been compiled in an original state diagram in order to show material properties evolution in a time-temperature space. The whole ex situ characterizations are then managed to described the behavior of the different formulations during the rotational moulding. Moreover they allow to form specific materials and so to widen the range of material to thermoset polymers. Finally, in order to correlate theoretical deduction to real reactive systems evolution, the elaboration of innovating monitoring tool based on ultrasonic analysis has been studied. To begin, polymerization monitoring criteria have been identified and then specific techniques have been set to monitor these criteria in real forming process. (author)

  16. Measurement of the anti reactivity of a control rod of G1, by a slow oscillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, D.; Leroy, J.; Vidal, R.

    1957-01-01

    It is possible to determine the effect of the end of a control rod on the reactivity of the pile by measuring the modulation induced in the neutron flux by the slow oscillation of this control rod. The total effect of the control rod can be deduced, given certain hypothesis and corrections, from the experimental curve giving the effect of the end of the rod as a function of its position. This method has the advantage of permitting the measurement of very large anti reactivities, such as p= 10 -2 for example, which would not be possible by other kinetic methods. Thus the control rod B 3 , in the low position, brings about a reduction in reactivity equal to 1130 p.c.m. ± 30 in the pile charged with 518 fuel elements, on one side only of the slit. We have compared the oscillation method with the classical divergence method, in the fields where the two measurements were possible: a satisfactory agreement was found. We have established that the phase displacement between the oscillation of the rod and the modulation of the flux varied greatly with the position of the rod. This variation cannot be explained on the basis of the dynamic model independent of space; we have attributed it to the influence of spatial harmonics of the flux distribution, and have determined a correction which frees the measurements of this influence. (author) [fr

  17. Single-point reactive power control method on voltage rise mitigation in residential networks with high PV penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasheminamin, Maryam; Agelidis, Vassilios; Ahmadi, Abdollah

    2018-01-01

    Voltage rise (VR) due to reverse power flow is an important obstacle for high integration of Photovoltaic (PV) into residential networks. This paper introduces and elaborates a novel methodology of an index-based single-point-reactive power-control (SPRPC) methodology to mitigate voltage rise by ...... system with high r/x ratio. Efficacy, effectiveness and cost study of SPRPC is compared to droop control to evaluate its advantages.......Voltage rise (VR) due to reverse power flow is an important obstacle for high integration of Photovoltaic (PV) into residential networks. This paper introduces and elaborates a novel methodology of an index-based single-point-reactive power-control (SPRPC) methodology to mitigate voltage rise...... by absorbing adequate reactive power from one selected point. The proposed index utilizes short circuit analysis to select the best point to apply this Volt/Var control method. SPRPC is supported technically and financially by distribution network operator that makes it cost effective, simple and efficient...

  18. Reactivity to smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment of depressive symptoms (MoodMonitor: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter van Ballegooijen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecological momentary assessment (EMA of mental health symptoms may influence the symptoms that it measures, i.e. assessment reactivity. In the field of depression, EMA reactivity has received little attention. We aim to investigate whether EMA of depressive symptoms induces assessment reactivity. Reactivity will be operationalised as an effect of EMA on depressive symptoms measured by a retrospective questionnaire, and, secondly, as a change in response rate and variance of the EMA ratings. Methods This study is a 12-week randomised controlled trial comprising three groups: group 1 carries out EMA of mood and completes a retrospective questionnaire, group 2 carries out EMA of how energetic they feel and completes a retrospective questionnaire, group 3 is the control group, which completes only the retrospective questionnaire. The retrospective questionnaire (Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale; CES-D assesses depressive symptoms and is administered at baseline, 6 weeks after baseline and 12 weeks after baseline. We aim to recruit 160 participants who experience mild to moderate depressive symptoms, defined as a Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 score of 5 to 15. This study is powered to detect a small between-groups effect, where no clinically relevant effect is defined as the effect size margin −0.25< d <0.25. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate whether self-rated EMA of depressive symptoms could induce assessment reactivity among mildly depressed individuals. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register NTR5803. Registered 12 April 2016. http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=5803 .

  19. Enhanced Open-Circuit Voltage in Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics via Reactivity-Controlled Solution-Phase Ligand Exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Jo, Jea Woong; Kim, Younghoon; Choi, Jongmin; de Arquer, F. Pelayo Garcí a; Walters, Grant; Sun, Bin; Ouellette, Olivier; Kim, Junghwan; Proppe, Andrew H.; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Fan, James; Xu, Jixian; Tan, Chih Shan; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    The energy disorder that arises from colloidal quantum dot (CQD) polydispersity limits the open-circuit voltage (VOC) and efficiency of CQD photovoltaics. This energy broadening is significantly deteriorated today during CQD ligand exchange and film assembly. Here, a new solution-phase ligand exchange that, via judicious incorporation of reactivity-engineered additives, provides improved monodispersity in final CQD films is reported. It has been found that increasing the concentration of the less reactive species prevents CQD fusion and etching. As a result, CQD solar cells with a VOC of 0.7 V (vs 0.61 V for the control) for CQD films with exciton peak at 1.28 eV and a power conversion efficiency of 10.9% (vs 10.1% for the control) is achieved.

  20. Literature Survey on Operational Voltage Control and Reactive Power Management on Transmission and Sub-Transmission Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Holzer, Jesse T.; Vallem, Mallikarjuna R.; Huang, Renke; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR; Ke, Xinda; Pan, Feng

    2017-10-02

    Voltage and reactive power system control is generally performed following usual patterns of loads, based on off-line studies for daily and seasonal operations. This practice is currently challenged by the inclusion of distributed renewable generation, such as solar. There has been focus on resolving this problem at the distribution level; however, the transmission and sub-transmission levels have received less attention. This paper provides a literature review of proposed methods and solution approaches to coordinate and optimize voltage control and reactive power management, with an emphasis on applications at transmission and sub-transmission level. The conclusion drawn from the survey is that additional research is needed in the areas of optimizing switch shunt actions and coordinating all available resources to deal with uncertain patterns from increasing distributed renewable generation in the operational time frame. These topics are not deeply explored in the literature.

  1. Enhanced Open-Circuit Voltage in Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics via Reactivity-Controlled Solution-Phase Ligand Exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Jo, Jea Woong

    2017-10-09

    The energy disorder that arises from colloidal quantum dot (CQD) polydispersity limits the open-circuit voltage (VOC) and efficiency of CQD photovoltaics. This energy broadening is significantly deteriorated today during CQD ligand exchange and film assembly. Here, a new solution-phase ligand exchange that, via judicious incorporation of reactivity-engineered additives, provides improved monodispersity in final CQD films is reported. It has been found that increasing the concentration of the less reactive species prevents CQD fusion and etching. As a result, CQD solar cells with a VOC of 0.7 V (vs 0.61 V for the control) for CQD films with exciton peak at 1.28 eV and a power conversion efficiency of 10.9% (vs 10.1% for the control) is achieved.

  2. The variation of the reactivity with the number, diameter and length of the control rods in a heavy water natural uranium reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCriric, H

    1958-05-15

    Starting with the known reactor constants for a heavy water moderated reactor with reflector and a given number of control rods of a certain size, the reactivity equivalence of the control rods is calculated. The calculation is given in detail. The number, length and diameter of the control rods is then varied and the effect of these parameters on the reactivity is shown graphically. Flux plots are also given for the reactor with and without control rods.

  3. Polynomial curve fitting for control rod worth using least square numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Husamuddin Abdul Khalil; Mark Dennis Usang; Julia Abdul Karim; Mohd Amin Sharifuldin Salleh

    2012-01-01

    RTP must have sufficient excess reactivity to compensate the negative reactivity feedback effects such as those caused by the fuel temperature and power defects of reactivity, fuel burn-up and to allow full power operation for predetermined period of time. To compensate this excess reactivity, it is necessary to introduce an amount of negative reactivity by adjusting or controlling the control rods at will. Control rod worth depends largely upon the value of the neutron flux at the location of the rod and reflected by a polynomial curve. Purpose of this paper is to rule out the polynomial curve fitting using least square numerical techniques via MATLAB compatible language. (author)

  4. Overweight and Cognitive Performance: High Body Mass Index Is Associated with Impairment in Reactive Control during Task Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Steenbergen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of weight problems is increasing worldwide. There is growing evidence that high body mass index (BMI is associated with frontal lobe dysfunction and deficits in cognitive control. The present study aims to clarify the association between weight status and the degree of impairment in cognitive flexibility, i.e., the ability to efficiently switch from one task to another, by disentangling the preparatory and residual domains of task switching. Twenty-six normal weight (BMI < 25, five males and twenty-six overweight (BMI ≥ 25, seven males university students performed a task-switching paradigm that provides a relatively well-established diagnostic measure of proactive vs. reactive control with regard to cognitive flexibility. Compared to individuals with a BMI lower than 25, overweight (i.e., ≥25 was associated with increased switching costs in the reactive switching condition (i.e., when preparation time is short, representing reduced cognitive flexibility in the preparatory domain. In addition, the overweight group reported significantly more depression and binge eating symptoms, although still indicating minimal depression. No between-group differences were found with regard to self-reported autism spectrum symptoms, impulsiveness, state- and trait anxiety, and cognitive reactivity to depression. The present findings are consistent with and extend previous literature showing that elevated BMI in young, otherwise healthy individuals is associated with significantly more switching costs due to inefficiency in the retrieval, implementation, and maintenance of task sets, indicating less efficient cognitive control functioning.

  5. Determination of the most reactivity control rod by pseudo-harmonics perturbation method; Determinacao da barra de controle mais reativa usando o metodo de pseudo-harmonicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Fernando S.; Silva, Fernando C.; Martinez, Aquilino S. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: ffreire@con.ufrj.br; fernando@con.ufrj.br; aquilino@.con.ufrj.br

    2005-07-01

    Frequently it is necessary to compute the change in core multiplication caused by a change in the core temperature or composition. Even when this perturbation is localized, such as a control rod inserted into the core, one does not have to repeat the original criticality calculation, but instead we can use the well-known pseudo-harmonics perturbation method to express the corresponding change in the multiplication factor in terms of the neutron flux expanded in the basis vectors characterizing the unperturbed core. Therefore we may compute the control rod worth to find the most reactivity control rod to calculate the fast shutdown margin. In this thesis we propose a simple and precise method to identify the most reactivity control rod. (author)

  6. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Selvi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive daytime sleepiness is one of the most common sleep-related patient symptoms, with preva-lence in the community estimated to be as high as 18%. Patients with excessive daytime sleepiness may exhibit life threatening road and work accidents, social maladjustment, decreased academic and occupational performance and have poorer health than comparable adults. Thus, excessive daytime sleepiness is a serious condition that requires investigation, diagnosis and treatment primarily. As with most medical condition, evaluation of excessive daytime sleepiness begins a precise history and various objective and subjective tools have been also developed to assess excessive daytime sleepiness. The most common causes of excessive daytime sleepiness are insufficient sleep hygiene, chronic sleep deprivation, medical and psychiatric conditions and sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, medications, and narcolepsy. Treatment option should address underlying contributors and promote sleep quantity by ensuring good sleep hygiene. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 114-132

  7. Optimal Control of Wind Farms for Coordinated TSO-DSO Reactive Power Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sebastian Stock

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing importance of renewable generation connected to distribution grids requires an increased coordination between transmission system operators (TSOs and distribution system operators (DSOs for reactive power management. This work proposes a practical and effective interaction method based on sequential optimizations to evaluate the reactive flexibility potential of distribution networks and to dispatch them along with traditional synchronous generators, keeping to a minimum the information exchange. A modular optimal power flow (OPF tool featuring multi-objective optimization is developed for this purpose. The proposed method is evaluated for a model of a real German 110 kV grid with 1.6 GW of installed wind power capacity and a reduced order model of the surrounding transmission system. Simulations show the benefit of involving wind farms in reactive power support reducing losses both at distribution and transmission level. Different types of setpoints are investigated, showing the feasibility for the DSO to fulfill also individual voltage and reactive power targets over multiple connection points. Finally, some suggestions are presented to achieve a fair coordination, combining both TSO and DSO requirements.

  8. Controlled formation of anatase and rutile TiO2 thin films by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafieian Boroujeni, Damon; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Savenije, Tom; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the formation of TiO2 thin films via DC reactive magnetron sputtering. The oxygen concentration during sputtering proved to be a crucial parameter with respect to the final film structure and properties. The initial deposition provided amorphous films that crystallise upon annealing to

  9. Controlled formation of anatase and rutile TiO2 thin films by reactive magnetron sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Rafieian Boroujeni, Damon; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Savenije, Tom; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the formation of TiO2 thin films via DC reactive magnetron sputtering. The oxygen concentration during sputtering proved to be a crucial parameter with respect to the final film structure and properties. The initial deposition provided amorphous films that crystallise upon annealing to anatase or rutile, depending on the initial sputtering conditions. Substoichiometric films (TiOx

  10. Unified Behavior Framework for Reactive Robot Control in Real-Time Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    maintain coherent operation in concurrent programs by employing standard communication and synchronization patterns. Some typical ones are: semaphores ...through the semaphore . Signals, whether persistent or transient, are used to communicate between threads as a means of synchronizing their progress...tasks to be decomposed into collections of low-level primitive behaviors, Figure 2.b. This approach takes on the self- contradictory term, reactive

  11. Reactivity worth measurement of the control blades of the University of Florida training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero-Leyva, Barbaro

    1997-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out in order to measure the reactivity worth of the safety and regulating blades of the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) using the Inverse Kinetics, the Inverse Kinetics-Rod Drop method and the Power Ratio. The reactor's own instrumentation (compensated ion chamber) and an independent counting system (fission chamber) were used. A very smooth exponential decay of the flux was observed after 6s of the beginning of the transients using the reading of the reactor detector. The results of the measurements of the reactivity using both detectors were consistent and in good agreement. The compensated ion chamber showed a very smooth exponential behavior; this suggests that if we could record the power for a small sample time, say 0.1 s from the beginning of the transient, several additional research projects could be accomplished. First, precise intercomparison of the methods could be achieved if the statistics level is acceptable. Second, a precise description of the bouncing of the blades and its effects on the reactivity could be achieved. Finally, the design of a reactivity-meter could be based on such study. (author)

  12. Acute effects of muscle fatigue on anticipatory and reactive postural control in older individuals: a systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Evan V; Garg, Hina; Dibble, Leland E

    2015-01-01

    Falls are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury and fractures and the No. 1 cause of emergency department visits by older adults. Although declines in muscle strength and sensory function contribute to increased falls in older adults, skeletal muscle fatigue is often overlooked as an additional contributor to fall risk. In an effort to increase awareness of the detrimental effects of skeletal muscle fatigue on postural control, we sought to systematically review research studies examining this issue. The specific purpose of this review was to provide a detailed assessment of how anticipatory and reactive postural control tasks are influenced by acute muscle fatigue in healthy older individuals. An extensive search was performed using the CINAHL, Scopus, PubMed, SPORTDiscus, and AgeLine databases for the period from inception of each database to June 2013. This systematic review used standardized search criteria and quality assessments via the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Methodology to Develop Systematic Reviews of Treatment Interventions (2008 version, revision 1.2, AACPDM, Milwaukee, Wisconsin). A total of 334 citations were found. Six studies were selected for inclusion, whereas 328 studies were excluded from the analytical review. The majority of articles (5 of 6) utilized reactive postural control paradigms. All studies incorporated extrinsic measures of muscle fatigue, such as declines in maximal voluntary contraction or available active range of motion. The most common biomechanical postural control task outcomes were spatial measures, temporal measures, and end-points of lower extremity joint kinetics. On the basis of systematic review of relevant literature, it appears that muscle fatigue induces clear deteriorations in reactive postural control. A paucity of high-quality studies examining anticipatory postural control supports the need for further research in this area. These results should serve to heighten

  13. The impact of an exercise intervention on C - reactive protein during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Marquis; Braun, Barry; Marcus, Bess H; Stanek, Edward; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-06-24

    C-reactive protein (CRP) during pregnancy has been associated with adverse maternal outcomes such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus. Randomized trials suggest that exercise programs may be associated with reductions in CRP in non-pregnant populations; however, such studies have not been conducted among pregnant women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an individually-tailored motivationally-matched exercise intervention on CRP in pregnant women. The Behaviors Affecting Baby and You study was a randomized controlled trial of prenatal physical activity to prevent the development of gestational diabetes mellitus in women at increased risk. Women were randomized to either a 12-week exercise intervention (n = 84) or a comparison health and wellness intervention (n = 87). High sensitivity CRP (mg/dL) was measured using a commercial immunoassay kit. Physical activity was measured using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to evaluate the impact of the intervention on change in CRP using an intent-to-treat approach. CRP decreased (-0.09 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.25, 0.07) from pre- to post-intervention in the exercise arm (p = 0.14) and increased (0.08 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.07, 0.24) (p = 0.64) in the health and wellness arm; however the between group difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.14). Findings did not differ according to ethnic group or pre-pregnancy body mass index. In a secondary analysis based on self-reported physical activity, women who decreased their time spent in sports/exercise experienced a mean increase in CRP (0.09 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.14, 0.33), whereas women who maintained or increased their sports/ exercise experienced a mean decrease in CRP (-0.08 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.23, 0.08) (p = 0.046). Findings from this randomized trial in an ethnically and socio-economically diverse population of pregnant women were consistent with a positive impact

  14. A randomized controlled trial to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and promote postpartum weight loss in overweight and obese women: Health In Pregnancy and Postpartum (HIPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Sara; Liu, Jihong; Addy, Cheryl L; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Burgis, Judith T; Wingard, Ellen; Dahl, Alicia A; Whitaker, Kara M; Schneider, Lara; Boutté, Alycia K

    2018-03-01

    Interventions to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and promote postpartum weight loss have yielded modest results, particularly in overweight and obese women. To examine the impact of a theory-based lifestyle intervention on gestational weight gain, postpartum weight loss, and related maternal and child outcomes and to examine race differences in these outcomes. A randomized controlled trial (target N=400; 200 intervention, 200 standard care; 200 African American, 200 white). Overweight and obese African American and white women ≤16weeks gestation are recruited from obstetrics and gynecology clinics in South Carolina. Intervention participants receive two in-depth counseling sessions (early pregnancy and postpartum), telephone counseling, behavioral podcasts, and social media support that target weight self-monitoring and increasing physical activity and healthy dietary behavior practices, guided by Social Cognitive Theory. Standard care participants receive monthly mailings and a matched number of podcasts on non-weight related topics. All intervention activities last from ≤18weeks gestation to 6months after delivery. Gestational weight gain is the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes are meeting gestational weight gain guidelines (inadequate, adequate, excessive), weekly rate of gestational weight gain, postpartum weight retention, physical activity and dietary behaviors, health-related quality of life, and offspring adiposity. Participants are assessed at baseline (≤16weeks gestation), 32weeks gestation, and 6 and 12months postpartum, and offspring are assessed at 6 and 12months. HIPP is an innovative study that addresses significant gaps in the literature. Primary outcome results are expected in 2019. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of the behavior of a three phase grid-connected photovoltaic system to control active and reactive power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsengenes, Georgios; Adamidis, Georgios [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, University Campus Kimmeria, 67100 Xanthi (Greece)

    2011-01-15

    In this paper, a photovoltaic (PV) system, with maximum power point tracking (MPPT), connected to a three phase grid is presented. The connection of photovoltaic system on the grid takes place in one stage using voltage source inverter (VSI). For a better utilization of the photovoltaic system, the control strategy applied is based on p-q theory. According to this strategy during sunlight the system sends active power to the grid and at the same time compensates the reactive power of the load. In case there is no sunlight (during the night for instance), the inverter only compensates the reactive power of the load. In this paper the use of p-q theory to supply the grid with active power and compensate the reactive power of the load is investigated. The advantage of this control strategy is that the photovoltaic system is operated the whole day. Furthermore, the p-q theory uses simple algebraic calculations without demanding the use of PLL to synchronize the inverter with the grid. (author)

  16. Symptomatic endometriosis of the posterior cul-de-sac is associated with impaired sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness and insomnia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Bizzarri, Nicolò; Scala, Carolina; Tafi, Emanuela; Siesto, Gabriele; Alessandri, Franco; Ferrero, Simone

    2017-02-01

    To assess the impact of endometriosis of the posterior cul-de-sac on quality of sleep, average daytime sleepiness and insomnia. This age-matched case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral centre for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis between May 2012 and December 2013. It included 145 women with endometriosis of the posterior cul-de-sac (cases; group E) and 145 patients referred to our Institution because of routine gynaecologic consultations (controls; group C). This study investigated whether sleep is impaired in patients with endometriosis of the posterior cul-de-sac. Sleep quality, daytime sleepiness and insomnia were assessed using the following self-administered questionnaires: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Epworth sleepiness scale and the Insomnia Severity Index, respectively. The primary objective of the study was to evaluate sleep quality in the two study groups. Secondary outcomes of the study were to assess average daytime sleepiness and insomnia in the two study groups. The prevalence of poor sleep quality was significantly higher in group E (64.8%) than in group C (15.1%; pinsomnia (29.0%) and moderate clinical insomnia (16.6%) significantly more frequently than patients in group C (24.4% and 5.0%; p=0.002). A substantial proportion of women with endometriosis of the posterior cul-de-sac experiences poor sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness and insomnia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Surfactant-controlled synthesis of Pd/Ce0.6Zr0.4O2 catalyst for NO reduction by CO with excess oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.F.; Gonzalez, G.; Wang, J.A.; Norena, L.E.; Toledo, A.; Castillo, S.; Moran-Pineda, M.

    2005-01-01

    For the first time, this work reports a surfactant-controlled synthetic method to obtain a nanophase of mesoporous ceria-zirconia solid solution containing cationic defects in the crystalline structure. The incorporation of a cationic surfactant (myristyltrimethylammonium bromide) into the ceria-zirconia solid network not only controlled the pore diameter distribution but also induced creation of the lattice defect. Ceria-zirconia solid solution showed crystal microstrain and structural distortion that varied with the calcination temperature. Compared to pure ceria, the addition of zirconium to the ceria promoted the bulk oxygen reducibility and enhanced the thermal stability of the solid. Hydrogen could be stored into or released from the PdO/Ce 0.6 Zr 0.4 O 2 catalyst during the TPR procedure, which is associated to the formation/decomposition of a PdH x phase, due to the hydrogen dissociation catalyzed by metallic Pd. At cool start of reaction, NO reduction by CO with excess oxygen over the Pd/Ce 0.6 Zr 0.4 O 2 catalyst showed selectivity around 100% to N 2 . A competition between NO reduction by CO and CO oxidation by O 2 was observed: at reaction temperatures below 200 deg. C, NO inhibited CO oxidation activity; however, at reaction temperatures above 200 deg. C, high activity of CO oxidation resulted in an inhibition effect on NO reduction

  18. Control of the optical properties of silicon and chromium mixed oxides deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara, L.; Galindo, R. Escobar; Martinez, R.; Sanchez, O.; Palacio, C.; Albella, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The development of mixed-oxide thin films allows obtaining materials with better properties than those of the different binary oxides, which makes them suitable for a great number of applications in different fields, such as tribology, optics or microelectronics. In this paper we investigate the deposition of mixed chromium and silicon oxides deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering with a view to use them as optical coatings with an adjustable refractive index. These films have been characterized by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry so as to determine how the deposition conditions influence the characteristics of the material. We have found that the deposition parameter whose influence determines the properties of the films to a greater extent is the amount of oxygen in the reactive sputtering gas.

  19. An Optimized Reactive Power Control of Distributed Solar Inverters in Low Voltage Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirok, Erhan; Sera, Dezso; Teodorescu, Remus

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the reactive power ancillary services of solar inverters which are connected to low voltage (LV) distribution networks by giving attention to the grid voltage support service and grid losses. Two typical reference LV distribution network models as suburban and farm...... are introduced from the literature in order to evaluate contribution of two static droop strategies cosφ(P) and Q(U) on the grid voltage. Photovoltaic (PV) hosting capacities of the suburban and farm networks are estimated and the most predominant limitations of connecting more solar inverters are emphasized...... for each network type. Regarding the overloading of MV/LV distribution transformers, overloading of lines and the grid overvoltage limitations, new local grid voltage support methods (cosφ(P,U) and Q(U,P)) are also proposed. Resulting maximum allowable penetration levels with different reactive power...

