WorldWideScience

Sample records for exceeded regulatory limits

  1. Mercury in United Kingdom topsoils; concentrations, pools, and Critical Limit exceedances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipping, E., E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Poskitt, J.M.; Lawlor, A.J.; Wadsworth, R.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Norris, D.A.; Hall, J.R. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    The median total mercury concentration in 898 UK rural topsoils, sampled between 1998 and 2008, was 0.095 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Approximate adjustment for unreactive metal produced an estimate of 0.052 {mu}g g{sup -1} for reactive Hg. The highest concentrations were in the north and west, where organic-rich soils with low bulk densities dominate, but the spatial pattern was quite different if soil Hg pools (mg m{sup -2}) were considered, the highest values being near to the industrial north of England and London. Possible toxic effects of Hg were best evaluated by comparison with soil Critical Limits expressed as ratios of Hg to soil organic matter, or soil solution Hg{sup 2+} concentrations, estimated by chemical speciation modelling. Only a few percent of the rural UK soils showed exceedance, and this also applied to rural soils from the whole of Europe. UK urban and industrial soils had higher Hg concentrations and more cases of exceedance. - Highlights: > Concentrations of Hg in rural soils are highest near to industrial areas and London. > Mercury is strongly associated with soil organic matter. > Only a few percent of UK rural soils have Hg levels higher than Critical Limits. > Critical Limit exceedances are found for 15-30% of urban and industrial soils. - Mercury contents of 898 UK and 868 European rural soils are largely lower than Critical Limit values, but appreciable numbers of soils in UK urban and industrial areas show exceedance.

  2. White dwarf stars exceeding the Chandrasekhar mass limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2018-01-01

    The effect of nonlinear ultra-relativistic electron dispersion on the mass-radius relation of high-mass white dwarfs is studied. The dispersion is described by a permeability tensor in the Dirac equation, generated by the ionized high-density stellar matter, which constitutes the neutralizing background of the nearly degenerate electron plasma. The electron dispersion results in a stable mass-radius relation for high-mass white dwarfs, in contrast to a mass limit in the case of vacuum permeabilities. In the ultra-relativistic regime, the dispersion relation is a power law whose amplitude and scaling exponent is inferred from mass and radius estimates of two high-mass white dwarfs, Sirius B and LHS 4033. Evidence for the existence of super-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs is provided by several Type Ia supernovae (e.g., SN 2013cv, SN 2003fg, SN 2007if and SN 2009dc), whose mass ejecta exceed the Chandrasekhar limit by up to a factor of two. The dispersive mass-radius relation is used to estimate the radii, central densities, Fermi temperatures, bulk and compression moduli and sound velocities of their white dwarf progenitors.

  3. Investigation of the possibility of exceeding the Greenwald density limit during ECRH in T-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikaev, V.V.; Borshchegovskii, A.A.; Volkov, V.V.; Dremin, M.M.; Esipchuk, Yu.V.; Kakurin, A.M.; Kirneva, N.A.; Kislov, A.Ya.; Kislov, D.A.; Klimanov, I.V.; Kochin, V.A.; Krupin, V.A.; Krylov, S.V.; Myalton, T.B.; Novikov, A.Yu.; Notkin, G.E.; Pavlov, Yu.D.; Piterskii, V.V.; Poznyak, V.I.; Roi, I.N.

    2000-01-01

    In T-10 experiments, attempts were made to significantly exceed the Greenwald limit n-bar Gr during high-power (P ab = 750 kW) electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and gas puffing. Formally, the density limit (n-bar e ) lim exceeding the Greenwald limit ((n-bar) e ) lim /n-bar Gr = 1.8) was achieved for q L = 8.2. However, as q L decreased, the ratio (n-bar e ) lim /n-bar Gr also decreased, approaching unity at q L ≅ 3. It was suggested that the 'current radius' (i.e., the radius of the magnetic surface enclosing the bulk of the plasma current I p ), rather than the limiter radius, was the parameter governing the value of (n-bar e ) lim . In the ECRH experiments, no substantial degradation of plasma confinement was observed up to n-bar e ∼ 0.9(n-bar e ) lim regardless of the ratio (n(bar sign) e ) lim /n-bar Gr . In different scenarios of the density growth up to (n-bar e ) lim , two types of disruptions related to the density limit were observed

  4. Impact analysis of TOTEM data at the LHC: black disk limit exceeded

    CERN Document Server

    Alkin, A; Kovalenko, O; Troshin, S M

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the profile of the impact--parameter dependent elastic scattering amplitude. Extraction of impact-parameter dependence from the dataset with inclusion of the experimental data on elastic scattering at the LHC energies helps to reveal the asymptotics of hadron interactions. Analysis of the data clearly indicates that the impact-parameter elastic scattering amplitude exceed the black disk limit at the LHC energy 7TeV and the inelastic overlap function reaches its maximum value at $b>0$

  5. General aviation accidents related to exceedance of airplane weight/center of gravity limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Douglas D

    2016-06-01

    Obesity, affects a third of the US population and its corollary occupant weight adversely impacts safe flight operations. Increased aircraft weight results in longer takeoff/landing distances, degraded climb gradients and airframe failure may occur in turbulence. In this study, the rate, temporal changes, and lethality of accidents in piston-powered, general aviation aircraft related to exceeding the maximum aircraft weight/center of gravity (CG) limits were determined. Nation-wide person body mass were from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The NTSB database was used to identify accidents related to operation of aircraft outside of their weight/CG envelope. Statistical analyses employed T-tests, proportion tests and a Poisson distribution. While the average body mass climbed steadily (p<0.001) between 1999 and 2014 the rate of accidents related to exceedance of the weight/CG limits did not change (p=0.072). However, 57% were fatal, higher (p<0.001) than the 21% for mishaps attributed to other causes/factors. The majority (77%) of accidents were due to an overloaded aircraft operating within its CG limits. As to the phase of flight, accidents during takeoff and those occurring enroute carried the lowest (50%) and highest (85%) proportion of fatal accidents respectively. While the rate of general aviation accidents related to operating an aircraft outside of its weight/CG envelope has not increased over the past 15 years, these types of accidents carry a high risk of fatality. Airmen should be educated as to such risks and to dispel the notion held by some that flights may be safely conducted with an overloaded aircraft within its CG limits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of an international BRC [Below Regulatory Concern] limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1987-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has recently investigated the exemption from regulatory control of radiation sources containing limited quantities of radioactive materials. Early efforts were entitled de minimis and were aimed at establishing a philosophical basis and radiation dose limits. The main objectives of more recent work on exemption are to illustrate a method for developing practical radiological criteria, to establish generic criteria, and to determine the practicability of the preliminary exemption principles. The method used to develop the criteria relies on models to evaluate the potential radiation exposure pathways and scenarios for individuals and population groups potentially present following the unrestricted release of materials. This paper describes the assessment methods, presents the generic results expressed in terms of the limiting concentrations of selected radionuclides in municipal waste, and provides a comparison with recent regulatory efforts in the United States for considering selected wastes being Below Regulatory Concern (BRC). 17 refs., 4 tabs

  7. Below regulatory concern standards: The limits of state and local authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses: (1) the scope of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's authority to develop and implement below regulatory concern or BRC standards; and (2) the limitations on the legal authority of states and local governments to create impediments to full implementation of such standards. The paper demonstrates that the NRC is acting well within its statutory authority in developing BRC regulations and guidelines, and that the ability of state and local governments to impede generators' use of those regulations and guidelines on the basis of legal or regulatory initiatives is substantially circumscribed. While some generators may be reluctant, as a result of political factors, to utilize BRC standards, the decision whether or not to use such standards should not be made without careful consideration of the applicable legal and regulatory limitations on state and local authority

  8. The Need to Increase Regulatory Controls on Imports and Exports came from the Detection of an Argentine Import Containing Exceeding Pellets of Ir-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsolo, N.A.; Vidal, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    In Argentina, radioactive sources for application in Industrial Gamma radiography are manufactured using small metallic discs called pellets of radioactive isotope Ir-192, that are imported. They have to be shipped in specially sealed recipients according to their high radioactive levels. These recipients are large enough to contain activities as high as 296 TBq and are therefore approved as Type B(U) packages. This paper thoroughly describes a particular import of this material in which an exceeding 220 ± 2 Pellets (75,62 TBq) was found. The total amount of activity had not been declared adequately by the consignor. The corresponding notification to the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) was made by the importer and national manufacturer at the moment these particular Pellets were to be used for source production. The exceeding material doubled that which had been authorized to be imported. After the notification and since the material had entered to the country illicitly, customs legislations were applied in a legal process in which the Nuclear Regulatory Authority participated as well. The decision of the judge was to ship the exceeding cargo again to its proceeding country. However, a significant time had passed since the cargo arrived and the pellets had stuck to each other due to high temperature. This made them impossible to handle in order to encapsulate them as special form radioactive material again for their shipment in the available Type B(U) package. In the outcome, the material was retained at the manufacturer facilities, in its original packaging, with suitable radiological and physical conditions to guarantee safety and security, waiting until its activity had decayed to acceptable levels for its shipment as Type A package. As a result, a need to require further technical specifications from the vendor was detected. These specifications should warn about the period in which these Pellets may be utilized for source production before

  9. The need to increase regulatory controls on imports and exports came from the detection of an Argentine import containing exceeding pellets of Ir-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsolo, Nicolas; Vidal, Dora

    2008-01-01

    In Argentina, radioactive sources for application in industrial gamma radiography are manufactured using small metallic discs called pellets of radioactive isotope Ir-192, that are imported. They are to be shipped in specially sealed recipients according to their high radioactive levels. These recipients are large enough to contain activities as high as 296 TBq and are therefore approved as type B (U) packages. This paper thoroughly describes a particular import of this material in which an exceeding 220±2 pellets (75,62 TBq) was found. The total amount of activity had not been declared adequately by the consignor. The corresponding notification to the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) was made by the importer and national manufacturer at the moment these particular pellets were to be used for source production. The exceeding material doubled that which had been authorized to be imported. After the notification and since the material had entered to the country Illicitly, customs legislation were applied in a legal process in which the Nuclear regulatory Authority participated as well. The decision of the judge was to ship the exceeding cargo again to its proceeding country. However, a significant time had passed since the cargo arrived and the pellets has struck to each other due to high temperature. This made them impossible to handle in order to encapsulate them as special form radioactive material again for their shipment in the available Type B (U) package. In the outcome, the material was retained at the manufacturer facilities, in its original packaging, with suitable radiological and physical conditions to guarantee safety and security, waiting until its activity had decayed to acceptable levels for its shipments as type A package. As a result, a need to require further technical specifications from the vendor was detected. These specifications should warn about the period in which these pellets may be utilized for source production before

  10. Regulatory challenges associated with conducting multicountry clinical trials in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndebele, Paul; Blanchard-Horan, Christina; Shahkolahi, Akbar; Sanne, Ian

    2014-01-01

    International public health and infectious diseases research has expanded to become a global enterprise transcending national and continental borders in organized networks addressing high-impact diseases. In conducting multicountry clinical trials, sponsors and investigators have to ensure that they meet regulatory requirements in all countries in which the clinical trials will be conducted. Some of these requirements include review and approval by national drug regulatory authorities and recognized research ethics committees. A limiting factor to the efficient conduct of multicountry clinical trials is the regulatory environment in each collaborating country, with significant differences determined by various factors including the laws and the procedures used in each country. The long regulatory processes in resource-limited countries may hinder the efficient implementation of multisite clinical trials, delaying research important to the health of populations in these countries and costing millions of dollars a year.

  11. The limits of regulatory convergence: globalization and GMO politics in the south

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falkner, R.; Gupta, A.

    2009-01-01

    Is globalization promoting regulatory convergence in agricultural biotechnology policies in the South? This article examines the nature and limits of regulatory convergence in the field of agri-biotechnology and investigates the effects that international forces have on biotechnology and biosafety

  12. Regulatory guide in support of ECCS rule revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovmassian, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff is proposing to amend 10 CFR 50.46 and Appendix K to allow licensees to use best estimate calculations to estimate emergency core cooling system performance. This estimate in conjunction with an estimate of the uncertainty in the calculation would then be used to assure that the licensing limits set forth in 10 CFR 50.46(b) are not exceeded. The NRC staff has prepared a draft regulatory guide to assist licensees and applicants in complying with these proposed amendments. This paper sets forth the objectives of this regulatory guide, the approach taken, the difficulties encountered, and the current status of this effort

  13. Nearly half of the adolescents in an Italian school-based study exceeded the recommended upper limits for daily caffeine consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Barbara; Lapolla, Rosa; Rutigliano, Irene; Pettoello Mantovani, Massimo; Campanozzi, Angelo

    2018-06-01

    No data are available on caffeine consumption among Italian adolescents. We investigated caffeine intake from coffee, soft drinks and energy drinks in a sample of Italian adolescents and determined if they exceeded the recommended limits. The study comprised 1213 adolescents with a mean age of 15.1 years (range 12-19) from four schools in Foggia, southern Italy. Caffeine intake was assessed using an anonymous self-reported questionnaire during the 2013/2014 school year. We calculated the percentage of daily caffeine consumers, their mean intake of caffeine from beverages and the contribution of each beverage category to the total caffeine intake. Approximately 76% of the sample consumed caffeine every day, amounting to 125.5 ± 69.2 mg/day and 2.1 ± 1.2 mg/kg/day. When we applied the reference values from the Academy of Pediatrics, we found that 46% of the adolescents exceeded the recommended upper limits. Coffee was the most frequently consumed caffeinated drink and the main contributor to daily caffeine intake. More than three quarters (76%) of the Italian adolescents in our study drank coffee on a daily basis and nearly half (46%) exceeded the recommended upper limits. Strategies are needed to reduce caffeine consumption by adolescents. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A revised formula for 3-body recombination that cannot exceed the unitarity limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, Chris H.; Esry, B.D.; Suno, H.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the recent developments in theory and experiment that bear on our understanding of three-body recombination at ultracold temperatures. Some of these predictions include the fourth-power dependence of the three-body rate on the two-body scattering lenght a, the appearance of quantum mechanical shape resonance and Feshbach resonances, and the existence of destructive interference minima at large positive scattering lenghts. At very large scattering lenghts, however, the a 4 dependence of the recombination rate eventually will exceed the unitarity limit. We propose in this paper a simple way to correct this problem, permitting an approximate extension of previous predictions to slightly higher energies above the three-body fragmentation threshold. A preliminary comparison is carried out with a very recent experiment by Grimm and coworkers, showing reasonable agreement

  15. How much Baltic salmon can be consumed without exceeding the tolerable safety limit ?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristiansen, H.R. [Mobile Nutrients Ltd. (Denmark)

    2004-09-15

    Because Baltic salmon is a top predator preying on sprat, herring and tobis, it is very vulnerable to contamination with dioxin and PCBs. The EU safety limit (SL) for fish is 4 picogram (pg) WHOTEQ g{sup -1} fresh fish. In April 2004, Danish commercial salmon fishing was banned to in the Baltic sea around Bornholm and Gotland (mainly ICES areas 25, 26), because the Food Administration reported dioxin levels exceeding the intervention level of 3 pg g{sup -1} fresh salmon. Their report was based on data from 10 individual salmon, and 3 pooled samples, each with 10 salmon. Since dioxins are widespread in the environment, the human population face a trade off to produce sufficient food that is safe to eat and avoid eating contaminated food. The world population is increasing, and the demand for healthy food is steadily increasing. Consequently, there is a need for risk assessments, where the consequences of eating foods with different grades of contamination is evaluated. The evaluation must be based on data of high quality, and because dioxin accumulation is a slow proces, the risk assessments should consider long time periods of months and years instead of days and weeks. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the statistical variation of dioxin data from Baltic herring and salmon. The data are used to calculate the quantity of herring and salmon, that humans of different body weight can eat without exceeding the tolerable daily intake (TDI). (In dietary recommendations exposure from dairy products etc. must also be taken into account). A PCDD/F box model is proposed that subtract losses during cooking and postprandially.

  16. Radiative heat transfer exceeding the blackbody limit between macroscale planar surfaces separated by a nanosize vacuum gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Michael P.; Milovich, Daniel; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    Using Rytov's fluctuational electrodynamics framework, Polder and Van Hove predicted that radiative heat transfer between planar surfaces separated by a vacuum gap smaller than the thermal wavelength exceeds the blackbody limit due to tunnelling of evanescent modes. This finding has led to the conceptualization of systems capitalizing on evanescent modes such as thermophotovoltaic converters and thermal rectifiers. Their development is, however, limited by the lack of devices enabling radiative transfer between macroscale planar surfaces separated by a nanosize vacuum gap. Here we measure radiative heat transfer for large temperature differences (~120 K) using a custom-fabricated device in which the gap separating two 5 × 5 mm2 intrinsic silicon planar surfaces is modulated from 3,500 to 150 nm. A substantial enhancement over the blackbody limit by a factor of 8.4 is reported for a 150-nm-thick gap. Our device paves the way for the establishment of novel evanescent wave-based systems.

  17. Widespread arsenic contamination of soils in residential areas and public spaces: an emerging regulatory or medical crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belluck, D A; Benjamin, S L; Baveye, P; Sampson, J; Johnson, B

    2003-01-01

    A critical review finds government agencies allow, permit, license, or ignore arsenic releases to surface soils. Release rates are controlled or evaluated using risk-based soil contaminant numerical limits employing standardized risk algorithms, chemical-specific and default input values. United States arsenic residential soil limits, approximately 0.4- approximately 40 ppm, generally correspond to a one-in-one-million to a one-in-ten-thousand incremental cancer risk range via ingestion of or direct contact with contaminated residential soils. Background arsenic surface soil levels often exceed applicable limits. Arsenic releases to surface soils (via, e.g., air emissions, waste recycling, soil amendments, direct pesticide application, and chromated copper arsenic (CCA)-treated wood) can result in greatly elevated arsenic levels, sometimes one to two orders of magnitude greater than applicable numerical limits. CCA-treated wood, a heavily used infrastructure material at residences and public spaces, can release sufficient arsenic to result in surface soil concentrations that exceed numerical limits by one or two orders of magnitude. Although significant exceedence of arsenic surface soil numerical limits would normally result in regulatory actions at industrial or hazardous waste sites, no such pattern is seen at residential and public spaces. Given the current risk assessment paradigm, measured or expected elevated surface soil arsenic levels at residential and public spaces suggest that a regulatory health crisis of sizeable magnitude is imminent. In contrast, available literature and a survey of government agencies conducted for this paper finds no verified cases of human morbidity or mortality resulting from exposure to elevated levels of arsenic in surface soils. This concomitance of an emerging regulatory health crisis in the absence of a medical crisis is arguably partly attributable to inadequate government and private party attention to the issue.

  18. A Study on OBE Exceedance Criteria Using the CAV Concept for NPPs in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Se Moon; Cho, Sung Il; Yun, Kwan Hee

    2009-01-01

    NPPs in Korea have so far complied with the US Regulatory Guide 1.12 Rev.1 (1974) for the seismic monitoring systems. However, researchers in Korea have been considering attempting to comply with Regulatory Guide 1.12 rev.2 (1997) when implementing all future seismic monitoring systems. To comply with the new regulations, Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) Exceedance Criteria applied with the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV) has to be developed for local use. The CAV was developed in the USA as one reasonable OBE exceedance criterion for NPPs; however, it has not been widely used outside the USA, not-withstanding its solid technical basis. It is, however, expected that the worldwide NPP construction boom will necessitate development and more frequent use of reasonable OBE exceedance criteria. As multi-units (four or more) are situated in one site in Korea, prevention of simultaneous shutdown of multi-unit caused by non damaging earthquakes is very important; otherwise, a serious economic loss could occur, and there could also be a great impact on the stability of the power grid that would arise due to the unnecessary shutdown. Actually, we have had the experience of observing a Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA)-value greater than 0.1g (the current OBE level for Korean NPPs) due to an M=4.8 earthquake (20 th Jan. '07) that did not even cause any damage to the poorly-designed structures nearby. This experience gave a motivation to the KHNP should concern the needs of study on OBE exceedance criteria in view of application of the CAV to Korean seismic situation, which will be more practical. The present paper is intended to show the intermediate result of the research on Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) exceedance criteria in Korea

  19. Technical meeting on progress in managing, and limiting the consequences of events exceeding the design basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Technical Groups on 'Reactor Safety' and 'Thermodynamics and Fluid Dynamics' of the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft e.V. organized a joint technical meeting on 'Progress in Managing, and Limiting the Consequences of, Events Exceeding the Design Basis' at the FTU Training Center of the Karlsruhe Research Center. The topic chosen, the papers presented, the presenters, and the non-technical part of the program met with lively interest on the part of institutions in the nuclear field. These were the objectives of the technical meeting: - Establishing a forum for communicating relevant topics. - In-depth discussion of the main topic, i.e. the advanced development of reactor safety, research in the field, and its application, in twenty selected papers presented by speakers from different institutions. - Presentation of topical work in a nuclear technology institution, the Karlsruhe Research Center. (orig.) [de

  20. 21 CFR 109.4 - Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a food additive, may be established to define a level of contamination at which a food may be... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels. 109.4 Section 109.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  1. 21 CFR 509.4 - Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a food additive, may be established to define a level of contamination at which a food may be... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels. 509.4 Section 509.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  2. Legitimization of regulatory norms: Waterfowl hunter acceptance of changing duck bag limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.; Lawrence, Jeffrey S.; Cordts, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined response to regulatory change over time, or addressed hunter attitudes about changes in hunting bag limits. This article explores Minnesota waterfowl hunters’ attitudes about duck bag limits, examining attitudes about two state duck bag limits that were initially more restrictive than the maximum set by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), but then increased to match federal limits. Results are from four mail surveys that examined attitudes about bag limits over time. Following two bag limit increases, a greater proportion of hunters rated the new bag limit “too high” and a smaller proportion rated it “too low.” Several years following the first bag limit increase, the proportion of hunters who indicated that the limit was “too high” had declined, suggesting hunter acceptance of the new regulation. Results suggest that waterfowl bag limits may represent legal norms that influence hunter attitudes and gain legitimacy over time.

  3. Administrative limits for tritium concentrations found in non-potable groundwater at nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, R.; Hart, D.; WIllert, C.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is a regulatory limit available for tritium in drinking water, but no such limit for non-potable groundwater. Voluntary administrative limits for site groundwater may be established at nuclear power facilities to ensure minimal risk to human health and the environment, and provide guidance for investigation or other actions intended to prevent exceedances of future regulatory or guideline limits. This work presents a streamlined approach for nuclear power facilities to develop three tiers of administrative limits for tritium in groundwater so that facilities can identify abnormal/uncontrolled releases of tritium at an early stage, and take appropriate actions to investigate, control, and protect groundwater. Tier 1 represents an upper limit of background, Tier 2 represents a level between background and Tier 3, and Tier 3 represents a risk-based concentration protective of down-gradient receptors. (author)

  4. Prediction in Partial Duration Series With Generalized Pareto-Distributed Exceedances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan; Madsen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Peter Funder

    1992-01-01

    As a generalization of the common assumption of exponential distribution of the exceedances in Partial duration series the generalized Pareto distribution has been adopted. Estimators for the parameters are presented using estimation by both method of moments and probability-weighted moments...... distributions (with physically justified upper limit) the correct exceedance distribution should be applied despite a possible acceptance of the exponential assumption by a test of significance....

  5. Composition and sources of particles in Mannerheimintie during exceedance days of PM{sub 10} limit value in 2010; Hiukkasten koostumus ja laehteet Mannerheimintiellae PM{sub 10}-raja-arvon ylityspaeivinae 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupiainen, K.; Niemi, J.; Ritola, R.; Stojiljkovic, A.

    2012-02-15

    The purpose of the work was to determine sources of respirable particles (PM{sub 10}) in the center of Helsinki, at the measurement station in Mannerheimintie traffic site, in 2010 during the days when the daily average concentration of PM{sub 10} exceeded 50 mug/m3. By the end of the year (2010) the number of this kind of days was 24. The allowed number of exceedance days per year is 35, so the limit value was not exceeded in 2010. Similar work has been carried out in 2008 and 2009 and this report also summarizes results from all three years. HSY is responsible for monitoring the air quality in the Helsinki metropolitan area. The PM{sub 10} monitoring data in combination with electron microscopy based single particle compositional analysis and receptor modeling was used to evaluate dust source contributions on the exceedance days at HSY's air quality monitoring station in Mannerheimintie. According to the study the most significant source of PM{sub 10} particles in Mannerheimintie in 2010 was the dust sources related to traction control (winter-sanding and -salting of streets, pavement wear by studded tyres). Results from 2008 and 2009 show similar tendency. Also dust from construction sites contribute to airborne particle concentrations, timing of this source varies depending on the year. In 2010 particles from construction sites contributed to the exceedances that took place in late spring and early summer. Long-range transboundary air pollution also caused high concentrations of particles and contributed to some of the exceedances in 2008-2010. In late July and early August in 2010, long-range transboundary particles from the forest fires in Russia caused high particle concentrations in Helsinki metropolitan area and elsewhere in Southern Finland. Based on the results, the most significant means to reduce the airborne concentrations and to prevent the exceedance of the limit value are those that aim at mitigating street dust. In Helsinki, the means to

  6. An experimental study on developing seismic damage indicator appearing OBE exceedance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, D. S.; Kwon, K. J.; Lee, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Immediate measurement should be taken depending on the level of seismic damage to nuclear power plants when an earthquake exceeds Operating Base Earthquake by NRC regulatory guide. An earthquake at nuclear plant site is felt with seismic instrument and analyzed by seismic monitoring systems. However, if operators of insufficient knowledge to earthquake can recognize the intensity of the earthquake with a subsidiary indicating model, more immediate response can be conducted. This subsidiary indicating model is called seismic damage indicator. In this regard, an experimental study using shaking table was conducted to develop the seismic damage indicator by CAV and OBE compatible with NRC standard response spectrum. In this test result, stacked acrylic cylinders were manufactured to behave consistently for each direction of seismic load. If the developed SDI is installed in nuclear power plants, it is seemed to be useful in easily determining OBE exceedance easily, and counteracting by plant operator along with the existing seismic monitoring systems

  7. How to evaluate the risks of exceeding limits: geostatistical models and their application to air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouquet, Ch. de; Deraisme, J.; Bobbia, M.

    2007-01-01

    Geo-statistics is increasingly applied to the study of environmental risks in a variety of sectors, especially in the fields of soil decontamination and the evaluation of the risks due to air pollution. Geo-statistics offers a rigorous stochastic modeling approach that makes it possible to answer questions expressed in terms of uncertainty and risk. This article focusses on nonlinear geo-statistical methods, based on the Gaussian random function model, whose essential properties are summarised. We use two examples to characterize situations where direct and thus rapid methods provide appropriate solutions and cases that inevitably require more laborious simulation techniques. Exposure of the population of the Rouen metropolitan area to the risk of NO 2 pollution is assessed by simulations, but the surface area where the pollution exceeds the threshold limit can be easily estimated with nonlinear conditional expectation techniques. A second example is used to discuss the bias introduced by direct simulation, here of a percentile of daily SO 2 concentration for one year in the city of Le Havre; an operational solution is proposed. (authors)

  8. Optical Frequency Comb Fourier Transform Spectroscopy with Resolution Exceeding the Limit Set by the Optical Path Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltynowicz, Aleksandra; Rutkowski, Lucile; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Maslowski, Piotr; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, Kevin; Fermann, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) based on optical frequency combs (OFC) allow detection of broadband molecular spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios within acquisition times orders of magnitude shorter than traditional FTIRs based on thermal sources. Due to the pulsed nature of OFCs the interferogram consists of a series of bursts rather than a single burst at zero optical path difference (OPD). The comb mode structure can be resolved by acquiring multiple bursts, in both mechanical FTS systems and dual-comb spectroscopy. However, in all existing demonstrations the resolution was ultimately limited either by the maximum available OPD between the interferometer arms or by the total acquisition time enabled by the storage memory. We present a method that provides spectral resolution exceeding the limit set by the maximum OPD using an interferogram containing only a single burst. The method allows measurements of absorption lines narrower than the OPD-limited resolution without any influence of the instrumental lineshape function. We demonstrate this by measuring undistorted CO2 and CO absorption lines with linewidth narrower than the OPD-limited resolution using OFC-based mechanical FTS in the near- and mid-infrared wavelength ranges. The near-infrared system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a high finesse cavity, while the mid-infrared system is based on a Tm:fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator coupled to a multi-pass cell. We show that the method allows acquisition of high-resolution molecular spectra with interferometer length orders of magnitude shorter than traditional FTIR. Mandon, J., G. Guelachvili, and N. Picque, Nat. Phot., 2009. 3(2): p. 99-102. Zeitouny, M., et al., Ann. Phys., 2013. 525(6): p. 437-442. Zolot, A.M., et al., Opt. Lett., 2012. 37(4): p. 638-640.

  9. Physically based probability criterion for exceeding radionuclide concentration limits in heterogeneous bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worman, A.; Xu, S.; Dverstorp, B.

    2004-01-01

    A significant problem in a risk analysis of the repository for high-level nuclear waste is to estimate the barrier effect of the geosphere. The significant spatial variability of the rock properties implies that migrating RNs encounter a distribution of bedrock properties and mass-transfer mechanisms in different proportions along the transport paths. For practical reasons, we will never be able to know exactly this distribution of properties by performing a reasonable amount of measurements in a site investigation. On the contrary, recent experimental studies reveal that crystalline bedrock can possess a marked heterogeneity of various physical and geochemical properties that potentially may have a certain impact on the transport of RNs in fractured bedrock. Also current field investigation techniques provide only fragmentary information of the properties of the geosphere. This is a basic motivation for treating flows of water and solute elements in groundwaters by means of stochastic continuum models. The stochastic analysis is based on the idea that we know only certain point values of the property fields and use this information to estimate intermediate values. The probabilistic properties of the stochastic analysis are suitable input variables for risk analyses of the relevant sequence of extreme events for which empirical observations are rare or non-existing. The purpose of this paper is to outline the implications of the stochastic approach for estimating probabilities that certain concentration limits are exceeded at discharge points from. the bedrock in case of a leakage from the waste repository. The analysis is restricted to the water flow and solute transport in the bedrock alone without consideration of the full sequence of events in a full risk analysis and the Bayesian statistics involved in such conditioned (and cross-correlated) event series. The focus is on the implication for the risk analysis of the auto-covariance structure in bedrock

  10. Modelling of snow exceedances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, Pavlina K.; Sadovský, Zoltán; Stehlík, Milan

    2017-07-01

    Modelling of snow exceedances is of great importance and interest for ecology, civil engineering and general public. We suggest the favorable fit for exceedances related to the exceptional snow loads from Slovakia, assuming that the data is driven by Generalised Pareto Distribution or Generalized Extreme Value Distribution. Further, the statistical dependence between the maximal snow loads and the corresponding altitudes is studied.

  11. Composition and sources of particles in Mannerheimintie during exceedance days of PM{sub 10} limit value in 2009; Hiukkasten koostumus ja laehteet Mannerheimintiellae PM{sub 10}-raja-arvon ylityspaeivinae 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupiainen, K.; Stojiljkovic, A.; Ritola, R. (Nordic Envicon Oy, Helsinki (Finland))

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of the work was to determine sources of thoracic particles (PM{sub 10}) in the center of Helsinki, in Mannerheimintie, in 2009 during the days when the daily average concentration of PM{sub 10} exceeded 50 mug/m3. Work was commissioned by the Helsinki City Public Works department, the Helsinki Environment Centre and the Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY (formerly YTV). By the end of the year there were altogether 30 exceedance days. The allowed number of exceedance days per year is 35, so the limit value was not exceeded in 2009. HSY is responsible for monitoring the air quality in the Helsinki metropolitan area. The PM{sub 10} monitoring data in combination with electron microscopy based single particle compositional analysis and receptor modeling was used to evaluate dust source contributions on the exceedance days at HSY's air quality monitoring station in Mannerheimintie. Dust sources related to traction control (winter maintenance and pavement wear by studded tyres) contributed most to the PM{sub 10} concentrations in Mannerheimintie. On 12 exceeding days this group accounted for more than 50 % of PM{sub 10} particles, on 3 days the group alone was sufficient to cause the exceedance. On 3 of the exceedance days long-range transboundary air pollution or traffic exhaust emissions were on the same level with the traction control sources. On 11 days the most significant impact came from construction sites. (orig.)

  12. Exceedance of critical loads and of critical limits impacts tree nutrition across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldner, P.; Thimonier, A.; Graf Pannatier, E.

    2015-01-01

    solution tended to be related to less favourable nutritional status. Context Forests have been exposed to elevated atmospheric deposition of acidifying and eutrophying sulphur and nitrogen compounds for decades. Critical loads have been identified, below which damage due to acidification and eutrophication...... are not expected to occur. Aims We explored the relationship between the exceedance of critical loads and inorganic nitrogen concentration, the base cation to aluminium ratio in soil solutions, as well as the nutritional status of trees. Methods We used recent data describing deposition, elemental concentrations....... Conclusion The findings support the hypothesis that elevated nitrogen and sulphur deposition can lead to imbalances in tree nutrition....

  13. Interrelation between results of individual dosimetric control and regulatory control in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Bernal, E.D.; Jova Sed, L.A.; Capote Ferrera, E.; Lopez Bejerano, G.M.

    1997-01-01

    The increasing use of various applications of ionizing radiation in Cuba made it necessary to create a harmonic system of facilities that guarantees the radiological safety of radiation workers, the public and the environment. Therefore, in 1985 a Centre of Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) was created. Thereafter, in 1991, the regulatory function and the inspection of radiological and nuclear safety was assigned to the National Centre of Nuclear Safety. The introduction of this service has provided the regulatory body with a tool to control the existing situation with respect to registration and licensing. The results of the service in the period 1994-1996 and a comparison with previous years are given. The results obtained reflect that the system of supervision in general has guaranteed keeping levels of doses low. The dose values registered demonstrate the possibility to establish in the country as a does limit an annual average dose limit of 20 mSv which might rise to but shall on no account exceed 50 mSv per year without the need for costly investment and based on organizational measures

  14. Exceeding Conventional Photovoltaic Efficiency Limits Using Colloidal Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pach, Gregory F.

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are a widely investigated field of research due to their highly tunable nature in which the optical and electronic properties of the nanocrystal can be manipulated by merely changing the nanocrystal's size. Specifically, colloidal quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) have become a promising candidate for future generation photovoltaic technology. Quantum dots exhibit multiple exciton generation (MEG) in which multiple electron-hole pairs are generated from a single high-energy photon. This process is not observed in bulk-like semiconductors and allows for QDSCs to achieve theoretical efficiency limits above the standard single-junction Shockley-Queisser limit. However, the fast expanding field of QDSC research has lacked standardization of synthetic techniques and device design. Therefore, we sought to detail methodology for synthesizing PbS and PbSe QDs as well as photovoltaic device fabrication techniques as a fast track toward constructing high-performance solar cells. We show that these protocols lead toward consistently achieving efficiencies above 8% for PbS QDSCs. Using the same methodology for building single-junction photovoltaic devices, we incorporated PbS QDs as a bottom cell into a monolithic tandem architecture along with solution-processed CdTe nanocrystals. Modeling shows that near-peak tandem device efficiencies can be achieved across a wide range of bottom cell band gaps, and therefore the highly tunable band gap of lead-chalcogenide QDs lends well towards a bottom cell in a tandem architecture. A fully functioning monolithic tandem device is realized through the development of a ZnTe/ZnO recombination layer that appropriately combines the two subcells in series. Multiple recent reports have shown nanocrystalline heterostructures to undergo the MEG process more efficiency than several other nanostrucutres, namely lead-chalcogenide QDs. The final section of my thesis expands upon a recent publication by Zhang et. al., which

  15. Occupational noise exposure and regulatory adherence in music venues in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Barlow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise in most working environments is an unwanted by-product of the process. In most countries, noise exposure for workers has been controlled by legislation for many years. In the music industry the "noise" is actually the "desired" product, and for a long time the UK entertainment industry was exempt from these regulations. From April 2008, however, it became regulated under the Noise at Work Regulations 2005, meaning that employers from orchestras to nightclubs are legally required to adhere to the same requirements (based on ISO 9612:2009 for controlling noise exposure for their staff that have been applied to other industries for many years. A key question is to what degree, 2 years after implementation, these employers are complying with their legal responsibilities to protect the staff from noise? This study assessed four public music venues where live and/or recorded music is regularly played. Thirty staff members in different roles in the venues were monitored using noise dosimetry to determine noise exposure. Questionnaires were used to determine work patterns, attitudes to noise and hearing loss, and levels of training about noise risk. Results showed that the majority of staff (70% in all venues exceeded the daily noise exposure limit value in their working shift. Use of hearing protection was rare (<30% and not enforced by most venues. The understanding of the hazard posed by noise was low, and implementation of the noise regulations was haphazard, with staff regularly exceeding regulatory limits. The implication is that the industry is failing to meet regulatory requirements.

  16. The Cumulative Daily Tolerance Levels of Potentially Toxic Excipients Ethanol and Propylene Glycol Are Commonly Exceeded in Neonates and Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valeur, Kristine Svinning; Hertel, Steen Axel; Lundstrøm, Kaare Engell

    2018-01-01

    neonates and infants and compare these levels to the tolerance limits found in guidelines published by European Medicines Agency (EMA). As part of the SEEN study, all medicinal products administered to neonates and infants were recorded. All included neonates received ≥2 medicinal products/day and infants...... ≥3 medicinal products/day. Daily excipient levels were calculated based on quantities obtained from manufacturers or databases. Excipient levels were compared to tolerance limits proposed by the EMA. Altogether, 470 neonates and 160 infants were included, recording 4207 prescriptions and 316 products...... exceed tolerance limit of 6 mg/kg/day. Of the total number of prescriptions involving PG-containing medicinal products (n = 174), 70% would alone exceed a maximum tolerance limit of 50 mg/kg/day. Maximal daily exposure to ethanol (1563 mg/kg/day) or PG (954 mg/kg/day) exceeded the tolerance limits...

  17. Regulatory Powers in Public Procurement Law of Peruvian Administrative Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Morón Urbina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Peruvian law has explicitly recognized regulatory powers to administrative agencies, which allows them to have a preponderant role in the production of rules in public procurement. Although these delegations of legislative authority are positively defined, distortions in the system of legal sources arise when agencies exceed delegated powers or when measures issued by administrative entities are mistaken for regulations. This paper aims to identify regulatory powers of Peruvian administrative agencies, as well as the regulatory measures they issue, and their relation with other sources of law.

  18. 76 FR 40412 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate..., Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission... a more limited application by their terms. For more information about the rulebook consolidation...

  19. Early warning of limit-exceeding concentrations of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in drinking water reservoirs by inferential modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recknagel, Friedrich; Orr, Philip T; Bartkow, Michael; Swanepoel, Annelie; Cao, Hongqing

    2017-11-01

    An early warning scheme is proposed that runs ensembles of inferential models for predicting the cyanobacterial population dynamics and cyanotoxin concentrations in drinking water reservoirs on a diel basis driven by in situ sonde water quality data. When the 10- to 30-day-ahead predicted concentrations of cyanobacteria cells or cyanotoxins exceed pre-defined limit values, an early warning automatically activates an action plan considering in-lake control, e.g. intermittent mixing and ad hoc water treatment in water works, respectively. Case studies of the sub-tropical Lake Wivenhoe (Australia) and the Mediterranean Vaal Reservoir (South Africa) demonstrate that ensembles of inferential models developed by the hybrid evolutionary algorithm HEA are capable of up to 30days forecasts of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins using data collected in situ. The resulting models for Dolicospermum circinale displayed validity for up to 10days ahead, whilst concentrations of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and microcystins were successfully predicted up to 30days ahead. Implementing the proposed scheme for drinking water reservoirs enhances current water quality monitoring practices by solely utilising in situ monitoring data, in addition to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin measurements. Access to routinely measured cyanotoxin data allows for development of models that predict explicitly cyanotoxin concentrations that avoid to inadvertently model and predict non-toxic cyanobacterial strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 12 CFR 562.2 - Regulatory reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 562.2 Regulatory reports. (a) Definition and scope. This section applies to all regulatory reports, as... (TFR) are examples of regulatory reports. Regulatory reports are regulatory documents, not accounting... limited to, the accounting instructions provided in the TFR, guidance contained in OTS regulations...

  1. 76 FR 50796 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Increase the Position Limit for Options on the Standard and Poor's... Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission...

  2. Marine Biotoxins: Occurrence, Toxicity, Regulatory Limits and Reference Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierina Visciano

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms are natural phenomena caused by the massive growth of phytoplankton that may contain highly toxic chemicals, the so-called marine biotoxins causing illness and even death to both aquatic organisms and humans. Their occurrence has been increased in frequency and severity, suggesting a worldwide public health risk. Marine biotoxins can accumulate in bivalve molluscs and regulatory limits have been set for some classes according to European Union legislation. These compounds can be distinguished in water- and fat-soluble molecules. The first group involves those of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning and Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning, whereas the toxins soluble in fat can cause Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning and Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning. Due to the lack of long-term toxicity studies, establishing tolerable daily intakes for any of these marine biotoxins was not possible, but an acute reference dose can be considered more appropriate, because these molecules show an acute toxicity. Dietary exposure assessment is linked both to the levels of marine biotoxins present in bivalve molluscs and the portion that could be eaten by consumers. Symptoms may vary from a severe gastrointestinal intoxication with diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps to neurological disorders such as ataxia, dizziness, partial paralysis, and respiratory distress. The official method for the detection of marine biotoxins is the mouse bioassay (MBA showing some limits due to ethical restrictions and insufficient specificity. For this reason, the liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method has replaced MBA as the reference technique. However, the monitoring of algal blooms producing marine biotoxins should be regularly assessed in order to obtain more reliable, accurate estimates of bloom toxicity and their potential impacts.

  3. Radio-frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure levels in different European outdoor urban environments in comparison with regulatory limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbinello, Damiano; Joseph, Wout; Huss, Anke; Verloock, Leen; Beekhuizen, Johan; Vermeulen, Roel; Martens, Luc; Röösli, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Concerns of the general public about potential adverse health effects caused by radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) led authorities to introduce precautionary exposure limits, which vary considerably between regions. It may be speculated that precautionary limits affect the base station network in a manner that mean population exposure unintentionally increases. The objectives of this multicentre study were to compare mean exposure levels in outdoor areas across four different European cities and to compare with regulatory RF-EMF exposure levels in the corresponding areas. We performed measurements in the cities of Amsterdam (the Netherlands, regulatory limits for mobile phone base station frequency bands: 41-61 V/m), Basel (Switzerland, 4-6 V/m), Ghent (Belgium, 3-4.5 V/m) and Brussels (Belgium, 2.9-4.3 V/m) using a portable measurement device. Measurements were conducted in three different types of outdoor areas (central and non-central residential areas and downtown), between 2011 and 2012 at 12 different days. On each day, measurements were taken every 4s for approximately 15 to 30 min per area. Measurements per urban environment were repeated 12 times during 1 year. Arithmetic mean values for mobile phone base station exposure ranged between 0.22 V/m (Basel) and 0.41 V/m (Amsterdam) in all outdoor areas combined. The 95th percentile for total RF-EMF exposure varied between 0.46 V/m (Basel) and 0.82 V/m (Amsterdam) and the 99th percentile between 0.81 V/m (Basel) and 1.20 V/m (Brussels). All exposure levels were far below international reference levels proposed by ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection). Our study did not find indications that lowering the regulatory limit results in higher mobile phone base station exposure levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Radioactivity in consumer products : radiation safety and regulatory appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, B.K.S.; Venkataraman, G.; Subrahmanym, P.

    1993-01-01

    Use of radioactive materials in consumer products is in vogue almost since the discovery of radioactivity. There has been a rapid growth in the use of radioactive material in various consumer products such as Ionization Chamber Smoke Detectors (ICSD), Static eliminators, etc. In addition, there are certain manufacturing processes wherein the Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) get incorporated in the consumer products. Certain phosphatic fertilizers, titanium dioxide pigments, phospho gypsum plaster boards are some examples in this category. The manufacture and use of these products result in radiation dose to the public apart from radiation exposure to the personnel involved in the manufacturing process. Appropriate radiation control measures have to be taken in the design, manufacture and use of consumer products to ensure that the radiation doses to the public and the population at large do not exceed the relevant limits. While appropriate regulatory controls and surveillance are established for manufacture and use of certain products, these are still to be recognised and established in respect of certain other processes and products. The current status of radiation safety and regulatory control and the lack of these in respect of some products are discussed in this paper. (author). 5 refs

  5. How "ought" exceeds but implies "can": Description and encouragement in moral judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turri, John

    2017-11-01

    This paper tests a theory about the relationship between two important topics in moral philosophy and psychology. One topic is the function of normative language, specifically claims that one "ought" to do something. Do these claims function to describe moral responsibilities, encourage specific behavior, or both? The other topic is the relationship between saying that one "ought" to do something and one's ability to do it. In what respect, if any, does what one "ought" to do exceed what one "can" do? The theory tested here has two parts: (1) "ought" claims function to both describe responsibilities and encourage people to fulfill them (the dual-function hypothesis); (2) the two functions relate differently to ability, because the encouragement function is limited by the person's ability, but the descriptive function is not (the interaction hypothesis). If this theory is correct, then in one respect "ought implies can" is false because people have responsibilities that exceed their abilities. But in another respect "ought implies can" is legitimate because it is not worthwhile to encourage people to do things that exceed their ability. Results from two behavioral experiments support the theory that "ought" exceeds but implies "can." Results from a third experiment provide further evidence regarding an "ought" claim's primary function and how contextual features can affect the interpretation of its functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical and psychosocial predictors of exceeding target length of stay during inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wesley; Buttineau, Mackenzie; Harvey, Jennifer K; Pucci, Rebecca A; Wong, Anna P M; Dell'Erario, Linda; Bosnyak, Stephanie; Reid, Shannon; Salbach, Nancy M

    2017-10-01

    In Ontario, Canada, patients admitted to inpatient rehabilitation hospitals post-stroke are classified into rehabilitation patient groups based on age and functional level. Clinical practice guidelines, called quality-based procedures, recommend a target length of stay (LOS) for each group. The study objective was to evaluate the extent to which patients post-stroke at an inpatient rehabilitation hospital are meeting LOS targets and to identify patient characteristics that predict exceeding target LOS. A quantitative, longitudinal study from an inpatient rehabilitation hospital was conducted. Participants included adult patients (≥18 years) with stroke, admitted to an inpatient rehabilitation hospital between 2014 and 2015. The percentage of patients exceeding the recommended target LOS was determined. Logistic regression was performed to identify clinical and psychosocial patient characteristics associated with exceeding target LOS after adjusting for stroke severity. Of 165 patients, 38.8% exceeded their target LOS. Presence of ataxia, recurrent stroke, living alone, absence of a caregiver at admission, and acquiring a caregiver during hospital LOS was each associated with significantly higher odds of exceeding target LOS in comparison to patients without these characteristics after adjusting for stroke severity (p stroke-specific factors may be helpful to adjust LOS expectations and promote efficient resource allocation. This exploratory study was limited to findings from one inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Cross-validation of results using data-sets from multiple rehabilitation hospitals across Ontario is recommended.

