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Sample records for excavation damaged zone

  1. ROCK MASS DAMAGED ZONE CAUSED BY BLASTING DURING TUNNEL EXCAVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Antičević

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Design of underground spaces, including tunnels, and repositories for radioactive waste include the application of the same or similar technologies. Tunnel excavation by blasting inevitably results in the damage in the rock mass around the excavation profile. The damage in the rock mass immediately next to the tunnel profile emerges as the expanding of the existing cracks and the appearance of new cracks, i.e. as the change of the physical and-mechanical properties of the rock mass. Concerning the design of deep geological repositories, requirements in terms of damaged rock are the same or more rigorous than for the design of tunnel. The aforementioned research is directed towards determining the depth of damage zone caused by blasting. The depth of the damage zone is determined by measuring the changes of physical and-mechanical properties of the rock mass around the tunnel excavation profile. By this research the drilling and blasting parameters were correlated with the depth and size of the damage zone (the paper is published in Croatian.

  2. On the thermal impact on the excavation damaged zone around deep radioactive waste disposal

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Clays and claystones are considered in some countries (including Belgium, France and Switzerland) as a potential host rock for high activity long lived radioactive waste disposal at great depth. One of the aspects to deal with in performance assessment is related to the effects on the host rock of the temperature elevation due to the placement of exothermic wastes. The potential effects of the thermal impact on the excavated damaged zone in the close field are another important issue that was the goal of the TIMODAZ European research project. In this paper, some principles of waste disposal in clayey host rocks at great depth are first presented and a series of experimental investigations carried out on specific equipment specially developed to face the problem are presented. Both drained and undrained tests have been developed to investigate the drained thermal volume changes of clays and claystone and the thermal pressurization occurring around the galleries. This importance of proper initial saturation (un...

  3. Using Local Second Gradient Model and Shear Strain Localisation to Model the Excavation Damaged Zone in Unsaturated Claystone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardoen, Benoît; Levasseur, Séverine; Collin, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    The drilling of galleries induces damage propagation in the surrounding medium and creates, around them, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). The prediction of the extension and fracture structure of this zone remains a major issue, especially in the context of underground nuclear waste storage. Experimental studies on geomaterials indicate that localised deformation in shear band mode usually appears prior to fractures. Thus, the excavation damaged zone can be modelled by considering the development of shear strain localisation bands. In the classical finite element framework, strain localisation suffers a mesh-dependency problem. Therefore, an enhanced model with a regularisation method is required to correctly model the strain localisation behaviour. Among the existing methods, we choose the coupled local second gradient model. We extend it to unsaturated conditions and we include the solid grain compressibility. Furthermore, air ventilation inside underground galleries engenders a rock-atmosphere interaction that could influence the damaged zone. This interaction has to be investigated in order to predict the damaged zone behaviour. Finally, a hydro-mechanical modelling of a gallery excavation in claystone is presented and leads to a fairly good representation of the EDZ. The main objectives of this study are to model the fractures by considering shear strain localisation bands, and to investigate if an isotropic model accurately reproduces the in situ measurements. The numerical results provide information about the damaged zone extension, structure and behaviour that are in very good agreement with in situ measurements and observations. For instance, the strain localisation bands that develop in chevron pattern during the excavation and rock desaturation, due to air ventilation, are observed close to the gallery.

  4. Examination of the Excavation Damaged Zone in the TASS tunnel, Aespoe HRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Mats (Swebrec, Luleaa Univ. of Technology, Luleaa (Sweden)); Markstroem, Ingemar; Pettersson, Anders; Straeng, Malin (Golder Associates, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-10-15

    The question of an existing continuous Excavation Damage Zone (EDZ) is very important for SKB. Is it possible to use drilling and blasting in the planned repository for spent nuclear fuel? Could fractures from blasting form a continuous EDZ? In order to increase the understanding of the EDZ and the possibility of an existing continuous EDZ along the deposition tunnel, SKB decided to examine the fracturing in a selected area of the TASS tunnel and to create a 3D model of the fractures in the investigated area. It was of special interest to study the transition zones between the blast rounds to examine if the EDZ from the bottom charges could form a continuous EDZ from one round to another. The TASS-tunnel is situated at the 450-m level in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The tunnel, with a cross-section area of 20 m2, was planned to be 90 m long. In a subproject called Excavation the purpose was to test different plans for drilling, charging and initiation in order to give recommendations on how the final repository of spent fuel should be excavated. The test methodology used in this investigation comprised the following steps: selecting test area, drilling and wire sawing of blocks, surveying the blocks, removal and transportation of the blocks to the surface, cutting the blocks into slabs, fracture identification with penetrants, positioning and photographing the slabs, digitizing and 3D modelling of the fractures. The test area for EDZ consisted of an 8 m long and 1.5 m high section in excavation sequence no 4. The selected section covered the end of round 9, the entire round 10 and the start of round 11. In the contour and the helpers small diameter charges for smooth blasting were used (decoupled charges). These charges also have a relatively low detonation velocity (VOD) and this, together with the decoupling, gives short fracture lengths i.e. a small EDZ. The contour holes and the helpers were initiated with electronic detonators to achieve a simultaneous

  5. Improvement of the excavation damaged zone in saliferous formations. Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Simo Kuate, E.; Borstel, L. von; Engelhardt, H.J.

    2016-01-15

    In Germany, salt formations are considered to be suitable to host a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. However, local stress changes adjacent to man-made openings lead to the evolution of an excavation damaged zone (EDZ) during and after excavation. Such an EDZ can have a major impact on the operation of a radioactive waste repository since it represents a region where progressive failure occurs. This decreases the material strength and thus increases the permeability of the originally tight host rock. The objective of this investigation is determined by the need to develop a modeling strategy that can be applied to simulate the permeability increase due to mechanical deterioration of rock salt, in particular that occurring in the EDZ. The identification of material parameters is often conducted by back-calculation of laboratory experiments. However, standard laboratory tests, e.g. compression tests, are only applicable to provide information about the macroscopic deformation. For this purpose, further laboratory tests were conducted to derive material parameters used in the constitutive models. Combined acoustic emission and uniaxial compression tests as well as microstructural analyses were carried out to dissolve the macroscopic behavior micromechanically. The information obtained was then used for parameter identification utilizing optimization methods. The objective was to identify the best estimate of the micro-parameter values that can be applied to simulate the laboratory results performed. To make a qualitative comparison between the numerical analysis and the acoustic emission (AE) testing, the onset of failure at contacts was equated with events detected by AE testing. The onset of failure is identified at stress levels above 3 MPa. The number of tensile fractures increases continuously and the maximum is reached between 10 and 12 MPa axial stress. At the beginning of loading, tensile fractures appear more frequently than shear fractures

  6. Hydrogeochemical and microbiological effects on fractures in the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (Geopoint AB, Sollentuna (Sweden)); Gimeno, Maria; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia (Univ. of Zaragoza, Earth Science Dept., Zaragoza (Spain)); Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics, Moelnlycke (Sweden))

    2009-01-15

    Due to the disturbances associated with the excavation, construction and closure of the repository for storage of spent nuclear fuel, the saturation state of the groundwaters at repository depth with respect to several mineral phases may change and mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions may take place. In addition, changing groundwater conditions may facilitate microbial growth on fracture walls. These processes are of importance since they may influence the stability and safety of the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) because precipitation and microbial growth may seal the hydraulically conductive fractures caused by the repository construction. Different processes expected to occur in the EDZ during the open repository conditions and after repository closure have been evaluated based on data from Forsmark, Laxemar and Aespoe. Geochemical modelling by using PHREEQC was applied to simulate the following cases: - increase of temperature to 50 deg C and 100 deg C to simulate the thermal effects from spent nuclear fuel; - open repository conditions simulating atmospheric conditions (equilibrium with atmospheric partial pressures of CO{sub 2}(g) and O{sub 2}(g)); - mixing with deep saline water simulating up-coning; - mixing with shallow infiltration waters simulating down-coning; - mixing with different proportions of cement dissolution porewater. The effect of variable temperatures (up to 100 deg C) on most of the above modelled processes has also been assessed. A preliminary estimation of the effect of mineral precipitation on the hydraulic conductivity of the EDZ has been carried out. For most of the modelling cases, the estimated decrease of the hydraulic conductivity in ten years is smaller than 2%. Microbial evaluation was used to identify the potential for microbial calcite and iron hydroxide formation during various repository conditions. The most important groundwater parameters for microorganisms, are pH and carbonate, ferrous iron, methane and the

  7. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Studies of factors that affect and controls the Excavation Damaged/Disturbed Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Martin; Baeckstroem, Ann; Quanhong Feng (AaF - Berg och Maetteknik, Stockholm (Sweden)); Berglund, Johan (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Stockholm (Sweden)); Johansson, Malin; Mas Ivars, Diego (Itasca Geomekanik AB, Solna (Sweden)); Olsson, Mats (SweBefo, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    A tunnel was developed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in 2003 purposely for a large in-situ rock mechanics experiment, the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE). The tunnel had a large height/width ratio with a circular floor, primarily to control the stress situation around the tunnel and concentrate the stresses under the floor. An extensive set of data for understanding the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) was collected within section 47 of the tunnel. It consist of the blast design, blast sequences, convergence measurements during excavation, geological mapping of tunnel and cores, 3D-laser scanning of the tunnel geometry etc. Furthermore, in 2006, ultrasonic measurements along eight boreholes were carried out in order to estimate the extent of the EDZ in the tunnel. The collection of all these different information provides an opportunity to evaluate the mechanical damages caused by the excavation work. The overall aim with this project is to give feed-back to future planning of tunnelling on issues of importance for requirements with respect to minimising the EDZ in crystalline rock from the drill and blast method. A combination of the mapped geological features (tunnel and cores) and the geometry of the blasted tunnel obtained from the 3D-laser scanning were used to build a 3D model of the geology with emphasis on the geometry of the natural fractures. The rock mechanic response to the tunnelling was evaluated in a numerical model including the as-built geometry in combination with the 3D model of the geology. The modelling of the rock mechanical processes of importance for the EDZ could be calibrated against actual measurements. From observed changes in the ultrasonic wave velocity along the boreholes it was found that the locations of the velocity changes corresponded well with the location of the mapped fractures in the drill cores. This indicates that EDZ can be detected using the ultrasonic method with high accuracy. Furthermore, the

  8. HYBRID FINITE-DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELLING OF BLAST-INDUCED EXCAVATION DAMAGED ZONE IN THE TOP-HEADING OF DEEP TUNNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaming An

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid finite-discrete element method (FEM/DEM is introduced to model the excavation damage zone induced by blast in a deep tunnel. The key components of the hybrid finite-discrete element method, i.e. transition from continuum to discontinuum through fracture and fragmentation, and detonation-induced gas expansion and flow through fracturing rock, are introduced in detail. The stress and crack initiation and propagation of an uniaxial compression test is then modelled by the proposed method and compared with those well documented in literature to calibrate the hybrid FEM/DEM. The modelled stress-loading displacement curve presents a typical failure process of brittle materials. The calibrated method is then used to model the stress and crack initiation and propagation induced by blast for the last step of excavation in a deep tunnel. A separation contour, which connects the borehole through the radial cracks from each borehole, is observed during the excavation process. The newly formed tunnel wall is produced and the main components of excavation damage zone (EDZ are obtained. Therefore, the proposed treatment has the capabilities of modelling blast-induced EDZ and rock failure process. It is concluded that the hybrid FEM/DEM is a valuable numerical tool for studying excavation damage zone in terms of crack initiation and propagation and stress distribution.

  9. Gas transport in the excavation damage zone of a final storage in clay rock; Untersuchungen zum Gastransport in der Auflockerungszone in einem geologischen Endlager in Tongestein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haefner, Benjamin

    2014-05-13

    As a reference scenario for this thesis a gas pressure build-up in the post closure phase of a final storage for highly active nuclear waste storage is postulated. The mass transport mechanisms in the excavation damage zone relevant for this case are identified under varying scenario relevant boundary conditions. The contribution of these mechanisms to overall mass transport is quantified.

  10. Monitoring the Excavation Damaged Zone in Opalinus clay by three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity in the Mont Terri gallery G-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, N.; Adler, A.; Nicollin, F.; Gibert, D.; Nussbaum, C.

    2012-04-01

    The characteristics of opalinus clay have been studied in the last years for its capacity to retain radionuclide transport as a low permeable rock. This formation presents thereby suitable properties for hosting repository sites of radioactive waste. The Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland) has been excavated in opalinus clay layer in order to develop experiences improving the knowledge on the physico-chemical properties of the rock. The study of electrical properties furnishes information on the rock structure, its anisotropy and the changes of these properties with time (Nicollin et al., 2010 ; Thovert et al., 2011). Here the three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity aims at monitoring the temporal evolution of the excavation damaged zone. Three rings of electrodes have been set-up around the gallery and voltage is measured between two electrodes while a current is injected between two others (Gibert et al., 2006). Measurements have been achieved from July 2004 until April 2008 before, during and after the excavation of the gallery 04. In this study we develop a computational approach to reconstruct three dimensional images of the resistivity in the vicinity of the electrodes. A finite element model is used to represent the complex geometry of the gallery. The measurements inferred from a given resistivity distribution are estimated using the software EIDORS (Adler and Lionheart, 2006), this constitutes the forward problem. The reconstruction of the media resistivity is then implemented by fitting the estimated to the measured data, via the resolution of an inverse problem. The parameters of this inverse problem are defined by mapping the forward problem elements into a coarser mesh. This allows to reduce drastically the number of unknowns and so increases the robustness of the inversion. The inversion is executed with the conjugate gradient method regularised by an analysis of the Jacobian singular values. The results show an

  11. ZEDEX - A study of damage and disturbance from tunnel excavation by blasting and tunnel boring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emsley, S. [Golder Associates, Maidenhead (United Kingdom); Olsson, Olle; Stenberg, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Co., Figeholm (Sweden); Alheid, H.J. [Federal Inst. for Geosciences and Natural Resources, Hannover (Germany); Falls, S. [Queens Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada)

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of the ZEDEX project were to understand the mechanical behaviour of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) with respect to its origin, character, magnitude of property change, extent and its dependence on excavation method. Excavation with normal smooth blasting, blasting with low shock explosives and tunnel boring were studied. The drifts are located at Aespoe at a depth of 420 m, the profiles are circular and 5 m in diameter. The results have shown that there is a damaged zone, close to the drift wall dominated by changes in rock properties which are irreversible, and that there is a disturbed zone beyond the damaged zone that is dominated by changes in stress state and mainly reversible. There is no distinct boundary between the two zones. The results from ZEDEX indicate that the role of the EDZ as a preferential pathway to radionuclide transport is limited to the damaged zone. The extent of the damaged zone can be limited through application of appropriate excavation methods. By limiting the extent of the damaged zone it should also be feasible to block pathways in the damaged zone by plugs placed at strategic locations 68 refs, 92 figs, 31 tabs

  12. Excavation damage and disturbance in crystalline rock - results from experiments and analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckblom, Goeran (Conrox AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-11-15

    SKB plans to submit the application to site and construct the final repository for spent nuclear fuel in 2010. One important basis for the application is the results of the safety assessments, for which one particular dataset is the axial hydraulic properties along the underground openings used to calculate the transport resistance for radionuclide transport in the event that the canister is impaired. SKB initiated a project (Zuse) to be run over the period 2007-2009 to: - establish the current knowledge base on excavation damage and disturbance with particular focus on the axial hydraulic properties along the underground openings; - provide a basis for the requirements and compliance criteria for the excavation damaged and disturbed zone; - devise methods and instruments to infer or measure the excavation damage and disturbance at different times during the repository construction and operation before closure; - propose demonstration tests for which the methods are used in situ to qualify appropriate data for use in the safety reports. This report presents the results of the first stage of the Zuse project. Previous major experiments and studies in Canada, Finland, Japan, Sweden and Switzerland on spalling, excavation damage and disturbance was compiled and evaluated to provide the SR-Site report with a defendable database on the properties for the excavation damage and disturbance. In preparation for the SR-Site report, a number of sensitivity studies were conducted in which reasonable ranges of values for spalling and damage were selected in combination with an impaired backfill. The report here describes the construction of the repository in eleven steps and for each of these steps, the potential evolution of THMCB (Thermal, Mechanical, Hydraulic and Chemical/ Biological) processes are reviewed. In this work it was found that descriptions of the chemical and microbiological evolution connected with excavation damage and disturbance was lacking. The preliminary

  13. Characterisation of Excavation-Induced Damage Around a Short Test Tunnel in the Opalinus Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Salina; Loew, Simon; Schuster, Kristof; Nussbaum, Christophe; Fidelibus, Corrado

    2017-08-01

    In Switzerland, the Opalinus Clay is under consideration as a potential host rock for deep geological storage of nuclear waste. The Swiss concept involves high-level waste containers emplaced in small-diameter drifts of roughly 3 m. At the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, a short mine-by experiment (EZ-B) was executed in 2005 with the objective of characterising the excavation-induced damage through an interpretation of integrated field data. The damage zone was found to consist of two parts. Fracture mapping from drillcores and televiewer images revealed a thin inner zone of macroscopic fracturing (20 cm) and devoid of borehole instabilities as well as coinciding with the lowest P-wave characteristics (normalised amplitudes and velocities). The outer zone (50-80 cm) was defined by increasing P-wave characteristics and evidence of borehole instabilities. Supplementing the data interpretation, a simplified numerical elastic stress analysis indicated that the rock mass in the sidewalls and upper western haunch are the most susceptible to spalling. In these regions, stress levels only just reach a spalling limit around 0.05 in the inner fractured zone, suggesting that the zone of macro-fracturing around the niche is not significant. It is postulated that the physical manifestation of the relatively weak bedding plane strength is dominated by bedding-perpendicular displacement as opposed to bedding-parallel shear.

  14. Hydraulic tests for the Excavation Disturbed Zone in NATM drift of North Extension

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    Matsuoka, Eiken [Taisei Kiso Sekkei Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Investigation for characterization of rock properties of the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) were carried out in NATM drift of North Extension in the Tono Mine. As a part of this investigation, hydraulic tests were performed by means of the hydraulic measuring instrument, which had been developed by PNC Tono Geoscience Center. The purpose of this tests is to characterize the change in hydraulic properties of the EDZ caused by drift excavation using machine (boom header). The hydraulic tests were performed in the burials MH-1,2,3, in which hydraulic tests had been performed before the drift excavation in 1994. The test results indicate that the measured values of pore water pressure have decreased after excavation of the drift. The values ranged from -0.037 kgf/cm{sup 2} to 0.039 kgf/cm{sup 2}. The measured hydraulic conductivities ranged from 2.2*10{sup -11} cm/s to 9.1*10{sup -11} cm/s for mud stone and from 2.8*10{sup -9} cm/s to 2.4*10{sup -7} cm/s for conglomerate. The measured hydraulic conductivities for mud stone are below the lower limit of the instrument, and the change in the hydraulic conductivities for conglomerate is little. The hydraulic conductivities for conglomerate and mad stone (reference values) are interpreted. The change in hydraulic conductivities measured before and after excavation of the drift is insignificant. (author)

  15. Analysis of blasting damage in adjacent mining excavations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Yugo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a small-scale wedge failure at Yukon Zinc's Wolverine Mine in Yukon, Canada, a vibration monitoring program was added to the existing rockbolt pull testing regime. The failure in the 1150 drift occurred after numerous successive blasts in an adjacent tunnel had loosened friction bolts passing through an unmapped fault. Analysis of blasting vibration revealed that support integrity is not compromised unless there is a geological structure to act as a failure plane. The peak particle velocity (PPV rarely exceeded 250 mm/s with a frequency larger than 50 Hz. As expected, blasting more competent rock resulted in higher PPVs. In such cases, reducing the round length from 3.5 m to 2.0 m was an effective means of limiting potential rock mass and support damage.