  20. Opposition-Based Improved PSO for Optimal Reactive Power Dispatch and Voltage Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengrang Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An opposition-based improved particle swarm optimization algorithm (OIPSO is presented for solving multiobjective reactive power optimization problem. OIPSO uses the opposition learning to improve search efficiency, adopts inertia weight factors to balance global and local exploration, and takes crossover and mutation and neighborhood model strategy to enhance population diversity. Then, a new multiobjective model is built, which includes system network loss, voltage dissatisfaction, and switching operation. Based on the market cost prices, objective functions are converted to least-cost model. In modeling process, switching operation cost is described according to the life cycle cost of transformer, and voltage dissatisfaction penalty is developed considering different voltage quality requirements of customers. The experiment is done on the new mathematical model. Through the simulation of IEEE 30-, 118-bus power systems, the results prove that OIPSO is more efficient to solve reactive power optimization problems and the model is more accurate to reflect the real power system operation.

  1. A randomized controlled trial to test the effect of multispecies probiotics on cognitive reactivity to sad mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; van Hemert, Saskia; Bosch, Jos A; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-08-01

    Recent insights into the role of the human microbiota in cognitive and affective functioning have led to the hypothesis that probiotic supplementation may act as an adjuvant strategy to ameliorate or prevent depression. Heightened cognitive reactivity to normal, transient changes in sad mood is an established marker of vulnerability to depression and is considered an important target for interventions. The present study aimed to test if a multispecies probiotic containing Bifidobacterium bifidum W23, Bifidobacterium lactis W52, Lactobacillus acidophilus W37, Lactobacillus brevis W63, Lactobacillus casei W56, Lactobacillus salivarius W24, and Lactococcus lactis (W19 and W58) may reduce cognitive reactivity in non-depressed individuals. In a triple-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, pre- and post-intervention assessment design, 20 healthy participants without current mood disorder received a 4-week probiotic food-supplement intervention with the multispecies probiotics, while 20 control participants received an inert placebo for the same period. In the pre- and post-intervention assessment, cognitive reactivity to sad mood was assessed using the revised Leiden index of depression sensitivity scale. Compared to participants who received the placebo intervention, participants who received the 4-week multispecies probiotics intervention showed a significantly reduced overall cognitive reactivity to sad mood, which was largely accounted for by reduced rumination and aggressive thoughts. These results provide the first evidence that the intake of probiotics may help reduce negative thoughts associated with sad mood. Probiotics supplementation warrants further research as a potential preventive strategy for depression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkus, B.; Anac, H.; Alsan, S.; Erk, S.

    1991-01-01

    Nowadays, various digital methods making use of microcomputers for neutron detector signals and determining the reactivity by numerical calculations are used in reactor control systems in place of classical reactivity meters. In this work, a calculation based on the ''The Time Dependent Transport Equation'' has been developed for determining the reactivity numerically. The reactivity values have been obtained utilizing a computer-based data acquisition and control system and compared with the analog reactivity meter values as well as the values calculated from the ''Inhour Equation''

  3. Active video games as a tool to prevent excessive weight gain in adolescents: rationale, design and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, M.; Chinapaw, M.J.M.; Bovenkamp, van de M.; Boer, de M.R.; Seidell, J.C.; Brug, J.; Vet, de E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Excessive body weight, low physical activity and excessive sedentary time in youth are major public health concerns. A new generation of video games, the ones that require physical activity to play the games –i.e. active games- may be a promising alternative to traditional non-active

  4. Active video games as a tool to prevent excessive weight gain in adolescents : rationale, design and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Monique; Chinapaw, Mai J M; van de Bovenkamp, Maaike; de Boer, Michiel R; Seidell, Jacob C; Brug, Johannes; de Vet, Emely

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excessive body weight, low physical activity and excessive sedentary time in youth are major public health concerns. A new generation of video games, the ones that require physical activity to play the games--i.e. active games--may be a promising alternative to traditional non-active

  5. Active video games as a tool to prevent excessive weight gain in adolescents: Rationale, design and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, M.; Chinapaw, M.J.; Bovenkamp, M. van de; Boer, M.R. de; Seidell, J.C.; Brug, J.; Vet, E. de

    2014-01-01

    Background: Excessive body weight, low physical activity and excessive sedentary time in youth are major public health concerns. A new generation of video games, the ones that require physical activity to play the games -i.e. active games- may be a promising alternative to traditional non-active

  6. Low voltage ride-through capability control for single-stage inverter-based grid-connected photovoltaic power plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Shetwi, Ali Q.; Sujod, Muhamad Zahim; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    and current limiter are used to absorb the excessive dc-voltage and limits excessive ac current, respectively. This control strategy can also ensure the reactive power support through the injection of reactive current according to the standard requirements as soon as the voltage sag is detected. Furthermore...... to improve the capability of ride-through fault safely and keep the inverter connected, but also to provide grid support through active and reactive power control at different type of faults....

  7. Excessive daytime sleepiness and adherence to antihypertensive medications among Blacks: analysis of the counseling African Americans to control hypertension (CAATCH trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams NJ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natasha J Williams,1 Girardin Jean-Louis,1 Abhishek Pandey,2 Joseph Ravenell,1 Carla Boutin-Foster,3 Gbenga Ogedegbe1 1Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of Internal Medicine, NYU Medical Center, New York, 2Department of Family Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, 3Center of Excellence in Disparities Research, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA Background: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS often occurs as a result of insufficient sleep, sleep apnea, illicit substance use, and other medical and psychiatric conditions. This study tested the hypothesis that blacks exhibiting EDS would have poorer self-reported adherence to hypertensive medication using cross-sectional data from the Counseling African-Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH trial. Methods: A total of 1,058 hypertensive blacks (average age 57±12 years participated in CAATCH, a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a multilevel intervention for participants who receive care from community health centers in New York City. Data analyzed in this study included baseline sociodemographics, medical history, EDS, and medication adherence. We used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, with a cutoff score of ≥10, to define EDS. Medication adherence was measured using an abbreviated Morisky Medication Adherence scale, with a score >0 indicating nonadherence. Results: Of the sample, 71% were female, 72% received at least a high school education, 51% reported a history of smoking, and 33% had a history of alcohol consumption. Overall, 27% of the participants exhibited EDS, and 44% of those who exhibited EDS were classified as adherent to prescribed antihypertensive medications. Multivariable logistic regression analysis, adjusting for effects of age, body mass index, sex, education, and smoking and drinking history indicated that participants who exhibited EDS were more than twice as likely to be nonadherent (odds ratio 2.28, 95

  8. Better cognitive control of emotional information is associated with reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine reactivity to emotional stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Grant S; Kuchenbecker, Shari Young; Pressman, Sarah D; Sumida, Ken D; Slavich, George M

    2016-01-01

    Stress is strongly associated with several mental and physical health problems that involve inflammation, including asthma, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancer, and depression. It has been hypothesized that better cognitive control of emotional information may lead to reduced inflammatory reactivity to stress and thus better health, but to date no studies have examined whether differences in cognitive control predict pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to stress. To address this issue, we conducted a laboratory-based experimental study in which we randomly assigned healthy young-adult females to either an acute emotional stress (emotionally evocative video) or no-stress (control video) condition. Salivary levels of the key pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were measured before and after the experimental manipulation, and following the last cytokine sample, we assessed participants' cognitive control of emotional information using an emotional Stroop task. We also assessed participants' cortisol levels before and after the manipulation to verify that documented effects were specific to cytokines and not simply due to increased nonwater salivary output. As hypothesized, the emotional stressor triggered significant increases in IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8. Moreover, even in fully adjusted models, better cognitive control following the emotional (but not control) video predicted less pronounced cytokine responses to that stressor. In contrast, no effects were observed for cortisol. These data thus indicate that better cognitive control specifically following an emotional stressor is uniquely associated with less pronounced pro-inflammatory cytokine reactivity to such stress. These findings may therefore help explain why superior cognitive control portends better health over the lifespan.

  9. Excess of Radiation Burden for Young Testicular Cancer Patients using Automatic Exposure Control and Contrast Agent on Whole-body Computed Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiniviita, Hannele; Kulmala, Jarmo; Pölönen, Tuukka; Määttänen, Heli; Järvinen, Hannu; Salminen, Eeva

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess patient dose from whole-body computed tomography (CT) in association with patient size, automatic exposure control (AEC) and intravenous (IV) contrast agent. Sixty-five testicular cancer patients (mean age 28 years) underwent altogether 279 whole-body CT scans from April 2000 to April 2011. The mean number of repeated examinations was 4.3. The GE LightSpeed 16 equipped with AEC and the Siemens Plus 4 CT scanners were used for imaging. Whole-body scans were performed with (216) and without (63) IV contrast. The ImPACT software was used to determine the effective and organ doses. Patient doses were independent (p < 0.41) of patient size when the Plus 4 device (mean 7.4 mSv, SD 1.7 mSv) was used, but with the LightSpeed 16 AEC device, the dose (mean 14 mSv, SD 4.6 mSv) increased significantly (p < 0.001) with waist cirfumference. Imaging with the IV contrast agent caused significantly higher (13% Plus 4, 35% LightSpeed 16) exposure than non-contrast imaging (p < 0.001). Great caution on the use of IV contrast agent and careful set-up of the AEC modulation parameters is recommended to avoid excessive radiation exposure on the whole-body CT imaging of young patients.

  10. Hyperhidrosis (Excessive Sweating)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who have this type are otherwise healthy. In medical terminology, the word “primary” means that the cause is not another medical condition. Secondary hyperhidrosis In medical terminology, “secondary” means that the excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis) has ...

  11. Photovoltaic Hosting Capacity of Feeders with Reactive Power Control and Tap Changers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceylan, Oğuzhan; Paudyal, Sumit; Bhattarai, Bishnu P.; Myers, Kurt S.

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm to determine photovoltaic (PV) hosting capacity of power distribution networks as a function of number of PV injection nodes, reactive power support from the PVs, and the sub-station load tap changers (LTCs). In the proposed method, several minute by minute simulations are run based on randomly chosen PV injection nodes, daily PV output profiles, and daily load profiles from a pool of high-resolution realistic data set. The simulation setup is built using OpenDSS and MATLAB. The performance of the proposed method is investigated in the IEEE 123-node distribution feeder for multiple scenarios. The case studies are performed particularly for one, two, five and ten PV injection nodes, and looking at the maximum voltage deviations. Case studies show that the PV hosting capacity of the 123-node feeder greatly differs with the number of PV injection nodes. We have also observed that the PV hosting capacity increases with reactive power support and higher tap position of sub-station LTC.

  12. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Bimetallic Oxide Nanoparticles with Designed Elemental Compositions for Controlling the Explosive Reactivity of Nanoenergetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Ahn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a simple and viable method for controlling the energy release rate and pressurization rate of nanoenergetic materials by controlling the relative elemental compositions of oxidizers. First, bimetallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs with a homogeneous distribution of two different oxidizer components (CuO and Fe2O3 were generated by a conventional spray pyrolysis method. Next, the Al NPs employed as a fuel were mixed with CuO-Fe2O3 bimetallic oxide NPs by an ultrasonication process in ethanol solution. Finally, after the removal of ethanol by a drying process, the NPs were converted into energetic materials (EMs. The effects of the mass fraction of CuO in the CuO-Fe2O3 bimetallic oxide NPs on the explosive reactivity of the resulting EMs were examined by using a differential scanning calorimeter and pressure cell tester (PCT systems. The results clearly indicate that the energy release rate and pressurization rate of EMs increased linearly as the mass fraction of CuO in the CuO-Fe2O3 bimetallic oxide NPs increased. This suggests that the precise control of the stoichiometric proportions of the strong oxidizer (CuO and mild oxidizer (Fe2O3 components in the bimetallic oxide NPs is a key factor in tuning the explosive reactivity of EMs.

  13. WORKABILITY OF A MANAGEMENT CONTROL MODEL IN SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF REACTIVE, PROACTIVE AND COACTIVE PHILOSOPHIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Onome Imoniana

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to compare and contrast the three philosophies of management control models in the process of decision-making, namely reactive, proactive and the coactive. Research methodology was based on literature review and descriptive/exploratory approach. Additionally, a survey of 20 service organizations was carried out in order to make the analysis wider-reaching. In order to do that, the following steps were followed: firstly, fundamentals of reactive, proactive and coactive models were highlighted; secondly, management behaviors in the three approaches were compared, with concepts and their practical application being highlighted, thus retrieving managerial relationships in the organization. In so doing, we draw the hypothesis that middle and top managers who adopt control models that are distant from a more coactive one, usually spend a greater number of working hours in problem-solving, leaving little or no time for planning purposes. Finally, for study consolidation purpose, we have adopted qualitative data collection, whereby a content analysis was carried out with the assistance of six categories. Results have shown the need for a change in management paradigms so that firms are not only compared through financial perspectives, without considering the analysis of management control models which, according to this study, directly influence the operational results of the organizations.

  14. Substitution of the soluble boron reactivity control system of a pressurized water reactor by gadolinium burnable poisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Segev, M.; Radkowsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    The results are presented of a research project that is aimed at designing a gadolinium burnable poison (BP) system for complete reactivity control of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core during the ''equilibrium'' cycle, resulting in the elimination of the soluble boron system, which represents a considerable saving in both capital and operating costs. A flat and strong negative moderator temperature coefficient is assured for a poison-free moderator. The design analysis of a core, heavily loaded with gadolinium BP rods, was based on a BGUCORE neutronic package and cluster model of a fuel assembly. The project objective was achieved by a novel lumped BP rod, designed as an annulus of gadolinium, clad by zirconium, and inserted into vacant guide thimbles of fresh-fuel assemblies. Specific combinations were found for the inner/outer radii of the poison ring, gadolinium densities, and number of rods per assembly, resulting in an almost flat criticality curve during the cycle. A reactivity swing of ≅1% ΔK can be easily controlled by an existing system of control rods. Comparison of the fuel cycle length of a gadolinium-controlled core with that of the reference, soluble, boron-controlled core indicated that there is no penalty due to residual poison at end of life. Unique guidelines for the fuel loading strategy were applied to find a practical fuel-shuffling scheme by which the design and operational constraints of a typical PWR core of current design were satisfied. Several problems should be solved for a practical implementation of the presented design relative to operational and safety requirements of the existing control rod system. Adequate movement of the regulating rods should be determined and shutdown margins of the safety rods should be ascertained. Final judgment of the feasibility of the concept may be made following the solution of these and other regulatory-related issues

  15. Reactive and Proactive Control in Incarcerated and Community Adolescents and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iselin, Anne-Marie R.; DeCoster, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the cognitive control skills of male incarcerated adolescents (n = 44), male control adolescents (n = 33), male incarcerated young adults (n = 41), and male control young adults (n = 35) using the AX-continuous performance test (AX-CPT). This test measures proactive control (the ability to maintain a mental representation of…

  16. Consumption of extra virgin olive oil improves body composition and blood pressure in women with excess body fat: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão Cândido, Flávia; Xavier Valente, Flávia; da Silva, Laís Emilia; Gonçalves Leão Coelho, Olívia; Gouveia Peluzio, Maria do Carmo; Gonçalves Alfenas, Rita de Cássia

    2017-08-14

    Despite the fact that extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is widely used in obese individuals to treat cardiovascular diseases, the role of EVOO on weight/fat reduction remains unclear. We investigated the effects of energy-restricted diet containing EVOO on body composition and metabolic disruptions related to obesity. This is a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial in which 41 adult women with excess body fat (mean ± SD 27.0 ± 0.9 year old, 46.8 ± 0.6% of total body fat) received daily high-fat breakfasts containing 25 mL of soybean oil (control group, n = 20) or EVOO (EVOO group, n = 21) during nine consecutive weeks. Breakfasts were part of an energy-restricted normal-fat diets (-2090 kJ, ~32%E from fat). Anthropometric and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were assessed, and fasting blood was collected on the first and last day of the experiment. Fat loss was ~80% higher on EVOO compared to the control group (mean ± SE: -2.4 ± 0.3 kg vs. -1.3 ± 0.4 kg, P = 0.037). EVOO also reduced diastolic blood pressure when compared to control (-5.1 ± 1.6 mmHg vs. +0.3 ± 1.2 mmHg, P = 0.011). Within-group differences (P group, and for serum creatinine (+0.04 ± 0.01 µmol/L) and alkaline phosphatase (-3.3 ± 1.8 IU/L) in the EVOO group. There was also a trend for IL-1β EVOO reduction (-0.3 ± 0.1 pg/mL, P = 0.060). EVOO consumption reduced body fat and improved blood pressure. Our results indicate that EVOO should be included into energy-restricted programs for obesity treatment.

  17. Environmental control implications of generating electric power from coal. 1977 technology status report. Appendix D. Assessment of NO/sub x/ control technology for coal fired utility boilers. [Low-excess-air, staged combustion, flu gas recirculation and burner design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    An NOx control technology assessment study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of low-excess-air firing, staged combustion, flue gas recirculation, and current burner/boiler designs as applied to coal-fired utility boilers. Significant variations in NOx emissions exist with boiler type, firing method, and coal type, but a relative comparison of emissions control performance, cost, and operational considerations is presented for each method. The study emphasized the numerous operational factors that are of major importance to the user in selecting and implementing a combustion modification technique. Staged combustion and low-excess-air operation were identified as the most cost-effective methods for existing units. Close control of local air/fuel ratios and rigorous combustion equipment maintenance are essential to the success of both methods. Flue gas recirculation is relatively ineffective and has the added concern of tube erosion. More research is needed to resolve potential corrosion concerns with low-NOx operating modes. Low-NOx burners in conjunction with a compartmentalized windbox are capable of meeting a 0.6-lb/million Btu emission level on new units. Advanced burner designs are being developed to meet research emission goals of approximately 0.25 lb/MBtu.

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic controls on silica reactivity: an analog for waste disposal media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, P.M.; Icenhower, J.

    1997-01-01

    Silicate glasses are currently being proposed as the disposal media for radioactive and other toxic wastes. The dissolution behaviour of borosilicate glass is incompletely understood. One approach is to simplify the chemistry and first develop a better understanding of vitreous silica (v-SiO 2 ) as a simple analog of waste glass. This article reviews all the knowledge that is known about the dissolution of silica. Studies quantifying the effects of temperature, solution pH, and single salts on dissolution rates of quartz suggest that pH and cation-dependent dissolution trends hold for all of the silica polymorphs. The purpose of this review is to develop a consistent picture of glass reactivity by understanding how the molecular arrangement of constituents within glass, beginning with the Si-O bond, affects the dissolution processes. (A.C.)

  19. Arsenic in groundwater of the Red River floodplain, Vietnam: Controlling geochemical processes and reactive transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Larsen, Flemming; Hue, N.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The mobilization of arsenic (As) to the groundwater was studied in a shallow Holocene aquifer on the Red River flood plain near Hanoi, Vietnam. The groundwater chemistry was investigated in a transect of 100 piezometers. Results show an anoxic aquifer featuring organic carbon decomposition......(III) but some As(V) is always found. Arsenic correlates well with NH4, relating its release to organic matter decomposition and the source of As appears to be the Fe-oxides being reduced. Part of the produced Fe(II) is apparently reprecipitated as siderite containing less As. Results from sediment extraction...... chemistry over depth is homogeneous and a reactive transport model was constructed to quantify the geochemical processes along the vertical groundwater flow component. A redox zonation model was constructed using the partial equilibrium approach with organic carbon degradation in the sediment as the only...

  20. Kinetic and thermodynamic controls on silica reactivity: an analog for waste disposal media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dove, P.M.; Icenhower, J. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Silicate glasses are currently being proposed as the disposal media for radioactive and other toxic wastes. The dissolution behaviour of borosilicate glass is incompletely understood. One approach is to simplify the chemistry and first develop a better understanding of vitreous silica (v-SiO{sub 2}) as a simple analog of waste glass. This article reviews all the knowledge that is known about the dissolution of silica. Studies quantifying the effects of temperature, solution pH, and single salts on dissolution rates of quartz suggest that pH and cation-dependent dissolution trends hold for all of the silica polymorphs. The purpose of this review is to develop a consistent picture of glass reactivity by understanding how the molecular arrangement of constituents within glass, beginning with the Si-O bond, affects the dissolution processes. (A.C.)

  1. Temperature controls oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production through uncoupling in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Koziel, Agnieszka; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory and phosphorylation activities, mitochondrial uncoupling, and hydrogen peroxide formation were studied in isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria during experimentally induced hypothermia (25 °C) and hyperthermia (42 °C) compared to the physiological temperature of resting muscle (35 °C). For nonphosphorylating mitochondria, increasing the temperature from 25 to 42 °C led to a decrease in membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and quinone reduction levels. For phosphorylating mitochondria, no temperature-dependent changes in these mitochondrial functions were observed. However, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation decreased, whereas the oxidation and phosphorylation rates and oxidative capacities of the mitochondria increased, with increasing assay temperature. An increase in proton leak, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed with increasing assay temperature, which could explain the reduced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Controlled formation of anatase and rutile TiO2 thin films by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon Rafieian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the formation of TiO2 thin films via DC reactive magnetron sputtering. The oxygen concentration during sputtering proved to be a crucial parameter with respect to the final film structure and properties. The initial deposition provided amorphous films that crystallise upon annealing to anatase or rutile, depending on the initial sputtering conditions. Substoichiometric films (TiOx<2, obtained by sputtering at relatively low oxygen concentration, formed rutile upon annealing in air, whereas stoichiometric films formed anatase. This route therefore presents a formation route for rutile films via lower (<500 °C temperature pathways. The dynamics of the annealing process were followed by in situ ellipsometry, showing the optical properties transformation. The final crystal structures were identified by XRD. The anatase film obtained by this deposition method displayed high carriers mobility as measured by time-resolved microwave conductance. This also confirms the high photocatalytic activity of the anatase films.

  3. Resonance Raman study on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase: Control of reactivity by substrate-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Hara, Masayuki [Graduate School of Life Science and Picobiology Institute, University of Hyogo, Koto 3-2-1, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu [Biometal Science Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Koto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ogura, Takashi, E-mail: ogura@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life Science and Picobiology Institute, University of Hyogo, Koto 3-2-1, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: • Indoleamine 2,3-dioygenase has been studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. • Trp-binding to the enzyme induces high frequency shift of the Fe–His stretching mode. • Increased imidazolate character of histidine promotes the O–O bond cleavage step. • A fine-tuning of the reactivity of the O–O bond cleavage reaction is identified. • The results are consistent with the sequential oxygen-atom-transfer mechanism. - Abstract: Resonance Raman spectra of ligand-bound complexes including the 4-phenylimidazole complex and of free and L-Trp-bound forms of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in the ferric state were examined. Effects on the vinyl and propionate substituent groups of the heme were detected in a ligand-dependent fashion. The effects of phenyl group of 4-phenylimidazole on the vinyl and propionate Raman bands were evident when compared with the case of imidazole ligand. Substrate binding to the ferrous protein caused an upshift of the iron–histidine stretching mode by 3 cm{sup −1}, indicating an increase in negativity of the imidazole ring, which favors the O–O bond cleavage. The substrate binding event is likely to be communicated from the heme distal side to the iron–histidine bond through heme substituent groups and the hydrogen-bond network which includes water molecules, as identified in an X-ray structure of a 4-phenylimidazole complex. The results provide evidence for fine-tuning of the reactivity of O–O bond cleavage by the oxygenated heme upon binding of L-Trp.

  4. A Reactive Power Based Reference Model for Adaptive Control Strategy in a SEIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Taghikhani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new control strategy is proposed for a three-phase squirrel-cage self-excited induction generator (SEIG connected to a variable speed wind turbine in autonomous mode. In order to improve the dynamic performance of the mentioned vector control system, a model reference adaptive controller is used for online rotor time constant estimation. Thus, the main drawbacks of this method, which include the effects of the changes in machine parameters on rotor flux estimation, slip speed, the creation of instability problems and the system leaving vector control mode, are resolved. In this control strategy, a PI controller is used to control the dc voltage and three similar hysteresis current controllers (HCC are used to control the switching of IGBTs. The results of the dynamic simulation indicate the desirable performance of the proposed system.