  7. 77 FR 23770 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ...: The financial markets as a whole should benefit from [limit order display] because the price discovery... revised tier sizes and corresponding liquidity minimum amounts are in the best interest of the market for...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Amendment No. 1...

  8. Lens of the eye: regulatory limits, measurement, dosimetry and medical control. Technical sheets of the SFRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordy, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    As the lens of the eye are a radio-sensitive tissue which can be affected by ionizing radiations, and as epidemiological studies lead to the proposition of a revision of their exposure limit, this sheet first recalls regulatory limits and quantities to be measured. It proposes an overview of industrial and medical situations associated with an exposure risk for lens of the eye. It presents the conditions for bearing a specific individual dosimeter, and the design of dosimeters aimed at a direct measurement. It discusses the characteristics and performance of individual protection equipment, and the criterion for the choice between a direct measurement and an indirect assessment of a characteristic value of exposure for photons and for electrons. It addresses the issues of classification and monitoring for a professional medical follow-up: description of the pathological risk, elements for a medical follow-up (examinations), classification and dose monitoring

  9. Limited BRC rulemaking: Regulatory approach and experience in Texas for short-lived radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBurney, Ruth E.; Pollard, Christine G.

    1992-01-01

    In 1987, the Texas Department of Health (TDH) implemented a rule to allow, under certain conditions, wastes containing limited concentrations of short- lived radionuclides (less than 300-day half-life) to be disposed of in Type I sanitary landfills. The rule was based on a technical analysis that demonstrated the degree of safety for approximately 340 m of radioactive waste generated annually in Texas and identified major restrictions and conditions for disposal. TDH's Bureau of Radiation Control staff have been able to maintain an account of licensees utilizing the rule during the past years. Several research and industrial facilities in the state have saved significantly on waste disposal expenses. Public concerns and economic impacts for licensees as well as other regulatory aspects and experiences with the rule are discussed. (author)

  10. 47 CFR 22.535 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters operating on the channels listed in § 22.531 must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum ERP. The ERP must not exceed the applicable limits in this paragraph under any circumstances. Frequency range (MHz) Maximum ERP (Watts) 35-36 600 43...

  11. Prediction in Partial Duration Series With Generalized Pareto-Distributed Exceedances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan; Madsen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Peter Funder

    1992-01-01

    As a generalization of the common assumption of exponential distribution of the exceedances in Partial duration series the generalized Pareto distribution has been adopted. Estimators for the parameters are presented using estimation by both method of moments and probability-weighted moments......-weighted moments. Maintaining the generalized Pareto distribution as the parent exceedance distribution the T-year event is estimated assuming the exceedances to be exponentially distributed. For moderately long-tailed exceedance distributions and small to moderate sample sizes it is found, by comparing mean...... square errors of the T-year event estimators, that the exponential distribution is preferable to the correct generalized Pareto distribution despite the introduced model error and despite a possible rejection of the exponential hypothesis by a test of significance. For moderately short-tailed exceedance...

  12. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1987-12-01

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  13. The Belgian regulatory framework for NORM industries : test-case of a phosphate production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepin, Stephane; Dehandschutter, Boris; Poffijn, Andre; Michel Sonck

    2008-01-01

    According to the Belgian radiation protection regulatory framework, some categories of NORM industries must register to the competent Belgian radiation protection authority (FANC, Federal Agency for Nuclear Control). The facilities must provide a set of information which allows the authority to assess the radiological impact of the industrial activity on the workers, the population and the environment. If the dose exceeds or is likely to exceed 1 mSv/y, corrective measures have to be implemented. FANC has issued a methodology in order to define more precisely the data needed to evaluate the radiological impact. The methodology lists also the exposure pathways which have to be taken into account and the relevant parameters for the evaluation of the doses. The case of a phosphate production plant is discussed in more details: although the exposure of the workers in the production process as such is rather limited, the specific activity of some residues (calcium fluoride sludge) reaches around 10 kBq/kg of Ra-226. This sludge is disposed off in a specific landfill for which a program of radiological monitoring has been implemented. It includes periodic measurements of dose rate and radon concentration on the landfill. (author)

  14. Observed ozone exceedances in Italy: statistical analysis and modelling in the period 2002-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falasca, Serena; Curci, Gabriele; Candeloro, Luca; Conte, Annamaria; Ippoliti, Carla

    2017-04-01

    Local ambient air quality is strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions and meteorological conditions. The year 2015 is considered by NASA scientists as one of the hottest at the global scale since 1880. Furthermore, in Europe it was the first summer after the introduction of Euro6 regulation, the latest emission standard for passenger vehicles. The goal of this study is twofold: (1) the investigation of the impact of the heat wave occurred in the summer of 2015 on ozone levels and (2) the exploration of the weight of temperature as driver of high-level ozone events with respect to other variables. We performed a quantitative examination of the ozone seasons (May-September) for the period 2002-2015 using ozone concentration and weather data from 24 stations across Italy. The number of exceedances of limit values set by the European directive was calculated for each year, and compared with the trend of ozone concentration and temperature. Furthermore, the data were grouped in clusters of consecutive days of ozone exceedances in order to characterize the duration and the intensity of high ozone events. Finally, we developed a multivariate logistic regression model to investigate the role of a set of independent variables (meteorological, and temporal variables, altitude, number of inhabitants, vehicle emission standard) on the probability of exceedances. Results show that 2015 is one of the hottest years after 2003. During the period 2002-2015, the average number of exceedances per station of the daily maximum 8-hour average is often higher than the limit established by the European directive (25 per year). The highest number of exceedances was 65 per station, reached in 2003. The Po Valley is confirmed as a hot spot for pollution, with more frequent exceedances and a higher sensitivity to temperature, especially at urban sites. Ozone events in 2015 were fewer than recent years, but of longer duration (on average 4 days against 3 days), and with similar mean

  15. Technical findings and regulatory analysis for Generic Safety Issue II.E.4.3, ''Containment Integrity Check''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, A.W.

    1988-04-01

    This report contains the technical findings and regulatory analysis for Generic Safety Issue II.E.4.3, ''Containment Integrity Check.'' An evaluation of the containment isolation history from 1965 to 1983 reveals that (except for a small number of events) containment integrity has been maintained and that the majority of reported events have been events related to exceeding Technical Specification limits (or 0.6 of the allowable leakage level). In addition, more recent risk analyses have shown that allowable leakage rates even if increased by a factor of 10 would not significantly increase risk. Potential methods of continuous monitoring are identified and evaluated. Therefore, these technical findings and risk evaluations support closure of Generic Safety Issue II.E.4.3

  16. 78 FR 19057 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; ICE Clear Europe Limited; Notice of Filing Proposed Rule Changes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... categories. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the... by ICEEU. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the.... 78q-1(b)(3)(F). B. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on Burden on Competition ICE Clear Europe...

  17. Regulatory aspects of radiation protection in Indian nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chander, Vipin; Pawar, S.K.; Duraisamy, S.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Energy Act of 1962 covers the radiation safety aspects in the development, control and use of atomic energy. To carry out certain regulatory and safety functions under this act, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) was constituted in November 15, 1983. Operating Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) account for about 60% of occupational collective dose and about 65% of the number of radiation workers in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Therefore radiation protection aspects in NPPs are of prime importance. In 1970s and 1980s the high radiation exposures in NPPs was an issue with TAPS-1 and 2 reaching annual collective dose of 50 Person-Sv. In response to this, AERB constituted an expert committee to investigate the possibility of reducing collective doses in NPPs in 1988. Subsequently the recommendations of this committee were implemented in all NPPs. In 1990, International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended a downward revision of occupational dose limit to 20 mSv/yr from the earlier limit of 50 mSv/yr. Regulatory body endorsed these recommendations and gradually brought down the annual dose limits from 40 mSv in 1991 to 30 mSv in 1994 with the limit of 100 mSv averaged over a five year period in line with ICRP recommendations. Over the years, the regulatory body has put in place a sound regulatory frame work and mechanism to ensure adequate protection of occupational workers, members of public and environment due to operation of NPPs. Vast experiences in the field of radiation protection vis-à-vis stringent regulatory requirements such as review of exposure cases and special regulatory inspections during Biennial Shut Down (BSD) has helped in downward trends in occupational and public doses. This paper highlights the role of regulatory body in controlling the radiation doses to both occupational workers and members of public in the NPPs through a three-tier review system. The regulatory oversight, inspections and reviews has resulted in

  18. Transcriptional and Translational Regulatory Responses to Iron Limitation in the Globally Distributed Marine Bacterium Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel P.; Kitner, Joshua B.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Clauss, Therese R.; Lipton, Mary S.; Schwalbach, Michael S.; Steindler, Laura; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Iron is recognized as an important micronutrient that limits microbial plankton productivity over vast regions of the oceans. We investigated the gene expression responses of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. Microarray data indicated transcription of the periplasmic iron binding protein sfuC increased by 16-fold, and iron transporter subunits, iron-sulfur center assembly genes, and the putative ferroxidase rubrerythrin transcripts increased to a lesser extent. Quantitative peptide mass spectrometry revealed that sfuC protein abundance increased 27-fold, despite an average decrease of 59% across the global proteome. Thus, we propose sfuC as a marker gene for indicating iron limitation in marine metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic ecological surveys. The marked proteome reduction was not directly correlated to changes in the transcriptome, implicating post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms as modulators of protein expression. Two RNA-binding proteins, CspE and CspL, correlated well with iron availability, suggesting that they may contribute to the observed differences between the transcriptome and proteome. We propose a model in which the RNA-binding activity of CspE and CspL selectively enables protein synthesis of the iron acquisition protein SfuC during transient growth-limiting episodes of iron scarcity. PMID:20463970

  19. Regulatory considerations in the licensing of a mobile backscatter X-ray device used in security screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Jim; Railey, Leon

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the regulatory and radiation protection issues taken into consideration in the licensing of a mobile security screening device which employs backscatter X-ray technology. The views expressed are those of the authors and are not the formal view of ARPANSA. The US standard ANSI N43.17 proposes doses limits for X-ray personnel security screening systems, viz. 0.1 μSv effective dose per scan; 250 μSv effective dose per year. The Z backscatter van TM satisfies the first criterion, as demonstrated by the independent measurements. Finally, if we assume an average effective dose of 0.1 μSv per scan, an individual would require to be scanned approximately 7 times per day, every day for a year in order to exceed the second dose limit of 250 μSv per year. This is considered extremely unlikely, and hence the van also meets the requirements of ANSI N43.17.

  20. Acceptable-doses exceeding in radionuclides transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delabarre, P.

    2006-01-01

    Without any foregoing signal, the 12-gliding month dose in an employee of a radionuclides transporting firm raised to 44,30 mSv (over the double of the ICRP recommended yearly maximum of 20 mSv). Apart from immediate prohibition of any further professional exposure to ionising radiation for the employee concerned, and an inquiry for possible explanations concerning as well the employer as the employee, an in-depth investigation of the employees previous records took place. Except from the sudden rise, the investigation showed that the personal dosimeter was mostly presented for analysis weeks, even months, too late, what made any immediate action from occupational health and radioprotection side difficult and anyhow far too late. Investigation of the records of the other 30 employees showed that 1) mostly the dosimeters were not presented on the assumed date for analysis, but months to (sometimes) nearly one year late behind schedule 2) for the same job in the same period, registered doses varied from naught to over 8,00 mSv, depending on the employee 3) several employees had a 12-gliding months dose of over 10,00 mSv, even over 15,00 mSv During discussion with employee, employer, occupational physician and an agent of the qualified organisation for dosimeter analysis, the employer was anything but cooperative; the employee also was rather reluctant to answer questions, and given possible causes could not be corroborated. In an attempt to clarify the multiple problems, the Governmental Agency for Nuclear Control was involved, which imposed in a first time a( not very stringent, rather indulgent) action plan. Meanwhile, a written comment on the monthly dosimeter analyses was sent from as well the occupational physician as the analytical firm to the employer and to the concerned employees if a 12-gliding months dose exceeding 10 mSv was determined, without any reaction neither from the employer nor the employees. At the moment of the abstract submission (sept 05

  1. Regulatory Promotion of Emergent CCS Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Lincoln; Uchitel, Kirsten; Johnson, David

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing inevitability of climate change and the attendant need for mitigation strategies, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has yet to gain much traction in the United States. Recent regulatory proposals by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), limited in scope to new-build power plants, represent the only significant policy initiative intended to mandate diffusion of CCS technology. Phase I of this Project assessed barriers to CCS deployment as prioritized by the CCS community. That research concluded that there were four primary barriers: (1) cost, (2) lack of a carbon price, (3) liability, and (4) lack of a comprehensive regulatory regime. Phase II of this Project, as presented in this Report, assesses potential regulatory models for CCS and examines where those models address the hurdles to diffusing CCS technology identified in Phase I. It concludes (1) that a CCS-specific but flexible standard, such as a technology performance standard or a very particular type of market-based regulation, likely will promote CCS diffusion, and (2) that these policies cannot work alone, but rather, should be combined with other measures, such as liability limits and a comprehensive CCS regulatory regime.

  2. 77 FR 52098 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... Exchange would announce via Regulatory Bulletin the applicable time period(s) for the Risk Limitation... Exchange would specify via Regulatory Bulletin the applicable time period(s) for the Risk Limitation... Risk Limitation Mechanisms, as well as any applicable time period(s) and order types, via Regulatory...

  3. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  4. A Limited Survey of Aflatoxins in Poultry Feed and Feed Ingredients in Guyana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Morrison

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the presence of aflatoxins in finished poultry feed from manufacturing companies, feed ingredients, and poultry feed at the point of sale. Two collections were made. In the first collection, samples of the finished feed and feed ingredients were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. For the second collection, all samples were analyzed by ELISA while a subset was analyzed by HPLC. Of the 27 samples of finished feed, five samples had aflatoxin concentrations greater than the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA and European Union Commission (EUC maximum tolerable limit of 20 µg/kg, while for the feed ingredients, three of the 30 samples of feed ingredients exceeded the limit. Of the 93 samples of finished feed purchased from retailers, five samples had aflatoxin concentrations greater than the maximum tolerable limit. This survey indicates that most of the samples were below the maximum regulatory limit and maintained quality up to the point of sale for 2015 and 2016. However, given that some samples were above the limit, there is a need to monitor the production and marketing chain to ensure that the quality of the finished feed is not compromised.

  5. Regulatory competition in partnership law.

    OpenAIRE

    Siems, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory competition in company law has been extensively debated in the last few decades, but it has rarely been discussed whether there could also be regulatory competition in partnership law. This article fills this gap. It addresses the partnership law of the US, the UK, Germany, and France, and presents empirical data on the different types of partnerships and companies established in these jurisdictions. The main focus is on the use of a limited liability partnership (LLP) outside its ...

  6. Virtual harm reduction efforts for Internet gambling: effects of deposit limits on actual Internet sports gambling behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broda, Anja; LaPlante, Debi A; Nelson, Sarah E; LaBrie, Richard A; Bosworth, Leslie B; Shaffer, Howard J

    2008-08-06

    In an attempt to reduce harm related to gambling problems, an Internet sports betting service provider, bwin Interactive Entertainment, AG (bwin), imposes limits on the amount of money that users can deposit into their online gambling accounts. We examined the effects of these limits on gambling behavior. We compared (1) gambling behavior of those who exceeded deposit limits with those who did not, and (2) gambling behavior before and after exceeding deposit limits. We analyzed 2 years of the actual sports gambling behavior records of 47000 subscribers to bwin. Only 160 (0.3%) exceeded deposit limits at least once. Gamblers who exceeded deposit limits evidenced higher average number of bets per active betting day and higher average size of bets than gamblers who did not exceed deposit limits. Comparing the gambling behavior before and after exceeding deposit limits revealed slightly more unfavorable gambling behavior after exceeding deposit limits. Our findings indicate that Internet gamblers who exceed deposit limits constitute a group of bettors willing to take high risks; yet, surprisingly, they appear to do this rather successfully because their percentage of losses is lower than others in the sample. However, some of these gamblers exhibit some poor outcomes. Deposit limits might be necessary harm reduction measures to prevent the loss of extremely large amounts of money and cases of bankruptcy. We discuss how these limits might be modified based on our findings.

  7. Virtual harm reduction efforts for Internet gambling: effects of deposit limits on actual Internet sports gambling behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Sarah E

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an attempt to reduce harm related to gambling problems, an Internet sports betting service provider, bwin Interactive Entertainment, AG (bwin, imposes limits on the amount of money that users can deposit into their online gambling accounts. We examined the effects of these limits on gambling behavior. Methods We compared (1 gambling behavior of those who exceeded deposit limits with those who did not, and (2 gambling behavior before and after exceeding deposit limits. We analyzed 2 years of the actual sports gambling behavior records of 47000 subscribers to bwin. Results Only 160 (0.3% exceeded deposit limits at least once. Gamblers who exceeded deposit limits evidenced higher average number of bets per active betting day and higher average size of bets than gamblers who did not exceed deposit limits. Comparing the gambling behavior before and after exceeding deposit limits revealed slightly more unfavorable gambling behavior after exceeding deposit limits. Conclusion Our findings indicate that Internet gamblers who exceed deposit limits constitute a group of bettors willing to take high risks; yet, surprisingly, they appear to do this rather successfully because their percentage of losses is lower than others in the sample. However, some of these gamblers exhibit some poor outcomes. Deposit limits might be necessary harm reduction measures to prevent the loss of extremely large amounts of money and cases of bankruptcy. We discuss how these limits might be modified based on our findings.

  8. Monitoring and radioecological characteristics of radiocesium in Japanese beef after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauser, Georg

    2017-01-01

    After the Fukushima nuclear accident, beef proved to be a problematic food item with several exceedances entering the market. The reason was contaminated rice straw that was fed to cattle. Japanese authorities responded quickly to the exceedances and made beef one of the most-monitored food items after the Fukushima accident with more than a million samples within 5 years. Activity levels dropped quickly and are now considerably below the regulatory limit. No exceedance of the regulatory limit was observed after October 2012. The monitoring campaign focuses on the pre-market to catch any exceedances before they reach the consumer. The analysis also showed that some late beef samples exhibited an unusually high "1"3"4Cs/"1"3"7Cs activity ratio. The reason for this is unknown. (author)

  9. ResDE Two-Component Regulatory System Mediates Oxygen Limitation-Induced Biofilm Formation by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuan; Zhang, Nan; Xia, Liming; Li, Qing; Shao, Jiahui; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2018-04-15

    Efficient biofilm formation and root colonization capabilities facilitate the ability of beneficial plant rhizobacteria to promote plant growth and antagonize soilborne pathogens. Biofilm formation by plant-beneficial Bacillus strains is triggered by environmental cues, including oxygen deficiency, but the pathways that sense these environmental signals and regulate biofilm formation have not been thoroughly elucidated. In this study, we showed that the ResDE two-component regulatory system in the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain SQR9 senses the oxygen deficiency signal and regulates biofilm formation. ResE is activated by sensing the oxygen limitation-induced reduction of the NAD + /NADH pool through its PAS domain, stimulating its kinase activity, and resulting in the transfer of a phosphoryl group to ResD. The phosphorylated ResD directly binds to the promoter regions of the qoxABCD and ctaCDEF operons to improve the biosynthesis of terminal oxidases, which can interact with KinB to activate biofilm formation. These results not only revealed the novel regulatory function of the ResDE two-component system but also contributed to the understanding of the complicated regulatory network governing Bacillus biofilm formation. This research may help to enhance the root colonization and the plant-beneficial efficiency of SQR9 and other Bacillus rhizobacteria used in agriculture. IMPORTANCE Bacillus spp. are widely used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and disease suppression. The exertion of their plant-beneficial functions is largely dependent on their root colonization, which is closely related to their biofilm formation capabilities. On the other hand, Bacillus is the model bacterium for biofilm study, and the process and molecular network of biofilm formation are well characterized (B. Mielich-Süss and D. Lopez, Environ Microbiol 17:555-565, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.12527; L. S. Cairns, L. Hobley, and

  10. Can LENR Energy Gains Exceed 1000?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Energy gain is defined as the energy realized from reactions divided by the energy required to produce those reactions. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) have already been measured to significantly exceed the energy gain of 10 projected from ITER,possibly 15 years from now. Electrochemical experiments using the Pd-D system have shown energy gains exceeding 10. Gas phase experiments with the Ni-H system were reported to yield energy gains of over 100. Neither of these reports has been adequately verified or reproduced. However, the question in the title still deserves consideration. If, as thought by many, it is possible to trigger nuclear reactions that yield MeV energies with chemical energies of the order of eV, then the most optimistic expectation is that LENR gains could approach one million. Hence, the very tentative answer to the question above is yes. However, if LENR could be initiated with some energy cost, and then continue to ``burn,'' very high energy gains might be realized. Consider a match and a pile of dry logs. The phenomenon termed ``heat after death'' will be examined to see if it might be the initial evidence for nuclear ``burning.''

  11. The regulatory application of authorization in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.; Frullani, S.

    2004-01-01

    Authorization is the process used by governments and regulatory authorities to decide what regulatory controls or conditions, if any, should be applied to radioactive sources or radiation exposure situations in order to protect the public, workers and the environment appropriately. Over the years, governments and regulatory authorities have used various approaches to the authorization process under differing circumstances. Now, with the new draft recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), there is the prospect of being able to use a single, simple and self-coherent approach for the process of regulatory authorization under all circumstances. Previously, the ICRP recommended the use of various approaches to manage radiological protection situations. For what were called practices, exposures were subject to limits, and optimisation was required below these limits. What were called interventions were subject to intervention levels, above which some action could be considered justified, and which should be optimised based on consideration of how much dose could be averted by the countermeasure considered. Radon in homes was subject to action levels, above which some sort of countermeasure could be recommended. These approaches are all philosophically distinct and logically constructed, but their differences, particularly in the types of numerical criteria used (limits, intervention levels, action levels, etc.) contributed to confusion and misunderstanding. (author)

  12. Amino acid production exceeds plant nitrogen demand in Siberian tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Birgit; Eloy Alves, Ricardo J.; Bárta, Jiři; Čapek, Petr; Gentsch, Norman; Guggenberger, Georg; Hugelius, Gustaf; Knoltsch, Anna; Kuhry, Peter; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Palmtag, Juri; Prommer, Judith; Schnecker, Jörg; Shibistova, Olga; Takriti, Mounir; Urich, Tim; Richter, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Arctic plant productivity is often limited by low soil N availability. This has been attributed to slow breakdown of N-containing polymers in litter and soil organic matter (SOM) into smaller, available units, and to shallow plant rooting constrained by permafrost and high soil moisture. Using 15N pool dilution assays, we here quantified gross amino acid and ammonium production rates in 97 active layer samples from four sites across the Siberian Arctic. We found that amino acid production in organic layers alone exceeded literature-based estimates of maximum plant N uptake 17-fold and therefore reject the hypothesis that arctic plant N limitation results from slow SOM breakdown. High microbial N use efficiency in organic layers rather suggests strong competition of microorganisms and plants in the dominant rooting zone. Deeper horizons showed lower amino acid production rates per volume, but also lower microbial N use efficiency. Permafrost thaw together with soil drainage might facilitate deeper plant rooting and uptake of previously inaccessible subsoil N, and thereby promote plant productivity in arctic ecosystems. We conclude that changes in microbial decomposer activity, microbial N utilization and plant root density with soil depth interactively control N availability for plants in the Arctic.

  13. Transport Limits for Non-Fixed Contamination: A Hazard to Optimization in Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, S.; Lorenz, B.; Schwarz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Current contamination limits for packages and conveyances under routine transport conditions have been derived from the Fairbairn model more than 40 years ago. This model has proved to be effective if used with pragmatism, but conservative. In some countries the limits are handled as action levels. Actions are taken if contamination levels are exceeded, but instant reporting to authorities is only necessary if the excess is higher than a certain factor of e.g. 10. In countries like Germany the limits are regarded as strictly binding. As could be seen after contamination incidents with transport casks for spent fuel assembly, the reporting by the media and perception by the public was not in accordance with the real radiation risk, which could in any case be neglected. However, exceeding the limits by only one percent lead in some cases immediately to legal actions. To avoid such actions, any practice with relevance for possible contamination or decontamination must consider an additional safety margin which is usually a factor of 10. This results -by the definition of TS-R1 recommendations- in a complete removal of non fixed contamination. For two examples the tremendous amount of decontamination work as well as measurements, which are necessary to reach this aim, is quantified. The first example focuses on the clearance measurements of 20' standard ISO-containers, (which are used exclusively for the transport of radioactive materials,) as conveyances for shipment of radioactive packages. In the second example (a loaded cask awaiting shipment) such actions lead to a real operational exposure which -according to good health physics practice- should otherwise be subject to minimization. These information is compared with the results of an IAEA working group, which was set up in 2000 with the aim of remodeling the exposure conditions for all persons involved in the transport of radioactive material, even members of the public. This international group combined members

  14. Transport Limits for Non-Fixed Contamination: A Hazard to Optimization in Radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theis, S.; Lorenz, B.; Schwarz, W.

    2004-07-01

    Current contamination limits for packages and conveyances under routine transport conditions have been derived from the Fairbairn model more than 40 years ago. This model has proved to be effective if used with pragmatism, but conservative. In some countries the limits are handled as action levels. Actions are taken if contamination levels are exceeded, but instant reporting to authorities is only necessary if the excess is higher than a certain factor of e.g. 10. In countries like Germany the limits are regarded as strictly binding. As could be seen after contamination incidents with transport casks for spent fuel assembly, the reporting by the media and perception by the public was not in accordance with the real radiation risk, which could in any case be neglected. However, exceeding the limits by only one percent lead in some cases immediately to legal actions. To avoid such actions, any practice with relevance for possible contamination or decontamination must consider an additional safety margin which is usually a factor of 10. This results -by the definition of TS-R1 recommendations- in a complete removal of non fixed contamination. For two examples the tremendous amount of decontamination work as well as measurements, which are necessary to reach this aim, is quantified. The first example focuses on the clearance measurements of 20' standard ISO-containers, (which are used exclusively for the transport of radioactive materials,) as conveyances for shipment of radioactive packages. In the second example (a loaded cask awaiting shipment) such actions lead to a real operational exposure which -according to good health physics practice- should otherwise be subject to minimization. These information is compared with the results of an IAEA working group, which was set up in 2000 with the aim of remodeling the exposure conditions for all persons involved in the transport of radioactive material, even members of the public. This international group combined

  15. 7 CFR 52.3185 - Moisture limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Moisture limits. 52.3185 Section 52.3185 Agriculture... United States Standards for Grades of Dried Prunes Moisture, Uniformity of Size, Defects § 52.3185 Moisture limits. Dried prunes shall not exceed the moisture limits for the applicable grades and kind and...

  16. Regulatory requirements on PSA level 2: Review, aspects and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husarcek, J.

    2003-01-01

    The general requirements concerning utility obligations, probabilistic safety criteria (CDF should not exceed 1.0E-4/reactor year and LERF should not exceed 1.0E-5/reactor year), documentation and results, living PSA requirements and major steps in level 2 PSA are presented. PSA developments in Slovakia, collection and assembly of information, plant damage states, containment performance and failure modes, severe accident progression analyses, containment failure modes and source terms as a part of performed level 2 PSA are discussed. The PSA applications in design and operation evaluation, support to plant upgrade and modifications are also described. At the end, the following conclusion is made: more extensive PSA application needs to foster the exchange of experience and communication between PSA specialists, non-PSA engineers, designers, and the regulatory body staff responsible for safety assessment, inspection and enforcement

  17. Performance as a basic regulatory rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spano, F.; Rudelli, M.D.; Telleria, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    In Argentina, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority has been sustained, from beginning by a normative system whose fundamental features are its requirements for performance. The Authority has defined indicators for carrying out the classification of practices as major o minor. (As a function of the complexity of processes and operation, equipment, associate risks and type of consequences, etc.). An example is given base on the requirements of standards related with the practice of gammagraphy in Argentina. From the Authority records we know that the effective dose of operators registered do not exceed 5 mSv per year. The associate risk is lower than 2 10 -4 per year. Risk assessment in scenarios resulting in a potential exposure, taken into account the Argentine standards gives a total risk per year in the order of 10 -4 for workers and 4 10 -5 for members of the public. The contents and requirements of system that sustains the regulatory authority can be prescriptive or just based in performance. A decision in favour of one of them should not only reflect the technical-scientific reality of the country implementing it but also other factors like social and economic issues. (author)

  18. Effect of the Apulia air quality plan on PM10 and benzo(apyrene exceedances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Trizio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, several exceedances of PM10 and benzo(apyrene limit values exceedances were recorded in Taranto, a city in southern Italy included in so-called areas at high risk of environmental crisis because of the presence of a heavy industrial district including the largest steel factory in Europe. A study of these critical pollution events showed a close correlation with the wind coming from the industrial site to the adjacent urban area. During 2011, at monitoring sites closes to the industrial area, at least the 65% of PM10 exceedances were related to wind day conditions (characterized by at least 3 consecutive hours of wind coming from 270-360±2deg with an associated speed higher than 7 m/s. For this reason, in 2012 an integrated environmental permit and a regional air quality plan were enacted to reduce pollutant emissions from industrial plants. A study of PM10 levels registered during windy days was performed during critical episodes of pollution highlighting that the difference between windy days and no windy days’ concentrations reduces from 2012 to 2014 in industrial site. False negative events (verified ex-post by observed meteorological data not identified by the forecast model - did not show a significant influence on PM concentration: PM10 values were comparable and sometimes lower than windy days levels. It is reasonable that the new scenario with a relevant reduction emissions form Ilva plant reduced the pollutants contribution from industrial area, contributing to PM10 levels decrease, also in false negative events.

  19. Application of Resource Portfolio Concept in Nuclear Regulatory Infrastructure Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. E.; Ha, J. T.; Chang, H. S.; Kam, S. C.; Ryu, Y. H.

    2010-01-01

    As the new entrants in the global nuclear construction market are increasing and the establishment of an effective and sustainable regulatory infrastructure becomes more important, they have requested international assistance from the international nuclear communities with mature nuclear regulatory programmes. It needs to optimize the use of limited resources from regulatory organization providing support to regulatory infrastructure of new comers. This paper suggests the resource portfolio concept like a GE/Mckinsey Matrix used in business management and tries to apply it to the current needs considered in the regulatory support program in Korea as the case study

  20. Working draft regulatory guide on release criteria for decommissioning: NRC staff's draft for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily, M.C.; Huffert, A.; Cardile, F.; Malaro, J.C.

    1994-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations in 10 CFR 20 are being amended to include radiological criteria for decommissioning of lands and structures at nuclear facilities. 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E establishes criteria for the remediation of contaminated sites or facilities that will allow their release for future use with or without restrictions. The criteria include a Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) limit of 15 mrem/year (0.15 mSv/y) that should not be exceeded by an average individual among those who could potentially receive the greatest exposure from any residual activity within a facility or on a site. The criteria also require a licensee to reduce any residual radioactivity to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels. This staff draft guide describes acceptable procedures for determining the predicted dose level (PDL) from any residual radioactivity at the site. It describes the basic features of the calculational models and the associated default assumptions and parameter values the NRC staff would find acceptable in calculating PDLs. Appendices A, B, and C provide numerical values that can be used to estimate the dose from residual radioactivity remaining at a site. Since 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E introduces several new concepts, definitions and discussions are included in a regulatory position concepts section of the guide to assist licensees in understanding some of the philosophy underlying the rule

  1. 29 CFR 4.162 - Fringe benefits under contracts exceeding $2,500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Fringe benefits under contracts exceeding $2,500. 4.162... Compensation Standards § 4.162 Fringe benefits under contracts exceeding $2,500. (a) Pursuant to the statutory... contain a provision specifying the fringe benefits to be furnished the various classes of service...

  2. Unique characteristics of regulatory approval and pivotal studies of orphan anticancer drugs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hiroki; Tsukamoto, Katsura

    2018-04-17

    The approval of orphan anticancer drugs has increased, with the number exceeding that of non-orphan drugs in Japan in recent years. Although orphan anticancer drugs may have unique characteristics due to their rarity, these have not been fully characterized. We investigated anticancer drugs approved in Japan between April 2004 and November 2017 to reveal the characteristics of regulatory approval and pivotal studies on orphan anticancer drugs compared to non-orphan drugs. The median regulatory review time and number of patients in pivotal studies on orphan anticancer drugs (281.0 days [interquartile range, 263.3-336.0]; 222.5 patients [66.0-454.3]) were significantly lower than those on non-orphan drugs (353.0 days [277.0-535.5]; 521.0 patients [303.5-814.5], respectively) (P < 0.001). Phase II, non-randomized and non-controlled designs were more frequently used in pivotal studies on orphan anticancer drugs (45.9%, 41.9% and 43.2%) than non-orphan drugs (17.2%, 14.1% and 14.1%, respectively). Response rate was more commonly used as a primary endpoint in pivotal studies on orphan anticancer drugs (48.6%) than non-orphan drugs (17.2%). Indications limited by molecular features, second or later treatment line, and accelerated approval in the United States were associated with the use of response rate in orphan anticancer drug studies. In conclusion, we demonstrated that orphan anticancer drugs in Japan have unique characteristics compared to non-orphan drugs: shorter regulatory review and pivotal studies frequently using phase II, non-randomized, or non-controlled designs and response rate as a primary endpoint, with fewer patients.

  3. Regulatory impact analysis of final effluent limitations guidelines and standards for the offshore oil and gas industry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    For all major rulemaking actions, Executive Order 12291 requires a Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA), in which benefits of the regulation are compared to costs imposed by the regulation. The report presents the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA, or the Agency) RIA of the final rule on the effluent limitations guidelines for the Offshore Subcategory of the Oil and Gas Extraction Industry. The principal requirement of the Executive Order is that the Agency perform an analysis comparing the benefits of the regulation to the costs that the regulation imposes. Three types of benefits are analyzed in this RIA: quantified and monetized benefits; quantified and non-monetized benefits; and non-quantified and non-monetized benefits

  4. Impact limiter retention using a tape joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, A.; Eakes, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask employs polyurethane foam impact limiters that fit onto the ends of the cask. A foam impact limiter takes energy out of a system during a hypothetical accident condition by allowing foam crush and large deformations to occur. This, in turn, precludes high stresses or deformations from occurring to the cask. Because of the need to transmit significant amounts of heat to the environment, the BUSS cask impact limiters were designed to shield a minimum amount of the cask surface area. With this design impact limiter retention after the initial impact resulting from the 9 meter regulatory drops becomes a concern. Retention is essential to ensure the cask does not experience higher stresses during any secondary or rebound effects without impact limiters than it does during the 9 meter regulatory drop with impact limiters in place

  5. Space-charge-limit instabilities in electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Sullivan, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The method of characteristics and multiple-scaling perturbation techniques are used to study the space-charge instability of electron beams. It is found that the stable oscillating state (virtual cathode) created when the space-charge limit is exceeded is similar to a collisionless shock wave. The oscillatory solution originates at the bifurcation point of two unstable steady states. Complementary behavior (virtual anode) results when an ion beam exceeds its space-charge limit. The virtual cathode can also exist in the presence of a neutralizing heavy-ion background. The Pierce instability, where the electron and ion charge densities are equal, is a special case of this broader class. Estimates of the nonlinear growth rate of the instability at the space-charge limit are given

  6. ATLAS: Exceeding all expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    “One year ago it would have been impossible for us to guess that the machine and the experiments could achieve so much so quickly”, says Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The whole chain – from collision to data analysis – has worked remarkably well in ATLAS.   The first LHC proton run undoubtedly exceeded expectations for the ATLAS experiment. “ATLAS has worked very well since the beginning. Its overall data-taking efficiency is greater than 90%”, says Fabiola Gianotti. “The quality and maturity of the reconstruction and simulation software turned out to be better than we expected for this initial stage of the experiment. The Grid is a great success, and right from the beginning it has allowed members of the collaboration all over the world to participate in the data analysis in an effective and timely manner, and to deliver physics results very quickly”. In just a few months of data taking, ATLAS has observed t...

  7. 47 CFR 22.867 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.867... operating on the frequency ranges listed in § 22.857 must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) The peak ERP of airborne mobile station transmitters must not exceed 12 Watts. (b) The peak ERP of ground...

  8. 47 CFR 78.115 - Modulation limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Modulation limits. 78.115 Section 78.115... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.115 Modulation limits. (a) If amplitude modulation is employed, negative modulation peaks shall not exceed 100 percent modulation. [37 FR 3292, Feb. 12, 1972, as amended...

  9. 50 CFR 20.61 - Importation limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Importations § 20.61 Importation limits. No person shall import migratory game birds in excess of the following importation limits: (a) Doves and pigeons. (1) From any foreign country except Mexico, during any one calendar week beginning on Sunday, not to exceed 25 doves...

  10. Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, J.R. Shyr, L.J.

    1998-10-05

    Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits.

  11. Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, J.R.; Shyr, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits

  12. ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT STABILITY LIMIT OF NIGERIA'S ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    contingencies exceeds the acceptable security limits and reliability margins ... At the end of this study, security limit for faults ... protection to prevent the system from widespread effect ..... Conference on Computer, Energy, Networking, Robotics.

  13. 7 CFR 761.8 - Loan Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan Limitations. 761.8 Section 761.8 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS GENERAL PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION General Provisions § 761.8 Loan Limitations. (a) Dollar... cannot exceed any of the following at the time of loan closing or assumption of indebtedness. If the...

  14. 77 FR 8938 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... expenses as ``other'' (miscellaneous), a very general categorization that provides FINRA limited visibility... supplemental filing would play with respect to a broker-dealer's annual audit.\\28\\ \\26\\ CAI. \\27\\ Id. \\28\\ Id... any future schedules or reports be done through the more typical self- regulatory organization (``SRO...

  15. Indirect presentation in the thymus limits naive and regulatory T-cell differentiation by promoting deletion of self-reactive thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Jin Yan; Wirasinha, Rushika C; Chan, Anna; Howard, Debbie R; Goodnow, Christopher C; Daley, Stephen R

    2018-02-07

    Acquisition of T-cell central tolerance involves distinct pathways of self-antigen presentation to thymocytes. One pathway termed indirect presentation requires a self-antigen transfer step from thymic epithelial cells (TECs) to bone marrow-derived cells before the self-antigen is presented to thymocytes. The role of indirect presentation in central tolerance is context-dependent, potentially due to variation in self-antigen expression, processing and presentation in the thymus. Here, we report experiments in mice in which TECs expressed a membrane-bound transgenic self-antigen, hen egg lysozyme (HEL), from either the insulin (insHEL) or thyroglobulin (thyroHEL) promoter. Intrathymic HEL expression was less abundant and more confined to the medulla in insHEL mice compared with thyroHEL mice. When indirect presentation was impaired by generating mice lacking MHC class II expression in bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells, insHEL-mediated thymocyte deletion was abolished, whereas thyroHEL-mediated deletion occurred at a later stage of thymocyte development and Foxp3 + regulatory T-cell differentiation increased. Indirect presentation increased the strength of T-cell receptor signalling that both self-antigens induced in thymocytes, as assessed by Helios expression. Hence, indirect presentation limits the differentiation of naive and regulatory T cells by promoting deletion of self-reactive thymocytes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Variable Speed Limit (VSL) - Best Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Variable Speed Limit (VSL) system on the I-4 corridor in Orlando was implemented by Florida Department of Transportation in 2008, and since its deployment, it was revealed that the majority of traffic exceeds the speed limit by more mph when the ...

  17. Safety Committees for Argentinean Research Reactor - Regulatory Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, Carlos D.

    2009-01-01

    In the field of radiological and nuclear safety, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina controls three research reactors and three critical assemblies, by means of evaluations, audits and inspections, in order to ensure the fulfillment of the requirements established in the Licenses, in the Regulatory Standards and in the Mandatory Documentation in general. From the Nuclear Regulatory Authority's point of view, within the general process of research reactors safety management, the Operational Organization self verification of radiological and nuclear safety plays an outstanding role. In this aspect the ARN has established specific requirements in the Regulatory Standards, in the Operation Licenses and in the Operational Limits and Conditions. These requirements include the figure of different safety committees, which act as reviewers or advisers in diverse situations. This paper describes the main characteristics of the committees, their function, scope and the regulatory documents where the requirements are included. (author)

  18. Innovative approach to training radiation safety regulatory professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilley, Debbie Bray

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The supply of human resources required to adequately manage a radiation safety regulatory program has diminished in the last five years. Competing professional opportunities and a reduction in the number of health physics secondary schools have made it necessary to look at alternative methods of training. There are limited educational programs in the US that prepare our professionals for careers in the Radiation Regulatory Programs. The state of Florida's radiation control program embraced a new methodology using a combination of didactic and work experience using qualification journals, subject matter experts, and formalized training to develop a qualified pool of employees to perform the regulatory functions and emergency response requirements of a state radiation control program. This program uses a task-based approach to identify training needs and draws upon current staff to develop and implement the training. This has led to a task-oriented staff capable of responding to basic regulatory and emergency response activities within one year of employment. Florida's program lends itself to other states or countries with limited resources that have experienced staff attrition due to retirement or competing employment opportunities. Information on establishing a 'task-based' pool of employees that can perform basic regulatory functions and emergency response after one year of employment will be described. Initial task analysis of core functions and methodology is used to determine the appropriate training methodology for these functions. Instructions will be provided on the methodology used to 'mentor' new employees and then incorporate the new employees into the established core functions and be a useful employee at the completion of the first year of employment. New training philosophy and regime may be useful in assisting in the development of programs in countries and states with limited resources for training radiation protection personnel. (author)

  19. Cost tradeoffs in consequence management at nuclear power plants: A risk based approach to setting optimal long-term interdiction limits for regulatory analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubayi, V.

    1995-05-01

    The consequences of severe accidents at nuclear power plants can be limited by various protective actions, including emergency responses and long-term measures, to reduce exposures of affected populations. Each of these protective actions involve costs to society. The costs of the long-term protective actions depend on the criterion adopted for the allowable level of long-term exposure. This criterion, called the ''long term interdiction limit,'' is expressed in terms of the projected dose to an individual over a certain time period from the long-term exposure pathways. The two measures of offsite consequences, latent cancers and costs, are inversely related and the choice of an interdiction limit is, in effect, a trade-off between these two measures. By monetizing the health effects (through ascribing a monetary value to life lost), the costs of the two consequence measures vary with the interdiction limit, the health effect costs increasing as the limit is relaxed and the protective action costs decreasing. The minimum of the total cost curve can be used to calculate an optimal long term interdiction limit. The calculation of such an optimal limit is presented for each of five US nuclear power plants which were analyzed for severe accident risk in the NUREG-1150 program by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  20. Density limit investigations near and significantly above the Greenwald limit on the tokamaks TEXTOR-94 and RTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, J.; Koslowski, H.R.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Salzedas, F.; Vries, P.C. de; Schueller, F.C.; Hokin, S.; Messiaen, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Ignition scenarios like those developed for ITER require plasma densities which will be close or above the Greenwald limit. Generally it is observed that exceeding this limit may lead to a degradation of plasma confinement or to a violent end of the discharge. The achievable density limit and the related processes, such as radiative instabilities and MHD phenomena, which eventually lead to disruption, have been investigated in the limiter tokamaks TEXTOR-94 and RTP. (author)

  1. 78 FR 18983 - Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... Calculate Workload for FDA-Approved Semi-Automated Gynecologic Cytology Screening Devices. In this alert, it... cytotechnologist productivity should not exceed 70 slides and that an individual's screening time should not exceed... instruments is appropriate and to discourage the use of regulatory maximum workload limits as productivity...

  2. Most household waters below the safety limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, L.; Annanmaeki, M.

    1994-01-01

    According to guidelines published by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the radiation dose caused by radioactivity in household water shall not exceed 0.5 millisieverts a year. Most of the water distributed by Finnish waterworks meets this safety goal. According to measurements performed to date, only 20-30 small waterworks or water intake plants have exceeded the limit. Radioactivity in excess of the safety goal is almost invariably caused by a high radon concentration. When ingested, radon causes a radiation dose to the organism; the lungs are also affected when radon is released into the air and then inhalated. Privately owned bored wells, however pose a problem, because the radioactivity of water in some Finnish wells is among the highest in the world. If the same 0.5 millisievert limit was also applied to wells bored for private use, the safety goal would be exceeded by more than half of the wells. (orig.)

  3. 75 FR 52380 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... recent outsourcing of surveillance and other regulatory functions to FINRA.\\8\\ Specifically, to have... with NASD IM-1013-1 or NASD IM-1013-2, including limiting its business operations to ``permitted floor... NASD IM-1013-2 establish a waive-in membership application process for certain firms to become FINRA...

  4. Environmental radiation standards and risk limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission have established environmental radiation standards for specific practices which correspond to limits on risk to the public that vary by several orders of magnitude and often are much less than radiation risks that are essentially unregulated, e.g., risks from radon in homes. This paper discusses a proposed framework for environmental radiation standards that would improve the correspondence with limitation of risk. This framework includes the use of limits on annual effective dose equivalent averaged over a lifetime, rather than limits on dose equivalent to whole body or any organ for each year of exposure, and consideration of exposures of younger age groups as well as adults; limits on annual effective dose equivalent averaged over a lifetime no lower than 0.25 mSv (25 mrem) per practice; maintenance of all exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA); and establishment of a generally applicable de minimis dose for public exposures. Implications of the proposed regulatory framework for the current system of standards for limiting public exposures are discussed. 20 refs

  5. Romanian regulatory framework for uranium mining and milling (present and future)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodna, A.L.; Dumitrescu, N.