  16. Hydraulic Features of the Excavation Disturbed Zone - Laboratory investigations of samples taken from the Q- and S-tunnels at Aespoe HRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericsson, Lars O.; Brinkhoff, Petra; Gustafson, Gunnar; Kvartsberg, Sara (Div. of GeoEngineering, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    The general aim of the project has been to contribute to the SKB safety and assessment analysis with realistic figures of hydraulic properties in an excavation disturbed zone. The project had the following more detailed objectives: - Develop a laboratory method to determine fracture transmissivity under water-saturated conditions. - Provide magnitudes for realistic values for fracture transmissivity in the disturbed or damaged zone due to excavation. - Map micro cracks radially from the tunnel wall. - Map the spread of matrix porosity radially from the tunnel wall. - Develop single-hole hydraulic testing methodology in tunnel wall for saturated conditions. - Integration of fracture geometries and transmissivity investigations for conceptual hydraulic modelling of the bedrock along a tunnel wall

  17. Geological Investigation and Tunnel Excavation Aspects of the Weakness Zones of Xiang'an Subsea Tunnels in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peixin; Zhang, Dingli; Pan, Jianli; Liu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Tunneling through weakness zones under deep seawater involves significant risks and may have disastrous consequences. This paper presents a case study of geological investigation and excavation aspects of subsea tunnels in major weakness zones. The subject is the Xiang'an subsea tunnels, the first subsea tunnel project in mainland China. The Xiang'an subsea tunnels passed through four major weakness zones, mainly consisting of highly to completely weathered rock mass. The weakness zones were characterized by a combination of long-distance and short-distance, destructive and nondestructive methods, which supplement and verify information with each other. The weakness zones were treated by full-face curtain grouting, using both cementitious and chemical grouts. The interrelationship between the settlement at tunnel crown and ground surface, as well as the interrelationship between ground settlement and ground cracking, were explored based on instrumentation data recorded during tunneling on land. The pre-warning, warning, and limiting values of tunnel crown settlement during excavation of each heading of subsea sections were established to protect the seabed against cracking. Engineering means and methods were developed to control the ground deformation during excavation.

  18. Deformations and damage to buildings adjacent to deep excavations in soft soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korff, M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to gain insight into mechanisms of soil-structure interaction for buildings adjacent to deep excavations and to find a reliable method to design and monitor deep excavations in urban areas with soft soil conditions. The research focuses on typical Dutch conditions. The

  19. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task B. Understanding and characterizing the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ). Phase 2 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, John A. (ed.) [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Rock Engineering Consultants (United Kingdom); Lanru Jing (ed.) [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Antikainen, Juha [Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki (Finland); Backers, Tobias [GeoFrames GmbH, (Germany); Baeckstroem, Ann [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Bergbyggkonsult AB (Sweden); Koyama, Tomofumi [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Xiating Feng; Pengzhi Pan [Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Kobayashi, Akira [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Rinne, Mikael; Baotang Shen [Fracom Ltd. (Finland)

    2007-02-15

    The DECOVALEX-THMC project is an ongoing international co-operative project that was stared in 2004 to support the development of mathematical models of coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes in geological media for siting potential nuclear fuel waste repositories. The general objective is to characterise and evaluate the coupled THMC processes in the near field and far field of a geological repository and to assess their impact on performance assessment: - during the three phases of repository development: excavation phase, operation phase and post-closure phase; - for three different rocks types: crystalline, argillaceous and tuff; - with specific focus on the issues of: Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ), permanent property changes of rock masses, and glaciation and permafrost phenomena. The project involves a large number of research teams supported by radioactive waste management agencies or governmental regulatory bodies in Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden and USA, who conducted advanced studies and numerical modelling of coupled THMC processes under five tasks. This report summarizes the work contributed to Phase 2 of Task B of the project, which took place during the period of March 2004 to May 2006. The Phase 2 work incorporated the use of a wide range of numerical models to simulate the failure of a number of intact rock core samples, from the APSE tunnel at Aespoe HRL, as tested in uniaxial compression and other loading conditions with the intention of establishing the common and code-specific features of the models. The core samples of the Aespoe diorite were treated with different initial mechanical and chemical conditions as dry samples, saturated with distilled water, formation water and saline water, with different durations of submersion, respectively, in order to observe the mechanical effects of saturation by different chemical fluids on the mechanical properties of the intact core

  20. Damage-induced permeability changes around underground excavations; Endommagement des roches argileuses et permeabilite induite au voisinage d'ouvrages souterrains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coll, C

    2005-07-15

    The storage of nuclear waste in deep geological formations is now considered more and more as a potential solution. During excavation, a disturbed zone develops in which damaging can be important and which can lead eventually to the failure of the rock. Fluid flow and permeability in the rock mass can be significantly modified producing a possible security risk. Our work consisted in an experimental study of the hydro-mechanical coupling of two argillaceous rocks: Boom clay (Mol, Belgium) and Opalinus clay (Mont-Terri, Switzerland). Triaxial tests were performed in a saturated state to study the permeability evolution of both clays with isotropic and deviatoric stresses. Argillaceous rocks are geo-materials with complex behaviour governed by numerous coupled processes. Strong physico-chemical interactions between the fluid and the solid particles and their very low permeability required the modification of the experimental set up. Moreover, specific procedures were developed to measure permeability and to detect strain localisation in shear bands. We show that for Boom Clay, permeability is not significantly influenced by strain localisation. For Opalinus clay, fracturing can induce an increase of the permeability at low confining pressure. (author)

  1. Elemental analyses on porcelains of Tang and Song Dynasties excavated from Yongjinwan zone at Jinsha site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C. D.; Ge, L. J.; Liu, M. T.; Zhu, J. J.; An, Z.; Bai, B.

    2018-02-01

    The work presented here carried out elemental analyses on 60 porcelain shards of Tang and Song Dynasties, unearthed from Yongjinwan zone at Jinsha site, Sichuan, China, using a combination of PIXE and RBS methods. Six shards from Liulichang kiln site and 6 from Shifangtang kiln site were also analyzed as reference materials. The factor analyses for the elemental compositions in the bodies and glazes of the total 72 porcelain shards have been performed to explore their similarities and differences. Combining the results of factor analyses on elements in bodies and glazes and the classification by traditional archaeological criteria, the provenances for most of shards unearthed from Yongjinwan zone in Jinsha site could be determined. Majority of shards with a Qiong-kiln style were found as products of Liulichang kiln, this is consistent with Yongjinwan's geographical location and social environment, i.e., Yongjinwan was a suburban settlement nearest to Liulichang kiln in ancient times. Although both products of Liulichang kiln and Shifangtang kiln belonged to Qiong-kiln system and they shared a similar appearance such as red body and celadon glaze, there were distinct differences in chemical composition which could be unraveled by PIXE-RBS measurements and factor analysis. There were no apparent differences of chemical compositions for the same kinds of body and glaze between Tang and Song Dynasties, which may suggest that raw materials and production techniques for the same kinds of body and glaze continued between Tang and Song Dynasties. The chemical characteristics for each kind of body and glaze and the correlations between element composition and porcelain appearance were also obtained in this work.

  2. A Study on the Prediction of Damage Extent at the Time of Perforating Operation on Reinforced Concrete Structure through Horizontal Excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-hyoung; Kim, Hakman; Cho, Jin Woo

    2017-04-01

    When a building collapses in downtown due to a sudden external factor such as earthquake, gas explosion or terror, the rescue of a survivor in the buried area should be prioritized. When a collapse accident occurs in downtown, there is a difficulty of access to the surrounding area of the collapsed building site due to building debris and a risk of the second collapse, and it takes a lot of time to rescue any survivor in the top excavation method to rescue while removing building debris. Therefore, there is a method to rescue any survivor safely by installing the second lifeline after securing the first lifeline within 72 hours using inclined excavation near the site of collapsed building or horizontal excavation at the underground parking lot of an adjacent building and prolonging the life of any survivor. When a building collapses in downtown, the perforating operation is carried out at the existing structure in the process of establishing the first lifeline to the position of a survivor through the parking lot of an adjacent building or the external wall of the building, and the damage extent in case of carrying out such operation was confirmed in this study. In order to determine the stability of the damaged existing structure and the range of repair, the reinforced concrete wall was produced and the damage extent of the reinforced concrete for each perforating position was measured by installing a measuring instrument at a position separated by 150%˜200% from the perforating position. As a result, it was shown that the average damage area for each perforating position was influenced within approximately a 254% radius. Keywords: horizontal excavation, damage, reinforced roncrete, building collapses Acknowledgement This research was supported by a Grant from a Strategic Research Project (Horizontal Drilling and Stabilization Technologies for Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) Operation) funded by the Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology.

  3. In Situ Observation of Failure Mechanisms Controlled by Rock Masses with Weak Interlayer Zones in Large Underground Cavern Excavations Under High Geostress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shu-Qian; Feng, Xia-Ting; Jiang, Quan; Liu, Guo-Feng; Pei, Shu-Feng; Fan, Yi-Lin

    2017-09-01

    A weak interlayer zone (WIZ) is a poor rock mass system with loose structure, weak mechanical properties, variable thickness, random distribution, strong extension, and high risk due to the shear motion of rock masses under the action of tectonism, bringing many stability problems and geological hazards, especially representing a potential threat to the overall stability of rock masses with WIZs in large underground cavern excavations. Focusing on the deformation and failure problems encountered in the process of excavation unloading, this research proposes comprehensive in situ observation schemes for rock masses with WIZs in large underground cavern on the basis of the collection of geological, construction, monitoring, and testing data. The schemes have been fully applied in two valuable project cases of an underground cavern group under construction in the southwest of China, including the plastic squeezing-out tensile failure and the structural stress-induced collapse of rock masses with WIZs. In this way, the development of rock mass failure, affected by the step-by-step excavations along the cavern's axis and the subsequent excavation downward, could be observed thoroughly. Furthermore, this paper reveals the preliminary analyses of failure mechanism of rock masses with WIZs from several aspects, including rock mass structure, strength, high stress, ground water effects, and microfracture mechanisms. Finally, the failure particularities of rock masses with WIZs and rethink on prevention and control of failures are discussed. The research results could provide important guiding reference value for stability analysis, as well as for rethinking the excavation and support optimization of rock masses with WIZs in similar large underground cavern under high geostress.

  4. Modelling the excavation damaged zone using a hydro-mechanical double-scale model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Eijnden, A.P.; Bésuelle, P.; Collin, F.; Chambon, R.; Desrues, J.; Vardon, P.J.; Bykov, D.

    2016-01-01

    Disposal of spent nuclear fuel and long lived radioactive waste in deep clay geological formations is one of the promising options worldwide. In this concept of the geological disposal system, the Boom Clay is considered as a potential host rock when designing a generic waste repository in the

  5. Hip damage occurs at the zone of femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannast, M; Goricki, D; Beck, M; Murphy, S B; Siebenrock, K A

    2008-02-01

    Although current concepts of anterior femoroacetabular impingement predict damage in the labrum and the cartilage, the actual joint damage has not been verified by computer simulation. We retrospectively compared the intraoperative locations of labral and cartilage damage of 40 hips during surgical dislocation for cam or pincer type femoroacetabular impingement (Group I) with the locations of femoroacetabular impingement in 15 additional hips using computer simulation (Group II). We found no difference between the mean locations of the chondrolabral damage of Group I and the computed impingement zone of Group II. The standard deviation was larger for measures of articular damage from Group I in comparison to the computed values of Group II. The most severe hip damage occurred at the zone of highest probability of femoroacetabular impact, typically in the anterosuperior quadrant of the acetabulum for both cam and pincer type femoroacetabular impingements. However, the extent of joint damage along the acetabular rim was larger intraoperatively than that observed on the images of the 3-D joint simulations. We concluded femoroacetabular impingement mechanism contributes to early osteoarthritis including labral lesions. Level II, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  6. The forecast of mining-induced seismicity and the consequent risk of damage to the excavation in the area of seismic event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Drzewiecki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Central Mining Institute has developed a method for forecasting the amount of seismic energy created by tremors induced by mining operations. The results of geophysical measurements of S wave velocity anomalies in a rock mass or the results of analytic calculations of the values of pressure on the horizon of the elastic layers are used in the process of calculating the energy. The calculation program which has been developed and adopted has been modified over recent years and it now enables not only the prediction of the energy of dynamic phenomena induced by mining but also the forecasting of the devastating range of seismic shock. The results obtained from this calculation, usually presented in a more readable graphic form, are useful for the macroscopic evaluation of locations that are potential sources of seismic energy. Forecasting of the maximum energy of seismic shock without prior knowledge of the location of the shock's source, does not allow shock attenuation that results from, for example, a distance of tremor source from the excavation which will be affected by seismic energy, to be taken into consideration. The phenomena of energy dissipation, which is taken into account in the forecasts, create a new quality of assessment of threat to the excavation. The paper presents the principle of a method of forecasting the seismic energy of a shock and the risk of damage to the excavation as a result of the impact of its energy wave. The solution assumes that the source of the energy shock is a resilient layer in which the sum of the gravitational stresses, resulting from natural disturbances and those induced by the conducted or planned mining exploitation, is estimated. The proposed solution assumes a spherical model for the tremor source, for which seismic energy is forecasted as a function of the longwall advance and the elementary value of seismic energy destroying the excavation. Subsequently, the following are calculated for the

  7. Archaeological excavations in the zone in front of the face of Jaenschwalde opencast mine; Archaeologische Grabungen im Vorfeld des Tagebaues Jaenschwalde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boenisch, E. [Brandenburgisches Landesamt fuer Denkmalpflege mit Archaeologischem Landesmuseum, Pritzen (Germany). Referat Braunkohle; Gediga, K. [LAUBAG BD Jaenschwalde/Cottbus-Nord, Cottbus (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    Mining companies and archaeologists alike have a share in the planning and execution of the stripping of the zone in front of the face and, hence, of archaeological exploration. The facts stated by the authors show that, in spite of hindrances, it has been possible at Jaenschwalde opencast mine, on the one hand, to overcome the obstacles to the mining project due to the duration of the archaelogical excavations, and, on the other hand, to continue the expert examination and salvaging of buried prehistoric remains. The further field of activity is clearly defined. In order to avoid a race against the overburden excavator it is essential, above all, that medium- and long-term aims should be defined and pursued. To this end medium-term agreements are reached between the mining company in question and the Brandenburg State Department of Preservation of Monuments and State Archaeological Museum. (orig.) [German] Im Zustandekommen und an der Durchfuehrung der Vorfeldberaeumung und letztendlich der archaeologischen Untersuchungen haben Bergbaubetreibende und Archaeologen Anteil. Die Ausfuehrungen zeigen, dass es im Tagebau Jaenschwalde trotz Hindernissen gelingt, einerseits Behinderungen des bergbaulichen Vorhabens druch die Dauer von Ausgrabungen auszuschliessen und andererseits die fachgerechte Untersuchung und Bergung von Bodendenkmalen zu ermoeglichen. Das weitere Arbeitsfeld bleibt klar umrissen. Um ein Wettrennen mit dem Abraumbagger zu vermeiden, gilt es vor allem mittel- und langfristige Ziele zu definieren und umzusetzen. Diesem Ziel dienen mittelfristige Vereinbarungen zwischen dem Bergbautreibenden und dem Brandenburgischen Landesamt fuer Denkmalpflege und Archaeologisches Landesmuseum. (orig.)

  8. Critical Damage Analysis of WC-Co Tip of Conical Pick due to Coal Excavation in Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Dewangan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available WC-Co based tools are widely used in the field of coal and rock excavation because of their unique combination of strength, hardness, and resistance to abrasive wear. Conical pick is one of the coal cutting tools. The tip of the pick is made of WC-Co material. As coal and rock are heterogeneous elements, they pose various constraints during excavation. As a result the tools wear out during the process. Other parameters like cutting techniques, tool orientation, and environmental conditions also affect the tool significantly. The wearing phenomenon greatly reduces the service life of the tools and thereby cuts down the production rate. To prevent such wearing process, it is important to investigate the different wear mechanisms in WC-Co. Simultaneously, there has to be an ongoing endeavour for the development of better quality WC-Co. This paper focuses on different wear mechanisms in a conical pick which has been used in a continuous miner machine for coal cutting. The worn out surface has been observed by using FE-SEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy and EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The mechanisms, namely, coal/rock intermixing, cracking and crushing of WC grains, and adhesion of rock particles, have been predominantly investigated in this study. A little indication of corrosive decay in the WC grain has also been reported. The EDS has detected material concentration in a selected area or point of the worn-out surface. The spectrograph confirms the presence of coal/rock materials. Elements such as W, C, Ca, K, O, and Co have been mainly found in different concentrations at different positions.

  9. Experimental tests of truncated diffusion in fault damage zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Anna; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Li, Kewen; Horne, Roland N.

    2016-11-01

    Fault zones affect the flow paths of fluids in groundwater aquifers and geological reservoirs. Fault-related fracture damage decreases to background levels with increasing distance from the fault core according to a power law. This study investigated mass transport in such a fault-related structure using nonlocal models. A column flow experiment is conducted to create a permeability distribution that varies with distance from a main conduit. The experimental tracer response curve is preasymptotic and implies subdiffusive transport, which is slower than the normal Fickian diffusion. If the surrounding area is a finite domain, an upper truncated behavior in tracer response (i.e., exponential decline at late times) is observed. The tempered anomalous diffusion (TAD) model captures the transition from subdiffusive to Fickian transport, which is characterized by a smooth transition from power-law to an exponential decline in the late-time breakthrough curves.