  5. Internally-directed cognition and mindfulness:An integrative perspective derived from reactive versus predictive control systems theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattie eTops

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we will apply the Predictive And Reactive Control Systems (PARCS theory as a framework that integrates competing theories of neural substrates of awareness by describing the default mode network (DMN and anterior insula (AI as parts of two different behavioral and homeostatic control systems. The DMN, a network that becomes active at rest when there is no external stimulation or task to perform, has been implicated in self-reflective awareness and prospection. By contrast, the AI is associated with awareness and task-related attention. This has led to competing theories stressing the role of the DMN in self-awareness versus the role of interoceptive and emotional information integration in the AI in awareness of the emotional moment. In PARCS, the respective functions of the DMN and AI in a specific control system explains their association with different qualities of awareness, and how mental states can shift from one state (e.g., prospective self-reflection to the other (e.g., awareness of the emotional moment depending on the relative dominance of control systems. These shifts between reactive and predictive control are part of processes that enable the intake of novel information, integration of this novel information within existing knowledge structures, and the creation of a continuous personal context in which novel information can be integrated and understood. As such, PARCS can explain key characteristics of mental states, such as their temporal and spatial focus (e.g., a focus on the here and now vs. the future; a 1st person vs. a 3rd person perspective. PARCS further relates mental states to brain states and functions, such as activation of the DMN or hemispheric asymmetry in frontal cortical functions. Together, PARCS deepens the understanding of a broad range of mental states, including mindfulness, mind wandering, rumination, autobiographical memory, imagery, and the experience of self.

  6. Climatic controls on water vapor deuterium excess in the marine boundary layer of the North Atlantic based on 500 days of in situ, continuous measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Steen-Larsen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous, in situ measurements of water vapor isotopic composition have been conducted in the North Atlantic, at the Bermuda Islands (32.26° N, 64.88° W, between November 2011 and June 2013, using a cavity ring-down spectrometer water vapor isotope analyzer and an autonomous self-designed calibration system. Meticulous calibration allows us to reach an accuracy and precision on 10 min average of δ18O, δ D, and d-excess of, 0.14, 0.85, and 1.1‰, verified using two parallel instruments with independent calibration. As a result of more than 500 days with 6-hourly data the relationships between deuterium excess, relative humidity (RH, sea surface temperature (SST, wind speed, and wind direction are assessed. From the whole data set, 84 % of d-excess variance is explained by a strong linear relationship with relative humidity. The slope of this relationship (−42.6 ± 0.4‰ % (RH is similar to the theoretical prediction of Merlivat and Jouzel (1979 for SST between 20 and 30 °C. However, in contrast with theory, no effect of wind speed could be detected on the relationship between d-excess and relative humidity. Separating the data set into winter, spring, summer, and autumn seasons reveals different linear relationships between d-excess and humidity. Changes in wind directions are observed to affect the relationships between d-excess and humidity. The observed seasonal variability in the relationship between d-excess and relative humidity underlines the importance of long-term monitoring to make accurate conclusions.

  7. Altered Brain Reactivity to Game Cues After Gaming Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyeon Min; Chung, Hwan Jun; Kim, Sang Hee

    2015-08-01

    Individuals who play Internet games excessively show elevated brain reactivity to game-related cues. This study attempted to test whether this elevated cue reactivity observed in game players is a result of repeated exposure to Internet games. Healthy young adults without a history of excessively playing Internet games were recruited, and they were instructed to play an online Internet game for 2 hours/day for five consecutive weekdays. Two control groups were used: the drama group, which viewed a fantasy TV drama, and the no-exposure group, which received no systematic exposure. All participants performed a cue reactivity task with game, drama, and neutral cues in the brain scanner, both before and after the exposure sessions. The game group showed an increased reactivity to game cues in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). The degree of VLPFC activation increase was positively correlated with the self-reported increase in desire for the game. The drama group showed an increased cue reactivity in response to the presentation of drama cues in the caudate, posterior cingulate, and precuneus. The results indicate that exposure to either Internet games or TV dramas elevates the reactivity to visual cues associated with the particular exposure. The exact elevation patterns, however, appear to differ depending on the type of media experienced. How changes in each of the regions contribute to the progression to pathological craving warrants a future longitudinal study.

  8. Optimal reactive power and voltage control in distribution networks with distributed generators by fuzzy adaptive hybrid particle swarm optimisation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shuheng; Hu, Weihao; Su, Chi

    2015-01-01

    A new and efficient methodology for optimal reactive power and voltage control of distribution networks with distributed generators based on fuzzy adaptive hybrid PSO (FAHPSO) is proposed. The objective is to minimize comprehensive cost, consisting of power loss and operation cost of transformers...... that the proposed method can search a more promising control schedule of all transformers, all capacitors and all distributed generators with less time consumption, compared with other listed artificial intelligent methods....... algorithm is implemented in VC++ 6.0 program language and the corresponding numerical experiments are finished on the modified version of the IEEE 33-node distribution system with two newly installed distributed generators and eight newly installed capacitors banks. The numerical results prove...

  9. Superconductors with excess quasiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elesin, V.F.; Kopaev, Y.V.

    1981-01-01

    This review presents a systematic kinetic theory of nonequilibrium phenomena in superconductors with excess quasiparticles created by electromagnetic or tunnel injection. The energy distributions of excess quasiparticles and of nonequilibrium phonons, dependence of the order parameter on the power and frequency (or intensity) of the electromagnetic field, magnetic properties of nonequilibrium superconductors, I-V curves of superconductor-insulator-superconductor junctions, and other properties are described in detail. The stability of superconducting states far from thermodynamic equilibrium is investigated and it is shown that characteristic instabilities leading to the formation of nonuniform states of a new type or phase transitions of the first kind are inherent to superconductors with excess quasiparticles. The results are compared with experimental data

  10. Design and development of improved ballscrew and control circuit for reactivity mechanisms of 220 MWe PHWR operating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.K.; Rama Mohan, N.; Mathew, Jimmy; Mathur, M.K.; Roy, S.; Ingle, V.J.; Ghoshal, B.; Ashok Kumar, B.; Patil, D.C.; Dwivedi, K.P.; Bhambra, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    There has been persistent failure of Ballscrews used for Reactivity Mechanism in standardised 220 MWe PHWR units. The detailed review of failures indicated that on one hand the number of demands for operation of Absorber Rod and Regulating Rod had increased due to use of digital circuit in the drive control system as compared analog circuits used earlier. On the other hand, the existing design of ballscrew had some inherent weaknesses to withstand the loads generated during starting and stopping of the regulating rods. To solve these problems two-pronged approach was adopted. The control problem was traced to overshooting of the servomotor of Absorber Rod and Regulating Rod to the full speed at the time of starting and thereafter, settling to the required speed. This sudden overshooting produces a jerk in the drive mechanism. A modified circuit has been evolved to solve this problem. Also, Changing the dead band and gain of control circuits have reduced the number of rod movements. A 'new design' of Ballscrew assembly was finalised by NPCIL with a view to withstand the severe loads generated during starting and stopping of the regulating rods and to achieve enhanced service life under water-lubrication condition. Based on this design, prototype assemblies were successfully manufactured by two Indian manufacturers. The design was cleared for manufacturing of the bulk production of Ballscrew assemblies after evaluation of its performance during rigorous 'Acceptance Testing'. Two ballscrews of new design were installed in the KGS-1 reactor and are operating since July 2005. This paper covers operational feedback including ballscrew failures in various units, Design/Development of Modified Reactivity Mechanism Ballscrews and Control Circuit based on analysis of underlying causes of failures and feedback on performance of new design. (author)

  11. Excess wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2005-01-01

    Expansion of wind power is an important element in Danish climate change abatement policy. Starting from a high penetration of approx 20% however, momentary excess production will become an important issue in the future. Through energy systems analyses using the EnergyPLAN model and economic...... analyses it is analysed how excess productions are better utilised; through conversion into hydrogen of through expansion of export connections thereby enabling sales. The results demonstrate that particularly hydrogen production is unviable under current costs but transmission expansion could...

  12. Navigation towards a goal position: from reactive to generalised learned control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire da Silva, Valdinei [Laboratorio de Tecnicas Inteligentes - LTI, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, trav.3, n.158, Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo (Brazil); Selvatici, Antonio Henrique [Universidade Nove de Julho, Rua Vergueiro, 235, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Reali Costa, Anna Helena, E-mail: valdinei.freire@gmail.com, E-mail: antoniohps@uninove.br, E-mail: anna.reali@poli.usp.br [Laboratorio de Tecnicas Inteligentes - LTI, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, trav.3, n.158, Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-03-01

    The task of navigating to a target position in space is a fairly common task for a mobile robot. It is desirable that this task is performed even in previously unknown environments. One reactive architecture explored before addresses this challenge by denning a hand-coded coordination of primitive behaviours, encoded by the Potential Fields method. Our first approach to improve the performance of this architecture adds a learning step to autonomously find the best way to coordinate primitive behaviours with respect to an arbitrary performance criterion. Because of the limitations presented by the Potential Fields method, especially in relation to non-convex obstacles, we are investigating the use of Relational Reinforcement Learning as a method to not only learn to act in the current environment, but also to generalise prior knowledge to the current environment in order to achieve the goal more quickly in a non-convex structured environment. We show the results of our previous efforts in reaching goal positions along with our current research on generalised approaches.

  13. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters.

  14. Navigation towards a goal position: from reactive to generalised learned control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire da Silva, Valdinei; Selvatici, Antonio Henrique; Reali Costa, Anna Helena

    2011-01-01

    The task of navigating to a target position in space is a fairly common task for a mobile robot. It is desirable that this task is performed even in previously unknown environments. One reactive architecture explored before addresses this challenge by denning a hand-coded coordination of primitive behaviours, encoded by the Potential Fields method. Our first approach to improve the performance of this architecture adds a learning step to autonomously find the best way to coordinate primitive behaviours with respect to an arbitrary performance criterion. Because of the limitations presented by the Potential Fields method, especially in relation to non-convex obstacles, we are investigating the use of Relational Reinforcement Learning as a method to not only learn to act in the current environment, but also to generalise prior knowledge to the current environment in order to achieve the goal more quickly in a non-convex structured environment. We show the results of our previous efforts in reaching goal positions along with our current research on generalised approaches.

  15. An Enhanced Instantaneous Circulating Current Control for Reactive power and Harmonic Load Sharing in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorzadeh, Iman; Askarian Abyaneh, Hossein; Savaghebi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    To address inaccurate load demand sharing problems among parallel inverter-interfaced voltage-controlled distributed generation (DG) units in islanded microgrids with different DG power ratings and mismatched feeder impedances, an enhanced voltage control scheme based on actively compensation of ...

  16. Flexible Conflict Management: Conflict Avoidance and Conflict Adjustment in Reactive Cognitive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignath, David; Kiesel, Andrea; Eder, Andreas B.

    2015-01-01

    Conflict processing is assumed to serve two crucial, yet distinct functions: Regarding task performance, control is adjusted to overcome the conflict. Regarding task choice, control is harnessed to bias decision making away from the source of conflict. Despite recent theoretical progress, until now two lines of research addressed these…

  17. Active and reactive power control schemes for distributed generation systems under voltage dips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, F.; Duarte, J.L.; Hendrix, M.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    During voltage dips continuous power delivery from distributed generation systems to the grid is desirable for the purpose of grid support. In order to facilitate the control of distributed generation systems adapted to the expected change of grid requirements, generalized power control schemes

  18. Reactive Power Control in Eight Bus System Using FC-TCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavelu Vijayakumar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the simulation of eight bus system having fixed capacitor and thyristor controlled reactor. The system is modeled and simulated using MATLAB.The simulation results are presented. The power and control circuits are simulated. The current drawn by the TCR varies with the variation in the firing angle. The simulation results are compared with the theoretical results.

  19. Quantitative sensory testing and pain-evoked cytokine reactivity: comparison of patients with sickle cell disease to healthy matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Claudia M; Carroll, C Patrick; Kiley, Kasey; Han, Dingfen; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Swedberg, Lauren; Edwards, Robert R; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder associated with significant morbidity, which includes severe episodic pain, and, often, chronic pain. Compared to healthy individuals, patients with SCD report enhanced sensitivity to thermal detection and pain thresholds and have altered inflammatory profiles, yet no studies to date have examined biomarker reactivity after laboratory-induced pain. We sought to examine this relationship in patients with SCD compared to healthy control participants. We completed quantitative sensory testing in 83 patients with SCD and sequential blood sampling in 27 of them, whom we matched (sex, age, race, body mass index, and education) to 27 healthy controls. Surprisingly, few quantitative sensory testing differences emerged between groups. Heat pain tolerance, pressure pain threshold at the trapezius, thumb, and quadriceps, and thermal temporal summation at 45°C differed between groups in the expected direction, whereas conditioned pain modulation and pain ratings to hot water hand immersion were counterintuitive, possibly because of tailoring the water temperature to a perceptual level; patients with SCD received milder temperatures. In the matched subsample, group differences and group-by-time interactions were observed in biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-4, and neuropeptide Y. These findings highlight the utility of laboratory pain testing methods for understanding individual differences in inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest amplified pain-evoked proinflammatory cytokine reactivity among patients with SCD relative to carefully matched controls. Future research is warranted to evaluate the impact of enhanced pain-related cytokine response and whether it is predictive of clinical characteristics and the frequency/severity of pain crises in patients with SCD.

  20. Optimization Based Shunt APF Controller to Mitigate Reactive Power, Burden of Neutral Conductor, Current Harmonics and Improve cosɸ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anjana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Modified Gravitational Search Algorithm (MGSA to improve the performance of PI controller in varying load condition. The proposed approach is capable of mitigating reactive power, neutral current, source current THD and significant improvement in power factor nearly unity (0.997. The DC link voltage across the capacitor is controlled by PI controller which is deciding the performance of shunt APF. Hence, the robust optimization technique based integral time square error (ITSE with consideration of weight factor (α & β, maximum overshoot ((|(∆_Ve ̅〖(n〗_max | and setling time t_s-t_0, is providing the optimum solution of Kp & Ki. The robustness of proposed objective function and algorithm compared with GSA based three other error criterion techniques. The efficiency of the proposed controller has been tested over nonlinear and unbalance loading condition. The performance of ITSE based MGSA-PI controller is batter then other three error criterion techniques. The values of THD are below the mark of 5% specified in IEEE-519 standard.

  1. Disposition of excess material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviews briefly the means available to an enrichment customer to dispose of excess material scheduled for delivery under a fixed-commitment contract, other than through termination of the related separative work. The methods are as follows: (1) sales; (2) use in facilities covered by other DOE contracts; and (3) assignment

  2. HIV Excess Cancers JNCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2010, an estimated 7,760 new cancers were diagnosed among the nearly 900,000 Americans known to be living with HIV infection. According to the first comprehensive study in the United States, approximately half of these cancers were in excess of what wo

  3. Scoparone attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation through controlling reactive oxygen species production and scavenging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Jang, Hae-Dong, E-mail: haedong@hnu.kr

    2015-02-15

    Scoparone, one of the bioactive components of Artemisia capillaris Thunb, has various biological properties including immunosuppressive, hepatoprotective, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. This study aims at evaluating the anti-osteoporotic effect of scoparone and its underlying mechanism in vitro. Scoparone demonstrated potent cellular antioxidant capacity. It was also found that scoparone inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and suppressed cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38-mediated c-Fos–nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling pathway. During osteoclast differentiation, the production of general reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anions was dose-dependently attenuated by scoparone. In addition, scoparone diminished NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression and activation via the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)–cSrc–phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k) signaling pathway and prevented the disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain system. Furthermore, scoparone augmented the expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT). The overall results indicate that the inhibitory effect of scoparone on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is attributed to the suppressive effect on ROS and superoxide anion production by inhibiting Nox1 expression and activation and protecting the mitochondrial electron transport chain system and the scavenging effect of ROS resulting from elevated SOD1 and CAT expression. - Highlights: • Scoparone dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. • Scoparone diminished general ROS and superoxide anions in a dose-dependent manner. • Scoparone inhibited Nox1 expression and

  4. Daily stressors and emotional reactivity in individuals with mild cognitive impairment and cognitively healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickenbach, Elizabeth Hahn; Condeelis, Kristen L; Haley, William E

    2015-06-01

    Daily experiences of stress are common and have been associated with worse affect among older adults. People with mild cognitive impairment (PWMCI) have measurable memory deficits in between normal cognition and dementia and have been identified as having greater psychological distress than cognitively healthy older adults (CHOAs). Little is known about whether daily stressors contribute to distress among PWMCI. We hypothesized that compared with CHOAs, PWMCI would have higher daily negative affect and lower daily positive affect, report greater numbers and severity of daily stressors, and experience greater emotional reactivity to daily stressors. Fifteen clinically diagnosed PWMCI and 25 CHOAs completed daily reports of stressors, stressor severity, and positive and negative affect over an 8-day period. PWMCI reported higher daily negative affect, lower daily positive affect, and higher numbers and greater severity of memory stressors but did not differ from CHOAs in numbers or severity of general stressors. Cognitive status was a moderator of the daily stress-affect relationship. Days with greater numbers and severity of general daily stressors were associated with higher negative affect only for PWMCI. The numbers and severity of memory stressors were not associated with negative affect. In addition, more severe general daily stressors and memory stressors were associated with lower positive affect for all participants. Results suggest that PWMCI are less resilient in the face of daily stress than are CHOAs in terms of negative affect, perhaps because of declines in reserve capacity. The study presents a promising approach to understanding stress and coping in predementia states of cognition. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. A Controlled Intervention to Promote a Healthy Body Image, Reduce Eating Disorder Risk and Prevent Excessive Exercise among Trainee Health Education and Physical Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Zali; O'Dea, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the impact of two interventions on body image, eating disorder risk and excessive exercise among 170 (65% female) trainee health education and physical education (HE & PE) teachers of mean (standard deviation) age 21.6 (2.3) who were considered an "at-risk" population for poor body image and eating disorders. In the first year…

  6. Supervisory Control for Real Time Reactive Power Flow Optimization in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milczarek, Adam; Vasquez, Juan Carlos; Malinowski, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    -line measurements. Similarly to any process system, MG hierarchical control is divided into three levels. However, an additional control algorithm is required to manage power transmission between sources and loads, maximizing efficiency and minimizing transmission losses. This real-time optimization problem......A microgrid (MG) is a local energy system consisting of a number of energy sources, energy storage units and loads that operate connected to the main electrical grid or autonomously. MGs include wind, solar or other renewable energy sources. MGs provide flexibility, reduce the main electricity grid...... dependence and contribute to change the large centralized production paradigm to local and distributed generation. However, such energy systems require complex management, advanced control and optimization. Interest on MGs hierarchical control has increased due to the availability of cheap on...

  7. Copper mediated controlled radical copolymerization of styrene and2-ethylhexyl acrylate and determination of their reactivity ratios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu Prasad Koiry

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Copolymerization is an important synthetic tool to prepare polymers with desirable combination of properties which are difficult to achieve from the different homopolymers concerned. This investigation reports the copolymerization of 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA and styrene using copper bromide (CuBr as catalyst in combination with N,N,N’,N,N- pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDETA as ligand and 1-phenylethyl bromide (PEBr as initiator. Linear kinetic plot and linear increase in molecular weights versus conversion indicate that copolymerization reactions were controlled. The copolymer composition was calculated using 1H NMR studies. The reactivity ratio of styrene and EHA (r1 and r2 were determined using the Finemann-Ross (FR, inverted Finemann-Ross (FR and Kelen-Tudos (KT methods. Thermal properties of the copolymers were also studied by using TGA and DSC analysis.

  8. Cumulative risk exposure moderates the association between parasympathetic reactivity and inhibitory control in preschool-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Ryan J; Roos, Leslie E; Farrar, Jessica D; Skowron, Elizabeth A

    2018-04-01

    A child's cumulative risk for early exposure to stress has been linked to alterations of self-regulation outcomes, including neurobiological correlates of inhibitory control (IC). We examined whether children's ability to engage the parasympathetic nervous system impacts how risk affects IC. Children ages 3-5 years completed two laboratory measures of IC while respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was measured, indexing parasympathetic activity. Children with greater risk demonstrated lower IC; risk also moderated associations between RSA reactivity and IC. For children with less risk, greater RSA withdrawal during IC tasks was associated with better IC. In contrast, greater risk was associated with poor IC, regardless of RSA withdrawal. Effects of risk were more pronounced for cumulative than individual measures. Results suggest that cumulative risk exposure disrupts connectivity between physiological and behavioral components of self-regulation in early childhood. Parasympathetic withdrawal to cognitive tasks may be less relevant for performance in developmental samples experiencing greater life stress. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Heated hatha yoga to target cortisol reactivity to stress and affective eating in women at risk for obesity-related illnesses: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Lindsey B; Medina, Johnna L; Baird, Scarlett O; Rosenfield, David; Powers, Mark B; Smits, Jasper A J

    2016-06-01

    Cortisol reactivity to stress is associated with affective eating, an important behavioral risk factor for obesity and related metabolic diseases. Yoga practice is related to decreases in stress and cortisol levels, thus emerging as a potential targeted complementary intervention for affective eating. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of a heated, hatha yoga intervention for reducing cortisol reactivity to stress and affective eating. Females (N = 52; ages 25-46 years; 75% White) at risk for obesity and related illnesses were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of Bikram Yoga practice or to waitlist control. Cortisol reactivity to a laboratory stress induction were measured at Weeks 0 (pretreatment) and 9 (posttreatment). Self-reported binge eating frequency and coping motives for eating were assessed at Weeks 0, 3, 6, and 9. Among participants with elevated cortisol reactivity at pretreatment ("high reactors"), those randomized to the yoga condition evidenced greater pre- to posttreatment reductions in cortisol reactivity (p = .042, d = .85), but there were not significant condition differences for the "low reactors" (p = .178, d = .53). Yoga participants reported greater decreases in binge eating frequency (p = .040, d = .62) and eating to cope with negative affect (p = .038, d = .54). This study provides preliminary support for the efficacy of heated hatha yoga for treating physiological stress reactivity and affective eating among women at risk for obesity-related illnesses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Verification of excess defense material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearey, B.L.; Pilat, J.F.; Eccleston, G.W.; Nicholas, N.J.; Tape, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The international community in the post-Cold War period has expressed an interest in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) using its expertise in support of the arms control and disarmament process in unprecedented ways. The pledges of the US and Russian presidents to place excess defense materials under some type of international inspections raises the prospect of using IAEA safeguards approaches for monitoring excess materials, which include both classified and unclassified materials. Although the IAEA has suggested the need to address inspections of both types of materials, the most troublesome and potentially difficult problems involve approaches to the inspection of classified materials. The key issue for placing classified nuclear components and materials under IAEA safeguards is the conflict between these traditional IAEA materials accounting procedures and the US classification laws and nonproliferation policy designed to prevent the disclosure of critical weapon-design information. Possible verification approaches to classified excess defense materials could be based on item accountancy, attributes measurements, and containment and surveillance. Such approaches are not wholly new; in fact, they are quite well established for certain unclassified materials. Such concepts may be applicable to classified items, but the precise approaches have yet to be identified, fully tested, or evaluated for technical and political feasibility, or for their possible acceptability in an international inspection regime. Substantial work remains in these areas. This paper examines many of the challenges presented by international inspections of classified materials

  11. A refinement-based approach to developing software controllers for reactive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, V.L.; Kapur, D.; Berg, R.S.

    1999-12-09

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how transformation can be used to derive a high integrity implementation of a train controller from an algorithmic specification. The paper begins with a general discussion of high consequence systems (e.g., software systems) and describes how rewrite-based transformation systems can be used in the development of such systems. The authors then discuss how such transformations can be used to derive a high assurance controller for the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system from an algorithmic specification.