    2002-01-01

    In Romania, all operations in the nuclear field, including uranium mining and milling, are regulated by Law no. 111/1996 (republished in 1998), regarding the safe conduct of nuclear activities. These activities can be performed only on the basis of an authorization released by the national regulatory authority, i.e. the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control. The specific requirements which must be carried out by the owner of an operating licence for a uranium mining and milling operation are stipulated by the Republican Nuclear Safety Norms for Geological Research, Mining and Milling of Nuclear Raw Materials. These regulatory requirements have been in force since 1975. The regulatory norms include provisions that the effective dose limit for workers should not exceed 50 mSv/year and also that liquid effluents released into surface waters must have a content of natural radioactive elements that meets the standards for drinking water. The norms do not contain provisions concerning the conditions under which the mining sites and the uranium processing facilities can be shut down and decommissioned. The norms also do not contain requirements regarding either the rehabilitation of environments affected by abandoned mining and milling activities, nor criteria for the release of the rehabilitated sites for alternative uses. To implement the provisions of Council Directive 96/29 EURATOM in Romania, new Fundamental Radiological Protection Norms have been approved and will soon be published in the 'Monitorul Official' (Official Gazette of Romania). One of the main provisions of these norms is the reduction of the effective dose limit for the workers to 20 mSv/year. Changes in the Republican Nuclear Safety Norms for Geological Research, Mining and Milling of Nuclear Raw Materials, are also planned; these changes will be consistent with the Fundamental Radiological Protection Norms. To cover existing gaps, the new norms for uranium mining and milling will include

  6. As to achieve regulatory action, regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cid, R.; Encinas, D.

    2014-01-01

    The achievement of the effectiveness in the performance of a nuclear regulatory body has been a permanent challenge in the recent history of nuclear regulation. In the post-Fukushima era this challenge is even more important. This article addresses the subject from two complementary points of view: the characteristics of an effective regulatory body and the regulatory approaches. This work is based on the most recent studies carried out by the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities, CNRA (OECD/NEA), as well as on the experience of the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, CSN, the Spanish regulatory body. Rafael Cid is the representative of CSN in these project: Diego Encinas has participated in the study on regulatory approaches. (Author)

  7. Application of Regulatory Focus Theory to Search Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowle, Elyse N.; Georgia, Emily J.; Doss, Brian D.; Updegraff, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to test the utility of regulatory focus theory principles in a real-world setting; specifically, Internet hosted text advertisements. Effect of compatibility of the ad text with the regulatory focus of the consumer was examined. Design/methodology/approach Advertisements were created using Google AdWords. Data were collected for the number of views and clicks each ad received. Effect of regulatory fit was measured using logistic regression. Findings Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that there was a strong main effect for keyword, such that users were almost six times as likely to click on a promotion advertisement as a prevention advertisement, as well as a main effect for compatibility, such that users were twice as likely to click on an advertisement with content that was consistent with their keyword. Finally, there was a strong interaction of these two variables, such that the effect of consistent advertisements was stronger for promotion searches than for prevention searches. Research limitations/implications The effect of ad compatibility had medium to large effect sizes, suggesting that individuals’ state may have more influence on advertising response than do individuals’ traits (e.g. personality traits). Measurement of regulatory fit was limited by the constraints of Google AdWords. Practical implications The results of this study provide a possible framework for ad creation for Internet advertisers. Originality/value This paper is the first study to demonstrate the utility of regulatory focus theory in online advertising. PMID:26430293

  8. Scrape-off layer based modelling of the density limit in beryllated JET limiter discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrass, K.; Campbell, D.J.; Clement, S.; Vlases, G.C.

    1993-01-01

    The paper gives a scrape-off layer based interpretation of the density limit in beryllated JET limiter discharges. In these discharges, JET edge parameters show a complicated time evolution as the density limit is approached and the limit is manifested as a non-disruptive density maximum which cannot be exceeded by enhanced gas puffing. The occurrence of Marfes, the manner of density control and details of recycling are essential elements of the interpretation. Scalings for the maximum density are given and compared with JET data. The relation to disruptive density limits, previously observed in JET carbon limiter discharges, and to density limits in divertor discharges is discussed. (author). 18 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  9. Intrinsic limits to gene regulation by global crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Tamar; Prizak, Roshan; Guet, Calin; Barton, Nicholas H.; Tkacik, Gasper

    Gene activity is mediated by the specificity of binding interactions between special proteins, called transcription factors, and short regulatory sequences on the DNA, where different protein species preferentially bind different DNA targets. Limited interaction specificity may lead to crosstalk: a regulatory state in which a gene is either incorrectly activated due to spurious interactions or remains erroneously inactive. Since each protein can potentially interact with numerous DNA targets, crosstalk is inherently a global problem, yet has previously not been studied as such. We construct a theoretical framework to analyze the effects of global crosstalk on gene regulation, using statistical mechanics. We find that crosstalk in regulatory interactions puts fundamental limits on the reliability of gene regulation that are not easily mitigated by tuning proteins concentrations or by complex regulatory schemes proposed in the literature. Our results suggest that crosstalk imposes a previously unexplored global constraint on the functioning and evolution of regulatory networks, which is qualitatively distinct from the known constraints that act at the level of individual gene regulatory elements. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant agreement Nr. 291734 (T.F.) and ERC Grant Nr. 250152 (N.B.).

  10. Decommissioning of uranium mines and mills - Canadian regulatory approach and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, W.

    1986-09-01

    At the time of the recent closures of the Agnew Lake, Beaverlodge and Madawaska Mines Limited uranium mining and milling facilities, several relevant regulatory initiatives, including the development of decommissioning criteria, were underway, or contemplated. In the absence of precedents, the regulatory agencies and companies involved adopted approaches to the decommissioning of these facilities that reflected site specific circumstances, federal and provincial regulatory requirements, and generally accepted principles of good engineering practice and environmental protection. This paper summarizes related historical and current regulatory policies, requirements and guidelines; including those implemented at the three decommissioned sites

  11. 40 CFR 1045.107 - What are the not-to-exceed emission standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the not-to-exceed emission... Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1045.107 What are the not-to-exceed emission standards? Not...) For engines equipped with a catalyst, use NTE multipliers from the following table across the...

  12. A probabilistic evaluation of temporarily extending the diesel generator limiting condition for operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukielka, C.A.; Detamore, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Pennsylvania Power and Light Company is installing a fifth diesel generator at its Susquehanna Steam Electric Station. This new diesel generator will serve as a ''swing'' diesel generator, i.e., perform the function of any of the existing diesel generators. The addition of this diesel generator avoids a dual unit shutdown should a diesel generator outage for maintenance or repair exceed the three day Technical Specification Limiting Condition for Operation (LCO). It is estimated that up to fifteen days per diesel generator will be required to complete the tie-in. In accordance with the existing three day LCO, a dual unit shutdown would then result. To preclude such a shutdown, a one time temporary extension to the three day LCO was requested of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper presents a probabilistic evaluation that was used to estimate the increased risk due to extending the LCO to a cumulative sixty days to allow the tie-in of the fifth diesel generator

  13. The generalized Shockley-Queisser limit for nanostructured solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunlu; Gong, Tao; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-09-01

    The Shockley-Queisser limit describes the maximum solar energy conversion efficiency achievable for a particular material and is the standard by which new photovoltaic technologies are compared. This limit is based on the principle of detailed balance, which equates the photon flux into a device to the particle flux (photons or electrons) out of that device. Nanostructured solar cells represent a novel class of photovoltaic devices, and questions have been raised about whether or not they can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit. Here we show that single-junction nanostructured solar cells have a theoretical maximum efficiency of ˜42% under AM 1.5 solar illumination. While this exceeds the efficiency of a non-concentrating planar device, it does not exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit for a planar device with optical concentration. We consider the effect of diffuse illumination and find that with optical concentration from the nanostructures of only × 1,000, an efficiency of 35.5% is achievable even with 25% diffuse illumination. We conclude that nanostructured solar cells offer an important route towards higher efficiency photovoltaic devices through a built-in optical concentration.

  14. 7 CFR 770.5 - Loan limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan limitations. 770.5 Section 770.5 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDIAN TRIBAL LAND ACQUISITION LOANS § 770.5 Loan limitations. (a) Loan funds may not be... title. (b) The amount of loan funds used to acquire land may not exceed the market value of the land...

  15. Individual differences and self-regulatory fatigue: optimism, conscientiousness, and self-consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Nes, Lise Solberg; Carlson, Charles R.; Crofford, Leslie J.; de Leeuw, Reny; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2011-01-01

    Ability to self-regulate varies and self-regulatory strength is a limited source that can be depleted or fatigued. Research on the impact of individual differences on self-regulatory capacity is still scarce, and this study aimed to examine whether personality factors such as dispositional optimism, conscientiousness, and self-consciousness can impact or buffer self-regulatory fatigue. Participants were patients diagnosed with chronic multi-symptom illnesses (N = 50), or pain free matched con...

  16. Jimena: efficient computing and system state identification for genetic regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2013-10-11

    Boolean networks capture switching behavior of many naturally occurring regulatory networks. For semi-quantitative modeling, interpolation between ON and OFF states is necessary. The high degree polynomial interpolation of Boolean genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) in cellular processes such as apoptosis or proliferation allows for the modeling of a wider range of node interactions than continuous activator-inhibitor models, but suffers from scaling problems for networks which contain nodes with more than ~10 inputs. Many GRNs from literature or new gene expression experiments exceed those limitations and a new approach was developed. (i) As a part of our new GRN simulation framework Jimena we introduce and setup Boolean-tree-based data structures; (ii) corresponding algorithms greatly expedite the calculation of the polynomial interpolation in almost all cases, thereby expanding the range of networks which can be simulated by this model in reasonable time. (iii) Stable states for discrete models are efficiently counted and identified using binary decision diagrams. As application example, we show how system states can now be sampled efficiently in small up to large scale hormone disease networks (Arabidopsis thaliana development and immunity, pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and modulation by cytokinins and plant hormones). Jimena simulates currently available GRNs about 10-100 times faster than the previous implementation of the polynomial interpolation model and even greater gains are achieved for large scale-free networks. This speed-up also facilitates a much more thorough sampling of continuous state spaces which may lead to the identification of new stable states. Mutants of large networks can be constructed and analyzed very quickly enabling new insights into network robustness and behavior.

  17. EPA/NMED/LANL 1998 water quality results: Statistical analysis and comparison to regulatory standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallaher, B.; Mercier, T.; Black, P.; Mullen, K.

    2000-01-01

    Four governmental agencies conducted a round of groundwater, surface water, and spring water sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1998. Samples were split among the four parties and sent to independent analytical laboratories. Results from three of the agencies were available for this study. Comparisons of analytical results that were paired by location and date were made between the various analytical laboratories. The results for over 50 split samples analyzed for inorganic chemicals, metals, and radionuclides were compared. Statistical analyses included non-parametric (sign test and signed-ranks test) and parametric (paired t-test and linear regression) methods. The data pairs were tested for statistically significant differences, defined by an observed significance level, or p-value, less than 0.05. The main conclusion is that the laboratories' performances are similar across most of the analytes that were measured. In some 95% of the laboratory measurements there was agreement on whether contaminant levels exceeded regulatory limits. The most significant differences in performance were noted for the radioactive suite, particularly for gross alpha particle activity and Sr-90

  18. An evaluation model for the definition of regulatory requirements on spent fuel pool cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    A calculation model is presented for establishing regulatory requirements in the SFPCS System. The major design factors, regulatory and design limits and key parameters are discussed. A regulatory position for internal use is proposed. Finally, associated problems and experience are presented. (author)

  19. Regulatory controls for NORM contamination: Emerging issues and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wennerberg, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material (NORM) faces the increasing likelihood of federal or state regulatory control. Public concern and limited preliminary survey data fuel the debate over the necessity, approach, and jurisdiction of a NORM regulatory strategy. This debate requires the resolution of technical controversies and potentially competing state and federal agency interests. An additional facet of the debate is the impact of regulation upon traditionally non-nuclear industries, such as oil and gas production. Regulatory response has been initiated in several states, such as Louisiana's controls on equipment used in oil and gas production, to control specific industrial activities which generate NORM. A more comprehensive, generic federal strategy to control NORM contamination is also under review by the Environmental Protection Agency. This paper will detail the emerging technical issues, federal and state regulatory strategies under consideration, and evaluate the efficacy of selected regulatory approaches. (author)

  20. A review from the regulatory position of the control of occupational exposure associated with the first 20 years of the United Kingdom commercial nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerson, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Experience gained by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) during the past 20 years in the regulatory control of the nuclear power programme is discussed. After discussing control objectives, the principle sources of occupational exposure associated with the nuclear power programme are tabulated from 1962 to 1979. The fuel reprocessing plants give rise to the highest contribution to radiation dose. It is concluded that there is an improving trend in the radiological exposure pattern despite increasing power generation, fuel burn-up and processing plant throughput. The objective of ensuring that individuals do not exceed the statutory dose limits has largely been achieved. However, optimization procedures will probably be used in the future to optimise procedures and thus exposure data for various tasks will be required. (UK)

  1. 36 CFR 1004.11 - Load, weight and size limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 1004.11 Load, weight and size limits. (a) Vehicle load, weight and size limits established by State law... following are prohibited: (1) Operating a vehicle that exceeds a load, weight or size limit designated by... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Load, weight and size limits...

  2. Assessment of the Main Deviations Found during Regulatory Inspections in Industrial Gamma Radiography in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Jimenez, M.T.; Ermacora, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper shows the regulatory work made through inspections concerning radiation safety and security in the area of industrial gamma radiography. An account is shown of the items which should be available in the storage facility where the equipment and radioactive sources are placed as well as in site radiography and which are required to the users of the equipment meant for this practice, in order to ensure compliance with the regulations in force. The objective of this paper is to assess the most frequent deviations to the regulatory standards found during this type of inspections, such as lack of complete and operable radiation protection equipment, lack of available elements bound to act in case of emergency, no delimitation of controlled areas, gamma radiography equipment stored in unlocked position, wear gauge unavailable, record of movements of equipment and radioactive sources not updated, anomalous monthly or annual personal dose values, among the main findings. In particular, in connection with dose reports, some cases of occupational exposed workers exceeding the annual dose limits or investigation levels are highlighted. In addition, the explanations provided by the person responsible for radiation protection of companies in regard to the possible causes or circumstances which might have given rise to such dose values, the conclusions reached and the preventive and corrective measures implemented by these companies are analysed. Finally, an assessment of the annual dose distributions of the occupational exposed workers concerned with this kind of practice in the period 2004-2007 is shown. As a conclusion, the relevance of these deviations according to degradation in safety and security performance and the role of the regulatory work as a promoter of the implementation of safety culture will be emphasized. (authors)

  3. Assessment of the main deviations found during regulatory inspections in industrial gamma radiography in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Jimenez, Maria T.; Ermacora, Marcela

    2008-01-01

    The present paper shows the regulatory work made through inspections concerning radiation safety and security in the area of industrial gamma radiography. An account is shown of the items which should be available in the storage facility where the equipment and radioactive sources are placed as well as in site radiography and which are required to the users of the equipment meant for this practice, in order to ensure compliance with the regulations in force. The objective of this paper is to assess the most frequent deviations to the regulatory standards found during this type of inspections, such as lack of complete and operable radiation protection equipment, lack of available elements bound to act in case of emergency, no delimitation of controlled areas, gamma radiography equipment stored in unlocked position, wear gauge unavailable, record of movements of equipment and radioactive sources not updated, anomalous monthly or annual personal dose values, among the main findings. In particular, in connection with dose reports, some cases of occupational exposed workers exceeding the annual dose limits or investigation levels are highlighted. In addition, the explanations provided by the person responsible for radiation protection of companies in regard to the possible causes or circumstances which might have given rise to such dose values, the conclusions reached and the preventive and corrective measures implemented by these companies are analysed. Finally, an assessment of the annual dose distributions of the occupational exposed workers concerned with this kind of practice in the period 2004-2007 is shown. As a conclusion, the relevance of these deviations according to degradation in safety and security performance and the role of the regulatory work as a promoter of the implementation of safety culture will be emphasized. (author)

  4. Genome-wide analysis of the regulatory function mediated by the small regulatory psm-mec RNA of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Gordon Y C; Villaruz, Amer E; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Duong, Anthony C; Yeh, Anthony J; Nguyen, Thuan H; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Queck, S Y; Otto, M

    2014-07-01

    Several methicillin resistance (SCCmec) clusters characteristic of hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains harbor the psm-mec locus. In addition to encoding the cytolysin, phenol-soluble modulin (PSM)-mec, this locus has been attributed gene regulatory functions. Here we employed genome-wide transcriptional profiling to define the regulatory function of the psm-mec locus. The immune evasion factor protein A emerged as the primary conserved and strongly regulated target of psm-mec, an effect we show is mediated by the psm-mec RNA. Furthermore, the psm-mec locus exerted regulatory effects that were more moderate in extent. For example, expression of PSM-mec limited expression of mecA, thereby decreasing methicillin resistance. Our study shows that the psm-mec locus has a rare dual regulatory RNA and encoded cytolysin function. Furthermore, our findings reveal a specific mechanism underscoring the recently emerging concept that S. aureus strains balance pronounced virulence and high expression of antibiotic resistance. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Implementation of ICRP-60 recommendations on dose limits to radiation workers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthasarathy, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    The handling of radioactive material and radiation generating plants in India is regulated by the Atomic Energy Act, 1962 and rules issued under the Act. The Atomic Energy Regulatory Board enforces the rules. Currently, there are about 40,000 radiation workers in the country. Nearly half of them are employed in nuclear installations. During 1989, the Board considered the impact of restricting the maximum individual exposure to different values of dose limits. Through this analysis, the Board alerted all radiation users including persons responsible for radiation safety in nuclear facilities. When ICRP published ICRP-60, the Board issued directives to all radiation installations reducing the dose limit to occupational workers in a phased manner (40 mSv for 1991, 35 mSv for 1992 and 30 mSv for 1993). To meet the recommendations of ICRP-60, AERB issued a directive for the five year block 1994-1998, restricting the cumulative effective dose constraint to one hundred milliSievert (100 mSv) for individual radiation workers. Also, the annual effective dose to individual workers in any calendar year during the five-year block was restricted to thirty milliSievert (30 mSv). The stipulations of AERB are thus more conservative than those of ICRP. There was near total compliance with the dose limits by radiation installations in the country. For instance, in 1989, the number of radiation workers in nuclear power plants, who exceeded the dose level of 20 mSv/year was 9% of the total. This declined gradually to 2.2% in 1993 and 0.3% in 1997. During 1998, only 9 out of 10,145 exceeded 20 mSv/year. This has been achieved by the concerted efforts of the management, health physics staff and radiation workers. The health physicists regulated the radiation doses to workers by issuing work permits when the workers are assigned any job in high radiation areas. Appropriate training programmes are also in place. The broad guidelines to regulate radiation exposures in nuclear facilities

  6. 30 CFR 56.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exposure limits for airborne contaminants. 56... Quality and Physical Agents Air Quality § 56.5001 Exposure limits for airborne contaminants. Except as... contaminants shall not exceed, on the basis of a time weighted average, the threshold limit values adopted by...

  7. Assessment of regulatory effectiveness. Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    This report arises from the seventh series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled 'Assessment of Regulatory Effectiveness'. The term 'regulatory effectiveness' covers the quality of the work and level of performance of a regulatory body. In this sense, regulatory effectiveness applies to regulatory body activities aimed at preventing safety degradation and ensuring that an acceptable level of safety is being maintained by the regulated operating organizations. In addition, regulatory effectiveness encompasses the promotion of safety improvements, the timely and cost effective performance of regulatory functions in a manner which ensures the confidence of the operating organizations, the general public and the government, and striving for continuous improvements to performance. Senior regulators from 22 Member States participated in two peer group discussions during March and May 1999. The discussions were focused on the elements of an effective regulatory body, possible indicators of regulatory effectiveness and its assessment. This report presents the outcome of these meetings and recommendations of good practices identified by senior regulators, which do not necessarily reflect those of the governments of the nominating Member States, the organizations they belong to, or the International Atomic Energy Agency. In order to protect people and the environment from hazards associated with nuclear facilities, the main objective of a nuclear regulatory body is to ensure that a high level of safety in the nuclear activities under its jurisdiction is achieved, maintained and within the control of operating organizations. Even if it is possible to directly judge objective safety levels at nuclear facilities, such safety levels would not provide an exclusive indicator of regulatory effectiveness. The way the regulatory body ensures the safety of workers and the public and the way it discharges its responsibilities also determine its effectiveness. Hence the

  8. Regulatory perspectives of concept assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavelle, Peter A.

    1987-09-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the head agency for the regulatory review of the Assessment of the Canadian Concept for Nuclear Fuel Waste Disposal being done by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This paper describes the regulatory perspective of how the Concept Assessment could demonstrate the feasibility of a disposal conforming to regulatory requirements. The long-term aspects of Concept Assessment encourage the use of various predictive techniques for different time scales. Each technique will have a different potential for establishing confidence in the predictions. The predicted performance of a facility during operation should have a very high confidence, as it can be based on standard engineering calculations and the predictions can be validated later by monitoring during operation. The predictions of the transient period following closure of the facility should achieve a medium level of confidence, since they can be based on extrapolations of predictions of operational performance, using models that can be calibrated with monitoring data and with averaged input data derived from natural analog studies. Predictions based on fundamental processes will have a medium level of confidence when made to intermediate times after closure. Long-term predictions using generic or typical input data or Monte Carlo calculations of simplified models will have the least confidence and yet they can still contribute to the confidence that the disposal concept will conform to regulatory requirements

  9. DOE regulatory reform initiative vitrified mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.J.; Holtzscheiter, E.W.

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with responsibly managing the largest volume of mixed waste in the United States. This responsibility includes managing waste in compliance with all applicable Federal and State laws and regulations, and in a cost-effective, environmentally responsible manner. Managing certain treated mixed wastes in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage and disposal units (specifically those mixed wastes that pose low risks from the hazardous component) is unlikely to provide additional protection to human health and the environment beyond that afforded by managing these wastes in storage and disposal units subject to requirements for radiological control. In October, 1995, the DOE submitted a regulatory reform proposal to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) relating to vitrified mixed waste forms. The technical proposal supports a regulatory strategy that would allow vitrified mixed waste forms treated through a permit or other environmental compliance mechanism to be granted an exemption from RCRA hazardous waste regulation, after treatment, based upon the inherent destruction and immobilization capabilities of vitrification technology. The vitrified waste form will meet, or exceed the performance criteria of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass that has been accepted as an international standard for immobilizing radioactive waste components and the LDR treatment standards for inorganics and metals for controlling hazardous constituents. The proposal further provides that vitrified mixed waste would be responsibly managed under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) while reducing overall costs. Full regulatory authority by the EPA or a State would be maintained until an acceptable vitrified mixed waste form, protective of human health and the environment, is produced

  10. Meeting NPDES permit limits for an effluent-dependent stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, W.L.

    1998-01-01

    When the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina received a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit containing very low copper and toxicity limits for an effluent-dependent stream, an innovative and cost-effective method to meet them was sought. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control mandated that compliance with the new limits be achieved within three years of the effective date of the permit. SRS personnel studied various regulatory options for complying with the new limits including Water Effect Ratio, use of a Metals Translator, blending with additional effluents, and outfall relocation. Regulatory options were determined to not be feasible because the receiving stream is effluent dependent. Treatment options were studied after it was determined that none of the regulatory pathways were viable. Corrosion inhibitors were evaluated on a full-scale basis with only limited benefits. Ion exchange was promising, but not cost effective for a high flow effluent with a very low concentration of copper. A treatment wetlands, not normally given consideration for the removal of metals, proved to be the most cost effective method studied and is currently under construction

  11. European regulatory tools for advanced therapy medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, Egbert; Reinhardt, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Increasing scientific knowledge and technical innovations in the areas of cell biology, biotechnology and medicine resulted in the development of promising therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of human diseases. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) reflect a complex and innovative class of biopharmaceuticals as these products are highly research-driven, characterised by innovative manufacturing processes and heterogeneous with regard to their origin, type and complexity. This class of ATMP integrates gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineering products and are often individualized and patient-specific products. Multiple challenges arise from the nature of ATMPs, which are often developed by micro, small and medium sized enterprises, university and academia, for whom regulatory experiences are limited and regulatory requirements are challenging. Regulatory guidance such as the reflection paper on classification of ATMPs and guidelines highlighting product-specific issues support academic research groups and pharmaceutical companies to foster the development of safe and effective ATMPs. This review provides an overview on the European regulatory aspects of ATMPs and highlights specific regulatory tools such as the ATMP classification procedure, a discussion on the hospital exemption for selected ATMPs as well as borderline issues towards transplants/transfusion products.

  12. A High-Level Petri Net Framework for Genetic Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banks Richard

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available To understand the function of genetic regulatory networks in the development of cellular systems, we must not only realise the individual network entities, but also the manner by which they interact. Multi-valued networks are a promising qualitative approach for modelling such genetic regulatory networks, however, at present they have limited formal analysis techniques and tools. We present a flexible formal framework for modelling and analysing multi-valued genetic regulatory networks using high-level Petri nets and logic minimization techniques. We demonstrate our approach with a detailed case study in which part of the genetic regulatory network responsible for the carbon starvation stress response in Escherichia coli is modelled and analysed. We then compare and contrast this multivalued model to a corresponding Boolean model and consider their formal relationship.

  13. Regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  14. Data Science and Political Economy: Application to Financial Regulatory Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyn O'Halloran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of computational data science techniques in natural language processing and machine learning algorithms to analyze large and complex textual information opens new avenues for studying the interaction between economics and politics. We apply these techniques to analyze the design of financial regulatory structure in the United States since 1950. The analysis focuses on the delegation of discretionary authority to regulatory agencies in promulgating, implementing, and enforcing financial sector laws and overseeing compliance with them. Combining traditional studies with the new machine learning approaches enables us to go beyond the limitations of both methods and offer a more precise interpretation of the determinants of financial regulatory structure.

  15. Developing legal regulatory frameworks for modern biotechnology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper looks at attempts that have been made to develop legal regulatory frameworks for modern biotechnology. The discussion is limited to the regulation of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) technology by the two leading producers and exporters of GMOs in Africa: South Africa and Kenya. The international and ...

  16. Planktivory in the changing Lake Huron zooplankton community: Bythotrephes consumption exceeds that of Mysis and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, D.B.; Hunter, R. Douglas; Warner, D.M.; Chriscinske, M.A.; Roseman, E.F.

    2011-01-01

    Oligotrophic lakes are generally dominated by calanoid copepods because of their competitive advantage over cladocerans at low prey densities. Planktivory also can alter zooplankton community structure. We sought to understand the role of planktivory in driving recent changes to the zooplankton community of Lake Huron, a large oligotrophic lake on the border of Canada and the United States. We tested the hypothesis that excessive predation by fish (rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, bloater Coregonus hoyi) and invertebrates (Mysis relicta, Bythotrephes longimanus) had driven observed declines in cladoceran and cyclopoid copepod biomass between 2002 and 2007. We used a field sampling and bioenergetics modelling approach to generate estimates of daily consumption by planktivores at two 91-m depth sites in northern Lake Huron, U.S.A., for each month, May-October 2007. Daily consumption was compared to daily zooplankton production. Bythotrephes was the dominant planktivore and estimated to have eaten 78% of all zooplankton consumed. Bythotrephes consumption exceeded total zooplankton production between July and October. Mysis consumed 19% of all the zooplankton consumed and exceeded zooplankton production in October. Consumption by fish was relatively unimportant - eating only 3% of all zooplankton consumed. Because Bythotrephes was so important, we explored other consumption estimation methods that predict lower Bythotrephes consumption. Under this scenario, Mysis was the most important planktivore, and Bythotrephes consumption exceeded zooplankton production only in August. Our results provide no support for the hypothesis that excessive fish consumption directly contributed to the decline of cladocerans and cyclopoid copepods in Lake Huron. Rather, they highlight the importance of invertebrate planktivores in structuring zooplankton communities, especially for those foods webs that have both Bythotrephes and Mysis. Together, these species occupy the epi-, meta- and

  17. Advances in Canadian regulatory practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddington, J.G.

    1993-03-01

    The new General Amendments to the Regulations, new recommendations on dose limits, developments in techniques and safety thinking, and aging of plant are all contributing to the need for a significant number of new regulatory document on a wide range of topics. this paper highlights a number of initiatives taken in response to these pressures, giving a brief background to the initiative and, where possible, outlining some of the ideas in the document licensing guides on new dose limits, dosimetry, safety analysis, reliability, fault tree analysis, reporting requirements, human factors, software, the ALARA principle, backfitting and the licensing process. (Author) 29 refs., fig., 4 tabs

  18. Challenges and regulatory considerations in the acoustic measurement of high-frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Samuel M; Sundar, Guru; Schafer, Mark E; Harris, Gerald R; Vaezy, Shahram; Gessert, James M; Howard, Samuel M; Moore, Mary K; Eaton, Richard M

    2013-11-01

    This article examines the challenges associated with making acoustic output measurements at high ultrasound frequencies (>20 MHz) in the context of regulatory considerations contained in the US Food and Drug Administration industry guidance document for diagnostic ultrasound devices. Error sources in the acoustic measurement, including hydrophone calibration and spatial averaging, nonlinear distortion, and mechanical alignment, are evaluated, and the limitations of currently available acoustic measurement instruments are discussed. An uncertainty analysis of acoustic intensity and power measurements is presented, and an example uncertainty calculation is done on a hypothetical 30-MHz high-frequency ultrasound system. This analysis concludes that the estimated measurement uncertainty of the acoustic intensity is +73%/-86%, and the uncertainty in the mechanical index is +37%/-43%. These values exceed the respective levels in the Food and Drug Administration guidance document of 30% and 15%, respectively, which are more representative of the measurement uncertainty associated with characterizing lower-frequency ultrasound systems. Recommendations made for minimizing the measurement uncertainty include implementing a mechanical positioning system that has sufficient repeatability and precision, reconstructing the time-pressure waveform via deconvolution using the hydrophone frequency response, and correcting for hydrophone spatial averaging.

  19. 77 FR 7930 - Improving Government Regulations; Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 602), the Department of Defense's printed agenda entries... section 610 of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. Printing of these entries is limited to fields that contain...D Intelligence Interrogations, Detainee Debriefings, and Tactical Questioning. This rule only...

  20. Limiting currents of overcompensated electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malafaev, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    A possibility of producing recompensated electron beam and increasing its limiting currents in the magnetic field is experimentally investigated. It is shown that such a possibility is realized when the beam is surrounded by a cylindrical net placed into the tube located under the positive potential relative to the net. In this case an increase of limiting current at the expense of increasing the ion life time, takes place. Current, exceeding the Pierce threshold 1.5 times, is obtained

  1. Estimating the exceedance probability of rain rate by logistic regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Long S.; Kedem, Benjamin

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the fraction of an area with rain intensity above a fixed threshold is highly correlated with the area-averaged rain rate. To estimate the fractional rainy area, a logistic regression model, which estimates the conditional probability that rain rate over an area exceeds a fixed threshold given the values of related covariates, is developed. The problem of dependency in the data in the estimation procedure is bypassed by the method of partial likelihood. Analyses of simulated scanning multichannel microwave radiometer and observed electrically scanning microwave radiometer data during the Global Atlantic Tropical Experiment period show that the use of logistic regression in pixel classification is superior to multiple regression in predicting whether rain rate at each pixel exceeds a given threshold, even in the presence of noisy data. The potential of the logistic regression technique in satellite rain rate estimation is discussed.

  2. Efficiency limit of solar cells with index-near-zero photon management layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, A.P.

    2017-05-15

    As single-junction solar cells saturate in efficiency, the topic of photon management has generated interest in the long running quest to exceed the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. While a mirror applied to the backside of a solar cell has proven its benefit as a photon management layer in record setting devices that fall within the Shockley-Queisser limit, it has been proposed that a new type of photon management layer – a transparent index-near-zero (INZ) material – applied to the top surface of a solar cell will allow it to finally exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit. INZ layers – and their influence on solar cell current density, open circuit voltage, and power conversion efficiency – are analyzed. By considering the principle of detailed balance, Snell's law, and the role that entropy plays, it is shown that INZ layers do not allow a solar cell to exceed the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. At best, a solar cell with an INZ layer would have the same Shockley-Queisser limiting efficiency as a conventional solar cell tracked under a direct solar spectrum (direct beam radiation only), yet would suffer diminished efficiency under a global solar spectrum (direct beam plus diffuse light) due to the presence of an external critical acceptance angle.

  3. Efficiency limit of solar cells with index-near-zero photon management layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, A.P.

    2017-01-01

    As single-junction solar cells saturate in efficiency, the topic of photon management has generated interest in the long running quest to exceed the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. While a mirror applied to the backside of a solar cell has proven its benefit as a photon management layer in record setting devices that fall within the Shockley-Queisser limit, it has been proposed that a new type of photon management layer – a transparent index-near-zero (INZ) material – applied to the top surface of a solar cell will allow it to finally exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit. INZ layers – and their influence on solar cell current density, open circuit voltage, and power conversion efficiency – are analyzed. By considering the principle of detailed balance, Snell's law, and the role that entropy plays, it is shown that INZ layers do not allow a solar cell to exceed the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. At best, a solar cell with an INZ layer would have the same Shockley-Queisser limiting efficiency as a conventional solar cell tracked under a direct solar spectrum (direct beam radiation only), yet would suffer diminished efficiency under a global solar spectrum (direct beam plus diffuse light) due to the presence of an external critical acceptance angle.

  4. Efficiency limit of solar cells with index-near-zero photon management layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    As single-junction solar cells saturate in efficiency, the topic of photon management has generated interest in the long running quest to exceed the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. While a mirror applied to the backside of a solar cell has proven its benefit as a photon management layer in record setting devices that fall within the Shockley-Queisser limit, it has been proposed that a new type of photon management layer - a transparent index-near-zero (INZ) material - applied to the top surface of a solar cell will allow it to finally exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit. INZ layers - and their influence on solar cell current density, open circuit voltage, and power conversion efficiency - are analyzed. By considering the principle of detailed balance, Snell's law, and the role that entropy plays, it is shown that INZ layers do not allow a solar cell to exceed the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. At best, a solar cell with an INZ layer would have the same Shockley-Queisser limiting efficiency as a conventional solar cell tracked under a direct solar spectrum (direct beam radiation only), yet would suffer diminished efficiency under a global solar spectrum (direct beam plus diffuse light) due to the presence of an external critical acceptance angle.

  5. Extreme Temperature Exceedances Change more Rapidly Under Future Warming in Regions of non-Gaussian Short Temperature Distribution Tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loikith, P. C.; Neelin, J. D.; Meyerson, J.

    2017-12-01

    Regions of shorter-than-Gaussian warm and cold side temperature distribution tails are shown to occur in spatially coherent patterns in the current climate. Under such conditions, warming may be manifested in more complex ways than if the underlying distribution were close to Gaussian. For example, under a uniform warm shift, the simplest prototype for future warming, a location with a short warm side tail would experience a greater increase in extreme warm exceedances compared to if the distribution were Gaussian. Similarly, for a location with a short cold side tail, a uniform warm shift would result in a rapid decrease in extreme cold exceedances. Both scenarios carry major societal and environmental implications including but not limited to negative impacts on human and ecosystem health, agriculture, and the economy. It is therefore important for climate models to be able to realistically reproduce short tails in simulations of historical climate in order to boost confidence in projections of future temperature extremes. Overall, climate models contributing to the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project capture many of the principal observed regions of short tails. This suggests the underlying dynamics and physics occur on scales resolved by the models, and helps build confidence in model projections of extremes. Furthermore, most GCMs show more rapid changes in exceedances of extreme temperature thresholds in regions of short tails. Results therefore suggest that the shape of the tails of the underlying temperature distribution is an indicator of how rapidly a location will experience changes to extreme temperature occurrence under future warming.

  6. Politically Induced Regulatory Risk and Independent Regulatory Agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Strausz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in election outcomes generates politically induced regulatory risk. Political parties' risk attitudes towards such risk depend on a fluctuation effect that hurts both parties and an output--expansion effect that benefits at least one party. Notwithstanding the parties' risk attitudes, political parties have incentives to negotiate away all regulatory risk by pre-electoral bargaining. Efficient pre-electoral bargaining outcomes fully eliminate politically induced regulatory risk. P...

  7. 17 CFR 230.504 - Exemption for limited offerings and sales of securities not exceeding $1,000,000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... require the public filing and delivery to investors of a substantive disclosure document before sale, and... only to “accredited investors” as defined in § 230.501(a). (2) The aggregate offering price for an... § 230.504 fails to meet the limitation on the aggregate offering price, it does not affect the...

  8. The British Nuclear Fuels Limited (Payment and Loan Limit) Order 1976 No.1298

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Sections 11(4) and 12(1) of the Atomic Energy Authority Act 1971 authorise the Secretary of State for Energy (with the consent of the Treasury) to subscribe for shares in British Nuclear Fuels Limited and (with the approval of the Treasury) to make loans to the Company. Section 13 of the Act imposes an overall limit on the total amounts which may be paid or lent to that Company by the Secretary of State or by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, or both collectively, of Pound 50 million, which may be increased to such greater sum not exceeding Pound 75 million as may be specified by the Secretary of State by order. This Order increases the limit to Pound 75 million. (G.B.) [fr

  9. Intrinsic limits to gene regulation by global crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Tamar; Prizak, Roshan; Guet, Călin C.; Barton, Nicholas H.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation relies on the specificity of transcription factor (TF)–DNA interactions. Limited specificity may lead to crosstalk: a regulatory state in which a gene is either incorrectly activated due to noncognate TF–DNA interactions or remains erroneously inactive. As each TF can have numerous interactions with noncognate cis-regulatory elements, crosstalk is inherently a global problem, yet has previously not been studied as such. We construct a theoretical framework to analyse the effects of global crosstalk on gene regulation. We find that crosstalk presents a significant challenge for organisms with low-specificity TFs, such as metazoans. Crosstalk is not easily mitigated by known regulatory schemes acting at equilibrium, including variants of cooperativity and combinatorial regulation. Our results suggest that crosstalk imposes a previously unexplored global constraint on the functioning and evolution of regulatory networks, which is qualitatively distinct from the known constraints that act at the level of individual gene regulatory elements. PMID:27489144

  10. Calculating exclusion limits for weakly interacting massive particle direct detection experiments without background subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Anne M.

    2002-01-01

    Competitive limits on the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) spin-independent scattering cross section are currently being produced by 76 Ge detectors originally designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay, such as the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments. In the absence of background subtraction, limits on the WIMP interaction cross section are set by calculating the upper confidence limit on the theoretical event rate, given the observed event rate. The standard analysis technique involves calculating the 90% upper confidence limit on the number of events in each bin, and excluding any set of parameters (WIMP mass and cross section) which produces a theoretical event rate for any bin which exceeds the 90% upper confidence limit on the event rate for that bin. We show that, if there is more than one energy bin, this produces exclusion limits that are actually at a lower degree of confidence than 90%, and are hence erroneously tight. We formulate criteria which produce true 90% confidence exclusion limits in these circumstances, including calculating the individual bin confidence limit for which the overall probability that no bins exceed this confidence limit is 90% and calculating the 90% minimum confidence limit on the number of bins which exceed their individual bin 90% confidence limits. We then compare the limits on the WIMP cross section produced by these criteria with those found using the standard technique, using data from the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments

  11. Raising the speed limit from 75 to 80mph on Utah rural interstates: Effects on vehicle speeds and speed variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen

    2017-06-01

    In November 2010 and October 2013, Utah increased speed limits on sections of rural interstates from 75 to 80mph. Effects on vehicle speeds and speed variance were examined. Speeds were measured in May 2010 and May 2014 within the new 80mph zones, and at a nearby spillover site and at more distant control sites where speed limits remained 75mph. Log-linear regression models estimated percentage changes in speed variance and mean speeds for passenger vehicles and large trucks associated with the speed limit increase. Logistic regression models estimated effects on the probability of passenger vehicles exceeding 80, 85, or 90mph and large trucks exceeding 80mph. Within the 80mph zones and at the spillover location in 2014, mean passenger vehicle speeds were significantly higher (4.1% and 3.5%, respectively), as were the probabilities that passenger vehicles exceeded 80mph (122.3% and 88.5%, respectively), than would have been expected without the speed limit increase. Probabilities that passenger vehicles exceeded 85 and 90mph were non-significantly higher than expected within the 80mph zones. For large trucks, the mean speed and probability of exceeding 80mph were higher than expected within the 80mph zones. Only the increase in mean speed was significant. Raising the speed limit was associated with non-significant increases in speed variance. The study adds to the wealth of evidence that increasing speed limits leads to higher travel speeds and an increased probability of exceeding the new speed limit. Results moreover contradict the claim that increasing speed limits reduces speed variance. Although the estimated increases in mean vehicle speeds may appear modest, prior research suggests such increases would be associated with substantial increases in fatal or injury crashes. This should be considered by lawmakers considering increasing speed limits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  12. 30 CFR 57.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exposure limits for airborne contaminants. 57... Underground § 57.5001 Exposure limits for airborne contaminants. Except as permitted by § 57.5005— (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), the exposure to airborne contaminants shall not exceed, on the basis of...

  13. Toward quantum-limited position measurements using optically levitated microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Black, Eric D.

    2004-01-01

    We propose the use of optically levitated microspheres as test masses in experiments aimed at reaching and potentially exceeding the standard quantum limit for position measurements. Optically levitated microspheres have low mass and are essentially free of suspension thermal noise, making them well suited for experimentally testing our understanding of quantum-limited measurements

  14. Toward quantum-limited position measurements using optically levitated microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Black, Eric D

    2004-01-26

    We propose the use of optically levitated microspheres as test masses in experiments aimed at reaching and potentially exceeding the standard quantum limit for position measurements. Optically levitated microspheres have low mass and are essentially free of suspension thermal noise, making them well suited for experimentally testing our understanding of quantum-limited measurements.

  15. Higher than expected NOx emission from trucks may affect attainability of NO2 limit values in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velders, G.J.M.; Geilenkirchen, G.P.; Lange, R. de

    2011-01-01

    In past years, the European limit value for average annual NO2 concentration has been exceeded in city streets and along motorways in the Netherlands. By 2015 the limit value must be adhered to in the Netherlands. Although the total road length for which exceedance is likely is expected to decrease

  16. Papers on the nuclear regulatory dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Freeman, S.D.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1985-10-01

    The four papers contained in this report are titled: (1) From Prescriptive to Performance-Based Regulation of Nuclear Power; (2) Nuclear Regulatory Reform: A Technology-Forcing Approach; (3) Improving the Regulation of Nuclear Power; and (4) Science and Its Limits: The Regulators' Dilemma. These four papers investigate issues relating to the long-term regulation of nuclear energy. They were prepared as part of the Institute for Energy Analysis' project on Nuclear Regulation funded by a grant from the Mellon Foundation and a smaller grant by the MacArthur Foundation. Originally this work was to be supplemented by contributions from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and from the Department of Energy. These contributions were not forthcoming, and as a result the scope of our investigations was more restricted than we had originally planned.

  17. Papers on the nuclear regulatory dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Freeman, S.D.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1985-10-01

    The four papers contained in this report are titled: (1) From Prescriptive to Performance-Based Regulation of Nuclear Power; (2) Nuclear Regulatory Reform: A Technology-Forcing Approach; (3) Improving the Regulation of Nuclear Power; and (4) Science and Its Limits: The Regulators' Dilemma. These four papers investigate issues relating to the long-term regulation of nuclear energy. They were prepared as part of the Institute for Energy Analysis' project on Nuclear Regulation funded by a grant from the Mellon Foundation and a smaller grant by the MacArthur Foundation. Originally this work was to be supplemented by contributions from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and from the Department of Energy. These contributions were not forthcoming, and as a result the scope of our investigations was more restricted than we had originally planned

  18. Regulatory Flexibility: An Individual Differences Perspective on Coping and Emotion Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, George A; Burton, Charles L

    2013-11-01

    People respond to stressful events in different ways, depending on the event and on the regulatory strategies they choose. Coping and emotion regulation theorists have proposed dynamic models in which these two factors, the person and the situation, interact over time to inform adaptation. In practice, however, researchers have tended to assume that particular regulatory strategies are consistently beneficial or maladaptive. We label this assumption the fallacy of uniform efficacy and contrast it with findings from a number of related literatures that have suggested the emergence of a broader but as yet poorly defined construct that we refer to as regulatory flexibility. In this review, we articulate this broader construct and define both its features and limitations. Specifically, we propose a heuristic individual differences framework and review research on three sequential components of flexibility for which propensities and abilities vary: sensitivity to context, availability of a diverse repertoire of regulatory strategies, and responsiveness to feedback. We consider the methodological limitations of research on each component, review questions that future research on flexibility might address, and consider how the components might relate to each other and to broader conceptualizations about stability and change across persons and situations. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. 76 FR 12101 - Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [ Project No. 12737-002] Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Environmental Assessment In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's regulations, 18 CFR part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 447897), the Office of...

  20. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe used...

  1. Low Simulated Radiation Limit for Runaway Greenhouse Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Colin; Robinson, Tyler D.; Zahnle, Kevin J.; Crisp, David

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial planet atmospheres must be in long-term radiation balance, with solar radiation absorbed matched by thermal radiation emitted. For hot moist atmospheres, however, there is an upper limit on the thermal emission which is decoupled from the surface temperature. If net absorbed solar radiation exceeds this limit the planet will heat uncontrollably, the so-called \\runaway greenhouse". Here we show that a runaway greenhouse induced steam atmosphere may be a stable state for a planet with the same amount of incident solar radiation as Earth has today, contrary to previous results. We have calculated the clear-sky radiation limits at line-by-line spectral resolution for the first time. The thermal radiation limit is lower than previously reported (282 W/sq m rather than 310W/sq m) and much more solar radiation would be absorbed (294W/sq m rather than 222W/sq m). Avoiding a runaway greenhouse under the present solar constant requires that the atmosphere is subsaturated with water, and that cloud albedo forcing exceeds cloud greenhouse forcing. Greenhouse warming could in theory trigger a runaway greenhouse but palaeoclimate comparisons suggest that foreseeable increases in greenhouse gases will be insufficient to do this.

  2. Role of cooperation activities for capacity building of Romanian Regulatory Authority (CNCAN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, L.; Ciurea-Ercau, C.