  10. The processes controlling damage zone propagation induced by wellbore fluid injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Induced seismicity by wellbore fluid injection is an important tool for enhancing permeability in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. We model nucleation and propagation of damage zones and seismicity patterns for two-dimensional plane strain configuration at a depth of 5 km using novel numerical software developed in the course of this study. Simulations include the coupling of poro-elastic deformation and groundwater flow with damage evolution (weakening and healing) and its effect on the elastic and hydrologic parameters. Results show that the process occurring during fluid injection can be divided into four stages. The duration of each stage depends on the hydrological and mechanical parameters. Initially, fluid flows into the rock with no seismic events (5 to 20 hr). At this stage, damage increases from 0 to 1 creating two sets of conjugate zones (four narrow damage zones). Thereafter, the occurrence of seismic events and faulting begins and accelerates for the next 20 to 70 hr. At the initial part of this stage, two of the damage zones create stress shadows on the other two damage zones that stop progressing. The velocity of the advancing damage is limited only by the rock parameters controlling damage evolution. At the third stage, which lasts for the following 20-30 hr, damage acceleration decreases because fluid transport becomes a limiting factor as the damage zones are too long to efficiently transfer the pressure from the well to the tip of the damage zones. Finally, the damage decelerates and even stops in some cases. The propagation of damage is controlled and limited by fluid transport from the injection well to the tip of the damage zones because fluid transport does not keep up with the dilatancy of the damage zones. The time and distance of propagation depend on the damage-permeability coupling and the remote shear stress. Higher remote shear stress causes shorter initial periods of no seismicity; strong damage-permeability coupling causes

  11. A new conceptual model for damage zone evolution with fault growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Joussineau, G.; Aydin, A.

    2006-12-01

    Faults may either impede or enhance fluid flow in the subsurface, which is relevant to a number of economic issues (hydrocarbon migration and entrapment, formation and distribution of mineral deposits) and environmental problems (movement of contaminants). Fault zones typically comprise a low-permeability core made up of intensely deformed fault rock and a high-permeability damage zone defined by fault-related fractures. The geometry, petrophysical properties and continuity of both the fault core and the damage zone have an important influence on the mechanical properties of the fault systems and on subsurface fluid flow. Information about fault components from remote seismic methods is limited and is available only for large faults (slip larger than 20-100m). It is therefore essential to characterize faults and associated damage zones in field analogues, and to develop conceptual models of how faults and related structures form and evolve. Here we present such an attempt to better understand the evolution of fault damage zones in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone of the Valley of Fire State Park (SE Nevada). We document the formation and evolution of the damage zone associated with strike-slip faults through detailed field studies of faults of increasing slip magnitudes. The faults initiate as sheared joints with discontinuous pockets of damage zone located at fault tips and fault surface irregularities. With increasing slip (slip >5m), the damage zone becomes longer and wider by progressive fracture infilling, and is organized into two distinct components with different geometrical and statistical characteristics. The first component of the damage zone is the inner damage zone, directly flanking the fault core, with a relatively high fracture frequency and a thickness that scales with the amount of fault slip. Parts of this inner zone are integrated into the fault core by the development of the fault rock, contributing to the core's progressive widening. The second

  12. Reliability and Assessment Techniques on Ground Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanga Tangchawal

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Planning and assessment on the excavation of the brittle materials (soil or rock can be done by using the machinery and/or explosives. The reliability assessment has been proposed to predict the failure of ground during excavation process. The stability planning on cutting soil (rock face by machinery can be compared between the deterministic and the statistical method. The risk of using explosives for rock excavation has to concern on the damage and environmental impacts after blasting events.

  13. Formation of damage zone and seismic velocity variations during hydraulic stimulation: numerical modelling and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Eyal; Calò, Marco; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    During hydraulic stimulations, a complex interaction is observed between the injected flux and pressure, number and magnitude of induced seismic events, and changes in seismic velocities. In this paper, we model formation and propagation of damage zones and seismicity patterns induced by wellbore fluid injection. The model includes the coupling of poroelastic deformation and groundwater flow with damage evolution (weakening and healing) and its effect on the elastic and hydrologic parameters of crystalline rocks. Results show that three subsequent interactions occur during stimulation. (1) Injected flux-pressure interaction: typically, after a flux increase, the wellbore pressure also rises to satisfy the flux conditions. Thereafter, the elevated pore pressure triggers damage accumulation and seismic activity, that is, accompanied by permeability increase. As a result, wellbore pressure decreases retaining the target injected flux. (2) Wellbore pressure-seismicity interaction: damage processes create an elongated damage zone in the direction close to the main principal stress. The rocks within the damage zone go through partial healing and remain in a medium damage state. Damage that originates around the injection well propagates within the damage zone away from the well, raising the damage state of the already damaged rocks, and is followed by compaction and fast partial healing back to a medium damage state. This `damage wave' behaviour is associated with the injected flux changes only in early stages while fracture's height (h) is larger than its length (l). The ratio h/l controls the deformation process that is responsible for several key features of the damage zone. (3) Stress- and damage-induced variations of the seismic P-wave velocities (Vp). Vp gradually decreases as damage is accumulated and increases after rock failure as the shear stress is released and healing and compaction are dominant. Typically, Vp decreases within the damage zone and increases in

  14. Hip Damage Occurs at the Zone of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    OpenAIRE

    Tannast, M.; Goricki, D.; Beck, M; Murphy, S. B.; Siebenrock, K.A

    2008-01-01

    Although current concepts of anterior femoroacetabular impingement predict damage in the labrum and the cartilage, the actual joint damage has not been verified by computer simulation. We retrospectively compared the intraoperative locations of labral and cartilage damage of 40 hips during surgical dislocation for cam or pincer type femoroacetabular impingement (Group I) with the locations of femoroacetabular impingement in 15 additional hips using computer simulation (Group II). We found no ...

  15. Modeling of excavation induced coupled hydraulic-mechanical processes in claystone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massmann, Jobst

    2009-07-01

    induced hydraulic and mechanical response for a time period of at least ten years. An explanation can be given for the delayed development of an excavation damaged zone. It is caused by the desaturation induced shrinkage. (orig.)

  16. Excavation multiple up drafting tunnels in coastal mountains: A simple solution to resist against the severe drought in sub tropical zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daei, Mohammad Ali; Daei, Manizheh; Daei, Bijan

    2017-04-01

    At many sub tropical places in the globe, including the Persian Gulf in the south of Iran, there is continuously a tremendous amount of steam in the air, but it fails to transform to cloud because of the surrounding overheated lands. Reduction in precipitation in these regions has been extraordinary in recent years. The most probable reason is the global warming phenomena. Many dried forest remains, in these regions are referring to much more precipitations not long ago. All around the Persian Gulf, Oman Sea, Arab sea, and red sea there are enough steam to produce good precipitation nearly year round. The main missed requirement in this zone is the coldness. This fact can be well understand from a narrow green strip in Dhofar which is indebted to a cold oceanic stream that approaches to local shore during four months yearly. This natural cold stream helps a better condensation of water vapor and more precipitation but only in a narrow mountainous land. Based on this natural phenomenon, we hypothesize a different design to cool the water vapor with the same result. Prevention of close contact between the water vapors and hot lands by shooting the steam directly into the atmosphere may help to produce more cloud and rain. Making multiple vertical tunnels in mountains for upright conducting of humid air into the atmosphere can be a solution. Fortunately there are a few high mountain ranges alongside of the coastline in south part of Iran. So excavation of drafting tunnels in these mountains seems reasonable. These structures act passively, but for long term do their work without consuming energy, and making pollution. These earth tubes in some aspects resemble to Kariz, another innovative structure which invented by ancient Iranians, thousands of years ago in order to extract water from dry lands in deserts. Up drafting earth channels can be supposed as a wide vertical kariz which conduct water vapor into the atmosphere from the hot land near a warm sea, something

  17. Lightweight Robotic Excavation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Robust, lightweight, power-efficient excavation robots are mission enablers for lunar outposts and surface systems. Lunar excavators of this type cost-effectively...

  18. Focal Choroidal Excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci, Zafer; Bayraktar, Şerife; Oray, Merih; Kır, Nur

    2016-12-01

    Focal choroidal excavation is a choroidal pit that can be detected by optical coherence tomography. Central serous chorioretinopathy, choroidal neovascularization and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy are pathologies associated with focal choroidal excavation. In this article, we present the follow-up and treatment outcomes of three eyes of two patients with focal choroidal excavation.

  19. Vitelliform focal choroidal excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Chris; Forooghian, Farzin

    2014-05-30

    Focal choroidal excavations (FCE) are characterized by foveal or perifoveal choroid excavations seen on optical coherence tomography (OCT). The authors report a case of FCE associated with a vitelliform lesion within the excavation. A case of FCE associated with a small vitelliform lesion has been described previously, but the larger extent of the vitelliform lesion observed in the current case has not been previously reported. This may represent a novel category of FCE, vitelliform focal choroidal excavation, in which deposition of vitelliform material is associated with its development. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Crane and Excavator Operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on crane and excavator operation is designed to enable the crane and excavator operator to perform his/her duties more proficiently. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI students, a course introduction, and a study guide…

  1. Physical property characterization of a damage zone in granitic rock - Implications for geothermal reservoir properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenning, Quinn; Madonna, Claudio; Amann, Florian; Gischig, Valentin; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy offers a viable alternative to mitigate greenhouse gas emitting energy production. A tradeoff between less expensive drilling costs and increased permeability at shallow depths versus increased heat production at deeper depths stipulates the economic energy potential of a given reservoir. From a geological perspective, successful retrieval of geothermal energy from the subsurface requires sufficient knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic relationship of the target formations, which govern the thermal conditions, physical properties, and fluid flow properties of reservoir rocks. In Switzerland, deep basement rocks (~5 km) with fluid conducting damage zones and enhanced fractured systems stimulated by hydraulic shearing are seen as a potential geothermal reservoir system. Damage zones, both natural and induced, provide permeability enhancement that is especially important for creating fluid conductivity where the matrix permeability is low. This study concentrates on characterizing the elastic and transport properties entering into a natural damage zone penetrated by a borehole at the Grimsel underground research laboratory. The borehole drilled from a cavern at 480 m below ground surface penetrates approximately 20 m of mostly intact Grimsel granodiorite before entering the first phyllosilicate-rich shear zone (~0.2 m thick). The borehole intersects a second shear zone at approximately 23.8m. Between the two shear zones the Grimsel granodiorite is heavily fractured. The minimum principle stress magnitude from in-situ measurements decreases along the borehole into the first shear zone. Two mutually perpendicular core samples of Grimsel granodiorite were taken every 0.1 m from 19.5 to 20.1 m to characterize the physical properties and anisotropy changes as a gradient away from the damage zone. Measurements of ultrasonic compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) velocities at 1 MHz frequency are conducted at room temperature and hydrostatic pressures

  2. Damage development in the adhesive zone and mortar of porous asphalt concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, A.A.A.; Wu, S.P.; Huurman, M.; Mo, L.T.

    This research is focused on damage development in the adhesive zone and the mortar of porous asphalt concrete. The motive of this research is the loss of stone from the pavement surface, the so-called ravelling of noise reducing surface wearing courses. Ravelling is the dominant defect of porous

  3. Damage development in the adhesive zone and mortar of porous asphalt concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mo, L.T.

    2010-01-01

    This research is focused on damage development in the adhesive zone and the mortar of porous asphalt concrete. The motive of this research is the loss of stone from the pavement surface, the so-called ravelling of noise reducing surface wearing courses. Ravelling is the dominant defect of porous

  4. Principles of Mechanical Excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lislerud, A. [Tamrock Corp., Tampere (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    Mechanical excavation of rock today includes several methods such as tunnel boring, raiseboring, roadheading and various continuous mining systems. Of these raiseboring is one potential technique for excavating shafts in the repository for spent nuclear fuel and dry blind boring is promising technique for excavation of deposition holes, as demonstrated in the Research Tunnel at Olkiluoto. In addition, there is potential for use of other mechanical excavation techniques in different parts of the repository. One of the main objectives of this study was to analyze the factors which affect the feasibility of mechanical rock excavation in hard rock conditions and to enhance the understanding of factors which affect rock cutting so as to provide an improved basis for excavator performance prediction modeling. The study included the following four main topics: (a) phenomenological model based on similarity analysis for roller disk cutting, (b) rock mass properties which affect rock cuttability and tool life, (c) principles for linear and field cutting tests and performance prediction modeling and (d) cutter head lacing design procedures and principles. As a conclusion of this study, a test rig was constructed, field tests were planned and started up. The results of the study can be used to improve the performance prediction models used to assess the feasibility of different mechanical excavation techniques at various repository investigation sites. (orig.). 21 refs.

  5. Predicting the impact of riverbed excavation on the buried depth of groundwater table and capillary water zone in the river banks-taking Xinfeng hydropower station as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie; Lan, Jun-Kang

    2017-06-01

    In order to obtain a larger water level drop for power generation, Xinfeng hydropower station proposed to dig 0∼3m depth under the riverbed of downstream. This will affect the burial depth of the groundwater level and capillary water zone on both sides of the river and the nearby resident life and agriculture production. In this study, a three-dimensional groundwater numerical model was set using GMS software to predict the flow field changes after the downstream of riverbed was deepen in Xinfeng hydropower station. Simulation results showed that groundwater level near the bank will greatly decline, affecting water consumption of local residents. Because of the local developed canal system and abundant irrigation water amount, riverbed excavation barely affects agriculture production when increasing the irrigation water volume and frequency.

  6. Smart Calibration of Excavators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Marie; Døring, Kasper; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter

    2005-01-01

    Excavators dig holes. But where is the bucket? The purpose of this report is to treat four different problems concerning calibrations of position indicators for excavators in operation at concrete construction sites. All four problems are related to the question of how to determine the precise...... geographic and/or site-relative position of a given excavator and its bucket. However, our presentations and solutions to the problems can, nevertheless, be read and studied in any order and independently of each other. This also implies and induces a gentle warning to the reader: The {\\em{notation}} need...

  7. Pulverization Texturein Fault Damage Zones: A result of Implosion Damage or Dynamic Compressive Stresses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, T. K.; Girty, G.; Whearty, J.; Mitchell, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Micro-brecciation, or pulverization, is recognized as a fundamental component of the architecture and damage products of many large faults, although the precise mechanisms to produce this damage are debated, with both compressive and tensile mechanisms proposed. We characterized several sites along the San Jacinto fault, southern California, where the total depth of exhumation for the life history of the fault can be determined, to study the confining stresses required for pulverization. In basement rock near Anza, where exhumation is less than 100 m, granitic dikes injected into schist of the Burnt Valley Complex are pulverized out to several meters from the fault core, whereas the schist is brecciated at the macro-scale and contains narrow centimeter-thick seams of black cataclasite. Similar relationships are observed in Horse Canyon, which is exhumed about 400 m below a regional Tertiary erosion surface, where granitic dikes emplaced into schist are pulverized out to distances of several tens of meters from the fault core. These observations imply that very low confining stress is required for micro-brecciation in granitic rock. Unconsolidated sandstones (alluvial fan deposits) along the SJF in Rock House Canyon are undeformed where the deposits are exhumed by about 70 m, but show incipient pulverization (high-density, sub-grain cracking) at 120 m depth of exhumation. Cracks oriented perpendicular to the fault formed in individual quartz and feldspar grains out to a few meters from the fault core. These observations suggest that the confining stress required for onset of pulverization in unconsolidated deposits is on the order of 2-2.5 MPa. As the tensile strength of quartz is an order of magnitude higher than these confining stresses, the most likely mechanism that is producing this damage is dynamic compressive stresses during passage of the rupture front.

  8. Fluid Flow and Fault Zone Damage in Crystalline Basement Rocks (Ore Mountains Saxony)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtziger-Zupančič, P.; Loew, S.; Hiller, A.; Mariethoz, G.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater flow in fractured basement rocks on aquifer scale and processes involved in the creation of fracture network permeability are poorly understood even though they have been studied for decades. A unique hydrogeological dataset consisting of 1030 discrete inflows (corresponding to preferential groundwater pathways) to the Poehla Ore Mine (Ore Mountains) of the SDAG Wismut has been compiled and quantitatively interpreted. Transmissivities and permeabilities were calculated from discrete and cumulative inflows using analytical equations and numerical groundwater flow models. The Variscan basement at Poehla Mine was modelled in 3-D, covering a volume of 14x4x1 km3 with 14 metamorphosed litho-stratigraphic units and 131 faults separated in 6 main strike directions. Mesoscale fractures mapped at inflows points, i.e. locally conductive fractures, show a weak correlation with fault orientation, and a large orientation scattering, which could be related to small scale stress heterogeneities. Inflow points were spatially correlated with major faults considering two distance criteria. This correlation suggests that mainly NW-SE and NE-SW striking faults are transmissive, which should be critically stressed considering all available data about the regional stress field. The trace length (extent) and width of the core and damage zones of the modelled faults were compiled in order to investigate the flow distribution and permeability profiles in directions perpendicular to fault strike. It can be shown that 90% of all inflows are located in damage zones. The inflows are usually situated within multiple fault zones which overlap each other. Cumulative flow distribution functions within damage zones are non-linear and vary between faults with different orientation. 75-95% of the flow occurs in the inner 50% of the damage zone. Significantly lower flow rates were recognized within most fault cores.

  9. Lightweight Robotic Excavation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightweight robotic excavators address the need for machines that dig, collect, transport and dump lunar soil. Robust and productive small robots enable mining rich...

  10. Lunar Excavator Validation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Energid Technologies proposes to create a tool for simulation-based verification of lunar excavator designs. Energid will combine the best of 1) automatic control...

  11. Focal Choroidal Excavation in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Mohammad Riazi; Esfahani, Hamid Riazi; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim; Hemati, Karim

    2015-05-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) was first reported as a choroidal posteriorly excavated zone without any scleral change. Choroidal excavation also divided into conforming and nonconforming type. Numerous reports demonstrated association between FCE and other disease such as choroidal neovascularization and central serous choroidoretinopathy. Here, we report a rare case of FCE in a patient with Best disease. The patient was diagnosed by spectoral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the second report of choroidal excavation in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

  12. Macro-permeability distribution and anisotropy in a 3D fissured and fractured clay rock: ‘Excavation Damaged Zone’ around a cylindrical drift in Callovo-Oxfordian Argilite (Bure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababou, Rachid; Cañamón Valera, Israel; Poutrel, Adrien

    The Underground Research Laboratory at Bure (CMHM), operated by ANDRA, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency, was developed for studying the disposal of radioactive waste in a deep clayey geologic repository. It comprises a network of underground galleries in a 130 m thick layer of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock (depths 400-600 m). This work focuses on hydraulic homogenization (permeability upscaling) of the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) around a cylindrical drift, taking into account: (1) the permeability of the intact porous rock matrix; (2) the geometric structure of micro-fissures and small fractures synthesized as a statistical set of planar discs; (3) the curved shapes of large ‘chevron’ fractures induced by excavation (periodically distributed). The method used for hydraulic homogenization (upscaling) of the 3D porous and fractured rock is based on a ‘frozen gradient’ superposition of individual fluxes pertaining to each fracture/matrix block, or ‘unit block’. Each unit block comprises a prismatic block of permeable matrix (intact rock) obeying Darcy’s law, crossed by a single piece of planar fracture obeying either Darcy or Poiseuille law. Polygonal as well as disc shaped fractures are accommodated. The result of upscaling is a tensorial Darcy law, with macro-permeability K ij( x) distributed over a grid of upscaling sub-domains, or ‘voxels’. Alternatively, K ij( x) can be calculated point-wise using a moving window, e.g., for obtaining permeability profiles along ‘numerical’ boreholes. Because the permeable matrix is taken into account, the upscaling procedure can be implemented sequentially, as we do here: first, we embed the statistical fissures in the matrix, and secondly, we embed the large curved chevron fractures. The results of hydraulic upscaling are expressed first in terms of ‘equivalent’ macro-permeability tensors, K ij( x, y, z) distributed around the drift. The statistically isotropic fissures are

  13. Nondestructive testing using borehole and surface seismic techniques to evaluate rock mass damage zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, P.P.; Stokoe, K.H. II [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A suite of seismic tests was performed at the U12g tunnel at the Nevada Test Site. The methods include borehole (crosshole and downhole) and surface (Rayleigh wave and refraction) tests. Results indicate that the different methods should be considered complimentary, and that seismic methods can sensitively evaluate magnitudes and variations of in situ rock mass stiffness. In particular, near-surface low velocity (damage) zones are delineated quite well with Rayleigh wave and downhole methods.