  12. Reactor control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Akiyuki.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable three types of controls, that is, level control, scram control and excess reactivity control required for a reactor by a same mechanism by feeding neutron absorber liquid and pressure control gas to several blind pipes provided in the reactor core. Constitution: A plurality of blind pipes are disposed spaced apart in a reactor core and connected by way of injection pipes to a neutron absorber liquid tank. A pressure regulator is connected to the blind pipes, to which pressure control gas is supplied. The neutron absorber liquid used herein consists of sodium, potassium or their alloy, or mercury as a basic substance incorporated with one or more selected from boron, tantalum, rhenium, europium or their compounds. The level control, scram control and excess reactivity control can be attained by moderating the pressure changes in the pressure control gas or by regulating the fluctuation in the liquid level. (Horiughi, T.)

  13. Is blunted cardiovascular reactivity in depression mood-state dependent? A comparison of major depressive disorder remitted depression and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Kristen; Bylsma, Lauren M; White, Kristi E; Panaite, Vanessa; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Prior work has repeatedly demonstrated that people who have current major depression exhibit blunted cardiovascular reactivity to acute stressors (e.g., Salomon et al., 2009). A key question regards the psychobiological basis for these deficits, including whether such deficits are depressed mood-state dependent or whether these effects are trait-like and are observed outside of depression episodes in vulnerable individuals. To examine this issue, we assessed cardiovascular reactivity to a speech stressor task and a forehead cold pressor in 50 individuals with current major depressive disorder (MDD), 25 with remitted major depression (RMD), and 45 healthy controls. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure and impedance cardiography were assessed and analyses controlled for BMI and sex. Significant group effects were found for SBP, HR, and PEP for the speech preparation period and HR, CO, and PEP during the speech. For each of these parameters, only the MDD group exhibited attenuated reactivity as well as impaired SBP recovery. Reactivity and recovery in the RMD group more closely resembled the healthy controls. Speeches given by the MDD group were rated as less persuasive than the RMD or healthy controls' speeches. No significant differences were found for the cold pressor. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity and impaired recovery in current major depression may be mood-state dependent phenomena and may be more reflective of motivational deficits than deficits in the physiological integrity of the cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Traffic flow impacts of adaptive cruise control deactivation and (Re)activation with cooperative driver behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, G.; Li, M.; Minderhoud, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 in the Netherlands, a field operational test was carried out to study the effect of adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane departure warning on driver behavior and traffic flow in real traffic. To estimate the effect for larger penetration rates, simulations were needed. For a reliable

  15. ACTIVATION AND REACTIVITY OF NOVEL CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS FOR DRY SO2 CONTROL IN BOILERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemically modified calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) sorbents developed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL) for sulfur dioxide (SO2) control in utility boilers were tested in an electrically heated, bench-scale isotherma...

  16. Excessive crying in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Halpern

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: Excessive crying in the early months is a prevalent symptom; the pediatrician's attention is necessary to understand and adequately manage the problem and offer support to exhausted parents. The prescription of drugs of questionable action and with potential side effects is not a recommended treatment, except in extreme situations. The effectiveness of dietary treatments and use of probiotics still require confirmation. There is incomplete evidence regarding alternative treatments such as manipulation techniques, acupuncture, and use of the herbal supplements and behavioral interventions.

  17. An Optimal Reactive Power Control Strategy for a DFIG-Based Wind Farm to Damp the Sub-Synchronous Oscillation of a Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the auxiliary damping control with the reactive power loop on the rotor-side converter of doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG-based wind farms to depress the sub-synchronous resonance oscillations in nearby turbogenerators. These generators are connected to a series capacitive compensation transmission system. First, the damping effect of the reactive power control of the DFIG-based wind farms was theoretically analyzed, and a transfer function between turbogenerator speed and the output reactive power of the wind farms was introduced to derive the analytical expression of the damping coefficient. The phase range to obtain positive damping was determined. Second, the PID phase compensation parameters of the auxiliary damping controller were optimized by a genetic algorithm to obtain the optimum damping in the entire subsynchronous frequency band. Finally, the validity and effectiveness of the proposed auxiliary damping control were demonstrated on a modified version of the IEEE first benchmark model by time domain simulation analysis with the use of DigSILENT/PowerFactory. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that this derived damping factor expression and the condition of the positive damping can effectively analyze their impact on the system sub-synchronous oscillations, the proposed wind farms reactive power additional damping control strategy can provide the optimal damping effect over the whole sub-synchronous frequency band, and the control effect is better than the active power additional damping control strategy based on the power system stabilizator.

  18. ACTIVATION PARAMETERS AND EXCESS THERMODYANAMIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying these data, viscosity-B-coefficients, activation parameters (Δμ10≠) and (Δμ20≠) and excess thermodynamic functions, viz., excess molar volume (VE), excess viscosity, ηE and excess molar free energy of activation of flow, (GE) were calculated. The value of interaction parameter, d, of Grunberg and Nissan ...

  19. Characterization and temperature controlling property of TiAlN coatings deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.T.; Wang, J.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.A.; Fan, X.Y.; Wu, Z.G.; Yan, P.X.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) ternary coating is a potential material which is expected to be applied on satellite for thermal controlling. In order to investigate thermal controlling property, TiAlN coatings were deposited on Si wafers with different N 2 and Ar flux ratio by reactive magnetron co-sputtering. The structure, morphology, chemical composition and optical reflectance are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), atom force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectrophotometer, respectively. The orientation of the coatings depends on the N 2 /Ar flux ratio. The coatings deposited with N 2 /Ar ratio of 10, 30 and 60% show the cubic-TiN [2 2 0] preferred orientation and the coating deposited with N 2 /Ar ratio of 100% exhibits the phase of hexagonal-AlN and cubic-TiN. The surface of the coatings becomes more compact and smoother with the N 2 /Ar ratios increase. XPS spectrum indicates that the oxides (TiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 ), oxynitride (TiN x O y ) and nitrides (TiN and AlN x ) appear at the surface of the coatings. Ignoring internal power, the optimum equilibrium temperature of TiAlN coatings is 18 deg. C and the equilibrium temperature after heat-treated has slight change, which provides the prospective application on thermal controlling

  20. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, J. M.; Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Laan, G. van der; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2011-08-02

    The bioproduction of nano-scale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens, by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles has been investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicates the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimised biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently in the less harmful trivalent form.

  1. A translational investigation targeting stress-reactivity and prefrontal cognitive control with guanfacine for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Sherry A; Potenza, Marc N; Kober, Hedy; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Arnsten, Amy F T; Picciotto, Marina R; Weinberger, Andrea H; Ashare, Rebecca; Sinha, Rajita

    2015-03-01

    Stress and prefrontal cognitive dysfunction have key roles in driving smoking; however, there are no therapeutics for smoking cessation that attenuate the effects of stress on smoking and enhance cognition. Central noradrenergic pathways are involved in stress-induced reinstatement to nicotine and in the prefrontal executive control of adaptive behaviors. We used a novel translational approach employing a validated laboratory analogue of stress-precipitated smoking, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and a proof-of-concept treatment period to evaluate whether the noradrenergic α2a agonist guanfacine (3 mg/day) versus placebo (0 mg/day) reduced stress-precipitated smoking in the laboratory, altered cortico-striatal activation during the Stroop cognitive-control task, and reduced smoking following a quit attempt. In nicotine-deprived smokers (n=33), stress versus a neutral condition significantly decreased the latency to smoke, and increased tobacco craving, ad-libitum smoking, and systolic blood pressure in placebo-treated subjects, and these effects were absent or reduced in guanfacine-treated subjects. Following stress, placebo-treated subjects demonstrated decreased cortisol levels whereas guanfacine-treated subjects demonstrated increased levels. Guanfacine, compared with placebo, altered prefrontal activity during a cognitive-control task, and reduced cigarette use but did not increase complete abstinence during treatment. These preliminary laboratory, neuroimaging, and clinical outcome data were consistent and complementary and support further development of guanfacine for smoking cessation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Is impaired control of reactive stepping related to falls during inpatient stroke rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Avril; Inness, Elizabeth L; Wong, Jennifer S; Fraser, Julia E; McIlroy, William E

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with stroke fall more often than age-matched controls. Although many focus on the multifactorial nature of falls, the fundamental problem is likely the ability for an individual to generate reactions to recover from a loss of balance. Stepping reactions to recover balance are particularly important to balance recovery, and individuals with stroke have difficulty executing these responses to prevent a fall following a loss of balance. The purpose of this study is to determine if characteristics of balance recovery steps are related to falls during inpatient stroke rehabilitation. We conducted a retrospective review of individuals with stroke attending inpatient rehabilitation (n = 136). Details of falls experienced during inpatient rehabilitation were obtained from incident reports, nursing notes, and patient interviews. Stepping reactions were evoked using a "release-from-lean" postural perturbation. Poisson regression was used to determine characteristics of stepping reactions that were related to increased fall frequency relative to length of stay. In all, 20 individuals experienced 29 falls during inpatient rehabilitation. The characteristics of stepping reactions significantly related to increased fall rates were increased frequency of external assistance to prevent a fall to the floor, increased frequency of no-step responses, increased frequency of step responses with inadequate foot clearance, and delayed time to initiate stepping responses. Impaired control of balance recovery steps is related to increased fall rates during inpatient stroke rehabilitation. This study informs the specific features of stepping reactions that can be targeted with physiotherapy intervention during inpatient rehabilitation to improve dynamic stability control and potentially prevent falls.

  3. Effects of D-cycloserine on extinction of mesolimbic cue reactivity in alcoholism: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Falk; Kirsch, Martina; Bach, Patrick; Hoffmann, Sabine; Reinhard, Iris; Jorde, Anne; von der Goltz, Christoph; Spanagel, Rainer; Mann, Karl; Loeber, Sabine; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    Mesocorticolimbic reactivity to alcohol-associated cues has been shown to be associated with relapse to renewed drinking and to be decreased by cue-exposure-based extinction training (CET). Evidence from preclinical studies suggests that the extinction of conditioned alcohol-seeking behavior might be facilitated by drugs increasing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-associated memory consolidation. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of CET treatment supplemented with the partial NMDA-receptor agonist D-cycloserine (DCS) at reducing mesolimbic cue reactivity (CR), craving, and relapse risk in alcoholism. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, we recruited 76 recently detoxified abstinent alcohol-dependent patients. Thirty-two (16 DCS, 16 placebo) patients showed cue-induced ventral-striatal activation measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) prior to treatment and were thus included in the efficacy analyses. After inpatient detoxification, patients underwent nine sessions of CET spaced over 3 weeks, receiving either 50 mg DCS or placebo 1 h prior to each CET session. FMRI was conducted before treatment and 3 weeks after treatment onset. Following treatment with CET plus DCS, cue-induced brain activation in the ventral and dorsal striatum was decreased compared to treatment with CET plus placebo. Elevated posttreatment ventral striatal CR and increased craving (assessed using the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale) were associated with increased relapse risk. DCS was shown to augment the effect of CET for alcohol-dependent subjects. The interaction between craving and ventral-striatal CR on treatment outcome suggests that CET might be especially effective in patients exhibiting both high craving and elevated CR.

  4. Enhancing Carbon Reactivity in Mercury Control in Lignite-Fired Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad Wocken; Michael Holmes; John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Katie Brandt; Brandon Pavlish; Dennis Laudal; Kevin Galbreath; Michelle Olderbak

    2008-06-30

    This project was awarded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Program Solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41718-01. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) led a consortium-based effort to resolve mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. The EERC team-the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); the URS Corporation; the Babcock & Wilcox Company; ADA-ES; Apogee; Basin Electric Power Cooperative; Otter Tail Power Company; Great River Energy; Texas Utilities; Montana-Dakota Utilities Co.; Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc.; BNI Coal Ltd.; Dakota Westmoreland Corporation; the North American Coal Corporation; SaskPower; and the North Dakota Industrial Commission-demonstrated technologies that substantially enhanced the effectiveness of carbon sorbents to remove Hg from western fuel combustion gases and achieve a high level ({ge} 55% Hg removal) of cost-effective control. The results of this effort are applicable to virtually all utilities burning lignite and subbituminous coals in the United States and Canada. The enhancement processes were previously proven in pilot-scale and limited full-scale tests. Additional optimization testing continues on these enhancements. These four units included three lignite-fired units: Leland Olds Station Unit 1 (LOS1) and Stanton Station Unit 10 (SS10) near Stanton and Antelope Valley Station Unit 1 (AVS1) near Beulah and a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB)-fired unit: Stanton Station Unit 1 (SS1). This project was one of three conducted by the consortium under the DOE mercury program to systematically test Hg control technologies available for utilities burning lignite. The overall objective of the three projects was to field-test and verify options that may be applied cost-effectively by the lignite industry to reduce Hg emissions. The EERC, URS, and other team members tested sorbent injection technologies for plants equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and

  5. Effectiveness of reactive oral cholera vaccination in rural Haiti: a case-control study and bias-indicator analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivers, Louise C; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Teng, Jessica E; Almazor, Charles P; Jerome, J Gregory; Ternier, Ralph; Boncy, Jacques; Buteau, Josiane; Murray, Megan B; Harris, Jason B; Franke, Molly F

    2015-03-01

    Between April and June, 2012, a reactive cholera vaccination campaign was done in Haiti with an oral inactivated bivalent whole-cell vaccine. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of the vaccine in a case-control study and to assess the likelihood of bias in that study in a bias-indicator study. Residents of Bocozel or Grand Saline who were eligible for the vaccination campaign (ie, age ≥12 months, not pregnant, and living in the region at the time of the vaccine campaign) were included. In the primary case-control study, cases had acute watery diarrhoea, sought treatment at one of three participating cholera treatment units, and had a stool sample positive for cholera by culture. For each case, four control individuals who did not seek treatment for acute watery diarrhoea were matched by location of residence, enrolment time (within 2 weeks of the case), and age (1-4 years, 5-15 years, and >15 years). Cases in the bias-indicator study were individuals with acute watery diarrhoea with a negative stool sample for cholera. Controls were selected in the same manner as in the primary case-control study. Trained staff used standard laboratory procedures to do rapid tests and stool cultures from study cases. Participants were interviewed to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics, risk factors for cholera, and self-reported vaccination. Data were analysed by conditional logistic regression, adjusting for matching factors. From Oct 24, 2012, to March 9, 2014, 114 eligible individuals presented with acute watery diarrhoea and were enrolled, 25 of whom were subsequently excluded. 47 participants were analysed as cases in the vaccine effectiveness case-control study and 42 as cases in the bias-indicator study. 33 (70%) of 47 cholera cases self-reported vaccination versus 167 (89%) of 188 controls (vaccine effectiveness 63%, 95% CI 8-85). 27 (57%) of 47 cases had certified vaccination versus 147 (78%) of 188 controls (vaccine effectiveness 58%, 13-80). Neither self

  6. Controlling Fluences of Reactive Species Produced by Multipulse DBDs onto Wet Tissue: Frequency and Liquid Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    Tissue covered by a thin liquid layer treated by atmospheric pressure plasmas for biomedical applications ultimately requires a reproducible protocol for human healthcare. The outcomes of wet tissue treatment by dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) depend on the plasma dose which determines the integral fluences of radicals and ions onto the tissue. These fluences are controlled in part by frequency and liquid thickness. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of multipulse DBDs interacting with wet tissue. The DBDs were simulated for 100 stationary or random streamers at different repetition rates and liquid thicknesses followed by 10 s to 2 min of afterglow. At 100 Hz, NOaq and OHaq are mixed by randomly striking streamers, although they have different rates of solvation. NOaq is nearly completely consumed by reactions with OHaq at the liquid surface. Only H2O2aq, produced through OHaq mutual reactions, survives to reach the tissue. After 100 pulses, the liquid becomes ozone-rich, in which the nitrous ion, NO2-aq, is converted to the nitric ion, NO3-aq. Reducing the pulse frequency to 10 Hz results in significant fluence of NOaq to the tissue as NOaq can escape during the interpulse period from the liquid surface where OHaq is formed. For the same reason, NO2-aq can also reach deeper into the liquid at lower frequency. Frequency and thickness of the liquid are methods to control the plasma produced aqueous species to the underlying tissue. Work supported by DOE (DE-SC0001319) and NSF (CHE-1124724).

  7. Study on reactor power transient characteristics (reactor training experiments). Control rod reactivity calibration by positive period method and other experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Sunagawa, Takeyoshi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, it is reported about some experiments that have been carried out in the reactor training that targets sophomore of the department of applied nuclear engineering, FUT. Reactor of Kinki University Atomic Energy Research Institute (UTR-KINKI) was used for reactor training. When each critical state was achieved at different reactor output respectively in reactor operating, it was confirmed that the control rod position at that time does not change. Further, control rod reactivity calibration experiments using positive Period method were carried out for shim safety rod and regulating rod, respectively. The results were obtained as reasonable values in comparison with the nominal value of the UTR-KINKI. The measurement of reactor power change after reactor scram was performed, and the presence of the delayed neutron precursor was confirmed by calculating the half-life. The spatial dose rate measurement experiment of neutrons and γ-rays in the reactor room in a reactor power 1W operating conditions were also performed. (author)

  8. Elevated concentrations of C-reactive protein in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus are moderately influenced by glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morán, M; Guerrero-Romero, F

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether glycemic control results in decrease of C-reactive protein (CRP) in Type 2 diabetic subjects. Newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetic subjects were recruited and followed-up by 6-month intensive medical management. All the participants were carefully interviewed, clinically examined, and laboratory tested to exclude conditions likely to provoke an inflammatory response, which was an exclusion criterium. CRP was measured by automated microparticle enzyme immunoassay (IMx, Abbott Laboratories, USA). Two-hundred and forty-eight patients were included in the analysis of data. At baseline, average CRP levels were of 9.6 +/- 6.2 mg/l. Only 14 (5.7%) patients showed a fasting glucose equal or lower than 6.1 mmo/l (5.6 +/- 0.4 mmo/l); of them, 6 (42.8%) had elevated CRP levels (8.8 +/- 6.7 mg/l). The fasting glucose in the 234 (94.3%) non-controlled subjects was 13.1 +/- 4.8 mmol/l; of them 179 (76.5%) subjects showed elevated CRP levels (10.9 +/- 6.5 mg/I). At the end of the 6-month follow-up, the average fasting glucose and HbA1c in the overall group decreased from 12.5 +/- 5.0 to 9.0 +/- 1.6 mmol/l, p diabetic subjects.

  9. Reactive Power Control of Single-Stage Three-Phase Photovoltaic System during Grid Faults Using Recurrent Fuzzy Cerebellar Model Articulation Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faa-Jeng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new active and reactive power control scheme for a single-stage three-phase grid-connected photovoltaic (PV system during grid faults. The presented PV system utilizes a single-stage three-phase current-controlled voltage-source inverter to achieve the maximum power point tracking (MPPT control of the PV panel with the function of low voltage ride through (LVRT. Moreover, a formula based on positive sequence voltage for evaluating the percentage of voltage sag is derived to determine the ratio of the injected reactive current to satisfy the LVRT regulations. To reduce the risk of overcurrent during LVRT operation, a current limit is predefined for the injection of reactive current. Furthermore, the control of active and reactive power is designed using a two-dimensional recurrent fuzzy cerebellar model articulation neural network (2D-RFCMANN. In addition, the online learning laws of 2D-RFCMANN are derived according to gradient descent method with varied learning-rate coefficients for network parameters to assure the convergence of the tracking error. Finally, some experimental tests are realized to validate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  10. TRIGA control rod position and reactivity transient Monitoring by Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, R.; Palomba, M.; Sepielli, M.

    2008-01-01

    Plant sensors drift or malfunction and operator actions in nuclear reactor control can be supported by sensor on-line monitoring, and data validation through soft-computing process. On-line recalibration can often avoid manual calibration or drifting component replacement. DSP requires prompt response to the modified conditions. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Fuzzy logic ensure: prompt response, link with field measurement and physical system behaviour, data incoming interpretation, and detection of discrepancy for mis-calibration or sensor faults. ANN (Artificial Neural Network) is a system based on the operation of biological neural networks. Although computing is day by day advancing, there are certain tasks that a program made for a common microprocessor is unable to perform. A software implementation of an ANN can be made with Pros and Cons. Pros: A neural network can perform tasks that a linear program can not; When an element of the neural network fails, it can continue without any problem by their parallel nature; A neural network learns and does not need to be reprogrammed; It can be implemented in any application; It can be implemented without any problem. Cons: The architecture of a neural network is different from the architecture of microprocessors therefore needs to be emulated; it requires high processing time for large neural networks; and the neural network needs training to operate. Three possibilities of training exist: Supervised learning: the network is trained providing input and matching output patterns; Unsupervised learning: input patterns are not a priori classified and the system must develop its own representation of the input stimuli; Reinforcement Learning: intermediate form of the above two types of learning, the learning machine does some action on the environment and gets a feedback response from the environment. Two TRIGAN ANN applications are considered: control rod position and fuel temperature. The outcome obtained in this

  11. BN600 reactivity definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheltyshev, V.; Ivanov, A.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1980, the fast BN600 reactor with sodium coolant has been operated at Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant. The periodic monitoring of the reactivity modifications should be implemented in compliance with the standards and regulations applied in nuclear power engineering. The reactivity measurements are carried out in order to confirm the basic neutronic features of a BN600 reactor. The reactivity measurements are aimed to justify that nuclear safety is provided in course of the in-reactor installation of the experimental core components. Two reactivity meters are to be used on BN600 operation: 1. Digital on-line reactivity calculated under stationary reactor operation on power (approximation of the point-wise kinetics is applied). 2. Second reactivity meter used to define the reactor control rod operating components efficiency under reactor startup and take account of the changing efficiency of the sensor, however, this is more time-consumptive than the on-line reactivity meter. The application of two reactivity meters allows for the monitoring of the reactor reactivity under every operating mode. (authors)

  12. Attempts to identify a control system for chemical reactivity in the living state using virtual energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, B L; Bourke, C

    2001-07-01

    This thesis explores the activation of chemicals in metabolic systems from the viewpoint that this activation is under the control of elements of the space-sea in which the chemicals are immersed. Themselves inert, the chemicals are theorised to exploit a force or action issuing from space (fluctuation) and characterized by the homogeneity (termed symmetry) of this medium. The fluctuation is heterogenized upon collision with matter from the intervention of well recognized fields of gravity and electromagnetism at the instant of its issue to form the near field of radiation. Fractions of original space waves and of their intrinsic spin are produced resulting in the activation of the orbitals (valency) in the chemical itself. The thesis continues: the disturbed fluctuation must return to space, obliging in turn, a prior return to the homogeneous state requiring special restorative wave rearrangements known as resonance. The success of the restorative resonance is signalled by a singularity of the fluctuation now propelled to infinity (space), and the contingent chemical reactions thereby terminated. Compromise to this return can occur from many causes and, in its presence, activation of the orbitals continues. They now effectively constitute autonomous reactions alienated from the system as a whole. The thesis is supported from evidence from diverse fields such as space theory, history of quantum field theory in attempts to derive its meaning, dielectrics and the near field of electromagnetic radiation, electron-space interactions at the Fermi surface during phase transitions and evolution of equilibrium conditions in resonance phenomena. The utility of the hypothesis rests on recognition of the resonance condition at various points in the system sufficiently macroscopic as to be available clinically as an abrupt interface between physiology and pathology. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  13. A comparison of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) and Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) strategies at high load, low speed conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavuri, Chaitanya; Paz, Jordan; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Targeting high load-low speed, optimizations of RCCI and GCI strategies were performed. • The two strategies were compared in terms of performance, controllability and stability. • The optimum cases had high gross indicated efficiency (∼47%) and low NOx emissions. • RCCI strategy showed better combustion control but had higher soot emissions. • GCI strategy was relatively more sensitive to fluctuations in charge conditions. - Abstract: Past research has shown that Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) and Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) combustion are promising approaches to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions. However, the benefits have generally been confined to mid-load operating conditions. To enable practical application, these approaches must be able to operate over the entire engine map. A particularly challenging area is high load, low speed operation. Accordingly, the present work uses detailed CFD modeling and engine experiments to compare RCCI and GCI combustion strategies at a high load, low speed condition. Computational optimizations of RCCI and GCI combustion were performed at 20 bar gross indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) and 1300 rev/min. The optimum points from the two combustion strategies were verified using engine experiments and were used to make the comparisons between RCCI and GCI combustion. The comparison showed that both the strategies had very similar combustion characteristics with a near top dead center injection initiating combustion. A parametric study was performed to identify the key input parameters that control combustion for the RCCI and GCI strategies. For both strategies, the combustion phasing could be controlled by the start of injection (SOI) timing of the near TDC injection. The short ignition delay of diesel fuel gave the RCCI strategy better control over combustion than the GCI strategy, but also had a simultaneous tradeoff with soot emissions. With the GCI

  14. WWER safety analysis in case of simultaneous positive reactivity introduction by control rods withdrawal and pure condensate injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchin, A.; Ovdiienko, I.; Khalimonchuk, V.