    2010-01-01

    With a slow but active nuclear development program of sector since 1980, Romanian regulatory authority had to permanently adapt to the changes in national and international environment in order ensure continuously increase of capacity building and effectiveness, commensurate with the growing nuclear sector. Limited human resources available at the national level put the Romanian Regulatory Authority in the position of building the Technical Support Organization as part of its on organization. International cooperation played an important role in capacity building of Romanian regulatory body and providing necessary assistance in performing regulatory activities or support in development of regulatory framework. Fellowships and technical visits, workshops and training courses provided through IAEA TC at national or regional level, technical assistance provided by European Commission (EC) through PHARE Projects, all provided valuable contribution in assuring training of regulatory staff and development of proper regulatory framework in Romania. Therefore, Romanian Regulatory Authority is putting a strong accent on strengthening and promoting international cooperation through IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme, Molls between regulatory bodies, as one of the key elements in supporting capacity building of regulatory authorities in countries having small or embarking on nuclear power program. Building networks between training centers and research facilities and establishments of regional training centers represent one of the future viable options in preserving knowledge in nuclear field. (author)

  3. 77 FR 67427 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; ICE Clear Europe Limited; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... Rules provide updates related to anti-money laundering legislation applicable to customers, clarify... proposed rule change will have any impact or impose any burden on competition. C. Self-Regulatory...

  4. 78 FR 42992 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... will use technology automation to impose risk limits on Clearing Members for Credit Default Swap (CDS... credit limit automation is that CDS transactions that exceed the daily limit will be rejected for clearing. We will continue to communicate via email and telephone to work with your firm if your...

  5. Fundamental limit of light trapping in grating structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zongfu

    2010-08-11

    We use a rigorous electromagnetic approach to analyze the fundamental limit of light-trapping enhancement in grating structures. This limit can exceed the bulk limit of 4n 2, but has significant angular dependency. We explicitly show that 2D gratings provide more enhancement than 1D gratings. We also show the effects of the grating profile’s symmetry on the absorption enhancement limit. Numerical simulations are applied to support the theory. Our findings provide general guidance for the design of grating structures for light-trapping solar cells.

  6. A probabilistic method for determining effluent temperature limits for flow instability for SRS reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, B.J.; White, A.M.

    1990-06-01

    This manual describes the uncertainty analysis used to determine the effluent temperature limits for a Mark 22 charge in the Savannah River Site production reactors. The postulated accident scenario is a DEGB/LOCA resulting from a coolant pipe break at the plenum inlet accompanied by the safety rod failure described in the previous chapter. The analysis described in this manual is used to calculate the limits for the flow instability phase of the accident. For this phase of the accident, the limits criterion is that the Stanton number does not exceed 0.00455 [1]. The limits are determined for a specified 84% probability that the Stanton number will not exceed 0.00455 in any assembly in the core

  7. A probabilistic method for determining effluent temperature limits for flow instability for SRS reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B.J.; White, A.M.

    1990-06-01

    This manual describes the uncertainty analysis used to determine the effluent temperature limits for a Mark 22 charge in the Savannah River Site production reactors. The postulated accident scenario is a DEGB/LOCA resulting from a coolant pipe break at the plenum inlet accompanied by the safety rod failure described in the previous chapter. The analysis described in this manual is used to calculate the limits for the flow instability phase of the accident. For this phase of the accident, the limits criterion is that the Stanton number does not exceed 0.00455 [1]. The limits are determined for a specified 84% probability that the Stanton number will not exceed 0.00455 in any assembly in the core.

  8. 75 FR 79811 - Department Regulatory Agenda; Semiannual Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ....S.C. 602), DOT's printed agenda entries include only: 1. The Agency's agenda preamble; 2. Rules that... Regulatory Flexibility Act. Printing of these entries is limited to fields that contain information required... transfer of the functions from the Office of Emergency Transportation (OET) to the Office of Intelligence...

  9. Rotor aerodynamic power limits at low tip speed ratio using CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, Robert F; Sarmast, Sasan; Henningson, Dan; Sørensen, Jens N

    2014-01-01

    When investigating limits of rotor aerodynamic models, the Betz limit serves as a solid marker of an upper limit which no model should be able to exceed. A century ago Joukowsky (1912) proposed a rotor aerodynamic model utilizing a rotating actuator disc with a constant circulation. This model has since then been the subject of much controversy as it predicts a power performance that for all tip speed ratios exceeds the Betz limit and which goes to infinity when the tip speed ratio goes to zero. Recently, it was demonstrated that the Joukowsky model is fully consistent with the inviscid Euler equations and that the apparent inconsistency partly can be explained by the lack of viscous effects (Sprensen and van Kuik [4]). However, even including a term to account for the effect of viscosity at small tip speed ratios, the model still predicts a power yield that exceeds the Betz limit. In the present work we study in detail, using a CFD actuator line model, the flow behavior for rotors at small tip speed ratios. It is shown that the excessive swirl appearing towards the rotor center at small tip speed ratios generates vortex breakdown, causing a recirculating zone in the wake that limits the power yield of the rotor. The appearance of vortex breakdown has a similar effect on the flow behavior as the vortex ring state that usually appears at higher tip speed ratios. Limits to where vortex breakdown might occur with tip speed ratio and rotor loading as parameter are investigated and presented in the paper. The limits found correspond to well-known criterion for vortex breakdown onset for swirling flows in general. By applying a criterion for vortex breakdown in combination with the general momentum theory, the power performance always stays below the Betz limit

  10. Fisheries regulatory regimes and resilience to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojea, Elena; Pearlman, Isaac; Gaines, Steven D; Lester, Sarah E

    2017-05-01

    Climate change is already producing ecological, social, and economic impacts on fisheries, and these effects are expected to increase in frequency and magnitude in the future. Fisheries governance and regulations can alter socio-ecological resilience to climate change impacts via harvest control rules and incentives driving fisher behavior, yet there are no syntheses or conceptual frameworks for examining how institutions and their regulatory approaches can alter fisheries resilience to climate change. We identify nine key climate resilience criteria for fisheries socio-ecological systems (SES), defining resilience as the ability of the coupled system of interacting social and ecological components (i.e., the SES) to absorb change while avoiding transformation into a different undesirable state. We then evaluate the capacity of four fisheries regulatory systems that vary in their degree of property rights, including open access, limited entry, and two types of rights-based management, to increase or inhibit resilience. Our exploratory assessment of evidence in the literature suggests that these regulatory regimes vary widely in their ability to promote resilient fisheries, with rights-based approaches appearing to offer more resilience benefits in many cases, but detailed characteristics of the regulatory instruments are fundamental.

  11. Time perspective and social preference in older and younger adults: Effects of self-regulatory fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Geiger, Paul J; Combs, Hannah L; Boggero, Ian A

    2016-09-01

    Socioemotional selectivity theory predicts that when perceived time in life is limited, people will prefer emotionally close social partners over less emotionally rewarding partners. Regulating social choices with regard to time perspective can make the best use of time with regard to well-being. However, doing so may depend on the self-regulatory capacity of the individual. Two studies, 1 with younger adults (N = 101) and 1 with younger (N = 42) and older (N = 39) adults, experimentally tested the effects of time perspective and self-regulatory fatigue on preferences for emotionally close partners and knowledgeable partners. In both studies and across younger and older adults, when self-regulatory fatigue was low, the perception of limited time resulted in a greater preference for close social partners relative to knowledgeable social partners. However, this shift was eliminated by self-regulatory fatigue. In Study 2, when fatigued, younger adults preferred close social partners to knowledgeable partners across time perspectives; older adults preferred close and knowledgeable partners more equally across time perspectives. These findings have implications for social decision-making and satisfaction among people who experience chronic self-regulatory fatigue. They also contradict previous suggestions that only younger adults are susceptible to self-regulatory fatigue. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Application of Regulatory Focus Theory to Search Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowle, Elyse N; Georgia, Emily J; Doss, Brian D; Updegraff, John A

    The purpose of this paper is to test the utility of regulatory focus theory principles in a real-world setting; specifically, Internet hosted text advertisements. Effect of compatibility of the ad text with the regulatory focus of the consumer was examined. Advertisements were created using Google AdWords. Data were collected for the number of views and clicks each ad received. Effect of regulatory fit was measured using logistic regression. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that there was a strong main effect for keyword, such that users were almost six times as likely to click on a promotion advertisement as a prevention advertisement, as well as a main effect for compatibility, such that users were twice as likely to click on an advertisement with content that was consistent with their keyword. Finally, there was a strong interaction of these two variables, such that the effect of consistent advertisements was stronger for promotion searches than for prevention searches. The effect of ad compatibility had medium to large effect sizes, suggesting that individuals' state may have more influence on advertising response than do individuals' traits (e.g. personality traits). Measurement of regulatory fit was limited by the constraints of Google AdWords. The results of this study provide a possible framework for ad creation for Internet advertisers. This paper is the first study to demonstrate the utility of regulatory focus theory in online advertising.

  13. Regulatory control of nuclear safety in Finland. Annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tossavainen, K. [ed.

    2000-06-01

    This report concerns the regulatory control of nuclear energy in Finland in 1999. Its submission to the Ministry of Trade and Industry by the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is stipulated in section 121 of the Nuclear Energy Decree. STUK's regulatory work was focused on the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants as well as on nuclear waste management and safeguards of nuclear materials. The operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants was in compliance with the conditions set out in their operating licences and with current regulations, with the exception of some inadvertent deviations from the Technical Specifications. No plant events endangering the safe use of nuclear energy occurred. The individual doses of all nuclear power plant workers remained below the dose threshold. The collective dose of the workers was low, compared internationally, and did not exceed STUK's guidelines at either nuclear power plant. The radioactive releases were minor and the dose calculated on their basis for the most exposed individual in the vicinity of the plant was well below the limit established in a decision of the Council of State at both Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants. STUK issued statements to the Ministry of Trade and Industry about the environmental impact assessment programme reports on the possible nuclear power plant projects at Olkiluoto and Loviisa and about the continued operation of the research reactor in Otaniemi, Espoo. A Y2k-related safety assessment of the Finnish nuclear power plants was completed in December. In nuclear waste management STUK's regulatory work was focused on spent fuel storage and final disposal plans as well as on the treatment, storage and final disposal of reactor waste. No events occurred in nuclear waste management that would have endangered safety. A statement was issued to the Ministry of Trade and Industry about an environmental impact assessment report on a proposed final

  14. Regulatory control of nuclear safety in Finland. Annual report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    2000-06-01

    This report concerns the regulatory control of nuclear energy in Finland in 1999. Its submission to the Ministry of Trade and Industry by the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is stipulated in section 121 of the Nuclear Energy Decree. STUK's regulatory work was focused on the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants as well as on nuclear waste management and safeguards of nuclear materials. The operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants was in compliance with the conditions set out in their operating licences and with current regulations, with the exception of some inadvertent deviations from the Technical Specifications. No plant events endangering the safe use of nuclear energy occurred. The individual doses of all nuclear power plant workers remained below the dose threshold. The collective dose of the workers was low, compared internationally, and did not exceed STUK's guidelines at either nuclear power plant. The radioactive releases were minor and the dose calculated on their basis for the most exposed individual in the vicinity of the plant was well below the limit established in a decision of the Council of State at both Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants. STUK issued statements to the Ministry of Trade and Industry about the environmental impact assessment programme reports on the possible nuclear power plant projects at Olkiluoto and Loviisa and about the continued operation of the research reactor in Otaniemi, Espoo. A Y2k-related safety assessment of the Finnish nuclear power plants was completed in December. In nuclear waste management STUK's regulatory work was focused on spent fuel storage and final disposal plans as well as on the treatment, storage and final disposal of reactor waste. No events occurred in nuclear waste management that would have endangered safety. A statement was issued to the Ministry of Trade and Industry about an environmental impact assessment report on a proposed final disposal facility for

  15. Atmospheric dry and wet deposition of sulphur and nitrogen species and assessment of critical loads of acidic deposition exceedance in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J. Piketh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that acidic atmospheric pollution deposition, originating from the South African central industrial area, poses an environmental threat across a larger region within the dispersal footprint. A network of 37 passive monitoring sites to measure SO2 and NO2 was operated from August 2005 to September 2007. The area extended over the entire northern and eastern interior of South Africa. Monitoring locations were chosen to avoid direct impacts from local sources such as towns, mines and highways. Dry deposition rates of SO2 and NO2 were calculated from the measured concentrations. Concentrations of sulphur and nitrogen species in wet deposition from a previous study were used in conjunction with measured rainfall for the years 2006 and 2007 to estimate the wet deposition over the region. The calculated total (non-organic acidic deposition formed the basis for an assessment of exceedance of critical loads based on sensitivity of the regional soils. Regional soil sensitivity was determined by combining two major soil attributes available in the World Inventory of Soil Emission Potentials (International Soil Reference and Information Centre. Results indicate that certain parts of the central pollution source area on the South African Highveld have the potential for critical load exceedance, while limited areas downwind show lower levels of exceedance. Areas upwind and remote areas up and downwind, including forested areas of the Drakensberg escarpment, do not show any exceedance of the critical loads.

  16. Regulatory and cost barriers are likely to limit biosimilar development and expected savings in the near future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Henry G; Guha, Rahul; Salgado, Maria

    2014-06-01

    In March 2010 Congress established an abbreviated Food and Drug Administration approval pathway for biosimilars-drugs that are very similar but not identical to a reference biological product and cost less. Because bringing biosimilars to the market currently requires large investments of money, fewer biosimilars are expected to enter the biologics market than has been the case with generic drugs entering the small-molecule drug market. Additionally, given the high regulatory hurdles to obtaining interchangeability-which would allow pharmacists to substitute a biosimilar for its reference product, subject to evolving state substitution laws-most biosimilars will likely compete as therapeutic alternatives instead of as therapeutic equivalents. In other words, biosimilars will need to compete with their reference product on the basis of quality; price; and manufacturer's reputation with physicians, insurers, and patient groups. Biosimilars also will face dynamic competition from new biologics in the same therapeutic class-including "biobetters," which offer incremental improvements on reference products, such as extended duration of action. The prospects for significant cost savings from the use of biosimilars appear to be limited for the next several years, but their use should increase over time because of both demand- and supply-side factors. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  17. Strengthening Regulatory Competence in a Changing Nuclear Regulatory Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illizastigui, P.F.

    2016-01-01

    The paper addresses the approach followed by the Cuban National Center for Nuclear Safety for the management of current and new competences of its regulatory staff with the aim of allowing those staff to effectively fulfill their core regulatory functions. The approach is realized through an Integrated System for Competence Building, which is based on the IAEA recommendations, shown to be effective in ensuring the necessary competence in the relevant areas. In the author’s opinion, competence of the regulatory staff in the area of human and organizational factors is of paramount importance and needs to be further strengthened in order to be able to assess safety performance at the facilities and detect early signs of deteriorating safety performance. The former is defined by the author as the core regulatory function “Analysis” which covers the entire spectrum of assessment tasks carried out by the regulatory staff to: a) detect declining safety performance, b) diagnose latent weaknesses (root causes) and c) make effective safety culture interventions. The author suggests that competence associated with the fulfillment of the analysis function is distinctly identified and dealt with separately in the current system of managing regulatory competence. (author)

  18. Advanced Reactor Technologies - Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Wayne L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-08-23

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a “critical path” for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain “minimum” levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial “first step” in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by technology development studies, the anticipated regulatory

  19. Advanced Reactor Technology -- Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Wayne Leland [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a “critical path” for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain “minimum” levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial “first step” in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by technology development studies, the anticipated regulatory

  20. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  1. The Benefits and Limitations of Hydraulic Modeling for Ordinary High Water Mark Delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    between two cross sections, the HEC-RAS model will not show it. If there is a sudden drop in the channel, such as a waterfall or steep rapids, the...ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 6- 1 Wetland Regulatory Assistance Program (WRAP) The Benefits and Limitations of Hydraulic Modeling for Ordinary...client/default. Wetland Regulatory Assistance Program (WRAP) ERDC/CRREL TR-16-1 February 2016 The Benefits and Limitations of Hydraulic Modeling

  2. Regulatory approach to risk informed decision making in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chande, S.K.; Koley, J.

    2001-01-01

    Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), the authority for licensing and monitoring safety in Indian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), makes use of insights gained from PSA together with the results of the other deterministic analyses in taking decisions regarding the acceptability of the safety of the NPPs. PSA provides an estimation of risks; it also gives information on a balanced design by revealing interaction between engineered features and weak areas in a design. For regulatory use, PSA needs to be carried out using standardized methodology and state of the art technology. PSA helps regulators in taking faster and consistent decisions. Keeping in mind the limitations associated with PSA study, AERB has decided to adopt risk-informed decision making in regulatory licensing process. This paper describes the AERB policy regarding PSA and gives an overview of the experience in this area. (author)

  3. Genetic control of mammalian T-cell proliferation with synthetic RNA regulatory systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yvonne Y.; Jensen, Michael C.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2010-01-01

    RNA molecules perform diverse regulatory functions in natural biological systems, and numerous synthetic RNA-based control devices that integrate sensing and gene-regulatory functions have been demonstrated, predominantly in bacteria and yeast. Despite potential advantages of RNA-based genetic control strategies in clinical applications, there has been limited success in extending engineered RNA devices to mammalian gene-expression control and no example of their application to functional res...

  4. Protective containment behaviour under exceeded design loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holub, I.; Stepan, J.; Maly, J.; Schererova, K.

    2003-01-01

    The contribution describes the calculation results of the behaviour of containment structure if loaded in excess of its design load. The Temelin NPP comprises two WWER 1000 blocks and containment consists of a pre-stressed reinforced concrete structure with a system of unbonded cables. The objective of the calculations was to determine the level of load caused by the internal pressure and temperature at which the containment protective function would fail. In the first step, the maximum overpressure was determined, which may be transferred by the containment structure. In further steps analyses were made of various combinations of simultaneous pressure and temperature loads. The contribution presents relevant calculation results, including the evaluation of containment structure behaviour including liner under loads that exceed its design parameters. (author)

  5. Top-level regulatory criteria for the standard MHTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-10-15

    The Licensing Plan for the Standard MHTGR (Ref. 1) describes a program to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) design review and approval. The Plan calls for the submittal of Top-Level Regulatory Criteria to the NRC for concurrence with their completeness and acceptability for the MHTGR program. The Top-Level Regulatory Criteria are defined as the standards for judging licensability that directly specify acceptable limits for protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The criteria proposed herein are for normal plant operation and a broad spectrum of anticipated events, including accidents. The approach taken is to define a set of criteria which are general as opposed to being design specific. Specifically, it is recommended that criteria be met which: 1. Are less prescriptive than current regulation, thereby encouraging maximum flexibility in design approaches. 2. Are measurable. 3. Are not more strict than the criteria for current power plants.

  6. [Do vitamins from foods fortified exceed the allowed limits? Study carried out in population young adolescent and young adult of the metropolitan region of Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixas Sepúlveda, Alejandra; Díaz Narváez, Víctor Patricio; Durán Agüero, Samuel; Gaete Verdugo, María Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In order to analyze the usual consumption of vitamins in an adolescent population and young adult in the Metropolitan Region, were 213 food fortified with vitamins of the Chilean market. A survey of consumption and nutrient intake was calculated. The result added vitamins added to food. The normality of the variables of the intake was assessed and data were subjected to analysis of descriptive statisticians and percentiles are determined. Estimated percentages of subjects whose values exceed those fixed for DDR and UL listed for each vitamin and percentage of excess for each case. Discriminant analysis was performed using the M Box test. The correlation canonical and the Statisticians Wilks were estimated. Finally it was estimated the percentage of correctly classified data. Data were processed by the program SPSS 20.0 with a significance level of α ≤ 0.05. The results indicate that you for all the studied vitamins, the percentage of subjects who more than the DDR is for total folate (96.4%) and the lowest percentage is given for the vitamin E and B12 in young adult women. The percentage of subjects who exceed the UL values is greatest for the vitamin B3 (91.9%). According to the canonical correlation, there are differences in behavior between the groups. It is recommended to monitor the behavior and consumption of food fortified with vitamins, especially of the complex B and A. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of derived investigation levels for use in internal dosimetry at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to determine if the routine intemal dosimetry program at the West Valley Demonstration Project is capable of meeting the performance objective of 1 mSv annual effective dose equivalent due to internal contamination. With the use of the computer code REMedy the annual effective dose equivalent is calculated. Some of the radionuclides of concern result in an annual effective dose equivalent that exceeds the performance objective. Although the results exceed the performance objective, in all but two cases they do not exceed the US DOE regulatory limits. In these instances the Th-232 and Am-241 were determined to exceed the committed dose equivalent limit to their limiting tissue. In order to document the potential missed dose for regulatory compliance, Sr-90 is used as an indicator for Th-232. For Am-241 an investigation as to whether or not the minimum detectable amount can be lowered is performed. The derived investigation levels as a result of this project are 4.9E3 Bq/lung count for Co-60, 2.2E4 Bq/lung count for Cs-137, 1.9 Bq/1 for Sr-90 and for radionuclides other than Sr-90 any value greater than or equal to three standard deviations above their net count is considered to require further investigation

  8. Independent regulatory agencies and rules harmonization for the electricity sector and renewables in the Mediterranean region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambini, Carlo; Franzi, Donata

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyses the existing regulatory framework for the electricity and renewables sectors, and the role of regulatory agencies in Northern Africa and Middle East countries, under the promotion by the European Union. Using data collected through an original survey directed at regulators, ministry departments and energy companies of the southern Mediterranean, the study is aimed at assessing the extent of agencies' independence looking at three main dimensions of independence: regulatory instruments available to regulators and decision making autonomy; regulators' organizational autonomy; and regulators accountability. Results show that those countries having established an independent regulator have a more credible regulatory framework than those countries in which such a body does not exist. In particular, the analysis shows that Turkey, Croatia and Jordan have defined a regulatory framework that limits administrative expropriation and, consequently, creates an environment more suitable for attracting investments in the electricity and renewables sector. On the institutional ground, this is probably related with the harmonization of regulatory standards promoted by the European Union through the neighboring policy, for the Jordan case, and the membership perspective, in the Turkish and Croatian cases. - Highlights: • We analyze the existing regulatory framework in Northern Africa and Middle East countries. • We construct an original dataset through a survey directed to national regulators. • The extent of agencies' independence has been assessed in different dimensions. • These dimensions are decision making autonomy; organizational autonomy; and accountability. • Few countries have defined a regulatory framework limiting administrative expropriation

  9. Z limit of elements in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1985-02-01

    From a general consideration of atomic models, the Z of elements cannot exceed 1/α, where α is the fine structure constant. Combined with a knowledge of nuclear physics, we may conclude that the limit on strong interaction is that no long-lived nucleus exists beyond Z = 1/α

  10. ATRF Earns Three Green Globes, Exceeds NIH Building Standards | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer From project management and energy and water efficiency to emissions and the indoor environment, the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) was built with sustainability in mind, exceeding the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) building standards and earning three Green Globes from the Green Building Initiative (GBI).

  11. 76 FR 42534 - Mandatory Reliability Standards for Interconnection Reliability Operating Limits; System...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... Reliability Operating Limits; System Restoration Reliability Standards AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory... data necessary to analyze and monitor Interconnection Reliability Operating Limits (IROL) within its... Interconnection Reliability Operating Limits, Order No. 748, 134 FERC ] 61,213 (2011). \\2\\ The term ``Wide-Area...

  12. Regulatory networks, legal federalism, and multi-level regulatory systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kerber, Wolfgang; Wendel, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Transnational regulatory networks play important roles in multi-level regulatory regimes, as e.g, the European Union. In this paper we analyze the role of regulatory networks from the perspective of the economic theory of legal federalism. Often sophisticated intermediate institutional solutions between pure centralisation and pure decentralisation can help to solve complex tradeoff problems between the benefits and problems of centralised and decentralised solutions. Drawing upon the insight...

  13. Task-based dermal exposure models for regulatory risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, N.D.; Marquart, H.; Christopher, Y.; Laitinen, J.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    2006-01-01

    The regulatory risk assessment of chemicals requires the estimation of occupational dermal exposure. Until recently, the models used were either based on limited data or were specific to a particular class of chemical or application. The EU project RISKOFDERM has gathered a considerable number of

  14. Official publication of the regulatory guide concerning control of LAW and MAW with negligible heat release, which are not delivered to the waste collection station of the Land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Control of the LAW and MAW from nuclear installations is to be made so as to ensure that amounts, residence and status of conditioning of the wastes can be determined any time in order to provide for a safe interim storage or ultimate disposal by supervision and control of all waste management steps (waste treatment, conditioning, interim storage, transport). The checks have to determine the radionuclide inventory, and, independent of aforesaid measurements, the nuclear fuel content (e.g. Pu) has to be declared if the limit of 74 Bq/g is exceeded. The provisions of the regulatory guide are intended to be valid for a period of three years, and shall then be replaced by a statutory instrument (an ordinance to be prepared by the joint Committee of the Laender for Nuclear Energy - Executive Committee). (orig./HP) [de

  15. 11 CFR 9035.1 - Campaign expenditure limitation; compliance and fundraising exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Campaign expenditure limitation; compliance and... ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND EXPENDITURE LIMITATIONS § 9035.1 Campaign... campaign for nomination, which expenditures, in the aggregate, exceed $10,000,000 (as adjusted under 2 U.S...

  16. 76 FR 76153 - Allco Renewable Energy Limited v. Massachusetts Electric Company d/b/a National Grid; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL12-12-000] Allco Renewable Energy Limited v. Massachusetts Electric Company d/b/a National Grid; Notice of Complaint Take notice... Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), Allco Renewable Energy Limited filed a formal complaint...

  17. 10 CFR 72.96 - Siting limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL... site within which there is a candidate site for a HLW repository. This limitation shall apply until such time as DOE decides that such candidate site is no longer a candidate site under consideration for...

  18. Safety culture as a matter of regulatory control and regulatory effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, C.T.M.; Furieri, E.B.; Arrieta, L.A.I.; Almeida, C.U.C.

    2002-01-01

    More than 15 years have passed since the term 'safety culture' was introduced by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG), and although the concept now is widely accepted, practical applications and characteristics have been disseminated mainly for nuclear power plant operating organizations. There is still a lack of international guidance on the use of safety culture as a regulatory matter and on the application of the concept within regulatory organizations. This work explores the meaning of safety culture in two different fields: as an element of safety management systems it shall be a matter of regulatory control; as a complementary tool for quality management it should be used to enhance regulatory effectiveness. Brazilian recent experience on regulating nuclear power reactors provide some examples on how the concept of safety culture may influence regulatory strategies and regulatory management. (author)

  19. Chemical carcinogenesis and chemoprevention: Scientific priority ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occupational cancers are now a serious concern in industrializing developing countries where exposure levels to hazardous chemicals considerably exceed regulatory limits established in industrialized countries. The association between increasing use of chemicals and associated disorders and chemoprevention or ...

  20. Regulatory cascade and biological activity of Beauveria bassiana oosporein that limits bacterial growth after host death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanhua; Liu, Xi; Keyhani, Nemat O; Tang, Guirong; Pei, Yan; Zhang, Wenwen; Tong, Sheng

    2017-02-28

    The regulatory network and biological functions of the fungal secondary metabolite oosporein have remained obscure. Beauveria bassiana has evolved the ability to parasitize insects and outcompete microbial challengers for assimilation of host nutrients. A novel zinc finger transcription factor, BbSmr1 ( B. bassiana secondary metabolite regulator 1), was identified in a screen for oosporein overproduction. Deletion of Bbsmr1 resulted in up-regulation of the oosporein biosynthetic gene cluster ( OpS genes) and constitutive oosporein production. Oosporein production was abolished in double mutants of Bbsmr1 and a second transcription factor, OpS3 , within the oosporein gene cluster ( ΔBbsmr1ΔOpS3 ), indicating that BbSmr1 acts as a negative regulator of OpS3 expression. Real-time quantitative PCR and a GFP promoter fusion construct of OpS1 , the oosporein polyketide synthase, indicated that OpS1 is expressed mainly in insect cadavers at 24-48 h after death. Bacterial colony analysis in B. bassiana -infected insect hosts revealed increasing counts until host death, with a dramatic decrease (∼90%) after death that correlated with oosporein production. In vitro studies verified the inhibitory activity of oosporein against bacteria derived from insect cadavers. These results suggest that oosporein acts as an antimicrobial compound to limit microbial competition on B. bassiana -killed hosts, allowing the fungus to maximally use host nutrients to grow and sporulate on infected cadavers.

  1. Regulatory aspects for nuclear and radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraisamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) is the national authority for ensuring that the use of ionizing radiation and nuclear energy does not cause any undue risk to the health of workers, members of the public and to the environment. AERB was constituted on November 15, 1983 and derives its regulatory power from the rules and notifications promulgated under the Atomic Energy Act, 1962 and the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986. AERB is provided with the necessary powers and mandate to frame safety policies, lay down safety standards and requirements for monitoring and enforcing the safety provisions. AERB follows multi-tier system for its review and assessment, safety monitoring, surveillance and enforcement. While regulating various nuclear and radiation facilities, AERB adopts a graded approach taking into account the hazard potential associated with the facilities being regulated. The regulatory process has been continuous evolving to cater to the new developments in reactor and radiation technologies. The regulatory effectiveness and efficiency of AERB have grown over the last three decades to make it into a robust organization. The radiation protection infrastructure in the country is on a sound footing and is constantly being strengthened based on experience and continued research and development. As one of its mandates AERB prescribes radiation dose limits for the occupational workers and the public, in line with the IAEA Safety Standard and ICRP recommendations. The current dose limits and the radiation safety requirements are more stringent than past. To meet the current safety standards, it is important for the facilities to have state of art radiation monitoring system and programme in place. While recognizing the current system in place, this presentation also highlights certain key radiation protection challenges associated with the implementation of radiation protection standards in the nuclear and radiation facilities especially in the areas of

  2. Beam-beam limit in e+e- circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; Kamada, S.; Oide, K.; Cai, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2004-01-01

    Beam-beam effects limit the luminosity of circular colliders. Once the bunch population exceeds a threshold, the luminosity increases at a slower rate. This phenomenon is called the beam-beam limit. Onset of the beam-beam limit has been analyzed with various simulation methods based on the weak-strong and strong-strong models. We have observed that an incoherent phenomenon is mainly concerned in the beam-beam limit. The simulation have shown that equilibrium distributions of the two colliding beams are distorted from Gaussians when the luminosity is limited. The beam-beam limit is estimated to be ξ∼0.1 for a B factory with damping time of several thousand turns

  3. 174 | P a g e THE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK OF THE RADIO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    The law of global communication appears as the regulatory response to this need; .... 6 Richard K. Gardner, International Law, Pearson Education Limited, England, 2003 .... Vienna Declaration on Space and Human Development (The Space ...

  4. 76 FR 21932 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Granting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... statement therein, as follows: I. Introduction On February 4, 2011, the Financial Industry Regulatory...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Granting Approval of a... Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') to amend Rule 13806 of the Code of Arbitration...

  5. Regulatory inspection of nuclear facilities and enforcement by the regulatory body. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for regulatory bodies on the inspection of nuclear facilities, regulatory enforcement and related matters. The objective is to provide the regulatory body with a high level of confidence that operators have the processes in place to ensure compliance and that they do comply with legal requirements, including meeting the safety objectives and requirements of the regulatory body. However, in the event of non-compliance, the regulatory body should take appropriate enforcement action. This Safety Guide covers regulatory inspection and enforcement in relation to nuclear facilities such as: enrichment and fuel manufacturing plants; nuclear power plants; other reactors such as research reactors and critical assemblies; spent fuel reprocessing plants; and facilities for radioactive waste management, such as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This Safety Guide also covers issues relating to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the closure of waste disposal facilities and site rehabilitation. Section 2 sets out the objectives of regulatory inspection and enforcement. Section 3 covers the management of regulatory inspections. Section 4 covers the performance of regulatory inspections, including internal guidance, planning and preparation, methods of inspection and reports of inspections. Section 5 deals with regulatory enforcement actions. Section 6 covers the assessment of regulatory inspections and enforcement activities. The Appendix provides further details on inspection areas for nuclear facilities

  6. Thermodynamic limits of energy harvesting from outgoing thermal radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddhiraju, Siddharth; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui

    2018-04-17

    We derive the thermodynamic limits of harvesting power from the outgoing thermal radiation from the ambient to the cold outer space. The derivations are based on a duality relation between thermal engines that harvest solar radiation and those that harvest outgoing thermal radiation. In particular, we derive the ultimate limit for harvesting outgoing thermal radiation, which is analogous to the Landsberg limit for solar energy harvesting, and show that the ultimate limit far exceeds what was previously thought to be possible. As an extension of our work, we also derive the ultimate limit of efficiency of thermophotovoltaic systems.

  7. Limit lines for risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.C.; Baybutt, P.

    1982-01-01

    Approaches to the regulation of risk from technological systems, such as nuclear power plants or chemical process plants, in which potential accidents may result in a broad range of adverse consequences must take into account several different aspects of risk. These include overall or average risk, accidents posing high relative risks, the rate at which accident probability decreases with increasing accident consequences, and the impact of high frequency, low consequence accidents. A hypothetical complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF), with appropriately chosen parametric form, meets all these requirements. The Farmer limit line, by contrast, places limits on the risks due to individual accident sequences, and cannot adequately account for overall risk. This reduces its usefulness as a regulatory tool. In practice, the CCDF is used in the Canadian nuclear licensing process, while the Farmer limit line approach, supplemented by separate qualitative limits on overall risk, is employed in the United Kingdom

  8. LANSCE Beam Current Limiter (XL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an engineered safety system that provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated proton beams. The Beam Current Limiter (XL), as an active component of the RSS, limits the maximum average current in a beamline, thus the current available for a beam spill accident. Exceeding the pre-set limit initiates action by the RSS to mitigate the hazard (insertion of beam stoppers in the low energy beam transport). The beam limiter is an electrically isolated, toroidal transformer and associated electronics. The device was designed to continuously monitor beamline currents independent of any external timing. Fail-safe operation was a prime consideration in its development. Fail-safe operation is defined as functioning as intended (due to redundant circuitry), functioning with a more sensitive fault threshold, or generating a fault condition. This report describes the design philosophy, hardware, implementation, operation, and limitations of the device

  9. Carbon Capture and Storage Legal and Regulatory Review. Edition 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) considers carbon capture and storage (CCS) a crucial part of worldwide efforts to limit global warming by reducing greenhouse-gas emissions. The IEA estimates that emissions can be reduced to a level consistent with a 2°C global temperature increase through the broad deployment of low-carbon energy technologies – and that CCS would contribute about one-fifth of emission reductions in this scenario. Achieving this level of deployment will require that regulatory frameworks – or rather a lack thereof – do not unnecessarily impede environmentally safe demonstration and deployment of CCS, so in October 2010 the IEA launched the IEA Carbon Capture and Storage Legal and Regulatory Review. The CCS Review is a regular review of CCS regulatory progress worldwide. Produced annually, it collates contributions by national and regional governments, as well as leading organisations engaged in CCS regulatory activities, to provide a knowledge-sharing forum to support CCS framework development. Each two page contribution provides a short summary of recent and anticipated CCS regulatory developments and highlights a particular, pre-nominated regulatory theme. To introduce each edition, the IEA provides a brief analysis of key advances and trends, based on the contributions submitted. The theme for this third edition is stakeholder engagement in the development of CO2 storage projects. Other issues addressed include: regulating CO2-EOR, CCS and CO2-EOR for storage; CCS incentive policy; key, substantive issues being addressed by jurisdictions taking steps to finalise CCS regulatory framework development; and CCS legal and regulatory developments in the context of the Clean Energy Ministerial Carbon Capture, Use and Storage Action Group.

  10. 41 CFR 102-85.105 - How does an agency pay for customer alterations that exceed the TI allowance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for customer alterations that exceed the TI allowance? 102-85.105 Section 102-85.105 Public Contracts....105 How does an agency pay for customer alterations that exceed the TI allowance? Amounts exceeding the TI allowance are paid in a one-time lump sum and are not amortized over the term of the occupancy...

  11. Halden fuel and material experiments beyond operational and safety limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Boris; Wiesenack, Wolfgang; McGrath, M.; Tverberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main tasks of any research reactor is to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuel and materials prior to their introduction into the market. For commercial NPPs, it is important both to test nuclear fuels at a fuel burn-up exceeding current limits and to investigate reactor materials for higher irradiation dose. For fuel vendors such tests enable verification of fuel reliability or for the safety limits to be found under different operational conditions and accident situations. For the latter, in-pile experiments have to be performed beyond some normal limits. The program of fuel tests performed in the Halden reactor is aimed mainly at determining: The thermal FGR threshold, which may limit fuel operational power with burn-up increase, the “lift-off effect” when rod internal pressure exceeds coolant pressure, the effects of high burn-up on fuel behavior under power ramps, fuel relocation under LOCA simulation at higher burn-up, the effect of dry-out on high burn-up fuel rod integrity. This paper reviews some of the experiments performed in the Halden reactor for understanding some of the limits for standard fuel utilization with the aim of contributing to the development of innovative fuels and cladding materials that could be used beyond these limits. (author)

  12. 77 FR 8724 - Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ...] Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits February 9, 2012. AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory... limits for natural gas pipelines blanket construction certificates for each calendar year. DATES: This... CFR Part 157 Administrative practice and procedure, Natural gas, Reporting and recordkeeping...

  13. Advanced Reactor Technology -- Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe, Wayne Leland

    2015-01-01

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a ''critical path'' for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain ''minimum'' levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial ''first step'' in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by

  14. Legislative policy in Brazil : limits and possibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De, Paula F.

    2018-01-01

    This doctoral thesis discusses the limits and possibilities for developing a new legislative-regulatory policy in Brazil, understood as a public policy whose purpose is to improve the process of drafting legislation and regulation and to increase the quality of rules. It considers the

  15. Density limit experiments on FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucella, G.; Tudisco, O.; Apicella, M.L.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Belli, F.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Buratti, P.; Calabrò, G.; Castaldo, C.; Cianfarani, C.; Cocilovo, V.; Dimatteo, L.; Esposito, B.; Frigione, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Bin, W.; Granucci, G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main problems in tokamak fusion devices concerns the capability to operate at a high plasma density, which is observed to be limited by the appearance of catastrophic events causing loss of plasma confinement. The commonly used empirical scaling law for the density limit is the Greenwald limit, predicting that the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord depends only on the average plasma current density. However, the Greenwald density limit has been exceeded in tokamak experiments in the case of peaked density profiles, indicating that the edge density is the real parameter responsible for the density limit. Recently, it has been shown on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) that the Greenwald density limit is exceeded in gas-fuelled discharges with a high value of the edge safety factor. In order to understand this behaviour, dedicated density limit experiments were performed on FTU, in which the high density domain was explored in a wide range of values of plasma current (I p = 500–900 kA) and toroidal magnetic field (B T = 4–8 T). These experiments confirm the edge nature of the density limit, as a Greenwald-like scaling holds for the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a peripheral chord passing at r/a ≃ 4/5. On the other hand, the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord does not depend on the average plasma current density and essentially depends on the toroidal magnetic field only. This behaviour is explained in terms of density profile peaking in the high density domain, with a peaking factor at the disruption depending on the edge safety factor. The possibility that the MARFE (multifaced asymmetric radiation from the edge) phenomenon is the cause of the peaking has been considered, with the MARFE believed to form a channel for the penetration of the neutral particles into deeper layers of the plasma. Finally, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) analysis has shown that also the central line

  16. The use of Minilabs to improve the testing capacity of regulatory authorities in resource limited settings: Tanzanian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risha, Peter Gasper; Msuya, Zera; Clark, Malcolm; Johnson, Keith; Ndomondo-Sigonda, Margareth; Layloff, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    The Tanzania Food and Drugs Authority piloted the use of Minilab kits, a thin-layer-chromatographic based drug quality testing technique, in a two-tier quality assurance program. The program is intended to improve testing capacity with timely screening of the quality of medicines as they enter the market. After 1 week training of inspectors on Minilab screening techniques, they were stationed at key Ports-of-Entry (POE) to screen the quality of imported medicines. In addition, three non-Ports-of-Entry centres were established to screen samples collected during Post-Marketing-Surveillance. Standard operating procedures (SOPs) were developed to structure and standardize the implementation process. Over 1200 samples were tested using the Minilab outside the central quality control laboratory (QCL), almost doubling the previous testing capacity. The program contributed to increased regulatory reach and visibility of the Authority throughout the country, serving as a deterrent against entry of substandard medicines into market. The use of Minilab for quality screening was inexpensive and provided a high sample throughput. However, it suffers from the limitation that it can reliably detect only grossly substandard or wrong drug samples and therefore, it should not be used as an independent testing resource but in conjunction with a full-service quality control laboratory capable of auditing reported substandard results.

  17. Large deviation estimates for exceedance times of perpetuity sequences and their dual processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buraczewski, Dariusz; Collamore, Jeffrey F.; Damek, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of problems in pure and applied probability, it is of relevant to study the large exceedance probabilities of the perpetuity sequence $Y_n := B_1 + A_1 B_2 + \\cdots + (A_1 \\cdots A_{n-1}) B_n$, where $(A_i,B_i) \\subset (0,\\infty) \\times \\reals$. Estimates for the stationary tail dist......-time exceedance probabilities of $\\{ M_n^\\ast \\}$, yielding a new result concerning the convergence of $\\{ M_n^\\ast \\}$ to its stationary distribution.......In a variety of problems in pure and applied probability, it is of relevant to study the large exceedance probabilities of the perpetuity sequence $Y_n := B_1 + A_1 B_2 + \\cdots + (A_1 \\cdots A_{n-1}) B_n$, where $(A_i,B_i) \\subset (0,\\infty) \\times \\reals$. Estimates for the stationary tail...... distribution of $\\{ Y_n \\}$ have been developed in the seminal papers of Kesten (1973) and Goldie (1991). Specifically, it is well-known that if $M := \\sup_n Y_n$, then ${\\mathbb P} \\left\\{ M > u \\right\\} \\sim {\\cal C}_M u^{-\\xi}$ as $u \\to \\infty$. While much attention has been focused on extending...

  18. Spatiotemporal trend analysis of metal concentrations in sediments of a residential California stream with toxicity and regulatory implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lenwood W; Anderson, Ronald D; Killen, William D

    2017-06-07

    The objective of this study was to determine if concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc measured in the sediments of a residential stream in California (Pleasant Grove Creek) have changed temporally or spatially from 2006 to 2016. Threshold Effect Levels (TELs), conservative ecological effects benchmarks, and exceedances for the seven metals were also evaluated over the 11-year time period to provide insight into potential metal toxicity to resident benthic communities. In addition, the bioavailability of metals in sediments was also determined by calculating Simultaneous Extracted Metal/Acid Volatle Sulfide (SEM/AVS) ratios to allow an additional assessment of toxicity. Regulatory implications of this data set and the role of metal toxicity are also discussed. Stream-wide temporal trend analysis showed no statistically significant trends for any of the metals. However, spatial analysis for several sites located near storm drains did show a significant increase for most metals over the 11-year period. TEL exceedances during the 7 years of sampling, spanning 2006-2016, were reported for all metals with the number of exceedances ranging from 47 for copper and zinc to 1 for lead. A spatial analysis showed that the highest number of TEL exceedances and the highest number of SEM/AVS ratios greater than one with at least one metal exceeding a TEL occurred at upstream sites. The potentially toxic metal concentrations reported in Pleasant Grove Creek should be used in the 303 (d) listing process for impaired water bodies in California.

  19. Regulatory guidance document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM's evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7

  20. 77 FR 45401 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... change. All such Regulatory Bulletins will contain information regarding changes to the risk settings in...-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule... Applicable to the Market Maker Risk Limitation Mechanism Will Be Between One and 100 Executions per Second...

  1. CUMEX: a cumulative hazard index for assessing limiting exposures to environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, P.J.; Killough, G.G.; Parzyck, D.C.; Rohwer, P.S.; Rupp, e.M.; Whitfield, B.L.; Booth, R.S.; Raridon, R.J.

    1977-04-01

    A hazard index methodology called CUMEX has been developed for limiting human exposure to environmental pollutants. Hazard index is defined as Q/Q/sub L/ where Q is exposure or dose to total-body, organ or tissue from all environmental pathways and Q/sub L/ is a limit which should not be exceeded because of health risk to humans. Mathematical formulations for hazard indices are developed for each sampling medium corresponding to each effluent type. These hazard indices are accumulated into composite indices such that total human intake or dose would not exceed the health risk limit. Mathematical formulation for composite hazard indices or CUMEX indices for multiple pollutants are presented. An example CUMEX application to cadmium release from a smelter complex in East Helena, Montana demonstrates details of the methodology for a single pollutant where human intake occurs through inhalation and ingestion

  2. The behavioral ecology of a cognitive constraint: limited attention

    OpenAIRE

    Colin W. Clark; Reuven Dukas

    2003-01-01

    Limited attention may constrain animal behavior in situations in which the rate of relevant information exceeds the threshold processing capacity of the brain. In the present study, we examine why attention is limited by quantifying how attention affects the ubiquitous problem of balancing foraging and antipredator activity. We analyze how a given attentional capacity affects feeding requirements, the optimal attentional focus during predator scanning, and the probability of detecting predato...

  3. IRT‑Sofia, HEU to LEU conversion: regulatory approval tasks solution overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitev, Mladen; Belousov, Sergey; Dimitrov, Dobromir

    2014-01-01

    The HEU to LEU conversion of the IRT–Sofia research reactor of the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was jointly studied with the Argonne National Laboratory as a part of the RERTR Programme. The main purpose of the collaboration consisted in accomplishment of safety analyses and preparation of documents used for regulatory approval tasks solution. The main steps and results which are fundamental for the preparation of IRT–Sofia Safety Analyses Report including Operating Limits and Conditions are presented in this paper. The documents prepared by INRNE in accordance with the European nuclear safety requirements and IAEA recommendations were submitted for approval to the Bulgarian Nuclear Regulatory Agency at the end of 2010. Key words: research reactor, safety analyses report, Nuclear Regulatory Agency

  4. Regulatory principles to enhance coherence and to facilitate trade in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodson Greg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The globalization of the wine market has generally outpaced regulatory development. As a result, wine has been introduced to markets with little historical product experience and has been subjected to standard food regulatory approaches that are not always appropriate given its unique characteristics. In addition, disparate regulatory limits and approaches to testing wine in different markets may result in inadvertent obstacles to trade and increased costs of doing business, but provide no counterbalancing benefits to consumers, producers or regulators. This paper presents a series of principles (already endorsed by FIVS that, if recognized and implemented widely by governments, would have enormous consequences for the facilitation of global trade in wine. Many of these are already being applied among established trading partners, though they are generally not stated explicitly.