  14. Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Cassandra

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition is a new competition that needs graphics, logos, rules, as well as an arena. Although this is the first year of the competition, the competition is modeled after an existing competition, the Centennial Lunar Excavator Challenge. This competition however is aimed at college students. This makes the challenge identifying key aspects of the original competition and modeling them to fit into an easier task, and creating exciting advertisement that helps encourage participation. By using a youth focus group, young insight, as well as guiding advice from experts in the field, hopefully an arena can be designed and built, rules can be molded and created to fit, and alluring graphics can be printed to bring about a successful first year of the Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition.

  15. Mobile continuous lunar excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A novel approach to the concept of lunar mining and the use of in situ oxygen, metallics, and ceramics is presented. The EVA time required to set up, relocate, and maintain equipment, as well as the cost per pound of shipping the mining and processing equipment to the moon are considered. The proposed soil fracturing/loading mechanisms are all based loosely on using the Apollo Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) Frame. All use motor driven tracks for mobility in the forward/reverse and left/right direction. All mechanisms employ the concept of rototillers which are attached to a gantry which, through the use of motor-driven lead screws, provide the rototillers with an up/down capability. A self-reactant excavator, a local mass enhanced excavator, and a soil reactant excavator are illustrated.

  16. Fault damage zone origin of the Teufelsmauer, Subhercynian Cretaceous Basin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimczak, Christian; Schultz, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of fractures as porosity-reducing deformation bands pervading all sandstone segments of the Teufelsmauer, Subhercynian Creatceous Basin, Germany, motivates a study relating the observed macroscopic and microscopic deformation to the damage zone of the nearby Harz border fault. Deformation bands, confirmed and documented by several porosity-reducing micro-mechanisms, such as cataclasis, particulate flow, pressure solution and a heavy quartz cementation, were mapped and analyzed in terms of the kinematics and deformation intensities expressed by them. Deformation band kinematics are uniform throughout the entire basin and consistent with the large-scale tectonic structures of the area. A strain intensity study highlights two narrow but long zones of deformation bands, sub-parallel to the Harz border fault. Deformation band kinematics, strain intensity, as well as micro-mechanisms are all consistent with a continuous but internally diverse deformation band damage zone of the entire Teufelsmauer structure along the Harz border fault, bringing new insights into the tectonic evolution and the origin of the heavy quartz cementation of the sandstones in the Subhercynian Cretaceous Basin.

  17. Modelling of excavation depth and fractures in rock caused by tool indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou Shaoquan; Tan Xiangchun; Lindqvist, P.A. [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    The hydraulic regime after excavation in the near-field rock around deposition holes and deposition tunnels in a spent nuclear fuel repository is of concern for prediction of the saturation process of bentonite buffer and tunnel backfill. The hydraulic condition of main interest in this context is a result of the fracture network that is caused by the excavation. Modelling of the excavation disturbed zone in hard rocks caused by mechanical excavation has been carried out in the Division of Mining Engineering since 1993. This report contains an overview of the work conducted. The mechanical excavation is reasonably simplified as an indentation process of the interaction between rigid indenters and rocks. A large number of experiments have been carried out in the laboratory, and the results used for identifying crushed zones and fracture systems in rock under indentation are presented based on these experiments. The indentation causes crushing and damage of the rock and results in a crushed zone and a cracked zone. The indenter penetrates the rock with a certain depth when the force is over a threshold value relevant to the rock and tool. Outside the cracked zone there are basically three systems of cracks: median cracks, radial cracks, and side cracks. Fully developed radial cracks on each side of the indented area can connect with each other and join with median crack. This forms the so-called radial/median crack system. The influence of the mechanical properties of the rock is discussed based on our conceptual model, and the main factors governing the indentation event are summarised. The cracked zone is dealt with by an analytical fracture model. The side crack is simulated by applying the boundary element method coupled with fracture mechanics. Functional relationships are established relating either the indentation depth or the length of radial/median cracks to the various quantities characterising the physical event, namely the shape and the size of the

  18. Formation of lithospheric shear zones: Effect of temperature on two-phase grain damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Bercovici, David

    2017-09-01

    Shear localization in the lithosphere is a characteristic feature of plate tectonic boundaries, and is evident in the presence of small grain mylonites. Localization and mylonitization in the ductile portion of the lithosphere can arise when its polymineralic material deforms by a grain-size sensitive rheology in combination with Zener pinning, which can impede, or possibly even reverse, grain growth and thus promotes a self-softening feedback mechanism. However, the efficacy of this mechanism is not ubiquitous and depends on lithospheric conditions such as temperature and stress. Therefore, we explore the conditions under which self-weakening takes place, and, in particular, the effect of temperature and deformation state (stress or strain-rate) on these conditions. In our model, the lithosphere-like polymineralic material is deformed in a two-dimensional simple shear driven by constant stress or strain rate. The mineral grains evolve to a stable size, which is obtained when the rate of coarsening by normal grain growth and the rate of grain size reduction by damage are in balance. Damage involves processes by which some of the deformational energy gets transferred into surface energy. This can happen by (i) dynamic recrystallization (grain damage) and (ii) stretching, deforming and stirring the material interface (interface damage). The influence of temperature enters through rheological laws (which govern the rate of work and damage), grain growth kinetics, and the damage partitioning fraction, which is the fraction of deformational work that goes into creating new surface energy. We demonstrate that a two-phase damage model, in which the partitioning fraction depends on both temperature and roughness of the interface between the phases, can successfully match the field data, including the reported correlation of grain size and temperature, the increasing dominance of dislocation creep at higher temperatures and a large range of grain sizes observed across the

  19. Towards international excavation tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ike, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Over the last twenty years social opposition to mineral excavation has increased to such an extent in the densely populated Netherlands, that it is getting extremely difficult to discover new sites for quarrying coarse sand for concrete. While the Dutch government has attempted for many years to

  20. Damage development in the adhesive zone and mortar of porous asphalt concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, L.T.

    2010-01-01

    This research is focused on damage development in the adhesive zone and the mortar of porous asphalt concrete. The motive of this research is the loss of stone from the pavement surface, the so-called ravelling of noise reducing surface wearing courses. Ravelling is the dominant defect of porous asphalt resulting in huge costs of maintenance and resurfacing in the Netherlands. Ravelling is a mixture-associated problem and is directly related to the binding failure within the stone-to-stone co...

  1. Progressive delamination analysis of composite materials using XFEM and a discrete damage zone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongxiang; Waisman, Haim

    2015-01-01

    The modeling of progressive delamination by means of a discrete damage zone model within the extended finite element method is investigated. This framework allows for both bulk and interface damages to be conveniently traced, regardless of the underlying mesh alignment. For discrete interfaces, a new mixed-mode force-separation relation, which accounts for the coupled interaction between opening and sliding modes, is proposed. The model is based on the concept of Continuum Damage Mechanics and is shown to be thermodynamically consistent. An integral-type nonlocal damage is adopted in the bulk to regularize the softening material response. The resulting nonlinear equations are solved using a Newton scheme with a dissipation-based arc-length constraint, for which an analytical Jacobian is derived. Several benchmark delamination studies, as well as failure analyses of a fiber/epoxy unit cell, are presented and discussed in detail. The proposed model is validated against available analytical/experimental data and is found to be robust and mesh insensitive.

  2. The damage is done: Low fault friction recorded in the damage zone of the shallow Japan Trench décollement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Tucker T.; Kirkpatrick, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Fault damage zones record the integrated deformation caused by repeated slip on faults and reflect the conditions that control slip behavior. To investigate the Japan Trench décollement, we characterized the damage zone close to the fault from drill core recovered during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 343 (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST)). Core-scale and microscale structures include phyllosilicate bands, shear fractures, and joints. They are most abundant near the décollement and decrease in density sharply above and below the fault. Power law fits describing the change in structure density with distance from the fault result in decay exponents (n) of 1.57 in the footwall and 0.73 in the hanging wall. Microstructure decay exponents are 1.09 in the footwall and 0.50 in the hanging wall. Observed damage zone thickness is on the order of a few tens of meters. Core-scale structures dip between ~10° and ~70° and are mutually crosscutting. Compared to similar offset faults, the décollement has large decay exponents and a relatively narrow damage zone. Motivated by independent constraints demonstrating that the plate boundary is weak, we tested if the observed damage zone characteristics could be consistent with low-friction fault. Quasi-static models of off-fault stresses and deformation due to slip on a wavy, frictional fault under conditions similar to the JFAST site predict that low-friction fault produces narrow damage zones with no preferred orientations of structures. These results are consistent with long-term frictional weakness on the décollement at the JFAST site.

  3. Excavator Design Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pholsiri, Chalongrath; English, James; Seberino, Charles; Lim, Yi-Je

    2010-01-01

    The Excavator Design Validation tool verifies excavator designs by automatically generating control systems and modeling their performance in an accurate simulation of their expected environment. Part of this software design includes interfacing with human operations that can be included in simulation-based studies and validation. This is essential for assessing productivity, versatility, and reliability. This software combines automatic control system generation from CAD (computer-aided design) models, rapid validation of complex mechanism designs, and detailed models of the environment including soil, dust, temperature, remote supervision, and communication latency to create a system of high value. Unique algorithms have been created for controlling and simulating complex robotic mechanisms automatically from just a CAD description. These algorithms are implemented as a commercial cross-platform C++ software toolkit that is configurable using the Extensible Markup Language (XML). The algorithms work with virtually any mobile robotic mechanisms using module descriptions that adhere to the XML standard. In addition, high-fidelity, real-time physics-based simulation algorithms have also been developed that include models of internal forces and the forces produced when a mechanism interacts with the outside world. This capability is combined with an innovative organization for simulation algorithms, new regolith simulation methods, and a unique control and study architecture to make powerful tools with the potential to transform the way NASA verifies and compares excavator designs. Energid's Actin software has been leveraged for this design validation. The architecture includes parametric and Monte Carlo studies tailored for validation of excavator designs and their control by remote human operators. It also includes the ability to interface with third-party software and human-input devices. Two types of simulation models have been adapted: high-fidelity discrete

  4. Geochemical characteristics of fault core and damage zones of the Hong-Che Fault Zone of the Junggar Basin (NW China) with implications for the fault sealing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Wu, Kongyou; Wang, Xi; Pei, Yangwen; Liu, Bo; Guo, Jianxun

    2017-08-01

    Faults may have a complex internal structure, including fault core and damage zone, and can act as major conduits for fluid migration. The migration of fluids along faults is generally associated with strong fluid-rock interaction, forming large amounts of cement that fill in the fractures. The cementation of the fault fractures is considered to be one of the important parameters of fault sealing. The different components of faults have diverse geochemical features because of varying physical characteristics. The investigation of the geochemical characteristics of the fault and damage zones could provide important information about the fault sealing process, which is very important in oil and gas exploration. To understand the fault-cemented sealing process, detailed geochemical studies were conducted on the fault and damage zones of the Hong-Che Fault of the northwestern Junggar Basin in China. The major and trace element data of our study suggest that the fault core is characterized by higher loss on ignition (LOI), potassium loss, Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA), and Plagioclase Index of Alteration (PIA) values and lower high field strength element (HFSE), large-ion lithosphile element (LILE), and rare earth element (REE) concentrations compared with the damage zone, implying more serious elemental loss and weathering of the fault core compared with the damage zone during faulting. The carbon and oxygen isotope data reveal that the cement of the Hong-Che Fault Zone formed due to multiple sources of fluids. The fault core was mainly affected by deep sources of hydrothermal fluids. In combination with previous studies, we suggest a potential fault-cemented sealing process during the period of fault movement. The fault core acts as the fluid conduit during faulting. After faulting, the fault core is cemented and the damage zone becomes the major conduit for fluid migration. The cementation firstly occurs on two sides of the damage zone in the upper part of the

  5. Invasion of alien plants in fire-damaged forests at southern boundary of the taiga zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khapugin, A.A.; Vargot, E.V.; Chugunov, G.G.; Shugaev, N.I.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study: Biological invasions are one of the most important areas of forest research. In this study, we revealed invasibility of fire-damaged forests at the southern boundary of the taiga zone. Area of study: The Mordovia State Nature Reserve (Central Russia). Material and Methods: Altogether, 11 square plots of each 100 ×100 m were established in different types of fire-damaged forests. To test plant invasion outside the established plots, field researches were carried out by route method in fire-damaged area of the Mordovia Reserve. Main Results: Six alien species (Erigeron canadensis, E. annuus, Oenothera biennis, Lactuca serriola, Sambucus racemosa, Viola arvensis) were registered within the established plots in 2011–2014. In addition, two alien invasive plants (Solidago canadensis and Bidens frondosa) were found outside these plots. No differences were detected in invasibility of the tested forest ecosystems. Research highlights: Among the revealed alien species, Erigeron canadensis, Lactuca serriola and Solidago canadensis are the most invasive plants in forest ecosystems. The first one was observed with a high occurrence frequency and abundance in all forest types tested. The second one has not been differed by abundance, but it characterized by a high competition as well as a large biomass and a large number of seeds. Solidago canadensis penetrated to natural forest ecosystem in a short time period due to closest location of its dispersal centers near the boundary of the Mordovia Reserve. These species are the most probable invaders of the forest ecosystems. (Author)

  6. Choice of rock excavation methods for the Swedish deep repository for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckblom, Goeran [Conrox, Stockholm (Sweden); Christiansson, Rolf [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Lagerstedt, Leif [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-01

    Choice of rock excavation methods will or may have implications for a number of issues like repository layout, long term and operational safety, environmental impact, design of and operation of transport vehicles and methodology for backfilling the repository before closure as well as effects on costs and schedules. To fully analyse the issues at hand related to selection of excavation methods, SKB organized a project with the objectives: To investigate and compare principal technical solutions for rock excavation, both methods that are used at present but also methods that may be feasible 10 years from now; To assess how the selection of excavation method influences the design and operation of the deep repository; To present a definition of the Excavation Damaged/Disturbed Zone and practical methods for measurements of EDZ; To present advantages and disadvantages with different excavation methods for the various tunnels and underground openings as a basis for selection of preferred excavation methods; To present the Design Justification Statement for the selection of particular excavation methods for the different tunnels and openings in the deep repository to underpin a decision on excavation method; and To present background data that may be required for the evaluation of the long term safety of the deep repository. Main alternatives studied are very smooth blasting, excavation with a tunnel-boring machine (TBM) and excavation with horizontal pull-reaming using more or less conventional raise-boring equipment. The detailed studies were carried through in co-operation with major suppliers and end-users of the technology. An observation in this study is that all excavation technologies are mature; no major breakthroughs are foreseen within a 10 year period but it is likely that for any technology selected, SKB would specifically fine-tune the design of the equipment and work procedures in view of requirements and site specific conditions. Excavation methods have

  7. Wear model of an excavator bucket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarychev, Vladimir D.; Granovskii, Alexey Yu.; Nevskii, Sergey A.; Konovalov, Sergey V.; Gromov, Victor E.

    2017-12-01

    A mathematical model describing wear of the interior faces of the excavator bucket during the long-termed operation is proposed. The model is based on the Navier-Stocks equation and boundary conditions. The bucket was modeled as a rectangular parallelepiped; one of its faces is permeable for a granular material, whereas the others meet the conditions of impermeability and adhesion. In the approximation of viscous fluid, motion equations of a granular material in the excavator bucket were solved by the finite elements method. The velocity distribution curves of material particles along the bucket surface are obtained. A vortex structure is revealed at the bottom-back wall edge of the bucket, and it is thought to be the reason for high wear in these zones. As shown by the granular material pressure distributed along the bucket walls, its maximum is at the bottom-back wall edge of the excavator bucket. It is considered to be the reason for high wear in the operation process. Therefore, the bottom and back walls of the excavator bucket should be coated with a composite armouring mesh via arc surfacing.

  8. Deformation bands in normal fault damage zones, Southwestern Sinai, Suez rift, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaky, Kh. S.

    2017-03-01

    The present study provides evidence that the NW-SE normal faults in Nubian Sandstone reservoirs (Malha and Naqus formations) are surrounded by damage zones in which the rocks are affected by cataclastic deformation bands and small scale faults. The paleostress analysis of the small faults indicates that σ3 has NE-SW direction while σ1 is sub-vertical. The thickness of the bands is ranging from 3 mm to 1 cm. The density and thickness of the bands increase toward the faults and decrease backward. The deformation bands form two prominent sets. The first set is running in the NW-SE direction parallel to the main faults and dip towards the northeast and southwest, i.e. synthetic and antithetic conjugate sets. The second set has NE-SW direction and dip mainly in the NW in the Malha Formation and in the SE in Naqus Formation. The two sets of deformation bands mutually crosscut each other, suggesting that both sets developed during the same deformation event. The deformation bands are planar features and occur singly or form braided clusters. The microscopic studies indicate that the host rock is mainly quartz arenite and composed of fine to very fine, well sorted quartz grains which weakly fractured and cemented by calcite. The microscopic studies of the bands indicate that they composed of strong grain crushing (cataclasis) and clay minerals. This composition is probably causes reduction of porosity and permeability within the deformation bands. The reservoir rocks in the damage zones of the normal faults are divided into polygonal areas by the deformation bands.

  9. VNIR reflectance spectroscopy of natural carbonate rocks: implication for remote sensing identification of fault damage zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traforti, Anna; Mari, Giovanna; Carli, Cristian; Demurtas, Matteo; Massironi, Matteo; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    . The spectral analysis of the crushed and intact rock slabs in the VNIR spectral range revealed that in both cases, with increasing grain size: (i) the reflectance decreases (ii) VNIR spectrum slopes (i.e. calculated between wavelengths of 0.425 - 0.605 μm and 2.205 - 2.33 μm, respectively) and (iii) carbonate main absorption band depth (i.e. vibrational absorption band at wavelength of ˜2.3 μm) increase. In conclusion, grain size variations resulting from the fault zone evolution (e.g., cumulated slip or development of thick damage zones) produce reflectance variations in rocks and mineral spectral signatures. The remote sensing analysis in the VNIR spectral range can be applied to identify the spatial distribution and extent of fault core and damage zone domains for industrial and seismic hazard applications. Moreover, the spectral characterization of carbonate-built rocks can be of great interest for the surface investigation of inner planets (e.g. Earth and Mars) and outer bodies (e.g. Galilean icy satellites). On these surfaces, carbonate minerals at different grain sizes are common and usually related to water and carbon distribution, with direct implications for potential life outside Earth (e.g. Mars).