    2011-01-01

    Results of calculation assessment of positive reactivity insertion rate are presented under condition of simultaneous effect on reactivity of two provided by WWER project reactivity operation systems - extract of regulation group and decrease of boron acid concentration. Showed that maximal positive reactivity insertion rate is achieved at hot zero power and it's too less than limit value 0.07β eff /sec defined by normative document 'Nuclear safety regulation of NPP with pressurized water reactors'. For given reasons concluded that necessity of application of the extended protection PZ-2 actuation time is absent on interval of pure condensate transportation for full exclusion of possibility of positive reactivity insertion simultaneously by two different operation systems. (Authors)

  15. An optimal reactive power control strategy for a DFIG-based wind farm to damp the sub-synchronous oscillation of a power system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Bin; Li, Hui; Wang, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the auxiliary damping control with the reactive power loop on the rotor-side converter of doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG)-based wind farms to depress the sub-synchronous resonance oscillations in nearby turbogenerators. These generators are connected to a series capaciti...

  16. Coordination of voltage and reactive power control in the extra high voltage substations based on the example of solutions applied in the national power system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Kołodziej

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents examples of coordination between automatic voltage and reactive power control systems (ARST covering adjacent and strongly related extra high voltage substations. Included are conclusions resulting from the use of these solutions. The Institute of Power Engineering, Gdańsk Division has developed and deployed ARST systems in the national power system for a dozen or so years.

  17. Evaluation of serum C-reactive protein levels in subjects with aggressive and chronic periodontitis and comparison with healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaparthy, Aruna; Kanaparthy, Rosaiah; Niranjan, Nandini

    2012-05-01

    Periodontal subgingival pathogens affect local and systemic immune responses and initiate an acute phase systemic inflammatory response characterized by the release of C-reactive proteins (CRPs). This study has been carried out to evaluate the serum concentration of CRPs, which can be used as a marker of periodontal disease as well as a risk indicator for cardiovascular diseases. In a retrospective study a total number of 45 subjects were selected from the outpatient department of periodontics a mean age of 40 years. Based on the periodontal status, the subjects were divided into 3 groups of 15 subjects each. Group I: Control group [with attachment loss (AL) ≤ 2 mm and pocket depth (PD) periodontitis (AL ≤ 5 mm), Group III: chronic periodontitis (AL ≥ 2 mm, PD ≥ 5 mm), which includes moderate and severe periodontitis. The clinical parameters recorded were plaque index,gingival index, bleeding index, probing PD, and clinical attachment levels and scoring was done on 6 surfaces of all teeth. For the CRP assessment, blood samples were collected from subjects at the time of clinical examination. Analysis of covariance was used for comparison of mean values between the groups to adjust the ages (P value periodontitis compared with controls. This was found to be statistically significant. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.012) was found in the CRP level between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and between groups I and III. The results of the present study indicated an increase in serum CRP levels in subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis as compared with the controls.

  18. Evaluation of serum C-reactive protein levels in subjects with aggressive and chronic periodontitis and comparison with healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaparthy, Aruna; Kanaparthy, Rosaiah; Niranjan, Nandini

    2012-01-01

    Background: Periodontal subgingival pathogens affect local and systemic immune responses and initiate an acute phase systemic inflammatory response characterized by the release of C-reactive proteins (CRPs). This study has been carried out to evaluate the serum concentration of CRPs, which can be used as a marker of periodontal disease as well as a risk indicator for cardiovascular diseases. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study a total number of 45 subjects were selected from the outpatient department of periodontics a mean age of 40 years. Based on the periodontal status, the subjects were divided into 3 groups of 15 subjects each. Group I: Control group [with attachment loss (AL) ≤ 2 mm and pocket depth (PD) periodontitis (AL ≤ 5 mm), Group III: chronic periodontitis (AL ≥ 2 mm, PD ≥ 5 mm), which includes moderate and severe periodontitis. The clinical parameters recorded were plaque index,gingival index, bleeding index, probing PD, and clinical attachment levels and scoring was done on 6 surfaces of all teeth. For the CRP assessment, blood samples were collected from subjects at the time of clinical examination. Analysis of covariance was used for comparison of mean values between the groups to adjust the ages (P value chronic periodontitis compared with controls. This was found to be statistically significant. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.012) was found in the CRP level between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and between groups I and III. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated an increase in serum CRP levels in subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis as compared with the controls. PMID:23087729

  19. Characterization and temperature controlling property of TiAlN coatings deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.T. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, J. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); National Key Laboratory of Surface Engineering, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.A.; Fan, X.Y.; Wu, Z.G. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yan, P.X. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute Chemical and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: pxyan@lzu.edu.cn

    2009-03-20

    Titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) ternary coating is a potential material which is expected to be applied on satellite for thermal controlling. In order to investigate thermal controlling property, TiAlN coatings were deposited on Si wafers with different N{sub 2} and Ar flux ratio by reactive magnetron co-sputtering. The structure, morphology, chemical composition and optical reflectance are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), atom force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectrophotometer, respectively. The orientation of the coatings depends on the N{sub 2}/Ar flux ratio. The coatings deposited with N{sub 2}/Ar ratio of 10, 30 and 60% show the cubic-TiN [2 2 0] preferred orientation and the coating deposited with N{sub 2}/Ar ratio of 100% exhibits the phase of hexagonal-AlN and cubic-TiN. The surface of the coatings becomes more compact and smoother with the N{sub 2}/Ar ratios increase. XPS spectrum indicates that the oxides (TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), oxynitride (TiN{sub x}O{sub y}) and nitrides (TiN and AlN{sub x}) appear at the surface of the coatings. Ignoring internal power, the optimum equilibrium temperature of TiAlN coatings is 18 deg. C and the equilibrium temperature after heat-treated has slight change, which provides the prospective application on thermal controlling.

  20. Cue-reactivity in behavioral addictions: A meta-analysis and methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcke, Katrin; Antons, Stephanie; Trotzke, Patrick; Brand, Matthias

    2018-05-23

    Background and aims Recent research has applied cue-reactivity paradigms to behavioral addictions. The aim of the current meta-analysis is to systematically analyze the effects of learning-based cue-reactivity in behavioral addictions. Methods The current meta-analysis includes 18 studies (29 data sets, 510 participants) that have used a cue-reactivity paradigm in persons with gambling (eight studies), gaming (nine studies), or buying (one study) disorders. We compared subjective, peripheral physiological, electroencephal, and neural responses toward addiction-relevant cues in patients versus control participants and toward addiction-relevant cues versus control cues in patients. Results Persons with behavioral addictions showed higher cue-reactivity toward addiction-relevant cues compared with control participants: subjective cue-reactivity (d = 0.84, p = .01) and peripheral physiological and electroencephal measures of cue-reactivity (d = 0.61, p buying disorders also showed higher cue-reactivity toward addiction-relevant cues compared with control cues: subjective cue-reactivity (d = 0.39, p = .11) and peripheral physiological and electroencephal measures of cue-reactivity (d = 0.47, p = .05). Increased neural activation was found in the caudate nucleus, inferior frontal gyrus, angular gyrus, inferior network, and precuneus. Discussion and conclusions Cue-reactivity not only exists in substance-use disorders but also in gambling, gaming, and buying disorders. Future research should differentiate between cue-reactivity in addictive behaviors and cue-reactivity in functional excessive behaviors such as passions, hobbies, or professions.

  1. Excessive crying in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Halpern

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Review the literature on excessive crying in young infants, also known as infantile colic, and its effects on family dynamics, its pathophysiology, and new treatment interventions. Data source: The literature review was carried out in the Medline, PsycINFO, LILACS, SciELO, and Cochrane Library databases, using the terms “excessive crying,” and “infantile colic,” as well technical books and technical reports on child development, selecting the most relevant articles on the subject, with emphasis on recent literature published in the last five years. Summary of the findings: Excessive crying is a common symptom in the first 3 months of life and leads to approximately 20% of pediatric consultations. Different prevalence rates of excessive crying have been reported, ranging from 14% to approximately 30% in infants up to 3 months of age. There is evidence linking excessive crying early in life with adaptive problems in the preschool period, as well as with early weaning, maternal anxiety and depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and other behavioral problems. Several pathophysiological mechanisms can explain these symptoms, such as circadian rhythm alterations, central nervous system immaturity, and alterations in the intestinal microbiota. Several treatment alternatives have been described, including behavioral measures, manipulation techniques, use of medication, and acupuncture, with controversial results and effectiveness. Conclusion: Excessive crying in the early months is a prevalent symptom; the pediatrician's attention is necessary to understand and adequately manage the problem and offer support to exhausted parents. The prescription of drugs of questionable action and with potential side effects is not a recommended treatment, except in extreme situations. The effectiveness of dietary treatments and use of probiotics still require confirmation. There is incomplete evidence regarding alternative treatments

  2. Differentiating Motivational from Affective Influence of Performance-contingent Reward on Cognitive Control: The Wanting Component Enhances Both Proactive and Reactive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Anne-Clémence; Giersch, Anne; Hoonakker, Marc; Capa, Rémi L; Bonnefond, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Positive affect strongly modulates goal-directed behaviors and cognitive control mechanisms. It often results from the presence of a pleasant stimulus in the environment, whether that stimulus appears unpredictably or as a consequence of a particular behavior. The influence of positive affect linked to a random pleasant stimulus differs from the influence of positive affect resulting from performance-contingent pleasant stimuli. However, the mechanisms by which the performance contingency of pleasant stimuli modulates the influence of positive affect on cognitive control mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these differentiated effects are the consequence of the activation of the motivational "wanting" component specifically under performance contingency conditions. To that end, we directly compared the effects on cognitive control of pleasant stimuli (a monetary reward) attributed in a performance contingent manner, and of random pleasant stimuli (positive picture) not related to performance, during an AX-CPT task. Both proactive and reactive modes of control were increased specifically by performance contingency, as reflected by faster reaction times and larger amplitude of the CNV and P3a components. Our findings advance our understanding of the respective effects of affect and motivation, which is of special interest regarding alterations of emotion-motivation interaction found in several psychopathological disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a Technology-Based Approach for Preventing Excess Weight Gain during Pregnancy among Women with Overweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana M. Chao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveOverweight/obesity and excess weight gain during pregnancy are associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Few interventions have been effective in limiting gestational weight gain among women with overweight or obesity. This pilot, randomized clinical trial compared treatment as usual (TAU to a lifestyle modification program delivered via phone for the prevention of excess gestational weight gain in women who had overweight or obesity.MethodsParticipants included 41 pregnant women with a body mass index (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (mean age = 28.7 ± 5.8 years; mean pre-gravid BMI = 31.2 ± 6.2 kg/m2; 54% black, 39% white. The intervention group (n = 20 received weekly telephone counseling sessions and used WiFi scales to monitor their weight from weeks 16 to 36 of pregnancy. We compared differences in weight and birth outcomes for the intervention vs. the TAU group (n = 21.ResultsThe intervention and TAU groups did not differ with respect to: gestational weight gain (15.5 ± 5.3 vs. 13.3 ± 6.8 kg, respectively; proportion gaining above the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommended weight range (83 vs. 70%; and weight gain from pre-pregnancy weight to 6 weeks postpartum (4.8 ± 4.6 vs. 3.0 ± 5.5 kg. Other birth and health outcomes also did not differ.ConclusionA telemedicine intervention designed to decrease logistical burden on participants was not more successful in reducing excessive weight gain during pregnancy as compared to TAU. Future studies should examine more intensive forms of remote treatment beginning earlier in pregnancy as well as interventions promoting a healthy weight prior to pregnancy.

  4. The Virtual Diphoton Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Stolarski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Interpreting the excesses around 750 GeV in the diphoton spectra to be the signal of a new heavy scalar decaying to photons, we point out the possibility of looking for correlated signals with virtual photons. In particular, we emphasize that the effective operator that generates the diphoton decay will also generate decays to two leptons and a photon, as well as to four leptons, independently of the new resonance couplings to $Z\\gamma$ and $ZZ$. Depending on the relative sizes of these effective couplings, we show that the virtual diphoton component can make up a sizable, and sometimes dominant, contribution to the total $2\\ell \\gamma$ and $4\\ell$ partial widths. We also discuss modifications to current experimental cuts in order to maximize the sensitivity to these virtual photon effects. Finally, we briefly comment on prospects for channels involving other Standard Model fermions as well as more exotic decay possibilities of the putative resonance.

  5. Abundance, Excess, Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rox De Luca

    2016-02-01

    Her recent work focuses on the concepts of abundance, excess and waste. These concerns translate directly into vibrant and colourful garlands that she constructs from discarded plastics collected on Bondi Beach where she lives. The process of collecting is fastidious, as is the process of sorting and grading the plastics by colour and size. This initial gathering and sorting process is followed by threading the components onto strings of wire. When completed, these assemblages stand in stark contrast to the ease of disposability associated with the materials that arrive on the shoreline as evidence of our collective human neglect and destruction of the environment around us. The contrast is heightened by the fact that the constructed garlands embody the paradoxical beauty of our plastic waste byproducts, while also evoking the ways by which those byproducts similarly accumulate in randomly assorted patterns across the oceans and beaches of the planet.

  6. Control of electrical resistivity of TaN thin films by reactive sputtering for embedded passive resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S.M.; Yoon, S.G.; Suh, S.J.; Yoon, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Tantalum nitride thin films were deposited by radio frequency (RF) reactive sputtering at various N 2 /Ar gas flow ratios and working pressures to examine the change of their electrical resistivity. From the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and four-point probe sheet resistance measurements of the TaN x films, it was found that the change of the crystalline structures of the TaN x films as a function of the N 2 partial pressure caused an abrupt change of the electrical resistivity. When the hexagonal structure TaN thin films changed to an f.c.c. structure, the sheet resistance increased from 16 Ω/sq to 1396 Ω/sq. However, we were able to control the electrical resistivity of the TaN thin film in the range from 69 Ω/sq to 875 Ω/sq, with no change in crystalline structure, within a certain range of working pressures. The size of the grains in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images seemed to decrease with the increase of working pressure

  7. Effect of Whey Supplementation on Circulating C-Reactive Protein: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ling-Mei; Xu, Jia-Ying; Rao, Chun-Ping; Han, Shufen; Wan, Zhongxiao; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Whey supplementation is beneficial for human health, possibly by reducing the circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) level, a sensitive marker of inflammation. Thus, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate their relationship. A systematic literature search was conducted in July, 2014, to identify eligible studies. Either a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model was used to calculate pooled effects. The meta-analysis results of nine trials showed a slight, but no significant, reduction of 0.42 mg/L (95% CI −0.96, 0.13) in CRP level with the supplementation of whey protein and its derivates. Relatively high heterogeneity across studies was observed. Subgroup analyses showed that whey significantly lowered CRP by 0.72 mg/L (95% CI −0.97, −0.47) among trials with a daily whey dose ≥20 g/day and by 0.67 mg/L (95% CI −1.21, −0.14) among trials with baseline CRP ≥3 mg/L. Meta-regression analysis revealed that the baseline CRP level was a potential effect modifier of whey supplementation in reducing CRP. In conclusion, our meta-analysis did not find sufficient evidence that whey and its derivates elicited a beneficial effect in reducing circulating CRP. However, they may significantly reduce CRP among participants with highly supplemental doses or increased baseline CRP levels. PMID:25671415

  8. Reduction in size of bottom-mounted reactivity control mechanism of research reactor for seismic qualification test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jongoh; Kim, Gyeongho; Yoo, Yeonsik; Cho, Yeonggarp; Kim, Jongin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    A new research reactor employing bottom-mounted reactivity control mechanism (RCM) is under development and its safety function which is a shutdown of the reactor under earthquake events should be verified through a test. However, the real system is too heavy to be excited artificially, and hence the size of a test rig should be reduced somehow. As a preliminary study for development of a seismic test rig, this paper presents how to reduce the length of an extension shaft which is a main component of RCM while it maintains dynamic characteristics of the real system. In this paper, instead of reduction in length of the shaft, the inner/outer radius of the shaft and water gap size between the shaft and its guide tube will be modified in order to match its natural frequency and displacement due to seismic excitation to those of the real system. Furthermore, a proper mass which does not increase the stiffness will be inserted into the hollow shaft. Then, dynamic equation was derived for the beam model and an optimization problem was defined and solved. The result shows that the design modification is reasonable for description of dynamic characteristics of the real system under earthquake events.

  9. Reduction in size of bottom-mounted reactivity control mechanism of research reactor for seismic qualification test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jongoh; Kim, Gyeongho; Yoo, Yeonsik; Cho, Yeonggarp; Kim, Jongin

    2013-01-01

    A new research reactor employing bottom-mounted reactivity control mechanism (RCM) is under development and its safety function which is a shutdown of the reactor under earthquake events should be verified through a test. However, the real system is too heavy to be excited artificially, and hence the size of a test rig should be reduced somehow. As a preliminary study for development of a seismic test rig, this paper presents how to reduce the length of an extension shaft which is a main component of RCM while it maintains dynamic characteristics of the real system. In this paper, instead of reduction in length of the shaft, the inner/outer radius of the shaft and water gap size between the shaft and its guide tube will be modified in order to match its natural frequency and displacement due to seismic excitation to those of the real system. Furthermore, a proper mass which does not increase the stiffness will be inserted into the hollow shaft. Then, dynamic equation was derived for the beam model and an optimization problem was defined and solved. The result shows that the design modification is reasonable for description of dynamic characteristics of the real system under earthquake events

  10. Real-Time Control of Active and Reactive Power for Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG-Based Wind Energy Conversion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Abdulla Tanvir

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modeling, rapid control prototyping, and hardware-in-the-loop testing for real-time simulation and control of a grid-connected doubly fed induction generator (DFIG in a laboratory-size wind turbine emulator for wind energy conversation systems. The generator is modeled using the direct-quadrature rotating reference frame circuit along with the aligned stator flux, and the field-oriented control approach is applied for independent control of the active and reactive power and the DC-link voltage at the grid side. The control of the active, reactive power and the DC-link voltage are performed using a back-to-back converter at sub- and super-synchronous as well as at variable speeds. The control strategy is experimentally validated on an emulated wind turbine driven by the Opal-RT real-time simulator (OP5600 for simultaneous control of the DC-link voltage, active and reactive power.

  11. Experimental investigations of effects of EGR on performance and emissions characteristics of CNG fueled reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Kalsi, Sunmeet; Subramanian, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • NO_x emission decreased drastically in RCCI engine with EGR. • CO and HC emissions decreased with 8% EGR. • Smoke emission increased with EGR but is still less than base diesel. • Brake thermal efficiency does not change with EGR up to 15% • 8% EGR is optimum based on less CO, HC, NO_x except smoke. - Abstract: Experimental: tests were carried out on a single cylinder diesel engine (7.4 kW rated power at 1500 rpm) under dual fuel mode (CNG-Diesel) with EGR (exhaust gas recirculation). Less reacting fuel (CNG) was injected inside the intake manifold using timed manifold gas injection system whereas high reactive diesel fuel was directly injected into the engine’s cylinder for initiation of ignition. EGR at different percentages (8%, 15% and 30%) was inducted to the engine through intake manifold and tests were conducted at alternator power output of 2 kW and 5 kW. The engine can operate under dual fuel mode with maximum CNG energy share of 85% and 92% at 5 kW and 2 kW respectively. The brake thermal efficiency of diesel engine improved marginally at 5 kW power output under conventional dual fuel mode with the CNG share up to 37% whereas the efficiency did not change with up to 15% EGR however it decreased beyond the EGR percentage. NO_x emission in diesel engine under conventional dual fuel mode decreased significantly and it further decreased drastically with EGR. The notable point emerged from this study is that CO and HC emissions, which are major problems at part load in reactivity controlled compression ignition engine (RCCI), decreased with 8% EGR along with further reduction of NO_x. However, smoke emission is marginally higher with EGR than without EGR but it is still less than conventional mode (Diesel alone). The new concept emerged from this study is that CO and HC emissions of RCCI engine at part load can be reduced using EGR.

  12. Dark chocolate attenuates intracellular pro-inflammatory reactivity to acute psychosocial stress in men: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebler, Ulrike; Arpagaus, Angela; Meister, Rebecca E; von Känel, Roland; Huber, Susanne; Ehlert, Ulrike; Wirtz, Petra H

    2016-10-01

    Flavanol-rich dark chocolate consumption relates to lower risk of cardiovascular mortality, but underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated the effect of acute dark chocolate consumption on inflammatory measures before and after stress. Healthy men, aged 20-50years, were randomly assigned to a single intake of either 50g of flavanol-rich dark chocolate (n=31) or 50g of optically identical flavanol-free placebo-chocolate (n=34). Two hours after chocolate intake, both groups underwent the 15-min Trier Social Stress Test. We measured DNA-binding-activity of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB (NF-κB-BA) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, as well as plasma and whole blood mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, prior to chocolate intake as well as before and several times after stress. We also repeatedly measured the flavanol epicatechin and the stress hormones epinephrine and cortisol in plasma and saliva, respectively. Compared to the placebo-chocolate-group, the dark-chocolate-group revealed a marginal increase in IL-10 mRNA prior to stress (p=0.065), and a significantly blunted stress reactivity of NF-κB-BA, IL-1β mRNA, and IL-6 mRNA (p's⩽0.036) with higher epicatechin levels relating to lower pro-inflammatory stress reactivity (p's⩽0.033). Stress hormone changes to stress were controlled. None of the other measures showed a significant chocolate effect (p's⩾0.19). Our findings indicate that acute flavanol-rich dark chocolate exerts anti-inflammatory effects both by increasing mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and by attenuating the intracellular pro-inflammatory stress response. This mechanism may add to beneficial effects of dark chocolate on cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Injury incidence, reactivity and ease of handling of horses kept in groups: A matched case control study in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keeling, L.J.; Bøe, K.E.; Christensen, Janne Winther

    2016-01-01

    evaluated. It was hypothesized that a more socially variable group composition has beneficial effects on behaviour, ease of handling and reducing reactivity whereas frequent changes in group composition has negative consequences, resulting in more injuries. We found that differences in treatment effects...... horses from groups and horses’ reactivity to a fearful stimulus. Using a matched case control design, 61 groups of horses were studied in Denmark, Norway, Finland and Sweden. They were allocated into groups of similar or different age and sex or where membership changed regularly or remained stable....... Injuries were recorded before mixing the horses into treatment groups, the day after mixing and four weeks later. Reactivity of horses to a moving novel object and the behaviour of a horse being removed from its group and the reactions of other group members towards this horse and the handler were...

  14. Effects of intensive glucose control on platelet reactivity in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Results of the CHIPS Study ("Control de Hiperglucemia y Actividad Plaquetaria en Pacientes con Sindrome Coronario Agudo").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, David; García-Rubira, Juan C; Bernardo, Esther; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Martín, Patricia; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Núñez-Gil, Iván; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased platelet reactivity and impaired prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Whether platelet reactivity can be reduced by lowering glucose in this setting is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the functional impact of intensive glucose control with insulin on platelet reactivity in patients admitted with ACS and hyperglycaemia. This is a prospective, randomised trial evaluating the effects of either intensive glucose control (target glucose 80-120 mg/dl) or conventional control (target glucose 180 mg/dl or less) with insulin on platelet reactivity in patients with ACS and hyperglycaemia. The primary endpoint was platelet aggregation following stimuli with 20 μM ADP at 24 h and at hospital discharge. Aggregation following collagen, epinephrine and thrombin receptor-activated peptide, as well as P2Y₁₂ reactivity index and surface expression of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P-selectin were also measured. Of the 115 patients who underwent random assignment, 59 were assigned to intensive and 56 to conventional glucose control. Baseline platelet functions and inhospital management were similar in both groups. Maximal aggregation after ADP stimulation at hospital discharge was lower in the intensive group (47.9 ± 13.2% vs 59.1 ± 17.3%; p=0.002), whereas no differences were found at 24 h. Similarly all other parameters of platelet reactivity measured at hospital discharge were significantly reduced in the intensive glucose control group. In this randomised trial, early intensive glucose control with insulin in patients with ACS presenting with hyperglycaemia was found to decrease platelet reactivity. Clinical Trial Registration Number http://www.controlledtrials.com/ISRCTN35708451/ISRCTN35708451.