  5. ICRP-recommendations on dose limits for workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Dose limits proposed by the ICRP have been incorporated in most national and international standards and their respect has caused a distribution of doses with a average not exceeding 1/10 of the maximum permissible dose. This distribution corresponds to a risk which is well within the risks in 'safe industries'. There are at present some inconsistancies in the current system of recommended limits, for example having the same limit of 5 rem for the whole-body and also for some organs. Hopefully, this incosistancy will be removed in the next recommendation of the ICRP. But the whole-body limit of 5 rem in a year has been safe and there is little ground to reduce this limit on the basis of comparisons with 'safe industries'. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Butterfly Optics Exceed the Theoretical Limits of Conventional Apposition Eyes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van; Nilsson, D.-E.

    1987-01-01

    Optical experiments on butterfly compound eyes show that they have angular sensitivities narrower than expected from conventional apposition eyes. This superior performance is explained by a theoretical model where the cone stalk is considered as a modecoupling device. In this model the Airy

  7. 75 FR 11166 - Joint Meeting of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; Notice of Joint Meeting of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission March 2, 2010. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will hold...

  8. Occupational noise exposure and regulatory adherence in music venues in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Christopher; Castilla-Sanchez, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Noise in most working environments is an unwanted by-product of the process. In most countries, noise exposure for workers has been controlled by legislation for many years. In the music industry the "noise" is actually the "desired" product, and for a long time the UK entertainment industry was exempt from these regulations. From April 2008, however, it became regulated under the Noise at Work Regulations 2005, meaning that employers from orchestras to nightclubs are legally required to adhere to the same requirements (based on ISO 9612:2009) for controlling noise exposure for their staff that have been applied to other industries for many years. A key question is to what degree, 2 years after implementation, these employers are complying with their legal responsibilities to protect the staff from noise? This study assessed four public music venues where live and/or recorded music is regularly played. Thirty staff members in different roles in the venues were monitored using noise dosimetry to determine noise exposure. Questionnaires were used to determine work patterns, attitudes to noise and hearing loss, and levels of training about noise risk. Results showed that the majority of staff (70%) in all venues exceeded the daily noise exposure limit value in their working shift. Use of hearing protection was rare (industry is failing to meet regulatory requirements.

  9. 47 CFR 22.913 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... radiated power (ERP) of transmitters in the Cellular Radiotelephone Service must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum ERP. In general, the effective radiated power (ERP) of base transmitters and... areas, as those areas are defined in § 22.949, the ERP of base transmitters and cellular repeaters of...

  10. 47 CFR 90.1321 - Power and antenna limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... arrays that comprise the device, i.e., the sum of the power supplied to all antennas, antenna elements..., the power shall be reduced to ensure that the aggregate power from the overlapping beams does not exceed the limit specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. In addition, the aggregate power...

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission probabilistic risk assessment implementation program: A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, M.P.; Caruso, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is undertaking a number of activities intended to increase the consideration of risk significance in its decision processes and the effective use of risk-based technologies in its regulatory activities. Although the NRC is moving toward risk-informed regulation throughout its areas of responsibilities, this paper focuses primarily on those issues associated with reactor regulation. As the NRC completed significant milestones in its development of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology and gained considerable experience in the limited application of risk assessment to selected regulatory activities, it became evident that a much broader use of risk informed approaches offered advantages to both the NRC and the US commercial nuclear industry. This desire to enhance the use of risk assessment is driven by the clear belief that application of PRA methods will result in direct improvements in nuclear power plant operational safety from the perspective of both the regulator and the plant operator. The NRC believed that an overall policy on the use of PRA methods in nuclear regulatory activities should be established so that the many potential applications of PRA could be implemented in a consistent and predictable manner that would promote regulatory stability and efficiency. This paper describes the key activities that the NRC has undertaken to implement the initial stages of an integrated risk-informed regulatory framework

  12. 75 FR 63878 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance... Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory...

  13. Deciphering RNA Regulatory Elements Involved in the Developmental and Environmental Gene Regulation of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazestani, Vahid H; Salavati, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a vector-borne parasite with intricate life cycle that can cause serious diseases in humans and animals. This pathogen relies on fine regulation of gene expression to respond and adapt to variable environments, with implications in transmission and infectivity. However, the involved regulatory elements and their mechanisms of actions are largely unknown. Here, benefiting from a new graph-based approach for finding functional regulatory elements in RNA (GRAFFER), we have predicted 88 new RNA regulatory elements that are potentially involved in the gene regulatory network of T. brucei. We show that many of these newly predicted elements are responsive to both transcriptomic and proteomic changes during the life cycle of the parasite. Moreover, we found that 11 of predicted elements strikingly resemble previously identified regulatory elements for the parasite. Additionally, comparison with previously predicted motifs on T. brucei suggested the superior performance of our approach based on the current limited knowledge of regulatory elements in T. brucei.

  14. Modeling Dynamic Regulatory Processes in Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Jason E.; Jarman, Kenneth; Taylor, Ronald; Lancaster, Mary; Shankaran, Harish; Vartanian, Keri B.; Stevens, Susan L.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P.; Sanfilippo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The ability to examine the behavior of biological systems in silico has the potential to greatly accelerate the pace of discovery in diseases, such as stroke, where in vivo analysis is time intensive and costly. In this paper we describe an approach for in silico examination of responses of the blood transcriptome to neuroprotective agents and subsequent stroke through the development of dynamic models of the regulatory processes observed in the experimental gene expression data. First, we identified functional gene clusters from these data. Next, we derived ordinary differential equations (ODEs) from the data relating these functional clusters to each other in terms of their regulatory influence on one another. Dynamic models were developed by coupling these ODEs into a model that simulates the expression of regulated functional clusters. By changing the magnitude of gene expression in the initial input state it was possible to assess the behavior of the networks through time under varying conditions since the dynamic model only requires an initial starting state, and does not require measurement of regulatory influences at each time point in order to make accurate predictions. We discuss the implications of our models on neuroprotection in stroke, explore the limitations of the approach, and report that an optimized dynamic model can provide accurate predictions of overall system behavior under several different neuroprotective paradigms. PMID:23071432

  15. Below regulatory concern - or simply exempt?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, A.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission published a policy statement last summer on ''below regulatory concern'' (BRC), which exempted small quantities of radioactive material from regulatory control and would allow the deregulated disposal of some low level waste. The policy drew opposition from several groups. NRC is not planning to revise its BRC policy statement, but wants to develop a concensus on how to implement the policy. Although the Commission's publication of a long needed policy framework for guiding exemption decisions should be welcomed by those of us who have been concerned with making such decisions, there is an urgent need for further consensus building. The policy statement offers only broad guidelines, some of which could be confusing and seem contradictory. The policy statement by itself could further erode public confidence in the NRC's commitment to specific limits of risk, and the ability of its staff to independently evaluate the risks. Another reason why it is appropriate and urgent to embark upon consensus building involving all parties and the public, is that the risks of low level radioactive waste disposal as practiced and proposed in the United States have long been exaggerated in biased reports that receive most media attention. A consensus process needs to be established so that the public can have confidence that its concerns have been properly addressed. (author)

  16. Attempting to be active: Self-efficacy and barrier limitation differentiate activity levels of working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierc, Madelaine; Locke, Sean; Jung, Mary; Brawley, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Working mothers are less physically active than working women without children and mothers who do not work. The purpose of this study was to examine concurrent self-regulatory efficacy and barriers to physical activity in a sample of working mothers. Women completed a mixed-methods survey which included measures of physical activity, concurrent self-regulatory efficacy, and barriers. Sufficiently active women experienced significantly greater concurrent self-regulatory efficacy and significantly less barrier limitation and frequency. No significant group differences were found for age, domestic duties performed, and children's extracurricular activities. Thematic analysis of barriers revealed six themes of common and unique factors, including limited time and family activities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Status of nuclear regulatory research and its future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, M. W.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the regulatory research comprising an examination of the research system, its areas and contents, and the goals and financial resources is undertaken. As a result of this study, the future direction of regulatory research and its implementation strategies are suggested to resolve the current issues emerging from this examination. The major issues identified in the study are; (a) an insufficient investment in nuclear regulatory and safety research, (b) an interfacial discrepancy between similar research areas, and (c) a limitation of utilizing research results. To resolve these issues, several measures are proposed : (1) developing a lead project to establish a comprehensive infrastructure for enhancing research cooperation between nuclear organizations including institutes, industry, and universities, with an aim to improve cooperation between projects and to strengthen overall coordination functions among research projects, (2) introducing a certification system on research outcome to promote the proliferation of both research results themselves and their application with a view to enhancing the research quality, (3) strengthening the cooperative system to promote the international cooperative research, and (4) digitalizing all documents and materials relevant to safety and regulatory research to establish KIMS (knowledge and information based management system). It is expected that the aforementioned measures suggested in this study will enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of both nuclear regulatory and safety research, if they are implemented after deliberating with the government and related nuclear industries in the near future

  18. Evolution of Cis-Regulatory Elements and Regulatory Networks in Duplicated Genes of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsovski, Andrej A; Pradinuk, Julian; Guo, Xu Qiu; Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-12-01

    Plant genomes contain large numbers of duplicated genes that contribute to the evolution of new functions. Following duplication, genes can exhibit divergence in their coding sequence and their expression patterns. Changes in the cis-regulatory element landscape can result in changes in gene expression patterns. High-throughput methods developed recently can identify potential cis-regulatory elements on a genome-wide scale. Here, we use a recent comprehensive data set of DNase I sequencing-identified cis-regulatory binding sites (footprints) at single-base-pair resolution to compare binding sites and network connectivity in duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that duplicated gene pairs vary greatly in their cis-regulatory element architecture, resulting in changes in regulatory network connectivity. Whole-genome duplicates (WGDs) have approximately twice as many footprints in their promoters left by potential regulatory proteins than do tandem duplicates (TDs). The WGDs have a greater average number of footprint differences between paralogs than TDs. The footprints, in turn, result in more regulatory network connections between WGDs and other genes, forming denser, more complex regulatory networks than shown by TDs. When comparing regulatory connections between duplicates, WGDs had more pairs in which the two genes are either partially or fully diverged in their network connections, but fewer genes with no network connections than the TDs. There is evidence of younger TDs and WGDs having fewer unique connections compared with older duplicates. This study provides insights into cis-regulatory element evolution and network divergence in duplicated genes. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Regulatory activities; Actividades regulatorias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information.

  20. Limits of the current EU regulatory framework on GMOs: risk of not authorized GM event-traces in imports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roïz Julie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since their first commercialization in the 1990’s, the number of genetically modified organisms (GMOs cultivated around the world has steadily increased. This development has been accompanied by the development of regulatory and policy environments which vary from one country to another. Today, the European food and feed sectors are faced with the increasing risk of finding traces of not authorized GMOs in imports. Under the EU zero tolerance for unapproved GMOs, this situation may lead to trade disruptions with important cost implications. A regulatory environment which minimizes the risk of such disruption is therefore indispensable. To address this issue, the EU has adopted the “technical solution” but this remains insufficient to provide the necessary legal certainty which is needed to operate in such context. More comprehensive approaches are considered globally through low level presence policies.

  1. Maximum time-dependent space-charge limited diode currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griswold, M. E. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Fisch, N. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Recent papers claim that a one dimensional (1D) diode with a time-varying voltage drop can transmit current densities that exceed the Child-Langmuir (CL) limit on average, apparently contradicting a previous conjecture that there is a hard limit on the average current density across any 1D diode, as t → ∞, that is equal to the CL limit. However, these claims rest on a different definition of the CL limit, namely, a comparison between the time-averaged diode current and the adiabatic average of the expression for the stationary CL limit. If the current were considered as a function of the maximum applied voltage, rather than the average applied voltage, then the original conjecture would not have been refuted.

  2. Design of the movable limiters for JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nakamura, Hiroo; Ohkubo, Minoru; Ohta, Mitsuru

    1976-07-01

    Two fast-acting movable rail limiters will be used in JT-60 to suppress skin effect of the plasma current with a large radius. They travel safely through a stroke of about 1 m for 0.1 sec in the build-up phase of plasma current. The movable limiter system consists of a driving mechanism, a vacuum seal, a bearing used at high temperatures in a vacuum, a molybdenum rail limiter weighing 200 kg and its auxiliary members. Many problems are involved in construction of the system because the design specifications exceed the present technology. Described are design of the movable limiter system for JT-60 and problems in the mechanical, electrical and vacuum aspects. (auth.)

  3. Central-line-associated bloodstream infections in a resource-limited ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... that reported from resource-limited settings, but exceeds that of high-income countries. Prolonged NICU stay and central-line insertion in the operating theatre were important risk factors for CLABSI development. Intensified neonatal staff training regarding CLABSI maintenance bundle elements and hand hygiene are key ...

  4. Real-Time Continuous Response Spectra Exceedance Calculation Displayed in a Web-Browser Enables Rapid and Robust Damage Evaluation by First Responders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, M.; Skolnik, D. A.; Harvey, D.; Lindquist, K.

    2014-12-01

    specified spectral limits, reporting any such exceedances via alarm packets that are put in the object ring-buffer for use by any alarm processes that need them. The web-display subsystem allows alert dissemination, interactive exploration, and alarm cancellation via the WWW.

  5. The core to regulatory reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, J.W. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Orders 436, 500, and 636, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Public Utility Holding Company Act reform, and the 1992 Energy Policy Act all can have significant effects on an LDC's operations. Such changes in an LDC's environments must be balanced by changes within the utility, its marketplace, and its state regulatory environment. The question is where to start. For Columbia Gas Distribution Cos., based in Columbus, OH, the new operating foundation begins with each employee. Internal strength is critical in designing initiatives that meet the needs of the marketplace and are well-received by regulators. Employees must understand not only the regulatory environment in which the LDC operates, but also how their work contributes to a positive regulatory relationship. To achieve this, Columbia initiated the COntinuing Regulatory Education program, or CORE, in 1991. CORE is a regulatory-focused, information-initiative program coordinated by Columbia's Regulatory Policy, Planning, and Government Affairs Department. The CORE programs can take many forms, such as emerging issue discussions, dialogues with regulators and key parties, updates on regulatory fillings, regulatory policy meetings, and formal training classes. The speakers and discussion facilitators can range from human resource department trainers to senior officers, from regulatory department staff members to external experts, or from state commissioners to executives from other LDCs. The goals of CORE initiatives are to: Support a professional level of regulatory expertise through employee participation in well-developed regulatory programs presented by credible experts. Encourage a constructive state regulatory environment founded on communication and cooperation. CORE achieves these goals via five program levels: introductory basics, advanced learning, professional expertise, crossfunctional dialogues, and external idea exchanges

  6. Canadian and United States regulatory models compared: doses from atmospheric pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S-R.

    1997-01-01

    CANDU reactors sold offshore are licensed primarily to satisfy Canadian Regulations. For radioactive emissions during normal operation, the Canadian Standards Association's CAN/CSA-N288.1-M87 is used. This standard provides guidelines and methodologies for calculating a rate of radionuclide release that exposes a member of the public to the annual dose limit. To calculate doses from air concentrations, either CSA-N288.1 or the Regulatory Guide 1.109 of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which has already been used to license light-water reactors in these countries, may be used. When dose predictions from CSA-N288.1 are compared with those from the U.S. Regulatory Guides, the differences in projected doses raise questions about the predictions. This report explains differences between the two models for ingestion, inhalation, external and immersion doses

  7. Lost in transportation: Information measures and cognitive limits in multilayer navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallotti, Riccardo; Porter, Mason A; Barthelemy, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Cities and their transportation systems become increasingly complex and multimodal as they grow, and it is natural to wonder whether it is possible to quantitatively characterize our difficulty navigating in them and whether such navigation exceeds our cognitive limits. A transition between different search strategies for navigating in metropolitan maps has been observed for large, complex metropolitan networks. This evidence suggests the existence of a limit associated with cognitive overload and caused by a large amount of information that needs to be processed. In this light, we analyzed the world's 15 largest metropolitan networks and estimated the information limit for determining a trip in a transportation system to be on the order of 8 bits. Similar to the "Dunbar number," which represents a limit to the size of an individual's friendship circle, our cognitive limit suggests that maps should not consist of more than 250 connection points to be easily readable. We also show that including connections with other transportation modes dramatically increases the information needed to navigate in multilayer transportation networks. In large cities such as New York, Paris, and Tokyo, more than 80% of the trips are above the 8-bit limit. Multimodal transportation systems in large cities have thus already exceeded human cognitive limits and, consequently, the traditional view of navigation in cities has to be revised substantially.

  8. 76 FR 66344 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change... 31, 2011, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') (f/k/a National Association of... consolidation process, see Information Notice, March 12, 2008 (Rulebook Consolidation Process). For convenience...

  9. 75 FR 17456 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change..., Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission... terms. For more information about the rulebook consolidation process, see Information Notice, March 12...

  10. The Effects of Rising Interest Rates on Electric Utility Stock Prices: Regulatory Considerations and Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kihm, Steve [Seventhwave, Madison, WI (United States); Satchwell, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cappers, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-07-26

    This technical brief identifies conditions under which utility regulators should consider implementing policy approaches that seek to mitigate negative outcomes due to an increase in interest rates. Interest rates are a key factor in determining a utility’s cost of equity and investors find value when returns exceed the cost of equity. Through historical observations of periods of rising and falling interest rates and application of a pro forma financial tool, we identify the key drivers of utility stock valuations and estimate the degree to which those valuations might be affected by increasing interest rates.3 We also analyze the efficacy of responses by utility regulators to mitigate potential negative financial impacts. We find that regulators have several possible approaches to mitigate a decline in value in an environment of increasing interest rates, though regulators must weigh the tradeoffs of improving investor value with potential increases in customer costs. Furthermore, the range of approaches reflects today’s many different electric utility regulatory models and regulatory responses to a decline in investor value will fit within state-specific models.

  11. The Chinese health care regulatory institutions in an era of transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of Chinese health care regulation in an era of transition. It describes the major health care regulatory institutions operating currently in China and analyzes the underlying factors. The paper argues that in the transition from a planned to a market economy, the Chinese government has been employing a hybrid approach where both old and new institutions have a role in the management of emerging markets, including the health care market. This approach is consistent with the incremental reform strategy adopted by the Party-state. Although a health care regulatory framework has gradually taken shape, the framework is incomplete, with a particular lack of emphasis on professional self-regulation. In addition, its effectiveness is limited despite the existence of many regulatory institutions. In poor rural areas, the effectiveness of the regulatory framework is further undermined or distorted by the extremely difficult financial position that local governments find themselves in. The interpretations of the principle of 'rule of law' by policy makers and officials at different levels and the widespread informal network of relations between known individuals (Guanxi) play an important role in the operation of the regulatory framework. The findings of this paper reveal the complex nature of regulating health care in transitional China.

  12. 78 FR 62784 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Designation of a Longer... 5210 (Publication of Transactions and Quotations) October 4, 2013. I. Introduction On August 15, 2013, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission...

  13. Catastrophic events leading to de facto limits on liability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, K.A.; Okrent, D.

    1977-05-01

    This study conducts an overview of large technological systems in society to ascertain prevalence, if any, of situations that can lead to catastrophic effects where the resultant liabilities far exceed the insurances or assets subject to suit in court, thereby imposing de facto limits on liability. Several potential situations are examined: dam rupture, aircraft crash into a sports stadium, chemical plant accident, shipping disaster, and a toxic drug disaster. All of these events are estimated to have probabilities per year similar to or larger than a major nuclear accident and they are found to involve potential liability far exceeding the available resources, such as insurance, corporation assets, or government revenues

  14. 75 FR 21686 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... to pay arbitration awards to remain in the securities industry presents regulatory risks and is...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule... Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (``SEC'' or...

  15. Preliminary regulatory assessment of nuclear power plants vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, V.; Petelin, S.

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary attempts to develop models for nuclear regulatory vulnerability assessment of nuclear power plants are presented. Development of the philosophy and computer tools could be new and important insight for management of nuclear operators and nuclear regulatory bodies who face difficult questions about how to assess the vulnerability of nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities to external and internal threats. In the situation where different and hidden threat sources are dispersed throughout the world, the assessment of security and safe operation of nuclear power plants is very important. Capability to evaluate plant vulnerability to different kinds of threats, like human and natural occurrences and terrorist attacks and preparation of emergency response plans and estimation of costs are of vital importance for assurance of national security. On the basis of such vital insights, nuclear operators and nuclear regulatory bodies could plan and optimise changes in oversight procedures, organisations, equipment, hardware and software to reduce risks taking into account security and safety of nuclear power plants operation, budget, manpower, and other limitations. Initial qualitative estimations of adapted assessments for nuclear applications are shortly presented. (author)

  16. Team structure and regulatory focus: the impact of regulatory fit on team dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimotakis, Nikolaos; Davison, Robert B; Hollenbeck, John R

    2012-03-01

    We report a within-teams experiment testing the effects of fit between team structure and regulatory task demands on task performance and satisfaction through average team member positive affect and helping behaviors. We used a completely crossed repeated-observations design in which 21 teams enacted 2 tasks with different regulatory focus characteristics (prevention and promotion) in 2 organizational structures (functional and divisional), resulting in 84 observations. Results suggested that salient regulatory demands inherent in the task interacted with structure to determine objective and subjective team-level outcomes, such that functional structures were best suited to (i.e., had best fit with) tasks with a prevention regulatory focus and divisional structures were best suited to tasks with a promotion regulatory focus. This contingency finding integrates regulatory focus and structural contingency theories, and extends them to the team level with implications for models of performance, satisfaction, and team dynamics.

  17. Adjustable direct current and pulsed circuit fault current limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boenig, Heinrich J.; Schillig, Josef B.

    2003-09-23

    A fault current limiting system for direct current circuits and for pulsed power circuit. In the circuits, a current source biases a diode that is in series with the circuits' transmission line. If fault current in a circuit exceeds current from the current source biasing the diode open, the diode will cease conducting and route the fault current through the current source and an inductor. This limits the rate of rise and the peak value of the fault current.

  18. 75 FR 5157 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change... Consolidated FINRA Rulebook January 25, 2010. On December 2, 2009, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority... later in the rulebook consolidation process. It is therefore ordered, pursuant to Section 19(b)(2) of...

  19. 77 FR 47470 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Withdrawal of Proposed Rule Change To Adopt FINRA Rule 2231 (Customer Account Statements) in the Consolidated FINRA Rulebook August 2, 2012. On April 22, 2009, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') (f/k/a...

  20. 76 FR 21084 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Securities April 8, 2011. I. Introduction On March 3, 2011, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-64283; File No. SR-FINRA-2011-012] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Designation of a Longer...

  1. Managing Regulatory Body Competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, the IAEA published TECDOC 1254, which examined the way in which the recognized functions of a regulatory body for nuclear facilities results in competence needs. Using the systematic approach to training (SAT), TECDOC 1254 provided a framework for regulatory bodies for managing training and developing and their maintaining their competence. It has been successfully used by many regulators. The IAEA has also introduced a methodology and an assessment tool - Guidelines for Systematic Assessment of Regulatory Competence Needs (SARCoN) - which provides practical guidance on analysing the training and development needs of a regulatory body and, through a gap analysis, guidance on establishing competence needs and how to meet them. In 2009, the IAEA established a steering committee (supported by a bureau) with the mission to advise the IAEA on how it could best assist Member States to develop suitable competence management systems for their regulatory bodies. The committee recommended the development of a safety report on managing staff competence as an integral part of a regulatory body's management system. This Safety Report was developed in response to this request. It supersedes TECDOC 1254, broadens its application to regulatory bodies for all facilities and activities, and builds upon the experience gained through the application of TECDOC 1254 and SARCoN and the feedback received from Member States. This Safety Report applies to the management of adequate competence as needs change, and as such is equally applicable to the needs of States 'embarking' on a nuclear power programme. It also deals with the special case of building up the competence of regulatory bodies as part of the overall process of establishing an 'embarking' State's regulatory system

  2. Croatian energy regulatory council - independent Croatian regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepo, M.

    2002-01-01

    By means of approving five energy laws, the Republic of Croatia established an appropriate legislative framework for energy sector regulation. A series of sub-law acts is presently being elaborated as well as some additional documents in order to bring about transparent and non-discriminatory provisions for the establishment of electric energy, gas, oil/oil derivatives and thermal energy markets, i.e. for the introduction and management of market activities and public services. A considerable share of these activities relates to the definition of transparent regulatory mechanisms that would guarantee the implementation of regulation rules based on the law, and be carried out by the independent regulatory body - Croatian Energy Regulatory Council. The Council's rights and obligations include firm executive functions, which present obligations to every energy entity. A dissatisfied party may set in motion a settlement of dispute, if it maintains that the decisions are not based on the law or reveal a flaw in the procedure. Therefore, it is the Council's priority to always make careful and law-abiding decisions. This paper gives insight into the regulatory framework elements based on the laws including the Council's organisational structure and non-profit entities that will prepare act proposals for the Council and perform other professional activities. (author)

  3. Self-Regulatory Imagery and Physical Activity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Social-Cognitive Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteli, Maria-Christina; Cumming, Jennifer; Williams, Sarah E

    2018-01-01

    Limited research has investigated exercise imagery use in middle-aged and older adults and its relationship with affective and behavioral correlates. The study examined the association between self-regulatory imagery and physical activity (PA) through key social cognitive variables. Middle-aged and older adults (N = 299; M age = 59.73 years, SD = 7.73, range = 50 to 80) completed self-report measures assessing self-regulatory imagery use, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, perceived barriers, self-regulatory behavior, enjoyment, and PA levels. Path analysis supported a model (χ² [14] = 21.76, p = .08, CFI = .99, TLI = .97, SRMR = .03, RMSEA = .04) whereby self-regulatory imagery positively predicted self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-regulatory behaviors. Furthermore, self-regulatory imagery indirectly predicted barriers, outcome expectations, self-regulation, enjoyment, and PA. This research highlights self-regulatory imagery as an effective strategy in modifying exercise-related cognitions and behaviors. Incorporating social cognitive constructs into the design of imagery interventions may increase PA engagement.

  4. Tritium in Japanese precipitation following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Maruoka, Teruyuki; Shimoda, Gen; Obata, Hajime; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Yamamoto, Koshi; Mitsuguchi, Takehiro; Hagino, Kyoko; Tomioka, Naotaka; Sambandam, Chinmaya; Brummer, Daniela; Klaus, Philipp Martin; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-02-15

    Tritium concentrations in Japanese precipitation samples collected after the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) were measured. Values exceeding the pre-accident background were detected at three out of seven localities (Tsukuba, Kashiwa and Hongo) southwest of the FNPP1 at distances varying between 170 and 220 km from the source. The highest tritium content was found in the first rainfall in Tsukuba after the accident; however concentrations were 500 times less than the regulatory limit for tritium in drinking water. Tritium concentrations decreased steadily and rapidly with time, becoming indistinguishable from the pre-accident values within five weeks. The atmospheric tritium activities in the vicinity of the FNPP1 during the earliest stage of the accident was estimated to be 1.5×10(3) Bq/m(3), which is potentially capable of producing rainwater exceeding the regulatory limit, but only in the immediate vicinity of the source. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sound levels in a neonatal intensive care unit significantly exceeded recommendations, especially inside incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Johanna; de Suremain, Aurelie; Berne Audeoud, Frederique; Ego, Anne; Debillon, Thierry

    2017-12-01

    This study measured sound levels in a 2008 built French neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and compared them to the 2007 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations. The ultimate aim was to identify factors that could influence noise levels. The study measured sound in 17 single or double rooms in the NICU. Two dosimeters were installed in each room, one inside and one outside the incubators, and these conducted measurements over a 24-hour period. The noise metrics measured were the equivalent continuous sound level (L eq ), the maximum noise level (L max ) and the noise level exceeded for 10% of the measurement period (L 10 ). The mean L eq , L 10 and L max were 60.4, 62.1 and 89.1 decibels (dBA), which exceeded the recommended levels of 45, 50 and 65 dBA (p care was correlated to an increased noise level, except for a postconceptional age below 32 weeks. The sound levels significantly exceeded the AAP recommendations, particularly inside incubators. A multipronged strategy is required to improve the sound environment and protect the neonates' sensory development. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Radiance limits of ceramic phosphors under high excitation fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Zheng, Yi; Tchoul, Maxim

    2013-09-01

    Ceramic phosphors, excited by high radiance pump sources, offer considerable potential for high radiance conversion. Interestingly, thermodynamic arguments suggest that the radiance of the luminescent spot can even exceed that of the incoming light source. In practice, however, thermal quenching and (non-thermal) optical saturation limit the maximum attainable radiance of the luminescent source. We present experimental data for Ce:YAG and Ce:GdYAG ceramics in which these limits have been investigated. High excitation fluxes are achieved using laser pumping. Optical pumping intensities exceeding 100W/mm2 have been shown to produce only modest efficiency depreciation at low overall pump powers because of the short Ce3+ lifetime, although additional limitations exist. When pump powers are higher, heat-transfer bottlenecks within the ceramic and heat-sink interfaces limit maximum pump intensities. We find that surface temperatures of these laser-pumped ceramics can reach well over 150°C, causing thermal-quenching losses. We also find that in some cases, the loss of quantum efficiency with increasing temperature can cause a thermal run-away effect, resulting in a rapid loss in converted light, possibly over-heating the sample or surrounding structures. While one can still obtain radiances on the order of many W/mm2/sr, temperature quenching effects ultimately limit converted light radiance. Finally, we use the diffusion-approximation radiation transport models and rate equation models to simulate some of these nonlinear optical pumping and heating effects in high-scattering ceramics.

  7. 76 FR 37285 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... Limits and Accountability Measures AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... procedures and timing for specifying annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs) for western... accountability measures to ensure that the ACL is not exceeded. Restrictions may include, but are not limited to...

  8. Self-regulation as a regulatory strategy:
    The Italian legal framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Rodriquez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to provide an overview of the evolution of self-regulatory mechanisms in Italy. A brief overview of the Italian system of sources of law has showed that the model of the sources of law rooted in the Italian constitution is typically positivistic and centred on the pivotal role of Parliament, the only body empowered to legislate, either directly or by delegating its normative powers to the Government, within expressly specified limits. What room, if any, is there for self-regulatory rules? If one of the most interesting aims of the research was to analyse to what extent the self-regulatory phenomenon is compatible with Parliament’s undisputed sovereignty and with the linked principle of the rule of law, it should be clear that rules made by private actors (i.e. self-regulatory rules, which pretend to have external effects (binding erga omnes, can be considered as law and, as such, as sources of law, as long as they can be ‘incorporated’ into and recognized in some of the formal sources of Italian law. This seems the only possible and constitutionally compatible interpretation of a phenomenon (self-regulation which, instead, could potentially be able to place the formal hierarchy of sources of law in jeopardy. On the other hand, the results of the study make clear that, even when Parliament confers its normative powers on any other bodies (i.e. either independent administrative authorities or professional orders, or, more in general, any self-regulatory associations, it is unlikely that it will give up determining the limits within which those normative powers have to be exercised. Some authors actually consider this sort of ‘delegated legislation’ to be a means for the State to reassert its sovereignty. Anyway, this new pluralistic ‘architecture’ will undoubtedly allow the legislator to retain some exclusive duties: first and foremost, the power to prescribe the institutional conditions which underlie the basis of

  9. Neurological and neurophysiological examinations of workers exposed to arsenic levels exceeding hygiene standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Sińczuk-Walczak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The assessment of the neurotoxic effect of arsenic (As and its inorganic compounds is still the subject of interest due to a growing As application in a large array of technologies and the need to constantly verify the principles of prevention and technological parameters. The aim of this study was to determine the status of the nervous system (NS in workers exposed to As at concentrations exceeding hygiene standards (Threshold Limit Values (TLV – 10 μg/m3, Biological Exposure Index (BEI – 35 μg/l and to analyze the relationship between the NS functional state, species of As in urine and As levels in the workplace air. Material and Methods: The study group comprised 21 men (mean age: 47.43±7.59 employed in a copper smelting factory (mean duration of employment: 22.29±11.09. The control group comprised 16 men, matched by age and work shifts. Arsenic levels in the workplace air (As-A ranged from 0.7 to 92.3 μg/m3; (M = 25.18±28.83. The concentration of total arsenic in urine (Astot-U ranged from 17.35 to 434.68 μg/l (M = 86.82±86.6. Results: Syndrome of peripheral nervous system (PNS was manifested by extremity fatigue (28.6%, extremity pain (33.3% and paresthesia in the lower extremities (33.3%, as well as by neuropathy-type mini-symptoms (23.8%. Electroneurographic (ENeG tests of peroneal nerves showed significantly decreased response amplitude with normal values of motor conduction velocity (MCV. Stimulation of sural nerves revealed a significantly slowed sensory conduction velocity (SCV and decreased sensory potential amplitude. Neurophysiological parameters and the results of biological and environmental monitoring showed a relationship between Astot, AsIII (trivalent arsenic, the sum of iAs (AsIII+AsV (pentavalent arsenic+MMA (monomethylarsonic acid concentration in urine and As levels in the air. Conclusions: The results of the study demonstrate that occupational exposure to inorganic arsenic levels exceeding hygiene

  10. Regulatory Monitoring of Fortified Foods: Identifying Barriers and Good Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Laura A; Vossenaar, Marieke; Garrett, Greg S

    2015-01-01

    While fortification of staple foods and condiments has gained enormous global traction, poor performance persists throughout many aspects of implementation, most notably around the critical element of regulatory monitoring, which is essential for ensuring foods meet national fortification standards. Where coverage of fortified foods is high, limited nutritional impact of fortification programs largely exists due to regulatory monitoring that insufficiently identifies and holds producers accountable for underfortified products. Based on quality assurance data from 20 national fortification programs in 12 countries, we estimate that less than half of the samples are adequately fortified against relevant national standards. In this paper, we outline key findings from a literature review, key informant interviews with 11 fortification experts, and semi-quantitative surveys with 39 individuals from regulatory agencies and the food fortification industry in 17 countries on the perceived effectiveness of regulatory monitoring systems and barriers to compliance against national fortification standards. Findings highlight that regulatory agencies and industry disagree on the value that enforcement mechanisms have in ensuring compliance against standards. Perceived political risk of enforcement and poorly resourced inspectorate capacity appear to adversely reinforce each other within an environment of unclear legislation to create a major hurdle for improving overall compliance of fortification programs against national standards. Budget constraints affect the ability of regulatory agencies to create a well-trained inspector cadre and improve the detection and enforcement of non-compliant and underfortified products. Recommendations to improve fortification compliance include improving technical capacity; ensuring sustained leadership, accountability, and funding in both the private and the public sectors; and removing political barriers to ensure consistent detection of

  11. 47 CFR 27.50 - Power limits and duty cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.50 Power limits and duty cycle. (a) The.... In measuring transmissions in this band using an average power technique, the peak-to-average ratio (PAR) of the transmission may not exceed 13 dB. (6) Peak transmit power must be measured over any...

  12. Limits for the release of uranium compounds to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, F.; Ferruz, P.; Aguayo, A.

    1987-01-01

    A conservative criteria to be be followed by a Regulatory Body, in order to provide the limits of radioactive material release in the environment, When all the parameters are not available for the optimization of radiation protection is presented. This criteria can be applied to stablishment of radioactive release limits for uranium compounds from the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (author)

  13. Anti-regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells—termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)—that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune...... reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells......Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host...

  14. Nuclear safety and security culture - an integrated approach to regulatory oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronea, M.; Ciurea Ercau, C.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the development and implementation of regulatory guidelines for the oversight of safety and security culture within licensees organizations. CNCAN (the National Commission for Nuclear Activities of Romania) has used the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) attributes for a strong safety culture as the basis for its regulatory guidelines providing support to the reviewers and inspectors for recognizing and gathering information relevant to safety culture. These guidelines are in process of being extended to address also security culture, based on the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 7 document Nuclear Security Culture: Implementing Guide. Recognizing that safety and security cultures coexist and need to reinforce each other because they share the common objective of limiting risk and that similar regulatory review and inspection processes are in place for nuclear security oversight, an integrated approach is considered justified, moreover since the common elements of these cultures outweigh the differences. (authors)

  15. 76 FR 71007 - Shetek Wind Inc., Jeffers South, LLC and Allco Renewable Energy Limited, Midwest Independent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL11-53-000] Shetek Wind Inc., Jeffers South, LLC and Allco Renewable Energy Limited, Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator... an original and 14 copies of the protest or intervention to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

  16. Design of the digitizing beam position limit detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merl, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Digitizing Beam Position Limit Detector (DBPLD) is designed to identify and react to beam missteering conditions in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The high power of the insertion devices requires these missteering conditions to result in a beam abort in less than 2 milliseconds. Commercially available beam position monitors provide a voltage proportional to beam position immediately upstream and downstream of insertion devices. The DBPLD is a custom VME board that digitizes these voltages and interrupts the heartbeat of the APS machine protection system when the beam position exceeds its trip limits

  17. Over the limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, G

    1989-01-01

    With over 1 billion population, China is adding some 15 million to that total each year. And in the 18 years from 1982 to 2000, the net increase of Chinese population is expected to exceed 200 million. Because of the gigantic pressure from population and some mistakes in policies, the levels of ecological destruction and environment pollution are both serious. This includes deforestation, grassland degradation, desert encroachment, water resources shortage, and waste of mineral resources. Natural disasters including floods and droughts caused by those problems happen more and more frequently. If development damages the resource base, it can only result in a false prosperity, the so-called hollow economy. A large number of environmental problems result directly or indirectly from the pressure of population growth. Studies show that the appropriate number of people that can be supported by China's 9.6 million sq. km is about 700 million. However, this limit is now exceeded by over 300 million people, and will be exceeded by 500 million by the end of this century. Therefore, the task is to implement a birth control policy. At present, in urban areas, the goal of family planning has been reached, but in rural areas hard work is needed. Population control in urban areas, especially in big and medium-sized cities, includes dealing with the inflow of migrants from the countryside. There are 13 cities with a population above 2 million, 37 cities above 1-2 million, and 75 cities above 0.5-1 million. A lot of cities are very crowded, exerting great pressure on the environment. The booming of rural enterprises could provide a good solution to control the flow of rural people into big and medium-sized cities. The relationship between population, resources, environment, and development should be managed properly.

  18. Modelling the risk of Pb and PAH intervention value exceedance in allotment soils by robust logistic regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papritz, A.; Reichard, P.U.

    2009-01-01

    Soils of allotments are often contaminated by heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants. In particular, lead (Pb) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) frequently exceed legal intervention values (IVs). Allotments are popular in European countries; cities may own and let several thousand allotment plots. Assessing soil contamination for all the plots would be very costly. Soil contamination in allotments is often linked to gardening practice and historic land use. Hence, we predict the risk of IV exceedance from attributes that characterize the history and management of allotment areas (age, nearby presence of pollutant sources, prior land use). Robust logistic regression analyses of data of Swiss allotments demonstrate that the risk of IV exceedance can be predicted quite precisely without costly soil analyses. Thus, the new method allows screening many allotments at small costs, and it helps to deploy the resources available for soil contamination surveying more efficiently. - The contamination of allotment soils, expressed as frequency of intervention value exceedance, depends on the age and further attributes of the allotments and can be predicted by logistic regression.

  19. Relating road salt to exceedances of the water quality standard for chloride in New Hampshire streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Philip R; Kahl, J Steve; Sassan, Dari A; Heath, Douglas L; Walsh, Edward M

    2010-07-01

    Six watersheds in New Hampshire were studied to determine the effects of road salt on stream water quality. Specific conductance in streams was monitored every 15 min for one year using dataloggers. Chloride concentrations were calculated from specific conductance using empirical relationships. Stream chloride concentrations were directly correlated with development in the watersheds and were inversely related to streamflow. Exceedances of the EPA water quality standard for chloride were detected in the four watersheds with the most development. The number of exceedances during a year was linearly related to the annual average concentration of chloride. Exceedances of the water quality standard were not predicted for streams with annual average concentrations less than 102 mg L(-1). Chloride was imported into three of the watersheds at rates ranging from 45 to 98 Mg Cl km(-2) yr(-1). Ninety-one percent of the chloride imported was road salt for deicing roadways and parking lots. A simple, mass balance equation was shown to predict annual average chloride concentrations from streamflow and chloride import rates to the watershed. This equation, combined with the apparent threshold for exceedances of the water quality standard, can be used for screening-level TMDLs for road salt in impaired watersheds.

  20. Beta limits for ETF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, F.J.; Miller, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    ETF (Engineering Test Facility) one-dimensional transport simulations indicate that a volume-average beta of 4% is required for ignition. It is therefore important that theoretical beta limits, determined by requiring equilibria to be stable to all ideal modes, exceed 4%. This paper documents an ideal MHD analysis wherein it is shown that, with appropriate plasma cross-sectional shape and current profile optimization, operation near 5% is possible. The critical beta value, however, depends on the functional form used for ff', which suggests that higher critical betas could be achieved by directly optimizing the safety factor profile. (author)

  1. 75 FR 60157 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate..., 2010, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange... information about the rulebook consolidation process, see Information Notice, March 12, 2008 (Rulebook...

  2. Assessment of the benefits and impacts in the U.S. Nuclear Power Industry of hypothesized lower occupational dose limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, R.L.; Schmitt, J.F. [Nuclear Energy Institute, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements have issued recommendations that would limit occupational exposure of individuals to doses lower than regulatory limits contained in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s 10 CFR Part 20, {open_quotes}Standards for Protection Against Radiation{close_quotes}. Because of this situation, there is interest in the potential benefits and impacts that would be associated with movement of the NRC regulatory limits toward the advisory bodies recommendations. The records of occupational worker doses in the U.S. commercial nuclear power industry show that the vast majority of these workers have doses that are significantly below the regulatory limit of 50 mSv (5 rem) per year. Some workers doses do approach the limits, however. This is most common in the case of specially skilled workers, especially those with skills utilized in support of plant outage work. Any consideration of the potential benefits and impacts of hypothesized lower dose limits must address these workers as an important input to the overall assessment. There are also, of course, many other areas in which the benefits and impacts must be evaluated. To prepare to provide valid, constructive input on this matter, the U.S. nuclear power industry is undertaking an assessment, facilitated by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), of the potential benefits and impacts at its facilities associated with hypothesized lower occupational dose limits. Some preliminary results available to date from this assessment are provided.

  3. Assessment of the benefits and impacts in the U.S. Nuclear Power Industry of hypothesized lower occupational dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, R.L.; Schmitt, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements have issued recommendations that would limit occupational exposure of individuals to doses lower than regulatory limits contained in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's 10 CFR Part 20, open-quotes Standards for Protection Against Radiationclose quotes. Because of this situation, there is interest in the potential benefits and impacts that would be associated with movement of the NRC regulatory limits toward the advisory bodies recommendations. The records of occupational worker doses in the U.S. commercial nuclear power industry show that the vast majority of these workers have doses that are significantly below the regulatory limit of 50 mSv (5 rem) per year. Some workers doses do approach the limits, however. This is most common in the case of specially skilled workers, especially those with skills utilized in support of plant outage work. Any consideration of the potential benefits and impacts of hypothesized lower dose limits must address these workers as an important input to the overall assessment. There are also, of course, many other areas in which the benefits and impacts must be evaluated. To prepare to provide valid, constructive input on this matter, the U.S. nuclear power industry is undertaking an assessment, facilitated by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), of the potential benefits and impacts at its facilities associated with hypothesized lower occupational dose limits. Some preliminary results available to date from this assessment are provided

  4. 76 FR 20759 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate..., 2011, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange.... For more information about the rulebook consolidation process, see Information Notice, March 12, 2008...

  5. 75 FR 71164 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-22

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate..., 2010, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange.... For more information about the rulebook consolidation process, see Information Notice, March 12, 2008...

  6. 77 FR 34379 - Notice of Joint Meeting of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Federal Energy Regulatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. AD06-6-000] Notice of Joint Meeting of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will hold a joint meeting...

  7. Regulatory barriers for activating flexibility in the Nordic-Baltic electricity market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergaentzlé, Claire; Skytte, Klaus; Soysal, Emilie Rosenlund

    2017-01-01

    to flexibility. We find that the most restrictive barriers against flexibility are emitted by public authorities as part of broader policy strategies. Overall, we find that current regulatory and market framework conditions do not hinder flexibility. However, despite that, flexibility remains limited due......, load adjustment or to a greater coupling to other energy sectors. In this paper, we identify the framework conditions that influence the provision of VRE-friendly flexibility in the Nordic and Baltic electricity sector, i.e., the market and regulatory settings that act as drivers or barriers...... to a lack of coherent instruments intended to both the demand and supply-side to effectively act flexibly....

  8. Hydrostatic limits of Fluorinert liquids used for neutron and transport studies at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, V A; Sadykov, R A

    2005-01-01

    We determined the hydrostatic limits at room temperature for a number of Fluorinert liquids: FC70, FC75, FC77, FC84, FC87 and their mixtures. Pressure exceeding this limit produces pressure gradients in the sample, which are retained at low temperature. The maximum hydrostatic limit (2.3 GPa) was found for a (1:1) mixture of FC84/87

  9. 76 FR 60106 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate... 14, 2011, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') (f/k/a National Association of.... For more information about the rulebook consolidation process, see Information Notice, March 12, 2008...

  10. 75 FR 41254 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... registered capacity, may work in other investment-related industries, such as financial planning, or may seek...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving a Proposed Rule..., 2010, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and...

  11. Regulatory inhibition of biological tissue mineralization by calcium phosphate through post-nucleation shielding by fetuin-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joshua C., E-mail: joshchang@ucla.edu [Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA and Mathematical Biosciences Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Miura, Robert M., E-mail: miura@njit.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and inorganic phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are usually present at high concentrations throughout bodily fluids—at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. In this manuscript, we extend mean-field continuum classical nucleation theory of the growth of clusters to encompass surface shielding. We use this formulation to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues through the mechanism of post-nuclear shielding of nascent mineral particles by binding proteins. We develop a mathematical description of this phenomenon using a countable system of hyperbolic partial differential equations. A critical concentration of regulatory protein is identified as a function of the physical parameters that describe the system.