  10. Conference on the Rehabilitation of Severely Damaged Land and Freshwater Ecosystems in Temperate Zones

    CERN Document Server

    Woodman, M

    1978-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at a conference on "The rehabilitation of severely damaged land and freshwater eco­ systems in temperate zones", held at Reykjavik, Iceland, from 4th to 11th July, 1976. The meeting was held under the auspices of the Ecosciences Panel of the N.A.T.O. Science Committee, and the organising expenses and greater part of the expenses of the speakers and chairmen were provided by N.A.T.O. The scientific programme was planned by M. W. Holdgate and M. J. Woodman, in consultation with numerous colleagues, and especially with the Administrative Director of the Conference in Iceland, Dr. Sturla Fridriksson. Iceland proved a particularly suitable location for such a Conference. Geologically, it is one of the youngest countries 1n the world, owing its origin to the up-welling of volcanic rock along the spreading zone of the mid-Atlantic ridge within the past 20 million years. Its structure, northern oceanic situation, recent glaciation and continuing volcanic activity make it dis...

  11. Safety excavation; Seguranca em escavacoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Walter Manoel [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    In the construction and maintenance services of buried pipelines, the excavation is the activity that contains larger risk, could cause serious accidents. Norms, procedures and technical articles, national and international goods, should be followed for legal and technical aspects. This paper - Safety in Excavations - has purpose to gather all the technical concepts and of safety in a document denominated Procedure of Safety Excavation, serving as instrument to systematize and control the execution of excavation services in construction civil, assembly and pipelines repairs, seeking the people, facilities and the environment's safety. (author)

  12. Qajaa Excavations 1981 and 1982

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog Jensen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    This report is an account of excavations conducted in 1981 and 1982 by Jørgen Meldgaard (1927-2007) The National Museum of Denmark at the Qajaa site in West Greenland. A total of 388 wooden objects, 255 bone artefacts, 696 lithic tools and more than 4000 flakes have been excavated and are presented...

  13. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from Two Explosions at the Source Physics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, M.; Prothro, L.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Obi, C.; Reed, D.; Snelson, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive tests are being conducted in fractured granite in Nevada to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests, collectively known as the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), are designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. Three of seven planned tests have been conducted to date. All the tests have been conducted in the same source hole. The first SPE shot (SPE-1) was a Green's function test conducted at the depth of 54.9 m, with an explosive yield of 88 kg (TNT equivalent). This study addresses the second and third shots (SPE 2 and SPE-3), which were conducted at the same depth, shallower than SPE-1 and with a larger explosive yield, to explore the influence of explosion-induced damage on seismic wave propagation. SPE-2 was conducted at the depth of 45.7 m in October 2011, with a yield of 997 kg, after which an angled core hole (U-15n#10) was drilled from the surface to the shot point to characterize the damage zone. After the source hole was cleaned out, SPE-3 was conducted at 45.8 m in July 2012, with a yield of 905 kg. Following SPE-3, a second angled core hole (U-15n#12) was drilled sub-parallel to U 15n#10 to provide a comparison of explosion-induced damage between the two shots. Geophysical logs were run in both holes, core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories for measurement of physical and mechanical properties, and down-hole videos were made in the source hole following both tests. The presence of natural faulting near the shot point complicates the comparison of the damage from the SPE-2 and SPE-3 shots, using only information from the two similarly positioned angled core holes. Characteristics of natural fractures allow them to be distinguished from shock-induced breaks

  14. Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

    1999-10-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a

  15. The micro-damage process zone during transverse cortical bone fracture: No ears at crack growth initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Thomas; Josey, David; Lu, Rick Xing Ze; Minhas, Gagan; Montesano, John

    2017-10-01

    Apply high-resolution benchtop micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to gain greater understanding and knowledge of the formation of the micro-damage process zone formed during traverse fracture of cortical bone. Bovine cortical bone was cut into single edge notch (bending) fracture testing specimens with the crack on the transverse plane and oriented to grow in the circumferential direction. We used a multi-specimen technique and deformed the specimens to various individual secant modulus loss levels (P-values) up to and including maximum load (Pmax). Next, the specimens were infiltrated with a BaSO4 precipitation stain and scanned at 3.57-μm isotropic voxel size using a benchtop high resolution-micro-CT. Measurements of the micro-damage process zone volume, width and height were made. These were compared with the simple Irwin's process zone model and with finite element models. Electron and confocal microscopy confirmed the formation of BaSO4 precipitate in micro-cracks and other porosity, and an interesting novel mechanism similar to tunneling. Measurable micro-damage was detected at low P values and the volume of the process zone increased according to a second order polynomial trend. Both width and height grew linearly up to Pmax, at which point the process zone cross-section (perpendicular to the plane of the crack) was almost circular on average with a radius of approximately 550µm (approximately one quarter of the unbroken ligament thickness) and corresponding to the shape expected for a biological composite under plane stress conditions. This study reports details of the micro-damage fracture process zone previously unreported for cortical bone. High-resolution micro-CT enables 3D visualization and measurement of the process zone and confirmation that the crack front edge and process zone are affected by microstructure. It is clear that the process zone for the specimens studied grows to be meaningfully large, confirming the need for the J

  16. Bond-slip analysis via a cohesive-zone model simulating damage, friction and interlocking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Serpieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A recently proposed cohesive-zone model which effectively combines damage, friction and mechanical interlocking has been revisited and further validated by numerically simulating the pull-out test, from a concrete block, of a ribbed steel bar in the post-yield deformation range. The simulated response is in good agreement with experimental measurements of the bond slip characteristics in the post-yield range of deformed bars reported in the literature. This study highlights the main features of the model: with physically justified and relatively simple arguments, and within the sound framework of thermodynamics with internal variables, the model effectively separates the three main sources of energy dissipation, i.e. loss of adhesion, friction along flat interfaces and mechanical interlocking. This study provides further evidence that the proposed approach allows easier and physically clearer procedures for the determination of the model parameters of such three elementary mechanical behaviours, and makes possible their interpretation and measurement as separate material property, as a viable alternative to lumping these parameters into single values of the fracture energy. In particular, the proposed approach allows to consider a single value of the adhesion energy for modes I and II.

  17. Choroidal neovascularization associated with focal choroidal excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyung; Lee, Won Ki

    2014-03-01

    To describe the clinical and imaging characteristics of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) accompanied by focal choroidal excavation. Retrospective, interventional case series. The medical records of 16 patients (16 eyes) were reviewed. Imaging findings including fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) were analyzed. CNV complexes were primarily located beneath the retinal pigment epithelium (type 1 CNV) in 9 eyes and in the subneurosensory retinal space (type 2 CNV) in 7 eyes, as assessed by SD OCT. Seven of 8 patients over 50 years old had type 1 CNV, and 6 of 8 patients under 50 had type 2 lesions. All 7 eyes with type 2 CNV exhibited classic CNV on FA. Additionally, 7 of 9 eyes with type 1 CNV had the classic pattern, and in these eyes, the CNV complexes were confined to the concavity of choroidal excavation. In 15 patients treated by anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injections, the mean best-corrected visual acuity improved from 20/44 to 20/26 with a mean of 3.7 injections during a mean follow-up period of 14.5 months. The CNV growth pattern and extent seem to be determined by the degree of damage to the retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch membrane complex resulting from choroidal excavation, as well as age. Neovascular complexes tend to be located within the boundary of choroidal excavation and are revealed as classic patterns on FA, even in type 1 CNV. Anti-VEGF was notably effective for treating these lesions, with a low rate of recurrence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Applying 3D Full Waveform Inversion in resolving fracture damage zones around a modelled geological disposal facility in granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, H. L. M.; Morgan, J. V.; Angus, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    The UK has a large volume of high level and intermediate level radioactive waste and government policy is to dispose of this waste in a Geological Disposal Facility (GDF). This will be a highly-engineered facility capable of isolating radioactive waste within multiple protective barriers, deep underground, to ensure that no harmful quantities of radioactivity ever reach the surface environment. Although no specific GDF site in the UK has been chosen, granite is one of the candidate host rocks due to its strength, in engineering terms, and because of its low permeability in consideration of groundwater movement. We design time-lapse seismic surveys to characterise geological models of naturally fractured granite with GDF-related tunnel damage zones at a potential disposal depth of 1000 m (the UK GDF might be shallower). Additionally, we use effective medium models to calculate the velocity change when the fracture density is increased in the damage zones, and find a reduction of 60 m/s in P-wave velocity when the fracture density is doubled. Next, we simulate seismic surveys and apply 3D Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) to see how well we can recover the low-velocity damage zones. Furthermore we evaluate the effectiveness of using a survey design consisting of surface and tunnel receivers (a combined array) to resolve the target. After applying FWI we find the velocity anomaly within the damage zone can be resolved to within 2 m/s (3%) and the shape of the damage zone is resolved to 12.5 m (within a single grid cell). Using the combined array we are able to resolve the anomaly strength and shape more completely. When we add further complexity to the model by including tunnel infrastructure, we conclude the combined array is essential in recovering the tunnel damage zone. Our findings show that it is beneficial to use 3D FWI and novel survey designs for characterising subtle variations as may be present in granite, information that could assist in the GDF site selection

  19. Another Form of Focal Choroidal Excavation Based on Multimodality Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyuan; Zhao, Peiquan

    2016-10-01

    To describe a peculiar choroidal entity using multimodality imaging and to further understand the relationship between focal choroidal excavation and central serous chorioretinopathy. A peculiar entity was detected in both eyes of a 20-year-old male patient who was followed for more than 4 years; one perifoveal focal choroidal excavation and two extrafoveal focal choroidal excavations were noted in each eye. The bilateral perifoveal focal choroidal excavations exhibited progressive development with repeated interconversion between the nonconforming and conforming types. Dilated choroid blood vessels were detected by en face spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Although the ellipsoid zone and retinal pigment epithelium layer defect also involved the fovea, a visual acuity of 20/20 was maintained in both eyes, with neither metamorphopsia by Amsler grid nor abnormalities noted by multifocal electroretinogram. However, pigment epithelium detachment finally appeared in the right eye. The microperimetry test revealed reduced threshold sensitivity corresponding to the lesions, and near-infrared autofluorescence revealed increased hyperfluorescence at the latest visit. Idiopathic focal choroidal excavation may convert to the structure of central serous chorioretinopathy alike, which likely indicates another rare condition of focal choroidal excavation or central serous chorioretinopathy. Wide- and deep-scanning modes should be routinely applied in OCT imaging to detect choroidal disorders.

  20. Airborne asbestos fibres monitoring in tunnel excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Laura; Sanguineti, Elisa; Yus González, Adrián; Militello, Gaia Maria; Scuderi, Alberto; Parisi, Giovanni

    2017-07-01

    Tunnelling across ophiolitic formation with Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) can release fibres into the environment, exposing workers, and the population, if fibres spread outside the tunnel, leading to increased risk of developing asbestos-related disease. Therefore, a careful plan of environmental monitoring is carried out during Terzo Valico tunnel excavation. In the present study, data of 1571 samples of airborne dust, collected between 2014 and 2016 inside the tunnels, and analyzed by SEM-EDS for quantification of workers exposure, are discussed. In particular, the engineering and monitoring management of 100 m tunnelling excavation across a serpentinite lens (Cravasco adit), intercalated within calcschists, is reported. At this chrysotile occurrence, 84% of 128 analyzed samples (from the zone closer to the front rock) were above 2 ff/l. However, thanks to safety measures implemented and tunnel compartmentation in zones, the asbestos fibre concentration did not exceed the Italian standard of occupational exposure (100 ff/l) and 100% of samples collected in the outdoor square were below 1 ff/l. During excavation under normal working conditions, asbestos concentrations were below 2 ff/l in 97.4% of the 668 analyzed samples. Our results showed that air monitoring can objectively confirm the presence of asbestos minerals at a rock front in relative short time and provide information about the nature of the lithology at the front. The present dataset, the engineering measures described and the operative conclusions are liable to support the improvement of legislation on workers exposure to asbestos referred to the tunnelling sector, lacking at present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictive zoning of rice stem borer damage in southern India through spatial interpolation of weather-based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reji, G; Chander, Subhash; Kamble, Kalpana

    2014-09-01

    Rice stem borer is an important insect pest causing severe damage to rice crop in India. The relationship between weather parameters such as maximum (T(max)) and minimum temperature (T(min)), morning (RH1) and afternoon relative humidity (RH2) and the severity of stem borer damage (SB) were studied. Multiple linear regression analysis was used for formulating pest-weather models at three sites in southern India namely, Warangal, Coimbatore and Pattambi as SB = -66.849 + 2.102 T(max) + 0.095 RH1, SB = 156.518 - 3.509 T(min) - 0.785 RH1 and SB = 43.483 - 0.418 T(min) - 0.283 RH1 respectively. The pest damage predicted using the model at three sites did not significantly differ from the observed damage (t = 0.442; p > 0.05). The range of weather parameters favourable for stem borer damage at each site were also predicted using the models. Geospatial interpolation (kriging) of the pest-weather models were carried out to predict the zones of stem borer damage in southern India. Maps showing areas with high, medium and low risk of stem borer damage were prepared using geographical information system. The risk maps of rice stem borer would be useful in devising management strategies for the pest in the region.

  2. Subsurface fault damage zone of the 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa, California, earthquake viewed from fault‐zone trapped waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Gang; Catchings, Rufus D.; Goldman, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    The aftershocks of the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake generated prominent fault‐zone trapped waves (FZTWs) that were recorded on two 1.9‐km‐long seismic arrays deployed across the northern projection (array 1, A1) and the southern part (A2) of the surface rupture of the West Napa fault zone (WNFZ). We also observed FZTWs on an array (A3) deployed across the intersection of the Franklin and Southampton faults, which appear to be the southward continuations of the WNFZ. A1, A2, and A3 consisted of 20, 20, and 10 L28 (4.5 Hz) three‐component seismographs. We analyzed waveforms of FZTWs from 55 aftershocks in both time and frequency to characterize the fault damage zone associated with this Mw 6.0 earthquake. Post‐S coda durations of FZTWs increase with epicentral distances and focal depths from the recording arrays, suggesting a low‐velocity waveguide along the WNFZ to depths in excess of 5–7 km. Locations of the aftershocks showing FZTWs, combined with 3D finite‐difference simulations, suggest the subsurface rupture zone having an S‐wave speed reduction of ∼40%–50% between A1 and A2, coincident with the ∼14‐km‐long mapped surface rupture zone and at least an ∼500‐m‐wide deformation zone. The low‐velocity waveguide along the WNFZ extends further southward to at least A3, but with a more moderate‐velocity reduction of 30%–35% at ray depth. This last FZTW observation suggests continuity between the WNFZ and Franklin fault. The waveguide effect may have localized and amplified ground shaking along the WNFZ and the faults farther to the south (see a companion paper by Catchings et al., 2016).

  3. 18 CFR 1304.303 - Channel excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Channel excavation... Activities on TVA Flowage Easement Shoreland § 1304.303 Channel excavation. (a) Channel excavation of... encourage owners of flowage easement property to adopt the standards for channel excavation applicable to...

  4. Deep rock damage in the San Andreas Fault revealed by P- and S-type fault-zone-guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, William L.; Malin, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Damage to fault-zone rocks during fault slip results in the formation of a channel of low seismic-wave velocities. Within such channels guided seismic waves, denoted by Fg, can propagate. Here we show with core samples, well logs and Fg-waves that such a channel is crossed by the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) borehole at a depth of 2.7 km near Parkfield, California, USA. This laterally extensive channel extends downwards to at least half way through the seismogenic crust, more than about 7 km. The channel supports not only the previously recognized Love-type- (FL) and Rayleigh-type- (FR) guided waves, but also a new fault-guided wave, which we name FF. As recorded 2.7 km underground, FF is normally dispersed, ends in an Airy phase, and arrives between the P- and S-waves. Modelling shows that FF travels as a leaky mode within the core of the fault zone. Combined with the drill core samples, well logs and the two other types of guided waves, FF at SAFOD reveals a zone of profound, deep, rock damage. Originating from damage accumulated over the recent history of fault movement, we suggest it is maintained either by fracturing near the slip surface of earthquakes, such as the 1857 Fort Tejon M 7.9, or is an unexplained part of the fault-creep process known to be active at this site.

  5. Discrete element analysis of the excavation effect of cross-river tunnel on the surroundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Dongyuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-river tunnel as one of the underground constructions is complicated during its construction. For stability of tunnel excavation, it is emergency to analyze the dynamic characteristics of tunnel deformation under high water pressure. Therefore, a cross-river tunnel model is proposed based on DEM in this paper. Stiffness of particles decreases during excavation process which is as one of excavation methods. Porosity ratio of original porosity over its value at different excavation time has been considered. Radial displacements of particles at different angle around the tunnel are detected during excavation process. It shows that large deformation occurs at the vault of the excavation zone which accompanies with large radial displacement. The upper half of the tunnel performs larger deformation than the lower half part which results in many cracks in the concrete lining, the high water pressure may play an crucial role in it.

  6. Percussive Excavation of Lunar Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Matthew P.

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested using a percussive motion could improve the efficiency of excavation by up to 90%. If this is proven to be true it would be very beneficial to excavation projects on the Moon and Mars. The purpose of this study is to design, build and test a percussive tool which could dig a trench and then compare this data against that of a non-percussive tool of the same shape and size. The results of this test thus far have been inconclusive due to malfunctions in the testbed and percussive bucket; however, experimental results from small scale experiments confirm this higher efficiency and support further testing.