  15. Effect of vitamin E supplementation on serum C-reactive protein level: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboori, S; Shab-Bidar, S; Speakman, J R; Yousefi Rad, E; Djafarian, K

    2015-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of chronic inflammation, has a major role in the etiology of chronic disease. Vitamin E may have anti-inflammatory effects. However, there is no consensus on the effects of vitamin E supplementation on CRP levels in clinical trials. The aim of this study was to systematically review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that report on the effects of vitamin E supplementation (α- and γ-tocopherols) on CRP levels. A systematic search of RCTs was conducted on Medline and EMBASE through PubMed, Scopus, Ovid and Science Direct, and completed by a manual review of the literature up to May 2014. Pooled effects were estimated by using random-effects models and heterogeneity was assessed by Cochran's Q and I(2) tests. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression analyses were also performed according to intervention duration, dose of supplementation and baseline level of CRP. Of 4734 potentially relevant studies, only 12 trials met the inclusion criteria with 246 participants in the intervention arms and 249 participants in control arms. Pooled analysis showed a significant reduction in CRP levels of 0.62 mg/l (95% confidence interval = -0.92, -0.31; P vitamin E-treated individuals, with the evidence of heterogeneity across studies. This significant effect was maintained in all subgroups, although the univariate meta-regression analysis showed that the vitamin E supplementation dose, baseline level of CRP and duration of intervention were not the sources of the observed heterogeneity. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that supplementation with vitamin E in the form of either α-tocopherol or γ-tocopherol would reduce serum CRP levels.

  16. Reactive recruitment of attentional control in math anxiety: an ERP study of numeric conflict monitoring and adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Suárez-Pellicioni

    Full Text Available This study uses event-related brain potentials (ERPs to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of numeric conflict monitoring in math-anxious individuals, by analyzing whether math anxiety is related to abnormal processing in early conflict detection (as shown by the N450 component and/or in a later, response-related stage of processing (as shown by the conflict sustained potential; Conflict-SP. Conflict adaptation effects were also studied by analyzing the effect of the previous trial's congruence in current interference. To this end, 17 low math-anxious (LMA and 17 high math-anxious (HMA individuals were presented with a numerical Stroop task. Groups were extreme in math anxiety but did not differ in trait or state anxiety or in simple math ability. The interference effect of the current trial (incongruent-congruent and the interference effect preceded by congruence and by incongruity were analyzed both for behavioral measures and for ERPs. A greater interference effect was found for response times in the HMA group than in the LMA one. Regarding ERPs, the LMA group showed a greater N450 component for the interference effect preceded by congruence than when preceded by incongruity, while the HMA group showed greater Conflict-SP amplitude for the interference effect preceded by congruence than when preceded by incongruity. Our study showed that the electrophysiological correlates of numeric interference in HMA individuals comprise the absence of a conflict adaptation effect in the first stage of conflict processing (N450 and an abnormal subsequent up-regulation of cognitive control in order to overcome the conflict (Conflict-SP. More concretely, our study shows that math anxiety is related to a reactive and compensatory recruitment of control resources that is implemented only when previously exposed to a stimuli presenting conflicting information.

  17. Reactive recruitment of attentional control in math anxiety: an ERP study of numeric conflict monitoring and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Pellicioni, Macarena; Núñez-Peña, María Isabel; Colomé, Àngels

    2014-01-01

    This study uses event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of numeric conflict monitoring in math-anxious individuals, by analyzing whether math anxiety is related to abnormal processing in early conflict detection (as shown by the N450 component) and/or in a later, response-related stage of processing (as shown by the conflict sustained potential; Conflict-SP). Conflict adaptation effects were also studied by analyzing the effect of the previous trial's congruence in current interference. To this end, 17 low math-anxious (LMA) and 17 high math-anxious (HMA) individuals were presented with a numerical Stroop task. Groups were extreme in math anxiety but did not differ in trait or state anxiety or in simple math ability. The interference effect of the current trial (incongruent-congruent) and the interference effect preceded by congruence and by incongruity were analyzed both for behavioral measures and for ERPs. A greater interference effect was found for response times in the HMA group than in the LMA one. Regarding ERPs, the LMA group showed a greater N450 component for the interference effect preceded by congruence than when preceded by incongruity, while the HMA group showed greater Conflict-SP amplitude for the interference effect preceded by congruence than when preceded by incongruity. Our study showed that the electrophysiological correlates of numeric interference in HMA individuals comprise the absence of a conflict adaptation effect in the first stage of conflict processing (N450) and an abnormal subsequent up-regulation of cognitive control in order to overcome the conflict (Conflict-SP). More concretely, our study shows that math anxiety is related to a reactive and compensatory recruitment of control resources that is implemented only when previously exposed to a stimuli presenting conflicting information.

  18. Application of a Virtual Reactivity Feedback Control Loop in Non-Nuclear Testing of a Fast Spectrum Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Forsbacka, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    For a compact, fast-spectrum reactor, reactivity feedback is dominated by core deformation at elevated temperature. Given the use of accurate deformation measurement techniques, it is possible to simulate nuclear feedback in non-nuclear electrically heated reactor tests. Implementation of simulated reactivity feedback in response to measured deflection is being tested at the Nasa Marshall Space Flight Center Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF). During tests of the SAFE-100 reactor prototype, core deflection was monitored using a high resolution camera. 'Virtual' reactivity feedback was accomplished by applying the results of Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to core deflection measurements; the computational analysis was used to establish the reactivity worth of various core deformations. The power delivered to the SAFE-100 prototype was then adjusted accordingly via kinetics calculations. The work presented in this paper will demonstrate virtual reactivity feedback as core power was increased from 1 kWt to 10 kWt, held approximately constant at 10 kWt, and then allowed to decrease based on the negative thermal reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  19. Comparison of DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity control methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ko, Won Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-08-01

    A method to reduce the fuel composition heterogeneity effect on the core performance parameters has been studied for the DUPIC fuel which is made of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuels by a dry refabrication process. This study focuses on the reactivity control method which uses either slightly enriched, depleted, or natural uranium to minimize the cost rise effect on the manufacturing of DUPIC fuel, when adjusting the excess reactivity of the spent PWR fuel. In order to reduce the variation of isotopic composition of the DUPIC fuel, the inter-assembly mixing operation was taken three times. Then, three options have been considered: reactivity control by slightly enriched and depleted uranium, reactivity control by natural uranium for high reactivity spent PWR fuels, and reactivity control by natural uranium for linear reactivity spent PWR fuels. The results of this study have shown that the reactivity of DUPIC fuel can be tightly controlled with the minimum amount of fresh uranium feed. For the reactivity control by slightly enriched and depleted uranium, all the spent PWR fuels can be utilized as the DUPIC fuel and the fraction of fresh uranium feed is 3.4% on an average. For the reactivity control by natural uranium, about 88% of spent PWR fuel can be utilized as the DUPIC fuel when the linear reactivity spent PWR fuels are used, and the amount of natural uranium feed needed to control the DUPIC fuel reactivity is negligible. 13 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs. (Author)

  20. Transmembrane Tumor Necrosis Factor Controls Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Activity via TNF Receptor 2 and Protects from Excessive Inflammation during BCG-Induced Pleurisy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Chavez-Galan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pleural tuberculosis (TB is a form of extra-pulmonary TB observed in patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC has been observed in animal models of TB and in human patients but their role remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the role of transmembrane TNF (tmTNF in the accumulation and function of MDSC in the pleural cavity during an acute mycobacterial infection. Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced pleurisy was resolved in mice expressing tmTNF, but lethal in the absence of tumor necrosis factor. Pleural infection induced MDSC accumulation in the pleural cavity and functional MDSC required tmTNF to suppress T cells as did pleural wild-type MDSC. Interaction of MDSC expressing tmTNF with CD4 T cells bearing TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2, but not TNFR1, was required for MDSC suppressive activity on CD4 T cells. Expression of tmTNF attenuated Th1 cell-mediated inflammatory responses generated by the acute pleural mycobacterial infection in association with effective MDSC expressing tmTNF and interacting with CD4 T cells expressing TNFR2. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the crucial role played by the tmTNF/TNFR2 pathway in MDSC suppressive activity required during acute pleural infection to attenuate excessive inflammation generated by the infection.

  1. Examining an underappreciated control on lignin decomposition in soils? Effects of reactive manganese species on intact plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, M.; Bougoure, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Kleber, M.; Nico, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    Lignin comprises a dominant proportion of carbon fluxes into the soil (representing up to 50% of plant litter and roots). Two lines of evidence suggest that manganese (Mn) acts as a strong controlling factor on the residence time of lignin in soil ecosystems. First, Mn content is highly correlated with litter decomposition in temperate and boreal forest soil ecosystems and, second, microbial agents of lignin degradation have been reported to rely on reactive Mn(III)-complexes to specifically oxidize lignin. However, few attempts have been made to isolate the mechanisms responsible for the apparent Mn-dependence of lignin decomposition in soils. Here we tested the hypothesis that Mn(III)-oxalate complexes may act as a perforating 'pretreatment' for structurally intact plant cell walls. We propose that these diffusible oxidizers are small enough to penetrate and react with non-porous ligno-cellulose in cell walls. This process was investigated by reacting single Zinnia elegans tracheary elements with Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in a continuous flow-through microreactor. The uniformity of cultured tracheary elements allowed us to examine Mn(III)-induced changes in cell wall chemistry and ultrastructure on the micro-scale using fluorescence and electron microscopy as well as synchrotron-based infrared and X-ray spectromicroscopy. Our results show that Mn(III)-complexes substantially oxidize specific lignin components of the cell wall, solubilize decomposition products, severely undermine the cell wall integrity, and cause cell lysis. We conclude that Mn(III)-complexes induce oxidative damage in plant cell walls that renders ligno-cellulose substrates more accessible for microbial lignin- and cellulose-decomposing enzymes. Implications of our results for the rate limiting impact of soil Mn speciation and availability on litter decomposition in forest soils will be discussed.

  2. Reactive sputter deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    In this valuable work, all aspects of the reactive magnetron sputtering process, from the discharge up to the resulting thin film growth, are described in detail, allowing the reader to understand the complete process. Hence, this book gives necessary information for those who want to start with reactive magnetron sputtering, understand and investigate the technique, control their sputtering process and tune their existing process, obtaining the desired thin films.

  3. Fuel element reactivity worth in different rings of the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes do Prado Souza, Rose Mary

    2008-10-29

    The thermal power of the IPR-R1 TRIGA Reactor will be upgraded from 100 kW to 250 kW. Starting core: loaded with 59 aluminum cladded fuel elements; 1.34 $ excess reactivity; and 100 kW power. It is planned to go 2.5 times the power licensed, i.e., 250 kW. This forces to enlarge the reactivity level. Nuclear reactors must have sufficient excess reactivity to compensate the negative reactivity feedback effects caused by: the fuel temperature, fuel burnup, fission poisoning production, and to allow full power operation for predetermined period of time. To provide information for the calculation of the new core arrangement, the reactivity worth of some fuel elements in the core were measured as well as the determination of the core reactivity increase in the substitution of the original fuels, cladded with aluminium, for new ones, cladded with stainless steel. The reactivity worth of fuel element was measured from the difference in critical position of the control rods, calibrated by the positive period method, before and after the fuel element was withdrawn from the core. The magnitude of reactivity increase was determined when withdrawing the original Al-clad fuel (a little burned up) and the graphite elements, and inserting a fresh Al-clad fuel element, one by one. Experimental results indicated that to obtain enough reactivity excess to increase the rector power the addition of 4 new fuel elements in the core would be sufficient: - Substitution of 4 Al-clad fuel elements in ring C for fresh stainless steel clad fuel elements; - increase the reactivity {approx_equal} 4 x 6.5 = 26 cents; - The removed 4 Al-clad F. E. (a little burned up) put in the core periphery, ring F, replacing graphite elements; - add < 4 x 39 156 cents (39 cents was measured with a fresh F.E.). Neutron source was changed from position F7 to F8. Control and Safety rods were moved from ring D to C in order to increase their reactivity worth. Regulating rod was kept at the same position, F16. Four

  4. Problematic Internet use, excessive alcohol consumption, their comorbidity and cardiovascular and cortisol reactions to acute psychological stress in a student population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbey, Adam; Phillips, Anna C; Ginty, Annie T; Carroll, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    Problematic Internet use and excessive alcohol consumption have been associated with a host of maladaptive outcomes. Further, low (blunted) cardiovascular and stress hormone (e.g. cortisol) reactions to acute psychological stress are a feature of individuals with a range of adverse health and behavioural characteristics, including dependencies such as tobacco and alcohol addiction. The present study extended this research by examining whether behavioural dependencies, namely problematic Internet use, excessive alcohol consumption, and their comorbidity would also be associated with blunted stress reactivity. A large sample of university students (N = 2313) were screened using Internet and alcohol dependency questionnaires to select four groups for laboratory testing: comorbid Internet and alcohol dependence (N = 17), Internet dependence (N = 17), alcohol dependence (N = 28), and non-dependent controls (N = 26). Cardiovascular activity and salivary cortisol were measured at rest and in response to a psychological stress protocol comprising of mental arithmetic and public speaking tasks. Neither problematic Internet behaviour nor excessive alcohol consumption, either individually or in combination, were associated with blunted cardiovascular or cortisol stress reactions. Discussion It is possible that problematic Internet behaviour and excessive alcohol consumption in a student population were not related to physiological reactivity as they may not reflect ingrained addictions but rather an impulse control disorder and binging tendency. The present results serve to indicate some of the limits of the developing hypothesis that blunted stress reactivity is a peripheral marker of the central motivational dysregulation in the brain underpinning a wide range of health and behavioural problems.

  5. Peripherally Administered Y2-Receptor Antagonist BIIE0246 Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity in Mice With Excess Neuropeptide Y, but Enhances Obesity in Control Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailanen, Liisa; Vähätalo, Laura H; Salomäki-Myftari, Henriikka; Mäkelä, Satu; Orpana, Wendy; Ruohonen, Suvi T; Savontaus, Eriika

    2018-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis in the level of central and sympathetic nervous systems (SNSs). Genetic silencing of peripheral Y 2 -receptors have anti-obesity effects, but it is not known whether pharmacological blocking of peripheral Y 2 -receptors would similarly benefit energy homeostasis. The effects of a peripherally administered Y 2 -receptor antagonist were studied in healthy and energy-rich conditions with or without excess NPY. Genetically obese mice overexpressing NPY in brain noradrenergic nerves and SNS (OE-NPY DβH ) represented the situation of elevated NPY levels, while wildtype (WT) mice represented the normal NPY levels. Specific Y 2 -receptor antagonist, BIIE0246, was administered (1.3 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 2 or 4.5 weeks to OE-NPY DβH and WT mice feeding on chow or Western diet. Treatment with Y 2 -receptor antagonist increased body weight gain in both genotypes on chow diet and caused metabolic disturbances (e.g., hyperinsulinemia and hypercholesterolemia), especially in WT mice. During energy surplus (i.e., on Western diet), blocking of Y 2 -receptors induced obesity in WT mice, whereas OE-NPY DβH mice showed reduced fat mass gain, hepatic glycogen and serum cholesterol levels relative to body adiposity. Thus, it can be concluded that with normal NPY levels, peripheral Y 2 -receptor antagonist has no potential for treating obesity, but oppositely may even induce metabolic disorders. However, when energy-rich diet is combined with elevated NPY levels, e.g., stress combined with an unhealthy diet, Y 2 -receptor antagonism has beneficial effects on metabolic status.

  6. Kinetic Controls on the Desorption/Dissolution of Sorbed U(VI) and their Influence on Reactive Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachara, John M.; Chongxuan Liu; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; McKinley, James P.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Brown, Gordon E. Jr.; Davis, James A.

    2006-01-01

    source to groundwater. (2) Measure desorption/dissolution rates of sorbed U(VI), quantify controlling factors, and develop descriptive kinetic models to provide a scientific basis to forecast U(VI) fluxes to groundwater, future plume dynamics, and long-term contaminant attenuation. (3) Establish reaction networks and determine geochemically/ physically realistic reaction parameters to drive state-of-the-art reactive transport modeling of U in vadose zone pore fluids and groundwater

  7. Kinetic Controls on the Desorption/Dissolution of Sorbed U(VI) and Their Influence on Reactive Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. M. Zachara; C. Liu; N. Qafoku; J. P. McKinley; J. A. Davis; D. Stoliker; Y. Arai; J. G. Catalano; G. E. Brown, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    disposal source to groundwater; (2) Measure desorption/dissolution rates of sorbed U(VI), quantify controlling factors, and develop descriptive kinetic models to provide a scientific basis to forecast U(VI) fluxes to groundwater, future plume dynamics, and long-term contaminant attenuation; and (3) Establish reaction networks and determine geochemically/ physically realistic reaction parameters to drive state-of-the-art reactive transport modeling of U in vadose zone pore fluids and groundwater

  8. Active and Reactive Power Control Strategy for Grid-Connected Six-Phase Generator by Using Multi-Modular Matrix Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Caballero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an active and reactive power control strategy based on predictive control approaches applied to gridconnected renewable energy systems. To accomplish this a multi-modular matrix converter topologies are used in combination with a simple but efficient grid synchronization strategy. The theoretical performance analysis is performed considering a six-phase wind energy generator system interconnected with the grid. Results based on a MATLAB/Simulink simulation environment are discussed and the most relevant characteristics of the proposed control technique are highlighted considering the total harmonic distortion and the mean squared error as a parameters of performance.

  9. Evaluation of the Prevention and Reactivation Care Program (PReCaP) for the hospitalized elderly: A prospective nonrandomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Asmus-Szepesi, Kirsten; Flinterman, Linda; Koopmanschap, Marc; Nieboer, Anna; Bakker, Ton; Mackenbach, Johan; Steyerberg, Ewout

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The hospitalized elderly are at risk of functional decline. We evaluated the effects and care costs of a specialized geriatric rehabilitation program aimed at preventing functional decline among at-risk hospitalized elderly. Methods: The prospective nonrandomized controlled trial reported here was performed in three hospitals in the Netherlands. One hospital implemented the Prevention and Reactivation Care Program (PReCaP), while two other hospitals providing usual car...

  10. Recent changes in anthropogenic reactive nitrogen compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronache, Constantin

    2014-05-01

    Significant anthropogenic perturbations of the nitrogen cycle are the result of rapid population growth, with mounting need for food and energy production. The increase of reactive nitrogen compounds (such as NOx, HNO3, NH3, and N2O) has a significant impact on human health, environment, and climate. NOx emissions contribute to O3 chemistry, aerosol formation and acidic precipitation. Ammonia is a notable atmospheric pollutant that may deteriorate ecosystems and contribute to respiratory problems. It reacts with acidic gases to form aerosols or is deposited back to ecosystems. The application of fertilizers accounts for most of the N2O production, adding to greenhouse gas emissions. We analyze the change of some reactive nitrogen compounds based on observations, in eastern United States. Results show that the control of NOx and SO2 emissions over the last decades caused a significant decrease of acidic deposition. The nitrate deposition is highest in eastern US, while the ammonium ion concentration is highest in central US regions. Overall, the inorganic nitrogen wet deposition from nitrate and ammonium is enhanced in central, and eastern US. Research shows that sensitive ecosystems in northeastern regions exhibit a slow recovery from the accumulated effects of acidic deposition. Given the growing demand for nitrogen in agriculture and industry, we discuss possible pathways to reduce the impact of excess reactive nitrogen on the environment.

  11. A randomized controlled trial to test the effect of multispecies probiotics on cognitive reactivity to sad mood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, L.; Sellaro, R.; van Hemert, S.; Bosch, J.A.; Colzato, L.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent insights into the role of the human microbiota in cognitive and affective functioning have led to the hypothesis that probiotic supplementation may act as an adjuvant strategy to ameliorate or prevent depression. Objective: Heightened cognitive reactivity to normal, transient

  12. THE IMPACT OF POWER COEFFICIENT OF REACTIVITY ON CANDU 6 REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. KASTANYA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of reactivity coefficients, along with other core nuclear characteristics, determine reactor core behavior in normal operation and accident conditions. The Power Coefficient of Reactivity (PCR is an aggregate indicator representing the change in reactor core reactivity per unit change in reactor power. It is an integral quantity which captures the contributions of the fuel temperature, coolant void, and coolant temperature reactivity feedbacks. All nuclear reactor designs provide a balance between their inherent nuclear characteristics and the engineered reactivity control features, to ensure that changes in reactivity under all operating conditions are maintained within a safe range. The CANDU® reactor design takes advantage of its inherent nuclear characteristics, namely a small magnitude of reactivity coefficients, minimal excess reactivity, and very long prompt neutron lifetime, to mitigate the demand on the engineered systems for controlling reactivity and responding to accidents. In particular, CANDU reactors have always taken advantage of the small value of the PCR associated with their design characteristics, such that the overall design and safety characteristics of the reactor are not sensitive to the value of the PCR. For other reactor design concepts a PCR which is both large and negative is an important aspect in the design of their engineered systems for controlling reactivity. It will be demonstrated that during Loss of Regulation Control (LORC and Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA events, the impact of variations in power coefficient, including a hypothesized larger than estimated PCR, has no safety-significance for CANDU reactor design. Since the CANDU 6 PCR is small, variations in the range of values for PCR on the performance or safety of the reactor are not significant.

  13. A micro-chip initiator with controlled combustion reactivity realized by integrating Al/CuO nanothermite composites on a microhotplate platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Ji Young; Lee, Hyung Woo; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Soo Hyung; Kim, Sang Beom; Kim, Ji Hoon; Jang, Nam Su; Kim, Dae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The interfacial contact area between the fuel and oxidizer components plays an important role in determining the combustion reactivity of nanothermite composites. In addition, the development of compact and reliable ignition methods can extend the applicability of nanothermite composites to various thermal engineering fields. In this study we report the development of a micro-chip initiator with controlled combustion reactivity using concepts usually applied to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and simple nanofabrication processes. The nanothermite composites fabricated in this study consisted of aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) as the fuel and copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) as the oxidizer accumulated on a silicon oxide substrate with a serpentine-shaped gold (Au) electrode. The micro-chip initiator rapidly ignited and exploded when minimal current was supplied. The effects of stacking structures of Al and CuO-based multilayers on the combustion properties were systematically investigated in terms of the pressurization rate, peak explosion time, and heat flow. Pressurization rates of 0.004–0.025 MPa μs −1 and heat flows of 2.0–3.8 kJ g −1 with a commonly fast response time of less than 20 ms could be achieved by simply changing the interfacial structures of the Al and CuO multilayers. The controllability of combustion reactivity of micro-chip initiator can be made for general nanothermite composites composed of Al and various metal oxides (e.g. Fe 2 O 3 , CuO, KMnO 4 , etc). The micro-chip initiator fabricated in this study was reliable, compact, and proved to be a versatile platform, exhibiting controlled combustion reactivity and fast response time, which could be used for various civilian and military thermal engineering applications, such as in initiators and propulsion, welding, and ordinance systems. (paper)

  14. Does excessive pronation cause pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, C G; Nielsen, Rasmus Gottschalk N; Rathleff, Michael Skovdal

    2008-01-01

    Excessive pronation could be an inborn abnormality or an acquired foot disorder caused by overuse, inadequate supported shoes or inadequate foot training. When the muscles and ligaments of the foot are insufficient it can cause an excessive pronation of the foot. The current treatment consist of ...