  12. Quality management of the nuclear regulatory body. Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the ninth series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled Nuclear Regulatory Body Quality Management, held in March and May 2001, and which involved the participation of senior nuclear regulators from 23 IAEA Member States. This report conveys the essence of two peer group discussions and highlights some good practices identified by the participating senior regulators. The objective of the discussions was to share experiences of regulatory bodies in implementing QM systems in their own work so as to ensure that the regulatory control over the licensees is effective and efficient and is commensurate with the mandate assigned by their governments. The shared experiences and good practices presented in the report, however, do not necessarily reflect the views of and good practices endorsed by the governments of the nominating Member States, the organizations to which the regulators belong, or the IAEA. The report sets down the peer group's experience in developing, implementing and evaluating QM within their regulatory bodies and identifies points to bear in mind when introducing such a system. This report is structured so that it covers the subject matter under the main headings of: application of quality management to regulatory work; development and implementation of quality management; assessment and improvement of performance; and good practices

  13. Use of a VGT to improve the limiting torque characteristics of a DI automotive diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, J.G.; Wallace, F.J.; Cox, A. [University of Bath (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Pease, A.C. [Lotus Cars Ltd., Norwich (United Kingdom); Bird, G.L. [AVT, Diesel, Ford Motor Co. Ltd., Dunton (United Kingdom); Horrocks, R.W. [Diesel Powertrain Research, FFA, Aachen (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    The paper describes the experimental and modelling investigations that have been undertaken on the use of a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) to improve the limiting torque characteristics of a prototype 1.8 litre DI diesel engine. The baseline build of the engine with a fixed geometry turbocharger (FGT) was extensively mapped. Replacement of the FGT with the VGT resulted in a 10 per cent increase in torque on the baseline LTC without exceeding the set limiting parameters of maximum cylinder pressure, pre-turbine temperature and exhaust smoke. In conjunction with the experimental evaluation, an extensive cycle simulation exercise was conducted which indicated that the baseline LTC could be extended by as much as 15 per cent without exceeding the limiting engine operating criteria. (author)

  14. An overview of the UK regulatory expectation for design basis accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimble, Andy

    2013-01-01

    The UK Health and Safety Executive published its most recent regulatory expectations in the 2006 version of it's safety assessment principles (SAPs). This built on experience regulating the full range of facilities for which it is responsible. Thus the principles underpinning all regulatory safety case assessment are the same but the implementation differs depending on the application. This paper will describe the published design basis accident analysis (DBAA) logic in context with other technical aspects of the regulatory expectation for safety cases. It will further illustrate the DBAA methodology with practical examples from actual experience on reprocessing plant gained over the last 15 years or so. Among the examples will be the relevance of conventional safety fault initiators to nuclear safety assessment. It will further demonstrate the derivation of facility limits and conditions necessary for nuclear safety. (authors)

  15. A risk-informed basis for establishing non-fixed surface contamination limits for spent fuel transportation casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawl, R.R.; Eckerman, K.F.; Bogard, J.S.; Cook, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The current limits for non-fixed contamination on packages used to transport radioactive materials were introduced in the 1961 edition of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) transport regulations and were based on radiation protection guidance and practices in use at that time. The limits were based on exposure scenarios leading to intakes of radionuclides by inhalation and external irradiation of the hands. These considerations are collectively referred to as the Fairbairn model. Although formulated over 40 years ago, the model remains unchanged and is still the basis of current regulatory-derived limits on package non-fixed surface contamination. There can also be doses that while not resulting directly from the contamination, are strongly influenced by and attributable to transport regulatory requirements for contamination control. For example, actions necessary to comply with the current derived limits for light-water-reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) casks can result in significant external doses to workers. This is due to the relatively high radiation levels around the loaded casks, where workers must function during the measurement of contamination levels and while decontaminating the cask. In order to optimize the total dose received due to compliance with cask contamination levels, it is necessary to take into account all the doses that vary as a result of the regulatory limit. Limits for non-fixed surface contamination on spent fuel casks should be established by using a model that considers and optimizes the appropriate exposure scenarios both in the workplace and in the public environment. A risk-informed approach is needed to ensure optimal use of personnel and material resources for SNF-based packaging operations. This paper is a summary of a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory that examined the dose implications for removable surface contamination limits on spent fuel

  16. Future nuclear regulatory challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    1998-01-01

    In December 1996, the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities concluded that changes resulting from economic deregulation and other recent developments affecting nuclear power programmes have consequences both for licensees and regulatory authorities. A number of potential problems and issues which will present a challenge to nuclear regulatory bodies over the next ten years have been identified in a report just released. (author)

  17. 77 FR 7218 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on January 30, 2012, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.... For more information about the rulebook consolidation process, see Information Notice, March 12, 2008...

  18. 75 FR 59771 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving the Proposed Rule.... I. Introduction On July 27, 2010, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') (f/k... pertinent distribution-related information from its members in a timely fashion to facilitate its Regulation...

  19. Assesment of safe discharge limits in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van As, D.

    1984-01-01

    Routine releases from the nuclear industry to the environment are controlled by three principles, viz. that the practice creating the effluents should be kept as low as reasonably achievable, and radiation dose limits should not be exceeded. In the nuclear industry, the discharge of radioactive effluent is controlled by a system of dose limitation. The application of this system to conventional effluents require: i) a quantitative relationship between intake and effect so as to establish intake limits; ii) environmental models that will allow calculation of the relationship between discharge and intake; iii) a measure of the total detriment due to the discharge. For such a system discharge limits can be established for the desired level of risk (safety)

  20. Regulatory difficulties in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, W.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The regulatory agency assigned the task of regulating the initial entry into the field of nuclear power generation by a developing country has a very difficult job. Based on the authors' experience during the start-up and initial operation of Ko-Ri Unit I, the first power reactor in the Republic of Korea, observations on regulatory difficulties and recommendations for improved regulatory effectiveness are offered. The problem areas can be loosely grouped into three general categories: (1) Lack of adequate technical knowledge which is the basis for all effective regulation; (2) Difficulties with understanding and utilization of the required regulatory documentation; (3) Failure to establish the proper regulatory environment. Examples are cited from actual experience during the Ko-Ri Unit I start-up to demonstrate the impact that regulatory activities can have on a plant construction and testing programme. The problems encountered are not unique to developing countries but also exist in the United States of America. Recommendations are offered which should be beneficial to either newly formed regulatory agencies or agencies wishing to improve their abilities and effectiveness. These include: (1) Additional training of regulatory inspectors in plant operations; (2) Additional experience gained by participation in regulatory activities in other countries; (3) Increased attention given to regulatory documents, especially plant technical specifications; (4) Establishment of formal lines of communication between the utility and the regulatory agency; (5) Clear definition of regulatory responsibilities to avoid areas of overlapping jurisdiction; (6) Active participation by the regulatory staff very early in the project. It is hoped that these and other recommendations offered will greatly improve regulatory effectiveness and at the same time demonstrate that when the decision is made to 'go nuclear', a strong commitment must be made to develop and support a technically

  1. Regulatory control of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to support IAEA training courses and workshops in the field of regulatory control of nuclear power plants as well as to support the regulatory bodies of Member States in their own training activities. The target group is the professional staff members of nuclear safety regulatory bodies supervising nuclear power plants and having duties and responsibilities in the following regulatory fields: regulatory framework; regulatory organization; regulatory guidance; licensing and licensing documents; assessment of safety; and regulatory inspection and enforcement. Important topics such as regulatory competence and quality of regulatory work as well as emergency preparedness and public communication are also covered. The book also presents the key issues of nuclear safety such as 'defence-in-depth' and safety culture and explains how these should be taken into account in regulatory work, e.g. during safety assessment and regulatory inspection. The book also reflects how nuclear safety has been developed during the years on the basis of operating experience feedback and results of safety research by giving topical examples. The examples cover development of operating procedures and accident management to cope with complicated incidents and severe accidents to stress the importance of regulatory role in nuclear safety research. The main target group is new staff members of regulatory bodies, but the book also offers good examples for more experienced inspectors to be used as comparison and discussion basis in internal workshops organized by the regulatory bodies for refreshing and continuing training. The book was originally compiled on the basis of presentations provided during the two regulatory control training courses in 1997 and 1998. The textbook was reviewed at the beginning of the years 2000 and 2002 by IAEA staff members and consistency with the latest revisions of safety standards have been ensured. The textbook was completed in the

  2. Regulatory challenges for preventing firearms smuggling into Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Eugenio Weigend; González, Silvia Villarreal

    2015-01-01

    The recent surge in illegal firearms trafficking from the U.S. into Mexico has helped empower Mexican criminal groups to adopt highly confrontational strategies, contributing to a surge of violence throughout the country. This article addresses the regulatory asymmetries between Mexico and the U.S. with respect to the production, import, export, sales and possession of firearms. It reviews several important gun laws and explores why this asymmetry limits bilateral cooperation and encourages g...

  3. Remarkable difference in paralytic shellfish poisoning toxin distribution in tissues of pen shell atrina pectinata exposed to toxic red tide bloom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narceda, Ronald Jefferson A.; Montojo, Ulysses M.; Cayme, Mirriam F.; Borja, Valeriano M.

    2011-01-01

    Pen shell atrina pectinata is one of the commercially important bivalves in Western Pacific region. In the Philippines, it is marketed as a whole meat or processed by shellfish harvesters to separate the abductor muscle as an export commodity. During blooms of toxic dinoflagellate pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum (Pbc), A. pectinata accumulates paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins sometimes exceeding Philippine regulatory limit of 60μgSTXeq/100g tissue and international regulatory limit of 80μgSTXeq/100g tissue for safe human consumption, based on whole tissue analysis. Toxic blooms directly affect the shellfish industry which includes A. pectinata, and this causes not only significant economical losses on shellfish gatherers but also serious public health concerns. In this study, samples of A. pectinata exposed to toxic bloom of Pbc were collected in Sorsogon Bay, Philippines. Bioaccumulation and distribution of PSP toxins were determined in different tissues namely, abductor muscle, mantle, gills, gonads, siphon, stomach and intestine using High Performance Liquid Chromatography post column derivatization method with fluorescence detection. Likewise, green mussels Perna viridis being the sentinel species for PSP monitoring in the Philippines were also collected in the same area and served as control. Interestingly, results showed that the abductor muscle accumulates minimal level of PSP toxins and is several folds lower than the Philippine and international regulatory limits in contrast with the results obtained from P. viridis. Mantle parts showed toxicity values exceeding local regulatory limit and near to go beyond the international regulatory limit. Conversely, the remaining parts showed high toxicity values surpassing both regulation limits. Standard mouse bioassay regulatory used in PSP monitoring in the Philippines was also performed and revealed that the abductor muscle had non-detectable level of toxins. Also, toxicity values from different

  4. 47 CFR 18.305 - Field strength limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Field strength limit (uV/m) Distance (meters) Any type unless otherwise specified (miscellaneous) Any...Any 2515 300300 Ultrasonic Below 490 kHz Below 500500 or more 2,400/F(kHz)2,400/F(kHz)× SQRT(power/500... kHzOn or above 90 kHz AnyAny 1,500300 430 430 1 Field strength may not exceed 10 μV/m at 1600 meters...

  5. Ballistic Transport Exceeding 28 μm in CVD Grown Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banszerus, Luca; Schmitz, Michael; Engels, Stephan; Goldsche, Matthias; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Beschoten, Bernd; Stampfer, Christoph

    2016-02-10

    We report on ballistic transport over more than 28 μm in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) that is fully encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. The structures are fabricated by an advanced dry van-der-Waals transfer method and exhibit carrier mobilities of up to three million cm(2)/(Vs). The ballistic nature of charge transport is probed by measuring the bend resistance in cross- and square-shaped devices. Temperature-dependent measurements furthermore prove that ballistic transport is maintained exceeding 1 μm up to 200 K.

  6. Improving nuclear regulatory effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Ensuring that nuclear installations are operated and maintained in such a way that their impact on public health and safety is as low as reasonably practicable has been and will continue to be the cornerstone of nuclear regulation. In the past, nuclear incidents provided the main impetus for regulatory change. Today, economic factors, deregulation, technological advancements, government oversight and the general requirements for openness and accountability are leading regulatory bodies to review their effectiveness. In addition, seeking to enhance the present level of nuclear safety by continuously improving the effectiveness of regulatory bodies is seen as one of the ways to strengthen public confidence in the regulatory systems. This report covers the basic concepts underlying nuclear regulatory effectiveness, advances being made and future requirements. The intended audience is primarily nuclear safety regulators, but government authorities, nuclear power plant operators and the general public may also be interested. (author)

  7. 75 FR 27606 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...\\ and Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on April 27, 2010, the Financial Industry... restated following the formation of FINRA through the consolidation of NASD and the member regulatory...

  8. Plant safety and performance indicators for regulatory use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferjancic, M.; Nemec, T.; Cimesa, S.

    2004-01-01

    Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) supervises nuclear and radiological safety of Krsko NPP. This SNSA supervision is performed through inspections, safety evaluations of plant modifications and event analyses as well as with the safety and performance indicators (SPI) which are a valuable data source for plant safety monitoring. In the past SNSA relied on the SPI provided by Krsko NPP and did not have a set of SPI which would be more appropriate for regulatory use. In 2003 SNSA started with preparation of a new set of SPI which would be more suitable for performing the regulatory oversight of the plant. New internal SNSA procedure which is under preparation will define use and evaluation of SPI and will include definitions for the proposed set of SPI. According to the evaluation of SPI values in comparison with the limiting values and/or trending, the procedure will define SNSA response and actions. (author)

  9. Nuclear Regulatory legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    This compilation of statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 97th Congress, 2nd Session, has been prepared by the Office of the Executive Legal Director, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, with the assistance of staff, for use as an internal resource document

  10. Limiting values of radionuclide intake and air concentration and dose conversion factors for inhalation, submersion, and ingestion: Federal guidance report No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Wolbarst, A.B.; Richardson, A.C.B.

    1988-09-01

    Radiation protection programs for workers are based, in the United States, on a hierarchy of limitations stemming from Federal guidance approved by the President. This guidance, which consists of principles, policies, and numerical primary guides, is used by Federal agencies as the basis for developing and implementing their own regulatory standards. The primary guides are usually expressed in terms of limiting doses to workers. The protection of workers against taking radioactive materials into the body, however, is accomplished largely through the use of regulations based on derived guides expressed in terms of quantities or concentrations of radionuclides. The values of these derived guides are chosen so as to assure that workers in work environments that conform to them are unlikely to receive radiation doses that exceed the primary guides. The purpose of the present report is to set forth derived guides that are consistent with current Federal radiation protection guidance. They are intended to serve as the basis for regulations setting upper bounds on the inhalation and ingestion of, and submersion in, radioactive materials in the workplace. The report also includes tables of exposure-to-dose conversion factors, for general use in assessing average individual committed doses in any population that is adequately characterized by Reference Man. 38 refs

  11. Limiting values of radionuclide intake and air concentration and dose conversion factors for inhalation, submersion, and ingestion: Federal guidance report No. 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Wolbarst, A.B.; Richardson, A.C.B.

    1988-09-01

    Radiation protection programs for workers are based, in the United States, on a hierarchy of limitations stemming from Federal guidance approved by the President. This guidance, which consists of principles, policies, and numerical primary guides, is used by Federal agencies as the basis for developing and implementing their own regulatory standards. The primary guides are usually expressed in terms of limiting doses to workers. The protection of workers against taking radioactive materials into the body, however, is accomplished largely through the use of regulations based on derived guides expressed in terms of quantities or concentrations of radionuclides. The values of these derived guides are chosen so as to assure that workers in work environments that conform to them are unlikely to receive radiation doses that exceed the primary guides. The purpose of the present report is to set forth derived guides that are consistent with current Federal radiation protection guidance. They are intended to serve as the basis for regulations setting upper bounds on the inhalation and ingestion of, and submersion in, radioactive materials in the workplace. The report also includes tables of exposure-to-dose conversion factors, for general use in assessing average individual committed doses in any population that is adequately characterized by Reference Man. 38 refs.

  12. The JET belt limiter tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deksnis, E.

    1988-09-01

    The belt limiter system, comprising two full toroidal rings of limiter tiles, was installed in JET in 1987. In consists of water-cooled fins with the limiter material in form of tile inbetween. The tiles are designed to absorb heat fluxes during irradiation without the surface temperature exceeding 2000 0 C and to radiate this heat between pulses to the water cooled sink whose temperature is lower than that of the vacuum vessel. An important feature of the design is to maximise the area of the radiating surface facing the water cooled fin. This leads to a tile depth much greater than the width of the tile facing the heat flux. Limiter tiles intercept particles flowing out of the plasma through the area between the two belt limiter rings and through remaining surface area of the plasma column. Power deposition to a limiter tile depends strongly on the shape of the plasma, the edge plasma properties as well as on the surface profile of the tiles. This paper will discuss the methodology that was followed in producing an optimized surface profile of the tiles. This shaped profile has the feature that the resulting power deposition profile is roughly similar for a wide range of plasma parameters. (author)

  13. Future Challenges and Possibilities for the Danish Long-line Production of Blue Mussels, Mytilus edilus (L)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pernille

    -valves was observed to occur earlier as well as the reduction in clearance rate became more pronounced with increasing concentrations of D. acuta. In addition, the total amount of DST accumulated in the mussels exceeded the regulatory limit for human consumption. However, DST-containing D. acuta did not have a severe...

  14. A method for statistical steady state thermal analysis of reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetton, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    In a previous publication the author presented a method for undertaking statistical steady state thermal analyses of reactor cores. The present paper extends the technique to an assessment of confidence limits for the resulting probability functions which define the probability that a given thermal response value will be exceeded in a reactor core. Establishing such confidence limits is considered an integral part of any statistical thermal analysis and essential if such analysis are to be considered in any regulatory process. In certain applications the use of a best estimate probability function may be justifiable but it is recognised that a demonstrably conservative probability function is required for any regulatory considerations. (orig.)

  15. High density regimes and beta limits in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeulders, P.

    1990-01-01

    Results are first presented on the density limit in JET discharges with graphite (C), Be gettered graphite and Be limiters. There is a clear improvement in the case of Be limiters. The Be gettered phase showed no increase in the gas fueled density limit, except with Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH), but, the limit changed character. During MARFE-formation, any further increase in density was prevented, leading to a soft density limit. The soft density limit was a function of input power and impurity content with a week dependence on q. Helium and pellet fuelled discharges exceeded the gas-fuelled global density limits, but essentially had the same edge limit. In the second part, results are presented of high β operation in low-B Double-Null (DN) X-point configurations with Be-gettered carbon target plates. The Troyon limit was reached during H-mode discharges and toroidal β values of 5.5% were obtained. At high beta, the sawteeth were modified and characterised by very rapid heat-waves and fishbone-like pre- and post-cursors with strongly ballooning character. 17 refs., 5 figs

  16. 75 FR 53998 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... characteristics and risks of security futures. \\6\\ 15 U.S.C. 78o-3(b)(6). B. Self-Regulatory Organization's...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend the Security Futures Risk Disclosure Statement August 27, 2010...

  17. Identifying TF-MiRNA Regulatory Relationships Using Multiple Features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Shao

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are known to play important roles in the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. While intensive research has been conducted to identify miRNAs and their target genes in various genomes, there is only limited knowledge about how microRNAs are regulated. In this study, we construct a pipeline that can infer the regulatory relationships between transcription factors and microRNAs from ChIP-Seq data with high confidence. In particular, after identifying candidate peaks from ChIP-Seq data, we formulate the inference as a PU learning (learning from only positive and unlabeled examples problem. Multiple features including the statistical significance of the peaks, the location of the peaks, the transcription factor binding site motifs, and the evolutionary conservation are derived from peaks for training and prediction. To further improve the accuracy of our inference, we also apply a mean reciprocal rank (MRR-based method to the candidate peaks. We apply our pipeline to infer TF-miRNA regulatory relationships in mouse embryonic stem cells. The experimental results show that our approach provides very specific findings of TF-miRNA regulatory relationships.

  18. A system-level model for the microbial regulatory genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Aaron N; Reiss, David J; Allard, Antoine; Wu, Wei-Ju; Salvanha, Diego M; Plaisier, Christopher L; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Pan, Min; Kaur, Amardeep; Baliga, Nitin S

    2014-07-15

    Microbes can tailor transcriptional responses to diverse environmental challenges despite having streamlined genomes and a limited number of regulators. Here, we present data-driven models that capture the dynamic interplay of the environment and genome-encoded regulatory programs of two types of prokaryotes: Escherichia coli (a bacterium) and Halobacterium salinarum (an archaeon). The models reveal how the genome-wide distributions of cis-acting gene regulatory elements and the conditional influences of transcription factors at each of those elements encode programs for eliciting a wide array of environment-specific responses. We demonstrate how these programs partition transcriptional regulation of genes within regulons and operons to re-organize gene-gene functional associations in each environment. The models capture fitness-relevant co-regulation by different transcriptional control mechanisms acting across the entire genome, to define a generalized, system-level organizing principle for prokaryotic gene regulatory networks that goes well beyond existing paradigms of gene regulation. An online resource (http://egrin2.systemsbiology.net) has been developed to facilitate multiscale exploration of conditional gene regulation in the two prokaryotes. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  20. 40 CFR 141.209 - Special notice for nitrate exceedances above MCL by non-community water systems (NCWS), where...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Water Violations § 141.209 Special notice for nitrate exceedances above MCL by non-community water... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special notice for nitrate exceedances above MCL by non-community water systems (NCWS), where granted permission by the primacy agency under Â...

  1. Technical and scientific support to nuclear regulatory authority in Montenegro. Present situation and outlooks for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, S.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear regulatory competences in the Republic of Montenegro are shared between the ministries of health and of the environment. Following the independence of the country by mid 2006, Radiation Protection Commission (RPC) is established within the Ministry of Health, so as to match the regulatory role for the sources used in medicine. A similar step is expected to be made soon within the Ministry of the Environment, too. The two commissions will likely and logically merge into one, representing an interim regulatory authority to be functioning until a full capacity and effectively independent regulatory body is established by new nuclear law. Promulgation of the latter is expected to take part in the course of 2007. Let us mention here that the law in force is one from 1996 - quite obsolete and not taking into consideration the Basic Safety Standards (IAEA, 1996) and subsequent IAEA and EU documents in the field. Montenegro is a small, non-nuclear country (no nuclear installations or fuel cycle segments), the use of radiation sources being limited mostly to medical and industrial applications. Technical support to regulatory functions, in whatever basic form these were effectuated up to now, was/is given by the Centre for Eco-Toxicological Research of Montenegro (CETI), Department of Radiation Protection and Monitoring, in Podgorica. As to scientific support, it is fundamentally to be found at the University of Montenegro, Faculty of Sciences (FS), Department of Physics. While CETI is relatively well equipped, running quite a modern nuclear spectrometry laboratory (alpha, beta and gamma spectrometry, radon measurements) and having a decent dosimetry unit (TLD, field and workplace monitoring), FS is practically limited to sporadic theoretical studies, with very poor laboratory capabilities. Environmental radioactivity monitoring is performed by CETI, following the programme defined by the government. Licensing and inspections are the two regulatory functions still

  2. [95/95] Approach for design limits analysis in WWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkov, L.; Tsyganov, S.

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses a well-known condition [95%/95%], which is important for monitoring some limits of core parameters in the course of designing the reactors (such as PWR or WWER). The condition ensures the postulate 'there is at least a 95 % probability at a 95 % confidence level that' some parameter does not exceed the limit. Such conditions are stated, for instance, in US standards and IAEA norms as recommendations for DNBR and fuel temperature. A question may arise: why can such approach for the limits be only applied to these parameters, while not normally applied to any other parameters? What is the way to ensure the limits in design practice? Using the general statements of mathematical statistics the authors interpret the [95/95] approach as applied to WWER design limits. (Authors)

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide

  4. Limits on the space density of gamma-ray burst sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, R.I.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst spectra which extend to several MeV without significant steepening indicate that there is negligible degradation due to two-photon pair production. The inferred low rate of photon-photon reactions is used to give upper limits to the distances to the sources and to the intensity of the radiation from the sources. These limits are calculated under the assumptions that the bursters are neutron stars which emit uncollimated gamma rays. The principal results are that the space density of the gamma-ray burst sources exceeds approx.10 -6 pc -3 if the entire surface of the neutron star radiates and exceeds approx.10 -3 pc -3 if only a small cap or thin strip in the stellar surface radiates. In the former case the density of gamma-ray bursters is approx.1% of the inferred density of extinct pulsars, and in the latter case the mean mass density of burster sources is a few percent of the density of unidentified dark matter in the solar neighborhood. In both cases the X-ray intensity of the sources is far below the Rayleigh-Jeans limit, and the total flux is at most comparable to the Eddington limit. This implies that low-energy self-absorption near 10 keV is entirely negligible and that radiation-driven explosions are just barely possible

  5. MAXIMIZING PROFIT - OPTICAL TRADITIONAL TRAVEL AGENCIES EXCEEDED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENEA CONSTANŢA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently concepts of globalized the services the advertising only that and substantial modifications, but that just radicals, in the structure net of touristic states. Is directed to of a new conceive the organic fashions of structures ale net of realized and of casting of guy colaborative, baze on interconexion, the interface and flexible interactions, from which his. I result the competitive advantages popularly the partners of business. The optics traditional agencies of tourings considered the production and the delivery touristic services except through the of a alone objective major prism scilicet maximizarea of the profits, falls to is exceeded. For the past decades ale the century XX, the impact technological changes in the industry services becomes all determine maul influenced the „traditional sectors” in charge, as for example the education, the trade, the touring, the informatics. Certainly, globalized can be interpretation in different senses. Referenced to the touristic services, the globalized is define as be a form an advanced still more complex maul of which nationalization involves a degrees of functional integration between the touristic activities disperse on plans transfrontalier.

  6. Research and regulatory review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macleod, J.S.; Fryer, D.R.H.

    1979-01-01

    To enable the regulatory review to be effectively undertaken by the regulatory body, there is a need for it to have ready access to information generated by research activities. Certain advantages have been seen to be gained by the regulatory body itself directly allocating and controlling some portion of these activities. The princial reasons for reaching this conclusion are summarised and a brief description of the Inspectorates directly sponsored programme outlined. (author)

  7. Contaminated Non-Food Products. Regulatory Deficit Regarding Contaminated Non-Food Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-11-01

    An INES 7 event in Europe will generate tremendous amounts of class 7 goods. From roofing tile to motor cycle, everything becomes a surface contaminated object and therefore a dangerous good. Along with the classification as a dangerous good goes the classification as waste. Who would buy a commodity that cannot be shipped without special care? Thus, ADR/RID induce a de facto dose limit for commodities, whether intended or not. Within the present ADR/RID this regulatory checkmate can hardly be avoided. National exemptions are impossible and with a view to the European internal market even pointless. Here we present a harmonised description of this particular checkmate. We discuss two specific scenarios and the corresponding regulatory issues

  8. 76 FR 12380 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Amendment No. 1..., the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange... information about the rulebook consolidation process, see Information Notice, March 12, 2008 (Rulebook...

  9. Derivation and Mapping of Critical Loads for Nitrogen and Trends in Their Exceedance in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Dieter Nagel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “critical load” means a quantitative estimate of an exposure to one or more pollutants below which significant harmful effects on specified sensitive elements of the environment do not occur, according to present knowledge. In the case of nitrogen, both oxidised and reduced compounds contribute to the total deposition of acidity, which exceeds critical loads in many forest ecosystems. These also cause negative effects through eutrophication. Critical loads of nitrogen were derived for forest soils (deciduous and coniferous forest, natural grassland, acid fens, heathland, and mesotrophic peat bogs. In Germany, a decrease in sulphur emissions over the past 15 years resulted in a reduced exceedance of critical loads for acid deposition. In the same period it was noted that reduction in the emissions of nitrogen oxides and ammonia remained insignificant. Therefore, emissions of nitrogen compounds have become relatively more important and will continue to threaten ecosystem function and stability. The risk of environmental damage remains at an unacceptable level. The German maps show the degree to which the critical loads are exceeded, and they present current developments and an expected future trend. Results indicate that recovery from pollutant stress occurs only gradually.

  10. Wetlands: The changing regulatory landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glick, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Protection of wetlands became a national issue in 1988 when President George Bush pledged no net loss of wetlands in the US under his open-quotes environmental presidency.close quotes As wetlands became a national issue, the job of protecting them became an obligation for many groups, including hydro-power developers. Now, when a site selected for development includes an area that may be classified as a wetland, the developer quickly discovers the importance of recognizing and protecting these natural habitats. Federal legislation severely limits development of wetland, and most states increase the restrictions with their own wetlands regulations. The difficulty of defining wetlands complicates federal and state enforcement. Land that appears to be dry may in fact be classified as a wetland. So, even if a site appears dry, potential hydro developers must confirm whether or not any jurisdictional wetlands are present. Regulated lands include much more than marshes and swamps. Further complicating the definition of wetlands, a recent court decision found that even artificially created wetlands, such as man-made ponds, may be subject to regulation. Hydro developers must be aware of current regulatory requirements before they consider development of any site that may contain wetlands. To be certain that a site is open-quotes buildableclose quotes from the standpoint of wetlands regulation, a developer must verify (with the help of state agencies) that the property does not contain any jurisdictional wetlands. If it does, the regulatory process before development becomes much more complicated. For the short term, uncertainty abounds and extreme caution is in order. Because the regulatory process has become so complex and an agreeable definition of wetlands so elusive, the trend among the Corps and collaborating agencies is to constrict nationwide permits in favor of narrowing the jurisdictional definition of wetlands

  11. Regulatory decision with EPA/NRC/DOE/State Session (Panel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Donnell, E.

    1995-12-31

    This panel will cover the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) proposed radiation limits in the Branch Technical Position on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Performance Assessment and the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) draft regulation in Part 193. Representatives from NRC and EPA will discuss the inconsistencies in these two regulations. DOE and state representatives will discuss their perspective on how these regulations will affect low-level radioactive waste performance assessments.

  12. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  13. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  14. Regulatory and management approaches to NORM residues in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, M.; Teng, I.L.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) processing industries in Malaysia include oil and gas production and mineral processing plants. These industries are controlled by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board of Malaysia (AELB) through the enforcement of the Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984 (Act 304). Related regulations have been developed in order to ensure the safety of workers and members of the public. However, more regulations are necessary for the safe handling of NORM. NORM processing generates various types of NORM residues that require proper management. As for low-level NORM residues, landfill disposal can be exempted from regulatory control if the Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) shows that the additional dose to the members of the public is below the limit set by the authority. This paper outlines the regulatory and management approaches to NORM residues in Malaysia. (author)

  15. Risk assessment of coumarin using the bench mark dose (BMD) approach: children in Norway which regularly eat oatmeal porridge with cinnamon may exceed the TDI for coumarin with several folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotland, T Ø; Paulsen, J E; Sanner, T; Alexander, J; Husøy, T

    2012-03-01

    Coumarin is a naturally occurring flavouring substance in cinnamon and many other plants. It is known that coumarin can cause liver toxicity in several species, and it is considered a non-genotoxic carcinogen in rodents. By using the bench mark dose approach we re-assessed coumarin toxicity and established a new TDI for coumarin of 0.07 mg/kg bw/day. Oral intake of coumarin is related to consumption of cinnamon-containing foods and food supplements. Cinnamon is a widely used spice in Norway, and can be used as topping on oatmeal porridge. Based on analyses of coumarin in Norwegian foods, intake calculations for children and adults were conducted, and a risk assessment of coumarin in the Norwegian population was performed. Intake estimates of coumarin show that small children eating oatmeal porridge several times a week sprinkled with cinnamon could have a coumarin intake of 1.63 mg/kg bw/day and may exceeding the TDI with several folds. Adults drinking cinnamon-based tea and consuming cinnamon supplements also can exceed TDI. The coumarin intake could exceed the TDI by 7- to 20-fold in some intake scenarios. Such large daily exceedances of TDI, even for a limited time period of 1-2 weeks, cause concern of adverse health effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 75 FR 2897 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule... hereby given that on December 23, 2009, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') (f/k/a... consolidation process, see Information Notice, March 12, 2008 (Rulebook Consolidation Process). NASD Rule 2450...

  17. The regulatory and waste safety infrastructure of Bangladesh: Present status and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, O.A.

    2001-01-01

    Although nuclear energy and ionizing radiation exist as this planet earth exists, the history of human use of these energies is only a little over hundred years old. Nuclear and radiological practices are of immense benefit to society. But, like all other practices, nuclear and radiological practices also involve risks of a special type and nature. People and media are particularly sensitive to the use as well as to any accident or emergency involving the practices. Necessary laws and regulatory bodies have existed in many countries for a long time to control and keep the risks within acceptable limits. Nonetheless, accidents do occur and emergencies arise, which leads to the questioning of such regulatory systems' effectiveness. International interaction and co-operation are essential to addressing societal concerns appropriately. Bangladesh, though late, has also enacted laws and established a regulatory system to control the practices. This paper focuses on the country's regulatory status, hurdles being faced in implementing the legal requirements, and future thinking to increase effectiveness and efficiency. (author)

  18. Through the regulatory hoop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirner, N.P.

    1985-01-01

    There are many regulatory hoops through which waste generators, brokers, and disposal site operators must jump to dispose of waste safely. As the proposed exclusionary date of January 1, 1986, approaches, these regulatory hoops have the distinct possibility of multiplying or at least changing shape. The state of Washington, in its role as an Agreement State with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, licenses and inspects the commercial operator of the Northwest Compact's low-level radioactive waste disposal site on the Hanford Reservation. Washington has received as much as 53%, or 1.4 million cubic feet per year, of the nation's total volume of waste disposed. To control such a large volume of waste, a regulatory program involving six agencies has developed over the years in Washington

  19. Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide is intended to assist States in implementing the requirements established in Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1, Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, for a national regulatory infrastructure to regulate any practice involving radiation sources in medicine, industry, research, agriculture and education. The Safety Guide provides advice on the legislative basis for establishing regulatory bodies, including the effective independence of the regulatory body. It also provides guidance on implementing the functions and activities of regulatory bodies: the development of regulations and guides on radiation safety; implementation of a system for notification and authorization; carrying out regulatory inspections; taking necessary enforcement actions; and investigating accidents and circumstances potentially giving rise to accidents. The various aspects relating to the regulatory control of consumer products are explained, including justification, optimization of exposure, safety assessment and authorization. Guidance is also provided on the organization and staffing of regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Legal framework for a regulatory infrastructure; 3. Principal functions and activities of the regulatory body; 4. Regulatory control of the supply of consumer products; 5. Functions of the regulatory body shared with other governmental agencies; 6. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body; 7. Documentation of the functions and activities of the regulatory body; 8. Support services; 9. Quality management for the regulatory system.

  20. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  1. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  2. Regulatory risk assessments: Is there a need to reduce uncertainty and enhance robustness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodin, D J

    2015-12-01

    A critical evaluation of several recent regulatory risk assessments has been undertaken. These relate to propyl paraben (as a food additive, cosmetic ingredient or pharmaceutical excipient), cobalt (in terms of a safety-based limit for pharmaceuticals) and the cancer Threshold of Toxicological Concern as applied to food contaminants and pharmaceutical impurities. In all cases, a number of concerns can be raised regarding the reliability of the current assessments, some examples being absence of data audits, use of single-dose and/or non-good laboratory practice studies to determine safety metrics, use of a biased data set and questionable methodology and lack of consistency with precedents and regulatory guidance. Drawing on these findings, a set of recommendations is provided to reduce uncertainty and improve the quality and robustness of future regulatory risk assessments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. The effects of the Brazilian regulatory inspection programme on nuclear medicine facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, C E G R; Azevedo, E M; Mendes, L C G; Franca, W F L; Gutterres, R F; Goncalves, M [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear-CGMI/CNEN, Rua General Severiano 90, 22290-901, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); De Sa, L V; Da Rosa, L A R [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria-IRD/CNEN, Avenida Salvador Allende s/n, 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: telo@xexeu.org

    2009-12-01

    This paper aims to demonstrate the importance of the regulatory inspections carried out by the Brazilian regulatory body in the area of nuclear medicine. The main aspects observed during the inspections are presented as well as the time evolution of the non-compliances, according to their occurrence by type. We also evaluate factors concerning the working of the nuclear medicine facility responsible for solving the non-compliances. The results suggest a decrease of occurrence of non-compliances with time that can be related to the strictness of the inspections and the awareness of the personnel in the nuclear medicine facilities. An analysis of radiation dose exposure levels for the professionals involved in nuclear medicine was carried out; although dose values are below regulatory dose limits, their occurrence is not decreasing satisfactorily. Results indicate the need for staff training and commitment of the responsible nuclear medicine facility staff to the radiological protection procedures. Our results also emphasise the importance of continuous coercive actions to improve the level of radiological protection in nuclear medicine facilities in compliance with the standards established by the national regulatory authority and international recommendations.

  4. Nuclear regulatory decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, Patricia; Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    2011-01-01

    The scientific considerations upon which the nuclear regulations are based provide objective criteria for decisions on nuclear safety matters. However, the decisions that a regulatory agency takes go far beyond granting or not an operating license based on assessment of compliance. It may involve decisions about hiring experts or research, appeals, responses to other government agencies, international agreements, etc.. In all cases, top management of the regulatory agency should hear and decide the best balance between the benefits of regulatory action and undue risks and other associated impacts that may arise, including issues of credibility and reputation. The establishment of a decision framework based on well established principles and criteria ensures performance stability and consistency, preventing individual subjectivity. This article analyzes the challenges to the decision-making by regulatory agencies to ensure coherence and consistency in decisions, even in situations where there is uncertainty, lack of reliable information and even divergence of opinions among experts. The article explores the basic elements for a framework for regulatory decision-making. (author)

  5. Nuclear regulatory decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear utilities operate their plants at all times in an acceptably safe manner. In meeting this objective, the regulatory body should strive to ensure that its regulatory decisions are technically sound, consistent from case to case, and timely. In addition, the regulator must be aware that its decisions and the circumstances surrounding those decisions can affect how its stakeholders, such as government policy makers, the industry it regulates, and the public, view it as an effective and credible regulator. In order to maintain the confidence of those stakeholders, the regulator should make sure that its decisions are transparent, have a clear basis in law and regulations, and are seen by impartial observers to be fair to all parties. Based on the work of a Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) expert group, this report discusses some of the basic principles and criteria that a regulatory body should consider in making decisions and describes the elements of an integrated framework for regulatory decision making. (author)

  6. 32 CFR 644.448 - Limits on government obligation to restore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirement is subject to certain limitations. (a) Restoration not to exceed fee simple value. The cost of... therefrom, an appraisal will be made of the present value of the property in its unrestored condition and a separate appraisal will be made of the present value of the property, assuming restoration is accomplished...

  7. Virginia Power's regulatory reduction program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    Virginia Power has two nuclear plants, North Anna and Surry Power Stations, which have two units each for a total of four nuclear units. In 1992, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission solicited comments from the nuclear industry to obtain their ideas for reducing the regulatory burden on nuclear facilities. Pursuant to the new regulatory climate, Virginia Power developed an internal program to evaluate and assess the regulatory and self-imposed requirements to which they were committed, and to pursue regulatory relief or internal changes where possible and appropriate. The criteria were that public safety must be maintained, and savings must be significant. Up to the date of the conference, over US$22 million of one-time saving had been effected, and US$2.75 million in annual savings

  8. 75 FR 7526 - Withdrawal of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ...'s Electronic Reading Room at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections . Regulatory guides are... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0052] Withdrawal of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Withdrawal of Regulatory Guide 1.56, ``Maintenance of Water Purity in Boiling...

  9. Dose limits and licensing requirements for the limitation of the emission of radioactive materials from nuclear power stations in the FRG and the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwibach, J; Huber, O

    1975-08-01

    In licensing the operation of nuclear power plants in the FRG and USA, particular limitations of the release of radioactive materials in the air and water are layed down to correspond to the protective laws of radiation and environmental protection. The first limiting recommendations for the removal of radioactive waste waters were worked out in 1965 in the FRG and in 1968/69 for the removal of radioactive exhaust air of nuclear power plants. Based on this, in 1975 these relevant regulations were included in the draft of the new radiation protection specification. In 1971, these type of guidelines were put to discussion in the USA and were dismissed in 1975 in a licensing regulation of the NRC. These regulations or guidelines differ in their various dose limits. For example, the German dose limits of 30 mrem/a whole body dose for radioactive materials in the exhaust air of nuclear power plants and of 90 mrem/a for the thyroid dose through radioiodine via the exposure exhaust air-pasture-cow-milk-infant are often compared to the American dose limits of 5 mrem/a whole body dose and 15 mrem/a skin dose as well as 15 mrem/a thyroid dose. Such a numerical comparison is, howewer, wrong. The dose limits used in the FRG are, e.g., not to be exceeded. Furthermore, in the FRG, all contributions to be calculated on one site are to be considered. In the USA, the corresponding values are only valid for actual exposure paths due to the emission of a power reactor. They can be multiply exceeded. Thus the German licensing practise is clearly more restrictive.

  10. KWOC [Key-Word-Out-of-Context] Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, S.D.

    1990-04-01

    To meet the objectives of the program funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Nuclear Energy (NE) Technology Support Programs, the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) administers a Performance Assurance Information Program that collects, compiles, and distributes program-related information, reports, and publications for the benefit of the DOE-NE program participants. THE ''KWOC Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series'' is prepared as an aid in searching for specific topics in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Regulatory Guide Series

  11. Organization of nuclear regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blidaru, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    facilities; - Accident analyses; - Criticality calculations; - Licensing process for TRIGA research reactor; - Application of RESP code for CANDU type power reactors. The main tasks, objectives and methodologies applied by the Regulatory Authority are presented. The main nuclear facilities to which specific regulatory approaches are applied are: - Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1; - Cernavoda NPP Unit 2; - TRIGA Research reactor; - WWR-S research reactor (in conservation); - Specific installations related to the nuclear safety area of licensing, namely; - devices as C-2, C-5, C-6, by the TRIGA research reactor; - criticality aspects relating to transportation and storage of the fresh and spent fuels; - CANDU6 fuel plant; - dry storage facilities for spent fuel. The second half of the paper deals with specific aspects concerning the TRIGA research reactors. There are described the regulatory approaches and the licensing process, it is given a presentation of the configuration of the reactor, the operation of replacing the HEU fuel by LEU fuel, operation and applications of the reactor and finally specific aspects of the licensing process. These aspects concern the following issues: - reactivity accidents; - core interaction; - fuel temperature; prompt negative temperature coefficient. The regulatory approach for further licensing process deals with the following aspects: - nuclear safety documentation assessment for the reactor and each experimental device; - the operational licence to be issued for the whole nuclear unit; - technical nuclear safety documentation to be revised by the licensee and additional safety assessment to be performed for the reactor itself and also for the experimental devices in order to establish the concordance with the design changes (conversion to LEU from HEU fuel, 6 control rods in the reactor control system); - technical limits and conditions to be well established according to the tests conclusions or independent calculations and safety

  12. Professional and Regulatory Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Professional and Regulatory search are designed for people who use EPA web resources to do their job. You will be searching collections where information that is not relevant to Environmental and Regulatory professionals.

  13. What could have caused pre-industrial biomass burning emissions to exceed current rates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, van der G.R.; Peters, W.; Leeuwen, van T.T.; Giglio, L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies based on trace gas mixing ratios in ice cores and charcoal data indicate that biomass burning emissions over the past millennium exceeded contemporary emissions by up to a factor of 4 for certain time periods. This is surprising because various sources of biomass burning are linked

  14. What could have caused pre-industrial biomass burning emissions to exceed current rates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, G. R.; Peters, W.; van Leeuwen, T. T.; Giglio, L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies based on trace gas mixing ratios in ice cores and charcoal data indicate that biomass burning emissions over the past millennium exceeded contemporary emissions by up to a factor of 4 for certain time periods. This is surprising because various sources of biomass burning are linked

  15. Perceptions of regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halin, Magnus; Leinonen, Ruusaliisa

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Ruusaliisa Leinonen and Mr. Magnus Halin from Fortum gave a joint presentation on industry perceptions of regulatory oversight of LMfS/SC. It was concluded that an open culture of discussion exists between the regulator (STUK) and the licensee, based on the common goal of nuclear safety. An example was provided of on how regulatory interventions helped foster improvements to individual and collective dose rate trends, which had remained static. Regulatory interventions included discussions on the ALARA concept to reinforce the requirement to continuously strive for improvements in safety performance. Safety culture has also been built into regulatory inspections in recent years. Training days have also been organised by the regulatory body to help develop a shared understanding of safety culture between licensee and regulatory personnel. Fortum has also developed their own training for managers and supervisors. Training and ongoing discussion on LMfS/SC safety culture is considered particularly important because both Fortum and the regulatory body are experiencing an influx of new staff due to the demographic profile of their organisations. It was noted that further work is needed to reach a common understanding of safety culture on a practical level (e.g., for a mechanic setting to work), and in relation to the inspection criteria used by the regulator. The challenges associated with companies with a mix of energy types were also discussed. This can make it more difficult to understand responsibilities and decision making processes, including the role of the parent body organisation. It also makes communication more challenging due to increased complexity and a larger number of stakeholders

  16. Cumulative exposure to phthalates from phthalate-containing drug products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ennis, Zandra Nymand; Broe, Anne; Pottegård, Anton

    2018-01-01

    European regulatory limit of exposure ranging between 380-1710 mg/year throughout the study period. Lithium-products constituted the majority of dibutyl phthalate exposure. Diethyl phthalate exposure, mainly caused by erythromycin, theophylline and diclofenac products, did not exceed the EMA regulatory...... to quantify annual cumulated phthalate exposure from drug products among users of phthalate-containing oral medications in Denmark throughout the period of 2004-2016. METHODS: We conducted a Danish nationwide cohort study using The Danish National Prescription Registry and an internal database held...

  17. 77 FR 12098 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule... FINRA and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the..., and C below, of the most significant aspects of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's...

  18. Unified Ideal Stability Limits for Advanced Tokamak and Spherical Torus Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.E.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Jardin, S.C.; Maingi, R.; Manickam, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Peng, Y.-K.M.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.; Synakowski, E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability limits of shaped tokamak plasmas with high bootstrap fraction are systematically determined as a function of plasma aspect ratio. For plasmas with and without wall stabilization of external kink modes, the computed limits are well described by distinct and nearly invariant values of a normalized beta parameter utilizing the total magnetic field energy density inside the plasma. Stability limit data from the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment is compared to these theoretical limits and indicates that ideal nonrotating plasma no-wall beta limits have been exceeded in regimes with sufficiently high cylindrical safety factor. These results could impact the choice of aspect ratio in future fusion power plants

  19. 76 FR 45899 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Amex LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... underlying market. In addition such limits serve to reduce the possibility for disruption of the options..., routine oversight inspections of the Exchange's regulatory programs by the Commission have not uncovered...

  20. 76 FR 44969 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... squeezes of the underlying market. In addition such limits serve to reduce the possibility for disruption... trading activity. In addition, routine oversight inspections of the Exchange's regulatory programs by the...