  7. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    2012-09-18

    The National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS), established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly the Nevada Test Site) that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The initial NCNS project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment at the NNSS (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks at the Climax stock in northern Yucca Flat. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The data will be used to improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. The first SPE-N test (SPE-N-1) was a “calibration” shot conducted in May 2011, using 100 kilograms (kg) of explosives at the depth of 54.9 meters (m) (180 feet [ft]) in the U-15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m (150 ft) in the same source hole. Following the SPE-N-2 test, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast side, where the core hole penetrated it. The three-dimensional shape and symmetry of the damage zone are unknown at this time. Rather than spherical in shape, the dimensions of the damage zone could be influenced by the natural fracture sets in the vicinity. Geologic characterization of the borehole included geophysical logging, a directional survey

  8. Predicting the width and average fracture frequency of damage zones using a partial least squares statistical analysis: Implications for fault zone development

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Alex P.; Jacobi, Robert D.; Sheets, H. David

    2017-05-01

    We introduce the partial least squares (PLS) statistical analysis that quantifies and predicts the observed relationships among normal fault slip, fracturing associated with the fault, and lithology. We describe the systematic process for constructing a multivariate PLS model that predicts the average fracture frequency and the width of fracture-dominated fault damage zones from fault, lithologic and fracture data. Conversely, the model can also predict normal fault net slip for a defined lithology given the average fracture frequency and width of a fracture-dominated fault damage zone, hereafter defined as a fracture intensification domain (FID). Fracture, fault and lithologic data were collected in the Mohawk Valley of New York State from outcrops in the Upper Ordovician Utica Group and Lorraine Group. Data collection was focused on faults with observable slip, associated FIDs, and no observable lateral restriction. Our statistical analysis used three variables to describe the geometry of the FID: FID width (FIDw), average fracture frequency within the FID (FIDƒ), and the power law regression exponent (FIDR) of the least squares trend line. We incorporated additional data from literature and tested multiple PLS models in order to refine the analysis using quality indicators provided by the PLS summary statistics output. Variables included in the final predictive model included FIDw, FIDƒ, fault slip, grain size and clay percent. Fault slip and grain size were found to have a positive covariance with FIDw while clay percent had a negative covariance. Fault slip, grain size and clay percent all showed a negative covariance with FIDƒ. Results from this research indicate that increasing fault slip leads to wider FIDs and lower average fracture frequency within the FID. The lower average fracture frequency in wider FIDs is primarily attributed to an increase in the length of the low-frequency FID tail away from the associated fault. A possible secondary influence

  9. Low-energy Planetary Excavator (LPE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC is developing an innovative Low-energy Planetary Excavator (LPE) to excavate in situ regolith, ice-regolith mixes, and a variety of other geologic materials...

  10. Low-energy Planetary Excavator (LPE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop an innovative Low-energy Planetary Excavator (LPE) to excavate in situ regolith, ice-regolith mixes, and a variety of other geologic...

  11. Determining VCE damage zones using the GAME correlations and explosion regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, H.; Voort, M.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Predicting potential consequences of Vapor Cloud Explosions (VCEs) has always been an important issue in safety assessments, because of the devastating damage that this phenomenon can create on (petro chemical) production sites. Although the TNO Multi-Energy method has been recognized as one of the

  12. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, M. J.; Huckins-Gang, H. E.; Prothro, L. B.; Reed, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE-N-1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 100 kg of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE-N-3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE-N-2, and at the same depth as SPE-N-2, within the damage zone created by the SPE-N-2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE-N-2 shot and prior to the SPE-N-3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The objective was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE-N-2 core hole included

  13. Comparative mineral chemistry and textures of SAFOD fault gouge and damage-zone rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Diane E.

    2014-01-01

    Creep in the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drillhole is localized to two foliated gouges, the central deforming zone (CDZ) and southwest deforming zone (SDZ). The gouges consist of porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rock dispersed in a foliated matrix of Mg-smectite clays that formed as a result of shearing-enhanced reactions between the serpentinite and quartzofeldspathic rocks. The CDZ takes up most of the creep and exhibits differences in mineralogy and texture from the SDZ that are attributable to its higher shearing rate. In addition, a ∼0.2-m-wide sector of the CDZ at its northeastern margin (NE-CDZ) is identical to the SDZ and may represent a gradient in creep rate across the CDZ. The SDZ and NE-CDZ have lower clay contents and larger porphyroclasts than most of the CDZ, and they contain veinlets and strain fringes of calcite in the gouge matrix not seen elsewhere in the CDZ. Matrix clays in the SDZ and NE-CDZ are saponite and corrensite, whereas the rest of the CDZ lacks corrensite. Saponite is younger than corrensite, reflecting clay crystallization under declining temperatures, and clays in the more actively deforming portions of the CDZ have better equilibrated to the lower-temperature conditions.

  14. Roughness of interfacial crack fronts: stress-weighted percolation in the damage zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Hansen, Alex; Batrouni, G George

    2003-01-31

    We study numerically the roughness exponent zeta of an in-plane fracture front slowly propagating along a heterogeneous interface embedded in an elastic body, using a model based on the evolution of a process zone rather than a fracture line. We find zeta=0.60+/-0.05. For the first time, simulation results are in close agreement with experimental results. We then show that the roughness exponent is related to the correlation length exponent nu of a stress-weighted percolation problem through zeta=nu/(1+nu). A numerical study of the stress-weighted percolation problem yields nu=1.54 giving zeta=0.61 in close agreement with our numerical results and with experimental observations.

  15. Telemanipulation and supervisory control of a backhoe excavator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo, Oscar; Barrientos, Antonio

    1998-12-01

    The excavation tasks present one of the more challenging area in robotic research. The environment is highly unstructured, the forces that appear are very large it is very important the detection of underground obstacles to avoid any damage, and the modeling of the hydraulic actuators is highly nonlinear. In recent years, the remote control of the excavation has found applications in very dangerous environments for human beings, like nuclear power plants, nuclear and chemical waste facilities and terrestrial and extra-terrestrial mining. Some kind of intelligence is required due to the presence of unexpected situations. The first approach to deal with the problem is to put a human being in the loop, that is: teleoperation. The next step towards the total automation of the excavation is the supervisory control of the task. In this scheme, the operator acts like a supervisor, providing high level commands, and checking the development and accomplishment of the task. The solutions that DISAM has developed are presented in this paper, as well as future work that will be very useful in the search for the total automation of excavation tasks.

  16. Clinical and optic coherence tomography findings of focal choroidal excavation in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jie; Zhong, Lu; Jiang, Chunhui; Zhou, Xin; Xu, Gezhi; Wang, Wenji; Wang, Yuliang

    2014-05-06

    To describe the clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) features of focal choroidal excavation in Chinese patients. Retrospectively, thirty-seven eyes (in 31 patients) that demonstrated focal choroidal excavation on spectral-domain OCT were collected. Their clinical characteristics and other features were also collected and analyzed. In total, 42 focal choroidal excavations were identified in 31 patients, including 25 unilateral and 6 bilateral (37 eyes). The abnormal changes in these eyes with choroidal excavation were more prominent at the outer part of the neuro-retina, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the choroid. The average transverse diameter and depth of the excavations were 670.8 μm and 106.9 μm, respectively. In addition to the conforming and nonconforming types, the excavations could also be classified into 2 types according to their shape: type 1 - small with a sharp, cut-down contour; and type 2 - slightly larger with a gradual edge. The transverse diameter/depth ratio of the two types were significantly different (type1: 4.57 ± 1.65, type 2: 10.0 ± 5.2; p = 0.000). Four central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) cases were confirmed by fluorescein angiography; in these cases, the retinal detachment was larger than the area of excavation, and the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) and external limiting membrane (ELM) were above those of the normal part. Concomitant CNV was also found in another 2 cases. Focal choroidal excavation was not uncommon in Chinese patients. The choroid and the RPE at the excavation were impaired or vulnerable to other damage. Additionally, OCT might be useful in the differentiation between nonconforming excavations and ones with CSCR.

  17. Silica exposure to excavation workers during the excavation of a low level radiological waste pit and tritium disposal shafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluated the task-length average (TLA) respirable dust and respirable silica airborne concentrations to which construction workers excavating volcanic tuff at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were exposed. These workers were excavating a low level radiological waste disposal pit of final dimensions 720 feet long, 132 feet wide and 60 feet deep. The objectives of this study were as follows: (1) evaluate exposures; (2) determine if the type of machinery used affects the respirable dust concentration in the breathing zone of the worker; (3) evaluate the efficacy of wetting the pit to reduce the respirable dust exposure; and (4) determine if exposure increases with increasing depth of pit due to the walls of the pit blocking the cross wind ventilation.

  18. A Coupled Thermal–Hydrological–Mechanical Damage Model and Its Numerical Simulations of Damage Evolution in APSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhui Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a coupled thermal–hydrological–mechanical damage (THMD model for the failure process of rock, in which coupling effects such as thermally induced rock deformation, water flow-induced thermal convection, and rock deformation-induced water flow are considered. The damage is considered to be the key factor that controls the THM coupling process and the heterogeneity of rock is characterized by the Weibull distribution. Next, numerical simulations on excavation-induced damage zones in Äspö pillar stability experiments (APSE are carried out and the impact of in situ stress conditions on damage zone distribution is analysed. Then, further numerical simulations of damage evolution at the heating stage in APSE are carried out. The impacts of in situ stress state, swelling pressure and water pressure on damage evolution at the heating stage are simulated and analysed, respectively. The simulation results indicate that (1 the v-shaped notch at the sidewall of the pillar is predominantly controlled by the in situ stress trends and magnitude; (2 at the heating stage, the existence of confining pressure can suppress the occurrence of damage, including shear damage and tensile damage; and (3 the presence of water flow and water pressure can promote the occurrence of damage, especially shear damage.

  19. Slope excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation in hydraulic projects based on laser scanning technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slope excavation is one of the most crucial steps in the construction of a hydraulic project. Excavation project quality assessment and excavated volume calculation are critical in construction management. The positioning of excavation projects using traditional instruments is inefficient and may cause error. To improve the efficiency and precision of calculation and assessment, three-dimensional laser scanning technology was used for slope excavation quality assessment. An efficient data acquisition, processing, and management workflow was presented in this study. Based on the quality control indices, including the average gradient, slope toe elevation, and overbreak and underbreak, cross-sectional quality assessment and holistic quality assessment methods were proposed to assess the slope excavation quality with laser-scanned data. An algorithm was also presented to calculate the excavated volume with laser-scanned data. A field application and a laboratory experiment were carried out to verify the feasibility of these methods for excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation. The results show that the quality assessment indices can be obtained rapidly and accurately with design parameters and scanned data, and the results of holistic quality assessment are consistent with those of cross-sectional quality assessment. In addition, the time consumption in excavation project quality assessment with the laser scanning technology can be reduced by 70%−90%, as compared with the traditional method. The excavated volume calculated with the scanned data only slightly differs from measured data, demonstrating the applicability of the excavated volume calculation method presented in this study.

  20. Slope excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation in hydraulic projects based on laser scanning technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slope excavation is one of the most crucial steps in the construction of a hydraulic project. Excavation project quality assessment and excavated volume calculation are critical in construction management. The positioning of excavation projects using traditional instruments is inefficient and may cause error. To improve the efficiency and precision of calculation and assessment, three-dimensional laser scanning technology was used for slope excavation quality assessment. An efficient data acquisition, processing, and management workflow was presented in this study. Based on the quality control indices, including the average gradient, slope toe elevation, and overbreak and underbreak, cross-sectional quality assessment and holistic quality assessment methods were proposed to assess the slope excavation quality with laser-scanned data. An algorithm was also presented to calculate the excavated volume with laser-scanned data. A field application and a laboratory experiment were carried out to verify the feasibility of these methods for excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation. The results show that the quality assessment indices can be obtained rapidly and accurately with design parameters and scanned data, and the results of holistic quality assessment are consistent with those of cross-sectional quality assessment. In addition, the time consumption in excavation quality assessment with the laser scanning technology can be reduced by 70%–90%, as compared with the traditional method. The excavated volume calculated with the scanned data only slightly differs from measured data, demonstrating the applicability of the excavated volume calculation method presented in this study.

  1. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  2. Excavation costs for lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, W. D., III

    1979-01-01

    A lunar strip mining system is presented which is capable of excavating and transporting 3 million metric tons of ore per year to a central processing plant on the moon's surface. The mining system would grow from a single front-end loader in the first year, to a fleet of ten haulers in the 30th year. Lunar personnel requirements would consist of a single individual, whose primary function would be to perform maintenance. All of the mining equipment would either operate automatically or by remote control from earth. The projected cost for the lunar mining system is approximately $12 to $37 per ton of ore over the life of the mine, an important part of the overall economics of exploiting lunar resources.

  3. Archaeology Excavation Simulation: Correcting the Emphasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thistle, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Museums offering archaeological programs often attempt to use the "sandbox approach" to simulate archaeological excavation work. However, in light of the definition of simulation, and given the realities of actual professional practice in archaeological excavation, the author argues that the activity of troweling for artifacts in loose sand places…

  4. Excavations of Islamic Jarash, 2002-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan George

    2005-01-01

    A preliminary report on the excavations at Jarash's mosque by the Danish-Jordanian Islamic Jarash Project during four seasons between 2002 and 2005.......A preliminary report on the excavations at Jarash's mosque by the Danish-Jordanian Islamic Jarash Project during four seasons between 2002 and 2005....

  5. High Resistant Sand Injected Marl and Low Resistant Damaged Marl to Locate and Characterize the Thénia Fault Zone in Boumerdes City (North-Central Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulouel, Hakim; Bensalem, Rabah; Machane, Djamel; Bendaoud, Abderrahmane; Gharbi, Sofiane; Oubaiche, El-Hadi; Ousalem, Hassane; Skendri, Walid

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to locate and characterize the Thénia Fault Zone (TFZ) in the urban area of Boumerdes city; geological and electrical resistivity tomography surveys have targeted the Plaisancian marl and its Quaternary cover. As a whole, data indicate a complex near-vertical fault zone with an asymmetric and zoned internal structure of at least 150 m wide and with a straight N120° overall trending. The fault zone is traversed with two elongated parallel fault branches (FB1 and FB2), generally, 70 m distant from each other. These fault branches locate two intense damage zones (IDZs) of 10-15 m thick each, situated at the margin of two damage zones each having a thickness of several tens of meters. Downward sand injections into IDZs during Pleistocene epoch, possible pulverization of Plaisancian marl rocks, systematic deflection of actual stream channels, and vertical displacement of at least 30 m affecting Quaternary alluvial deposits show that the area would have undergone active tectonic driven by the TFZ.

  6. Petrophysical, Geochemical, and Hydrological Evidence for Extensive Fracture-Mediated Fluid and Heat Transport in the Alpine Fault's Hanging-Wall Damage Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townend, John; Sutherland, Rupert; Toy, Virginia G.; Doan, Mai-Linh; Célérier, Bernard; Massiot, Cécile; Coussens, Jamie; Jeppson, Tamara; Janku-Capova, Lucie; Remaud, Léa.; Upton, Phaedra; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Pezard, Philippe; Williams, Jack; Allen, Michael John; Baratin, Laura-May; Barth, Nicolas; Becroft, Leeza; Boese, Carolin M.; Boulton, Carolyn; Broderick, Neil; Carpenter, Brett; Chamberlain, Calum J.; Cooper, Alan; Coutts, Ashley; Cox, Simon C.; Craw, Lisa; Eccles, Jennifer D.; Faulkner, Dan; Grieve, Jason; Grochowski, Julia; Gulley, Anton; Hartog, Arthur; Henry, Gilles; Howarth, Jamie; Jacobs, Katrina; Kato, Naoki; Keys, Steven; Kirilova, Martina; Kometani, Yusuke; Langridge, Rob; Lin, Weiren; Little, Tim; Lukacs, Adrienn; Mallyon, Deirdre; Mariani, Elisabetta; Mathewson, Loren; Melosh, Ben; Menzies, Catriona; Moore, Jo; Morales, Luis; Mori, Hiroshi; Niemeijer, André; Nishikawa, Osamu; Nitsch, Olivier; Paris, Jehanne; Prior, David J.; Sauer, Katrina; Savage, Martha K.; Schleicher, Anja; Shigematsu, Norio; Taylor-Offord, Sam; Teagle, Damon; Tobin, Harold; Valdez, Robert; Weaver, Konrad; Wiersberg, Thomas; Zimmer, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Fault rock assemblages reflect interaction between deformation, stress, temperature, fluid, and chemical regimes on distinct spatial and temporal scales at various positions in the crust. Here we interpret measurements made in the hanging-wall of the Alpine Fault during the second stage of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-2). We present observational evidence for extensive fracturing and high hanging-wall hydraulic conductivity (˜10-9 to 10-7 m/s, corresponding to permeability of ˜10-16 to 10-14 m2) extending several hundred meters from the fault's principal slip zone. Mud losses, gas chemistry anomalies, and petrophysical data indicate that a subset of fractures intersected by the borehole are capable of transmitting fluid volumes of several cubic meters on time scales of hours. DFDP-2 observations and other data suggest that this hydrogeologically active portion of the fault zone in the hanging-wall is several kilometers wide in the uppermost crust. This finding is consistent with numerical models of earthquake rupture and off-fault damage. We conclude that the mechanically and hydrogeologically active part of the Alpine Fault is a more dynamic and extensive feature than commonly described in models based on exhumed faults. We propose that the hydrogeologically active damage zone of the Alpine Fault and other large active faults in areas of high topographic relief can be subdivided into an inner zone in which damage is controlled principally by earthquake rupture processes and an outer zone in which damage reflects coseismic shaking, strain accumulation and release on interseismic timescales, and inherited fracturing related to exhumation.

  7. Setting up excavators with growing cracks in their metal structures for repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasonov, M. Y.; Lykov, Y. V.

    2017-10-01

    When determining the loads that arise on the working bodies of excavators, it is assumed that the developed soils and blown rock are homogeneous and are cut by a bucket in the form of shavings of a certain thickness. At the same time, it is considered that in metal structures of excavators there are no stress jumps from the bucket collision with individual pieces of rock, and cyclic loads are related only to the loading and unloading cycle of the bucket. Studies have shown that in cyclic loading of metal structures, the bucket collides with each piece of rock. The magnitude of voltage jump depends on the size of rock piece. Presently, theoretical calculation of stresses in metal structures of excavators is carried out without taking into account the concentration of stresses in zones of welding defects and this gives underestimated stresses. Studies have also shown that in zones with defects, the stresses can differ several times from nominal stresses.

  8. The huge ATLAS cavern now fully excavated

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Excavation of the ATLAS cavern is now complete! At the end of two years' work involving a tremendous technical challenge, the civil engineering contractors have succeeded in digging out one of the biggest experimental caverns in the world. Bravo!

  9. An in vitro comparison of fluorescence-aided caries excavation and conventional excavation by microhardness testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Guangyun; Zhu, Laikuan; Xu, Xiaohui; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare fluorescence-aided caries excavation with conventional excavation based on the Martens and Vickers hardness of dentin at the cavity floor after caries removal. In total, 20 extracted human teeth with dentin caries were bisected through the lesion center into two halves, which were assigned to either the fluorescence-aided caries excavation group or the conventional excavation group. After the treatment, embedding, mounting, and polishing, a line of indentations from the dental pulp across the sound dentin to the cavity floor was made on each sample. The data were compared with Student's t and Mann-Whitney U tests. The calculated Vickers hardness of the sound dentin was 57 ± 10 kg/mm(2) in the fluorescence-aided caries excavation group and 59 ± 8 kg/mm(2) in the conventional excavation group, which is consistent with the previous studies. The absolute and relative Martens hardness measurements of the cavity floor were 224 ± 93 N/mm(2) and 46 ± 17%, respectively, in the fluorescence-aided caries excavation group and 412 ± 75 N/mm(2) and 81 ± 14%, respectively, in the conventional excavation group. Based on either the Martens or Vickers hardness, both the absolute and relative microhardness measurements of the cavity floor after fluorescence-aided caries excavation were significantly lower than the values obtained by conventional excavation. Fluorescence-aided caries excavation showed the tissue-preserving property and was more conservative than the conventional excavation in this in vitro study.