  15. Explaining excess morbidity amongst homeless shelter users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Lars; Birkelund, Jesper Fels

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: This article analyses excess morbidity amongst homeless shelter users compared to the general Danish population. The study provides an extensive control for confounding and investigates to what extent excess morbidity is explained by homelessness or other risk factors. METHODS: Data set...... includes administrative micro-data for 4,068,926 Danes who were 23 years or older on 1 January 2007. Nationwide data on shelter use identified 14,730 individuals as shelter users from 2002 to 2006. Somatic diseases were measured from 2007 to 2011 through diagnosis data from hospital discharges. The risk...... of somatic diseases amongst shelter users was analysed through a multivariate model that decomposed the total effect into a direct effect and indirect effects mediated by other risk factors. RESULTS: The excess morbidity associated with shelter use is substantially lower than in studies that did not include...

  16. The Next Step in Understanding Impaired Reactive Balance Control in People With Stroke: The Role of Defective Early Automatic Postural Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kam, Digna; Roelofs, Jolanda M B; Bruijnes, Amber K B D; Geurts, Alexander C H; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2017-08-01

    Postural muscle responses are often impaired after stroke. We aimed to identify the contribution of deficits in very early postural responses to poorer reactive balance capacity, with a particular focus on reactive stepping as a key strategy for avoiding falls. A total of 34 chronic stroke survivors and 17 controls were subjected to translational balance perturbations in 4 directions. We identified the highest perturbation intensity that could be recovered without stepping (single stepping threshold [SST]) and with maximally 1 step (multiple stepping threshold [MST]). We determined onset latencies and response amplitudes of 7 leg muscles bilaterally and identified associations with balance capacity. People with stroke had a lower MST than controls in all directions. Side steps resulted in a higher lateral MST than crossover steps but were less common toward the paretic side. Postural responses were delayed and smaller in amplitude on the paretic side only. We observed the strongest associations between gluteus medius (GLUT) onset and amplitude and MST toward the paretic side ( R 2 = 0.33). Electromyographic variables were rather weakly associated with forward and backward MSTs ( R 2 = 0.10-0.22) and with SSTs ( R 2 = 0.08-0.15). Delayed and reduced paretic postural responses are associated with impaired reactive stepping after stroke. Particularly, fast and vigorous activity of the GLUT is imperative for overcoming large sideways perturbations, presumably because it facilitates the effective use of side steps. Because people with stroke often fall toward the paretic side, this finding indicates an important target for training.

  17. Preparation of explosive nanoparticles in a porous chromium(III) oxide matrix: a first attempt to control the reactivity of explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comet, M; Siegert, B; Pichot, V; Gibot, P; Spitzer, D

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the first attempt to control the combustion and the detonation properties of a high explosive through its structure. A porous chromium(III) oxide matrix produced by the combustion of ammonium dichromate was infiltrated by hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The structure of the Cr 2 O 3 matrix was studied by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM); the Cr 2 O 3 /RDX nanocomposites were characterized by nitrogen adsorption. A mathematical model based on these techniques was used to demonstrate that the Cr 2 O 3 matrix encloses and stabilizes RDX particles at the nanoscale. The decomposition process of the nanocomposites was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The reactivity and sensitivity of the nanocomposites were studied by impact and friction tests, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), time-resolved cinematography and detonation experiments, and were correlated with their structure. The size of RDX nanoparticles and their distribution in the Cr 2 O 3 matrix have an important influence on their reactivity. The reactive properties of nanostructured RDX differ significantly from those of classical micron-sized RDX. For instance, the melting point disappears and the decomposition temperature is significantly lowered. The quantization of the explosive particles in the Cr 2 O 3 matrix decreases the sensitivity to mechanical stress and allows controlling the decomposition mode-i.e. combustion versus detonation

  18. Preparation of explosive nanoparticles in a porous chromium(III) oxide matrix: a first attempt to control the reactivity of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comet, M; Siegert, B; Pichot, V; Gibot, P; Spitzer, D [Laboratoire ISL/CNRS ' Nanomateriaux pour les Systemes Sous Sollicitations Extremes' (NS3E), FRE 3026, French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL), 5 rue du General Cassagnou, 68301 Saint-Louis (France)], E-mail: comet@isl.tm.fr

    2008-07-16

    This paper reports the first attempt to control the combustion and the detonation properties of a high explosive through its structure. A porous chromium(III) oxide matrix produced by the combustion of ammonium dichromate was infiltrated by hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The structure of the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix was studied by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM); the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RDX nanocomposites were characterized by nitrogen adsorption. A mathematical model based on these techniques was used to demonstrate that the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix encloses and stabilizes RDX particles at the nanoscale. The decomposition process of the nanocomposites was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The reactivity and sensitivity of the nanocomposites were studied by impact and friction tests, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), time-resolved cinematography and detonation experiments, and were correlated with their structure. The size of RDX nanoparticles and their distribution in the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix have an important influence on their reactivity. The reactive properties of nanostructured RDX differ significantly from those of classical micron-sized RDX. For instance, the melting point disappears and the decomposition temperature is significantly lowered. The quantization of the explosive particles in the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix decreases the sensitivity to mechanical stress and allows controlling the decomposition mode-i.e. combustion versus detonation.

  19. Digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copie, M.; Valantic, B.

    1978-01-01

    Digital reactivity meters (DRM) are mostly used as measuring instruments, e.g. for calibration of control rods, and there are only a few cases of their incorporation into the control systems of the reactors. To move in this direction there is more development work needed. First of all, fast algorithms are needed for inverse kinetics equations to relieve the computer for more important tasks of reactor model solving in real time. The next problem, currently under investigation, is the incorporation of the reactor thermal-hydraulic model into the DRM so that it can be used in the power range. Such an extension of DHM allows presentation not only of the instantaneous reactivity of the system, but also the inserted reactivity can be estimated from the temperature reactivity feed-backs. One of the applications of this concept is the anomalous digital reactivity monitor (ADRN) as part of the reactor protection system. As a solution of the first problem, a fast algorithm for solving the inverse kinetics equations has been implemented in the off-line program RODCAL on CDC 1700 computer and tested for its accuracy by performing different control rod calibrations on the reactor TRIGA

  20. Multi-objective optimal reactive power dispatch to maximize power system social welfare in the presence of generalized unified power flow controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Chintalapudi Venkata

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel non-linear optimization problem is formulated to maximize the social welfare in restructured environment with generalized unified power flow controller (GUPFC. This paper presents a methodology to optimally allocate the reactive power by minimizing voltage deviation at load buses and total transmission power losses so as to maximize the social welfare. The conventional active power generation cost function is modified by combining costs of reactive power generated by the generators, shunt capacitors and total power losses to it. The formulated objectives are optimized individually and simultaneously as multi-objective optimization problem, while satisfying equality, in-equality, practical and device operational constraints. A new optimization method, based on two stage initialization and random distribution processes is proposed to test the effectiveness of the proposed approach on IEEE-30 bus system, and the detailed analysis is carried out.

  1. Strong Coupling between Nanofluidic Transport and Interfacial Chemistry: How Defect Reactivity Controls Liquid-Solid Friction through Hydrogen Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Laurent; Tocci, Gabriele; Merabia, Samy; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-04-07

    Defects are inevitably present in nanofluidic systems, yet the role they play in nanofluidic transport remains poorly understood. Here, we report ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of the friction of liquid water on defective graphene and boron nitride sheets. We show that water dissociates at certain defects and that these "reactive" defects lead to much larger friction than the "nonreactive" defects at which water molecules remain intact. Furthermore, we find that friction is extremely sensitive to the chemical structure of reactive defects and to the number of hydrogen bonds they can partake in with the liquid. Finally, we discuss how the insight obtained from AIMD can be used to quantify the influence of defects on friction in nanofluidic devices for water treatment and sustainable energy harvesting. Overall, we provide new insight into the role of interfacial chemistry on nanofluidic transport in real, defective systems.

  2. Adaptive Reactive Power Control of PV Power Plants for Improved Power Transfer Capability under Ultra-Weak Grid Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Dongsheng; Wang, Xiongfei; Liu, Fangcheng

    2018-01-01

    with the unity power factor. Then, considering the reactive power compensation from PV inverters, the minimum SCR in respect to Power Factor (PF) is derived, and the optimized coordination of the active and reactive power is exploited. It is revealed that the power transfer capability of PV power plant under...... of a 200 MW PV power plant demonstrate that the proposed method can ensure the rated power transfer of PV power plant with the SCR of 1.25, provided that the PV inverters are operated with the minimal PF=0.9.......This paper analyzes the power transfer limitation of the PV power plant under the ultra-weak grid condition, i.e., when the Short-Circuit Ratio (SCR) is close to 1. It explicitly identifies that a minimum SCR of 2 is required for the PV power plant to deliver the rated active power when operating...

  3. Speciated OVOC and VOC emission inventories and their implications for reactivity-based ozone control strategy in the Pearl River Delta region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jiamin; Zheng, Junyu; Li, Rongrong; Huang, Xiaobo; Zhong, Zhuangmin; Zhong, Liuju; Lin, Hui

    2015-10-15

    The increasing ground-ozone (O3) levels, accompanied by decreasing SO2, NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations benefited from air pollution control measures implemented in recent years, initiated a serious challenge to control Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China. Speciated VOC emission inventory is fundamental for estimating Ozone Formation Potentials (OFPs) to identify key reactive VOC species and sources in order to formulate efficient O3 control strategies. With the use of the latest bulk VOC emission inventory and local source profiles, this study developed the PRD regional speciated Oxygenated Volatile Organic Compound (OVOC) and VOC emission inventories to identify the key emission-based and OFP-based VOC sources and species. Results showed that: (1) Methyl alcohol, acetone and ethyl acetate were the major constituents in the OVOC emissions from industrial solvents, household solvents, architectural paints and biogenic sources; (2) from the emission-based perspective, aromatics, alkanes, OVOCs and alkenes made up 39.2%, 28.2%, 15.9% and 10.9% of anthropogenic VOCs; (3) from the OFP-based perspective, aromatics and alkenes become predominant with contributions of 59.4% and 25.8% respectively; (4) ethene, m/p-xylene, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene and other 24 high OFP-contributing species were the key reactive species that contributed to 52% of anthropogenic emissions and up to 80% of OFPs; and (5) industrial solvents, industrial process, gasoline vehicles and motorcycles were major emission sources of these key reactive species. Policy implications for O3 control strategy were discussed. The OFP cap was proposed to regulate VOC control policies in the PRD region due to its flexibility in reducing the overall OFP of VOC emission sources in practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Controlling line-edge roughness and reactive ion etch lag in sub-150 nm features in borophosphosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Panda, Siddhartha; Edleman, Nikki L.; Allen, Scott D.; Wise, Richard; Mahorowala, Arpan

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a reactive ion etch (RIE) process in borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) for 150 nm line-and-space features, where line-edge roughness (LER) complemented with RIE lag becomes a major issue. Effect of flow rates and carbon-to-fluorine atomic ratio of fluorohydrocarbon gases was utilized to achieve acceptable process window allowing lower radio frequency powers therefore obtaining acceptable LER and RIE lag in the high-resolution features etched into BPSG

  5. Controlled formation of anatase and rutile TiO2 thin films by reactive magnetron sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Rafieian, Damon; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Savenije, T.J.; Lammertink, Rob G H

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the formation of TiO2 thin films via DC reactive magnetron sputtering. The oxygen concentration during sputtering proved to be a crucial parameter with respect to the final film structure and properties. The initial deposition provided amorphous films that crystallise upon annealing to anatase or rutile, depending on the initial sputtering conditions. Substoichiometric films (TiOx), obtained by sputtering at relatively low oxygen concentration, formed rutile upon annealing in air, ...

  6. Reactivity and reaction rate studies on the fourth loading of ZENITH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, I.R.; Freemantle, R.G.; Reed, D.L.; Wilson, D.J.

    1963-08-01

    The determination of the excess reactivity, control rod worths, prompt neutron lifetime, flux fine structure, and reaction rates of various nuclides for the fourth loading of the heated zero energy reactor ZENITH is described. The core contains 7.76 kg of U235, giving a carbon/U235 atom ratio of 7578, and forms the most dilute of the range studied. Comparisons of the experimental results with calculations using multigroup diffusion codes are presented. (author)

  7. Reactivity and reaction rate studies on the fourth loading of ZENITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, I R; Freemantle, R G; Reed, D L; Wilson, D J [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1963-08-15

    The determination of the excess reactivity, control rod worths, prompt neutron lifetime, flux fine structure, and reaction rates of various nuclides for the fourth loading of the heated zero energy reactor ZENITH is described. The core contains 7.76 kg of U235, giving a carbon/U235 atom ratio of 7578, and forms the most dilute of the range studied. Comparisons of the experimental results with calculations using multigroup diffusion codes are presented. (author)

  8. Reactive power compensator

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  9. Reactive power compensator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  10. Reactivity shimming in FFTF with safety rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor demonstrated operation at a 65% annual capacity factor in 1984 and a 70% annual capacity factor in 1985. This was achieved in part by extending the cycle lengths beyond the originally designed 100-day cycles. The advent of extended cycle lengths at the FFTF reactor led to the development of a contingency plan to shim some of the installed excess reactivity at the beginning of the cycle with the primary control rod bank (safety rods) in order to maintain the minimum required shutdown margin in the secondary shutdown system. This paper describes both the implementation of this plan in terms of the licensing aspects and the actual use of primary shim during cycles 5 and 6 operation at FFTF

  11. Molecular Control of the Nanoscale: Effect of Phosphine–Chalcogenide Reactivity on CdS–CdSe Nanocrystal Composition and Morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruberu, T. Purnima A.; Albright, Haley R.; Callis, Brandon; Ward, Brittney; Cisneros, Joana; Fan, Hua-Jun; Vela, Javier

    2012-04-22

    We demonstrate molecular control of nanoscale composition, alloying, and morphology (aspect ratio) in CdS–CdSe nanocrystal dots and rods by modulating the chemical reactivity of phosphine–chalcogenide precursors. Specific molecular precursors studied were sulfides and selenides of triphenylphosphite (TPP), diphenylpropylphosphine (DPP), tributylphosphine (TBP), trioctylphosphine (TOP), and hexaethylphosphorustriamide (HPT). Computational (DFT), NMR (31P and 77Se), and high-temperature crossover studies unambiguously confirm a chemical bonding interaction between phosphorus and chalcogen atoms in all precursors. Phosphine–chalcogenide precursor reactivity increases in the order: TPPE < DPPE < TBPE < TOPE < HPTE (E = S, Se). For a given phosphine, the selenide is always more reactive than the sulfide. CdS1–xSex quantum dots were synthesized via single injection of a R3PS–R3PSe mixture to cadmium oleate at 250 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV/Vis and PL optical spectroscopy reveal that relative R3PS and R3PSe reactivity dictates CdS1–xSex dot chalcogen content and the extent of radial alloying (alloys vs core/shells). CdS, CdSe, and CdS1–xSex quantum rods were synthesized by injection of a single R3PE (E = S or Se) precursor or a R3PS–R3PSe mixture to cadmium–phosphonate at 320 or 250 °C. XRD and TEM reveal that the length-to-diameter aspect ratio of CdS and CdSe nanorods is inversely proportional to R3PE precursor reactivity. Purposely matching or mismatching R3PS–R3PSe precursor reactivity leads to CdS1–xSex nanorods without or with axial composition gradients, respectively. We expect these observations will lead to scalable and highly predictable “bottom-up” programmed syntheses of finely heterostructured nanomaterials with well-defined architectures and properties that are tailored for precise applications.

  12. Developing Master Keys to Brain Pathology, Cancer and Aging from the Structural Biology of Proteins Controlling Reactive Oxygen Species and DNA Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Fan, Li; Tainer, John A.

    2007-01-01

    This review is focused on proteins with key roles in pathways controlling either reactive oxygen species or DNA damage responses, both of which are essential for preserving the nervous system. An imbalance of reactive oxygen species or inappropriate DNA damage response likely causes mutational or cytotoxic outcomes, which may lead to cancer and/or aging phenotypes. Moreover, individuals with hereditary disorders in proteins of these cellular pathways have significant neurological abnormalities. Mutations in a superoxide dismutase, which removes oxygen free radicals, may cause the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Additionally, DNA repair disorders that affect the brain to varying extents include ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder, Cockayne syndrome or Werner syndrome. Here, we highlight recent advances gained through structural biochemistry studies on enzymes linked to these disorders and other related enzymes acting within the same cellular pathways. We describe the current understanding of how these vital proteins coordinate chemical steps and integrate cellular signaling and response events. Significantly, these structural studies may provide a set of master keys to developing a unified understanding of the survival mechanisms utilized after insults by reactive oxygen species and genotoxic agents, and also provide a basis for developing an informed intervention in brain tumor and neurodegenerative disease progression. PMID:17174478

  13. A double blind, placebo-controlled study of the effects of post-retrieval propranolol on reconsolidation of memory for craving and cue reactivity in cocaine dependent humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Michael E; Gray, Kevin M; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Larowe, Steven D; Yeatts, Sharon D; Baker, Nathaniel L; Hartwell, Karen J; Brady, Kathleen T

    2013-04-01

    This study examined the effects of propranolol vs. placebo, administered immediately after a "retrieval" session of cocaine cue exposure (CCE), on craving and physiological responses occurring 24 h later during a subsequent "test" session of CCE. It was hypothesized that compared to placebo-treated cocaine-dependent (CD) individuals, propranolol-treated CD individuals would evidence attenuated craving and physiological reactivity during the test session. Secondarily, it was expected that group differences identified in the test session would be evident at a 1-week follow-up CCE session. Exploratory analyses of treatment effects on cocaine use were also performed at follow-up. CD participants received either 40 mg propranolol or placebo immediately following a "retrieval" CCE session. The next day, participants received a "test" session of CCE that was identical to the "retrieval" session except no medication was administered. Participants underwent a "follow-up" CCE session 1 week later. Craving and other reactivity measures were obtained at multiple time points during the CCE sessions. Propranolol- vs. placebo-treated participants evidenced significantly greater attenuation of craving and cardiovascular reactivity during the test session. Analysis of the follow-up CCE session data did not reveal any group differences. Although there was no evidence of treatment effects on cocaine use during follow-up, this study was insufficiently powered to rigorously evaluate differential cocaine use. This double-blind, placebo-controlled laboratory study provides the first evidence that propranolol administration following CCE may modulate memories for learning processes that subserve cocaine craving/cue reactivity in CD humans. Alternative interpretations of the findings were considered, and implications of the results for treatment were noted.

  14. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  15. Individual differences in emotion-cognition interactions: Emotional valence interacts with serotonin transporter genotype to influence brain systems involved in emotional reactivity and cognitive control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eStollstorff

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR influences emotional reactivity and attentional bias towards or away from emotional stimuli and has been implicated in psychopathological states, such as depression and anxiety disorder. The short allele is associated with increased reactivity and attention towards negatively-valenced emotional information, whereas the long allele is associated with that towards positively-valenced emotional information. The neural basis for individual differences in the ability to exert cognitive control over these bottom-up biases in emotional reactivity and attention is unknown, an issue investigated in the present study. Two groups, homozygous 5-HTTLPR long allele carriers or homozygous short allele carriers, underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while completing an Emotional Stroop-like task that varied with regards to the congruency of task-relevant and task-irrelevant information and the emotional valence of the task-irrelevant information. Behaviorally, participants demonstrated the classic Stroop effect (slower responses for incongruent than congruent trials, which did not differ by 5-HTTLPR genotype. However, fMRI results revealed that genotype influenced the degree to which neural systems were engaged depending on the valence of the conflicting task-irrelevant information. While the Long group recruited prefrontal control regions and superior temporal sulcus during conflict when task-irrelevant information was positively-valenced, the "Short" group recruited these regions when task-irrelevant information was negatively-valenced. Thus, participants successfully engaged cognitive control to overcome conflict in an emotional context using similar neural circuitry, but the engagement of this circuitry depended on emotional valence and 5-HTTLPR status. These results suggest that the interplay between emotion and cognition is modulated, in part, by a genetic polymorphism that influences serotonin

  16. Voltage sensitivity based reactive power control on VSC-HVDC in a wind farm connected hybrid multi-infeed HVDC system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    With increasing application of both Line Commutated Converter based High Voltage Direct Current (LCC-HVDC) systems and Voltage Source Converter based HVDC (VSC-HVDC) links, a new type of system structure named Hybrid Multi-Infeed HVDC (HMIDC) system is formed in the modern power systems. This paper...... presents the operation and control method of the wind farm connected HMIDC system. The wind power fluctuation takes large influence to the system voltages. In order to reduce the voltage fluctuation of LCC-HVDC infeed bus caused by the wind power variation, a voltage sensitivity-based reactive power...

  17. Regarding KUR Reactivity Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamori, Akira; Hasegawa, Kei; Tsuchiyama, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Okumura, Ryo; Sano, Tadafumi

    2012-01-01

    This article reported: (1) the outline of the reactivity measurement system of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), (2) the calibration data of control rod, (3) the problems and the countermeasures for range switching of linear output meter. For the laptop PC for the reactivity measurement system, there are four input signals: (1) linear output meter, (2) logarithmic output meter, (3) core temperature gauge, and (4) control rod position. The hardware of reactivity measurement system is controlled with Labview installed on the laptop. Output, reactivity, reactor period, and the change in reactivity due to temperature effect or Xenon effect are internally calculated and displayed in real-time with Labview based on the four signals above. Calculation results are recorded in the form of a spreadsheet. At KUR, the reactor core arrangement was changed, so the control rod was re-calibrated. At this time, calculated and experimental values of reactivity based on the reactivity measurement system were compared, and it was confirmed that the reactivity calculation by Labview was accurate. The range switching of linear output meter in the nuclear instrumentation should automatically change within the laptop, however sometimes this did not function properly in the early stage. It was speculated that undefined percent values during the transition of percent value were included in the calculation and caused calculation errors. The range switching started working properly after fixing this issue. (S.K.)

  18. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: Quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling.

  19. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 40 CFR 57.304 - Bypass, excess emissions and malfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (performance level of interim constant controls) or § 57.303 (plantwide emission limitation) of this subpart... limitation, as well as the operating data, documents, and calculations used in determining the magnitude of the excess emissions; (3) Time and duration of the excess emissions; (4) Identity of the equipment...

  1. Contrast induced hyperthyroidism due to iodine excess

    OpenAIRE

    Mushtaq, Usman; Price, Timothy; Laddipeerla, Narsing; Townsend, Amanda; Broadbridge, Vy

    2009-01-01

    Iodine induced hyperthyroidism is a thyrotoxic condition caused by exposure to excessive iodine. Historically this type of hyperthyroidism has been described in areas of iodine deficiency. With advances in medicine, iodine induced hyperthyroidism has been observed following the use of drugs containing iodine—for example, amiodarone, and contrast agents used in radiological imaging. In elderly patients it is frequently difficult to diagnose and control contrast related hyperthyroidism, as most...