  1. Requirements for US regulatory approval of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, D.A.; Haire, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is the first fusion machine that will have sufficient decay heat and activation product inventory to pose potential nuclear safety concerns. As a result, nuclear safety and environmental issues will be much more important in the approval process for the design, siting, construction, and operation of ITER in the United States than previous fusion devices, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The purpose of this report is (a) to provide an overview of the regulatory approval process for a Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility; (b) to present the dose limits used by DOE to protect workers, the public, and the environment from the risks of exposure to radiation and hazardous materials; (c) to discuss some key nuclear safety-related issues that must be addressed early in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA) to obtain regulatory approval; and (d) to provide general guidelines to the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) concerning the development of a regulatory framework for the ITER project

  2. The Energy Regulatory Commission (1). Law of the Comision Reguladora de Energia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Energy Regulatory Commission. Reforms to the Electric Energy Public Service Law (1992) and the Regulatory Law of Article 27 on Petroleum (1995) have brought about fundamental changes in the electric and natural gas industries. The legal reforms explicitly permit the private sector to construct, operate, and own, systems of electric generation and natural gas transportation, storage and distribution. The participation of the private sector in these areas required a redefinition in the government regulatory institutions. Accordingly the Federal Congress enacted the law of the Comision Reguladora de Energia (CRE) in 1995. The CRE law expands the scope of the CRE's authority and the breadth of its powers beyond those established when it was initially created in 1993. The CRE commenced operations in January 1994 as a decentralized technical and consultative body of the Energy Ministry. The decree that created the Commission limited the scope of its authority to an analysis and consultative role applicable only to the electric industry. (Author)

  3. 40 CFR 141.208 - Special notice for exceedance of the SMCL for fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exceed 2 mg/l because of this cosmetic dental problem. For more information, please call [name of water system contact] of [name of community water system] at [phone number]. Some home water treatment units... drinking water provided by your community water system [name] has a fluoride concentration of [insert value...

  4. 76 FR 9840 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    .... 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance... Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory..., and C below, of the most significant aspects of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's...

  5. Limitations in cooling electrons using normal-metal-superconductor tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekola, J P; Heikkilä, T T; Savin, A M; Flyktman, J T; Giazotto, F; Hekking, F W J

    2004-02-06

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally two limiting factors in cooling electrons using biased tunnel junctions to extract heat from a normal metal into a superconductor. First, when the injection rate of electrons exceeds the internal relaxation rate in the metal to be cooled, the electrons do not obey the Fermi-Dirac distribution, and the concept of temperature cannot be applied as such. Second, at low bath temperatures, states within the gap induce anomalous heating and yield a theoretical limit of the achievable minimum temperature.

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This compilation of statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 100th Congress, 2nd Session, has been prepared by the Office of the General Counsel, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, with the assistance of staff, for use as an internal resource document. Persons using this document are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in lieu of the primary legislative sources. Furthermore, while every effort has been made to ensure the completeness and accuracy of this material, neither the United States Government, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability for the accuracy or completeness of the material presented in this compilation

  7. Disposal and re-use of TENORM - legal limitations and obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, D.; Ettenhuber, E.

    2004-01-01

    While implementing EURATOM guideline 96/29 in the German legislation, in June of 2001 an essential pre-condition was created for re-use or disposal of TENORM. An essential progress has been achieved allowing to re-use TENORM or to dump it together with other residues and waste, if the specific activity does not exceed the limits defined in the radiation protection ordinance (StrlSchV). Otherwise, if the specified limits in terms of concentration or radiation dose are exceeded, than these materials must remain under radiological protection. A practical application of the new German regulation turns out to be difficult especially for disposal together with other waste and for re-use as backfilling material in mines taking into account problems arising from adaptation of the respective legislation on radiation protection, soil protection, waste management and shipment of dangerous goods. The report tackles obstacles for re-use and disposal of TENORM together with garbage and toxic waste arising from the new legislation. Otherwise, proposals will be given how obstacles of selected options for re-use and disposal can be overcome. (orig.)

  8. Risk-based Regulatory Evaluation Program methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuCharme, A.R.; Sanders, G.A.; Carlson, D.D.; Asselin, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this DOE-supported Regulatory Evaluation Progrwam are to analyze and evaluate the safety importance and economic significance of existing regulatory guidance in order to assist in the improvement of the regulatory process for current generation and future design reactors. A risk-based cost-benefit methodology was developed to evaluate the safety benefit and cost of specific regulations or Standard Review Plan sections. Risk-based methods can be used in lieu of or in combination with deterministic methods in developing regulatory requirements and reaching regulatory decisions

  9. Methodology for the Systematic Assessment of the Regulatory Competence Needs (SARCoN) for Regulatory Bodies of Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    A regulatory body’s competence is dependent, among other things, on the competence of its staff. A necessary, but not sufficient, condition for a regulatory body to be competent is that its staff can perform the tasks related to the functions of the regulatory body. In 2001, the IAEA published TECDOC 1254, Training the Staff of the Regulatory Body for Nuclear Facilities: A Competency Framework, which examines the manner in which the recognized regulatory functions of a nuclear regulatory body results in competence needs. Using the internationally recognized systematic approach to training, TECDOC 1254 provides a framework for regulatory bodies for managing training and developing, and maintaining the competence of its staff. It has been successfully used by many regulatory bodies all over the world, including States embarking on a nuclear power programme. The IAEA has also introduced a methodology and an assessment tool — Guidelines for Systematic Assessment of Regulatory Competence Needs (SARCoN) — which provides practical guidance on analysing the training and development needs of a regulatory body and, through a gap analysis, guidance on establishing competence needs and how to meet them. In 2013, the IAEA published Safety Reports Series No. 79, Managing Regulatory Body Competence, which provides generic guidance based on IAEA safety requirements in the development of a competence management system within a regulatory body’s integrated management system. An appendix in the Safety Report deals with the special case of building up the competence of regulatory bodies as part of the overall process of establishing an embarking State’s regulatory system. This publication provides guidance for the analysis of required and existing competences to identify those required by the regulatory body to perform its functions and therefore associated needs for acquiring competences. Hence, it is equally applicable to the needs of States embarking on nuclear power

  10. Total femur arthroplasty for revision hip failure in osteogenesis imperfecta: limits of biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sanz-Ruiz, PhD, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is a rare congenital disease characterized by alterations in bone quality, with susceptibility to fractures, instability, deformities, and osteoarthrosis. Prosthetic surgery in these patients is associated with an abnormally high rate of implant failures. On the other hand, abnormal bone fragility adds to the complexity of revision surgery in such individuals—thus representing a genuine challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon. We present a case of femoral reconstruction in a patient with OI and prosthetic loosening after reconstruction secondary to femoral septic pseudoarthrosis. Intramedullary total femoral reconstruction was carried out after exceeding the biological reconstruction limits. This is the first reported instance of the use of an intramedullary total femur arthroplasty as salvage technique in an OI patient. This technique should be considered when we have exceeded biological limits for femoral fixation.

  11. 76 FR 9838 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    .... 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance..., and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the... in sections A, B, and C below, of the most significant aspects of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory...

  12. First update to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulatory strategy for the high-level waste repository program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.; Linehan, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has updated its initial regulatory strategy for the High-Level Waste Repository Licensing Program. The update describes changes to the initial strategy and summarizes progress and future activities. This paper summarizes the first update of the regulatory strategy. In general the overall strategy of identifying and reducing uncertainties is unchanged. Identifying regulatory and institutional uncertainties is essentially complete, and therefore, the current and future emphasis is on reducing those regulatory and institutional uncertainties identified to date. The NRC staff has improved the methods of reducing regulatory uncertainties by (1) enhancing the technical basis preparation process for potential rulemakings and guidance and (2) designing a new guidance document, called a staff position, for clarifying regulatory uncertainties. For guiding the US DOE's reduction of technical uncertainties, the NRC staff will give more emphasis to prelicense application reviews and less emphasis on preparing staff technical positions

  13. National legislative and regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This section gathers the following national legislative and regulatory activities sorted by country: Bulgaria: General legislation; Czech Republic: General legislation; France: General legislation, Regulatory infrastructure and activity; Germany: General legislation; India: Liability and compensation, Organisation and structure; Ireland: Radiation protection, General legislation; Korea (Republic of): Organisation and structure; Lithuania: Regulatory infrastructure and activity, Radioactive waste management, Radiation protection, international cooperation, Nuclear safety; Poland: General legislation; Romania: Environmental protection; Russian Federation: Radioactive waste management; Slovenia: Nuclear safety; Spain: Liability and compensation, Nuclear security; Sweden: Nuclear safety; Turkey: Radiation protection, Regulatory infrastructure and activity, Nuclear safety, Liability and compensation; United States: General legislation

  14. Developing regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Lars Axelsson presented SSM progress on oversight of LMfS/SC since the Chester 1 Workshop in 2007. Current SSM approaches for safety culture oversight include targeted safety management and safety culture inspections, compliance inspections which cover aspects of safety management/safety culture and multi-disciplinary team inspections. Examples of themes for targeted inspections include management of ambiguous operational situations or other weak signals, understanding of and attitudes to Human Performance tools, the Safety Department's role and authority and Leadership for safety. All regulatory activities provide inputs for the SSM yearly safety evaluation of each licensee. A form has been developed to capture safety culture observations from inspections and other interactions with licensees. Analysis will be performed to identify patterns and provide information to support planning of specific Safety Culture activities. Training has been developed for regulatory staff to enhance the quality of regulatory interventions on safety culture. This includes a half-day seminar to provide an overview of safety culture, and a workshop which provides more in-depth discussion on cultural issues and how to capture those during regulatory activities. Future plans include guidance for inspectors, and informal seminars on safety culture with licensees

  15. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of generic issue C---8, main steam isolation valve leakage and LCS [leakage control system] failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, C.C.

    1990-06-01

    Generic Issue C-8 deals with staff concerns about public risk because of the incidence of leak test failures reported for main steam isolation valves (MSIVs) at boiling water reactors and the limitations of the leakage control systems (LCSs) for mitigating the consequences of leakage from these valves. If the MSIV leakage is greatly in excess of the allowable value in the technical specifications, the LCS would be unavailable because of design limitations. The issue was initiated in 1983 to assess (1) the causes of MSIV leakage failures, (2) the effectiveness of the LCS and alternative mitigation paths, and (3) the need for additional regulatory action to reduce public risk. This report presents the regulatory analysis for Generic Issue C-8 and concludes that no new regulatory requirements are warranted

  16. Limitation of Electrical Power in January

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During maintenance work on CERN's 400 kV main electrical supply in Prevessin, the laboratory will be connected to the 130 kV Suisse network in Meyrin from 4 to 22 January. Due to the on-going LHC activities during this period, the power demand will be very close to the technical limitations of this source. The effort of every one to reduce the consumption of electrical energy during this period is vital to avoid powercuts caused by exceeding the maximum capacity of the system. Mario Batz TS/CV Gerard Cumer TS/EL

  17. Limitation of Electrical Power in January

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    During maintenance work on CERN's 400 kV main electrical supply in Prevessin, the laboratory will be connected to the 130 kV Suisse network in Meyrin from 4 to 22 January. Due to the on-going LHC activities during this period, the power demand will be very close to the technical limitations of this source. The effort of every one to reduce the consumption of electrical energy during this period is vital to avoid powercuts caused by exceeding the maximum capacity of the system. Mario Batz TS/CV Gerard Cumer TS/EL

  18. Trust in regulatory regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Six, Frédérique; Verhoest, Koen

    2017-01-01

    Within political and administrative sciences generally, trust as a concept is contested, especially in the field of regulatory governance. This groundbreaking book is the first to systematically explore the role and dynamics of trust within regulatory regimes. Conceptualizing, mapping and analyzing

  19. Limitations of systemic accident analysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casandra Venera BALAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In terms of system theory, the description of complex accidents is not limited to the analysis of the sequence of events / individual conditions, but highlights nonlinear functional characteristics and frames human or technical performance in relation to normal functioning of the system, in safety conditions. Thus, the research of the system entities as a whole is no longer an abstraction of a concrete situation, but an exceeding of the theoretical limits set by analysis based on linear methods. Despite the issues outlined above, the hypothesis that there isn’t a complete method for accident analysis is supported by the nonlinearity of the considered function or restrictions, imposing a broad vision of the elements introduced in the analysis, so it can identify elements corresponding to nominal parameters or trigger factors.

  20. Automated Identification of Core Regulatory Genes in Human Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Narang

    Full Text Available Human gene regulatory networks (GRN can be difficult to interpret due to a tangle of edges interconnecting thousands of genes. We constructed a general human GRN from extensive transcription factor and microRNA target data obtained from public databases. In a subnetwork of this GRN that is active during estrogen stimulation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we benchmarked automated algorithms for identifying core regulatory genes (transcription factors and microRNAs. Among these algorithms, we identified K-core decomposition, pagerank and betweenness centrality algorithms as the most effective for discovering core regulatory genes in the network evaluated based on previously known roles of these genes in MCF-7 biology as well as in their ability to explain the up or down expression status of up to 70% of the remaining genes. Finally, we validated the use of K-core algorithm for organizing the GRN in an easier to interpret layered hierarchy where more influential regulatory genes percolate towards the inner layers. The integrated human gene and miRNA network and software used in this study are provided as supplementary materials (S1 Data accompanying this manuscript.

  1. 76 FR 8293 - Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ...] Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits February 8, 2011. AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory... for natural gas pipelines blanket construction certificates for each calendar year. DATES: Effective... of Subjects in 18 CFR Part 157 Administrative practice and procedure, Natural Gas, Reporting and...

  2. 75 FR 8245 - Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ...] Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits February 18, 2010. AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory... for natural gas pipelines blanket construction certificates for each calendar year. DATES: This final..., Natural gas, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Jeff C. Wright, Director, Office of Energy Projects...

  3. European regulation affecting nanomaterials – review of limitations and future recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    2012-01-01

    After learning about the potential risks associated with various specific nanomaterials, concerns have been raised about adequacy of existing regulation in Europe and what should be done to address any potential regulatory gaps related to nanomaterials. Understanding the limitations of the curren...

  4. The FDA “Deeming Rule” and Tobacco Regulatory Research

    OpenAIRE

    Backinger, Cathy L.; Meissner, Helen I.; Ashley, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In May 2016, the Food and Drug Administration extended its tobacco regulatory authorities to other products meeting the definition of a tobacco product (Deeming Rule). This authority now includes, but is not limited to, electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), such as electronic cigarettes, as well as all cigars, pipes, and hookahs (waterpipes). The FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products has been able to fund research projects addressing these newly deemed tobacco products through a variety of...

  5. Drinking Water Program 1992 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.D.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.

    1993-08-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., initiated a monitoring program for drinking water in 1988 for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. EG ampersand G Idaho structured this monitoring program to ensure that they exceeded the minimum regulatory requirements for monitoring drinking water. This program involves tracking the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters that are required for a open-quotes community water systemclose quotes (maximum requirements). This annual report describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at the 17 EG ampersand G Idaho operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters that were detected and the regulatory limits that were exceeded during 1992. In addition, ground water quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for EG ampersand G Idaho production wells

  6. Regulatory Acceptance of Alternative Methods in the Development and Approval of Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beken, Sonja; Kasper, Peter; van der Laan, Jan-Willem

    Animal studies may be carried out to support first administration of a new medicinal product to either humans or the target animal species, or before performing clinical trials in even larger populations, or before marketing authorisation, or to control quality during production. Ethical and animal welfare considerations require that animal use is limited as much as possible. Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes unambiguously fosters the application of the principle of the 3Rs when considering the choice of methods to be used.As such, today, the 3Rs are embedded in the relevant regulatory guidance both at the European (European Medicines Agency (EMA)) and (Veterinary) International Conference on Harmonization ((V)ICH) levels. With respect to non-clinical testing requirements for human medicinal products, reduction and replacement of animal testing has been achieved by the regulatory acceptance of new in vitro methods, either as pivotal, supportive or exploratory mechanistic studies. Whilst replacement of animal studies remains the ultimate goal, approaches aimed at reducing or refining animal studies have also been routinely implemented in regulatory guidelines, where applicable. The chapter provides an overview of the implementation of 3Rs in the drafting of non-clinical testing guidelines for human medicinal products at the level of the ICH. In addition, the revision of the ICH S2 guideline on genotoxicity testing and data interpretation for pharmaceuticals intended for human use is discussed as a case study.In October 2010, the EMA established a Joint ad hoc Expert Group (JEG 3Rs) with the mandate to improve and foster the application of 3Rs principles to the regulatory testing of medicinal products throughout their lifecycle. As such, a Guideline on regulatory acceptance of 3R testing approaches was drafted that defines regulatory acceptance and provides guidance on the scientific and technical criteria for regulatory

  7. Global regulatory framework for production and marketing of crops biofortified with vitamins and minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Luis A; Dary, Omar; Boukerdenna, Hala

    2017-02-01

    Biofortification of crops is being introduced in several countries as a strategy to reduce micronutrient deficiencies. Biofortified products, with increased contents of micronutrients, are currently produced by conventional plant breeding, genetic modification, or nutrient-enhanced fertilization. Corn, rice, wheat, beans, pearl millet, sweet potato, and cassava have been biofortified with increased contents of provitamin A carotenoids, iron, or zinc. However, regulatory considerations are rare or nonexistent. The objective of this paper is to review the regulatory framework for production and marketing of biofortified crops in countries that have adopted this strategy. The information was identified using Internet search engines and websites of health and nutrition organizations and nongovernmental organizations and by consulting scientists and government authorities. Thus far, biofortified products introduced in Latin America, Africa, and Asia have been produced only by conventional breeding. Cultivars using other techniques are still under testing. The production and marketing of these products have been conducted without regulatory framework and under limited government control or regulatory guidance. Nevertheless, some countries have integrated biofortified crops into their nutrition agendas. Although improvements by conventional breeding have not been subject to regulations, when biofortification becomes expanded by including other techniques, an appropriate regulatory framework will be necessary. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Regulatory Safety Requirements for Operating Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubela, W.

    2017-01-01

    The National Nuclear Regulator (NNR) is established in terms of the National Nuclear Regulator Act (Act No 47 of 1999) and its mandate and authority are conferred through sections 5 and 7 of this Act, setting out the NNR's objectives and functions, which include exercising regulatory control over siting, design, construction etc of nuclear installations through the granting of nuclear authorisations. The NNR's responsibilities embrace all those actions aimed at providing the public with confidence and assurance that the risks arising from the production of nuclear energy remain within acceptable safety limits -> Therefore: Set fundamental safety standards, conducting pro-active safety assessments, determining licence conditions and obtaining assurance of compliance. The promotional aspects of nuclear activities in South Africa are legislated by the Nuclear Energy Act (Act No 46 of 1999). The NNR approach to regulations of nuclear safety and security take into consideration, amongst others, the potential hazards associated with the facility or activity, safety related programmes, the importance of the authorisation holder's safety related processes as well as the need to exercise regulatory control over the technical aspects such as of the design and operation of a nuclear facility in ensuring nuclear safety and security. South Africa does not have national nuclear industry codes and standards. The NNR is therefore non-prescriptive as it comes to the use of industry codes and standards. Regulatory framework (current) provide for the protection of persons, property, and environment against nuclear damage, through Licensing Process: Safety standards; Safety assessment; Authorisation and conditions of authorisation; Public participation process; Compliance assurance; Enforcement

  9. Strengthening Regulatory Competence in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.

    2016-01-01

    Capacity building of Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority is considered an essential element in pursuit of its vision to become a world class regulatory body. Since its inception in 2001, PNRA has continuously endeavoured to invest in its people, develop training infrastructure and impart sound knowledge and professional skills with the aim to improve its regulatory effectiveness. The use of nuclear and radioactive material in Pakistan has increased manifold in recent years, thus induction of more manpower was needed for regulatory oversight. PNRA adopted two pronged approach for meeting the manpower demand (a) employment of university graduates through fast track recruitment drive and (b) induction of graduates by offering fellowships for Master degree programs. Although, the newly employed staff was selected on the basis of their excellent academic qualifications in basic and applied sciences, but they required rigorous knowledge and skills in regulatory perspectives. In order to implement a structured training program, PNRA conducted Training Needs Assessment (TNA) and identified competency gaps of the regulatory staff in legal, technical, regulatory practice and behavioural domains. PNRA took several initiatives for capacity building which included establishment of a training centre for sustainability of trainings, initiation of a fellowship scheme for Master program, attachment of staff at local institutes for on-the-job training and placement at foreign regulatory bodies and organizations for technical development with the assistance of IAEA. The above strategies have been very beneficial in competence building of the PNRA staff to perform all regulatory activities indigenously for nuclear power plants, research reactors and radiation facilities. Provision of vibrant technical support to IAEA and Member States in various programs by PNRA is a landmark of these competence development efforts. This paper summarizes PNRA initiatives and the International Atomic

  10. The Political Economy of Regulatory Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Strausz, Roland

    2009-01-01

    I investigate the argument that, in a two–party system with different regulatory objectives, political uncertainty generates regulatory risk. I show that this risk has a fluctuation effect that hurts both parties and an output–expansion effect that benefits one party. Consequently, at least one party dislikes regulatory risk. Moreover, both political parties gain from eliminating regulatory risk when political divergence is small or the winning probability of the regulatory–risk–averse party ...

  11. Air pollution by ozone in Europe in summer 2003 - Overview of exceedances of EC ozone threshold values during the summer season April-August 2003 and comparisons with previous years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiala, J.; Cernikovsky, L.; Leeuw, F. de; Kurfuerst, P.; Aalst, R. van (eds.)

    2003-07-01

    In the period 1995-2003 of reporting tinder the old ozone directive, there has been little or no change in the reported exceedances of ozone threshold values. This is not unexpected as reductions in the EU emissions of nitrogen oxides and nonmethane volatile organic compounds, the main ozone precursors, have so far been limited - about 30 % between 1990 and 2000. 2010 under the national emission teilings directive. While peak ozone concentrations seem to go down, ozone concentration statistics relevant to the target values set in the new ozone directive show little or no reduction in the period 1996-2000. Very few stations actually show a significant downward trend for these stabstics. The threshold for warning the population continues to be exceeded on a few occasions Bach year, while the threshold for informing the population is exceeded at riost stations in most countries (outside northern Europe and Ireland) each year, generally more so in warm summers. These exceedances are likely to retur in years with temperatures above the long-term average until there is a substantially larger decrease in precursor emissions. A further reduction of about 30 % is foreseen towards Under current legislation and with the rate of turnover of the vehicle fleet, furtber reductions will gradually occur towards 2010, and further reductions may be necessary to achieve the target values of the new ozone directive. Note that, due to the uncertainties caused by year-to-year meteorological variations and the changes in the monitoring station configuration, these conclusions are tentative. (au)

  12. POEM: Identifying joint additive effects on regulatory circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya eBotzman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL mapping tackles the problem of identifying variation in DNA sequence that have an effect on the transcriptional regulatory network. Major computational efforts are aimed at characterizing the joint effects of several eQTLs acting in concert to govern the expression of the same genes. Yet, progress towards a comprehensive prediction of such joint effects is limited. For example, existing eQTL methods commonly discover interacting loci affecting the expression levels of a module of co-regulated genes. Such ‘modularization’ approaches, however, are focused on epistatic relations and thus have limited utility for the case of additive (non-epistatic effects.Results: Here we present POEM (Pairwise effect On Expression Modules, a methodology for identifying pairwise eQTL effects on gene modules. POEM is specifically designed to achieve high performance in the case of additive joint effects. We applied POEM to transcription profiles measured in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells across a population of genotyped mice. Our study reveals widespread additive, trans-acting pairwise effects on gene modules, characterizes their organizational principles, and highlights high-order interconnections between modules within the immune signaling network. These analyses elucidate the central role of additive pairwise effect in regulatory circuits, and provide computational tools for future investigations into the interplay between eQTLs.Availability: The software described in this article is available at csgi.tau.ac.il/POEM/.

  13. Reduction of regulatory risk: a network economic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Several definitions of regulatory risk are known from the literature. From the perspective of regulatory reform it is important to differentiate between the impact of a given regulatory scheme on the firm's risk exposure and the risk arising from discretionary behavior of regulatory agencies. Whereas the conse-quences of effective regulation in principle are known and accepted, excessive regulatory discretion may cause a strong need for regulatory reform. Regulatory reform focussing on the re...

  14. 76 FR 43682 - Shetek Wind Inc. Jeffers South, LLC Allco Renewable Energy Limited v. Midwest Independent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL11-53-000] Shetek Wind Inc. Jeffers South, LLC Allco Renewable Energy Limited v. Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc...), Shetek Wind Inc., Jeffers South, LLC, and Allco Renewable Energy Limited (collectively Complainants...

  15. A National Regulatory Authority set up in a developing country: case of Mali

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kone, Nagantie

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Republic of Mali is member of the International Atomic Energy Agency since 1961. Of since the creation of the IAEA, some African countries are members. The technical cooperation with the Agency started in the years 1975. Through that cooperation, many pacific uses of nuclear techniques have been introduced, then developed at different levels in many socio- economic domains as medicine, agriculture, research, and so on. That development of nuclear techniques use has occurred without legislation at all or in some limited cases with part of the legislation of the colonizing country), in a precise field (like radiography in medicine). Later the need of regulatory infrastructure implementation started. That implementation has followed several ways in the different African countries. Also, it started earlier in countries which had advanced activities in nuclear techniques and very later in others. Most if not all of these infrastructure (say regulatory board) were created by the greatest users of the nuclear techniques, the Ministry of Health in most cases or Energy Commission for Countries having a research reactor. After the years 90, the Agency has developed new vision in the implementation of Regulatory Authorities. The new innovation was: 1-) Development of Regulatory Authority with independent statute (decisions and finance); 2-) Assuming post graduate training in developing countries to come other the lack of human resources. That new strategy of the IAEA has facilitated the apparition and development of several new regulatory authorities. We are going to develop here the progress done by one of these new regulatory authorities, through five years being. (author)

  16. Radioactive waste below regulatory concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuder, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published two notices in the Federal Register concerning radioactive waste below regulatory concern. The first, a Commission Policy Statement and Implementation Plan published August 29, 1986, concerns petition to exempt specific radioactive waste streams from the regulations. The second, an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking published Decemger 2, 1986, addresses the concept of generic rulemaking by the NRC on radioactive wastes that are below regulatory concern. Radioactive waste determined to be below regulatory concern would not be subject to regulatory control and would not need to go to a licensed low-level radioactive waste disposal site. The Policy Statement and Implementation Plan describe (1) the information a petitioner should file in support of a petition to exempt a specific waste stream, (2) the decision criteria the Commission intends to use for judging the petition, and (3) the internal administrative procedures to use be followed in order to permit the Commission to act upon the petition in an expedited manner

  17. 75 FR 22868 - Withdrawal of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ...'s public Web site under ``Regulatory Guides'' in the NRC's Electronic Reading Room at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections . Regulatory guides are also available for inspection at the NRC's... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0167] Withdrawal of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear...

  18. Resistive current limiter with high-temperature superconductors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, M.

    1995-12-01

    Fundamental results of the possibility of using high temperature superconductors (HTSC) in resistive fault current limiters are discussed. Measurement of the homogeneity of BSCCO-powder-in-tube materials were made. In addition, investigations of the transition from superconducting to normalconducting state under AC-current conditions were carried out. Based on these results, simulations of HTSC-materials on ceramic substrate were made and recent results are presented. Important results of the investigations are: 1. Current-limiting without external trigger only possible when the critical current density of HTSC exceeds 10 4 A/cm 2 . 2. Inhomogeneities sometimes cause problems with local destruction. This can be solved by parallel-elements or external trigger. 3. Fast current-limiting causes overvoltages which can be reduced by using parallel-elements. (orig.) [de

  19. Development of Thresholds and Exceedance Probabilities for Influent Water Quality to Meet Drinking Water Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K. L.; Samson, C.; Summers, R. S.; Balaji, R.

    2017-12-01

    Drinking water treatment utilities (DWTU) are tasked with the challenge of meeting disinfection and disinfection byproduct (DBP) regulations to provide safe, reliable drinking water under changing climate and land surface characteristics. DBPs form in drinking water when disinfectants, commonly chlorine, react with organic matter as measured by total organic carbon (TOC), and physical removal of pathogen microorganisms are achieved by filtration and monitored by turbidity removal. Turbidity and TOC in influent waters to DWTUs are expected to increase due to variable climate and more frequent fires and droughts. Traditional methods for forecasting turbidity and TOC require catchment specific data (i.e. streamflow) and have difficulties predicting them under non-stationary climate. A modelling framework was developed to assist DWTUs with assessing their risk for future compliance with disinfection and DBP regulations under changing climate. A local polynomial method was developed to predict surface water TOC using climate data collected from NOAA, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from the IRI Data Library, and historical TOC data from three DWTUs in diverse geographic locations. Characteristics from the DWTUs were used in the EPA Water Treatment Plant model to determine thresholds for influent TOC that resulted in DBP concentrations within compliance. Lastly, extreme value theory was used to predict probabilities of threshold exceedances under the current climate. Results from the utilities were used to produce a generalized TOC threshold approach that only requires water temperature and bromide concentration. The threshold exceedance model will be used to estimate probabilities of exceedances under projected climate scenarios. Initial results show that TOC can be forecasted using widely available data via statistical methods, where temperature, precipitation, Palmer Drought Severity Index, and NDVI with various lags were shown to be important

  20. National legislative and regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This section treats of the following National legislative and regulatory activities: 1 - France: General legislation, regulations and instruments; Nuclear trade (including non-proliferation); International co-operation; 2 - India: Licensing and regulatory infrastructure; Liability and compensation; 3 - Ireland: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (including nuclear emergency planning); Transport of radioactive material; Nuclear trade (including non-proliferation); 4 - Lithuania: Licensing and regulatory infrastructure; Nuclear safety and radiological protection (including nuclear emergency planning); Radioactive waste management; 5 - Luxembourg: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (including nuclear emergency planning); 6 - Slovak Republic: International co-operation; General legislation, regulations and instruments; 7 - Spain: Radioactive materials (including physical protection); Radioactive waste management; 8 - United States: Licensing and regulatory infrastructure

  1. 76 FR 24539 - Final Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... site under ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . Electronic copies... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0181] Final Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide...

  2. A global regulatory science agenda for vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmgren, Lindsay; Li, Xuguang; Wilson, Carolyn; Ball, Robert; Wang, Junzhi; Cichutek, Klaus; Pfleiderer, Michael; Kato, Atsushi; Cavaleri, Marco; Southern, James; Jivapaisarnpong, Teeranart; Minor, Philip; Griffiths, Elwyn; Sohn, Yeowon; Wood, David

    2013-04-18

    The Decade of Vaccines Collaboration and development of the Global Vaccine Action Plan provides a catalyst and unique opportunity for regulators worldwide to develop and propose a global regulatory science agenda for vaccines. Regulatory oversight is critical to allow access to vaccines that are safe, effective, and of assured quality. Methods used by regulators need to constantly evolve so that scientific and technological advances are applied to address challenges such as new products and technologies, and also to provide an increased understanding of benefits and risks of existing products. Regulatory science builds on high-quality basic research, and encompasses at least two broad categories. First, there is laboratory-based regulatory science. Illustrative examples include development of correlates of immunity; or correlates of safety; or of improved product characterization and potency assays. Included in such science would be tools to standardize assays used for regulatory purposes. Second, there is science to develop regulatory processes. Illustrative examples include adaptive clinical trial designs; or tools to analyze the benefit-risk decision-making process of regulators; or novel pharmacovigilance methodologies. Included in such science would be initiatives to standardize regulatory processes (e.g., definitions of terms for adverse events [AEs] following immunization). The aim of a global regulatory science agenda is to transform current national efforts, mainly by well-resourced regulatory agencies, into a coordinated action plan to support global immunization goals. This article provides examples of how regulatory science has, in the past, contributed to improved access to vaccines, and identifies gaps that could be addressed through a global regulatory science agenda. The article also identifies challenges to implementing a regulatory science agenda and proposes strategies and actions to fill these gaps. A global regulatory science agenda will enable

  3. 75 FR 42170 - Final Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... NRC's public Web site under ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0425] Final Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide...

  4. 75 FR 48381 - Final Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... NRC's public Web site under ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0274] Final Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of issuance and availability of Regulatory Guide...

  5. Regulatory function of a novel population of mouse autoantigen-specific Foxp3 regulatory T cells depends on IFN-gamma, NO, and contact with target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyndi Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Both naturally arising Foxp3(+ and antigen-induced Foxp3(- regulatory T cells (Treg play a critical role in regulating immune responses, as well as in preventing autoimmune diseases and graft rejection. It is known that antigen-specific Treg are more potent than polyclonal Treg in suppressing pathogenic immune responses that cause autoimmunity and inflammation. However, difficulty in identifying and isolating a sufficient number of antigen-specific Treg has limited their use in research to elucidate the mechanisms underlying their regulatory function and their potential role in therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a novel class II MHC tetramer, we have isolated a population of CD4(+ Foxp3(- T cells specific for the autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase p286-300 peptide (NR286 T cells from diabetes-resistant non-obese resistant (NOR mice. These Foxp3(- NR286 T cells functioned as Treg that were able to suppress target T cell proliferation in vitro and inhibit type 1 diabetes in animals. Unexpected results from mechanistic studies in vitro showed that their regulatory function was dependent on not only IFN-gamma and nitric oxide, but also on cell contact with target cells. In addition, separating NR286 Treg from target T cells in transwell assays abolished both production of NO and suppression of target T cells, regardless of whether IFN-gamma was produced in cell cultures. Therefore, production of NO, not IFN-gamma, was cell contact dependent, suggesting that NO may function downstream of IFN-gamma in mediating regulatory function of NR286 Treg. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies identified a unique population of autoantigen-specific Foxp3(- Treg that can exert their regulatory function dependent on not only IFN-gamma and NO but also cell contact with target cells.

  6. Regulatory and licensee surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Prior to the workshop two CSNI/WGHOF surveys were distributed. One survey was directed at regulatory bodies and the other was directed at plant licensees. The surveys were: 1 - Regulatory Expectations of Licensees' Arrangements to Ensure Suitable Organisational Structure, Resources and Competencies to Manage Safety (sent to WGHOF regulatory members). The survey requested that the respondents provide a brief overview of the situation related to plant organisations in their country, their regulatory expectations and their formal requirements. The survey addressed three subjects: the demonstration and documentation of organisational structures, resources and competencies, organisational changes, issues for improvement (for both current and new plants). Responses were received from eleven regulatory bodies. 2 - Approaches to Justify Organisational Suitability (sent to selected licensees). The purpose of the survey to was to gain an understanding of how licensees ensure organisational suitability, resources and competencies. This information was used to assist in the development of the issues and subjects that were addressed at the group discussion sessions. Responses were received from over fifteen licensees from nine countries. The survey requested that the licensees provide information on how they ensure effective organisational structures at their plants. The survey grouped the questions into the following four categories: organisational safety functions, resource and competence, decision-making and communication, good examples and improvement needs. The findings from these surveys were used in conjunction with other factors to identify the key issues for the workshop discussion sessions. The responses from these two surveys are discussed briefly in Sections 4 and 5 of this report. More extensive reviews of the regulatory and licensee responses are provided in Appendix 1

  7. 12 CFR 914.1 - Regulatory Report defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Bank. (b) Examples. Regulatory Report includes: (1) Call reports and reports of instrument-level risk... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulatory Report defined. 914.1 Section 914.1... DATA AVAILABILITY AND REPORTING § 914.1 Regulatory Report defined. (a) Definition. Regulatory Report...

  8. Silicon-Vacancy Spin Qubit in Diamond: A Quantum Memory Exceeding 10 ms with Single-Shot State Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukachev, D. D.; Sipahigil, A.; Nguyen, C. T.; Bhaskar, M. K.; Evans, R. E.; Jelezko, F.; Lukin, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    The negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV- ) color center in diamond has recently emerged as a promising system for quantum photonics. Its symmetry-protected optical transitions enable the creation of indistinguishable emitter arrays and deterministic coupling to nanophotonic devices. Despite this, the longest coherence time associated with its electronic spin achieved to date (˜250 ns ) has been limited by coupling to acoustic phonons. We demonstrate coherent control and suppression of phonon-induced dephasing of the SiV- electronic spin coherence by 5 orders of magnitude by operating at temperatures below 500 mK. By aligning the magnetic field along the SiV- symmetry axis, we demonstrate spin-conserving optical transitions and single-shot readout of the SiV- spin with 89% fidelity. Coherent control of the SiV- spin with microwave fields is used to demonstrate a spin coherence time T2 of 13 ms and a spin relaxation time T1 exceeding 1 s at 100 mK. These results establish the SiV- as a promising solid-state candidate for the realization of quantum networks.

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the Commission. This is the first of an annual publication for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. The Digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide

  10. 75 FR 57762 - MATEP Limited Partnership; MATEP LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ...-000] MATEP Limited Partnership; MATEP LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing... the above-referenced proceeding of MATEP Limited Partnership and MATEP LLC's application for market... liability. Any person desiring to intervene or to protest should file with the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  11. Informal public transport driver behaviour and regulatory policy linkage: An expose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smart Dumba

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Literature on the negative socio-economic and environmental externalities generated by informal public transport (IPT in developing countries is vast, vibrant and growing fast. These externalities include but are not limited to noise, air and land pollution, accidents and, more importantly, a source of congestion (human and vehicular because of poor driver behaviour. In this article, the research does not seek to reinstate these, but rather, it argues that poor driver behaviour is a dependent variable to some regulatory policy stimuli. Yet, an extensive literature survey has shown that the driver behaviour and urban transport regulation linkage remain little explored. Objective: The purpose of this article was to unpack the relationship between informal public transport driver behaviour and the prevailing regulatory framework. Method: Based on a case study of Harare, Zimbabwe, the researcher adopted a mixed-methods paradigm and interrogated the prevailing urban public transport regulatory regimes and applied professional judgement, oral interviews backed by some quantitative data and relate these to obtaining IPT driver behavioural characteristics. Results: Poor driver behaviour exhibited by IPT were generated, exacerbated and or eased by the prevailing regulatory policy. This is well depicted through an IPT driver behaviour and regulation loop reinforcing diagram. Conclusion: Following this argument, the article cautions policy makers and urban managers alike that direct approaches and interventions when trying to regulate IPT poor driver behaviour and its secondary negative effects will be futile as long as the regulatory policy remains the same. Failure to recognise and connect the dots between IPT driver behaviour and policy partly explains why globally, the IPT sector has proved difficult in prohibiting, restructuring or even formalising it.

  12. Characterizing costs and benefits of uncertain future regulatory requirements on the U.S. natural gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godec, M.L.; Smith, G.E.; Fitzgibbon, T.

    1995-01-01

    Environmental regulatory requirements at both the state and federal level are constantly changing, making it difficult for industry and R ampersand D program managers to project future compliance requirements and costs. Even if a company is trying to keep abreast of various proposed regulatory initiatives, the number of possible combinations of initiatives that could occur in the future seems virtually limitless. Uncertainty associated with potential future environmental compliance requirements makes the identification and evaluation of future investment and R ampersand D opportunities exceedingly difficult, and makes the process of systematic strategic planning increasingly complex. This paper describes a methodology for accounting for uncertain future environmental compliance costs in a systematic, comprehensive manner. Through analysis of proposed initiatives for making future environmental requirements more stringent, forecasting the likelihood of occurrence and potential timing of each initiative, and estimating potential future compliance costs associated with each initiative, a thorough process for incorporating regulatory uncertainty into strategic planning and project evaluation is described. This approach can be used for evaluating R ampersand D opportunities to determine where development of new technologies or assessment of risks posed by industry operations may have the greatest impact on future industry costs of compliance. This approach could also be used to account for the uncertainty of future environmental costs in corporate strategic planning or for factoring future compliance costs into project evaluation. This approach could also be enhanced through use in conjunction with other modeling and forecasting systems that could consider a broad range of impacts, including impacts on gas production, industry activity levels, and tax revenues

  13. Autotrophic stoichiometry emerging from optimality and variable co-limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai W Wirtz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic organisms reveal an astounding flexibility in their elemental stoichiometry, with potentially major implications on biogeochemical cycles and ecological functioning. Notwithstanding, stoichiometric regulation and co-limitation by multiple resources in autotrophs revt were in the past often described by heuristic formulations.In this study, we present a mechanistic model of autotroph growth, which features two major improvements over the existing schemes. First, we introduce the concept of metabolic network independence that defines the degree of phase-locking between accessory machines. Network independence is in particular suggested to be proportional to protein synthesis capability as quantified by variable intracellular N:C. Consequently, the degree of co-limitation becomes variable, contrasting with the dichotomous debate on the use of Liebig's law or the product rule, standing for constantly low and high co-limitation, respectively. Second, we resolve dynamic protein partitioning to light harvesting, carboxylation processes, and to an arbitrary number of nutrient acquisition machineries, as well as instantaneous activity regulation of nutrient uptake. For all regulatory processes we assume growth rate optimality, here extended by an explicit consideration of indirect feed-back effects.The combination of network independence and optimal regulation displays unprecedented skill in reproducing rich stoichiometric patterns collected from a large number of published chemostat experiments. This high skill indicates (1 that the current paradigm of fixed co-limitation is a critical short-coming of conventional models, and (2 that stoichiometric flexibility in autotrophs possibly reflects an optimality strategy. Numerical experiments furthermore show that regulatory mechanisms homogenize the effect of multiple stressors. Extended optimality alleviates the effect of the most limiting resource(s while down-regulating machineries for the

  14. Subcritical limits for special fissile actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, H.K.

    1980-01-01

    Critical masses and subcritical mass limits in oxide-water mixtures were calculated for actinide nuclides other than 233 U, 235 U, and 239 Pu that have an odd number of neutrons in the nucleus: S/sub n/ transport theory was used together with cross sections, drawn from the GLASS multigroup library, developed to provide accurate forecasts of actinide production at Savannah River. The subcritical limits are 201 g for 241 Pu, 13 g for 242 /sup m/Am, 90 g for 243 Cm, 30 g for 245 Cm, 900 g for 247 Cm, 10 g for 249 Cf, and 5 g for 251 Cf. Association of 241 Pu with an equal mass of 240 Pu increases the 241 Pu limit to a value greater than that for pure 239 Pu. Association of 242 /sup m/Am with 241 Am increases the limit for the mixture to that for dry, theoretical density AmO 2 at isotopic concentrations of 242 /sup m/Am less than approx. 6%. Association of 245 Cm with 244 Cm increases the limit according to the formula 30 + 0.3 244 Cm/ 245 Cm up to the limit for dry CmO 2 . A limiting mass of 8.15 kg for plutonium containing at least 67% 238 Pu as oxide was calculated that applies (provided 240 Pu exceeds 241 Pu) with no limit on moderation. 1 figure, 5 tables

  15. Risk Assessment Review Group report to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, H.W.; Budnitz, R.J.; Kouts, H.J.C.; Loewenstein, W.B.; Rowe, W.D.; von Hippel, F.; Zachariasen, F.

    1978-09-01

    The Risk Assessment Review Group was organized by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 1, 1977, with four elements to its charter: clarify the achievements and limitations of WASH-1400, the ''Rasmussen Report''; assess the peer comments thereon, and responses to those comments; study the present state of such risk assessment methodology; and recommend to the Commission how (and whether) such methodology can be used in the regulatory and licensing process. Areas of study include: risk assessment methodologies; statistical issues; completeness; the data base; and the WASH-1400 assessment of the damage to human health from radiation after a postulated accident. Specific items discussed include: Browns Ferry; common cause failure; human factors; format and scrutability; the peer review process; earthquakes; risk perception; allegations by UCS concerning WASH-1400 treatment of quality assurance and quality control; current role of probabilistic methods in the regulatory process; acts of violence; ATWS; influence of design defects in quality assurance failures; and calculation of population doses from given releases of radionuclides

  16. Regulatory pathways for vaccines for developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstien, Julie; Belgharbi, Lahouari

    2004-01-01

    Vaccines that are designed for use only in developing countries face regulatory hurdles that may restrict their use. There are two primary reasons for this: most regulatory authorities are set up to address regulation of products for use only within their jurisdictions and regulatory authorities in developing countries traditionally have been considered weak. Some options for regulatory pathways for such products have been identified: licensing in the country of manufacture, file review by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency on behalf of WHO, export to a country with a competent national regulatory authority (NRA) that could handle all regulatory functions for the developing country market, shared manufacturing and licensing in a developing country with competent manufacturing and regulatory capacity, and use of a contracted independent entity for global regulatory approval. These options have been evaluated on the basis of five criteria: assurance of all regulatory functions for the life of the product, appropriateness of epidemiological assessment, applicability to products no longer used in the domestic market of the manufacturing country, reduction of regulatory risk for the manufacturer, and existing rules and regulations for implementation. No one option satisfies all criteria. For all options, national infrastructures (including the underlying regulatory legislative framework, particularly to formulate and implement local evidence-based vaccine policy) must be developed. WHO has led work to develop this capacity with some success. The paper outlines additional areas of action required by the international community to assure development and use of vaccines needed for the developing world. PMID:15042235

  17. 78 FR 51758 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; NYSE MKT LLC; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... limitation and voting limitation, such person must deliver notice of such person's intention to own or vote... books and records of any of the U.S. Regulated Subsidiaries; and (2) the self-regulatory function of the... information) contained in the books and records of the European Market Subsidiaries, and not use such...

  18. The development of AECB regulatory documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, M.

    1981-01-01

    This document describes the Atomic Energy Control Board's (AECB) approach to the development and preparation of regulatory documents. The principal factors that have shaped the AECB'a regulatory approach are identified as background to the evolution of regulatory documents as are a number of current influences that affect the present and future development of these documents. Also described are the process by which regulatory documents are prepared and published and the points of contact between this process and the Canadian Standards Association program for nuclear standards. (author)

  19. Application of fault current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, A.

    2007-11-30

    This report presents the results of a study commissioned by the Department for Business, Enterprise and Industry (BERR; formerly the Department of Trade and Industry) into the application of fault current limiters in the UK. The study reviewed the current state of fault current limiter (FCL) technology and regulatory position in relation to all types of current limiters. It identified significant research and development work with respect to medium voltage FCLs and a move to high voltage. Appropriate FCL technologies being developed include: solid state breakers; superconducting FCLs (including superconducting transformers); magnetic FCLs; and active network controllers. Commercialisation of these products depends on successful field tests and experience, plus material development in the case of high temperature superconducting FCL technologies. The report describes FCL techniques, the current state of FCL technologies, practical applications and future outlook for FCL technologies, distribution fault level analysis and an outline methodology for assessing the materiality of the fault level problem. A roadmap is presented that provides an 'action agenda' to advance the fault level issues associated with low carbon networks.