  10. Focal choroidal excavation complicated by choroidal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haifeng; Zeng, Fanxing; Shi, Depeng; Sun, Xiaolei; Chen, Xiuli; Bai, Yao

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical findings of focal choroidal excavation (FCE) complicated by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Retrospective, observational case series. Twelve patients (15 eyes) with FCE and CNV. The medical records of the patients were reviewed. Clinical findings including age, sex, refraction, color photography, fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) were analyzed. Fundus fluorescein angiography, ICGA, and OCT findings. The 12 patients included 6 women and 6 men. The mean age was 46.8±13.4 years (range, 26-64 years). One half of the patients were emmetropic, and the others were myopic (-0.5 to -3.0 diopters). All subjects were Chinese. Before CNV development, normal appearance or nonspecific pigment disturbance could be seen around the choroidal excavation. Corresponding to the excavation, window defects were observed by FFA, whereas hypofluorescence was found on ICGA images. Choroidal neovascularization in all eyes was classic as revealed by FFA. The OCT images showed that all eyes had a single choroidal excavation. In 7 of the 15 eyes, the choroidal excavation was located subfoveally, and in the other 8 eyes, it was eccentric. All CNV lesions grew from the bottom or slope of the excavation. Three patients had bilateral involvement. Choroidal neovascularization occurred in both conforming and nonconforming type FCEs, regardless of whether the excavation was shallow or deep, subfoveal or eccentric. All CNV lesions responded well to intravitreal injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents. After a single injection, CNV regressed in 13 of 15 eyes. Two eyes received an additional injection. Nonconforming FCE changed to the conforming type after successful treatment of CNV. Focal choroidal excavation is not always stable. Choroidal neovascularization commonly can be seen in patients with FCE and responds well to intravitreal anti-VEGF agents

  11. BILATERAL CHOROIDAL EXCAVATION IN JUVENILE LOCALIZED SCLERODERMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Mackenzie L; Day, Shelley

    2018-01-01

    To describe a case of bilateral choroidal excavation in a patient with juvenile localized scleroderma. Case report. An asymptomatic 12-year-old boy with localized scleroderma presented for examination and was found to have bilateral areas of choroidal excavation temporal to the fovea. Previous reports of ocular complications of localized scleroderma have primarily described adnexal and anterior segment changes. This is the second report of choroidal changes in a patient with localized scleroderma, and the first in a pediatric patient.

  12. Sacred activity by the Method of Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Anjos Furtado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Excavation is a clinical and teaching methodology created by the first author of this article. It constitutes a way of helping subjects think, make and speak. This process occurs through the xcavation of making, unblinding and/or unveiling elements in search for the understanding of sacred activity. Through xcavation, subjects understand their thoughts, values and the society in which they live in as they excavate their life stories and their relations with making, including their daily, social and work activities. We applied a thoughtful analysis to approach the role of excavation and the concept of sacred activity. Sacred activity is the core activity of every human being, which is not necessarily the activity we perform in our everyday or work life. Sacred activity is that in which subjects are inserted and experience integrally, genuinely and with no masking. Through sacred activities, subjects surrender, not only to the activity itself, but also to the other, to himself and into himself, by quest. Seeking sacred activity is, therefore, a process of questioning, excavating the routine of subjects, watching and understanding the content of this excavation, replacing and adjusting what is being unveiled, and thus making this activity sacred. In this analysis, we concluded that, by the method of excavation, the sacralization of this action should allow subjects to have tender relationships, and thus be cured.

  13. Characteristics of Braced Excavation under Asymmetrical Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjie Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous excavation practices have shown that large discrepancies exist between field monitoring data and calculated results when the conventional symmetry-plane method (with half-width is used to design the retaining structure under asymmetrical loads. To examine the characteristics of a retaining structure under asymmetrical loads, we use the finite element method (FEM to simulate the excavation process under four different groups of asymmetrical loads and create an integrated model to tackle this problem. The effects of strut stiffness and wall length are also investigated. The results of numerical analysis clearly imply that the deformation and bending moment of diaphragm walls are distinct on different sides, indicating the need for different rebar arrangements when the excavation is subjected to asymmetrical loads. This study provides a practical approach to designing excavations under asymmetrical loads. We analyze and compare the monitoring and calculation data at different excavation stages and find some general trends. Several guidelines on excavation design under asymmetrical loads are drawn.

  14. Clamshell excavation of a permeable reactive barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfetta, Antonio Di; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2006-06-01

    Nowadays, permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are one of the most widespread techniques for the remediation of contaminated aquifers. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants (ITRC in: Permeable reactive barriers: lessons learned/new directions. The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Permeable Reactive Barriers Team 2005). Although, a variety of excavation methods have been developed, backhoe excavators are often used for the construction of PRBs. The aim of this study is to describe the emplacement of a full-scale PRB and the benefits deriving from the use of a crawler crane equipped with a hydraulic grab (also known as clamshell excavator) in the excavation phases. The studied PRB was designed to remediate a chlorinated hydrocarbons plume at an old industrial landfill site, in Avigliana, near the city of Torino, in Italy. The continuous reactive barrier was designed to be 120 m long, 13 m deep, and 0.6 m thick. The installation of the barrier was accomplished using a clamshell for the excavation of the trench and a guar-gum slurry to support the walls. The performance of this technique was outstanding and allowed the installation of the PRB in 7 days. The degree of precision of the excavation was very high because of the intrinsic characteristics of this excavation tool and of the use of a concrete curb to guide the hydraulic grab. Moreover, the adopted technique permitted a saving of bioslurry thus minimizing the amount of biocide required.

  15. Parameters sensitivity analysis of underground excavation impacting on slope stability based on Vector Sum Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan

    2018-01-01

    The impact of underground excavation on slope stability is controlled by many parameters, including the shape of slope, the mechanical property of soil and rock, the relative position of excavation zone and slip surface, and so on. The factor of safety (FOS) base on limit equilibrium method (LEM) and strength reduction method (SRM) is not suitable to evaluate the impact. Vector sum method (VSM) and orthogonal experiment are used to evaluate the impact by doing parameters sensitivity analysis. The result shows that the VSM could be used to in this research field, and the gradient of a slope, the relative position between a excavation area and a slope, the cohesion are the top three factors which impact the stability significantly.

  16. The expanded spectrum of focal choroidal excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Ron; Mukkamala, Sri Krishna; Jampol, Lee M; Spaide, Richard F; Ober, Michael D; Sorenson, John A; Gentile, Ronald C; Miller, Joel A; Sherman, Jerome; Freund, K Bailey

    2011-10-01

    To describe the clinical and imaging findings in patients with focal choroidal excavation. Retrospective observational case series. The medical records of 12 patients (13 eyes) with focal choroidal excavation were reviewed. Clinical histories and imaging findings (including color photography, fundus autofluorescence imaging, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography) were analyzed. The mean age of the patients was 45 years (range, 22-62 years). Four patients were Asian. Mean visual acuity was 20/31 (range, 20/20 to 20/100). Mean refractive error was -3.54 diopters (D) (range, 6.00 to -8.00 D). One patient had bilateral involvement. All patients manifested varying degrees of foveal pigmentary changes that were usually hypoautofluorescent on fundus autofluorescence images. Fluorescein angiographic findings varied with degree of retinal pigment epithelial alterations. Indocyanine green angiography revealed relative hypofluorescence. In 7 eyes, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed outer retinal layers conforming to retinal pigment epithelial alterations within the excavation. In the other 6 eyes, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed a separation between the outer retina and the retinal pigment epithelium within the excavation. In 7 eyes studied with enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, there was no evidence of scleral ectasia. Mean choroidal thickness of the uninvolved choroid was thicker than normal at 319 μm (range, 244-439 μm). All lesions remained stable except for in 1 eye, which had findings of central serous chorioretinopathy and secondary type 2 (subretinal) neovascularization. Focal choroidal excavation is a newly described idiopathic entity in eyes having 1 or more focal areas of choroidal excavation. In some patients, there may be an association with central

  17. Stepwise excavation in a permanent molar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2010-01-01

    The current study presents a 17-year clinical report of stepwise excavation and indirect pulp capping in a lower right first molar, with great dentin destruction and a lack of dentin support of the cusps. At the first appointment, indirect pulp capping with calcium hydroxide and a temporary filling...... with zinc oxide cement were performed to minimize the risk of pulp exposure during excavation. After 45 days, the remaining carious tissue was removed and a restoration with glass-ionomer lining (Vitrebond) and resin composite (P-50) was performed. Satisfactory morphology and function of the restoration...

  18. Natural course of symptomatic focal choroidal excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Introini, Ugo; Gagliardi, Marco; Sergenti, Jessica; Cascavilla, Maria Lucia; Bandello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old man was referred to the authors' department for nonspecified macular dystrophy with persistent metamorphopsia in the right eye diagnosed 10 years before and followed using optical coherence tomography. The patient underwent a comprehensive ocular examination, including multimodal imaging evaluation and electrofunctional testing. The diagnosis was consistent with nonconforming focal choroid excavation. Over 10 years, no complications occurred, visual acuity was stable, and optical coherence tomography showed no progression of the lesion during follow-up. In this case, nonconforming symptomatic focal choroid excavation was a nonprogressive condition with good long-term visual outcome. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Pajarito Plateau archaeological surveys and excavations. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, C R

    1982-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory continues its archaeological program of data gathering and salvage excavations. Sites recently added to the archaeological survey are described, as well as the results of five excavations. Among the more interesting and important discoveries are (1) the apparently well-established local use of anhydrous lime, and (2) a late pre-Columbian use of earlier house sites and middens for garden plots. Evidence indicated that the local puebloan population was the result of an expansion of upper Rio Grande peoples, not an influx of migrants.

  20. Cross-sectional examination of the damage zone in impacted specimens of carbon/epoxy and carbon/PEEK composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.; Magold, N. J.

    1990-01-01

    Drop weight impact testing was utilized to inflict damage on eight-ply bidirectional and unidirectional samples of carbon/epoxy and carbon/PEEK (polyetheretherketone) test specimens with impact energies ranging from 0.80 J to 1.76 J. The impacting tip was of a smaller diameter (4.2-mm) than those used in most previous studies, and the specimens were placed with a diamond wheel wafering saw through the impacted area perpendicular to the outer fibers. Photographs at 12 x magnification were taken of these cross-sections and examined. The results on the bidirectional samples show little damage until 1.13 J, at which point delaminations were seen in the epoxy specimens. The PEEK specimens showed less delamination than the epoxy specimens for a given impact energy level. The unidirectional specimens displayed more damage than the bidirectional samples for a given impact energy, with the PEEK specimens showing much less damage than the epoxy material.

  1. Dilmun revisited: excavations at Saar, Bahrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Crawford

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available About 2000 BC the island of Bahrain was at the centre of a prosperous trading community - the Early Dilmun civilization - that stretched from Mesopotamia to the Indus Valley. Excavations at the site of Saar have, since 1989, recovered much new information about the layout of the settlement and its local economy and social system.

  2. Excavated Documents Dealing with Chinese Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yuzhen

    The materials ancient Chinese scholars used to write on changed from bamboo strips, wooden tablets, and silk in early China to paper in the later dynasties. This chapter will focus on excavated documents dealing with ancient Chinese astronomy and explore some of the ways that scholars have made use of these archaeological resources.

  3. Archaeological Rescue Excavations at the Dejazmach Gebreslassie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Archaeological rescue test excavations that were carried out by the Ethiopian Cultural Heritage Project Site Planning and Conservation sub-component at the Gebreslassie Bariya Gabir palace enclosure at the back of The Main Stelae Field in Aksum from the 5th of June to the 15th of July 2005 yielded at least four ...

  4. Heathrow Terminal 5 Excavation Archive (Data Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Framework Archaeology

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Framework Archaeology is a Joint Venture agreement between Oxford Archaeology (OA and Wessex Archaeology (WA to provide archaeological services to BAA (formerly British Airports Authority, now Heathrow Airport Holdings Ltd. Given the potential scale of some of BAA's projects, the joint venture enables Framework Archaeology to draw on the full resources of both OA and WA, including site staff, specialist managers, administrative support, and technical facilities. In 1993, BAA plc and Heathrow Airport Limited submitted a joint planning application to develop an additional passenger terminal complex (Terminal 5, together with the provision of aircraft aprons and taxiways, and include the realignment of rivers and landscaping. The resulting archaeological excavations were undertaken as three main phases of work. Excavations in 1996 by the Museum of London Archaeology Service of approximately 4 ha of sludge stockpile areas (site code POK96. Between 1999-2000 Framework Archaeology excavated approximately 21 ha in the Perry Oaks sludge works and adjacent areas (WPR98. Framework Archaeology also undertook excavations between 2002-2007 as part of the construction of Terminal 5 (PSH02, TEC05 covering a further 50 hectares. Importantly the aim of the Terminal 5 archaeological programme was to move beyond the description and recovery of archaeological remains and to arrive at an understanding of the history of human inhabitation and the practical ways in which people established their presence in the material, social and political conditions of their day.

  5. Cicatrization of the damaged zone around a tunnel in low permeable rocks; Cicatrisation de la zone endommagee autour du tunnel dans des roches peu permeables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamza, R.O

    2005-12-15

    Three types of clays have been studied in this work: the Mol clay (plastic clay), the Mont Terri clay (opalinus clay) and the East clay (stiff clay). This work is divided into three parts: an experimental part which has allowed to identify the cicatrization phenomenon and the cracks closing. Through several tests has been determined the evolution of the permeability of the clayey samples which are undamaged or damaged with time and according to the different applied hydro-mechanical loadings. In order to describe the cicatrization phenomenon, a rheological law has been developed from the experimental observations and under some hypotheses. The parameters of the cicatrization model have been determined by numerical simulation. In order to take into account the structures effects at a large scale, the modelling of a tunnel has allowed to better identify the cicatrization phenomenon and to analyze the long term stability of this work. (O.M.)

  6. The possibilites of coal seam underground excavation in Republic of Macedonia with high productive excavation methods

    OpenAIRE

    Despodov, Zoran; Doneva, Nikolinka; Mijalkovski, Stojance

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents mining and geology properties of coal deposits in R.Macedonia predetermined for underground exploitation. Also it will be shown the way of coal seams preparation and development for underground excavation with longwall mining methods. Based on mining and geology properties of coal and it’s caloric value it will be observed the possibilities for application on the longwall mining which is among excavation methods with highest production and capacity applied in the contemp...

  7. MicroCT-based comparison between fluorescence-aided caries excavation and conventional excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Guangyun; Kaisarly, Dalia; Xu, Xiaohui; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate and compare the use of micro-computed tomography (microCT) to investigate the mineral concentration of the treated dentin surface after caries removal with fluorescence-aided caries excavation (FACE) and conventional excavation. 20 extracted human teeth with dentin caries were bisected through the lesion center into two halves which were distributed to a FACE and a conventional excavation group. Tungsten-carbide round burs were used for both groups. Each specimen was investigated with microCT after excavation. The obtained images of all the specimens were evaluated using Image J. Based on the grey values, the linear attenuation coefficients were calculated. Four resin-embedded solid hydroxyapatite phantoms with the gradually increased mineral concentration were used to obtain a calibration curve and equation. Finally, the mineral concentration values of the superficial dentin of each specimen after removal and sound dentin were calculated. The data were compared with the Student's t-test. The statistical results showed that the linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) of the treated surface was significantly lower (P excavation group was 2.98 +/- 0.19 cm(-1). The LAC of sound dentin was 3.89 +/- 0.10 cm(-1). By using the calibration equation, the calculated mineral concentration of the superficial dentin after caries removal were 0.68 +/- 0.14 g/cm3 in the FACE group and 1.05 +/- 0.08 g/cm3 in the conventional excavation group. The mineral concentration of sound dentin was 1.44 +/- 0.04 g/cm3. The mineral concentration of the superficial dentin after caries removal in the FACE group was about 47% of that of sound dentin, while the value in the conventional excavation group was approximately 73% of that of sound dentin. Under the conditions of this in vitro study, the results of the microCT evaluation may imply that FACE was more conservative than conventional excavation.

  8. MPED: An ISRU Bucket Ladder Excavator Demonstrator System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract: The Multi-Purpose Excavation Demonstrator (MPED) is a commercial effort and a third generation of technology, following Bucket Wheel Excavator and Bucket...

  9. Fluorescence-aided caries excavation (FACE), caries detector, and conventional caries excavation in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Aine M; Attin, Thomas; Martens, Sabine; Buchalla, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare the ability of fluorescence-aided caries excavation (FACE) to remove infected dentin in primary teeth with that of conventional methods. Sixty-six extracted carious primary teeth were divided according to lesion size into 3 groups of 22 teeth. Caries excavation was carried out with a slow-speed handpiece and round burs for all groups. In the first group, caries was excavated conventionally using visual tactile criteria. In the second group, a caries detector dye was used to detect carious dentin. In the FACE group, cavities were excited with violet light (370-420 nm) and observed through a 530 nm highpass filter. Orange-red fluorescing areas were removed. Undecalcified thin slices were prepared, stained with Giemsa, and examined for presence of infected dentin using light microscopy. Four samples were lost during processing. Histology showed infected dentin in significantly less FACE samples (3 of 22) compared to conventional excavation (9 of 20; P=.03), but not significantly less compared to caries detector (5 of 20; P=.35). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that fluorescence-aided caries excavation is more effective than conventional excavation in removal of infected primary dentin.

  10. DOE/NV/25946--1586 Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, M.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Prothro, L.; Reed, D.

    2012-12-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE N1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 0.1 ton of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE N2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1.0 ton of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE N3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE N2, and at the same depth as SPE N2, within the damage zone created by the SPE N2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE N2 shot and prior to the SPE N3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE N2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE N2 core hole included geophysical logging, a

  11. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Cultural Patrimony From Federal or Tribal Lands § 10.3 Intentional archaeological excavations. (a) General... objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony that are excavated intentionally from Federal or... excavation of human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony from Federal...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.651 - Specific excavation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific excavation requirements. 1926.651 Section 1926.651..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Excavations § 1926.651 Specific excavation requirements. (a) Surface encumbrances. All surface encumbrances that are located so as...

  13. Numerical Simulation of Blast Vibration and Crack Forming Effect of Rock-Anchored Beam Excavation in Deep Underground Caverns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XinPing Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at surrounding rock damage induced by dynamic disturbance from blasting excavation of rock-anchored beam in rock mass at moderate or far distance in underground cavern, numerical model of different linear charging density and crustal stress in underground cavern is established by adopting dynamic finite element software based on borehole layout, charging, and rock parameter of the actual situation of a certain hydropower station. Through comparison in vibration velocity, contour surface of rock mass excavation, and the crushing extent of excavated rock mass between calculation result and field monitoring, optimum linear charging density of blast hole is determined. Studies are also conducted on rock mass vibration in moderate or far distance to blasting source, the damage of surrounding rock in near-field to blasting source, and crushing degree of excavated rock mass under various in situ stress conditions. Results indicate that, within certain range of in situ stress, the blasting vibration is independent of in situ stress, while when in situ stress is increasing above certain value, the blasting vibration velocity will be increasing and the damage of surrounding rock and the crushing degree of excavated rock mass will be decreasing.