  2. Comparison of DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity control methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ko, Won Il

    1999-08-01

    A method to reduce the fuel composition heterogeneity effect on the core performance parameters has been studied for the DUPIC fuel which is made of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuels by a dry refabrication process. This study focuses on the reactivity control method which uses either slightly enriched, depleted, or natural uranium to minimize the cost rise effect on the manufacturing of DUPIC fuel, when adjusting the excess reactivity control by slightly enriched and depleted uranium, reactivity control by natural uranium for high reactivity spent PWR fuels, and reactivity control by natural uranium for linear reactivity spent PWR fuels. The results of this study have shown that the reactivity control by slightly enriched and depleted uranium, all the spent PWR fuels can be utilized as the DUPIC fuel and the fraction of fresh uranium feed is 3.4% on an average. For the reactivity control by natural uranium, about 88% of spent PWR fuel can be utilized as the DUPIC fuel when the linear reactivity spent PWR fuels are used, and the amount of natural uranium feed needed to control the DUPIC fuel reactivity is negligible. (author). 13 refs., 16 tabs., 6 figs

  3. Spontaneous stabilization of HTGRs without reactor scram and core cooling—Safety demonstration tests using the HTTR: Loss of reactivity control and core cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi, E-mail: takamatsu.kuniyoshi@jaea.go.jp; Yan, Xing L.; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Sakaba, Nariaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) has superior safety characteristics; for example, an HTGR has a self-control system that uses only physical phenomena against various accidents. Moreover, the large heat capacity and low power density of the core result in very slow temperature transients. Therefore, an HTGR serves inherently safety features against loss of core cooling accidents such as the Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (TEPCO)’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) disaster. Herein we would like to demonstrate the inherent safety features using the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is the first HTGR in Japan with a thermal power of 30 MW and a maximum reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 °C; it was built at the Oarai Research and Development Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). In this study, an all-gas-circulator trip test was analyzed as a loss of forced cooling (LOFC) test with an initial reactor power of 9 MW to demonstrate LOFC accidents. The analytical results indicate that reactor power decreases from 9 MW to 0 MW owing to the negative reactivity feedback effect of the core, even if the reactor shutdown system is not activated. The total reactivity decreases for 2–3 h and then gradually increases in proportion to xenon reactivity; therefore, the HTTR achieves recritical after an elapsed time of 6–7 h, which is different from the elapsed time at reactor power peak occurrence. After the reactor power peak occurs, the total reactivity oscillates several times because of the negative reactivity feedback effect and gradually decreases to zero. Moreover, the new conclusions are as follows: the greater the amount of residual heat removed from the reactor core, the larger the stable reactor power after recriticality owing to the heat balance of the reactor system. The minimum reactor power and the reactor power peak occurrence are affected by the neutron source. The greater the

  4. 24 CFR 236.60 - Excess Income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excess Income. 236.60 Section 236... § 236.60 Excess Income. (a) Definition. Excess Income consists of cash collected as rent from the... Rent. The unit-by-unit requirement necessitates that, if a unit has Excess Income, the Excess Income...

  5. Improving contour accuracy and strength of reactive air brazed (RAB) ceramic/metal joints by controlling interface microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chichi; Kuhn, Bernd; Brandenberg, Joerg; Beck, Tilmann; Singheiser, Lorenz [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute for Energy and Climate Research (IEK), Microstructure and Properties of Materials (IEK-2), 52425 Juelich (Germany); Bobzin, Kirsten; Bagcivan, Nazlim; Kopp, Nils [Surface Engineering Institute (IOT), RWTH Aachen University, Kackertstr. 15, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The development of high-temperature electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen, and hydrogen separators and gas reformers poses a great challenge in brazing technology of metal/ceramic joints. To maintain the integrity of such equipment, the resulting seals have to be stable and hermetic during continuous and cyclic high temperature operation. As a solution for joining metal and ceramic materials, reactive air brazing has gained increasing interest in recent years. This paper compares joints brazed by different filler alloys: pure Ag, AgCu, and AgAl in three different aspects: contour accuracy, room temperature delamination resistance, and corresponding microstructures of the as-brazed and fractured brazed joints. Discussion focuses on fracture mechanism and associated delamination resistance. AgAl brazed joints exhibit the most promising mechanical properties and contour accuracy. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Mindfulness training and stress reactivity in substance abuse: results from a randomized, controlled stage I pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Judson A; Sinha, Rajita; Chen, Justin A; Michalsen, Ravenna N; Babuscio, Theresa A; Nich, Charla; Grier, Aleesha; Bergquist, Keri L; Reis, Deidre L; Potenza, Marc N; Carroll, Kathleen M; Rounsaville, Bruce J

    2009-01-01

    Stress is important in substance use disorders (SUDs). Mindfulness training (MT) has shown promise for stress-related maladies. No studies have compared MT to empirically validated treatments for SUDs. The goals of this study were to assess MT compared to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in substance use and treatment acceptability, and specificity of MT compared to CBT in targeting stress reactivity. Thirty-six individuals with alcohol and/or cocaine use disorders were randomly assigned to receive group MT or CBT in an outpatient setting. Drug use was assessed weekly. After treatment, responses to personalized stress provocation were measured. Fourteen individuals completed treatment. There were no differences in treatment satisfaction or drug use between groups. The laboratory paradigm suggested reduced psychological and physiological indices of stress during provocation in MT compared to CBT. This pilot study provides evidence of the feasibility of MT in treating SUDs and suggests that MT may be efficacious in targeting stress.

  7. Positioning strategies for decentralized energy resources providing reactive power voltage control; Anlagenauswahl und -positionierung zur Spannungsstuetzung mittels Blindleistungsmanagement dezentraler Erzeugungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matrose, Claas; Goedde, Markus; Cramer, Moritz; Potratz, Fabian; Pollok, Thomas; Schnettler, Armin [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochspannungstechnik

    2012-07-01

    The integration of decentralized generation into power distribution grids in Germany has reached a level at which more and more grid reinforcement is required in order to keep voltages within the given limits. The consumption of reactive power by decentralized generation systems can reduce the voltage rise, which is caused by active power in-feed of such systems. Caused by different characteristics of overhead lines and cables, this effect significantly varies. Parameter studies of four commonly used types of lines, of different power ratings of decentralized generation systems as well as different lengths of lines can quantify the effects. It can be shown that - depending on the characteristics of a specific grid - the grid capacity for power in-feed can be increased by factors between 1.5 and 10. (orig.)

  8. Reactive transport modeling of processes controlling the distribution and natural attenuation of phenolic compounds in a deep sandstone aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, K. U.; Benner, S. G.; Frind, E. O.; Thornton, S. F.; Lerner, D. N.

    2001-12-01

    Reactive solute transport modeling was utilized to evaluate the potential for natural attenuation of a contaminant plume containing phenolic compounds at a chemical producer in the West Midlands, UK. The reactive transport simulations consider microbially mediated biodegradation of the phenolic compounds (phenols, cresols, and xylenols) by multiple electron acceptors. Inorganic reactions including hydrolysis, aqueous complexation, dissolution of primary minerals, formation of secondary mineral phases, and ion exchange are considered. One-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) simulations were conducted. Mass balance calculations indicate that biodegradation in the saturated zone has degraded approximately 1-5% of the organic contaminant plume over a time period of 47 years. Simulations indicate that denitrification is the most significant degradation process, accounting for approximately 50% of the organic contaminant removal, followed by sulfate reduction and fermentation reactions, each contributing 15-20%. Aerobic respiration accounts for less than 10% of the observed contaminant removal in the saturated zone. Although concentrations of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) mineral phases are high in the aquifer sediment, reductive dissolution is limited, producing only 5% of the observed mass loss. Mass balance calculations suggest that no more than 20-25% of the observed total inorganic carbon (TIC) was generated from biodegradation reactions in the saturated zone. Simulations indicate that aerobic biodegradation in the unsaturated zone, before the contaminant entered the aquifer, may have produced the majority of the TIC observed in the plume. Because long-term degradation is limited to processes within the saturated zone, use of observed TIC concentrations to predict the future natural attenuation may overestimate contaminant degradation by a factor of 4-5.

  9. Microstructure and wear resistance of Al2O3-M7C3/Fe composite coatings produced by laser controlled reactive synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui; Luo, Zhen; Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Duan, Rui

    2015-05-01

    Based on the principle of thermite reaction of Al and Fe2O3 powders, the Al2O3 ceramic reinforced Fe-based composite coatings were fabricated on a steel substrate by laser controlled reactive synthesis and cladding. The effects of different additions of thermite reactants on the phase transition, microstructure evolution, microhardness and wear resistance of the composite coatings were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Vickers microhardness and block-on-ring wear test, respectively. The results show that Al2O3 ceramic and M7C3 carbide are in situ synthesized via the laser controlled reactive synthesis. The Al2O3 ceramic and M7C3 carbides prefer to distribute along the γ-Fe phase boundary continuously, which separates the γ-Fe matrix and is beneficial to the grain refinement. With the increase of thermite reactants, the amount of Al2O3 ceramic and M7C3 carbide in the composite coatings increases gradually. Moreover the cladding layer changes from dendritic structure to columnar structure and martensite structure in the heat affected zone becomes coarse. The increased thermite reactants improve the microhardness and wear resistance of the in situ composite coatings obviously and enhance the hardness of the heat affected zone, which should be ascribed to the grain refinement, ceramic and carbide precipitation and solid solution strengthening.

  10. Environmental Controls and Eco-geomorphic Interactions of the Barchan-to-parabolic Dune Stabilisation and the Parabolic-to-barchan Dune Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Baas, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Parabolic dunes are one of a few common aeolian landforms which are highly controlled by eco-geomorphic interactions. Parabolic dunes, on the one hand, can be developed from highly mobile dune landforms, barchans for instance, in an ameliorated vegetation condition; or on the other hand, they can be reactivated and transformed back into mobile dunes due to vegetation deterioration. The fundamental mechanisms and eco-geomorphic interactions controlling both dune transformations remain poorly understood. To bridge the gap between complex processes involved in dune transformations on a relatively long temporal scale and real world monitoring records on a very limited temporal scale, this research has extended the DECAL model to incorporate 'dynamic' growth functions and the different 'growth' of perennial shrubs between growing and non-growing seasons, informed by field measurements and remote sensing analysis, to explore environmental controls and eco-geomorphic interactions of both types of dune transformation. A non-dimensional 'dune stabilising index' is proposed to capture the interactions between environmental controls (i.e. the capabilities of vegetation to withstand wind erosion and sand burial, the sandy substratum thickness, the height of the initial dune, and the sand transport potential), and establish the linkage between these controls and the geometry of a stabilising dune. An example demonstrates how to use the power-law relationship between the dune stabilising index and the normalised migration distance to assist in extrapolating the historical trajectories of transforming dunes. The modelling results also show that a slight increase in vegetation cover of an initial parabolic dune can significantly increase the reactivation threshold of climatic impact (both drought stress and wind strength) required to reactivate a stabilising parabolic dune into a barchan. Four eco-geomorphic interaction zones that govern a barchan-to-parabolic dune transformation

  11. Surfactant-controlled synthesis of Pd/Ce{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} catalyst for NO reduction by CO with excess oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.F. [Laboratorio de Catalisis y Materiales, SEPI-ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Politecnico S/N, Col. Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-A, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa-Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez, G. [Laboratorio de Catalisis y Materiales, SEPI-ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Politecnico S/N, Col. Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Wang, J.A. [Laboratorio de Catalisis y Materiales, SEPI-ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Politecnico S/N, Col. Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jwang@ipn.mx; Norena, L.E. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-A, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa-Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Toledo, A. [Grupo de Molecular Ingenieria, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Castillo, S. [Grupo de Molecular Ingenieria, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Moran-Pineda, M. [Grupo de Molecular Ingenieria, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-04-30

    For the first time, this work reports a surfactant-controlled synthetic method to obtain a nanophase of mesoporous ceria-zirconia solid solution containing cationic defects in the crystalline structure. The incorporation of a cationic surfactant (myristyltrimethylammonium bromide) into the ceria-zirconia solid network not only controlled the pore diameter distribution but also induced creation of the lattice defect. Ceria-zirconia solid solution showed crystal microstrain and structural distortion that varied with the calcination temperature. Compared to pure ceria, the addition of zirconium to the ceria promoted the bulk oxygen reducibility and enhanced the thermal stability of the solid. Hydrogen could be stored into or released from the PdO/Ce{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} catalyst during the TPR procedure, which is associated to the formation/decomposition of a PdH{sub x} phase, due to the hydrogen dissociation catalyzed by metallic Pd. At cool start of reaction, NO reduction by CO with excess oxygen over the Pd/Ce{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} catalyst showed selectivity around 100% to N{sub 2}. A competition between NO reduction by CO and CO oxidation by O{sub 2} was observed: at reaction temperatures below 200 deg. C, NO inhibited CO oxidation activity; however, at reaction temperatures above 200 deg. C, high activity of CO oxidation resulted in an inhibition effect on NO reduction.

  12. Excessive or unwanted hair in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypertrichosis; Hirsutism; Hair - excessive (women); Excessive hair in women; Hair - women - excessive or unwanted ... Women normally produce low levels of male hormones (androgens). If your body makes too much of this ...

  13. Country Fundamentals and Currency Excess Returns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehwan Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We examine whether country fundamentals help explain the cross-section of currency excess returns. For this purpose, we consider fundamental variables such as default risk, foreign exchange rate regime, capital control as well as interest rate in the multi-factor model framework. Our empirical results show that fundamental factors explain a large part of the cross-section of currency excess returns. The zero-intercept restriction of the factor model is not rejected for most currencies. They also reveal that our factor model with country fundamentals performs better than a factor model with usual investment-style factors. Our main empirical results are based on 2001-2010 balanced panel data of 19 major currencies. This paper may fill the gap between country fundamentals and practitioners' strategies on currency investment.

  14. The effects of rose hip (Rosa canina) on plasma antioxidative activity and C-reactive protein in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal controls: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeskov, Bente; Christensen, Robin; Bügel, Susanne; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2011-08-15

    Rose hip (Rosa canina) has been used as an herbal remedy against a wide range of ailments including inflammatory disorders. The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of rose hips have been evaluated in vitro and active constituents have been isolated. Rose hip contains antioxidant nutrients and an anti-inflammatory galactolipid. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease where activated cells release reactive oxygen substances. Thus it could be relevant to investigate if rose hip had an anti-inflammatory and/or antioxidant effect in this situation. In this open case-control study 20 female patients with RA and 10 female controls were given 10.5 g rose hip powder daily (Litozin®) for 28 days. Blood samples were analysed at baseline and follow-up for the capacity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and catalase and the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). The participants kept a food diary for the first 3 days and the last 3 days of the intervention period. The RA-patients completed The Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. CRP-concentrations of both patients and healthy controls did not change. Nor was any effect found on the activity of antioxidant enzymes. There was no difference in food intake at baseline, but in the last week the RA-group reduced their energy intake. 10.5 g Litozin® in 28 days had neither effect on clinical symptoms or laboratory measurements in patients with RA or healthy controls. This is in contrast to previous intervention studies with rose hip powder that found a reduction in the concentration of CRP. The results of the present study indicate that a daily amount of approximately 10 g rose hip powder for one month has no anti-inflammatory and/or antioxidant effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Excessive masturbation after epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Mine; Erdogan, Ayten; Duvenci, Sirin; Ozyurt, Emin; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-02-01

    Sexual behavior changes as well as depression, anxiety, and organic mood/personality disorders have been reported in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients before and after epilepsy surgery. The authors describe a 14-year-old girl with symptoms of excessive masturbation in inappropriate places, social withdrawal, irritability, aggressive behavior, and crying spells after selective amygdalohippocampectomy for medically intractable TLE with hippocampal sclerosis. Since the family members felt extremely embarrassed, they were upset and angry with the patient which, in turn, increased her depressive symptoms. Both her excessive masturbation behavior and depressive symptoms remitted within 2 months of psychoeducative intervention and treatment with citalopram 20mg/day. Excessive masturbation is proposed to be related to the psychosocial changes due to seizure-free status after surgery as well as other possible mechanisms such as Kluver-Bucy syndrome features and neurophysiologic changes associated with the cessation of epileptic discharges. This case demonstrates that psychiatric problems and sexual changes encountered after epilepsy surgery are possibly multifactorial and in adolescence hypersexuality may be manifested as excessive masturbation behavior.

  16. Residual shear strength variability as a primary control on movement of landslides reactivated by earthquake-induced ground motion: Implications for coastal Oregon, U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, William H.; Wang, Gonghui

    2014-01-01

    Most large seismogenic landslides are reactivations of preexisting landslides with basal shear zones in the residual strength condition. Residual shear strength often varies during rapid displacement, but the response of residual shear zones to seismic loading is largely unknown. We used a ring shear apparatus to perform simulated seismic loading tests, constant displacement rate tests, and tests during which shear stress was gradually varied on specimens from two landslides to improve understanding of coseismic landslide reactivation and to identify shear strength models valid for slow gravitational failure through rapid coseismic failure. The landslides we studied represent many along the Oregon, U.S., coast. Seismic loading tests resulted in (1) catastrophic failure involving unbounded displacement when stresses represented those for the existing landslides and (2) limited to unbounded displacement when stresses represented those for hypothetical dormant landslides, suggesting that coseismic landslide reactivation may be significant during future great earthquakes occurring near the Oregon Coast. Constant displacement rate tests indicated that shear strength decreased exponentially during the first few decimeters of displacement but increased logarithmically with increasing displacement rate when sheared at 0.001 cm s−1 or greater. Dynamic shear resistance estimated from shear strength models correlated well with stresses observed during seismic loading tests, indicating that displacement rate and amount primarily controlled failure characteristics. We developed a stress-based approach to estimate coseismic landslide displacement that utilizes the variable shear strength model. The approach produced results that compared favorably to observations made during seismic loading tests, indicating its utility for application to landslides.

  17. A randomized, comparative pilot trial of family-based interpersonal psychotherapy for reducing psychosocial symptoms, disordered-eating, and excess weight gain in at-risk preadolescents with loss-of-control-eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomaker, Lauren B; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Matherne, Camden E; Mehari, Rim D; Olsen, Cara H; Marwitz, Shannon E; Bakalar, Jennifer L; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M; Kelly, Nichole R; Schvey, Natasha A; Burke, Natasha L; Cassidy, Omni; Brady, Sheila M; Dietz, Laura J; Wilfley, Denise E; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2017-09-01

    Preadolescent loss-of-control-eating (LOC-eating) is a risk factor for excess weight gain and binge-eating-disorder. We evaluated feasibility and acceptability of a preventive family-based interpersonal psychotherapy (FB-IPT) program. FB-IPT was compared to family-based health education (FB-HE) to evaluate changes in children's psychosocial functioning, LOC-eating, and body mass. A randomized, controlled pilot trial was conducted with 29 children, 8 to 13 years who had overweight/obesity and LOC-eating. Youth-parent dyads were randomized to 12-week FB-IPT (n = 15) or FB-HE (n = 14) and evaluated at post-treatment, six-months, and one-year. Changes in child psychosocial functioning, LOC-eating, BMI, and adiposity by dual-energy-X-ray-absorptiometry were assessed. Missing follow-up data were multiply imputed. FB-IPT feasibility and acceptability were indicated by good attendance (83%) and perceived benefits to social interactions and eating. Follow-up assessments were completed by 73% FB-IPT and 86% FB-HE at post-treatment, 60% and 64% at six-months, and 47% and 57% at one-year. At post-treatment, children in FB-IPT reported greater decreases in depression (95% CI -7.23, -2.01, Cohen's d = 1.23) and anxiety (95% CI -6.08, -0.70, Cohen's d = .79) and less odds of LOC-eating (95% CI -3.93, -0.03, Cohen's d = .38) than FB-HE. At six-months, children in FB-IPT had greater reductions in disordered-eating attitudes (95% CI -0.72, -0.05, Cohen's d = .66) and at one-year, tended to have greater decreases in depressive symptoms (95% CI -8.82, 0.44, Cohen's d = .69) than FB-HE. There was no difference in BMI gain between the groups. Family-based approaches that address interpersonal and emotional underpinnings of LOC-eating in preadolescents with overweight/obesity show preliminary promise, particularly for reducing internalizing symptoms. Whether observed psychological benefits translate into sustained prevention of disordered-eating or excess

  18. A Randomized, Comparative Pilot Trial of Family-Based Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Reducing Psychosocial Symptoms, Disordered-eating, and Excess Weight Gain in At-Risk Preadolescents with Loss-of-control-eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomaker, Lauren B.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Matherne, Camden E.; Mehari, Rim D.; Olsen, Cara H.; Marwitz, Shannon E.; Bakalar, Jennifer L.; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Kelly, Nichole R.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Burke, Natasha L.; Cassidy, Omni; Brady, Sheila M.; Dietz, Laura J.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Preadolescent loss-of-control-eating (LOC-eating) is a risk factor for excess weight gain and binge-eating-disorder. We evaluated feasibility and acceptability of a preventive family-based interpersonal psychotherapy (FB-IPT) program. FB-IPT was compared to family-based health education (FB-HE) to evaluate changes in children’s psychosocial functioning, LOC-eating, and body mass. Method A randomized, controlled pilot trial was conducted with 29 children, 8 to 13 years who had overweight/obesity and LOC-eating. Youth-parent dyads were randomized to 12-week FB-IPT (n=15) or FB-HE (n=14) and evaluated at post-treatment, six-months, and one-year. Changes in child psychosocial functioning, LOC-eating, BMI, and adiposity by dual-energy-X-ray-absorptiometry were assessed. Missing follow-up data were multiply imputed. Results FB-IPT feasibility and acceptability were indicated by good attendance (83%) and perceived benefits to social interactions and eating. Follow-up assessments were completed by 73% FB-IPT and 86% FB-HE at post-treatment, 60% and 64% at six-months, and 47% and 57% at one-year. At post-treatment, children in FB-IPT reported greater decreases in depression (95% CI −7.23, −2.01, Cohen’s d=1.23) and anxiety (95% CI −6.08, −0.70, Cohen’s d=.79) and less odds of LOC-eating (95% CI −3.93, −0.03, Cohen’s d=.38) than FB-HE. At six-months, children in FB-IPT had greater reductions in disordered-eating attitudes (95% CI −0.72, −0.05, Cohen’s d=.66) and at one-year, tended to have greater decreases in depressive symptoms (95% CI −8.82, 0.44, Cohen’s d=.69) than FB-HE. There was no difference in BMI gain between the groups. Discussion Family-based approaches that address interpersonal and emotional underpinnings of LOC-eating in preadolescents with overweight/obesity show preliminary promise, particularly for reducing internalizing symptoms. Whether observed psychological benefits translate into sustained prevention of

  19. An assessment of the dual-mode reactivity controlled compression ignition/conventional diesel combustion capabilities in a EURO VI medium-duty diesel engine fueled with an intermediate ethanol-gasoline blend and biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benajes, Jesús; García, Antonio; Monsalve-Serrano, Javier; Balloul, Iyad; Pradel, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reactivity controlled compression ignition regime utilized from 25% to 35% load. • Dual-mode reduces the regeneration periods of the diesel particulate filter. • The use of near-term available biofuels allows good performance and emissions. • Dual-mode leads to 2% greater efficiency than diesel combustion at high engine speeds. - Abstract: This work investigates the capabilities of the dual-mode reactivity controlled compression ignition/conventional diesel combustion engine operation to cover the full operating range of a EURO VI medium-duty diesel engine with compression ratio of 17.5:1. This concept is based on covering all the engine map switching between the reactivity controlled compression ignition and the conventional diesel combustion operating modes. Specifically, the benefits of reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion are exploited whenever possible according to certain restrictions, while the conventional diesel combustion operation is used to cover the zones of the engine map in which the reactivity controlled compression ignition operation is limited. The experiments were conducted using a single-cylinder research diesel engine derived from the multi-cylinder production engine. In addition, considering the mandatory presence of biofuels in the future context of road transport and the ability of ethanol to be blended with gasoline, the low reactivity fuel used in the study is a blend of 20% ethanol by volume with 80% of 95 octane number gasoline. Moreover, a diesel containing 7% of biodiesel has been used as high reactivity fuel. Firstly, a reactivity controlled compression ignition mapping is performed to check the operational limits of the concept in this engine platform. Later, based on the results, the potential of the dual-mode concept is discussed. Results suggest that, under the constraints imposed, reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion can be utilized between 25% and 35% load. In this region

  20. CDK2 differentially controls normal cell senescence and cancer cell proliferation upon exposure to reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Seung-Min; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► H 2 O 2 differently adjusted senescence and proliferation in normal and cancer cells. ► H 2 O 2 exposure transiently decreased PCNA levels in normal cells. ► H 2 O 2 exposure transiently increased CDK2 activity in cancer cells. ► p21 Cip1 is likely dispensable when H 2 O 2 induces senescence in normal cells. ► Suggestively, CDK2 and PCNA play critical roles in H 2 O 2 -induced cell fate decision. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species modulate cell fate in a context-dependent manner. Sublethal doses of H 2 O 2 decreased the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in normal cells (including primary human dermal fibroblasts and IMR-90 cells) without affecting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent senescence. In contrast, exposure of cancer cells (such as HeLa and MCF7 cells) to H 2 O 2 increased CDK2 activity with no accompanying change in the PCNA level, leading to cell proliferation. A CDK2 inhibitor, CVT-313, prevented H 2 O 2 -induced cancer cell proliferation. These results support the notion that the cyclin/CDK2/p21 Cip1 /PCNA complex plays an important role as a regulator of cell fate decisions.