  20. Status report on NRC's current below regulatory concern activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragonette, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of below regulatory concern (BRC) is not new to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or its predecessor agency, the Atomic Energy Commission. The regulations and licensing decisions have involved limited and de facto decisions on BRC since the beginning. For example, consumer products containing radioactive materials have been approved for distribution to persons exempt from licensing for some time and procedures for survey and release of equipment have traditionally been a part of many licensees' radiation safety programs. However, these actions have generally been ad hoc decisions in response to specific needs and have not been necessarily consistent. The need to deal with this regulatory matter has been receiving attention from both Congress and the NRC Commissioners. NRC response has grown from addressing specific waste streams, to generic rulemaking for wastes, and finally to efforts to develop a broad generic BRC policy. Section 10 of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 addressed NRC actions on specific waste streams. In response, NRC issued guidance on rulemaking petitions for specific wastes. NRC also issued an advance notice of proposed rulemaking indicating consideration of Commission initiated regulations to address BRC wastes in a generic manner. The Commissioners have directed staff to develop an umbrella policy for all agency decisions concerning levels of risk or dose that do not require government regulation

  1. Secondary limits of exposure in facilities handling uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavayya, M.

    1999-08-01

    Annual limits of exposure and intake for radiation workers in nuclear installations have been recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the same have been adopted by the Indian Atomic Energy Regulatory Board for all the radionuclides of interest. The prescribed limits cannot be directly used for day to day radiation protection work. Hence secondary limits have to be derived for routine applications. The modeling steps may be simple in some situations and more complicated in some others. The limits recommended are for individual radionuclides. But in facilities handling natural or enriched uranium the radionuclides (isotopes of uranium and its decay products) generally occur together in specific ratios. Derivation of secondary limits has to take this into consideration. The present document is an attempt at deriving the secondary limits required for routine application in facilities handling uranium (Mine, mill, refineries and fuel fabrication etc.). Secondary limits of exposure have been derived in this document for air borne activity, activity in water, surface contamination and internal exposures. (author)

  2. Regulatory inspection of BARC facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajdeep; Jayarajan, K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear and radiation facilities are sited, constructed, commissioned, operated and decommissioned, in conformity with the current safety standards and codes. Regulatory bodies follow different means to ensure compliance of the standards for the safety of the personnel, the public and the environment. Regulatory Inspection (RI) is one of the important measures employed by regulatory bodies to obtain the safety status of a facility or project and to verify the fulfilment of the conditions stipulated in the consent

  3. Environment, safety, and health regulatory implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    To identify, document, and maintain the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project's environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) regulatory requirements, the US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office tasked the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to develop a regulatory operating envelope for the UMTRA Project. The system selected for managing the UMTRA regulatory operating envelope data bass is based on the Integrated Project Control/Regulatory Compliance System (IPC/RCS) developed by WASTREN, Inc. (WASTREN, 1993). The IPC/RCS is a tool used for identifying regulatory and institutional requirements and indexing them to hardware, personnel, and program systems on a project. The IPC/RCS will be customized for the UMTRA Project surface remedial action and groundwater restoration programs. The purpose of this plan is to establish the process for implementing and maintaining the UMTRA Project's regulatory operating envelope, which involves identifying all applicable regulatory and institutional requirements and determining compliance status. The plan describes how the Project will identify ES ampersand H regulatory requirements, analyze applicability to the UMTRA Project, and evaluate UMTRA Project compliance status

  4. 40 CFR 92.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 92.6 Section 92... Regulations for Locomotives and Locomotive Engines § 92.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides an overview of the regulatory structure of this part. (a) The regulations of this part 92 are intended to...

  5. 40 CFR 94.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 94.6 Section 94... for Compression-Ignition Marine Engines § 94.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides an overview of the regulatory structure of this part. (a) The regulations of this Part 94 are intended to control...

  6. Evaluation of Urban air quality models for regulatory use: Refinement of an approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downton, M.W.; Dennis, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Statistical measures for evaluating the performance of urban air quality models have recently been strongly recommended by several investigators. Problems that were encountered in the use of recommended performance measures in an evaluation of three versions of an urban photochemical model are described. The example demonstrates the importance of designing an evaluation to take into account the way in which the model will be used in regulatory practice, and then choosing performance measures on the basis of that design. The evaluation illustrates some limitations and possible pitfalls in the use and interpretation of statistical measures of model performance. Drawing on this experience, a procedure for evaluation of air quality models for regulatory use is suggested

  7. Probabilistic risk analysis and its role in regulatory activity in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arredondo-Sanchez, C.

    1985-01-01

    The author discusses the criterion adopted for regulatory activity in a developing country with a nuclear power plant. He describes the problems that have to be overcome as a result of changes in the regulations during construction of the plant. There is discussion of the action taken by the regulatory body when introducing the method of probabilistic risk analysis. The part played by this form of analysis in quantifying the safety objectives proposed in the USA together with its limitations and the problems involved in this methodology are examined. Lastly, the author gives an opinion on the use that probabilistic risk analysis should be put to in developing countries such as Mexico. (author)

  8. Photonic limiters with enhanced dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononchuk, Rodion; Limberopoulos, Nicholaos; Anisimov, Igor; Vitebskiy, Ilya; Chabanov, Andrey

    2018-02-01

    Optical limiters transmit low intensity input light while blocking input light with the intensity exceeding certain limiting threshold. Conventional passive limiters utilize nonlinear optical materials, which are transparent at low light intensity and turn absorptive at high intensity. Strong nonlinear absorption, though, can result in over- heating and destruction of the limiter. Another problem is that the limiting threshold provided by the available optical material with nonlinear absorption is too high for many applications. To address the above problems, the nonlinear material can be incorporated in a photonic structure with engineered dispersion. At low intensity, the photonic structure can display resonant transmission via localized mode(s), while at high intensity the resonant transmission can disappear, and the entire stack can become highly re ective (not absorptive) within a broad frequency range. In the proposed design, the transition from the resonant transmission at low intensity to nearly total re ectivity at high intensity does not rely on nonlinear absorption; instead, it requires only a modest change in the refractive index of the nonlinear material. The latter implies a dramatic increase in the dynamic range of the limiter. The main idea is to eliminate the high-intensity resonant transmission by decoupling the localized (resonant) modes from the input light, rather than suppressing those modes using nonlinear absorption. Similar approach can be used for light modulation and switching.

  9. Self-Regulatory Strategies in Daily Life: Selection, Optimization, and Compensation and Everyday Memory Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Stephanie A.; Rickenbach, Elizabeth H.; Lachman, Margie E.

    2016-01-01

    The effective use of self-regulatory strategies, such as selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) requires resources. However, it is theorized that SOC use is most advantageous for those experiencing losses and diminishing resources. The present study explored this seeming paradox within the context of limitations or constraints due to…

  10. ENSI’s regulatory framework strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    This short brochure issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI defines the organisation’s regulatory framework strategy. Six guiding principles are declared and discussed: Comprehensive harmonisation with relevant international requirements, basing the regulatory framework on existing, tried-and-tested regulations, issuing of its own guidelines only when it is necessary to do so, guidelines to be drawn up transparently and with the involvement of all stakeholders and basing the level of detail of its regulatory framework on hazard potential and risk

  11. Rate setting and regulatory control of the radionuclides content in foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shandala, N. K.; Savskin, M. N.; Petukhova, E. V.; Novikova, N. Y.; Titov, A. V.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of rate setting, standardisation and regulatory control of the radionuclides content in foodstuffs consists in the following: ? the normative standards concern to 90Sr and 137Cs as biologically significant radionuclides; ? the internal exposure dose from ingestion intake of radionuclides with food should not exceed meaning of 1 mSv a-1 which is the intervention exception level concerning trading foodstuffs; ? for few consumed foodstuffs (wild berries, mushrooms, teas) is established, that the dose caused by their consumption is outside of dose limits of 1 mSv a-1 and it should not exceed 1 % for each product; ? the nutrition structure of population including seven basic components of a diet (bread and grain products, dairy products, potatoes, vegetables, meat, fish, fruit and berries) is taken into account as a source of ingestion intake of the radionuclides; ? The conformity to the established standard is determined on a parameter ?f the summary contents of 90Sr and 137Cs in foodstuff. With the purpose of the operative control of an internal exposure of population the permissible levels of specific activity of 90Sr and 137Cs in more than 120 kinds of foodstuff were developed. These standards are obligatory in Russia for domestic and imported foodstuffs. So, permissible levels of specific activity of 90Sr and 137Cs in bread make, accordingly, 20 and 40 Bq kg-1; in milk - 25 and 100 Bq kg-1; in meat - 50 and 160 Bq kg-1; in potatoes and vegetables - 40 and 120 Bq kg-1. Monitoring of contamination of foodstuffs by 137Cs and 90Sr is one of the basic measures on maintenance of radiation safety of population in Russia. State system of sanitary-epidemiological control carries out constant supervision over the content of the radionuclides in food production. By the carried out researches was shown that true levels of the contents of 90Sr or 137Cs in the main foodstuffs in territory of Russia, except for the territories, injures of the radiation accidents, make

  12. Should title lengths really adhere to the American Psychological Association's twelve word limit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Robert M; Dillner, Kari M

    2016-04-01

    The publication manual for the American Psychological Association (APA) suggests that title lengths do not exceed 12 words, yet journals do not prevent longer titles. Here, we examined title lengths in APA journals to see how many exceeded the APA's suggested limit. First, we conducted a systematic analysis of 235 articles in the current issues of 23 APA journals. A total of 52% of titles were more than 12 words long. Second, we examined articles from APA journals that were at least 50 years old to examine whether title lengths have changed over time. Our results suggested that the average title lengths have indeed increased with time. One of 2 courses should be taken. Perhaps science is becoming more complex that longer titles are needed in order to convey the primary message to the reader. If this is the case, then the APA's word limit should be increased. On the other hand, however, maybe editor and reviewers should try to enforce the current word limit to force writers to be succinct. Either way, editors should make their preferences clear so that the trend for longer titles does not continue unchecked. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Low-temperature operating regime of the tokamak evacuating limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokar', M.Z.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions for realizing the regime of strong recycling of a cold dense plasma of an evacuating limiter were determined based on a previously proposed model for describing the limiter layer of a tokamak. The scaling for the dependence of the gas pressure in the evacuation system on the average plasma density in the limiter layer was found, and agreed quantitatively with the results of measurements on the Alcator and ISX-B tokamaks. For the tokamak reactor of the INTOR scale the calculations show that the low-temperature operating regime of the evacuating limiter can be realized with a quite low pumping rate. It has the advantages of reduced erosion of the limiter and small fluxes of impurities into the working volume of the reactor. In addition, the relative concentration of the helium ash in the limiter layer does not exceed 2-3%, but the density of the main plasma is comparable to the proposed average density in the reactor. The concept of a stochastic limiter is of interest for lowering the plasma density in the limiter layer and lowering the thermal loads on the limiter

  14. 75 FR 80556 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate... Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on December 13, 2010, Financial Industry... application by their terms. For more information about the rulebook consolidation process, see Information...

  15. 75 FR 43588 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving a Proposed Rule... FINRA Rule 4320 in the Consolidated FINRA Rulebook July 20, 2010. On May 21, 2010, the Financial... application by their terms. For more information about the rulebook consolidation process, see Information...

  16. Maintenance cost savings - snubber elimination with limit stops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monette, P.; Baltus, R.; Cloud, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    ''Active'' snubbers can be replaced with ''passive'' Limit Stops using two separate strategies. One is a straightforward piping re-analysis to optimize the number of dynamics supports and replace remaining snubbers with Limit Stops. A second approach is to take implicit advantage of the margins afforded by the ASME Code Case N-411 damping ratios and simply replace snubbers one-for-one with no re-analysis. Both methods result in major maintenance cost savings and both have been received favorably by the USNRC (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission). Approaches to maintenance cost reduction using these strategies are discussed in this paper. (Author). 11 refs., 4 figs

  17. 75 FR 79049 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... site under ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . The regulatory... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0427] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 3.12...

  18. 75 FR 45173 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . In addition, regulatory guides are... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0638] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 1.151...

  19. 76 FR 18262 - Notice of issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... site under ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . The regulatory... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0277] Notice of issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 1.44...

  20. 76 FR 14107 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... site under ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . The regulatory... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0276] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 1.43...

  1. 76 FR 14108 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... site under ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . The regulatory... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0275] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 1.50...

  2. Notifiable events in systems for fission of nuclear fuels - nuclear power plants and research reactors with maximum output exceeding 50 kW of thermal normal rating - in the Federal Republic of Germany. Quarterly report, 2nd quarter of 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    There were 32 notifiable events in nuclear power plants in Germany in the second quarter of 1996. The report lists and characterises all the 32 events notified in the reporting period. The events did not involve any radioactivity release exceeding the maximum permissible limits during this period, so that there were no radiation hazards to the population or the environment. One event was classified at level 1 of the INES event scale (Anomaly). Research reactor operators in Germany reported 5 notifiable events in the reporting period. The report lists and characterises these events. These events did not involve any radioactivity release exceeding the maximum permissible limits during this period, so that there were no radiation hazards to the population or the environment. All events notified were classified into the lowest categories of safety significance of the official event scales (N, or below scale). (orig./DG) [de

  3. Delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2011-11-01

    Genetic regulatory networks can be described by nonlinear differential equations with time delays. In this paper, we study both locally and globally delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks, taking messenger ribonucleic acid alternative splicing into consideration. Based on nonnegative matrix theory, we first develop necessary and sufficient conditions for locally delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks with multiple time delays. Compared to the previous results, these conditions are easy to verify. Then we develop sufficient conditions for global delay-independent stability for genetic regulatory networks. Compared to the previous results, this sufficient condition is less conservative. To illustrate theorems developed in this paper, we analyze delay-independent stability of two genetic regulatory networks: a real-life repressilatory network with three genes and three proteins, and a synthetic gene regulatory network with five genes and seven proteins. The simulation results show that the theorems developed in this paper can effectively determine the delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks.

  4. Synthetic tetracycline-inducible regulatory networks: computer-aided design of dynamic phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaznessis Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tightly regulated gene networks, precisely controlling the expression of protein molecules, have received considerable interest by the biomedical community due to their promising applications. Among the most well studied inducible transcription systems are the tetracycline regulatory expression systems based on the tetracycline resistance operon of Escherichia coli, Tet-Off (tTA and Tet-On (rtTA. Despite their initial success and improved designs, limitations still persist, such as low inducer sensitivity. Instead of looking at these networks statically, and simply changing or mutating the promoter and operator regions with trial and error, a systematic investigation of the dynamic behavior of the network can result in rational design of regulatory gene expression systems. Sophisticated algorithms can accurately capture the dynamical behavior of gene networks. With computer aided design, we aim to improve the synthesis of regulatory networks and propose new designs that enable tighter control of expression. Results In this paper we engineer novel networks by recombining existing genes or part of genes. We synthesize four novel regulatory networks based on the Tet-Off and Tet-On systems. We model all the known individual biomolecular interactions involved in transcription, translation, regulation and induction. With multiple time-scale stochastic-discrete and stochastic-continuous models we accurately capture the transient and steady state dynamics of these networks. Important biomolecular interactions are identified and the strength of the interactions engineered to satisfy design criteria. A set of clear design rules is developed and appropriate mutants of regulatory proteins and operator sites are proposed. Conclusion The complexity of biomolecular interactions is accurately captured through computer simulations. Computer simulations allow us to look into the molecular level, portray the dynamic behavior of gene regulatory

  5. 76 FR 67236 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... a foreign financial institution, and as part of the corporate control transaction, the foreign... subsidiaries, both of which are U.S. non-broker-dealer financial institutions, and as part of the corporate...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

  6. 75 FR 29793 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate... (``Act'') \\1\\ and Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on May 4, 2010, Financial.... For more information about the rulebook consolidation process, see Information Notice, March 12, 2008...

  7. Regulatory control in the rehabilitation of contaminated sites in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Suman, H.

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this paper is concerning the regulatory control set by the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS) for the contaminated sites with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) in the oil industries in the northeast of Syria. These sites lie in a desert region with poor population density and low occupancy. The decision was made to use the activity concentration of 226 Ra per unit mass as a measure to identify the need for cleanup. Two limits were set for this purpose so that contamination concentration above the higher limit is defined as waste that has to be excavated from the site, while contamination concentration between the two limits can be dealt with on site. Contamination concentration below the lower limit was looked at as acceptable. Remediation plan to transfer the contaminated soil, with radium concentration over the higher limit, to an engineered disposal pit was adopted. Proper stabilisation measures and environmental monitoring programme were requested by the AECS and considered as essential parts of the remediation plan. (author)

  8. Are better sleepers more engaged workers? A self-regulatory approach to sleep hygiene and work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larissa; Grawitch, Matthew J; Munz, David C

    2013-10-01

    Previous research has emphasized facets of both the organizational environment and individual differences as predictors of work engagement. This study explored sleep hygiene as another important behavioural factor that may be related to work engagement. With a sample of 328 adult workers, we tested a multiple mediator model in which sleep hygiene predicts work engagement through one's appraisals of resource depletion stemming from demands (psychological strain) and general self-regulatory capacity (self-control). Results indicated that individuals who frequently engaged in poor sleep hygiene behaviours had lower self-regulatory capacity, experienced higher subjective depletion and were less engaged at work. Additionally, the path from poor sleep hygiene to decreased work engagement was attributed to perceptions of personal resources that are needed to exert self-regulatory energy at work. This is consistent with current self-regulatory theories suggesting that individuals have a limited amount of resources to allocate to demands and that the depletion of these resources can lead to stress and lower self-regulatory functioning in response to other demands. Specifically, poor sleep hygiene results in the loss of self-regulatory resources needed to be engaged in work tasks by impairing the after-work recovery process. Practical and research implications regarding sleep hygiene interventions for well-being and productivity improvement are discussed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Annual Report 2008. Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The present Annual Report of Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN), prepared regularly from the creation as independent institution, describes across four parts and seven annexes the activities developed by the organism during 2008. The main topic are: the organization and the activity of the ARN; the regulatory standards; the licensing and inspection of nuclear power plants and critical facilities; the emergency systems; the occupational surveillance; the environmental monitoring; improved organizational and budgetary developments. Also, this publication have annexes with the following content: regulatory documents; regulatory guides; measurement and evaluation of the drinking water of Ezeiza.

  10. Annual Report 2007. Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The present Annual Report of Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN), prepared regularly from the creation as independent institution, describes across tree parts and seven annexes the activities developed by the organism during 2007. The main topic are: the organization and the activity of the ARN; the regulatory standards; the licensing and inspection of nuclear power plants and critical facilities; the emergency systems; the occupational surveillance; the environmental monitoring; improved organizational. Also, this publication have annexes with the following content: regulatory documents; inspections to medical, industrial and training installations; regulatory guides; measurement and evaluation of the drinking water of Ezeiza.

  11. 77 FR 73646 - Essar Steel Minnesota, LLC v. Great Lakes Gas Transmission Limited Partnership; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... Transmission Limited Partnership (Respondent), alleging that the Respondent has failed to comply with the... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. RP13-313-000] Essar Steel Minnesota, LLC v. Great Lakes Gas Transmission Limited Partnership; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on...

  12. Dendritic Cells Limit Fibro-Inflammatory Injury in NASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Justin R.; Graffeo, Christopher S.; Rehman, Adeel; Fallon, Nina C.; Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Ochi, Atsuo; Barilla, Rocky; Jamal, Mohsin; Deutsch, Michael; Greco, Stephanie; Ego-Osuala, Melvin; Saeed, Usama Bin; Rao, Raghavendra S.; Badar, Sana; Quesada, Juan P.; Acehan, Devrim; Miller, George

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the most common etiology of chronic liver dysfunction in the United States and can progress to cirrhosis and liver failure. Inflammatory insult resulting from fatty infiltration of the liver is central to disease pathogenesis. Dendritic cells (DC) are antigen presenting cells with an emerging role in hepatic inflammation. We postulated that DC are important in the progression of NASH. We found that intrahepatic DC expand and mature in NASH liver and assume an activated immune-phenotype. However, rather than mitigating the severity of NASH, DC depletion markedly exacerbated intrahepatic fibro-inflammation. Our mechanistic studies support a regulatory role for DC in NASH by limiting sterile inflammation via their role in clearance of apoptotic cells and necrotic debris. We found that DC limit CD8+ T cell expansion and restrict Toll-like receptor expression and cytokine production in innate immune effector cells in NASH, including Kupffer cells, neutrophils, and inflammatory monocytes. Consistent with their regulatory role in NASH, during the recovery phase of disease, ablation of DC populations results in delayed resolution of intrahepatic inflammation and fibroplasia. Conclusion Our findings support a role for DC in modulating NASH. Targeting DC functional properties may hold promise for therapeutic intervention in NASH. PMID:23322710

  13. Steady-state sulfur critical loads and exceedances for protection of aquatic ecosystems in the U.S. Southern Appalachian Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Todd C; Sullivan, Timothy J; Hessburg, Paul F; Reynolds, Keith M; Povak, Nicholas A; Cosby, Bernard J; Jackson, William; Salter, R Brion

    2014-12-15

    Atmospherically deposited sulfur (S) causes stream water acidification throughout the eastern U.S. Southern Appalachian Mountain (SAM) region. Acidification has been linked with reduced fitness and richness of aquatic species and changes to benthic communities. Maintaining acid-base chemistry that supports native biota depends largely on balancing acidic deposition with the natural resupply of base cations. Stream water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) is maintained by base cations that mostly originate from weathering of surrounding lithologies. When ambient atmospheric S deposition exceeds the critical load (CL) an ecosystem can tolerate, stream water chemistry may become lethal to biota. This work links statistical predictions of ANC and base cation weathering for streams and watersheds of the SAM region with a steady-state model to estimate CLs and exceedances. Results showed that 20.1% of the total length of study region streams displayed ANC high elevation, and cool and moist forested conditions, the percentage of stream length in exceedance was highest for mountain wilderness areas and in national parks, and lowest for privately owned valley bottom land. Exceedance results were summarized by 12-digit hydrologic unit code (subwatershed) for use in developing management goals and policy objectives, and for long-term monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 77 FR 38694 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... matrix will be an effective means of assessing related fees. For instance, the proposed fee structure...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate... Organization's Statement of the Terms of the Substance of the Proposed Rule Change FINRA is proposing to amend...

  15. Risk literacy for scientists. Invitation to regulatory science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a regulatory science, which fills a gap between scientific knowledge and regulatory actions. The author provides examples of the regulatory science employed in chemical risk assessment, such as the linear non-threshold theory. In the regulatory science, scientific data as well as scientific reasoning based on scientific knowledge - or regulatory rules - should play an important role. It is important to recognize that the rules facilitate transparent decision making under conditions of uncertainty and time constraints. Furthermore, the development of traditional or pure science results in the validation of regulatory rules, and subsequently, the regulatory science procedure develops more systematically. The concept of this science should be understood by those engaged in governmental decision making. (author)

  16. Starch hydrolysis in autogenerative high pressure digestion: Gelatinisation and saccharification as rate limiting steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, R.E.F.; Ding, L.; Weijma, J.; Plugge, C.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Autogenerative high pressure digestion (AHPD) provides an integrated biogas upgrading technology, capable of producing biogas with a CH4 content exceeding 95% at pressures up to 90 bar. Hydrolysis is generally regarded as the rate-limiting step in the anaerobic digestion of complex organic matter,

  17. 78 FR 44165 - Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0159] Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Enforcement policy; request for comment. SUMMARY: The U.S... Policy. In SRM-SECY-12-0047, ``Revisions to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy,'' dated...

  18. Radiation shielding at interim storage facility for CANDU-type nuclear spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateescu, S.; Radu, M. Pantazi D.; Stanciu, M.

    1997-01-01

    Technical measures in radiological protection are taken in the interim storage facility design to ensure that, during normal operation, exposures of workers and members of public to ionizing radiation are limited to levels lower than regulatory limits. The spent fuel storage design provides for radiation exposure to be as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA principles). The evaluation of radiation shields includes the most conservative provisions: - all locations which may contain spent fuel are full; - the spent fuel has reached the maximum burnup; - the post irradiation cooling period should be the minimum reasonable; - equipment for handling contains the maximum amount of spent fuel. Radiation shields should ensure that external radiation fields do not exceed limits accepted by the Regulatory Body Module. The evaluation has been performed with two computer codes, QAD-5K and MICROSHIELD-4. (authors)

  19. Development of regulatory techniques for operational performance evaluation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. Y.; Lee, C. J.

    2005-03-01

    For the purpose of keeping up the capability for independent regulatory audit of risk information, we developed an PSA model, independent on that of the licensee. The developed regulatory PSA model, as named MPAS (Multi-purpose Probabilistic Analysis of Safety), is primarily based on the result of feasibility study about ASME PSA standard and done by the cooperation work with KAERI PSA research team. Current MPAS model is limited to the work scope on Level 1 internal full power analysis, which is finally implemented for the KSNP. The development of MPAS model consists of plenty of works establishing overall items which comprehensively implements all subjects such as detailed logic and input data for each analysis fields. In addition, relevant computational framework utilizing PSA and risk monitoring codes is also developed for users' convenience

  20. 78 FR 68893 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... that the size of the BBO equals the minimum quote size. Number of market makers actively quoting...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Extend the Tier Size Pilot of FINRA Rule 6433 (Minimum Quotation Size...

  1. ITER operating limit definition criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciattaglia, S.; Barabaschi, P.; Carretero, J.A.; Chiocchio, S.; Hureau, D.; Girard, J.Ph.; Gordon, C.; Portone, A.; Rodrigo, L. Rodriguez; Roldan, C.; Saibene, G.; Uzan-Elbez, J.

    2009-01-01

    The operating limits and conditions (OLCs) are operating parameters and conditions, chosen among all system/components, which, together, define the domain of the safe operation of ITER in all foreseen ITER states (operation, maintenance, commissioning). At the same time they are selected to guarantee the required operation flexibility which is a critical factor for the success of an experimental machine such as ITER. System and components that are important for personnel or public safety (safety important class, SIC) are identified considering their functional importance in the overall plant safety analysis. SIC classification has to be presented already in the preliminary safety analysis report and approved by the licensing authority before manufacturing and construction. OLCs comprise the safety limits that, if exceeded, could result in a potential safety hazard, the relevant settings that determine the intervention of SIC systems, and the operational limits on equipment which warn against or stop a functional deviation from a planned operational status that could challenge equipment and functions. Some operational conditions, e.g. in-Vacuum Vessel (VV) radioactive inventories, will be controlled through procedures. Operating experience from present tokamaks, in particular JET, and from nuclear plants, is considered to the maximum possible extent. This paper presents the guidelines for the development of the ITER OLCs with particular reference to safety limits.

  2. 75 FR 5630 - Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... ``Regulatory Guides'' collection of the NRC's Electronic Reading Room at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0031] Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability... Guide, DG-4017. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gregory Chapman, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

  3. Caffeine addiction: Need for awareness and research and regulatory measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shobhit; Srivastava, Adya Shanker; Verma, Raghunath Prasad; Maggu, Gaurav

    2017-02-04

    Caffeine consumption has been constantly growing in India especially among children and youngsters. Addictive potential of caffeine has long been reported, still there is lack of awareness about caffeine abuse in India. There is an intense need for appropriate public health regulatory measures and awareness about addictive potential & harms related to caffeine. To the best of our knowledge this is first case from India highlighting several important issues with progressive caffeine abuse resulting in dependence leading to physical, psychological, academic and social consequences; psychotic symptoms during intoxication; predisposing factors as impulsivity and novelty seeking traits in pre-morbid personality; psychosis in family; poor awareness of health hazards even among medical professionals. Widely variable caffeine containing products are available but caffeine content or its safety limit is not mentioned on caffeine products in India. Due to harmful consequences, legal availability to children, growing consumption of caffeine products, it is utmost essential to recognize caffeine as addictive substance and impose regulatory measures on sale, advertisement, maximum caffeine content, health consequences and safety limits of caffeine containing products. Further school teachers, parents and medical practitioners need to be made aware of health hazards of caffeine. Caffeine use shall always be enquired from patients presenting with psychiatric complaints. Further research and survey are required on caffeine use and related problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC's Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available

  5. Communication Regulatory Science: Mapping a New Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Seth M; Cappella, Joseph N; Price, Simani

    2017-12-13

    Communication regulatory science is an emerging field that uses validated techniques, tools, and models to inform regulatory actions that promote optimal communication outcomes and benefit the public. In the opening article to this special issue on communication and tobacco regulatory science, we 1) describe Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation of tobacco products in the US; 2) introduce communication regulatory science and provide examples in the tobacco regulatory science realm; and 3) describe the special issue process and final set of articles. Communication research on tobacco regulatory science is a burgeoning area of inquiry, and this work advances communication science, informs and potentially guides the FDA, and may help to withstand legal challenges brought by the tobacco industry. This research has the potential to have a major impact on the tobacco epidemic and population health by helping implement the most effective communications to prevent tobacco initiation and increase cessation. This special issue provides an example of 10 studies that exemplify tobacco regulatory science and demonstrate how the health communication field can affect regulation and benefit public health.

  6. Functional and topological characteristics of mammalian regulatory domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symmons, Orsolya; Uslu, Veli Vural; Tsujimura, Taro; Ruf, Sandra; Nassari, Sonya; Schwarzer, Wibke; Ettwiller, Laurence; Spitz, François

    2014-01-01

    Long-range regulatory interactions play an important role in shaping gene-expression programs. However, the genomic features that organize these activities are still poorly characterized. We conducted a large operational analysis to chart the distribution of gene regulatory activities along the mouse genome, using hundreds of insertions of a regulatory sensor. We found that enhancers distribute their activities along broad regions and not in a gene-centric manner, defining large regulatory domains. Remarkably, these domains correlate strongly with the recently described TADs, which partition the genome into distinct self-interacting blocks. Different features, including specific repeats and CTCF-binding sites, correlate with the transition zones separating regulatory domains, and may help to further organize promiscuously distributed regulatory influences within large domains. These findings support a model of genomic organization where TADs confine regulatory activities to specific but large regulatory domains, contributing to the establishment of specific gene expression profiles. PMID:24398455

  7. Annual Report 2010. Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The present Annual Report of Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN), prepared regularly from the creation as independent institution, describes across six chapters and seven annexes the activities developed by the organism during 2010. The main topic are: institutional issues; regulatory guides and standards; argentinean nuclear regulatory system; quality assurance of the ARN; the institutional communications; the licensing and inspection of nuclear power plants and critical facilities; the emergency systems; the safeguards and the physical protection; the environmental control; the institutional relations; the training and the public information. Also, this publication have annexes with the following content: the regulatory framework; regulatory documents; inspections to medical, industrial and training installations; measurement and evaluation of the drinking water of Ezeiza; international expert's report on the application of the international standards of radiological protection of the public in the zone of the Ezeiza Atomic Center; ethical code

  8. Annual Report 2011. Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The present Annual Report of Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN), prepared regularly from the creation as independent institution, describes across six chapters and seven annexes the activities developed by the organism during 2011. The main topic are: institutional issues; regulatory guides and standards; argentinean nuclear regulatory system; quality assurance of the ARN; the institutional communications; the licensing and inspection of nuclear power plants and critical facilities; the emergency systems; the safeguards and the physical protection; the environmental control; the institutional relations; the training and the public information. Also, this publication have annexes with the following content: the regulatory framework; regulatory documents; inspections to medical, industrial and training installations; measurement and evaluation of the drinking water of Ezeiza; international expert's report on the application of the international standards of radiological protection of the public in the zone of the Ezeiza Atomic Center; ethical code

  9. Development of regulatory policy for SMART-P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. H.; Lee, Y. H.; Moo, Philip; Koh, B. J.; Son, M. K.; Han, G. H.; Kim, D. H. [Korea Association for Nuclear Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    KAERI promoted the construction of a research reactor, SMART-P, the reduced scale of SMART, with intent to demonstrate the safety and performance of SMART. According to this progress, the development of regulatory process for SMART-P became necessary. The establishment of regulatory policy, based on the current regulatory guidelines as well as technical aspect, became essential matters. Considering the on-going small and medium size reactors in near future, the selection of the appropriate measure in the existing regulatory process to SMART-P is very important. Thus the schematic study for the applicable licensing procedure and regulatory requirements suitable for SMART-P is required.

  10. Development of regulatory policy for SMART-P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. H.; Moon, S. H.; Lee, Y. H.; Son, M. K.; Han, K. H.; Kim, D. H. [Korea Association for Nuclear Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    KAERI promoted the construction of a research reactor, SMART-P, the reduced scale of SMART, with intent to demonstrate the safety and performance of SMART. According to this progress, the development of regulatory process for SMART-P became necessary. The establishment of regulatory policy, based on the current regulatory guidelines as well as technical aspect, became essential matters. Considering the on-going small and medium size reactors m near future, the selection of the appropriate measure in the existing regulatory process to SMART-P is very important. Thus the schematic study for the applicable licensing procedure and regulatory requirements suitable for SMART-P is required.

  11. Annual Report 2009. Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The present Annual Report of Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN), prepared regularly from the creation as independent institution, describes across four parts and seven annexes the activities developed by the organism during 2009. The main topic are: the organization and the activity of the ARN; the regulatory standards; the licensing and inspection of nuclear power plants and critical facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental monitoring; the occupational surveillance; the training and the public information; improved organizational and budgetary developments. Also, this publication have annexes with the following content: regulatory documents; inspections to medical, industrial and training installations; regulatory guides; measurement and evaluation of the drinking water of Ezeiza.

  12. Impact-limiting materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.; Duffey, T.A.; McConnell, P.

    1993-01-01

    Three types of impact-limiting materials have been characterized which have applications in packages for the transport of radioactive materials. These materials are aluminum honeycombs, polyurethane foams, and aluminum foams. The results of the materials characterization have indicated strengths and weaknesses for each type of material. The polyurethane foams provide good impact limiting ability and excellent thermal insulation. However, they burn when subjected to the regulatory thermal event in the presence of air. The aluminum honeycombs provide excellent impact resistance in specific impact orientations. However, they provide relatively poor resistance to thermal assault. Finally, the aluminum foams exhibit relatively poor impact energy absorption capacities, significant variability in energy absorption, and limited thermal insulation. The development of the figures of merit examined the response of the materials to the impact event with the intent of maximizing the energy absorption of the materials with respect to either the volume or mass of the materials. Three figures of merit will be presented for the structural response. The figure of merit for the thermal event is based on minimizing the heat flux to the containment boundary. The paper presents a discussion of the test methods, a summary of the data and the figures of merit for each material. (J.P.N.)

  13. Developing a strategy and closure criteria for radioactive and mixed waste sites in the ORNL remedial action program: Regulatory interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabalka, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Some options for stabilization and treatment of contaminated sites can theoretically provide a once-and-for-all solution (e.g., removal or destruction of contaminants). Most realizable options, however, leave contaminants in place (in situ), potentially isolated by physical or chemical, but more typically, by hydrologic measures. As a result of the dynamic nature of the interactions between contaminants, remedial measures, and the environment, in situ stablization measures are likely to have limited life spans, and maintenance and monitoring of performance become an essential part of the scheme. The length of formal institutional control over the site and related questions about future uses of the land and waters are of paramount importance. Unique features of the ORNL site and environs appear to be key ingredients in achieving the very long term institutional control necessary for successful financing and implementation of in situ stabilization. Some formal regulatory interface is necessary to ensure that regulatory limitations and new guidance which can affect planning and implementation of the ORNL Remedial Action Program are communicated to ORNL staff and potential technical and financial limitations which can affect schedules or alternatives for achievement of long-term site stabilization and the capability to meet environmental regulations are provided to regulatory bodies as early as possible. Such an interface should allow decisions on closure criteria to be based primarily on technical merit and protection of human health and the environment. A plan for interfacing with federal and state regulatory authorities is described. 93 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  14. Potential for radionuclide immobilization in the EBS/NFE: solubility limiting phases for neptunium, plutonium, and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rard, J. A., LLNL

    1997-10-01

    Retardation and dispersion in the far field of radionuclides released from the engineered barrier system/near field environment (EBS/NFE) may not be sufficient to prevent regulatory limits being exceeded at the accessible environment. Hence, a greater emphasis must be placed on retardation and/or immobilization of radionuclides in the EBS/NFE. The present document represents a survey of radionuclide-bearing solid phases that could potentially form in the EBS/NFE and immobilize radionuclides released from the waste package and significantly reduce the source term. A detailed literature search was undertaken for experimental solubilities of the oxides, hydroxides, and various salts of neptunium, plutonium, and uranium in aqueous solutions as functions of pH, temperature, and the concentrations of added electrolytes. Numerous solubility studies and reviews were identified and copies of most of the articles were acquired. However, this project was only two months in duration, and copies of some the identified solubility studies could not be obtained at short notice. The results of this survey are intended to be used to assess whether a more detailed study of identified low- solubility phase(s) is warranted, and not as a data base suitable for predicting radionuclide solubility. The results of this survey may also prove useful in a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of incorporating chemical additives to the EBS/NFE that will enhance radionuclide immobilization.

  15. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlbert, L.M.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  16. Environmental regulatory update table, March 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  17. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, April 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  18. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  19. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  20. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  1. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  2. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  3. Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources. Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This Safety Guide is intended to assist States in implementing the requirements established in Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1, Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, for a national regulatory infrastructure to regulate any practice involving radiation sources in medicine, industry, research, agriculture and education. The Safety Guide provides advice on the legislative basis for establishing regulatory bodies, including the effective independence of the regulatory body. It also provides guidance on implementing the functions and activities of regulatory bodies: the development of regulations and guides on radiation safety; implementation of a system for notification and authorization; carrying out regulatory inspections; taking necessary enforcement actions; and investigating accidents and circumstances potentially giving rise to accidents. The various aspects relating to the regulatory control of consumer products are explained, including justification, optimization of exposure, safety assessment and authorization. Guidance is also provided on the organization and staffing of regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Legal framework for a regulatory infrastructure; 3. Principal functions and activities of the regulatory body; 4. Regulatory control of the supply of consumer products; 5. Functions of the regulatory body shared with other governmental agencies; 6. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body; 7. Documentation of the functions and activities of the regulatory body; 8. Support services; 9. Quality management for the regulatory system.

  4. Regulatory Oversight of Radioactive Sources through the Integrated Management of Safety and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) has full regulatory competence; its mission is to oversee the safety and security of all the peaceful applications of atomic energy. All the radioactive sources having activity above the exemption level is registered and licensed both from safety and security points of view. The Hungarian central register of radioactive sources contains about 7,000 radioactive sources and 450 license holders. In order to use its limited resources the HAEA has decided to introduce an integrated regulatory oversight programme. Accordingly, during the licensing process and inspection activities the HAEA intends to assess both safety and security aspects at the same time. The article describes the Hungarian the various applications of radioactive materials, and summarizes the preparation activities of the HAEA. (author)

  5. 78 FR 54502 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of a Proposed Rule... Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (``SEC'' or ``Commission... or manipulative motivation for the trading activity at issue.\\4\\ Specifically, proposed Supplementary...

  6. 76 FR 63969 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Amendment No. 1 to Proposed Rule Change To Adopt FINRA Rule 2231 (Customer Account Statements) in the Consolidated... Account Statements) in the Consolidated FINRA Rulebook (``Notice''). The Notice contained incorrect...

  7. On exceeding the solubility limit of Cr+3 dopants in SnO2 nanoparticles based dilute magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    URS, Kusuma; Bhat, S. V.; Kamble, Vinayak

    2018-04-01

    The paper investigates the magnetic behavior of chromium doped SnO2 Dilute Magnetic Semiconductor (DMS) nanoparticles, through structural, spectroscopic, and magnetic studies. A non-equilibrium solution combustion method is adopted to synthesize 0-5 at. % Cr doped SnO2 nanoparticles. The detailed spectroscopic studies on the system using micro-Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy along with the structural analysis confirm the presence of Cr in 3+ oxidation state, which substitutes at Sn4+ site in SnO6 octahedra of the rutile structure. This doping is found to enhance the defects in the system, i.e., oxygen vacancies. All the synthesized SnO2 nanoparticles (with or without dopants) are found to exhibit Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTFM). This occurrence of RTFM is attributed to the magnetic exchange interaction through F-centers of oxygen vacancies as well as dopant magnetic impurities and explained through the Bound Magnetic Polaron (BMP) model of DMS systems. Nonetheless, as the doping of Cr is further increased beyond 2%, the solubility limit is achieved. This antiferromagnetic exchange interaction from interstitial Cr dopants dominates over the BMP mechanism and, hence, leads to the decrease in the net magnetic moment drastically.

  8. 75 FR 52999 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... site under ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . In addition... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0556] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 8.35...

  9. 75 FR 45171 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ and through the NRC's Agencywide... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0072] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 3.13...

  10. 75 FR 37842 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... site under ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . In addition... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0396] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 2.5...

  11. 75 FR 43207 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... NRC's public Web site under ``Regulatory Guides'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0282] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 1.141...

  12. 75 FR 33361 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ....gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . In addition, regulatory guides are available for inspection at the... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0308] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 1.28...

  13. 75 FR 16525 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . In addition, regulatory guides are available for... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0413] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Regulatory Guide 1.11...

  14. 75 FR 27599 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ...'' at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ . In addition, regulatory guides are available for... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0492] Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of issuance and availability of Regulatory Guide 6.7...

  15. Limit of detection for the determination of Pt in biological material by RNAA using electrolytic separation of gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xilei, L.; Heydorn, K.; Rietz, B.

    1992-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis based on the 199 Au indicator for platinum requires the separation of gold at high radiochemical purity. The limit of detection is strongly affected by the presence of gold; with a gold content of 50 pg/g, irradiating for 5 days at 5*10 13 n/cm 2 is needed to achieve a limit of detection of approximately 30 pg/g. In this case the nuclear interference from gold will exceeded the level of platium by several orders of magnitude and has to be determined with exceedingly high precision. Preliminary results for SRM 1577 Bovine Liver with 95% yield gave consistent results for Au, but Pt could not be detected. (author) 23 refs.; 3 figs.; 4 tabs

  16. Remarks on 'Poisson ratio beyond the limits of the elasticity theory'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, K.W.

    2002-12-01

    The non-chiral, elastically isotropic model exhibits Poison ratios in the range -1 ≤ σ ≤ 1 without any molecular rotation. The centres of discs-atoms are replaced in the vertices of a perfect triangle of the side length equal to σ. The positive sign of the Lame constant λ is not necessary for the stability of an isotropic system at any dimensionality. As the upper limit for the Poisson ratio in 2D isotropic systems is 1, crystalline or polycrystalline 2D systems can be obtained having the Poisson ratio exceeding 1/2. Both the traditional theory of elasticity and the Cosserat one exclude Poisson ratios exceeding 1/2 in 3D isotropic systems. Neighter anisotropy nor rotation are necessary to obtain extreme values of the Poisson ratio (author)

  17. 12 CFR 567.2 - Minimum regulatory capital requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum regulatory capital requirement. 567.2... Regulatory Capital Requirements § 567.2 Minimum regulatory capital requirement. (a) To meet its regulatory capital requirement a savings association must satisfy each of the following capital standards: (1) Risk...

  18. A tale of three labels: translating the JUPITER trial data into regulatory claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridker, Paul M

    2011-08-01

    Whether a pivotal randomized trial will be interpreted in a similar and consistent manner by different regulatory agencies is uncertain as policy perspectives may play a role in data interpretation and the translation of trial results into clinical practice. Using a contemporary example, to compare and contrast regulatory claims in the United States, Europe, and Canada that derive from a pivotal clinical trial. The recently completed JUPITER trial of rosuvastatin as compared to placebo conducted among 17,802 men and women with LDL-C JUPITER trial provides an opportunity to compare and contrast how regulatory agencies in the United States, Canada, and Europe chose to interpret an identical database. Labeling indications based on earlier statin trials of primary and secondary prevention were also reviewed. JUPITER demonstrated a 44% reduction (p JUPITER trial population by stipulating that those eligible for treatment should be older men and women with hsCRP >2 mg/L, plus one additional risk factor for heart disease. The Canadian label is silent on age and hsCRP (the major trial inclusion criterion), stipulating instead that treatment can be considered for those with 'at least two conventional risk factors for cardiovascular disease,' a group more inclusive than that studied. In contrast, the European Medicines Agency label limits treatment only to 'high risk individuals' ignoring hsCRP and using instead a post hoc definition of 'high risk' that comprised a subgroup of less than 10% of the study population who contributed but 67 events to the study total and did not show statistical significance when compared to placebo. None of the regulatory labels included the trial primary endpoint; instead, each focused on separate and different components of the primary endpoint. Similar discrepancies were found between European and North American regulatory agencies with regard to earlier pivotal trials of statins for primary prevention, but not for secondary prevention. The

  19. The Regulatory Independence of FANR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALNuaimi, Fatema; Choi, Kwang Shik

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory independence is meant to provide a conservative system of policy making in order to comply with the problems that are forecasted upon the basis of assumptions. The Federal Authorization of Nuclear Regulation (FANR) is a regulatory commission that was formed to be regulatory body that governs the generation of nuclear power in United Arab Emirates. It was established under the UAE nuclear law (9/2009) as an independent regulatory body that was tasked with the regulation of all nuclear activities in the United Arab Emirates. As an independent body, FANR was tasked with ensuring that the regulation of the nuclear sector is done in effective and transparent manner to ensure its accountability to the people. Being independent, the regulatory body develops national nuclear regulations based on laid down safety standards by the International Atomic Energy Agency, ensuring that they are based on scientific and proven technologies The role of FANR is to ensure that the all corporations that undertake nuclear activities follow the laid down procedures and objectives and ensure safety measures are taken keenly to ensure the safety of the workers and the general public while at the same time ensuring the environment is free from nuclear radiations

  20. The Regulatory Independence of FANR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALNuaimi, Fatema; Choi, Kwang Shik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Regulatory independence is meant to provide a conservative system of policy making in order to comply with the problems that are forecasted upon the basis of assumptions. The Federal Authorization of Nuclear Regulation (FANR) is a regulatory commission that was formed to be regulatory body that governs the generation of nuclear power in United Arab Emirates. It was established under the UAE nuclear law (9/2009) as an independent regulatory body that was tasked with the regulation of all nuclear activities in the United Arab Emirates. As an independent body, FANR was tasked with ensuring that the regulation of the nuclear sector is done in effective and transparent manner to ensure its accountability to the people. Being independent, the regulatory body develops national nuclear regulations based on laid down safety standards by the International Atomic Energy Agency, ensuring that they are based on scientific and proven technologies The role of FANR is to ensure that the all corporations that undertake nuclear activities follow the laid down procedures and objectives and ensure safety measures are taken keenly to ensure the safety of the workers and the general public while at the same time ensuring the environment is free from nuclear radiations