  14. Selected aspects of designing deep excavations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obrzud Rafał F.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes two approaches to serviceability limit state (SLS verification for the deep excavation boundary value problem. The verification is carried out by means of the finite element (FE method with the aid of the commercial program ZSoil v2014. In numerical simulations, deep excavation in non-cohesive soil is supported with a diaphragm wall. In the first approach, the diaphragm wall is modeled with the Hookean material assuming reduced average stiffness and possible concrete cracking. The second approach is divided into two stages. In the first stage, the wall is modeled by defining its stiffness with the highest nominal Young’s modulus. The modulus makes it possible to find design bending moments which are used to compute the minimal design cross-section reinforcement for the retaining structure. The computed reinforcement is then used in a non-linear structural analysis which is viewed as the “actual” SLS verification.

  15. Focal choroidal excavation associated with focal retinochoroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Tetsutaro; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    To describe detailed spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings for two patients with focal choroidal excavation (FCE) associated with focal retinochoroiditis. Three eyes from two patients with FCE associated with focal retinochoroiditis were evaluated by funduscopy, fluorescence angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and spectral-domain OCT during follow-up. Both patients with focal retinochoroiditis developed new FCE after oral steroid treatment and two eyes showed regression of the FCE during the follow-up. Both eyes from one patient transformed from the conforming to the nonconforming type and neither of the eyes were stable during the follow-up. Ultimately, all eyes exhibited the conforming-type FCE. Focal choroidal excavation can be seen as a tomographic phenotype after the treatment of focal retinochoroiditis. Spectral-domain OCT was useful for detecting the development of FCE after the treatment and for observing FCE regression.

  16. Excavating and loading equipment for peat mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, A. V.; Zhigulskaya, A. I.; Yakonovskaya, T. B.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, the issues of sustainable development of Russian regions, related to ensuring energy security, are more urgent than ever. To achieve sustainable development, an integrated approach to the use of local natural resources is needed. Practically in all north regions of the Russian Federation, peat as a local natural resource is widespread, which has a practical application in the area of housing services. The paper presents the evaluation of technologies for open-pit peat mining, as well as analysis of technological equipment for peat production. Special attention is paid to a question of peat materials excavating and loading. The problem of equipment selection in a peat surface mine is complex. Many features, restrictions and criteria need to be considered. Use of low and ultra-low ground pressure excavators and low ground pressure front-end loaders with full-range tires to provide the necessary floatation in the peat bog environment is offered.

  17. Lunar Regolith Excavation Student Competition Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nething, Julia

    2009-01-01

    The Surface Systems team is working to learn about lunar regolith and how we can use it as a source of air, water, and fuel for spacecrafts. However, excavation of this valuable regolith is difficult because the robot has to conform to many specifications (mass limit, efficiency level, etc.). NASA has therefore decided to include college students and companies in the search to create the best robot by making it into a competition.

  18. Contiguous Pile Wall as a Deep Excavation Supporting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Ramasubbarao GODAVARTHI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Providing space for parking, public amenities, etc in multi-storey buildings at town centres has created a need to go deep excavations into ground. Deep excavations are supported by systems like conventional retaining walls, sheet pile walls, braced walls, diaphragm walls and pile walls. This article describes various excavation supporting systems that are in vogue essentially contiguous pile wall and its advantages. A detailed design methodology of an excavation supporting system is furnished in this study. A case study on the Contiguous pile wall retaining system for supporting a deep excavation at a town centre is presented.

  19. Telerobotic excavation system for unexploded ordnance retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, B.L.; Killough, S.M.; Thompson, D.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Rossi, R.A. [Office of the Project Manager for Ammunition Logistics, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The small emplacement excavator (SEE) is a ruggedized military vehicle with backhoe and front loader used by the US Army for unexploded ordnance (UXO) retrieval and general utility excavation activities. In order to evaluate the feasibility of removing personnel from the vehicle during high-risk excavation tasks a development and demonstration project was initiated to evaluate performance capabilities of the SEE under telerobotic control. A technology demonstration of the TSEE was conducted at McKinley Range, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama on 13--17 September, 1993. The primary objective of the demonstration was to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of remote UXO retrieval. During the demonstration, explosive ordnance disposal specialists were instructed on telerobotic operation of the TSEE, and then were asked to complete a simulated UXO retrieval task. Participants then submitted an evaluation of the system including human factors performance data. This presentation will describe the TSEE, retrieval demonstration, and summarize results of the performance evaluations. Some examples of the results are given below. Seventy percent of the demonstration participants found the tasks were as easy or easier to accomplish utilizing the remote system than with an unmodified system. Similarly, eighty percent of the participants found the TSEE hand controller was as easy or easier to use than the normal manual controls.

  20. Discrete Element Modeling for Mobility and Excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, M. A.; Hopkins, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The planning and completion of mobility and excavation efforts on the moon requires a thorough understanding of the planetary regolith. In this work, a discrete element method (DEM) model is created to replicate those activities in the laboratory and for planning mission activities in the future. The crux of this work is developing a particle bed that best replicates the regolith tool/wheel interaction seen in the laboratory. To do this, a DEM geotechnical triaxial strength cell was created allowing for comparison of laboratory JSC-1a triaxial tests to DEM simulated soils. This model relies on a triangular lattice membrane covered triaxial cell for determining the macroscopic properties of the modeled granular material as well as a fast and efficient contact detection algorithm for a variety of grain shapes. Multiple grain shapes with increasing complexity (ellipsoid, poly-ellipsoid and polyhedra) have been developed and tested. This comparison gives us a basis to begin scaling DEM grain size and shape to practical values for mobility and excavation modeling. Next steps include development of a DEM scoop for percussive excavation testing as well as continued analysis of rover wheel interactions using a wide assortment of grain shape and size distributions.

  1. National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-06-15

    The second meeting of Federal agency representatives interested in the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program took place on June 15, 1993. The Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hosted the meeting at the Washington, D.C., offices of DOE. Representatives from the National Science Foundation, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Bureau of Mines, National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, and various offices within the Department of Energy attended. For a complete list of attendees see Attachment A. The purpose of the meeting was: (1) to cover the status of efforts to gain formal approval for NADET, (2) to brief participants on events since the last meeting, especially two recent workshops that explored research needs in drilling and excavation, (3) to review some recent technological advances, and (4) to solicit statements of the importance of improving drilling and excavation technologies to the missions of the various agencies. The meeting agenda is included as Attachment B.

  2. Excavation of Regolith by Impinging Jets of Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.; Vu, Bruce T.; Donahue, Carly M.

    2006-01-01

    There are many situations in nature and technology where particulate matter is excavated by a fluid jet. Such a process is often used to excavate soil or to dig wells. Air jets are often used to transport particulate matter such as powders in various industrial processes. Similar situations occur in nature, as when waterfalls scour holes in sand. In other cases, the excavation is unwanted such as when a rocket lands on the sandy or dusty surface of a planet or moon. Recent research into regolith excavation by gas jets has obtained new insights into the physical processes of that excavation, and these may lead to new advances in technology for more efficient fluid-jet excavation processes and for better control of the unwanted excavation effects of landing rockets. This talk will explain the new insights and point to future work supporting lunar exploration.

  3. Focal choroidal excavation in eyes with central serous chorioretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellabban, Abdallah A; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Ooto, Sotaro; Yamashiro, Kenji; Oishi, Akio; Nakata, Isao; Miyake, Masahiro; Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Ueda-Arakawa, Naoko; Arichika, Shigeta; Yoshitake, Shin; Takahashi, Ayako; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2013-10-01

    To study the prevalence and 3-dimensional (3-D) tomographic features of focal choroidal excavations in eyes with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) using swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT). Prospective, cross-sectional study. We examined 116 consecutive eyes with CSC with a prototype 3-D swept-source OCT. 3-D images of the shape of the macular area, covering 6 × 6 mm(2), were reconstructed by segmentation of the outer surface of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The 3-D swept-source OCT detected focal choroidal excavations in 9 eyes (7.8%). The 3-D scanning protocol, coupled with en face scans, allowed for clear visualization of the excavation morphology. In 5 eyes with focal excavations, unusual choroidal tissue was found beneath the excavation, bridging the bottom of the excavation and the outer choroidal boundary. Additionally, 3 of those 5 eyes showed a suprachoroidal space below the excavation, as if the outer choroidal boundary is pulled inward by this bridging tissue. The focal choroidal excavations were located within fluorescein leakage points and areas of choroidal hyperpermeability. Eyes with focal choroidal excavations were more myopic (-4.42 ± 2.92 diopters) than eyes without excavations (-0.27 ± 1.80 diopters, P = .001). Subfoveal choroidal thickness was significantly thinner (301.3 ± 60.1 μm) in eyes with focal excavations than in eyes without the excavations (376.6 ± 104.8 μm, P = .036). Focal choroidal excavations were present in 7.8% of eyes with CSC. In these eyes, focal choroidal excavations may have formed from RPE retraction caused by focal scarring of choroidal connective tissue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Heat Damage Zones Created by Different Energy Sources Used in the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in a Pig Liver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Chi Fai; Chan, Alexander Chak Lam; Pun, Chung Ting; Ho, Lap Yin; Chan, Steve Wai-Hee; Au, Wing Hang

    2015-06-01

    There are different types of transurethral prostatic surgeries and the complication profiles are different. This study aims to compare the heat damage zones (HDZ) created by five different technologies in a pig liver model. Monopolar resection, bipolar resection, electrovaporization, and Greenlight™ lasers of 120 and 180 W were used to remove fresh pig liver tissue in a simulated model. Each procedure was repeated in five specimens. Two blocks were selected from each specimen to measure the three deepest HDZ. The mean of HDZ was 295, 234, 192, 673, and 567 μm, respectively, for monopolar resection, bipolar resection, electrovaporization, Greenlight laser 120 W, and Greenlight laser 180 W, respectively. The Greenlight laser produced one to three times deeper HDZ than the other energy sources (p=0.000). Both 120 and 180 W Greenlight lasers produced deeper HDZ than the other energy sources. Urologists need to be aware of HDZ that cause tissue damage outside the operative field.

  5. Patients' preferences for selective versus complete excavation: A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Mostajaboldave, Roxana; Otto, Isabella; Dörfer, Christof E; Burkert, Silke

    2016-03-01

    Despite increasing evidence supporting selective caries tissue removal, the technique is not adopted by most dentists, one possible reason being that patients might reject it. We aimed to assess patients' preferences for selective versus complete excavation, and to identify predictors of this preference. A sequential mixed-methods approach was taken. First, semi-structured focus group discussions on two convenience samples were performed. Verbatim transcripts were evaluated using content-analysis to inform quantitative study design. The subsequent survey employed convenience, snow-ball and deviant-case sampling, yielding 150 respondents. The relevance of treatment attributes (risks of nerve damage, root-canal treatment, recurrent caries, restorative complications, treatment costs, aesthetic consequences) on patients' treatment preferences was measured using case-vignettes. Dental experience and anxiety as well as patients' personality and socio-demographic details were recorded. Association of predictor variables (age, gender, education, partnership status, personality items, dental experience, anxiety) with treatment preference was assessed using regression analysis. Focus group participants perceived complete excavation as reliable, but feared endodontic treatment. The vast majority of survey respondents (82.7%) preferred complete over selective excavation. The preference for selective excavation was significantly increased in patients with an emotionally stable personality (pexcavation. Clinical decision-making regarding carious tissue removal might be affected by dentists on both an informative and an empathic level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Focal choroidal excavation: Clinical findings and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Navarro, V; Montero Hernández, J; Navarro Palop, C; Palomares Fort, P; Cervera Taulet, E

    2016-01-01

    To describe the clinical findings and its complications in 2 patients with focal choroidal excavation (FCE). A retrospective case-series including 4 eyes of 2 patients with FCE that underwent a comprehensive ophthalmological examination including slit-lamp examination, colour fundus photography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fluorescein angiography (FA), and indocyanine green angiography. In the 2 patients, both the anterior and posterior segment evaluations were mostly normal despite the of presence yellowish spots in the macular area of the right eye of patient 1, and of a small yellowish elevated lesion with serous macular detachment in the macular area of the left eye in patient 2. At diagnosis, SD-OCT revealed a conforming FCE in patient 1, and in patient 2, an FCE with perilesional subretinal fluid and a neuroepithelium detachment, suspicious of FCE complicated with central serous retinopathy (CSCR). At one year of follow-up, patient 1 developed choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) over the focal choroidal excavation. FA and indocyanine green angiography examinations revealed areas with hypofluorescence in earlier frames, and a diffuse leakage in late frames. After ranibizumab injections, the SD-OCT of patient 1 revealed no active exudation, while patient 2 showed partial resolution of subretinal fluid. FCE is a newly described entity of unclear aetiology. It is characterised by a choroidal excavation in eyes, with absence of posterior staphyloma, scleral ectasia, trauma, or retinal disease. Although most lesions remain stable, there could be an association with CRSC or CNV. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Excavator energy-saving efficiency based on diesel engine cylinder deactivation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Quan, Long; Yang, Yang

    2012-09-01

    The hydraulic excavator energy-saving research mainly embodies the following three measures: to improve the performance of diesel engine and hydraulic component, to improve the hydraulic system, and to improve the power matching of diesel-hydraulic system-actuator. Although the above measures have certain energy-saving effect, but because the hydraulic excavator load changes frequently and fluctuates dramatically, so the diesel engine often works in high-speed and light load condition, and the fuel consumption is higher. Therefore, in order to improve the economy of diesel engine in light load, and reduce the fuel consumption of hydraulic excavator, energy management concept is proposed based on diesel engine cylinder deactivation technology. By comparing the universal characteristic under diesel normal and deactivated cylinder condition, the mechanism that fuel consumption can be reduced significantly by adopting cylinder deactivation technology under part of loads condition can be clarified. The simulation models for hydraulic system and diesel engine are established by using AMESim software, and fuel combustion consumption by using cylinder-deactivation-technology is studied through digital simulation approach. In this way, the zone of cylinder deactivation is specified. The testing system for the excavator with this technology is set up based on simulated results, and the results show that the diesel engine can still work at high efficiency with part of loads after adopting this technology; fuel consumption is dropped down to 11% and 13% under economic and heavy-load mode respectively under the condition of driving requirements. The research provides references to the energy-saving study of the hydraulic excavators.

  8. A Novel Energy Recovery System for Parallel Hybrid Hydraulic Excavator

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wei; Cao, Baoyu; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic excavator energy saving is important to relieve source shortage and protect environment. This paper mainly discusses the energy saving for the hybrid hydraulic excavator. By analyzing the excess energy of three hydraulic cylinders in the conventional hydraulic excavator, a new boom potential energy recovery system is proposed. The mathematical models of the main components including boom cylinder, hydraulic motor, and hydraulic accumulator are built. The natural frequency of the pro...

  9. A STRUCTURAL MODEL OF AN EXCAVATOR WORKFLOW CONTROL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gurko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Earthwork improving is connected with excavators automation. In this paper, on the basis of the analysis of problems that a hydraulic excavator control system have to solve, the hierarchical structure of a control system have been proposed. The decomposition of the control process had been executed that allowed to develop the structural model which reflects the characteristics of a multilevel space-distributed control system of an excavator workflow.

  10. Middle Stone Age stratigraphy and excavations at Die Kelders Cave 1 (Western Cape Province, South Africa): the 1992, 1993, and 1995 field seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marean, C W; Goldberg, P; Avery, G; Grine, F E; Klein, R G

    2000-01-01

    Die Kelders Cave 1, first excavated under the direction of Franz Schweitzer in 1969-1973, was re-excavated between 1992 and 1995 by a combined team from the South African Museum, SUNY at Stony Brook, and Stanford University. These renewed excavations enlarged the artefactual and faunal samples from the inadequately sampled and less intensively excavated lower Middle Stone Age (MSA) layers, increased our understanding of the complex site formation processes within the cave, enlarged the hominid sample from the MSA deposits, and generated ESR, TL, and OSL dates for the MSA layers. Importantly, these new excavations dramatically improved our comprehension of the vertical and lateral characteristics of the MSA stratigraphy. Surface plotting of the MSA layers has led to the identification of at least two major zones of subsidence that significantly warped the layers, draping some along the eroding surface contours of major blocks of fallen limestone roof rock. A third zone of subsidence is probably present in the older excavations. Dramatic roof falls of very large limestone blocks occurred at least twice-once in the middle of Layer 4/5 where the roof blocks were only slightly weathered after collapse, and at the top of Layer 6 where the blocks weathered heavily after collapse, producing a zone of decomposed rock around the blocks. Many of the sandy strata are cut by small and localized faults and slippages. All of the strata documented by Schweitzer's excavations are present throughout the exposed area to the west of his excavated area, where many of them thicken and become more complex. Layer 6, the thickest MSA layer, becomes less diagenetically altered and compressed to the west. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Pneumatic Excavation Mechanism for Lunar Resource Utilization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Honeybee Robotics, in collaboration with Firestar Engineering, proposes to continue development of a pneumatic regolith excavating, moving and heating approach. With...

  12. Theory and technology of rock excavation for civil engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Dingxiang

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the technical advances in recent decades and the various theories on rock excavation raised by scholars from different countries, including China and Russia. It not only focuses on rock blasting but also illustrates a number of non-blasting methods, such as mechanical excavation in detail. The book consists of 3 parts: Basic Knowledge, Surface Excavation and Underground Excavation. It presents a variety of technical methods and data from diverse sources in the book, making it a valuable theoretical and practical reference resource for engineers, researchers and postgraduates alike.

  13. Historical photogrammetry: Bird's Paluxy River dinosaur chase sequence digitally reconstructed as it was prior to excavation 70 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkingham, Peter L; Bates, Karl T; Farlow, James O

    2014-01-01

    It is inevitable that some important specimens will become lost or damaged over time, conservation is therefore of vital importance. The Paluxy River dinosaur tracksite is among the most famous in the world. In 1940, Roland T. Bird described and excavated a portion of the site containing associated theropod and sauropod trackways. This excavated trackway was split up and housed in different institutions, and during the process a portion was lost or destroyed. We applied photogrammetric techniques to photographs taken by Bird over 70 years ago, before the trackway was removed, to digitally reconstruct the site as it was prior to excavation. The 3D digital model offers the opportunity to corroborate maps drawn by R.T. Bird when the tracksite was first described. More broadly, this work demonstrates the exciting potential for digitally recreating palaeontological, geological, or archaeological specimens that have been lost to science, but for which photographic documentation exists.

  14. Focal Choroidal Excavation in Retinal Dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braimah, Imoro Zeba; Rapole, Shruthi; Dumpala, Sunila; Chhablani, Jay

    2016-08-17

    To investigate the presence of focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), Stargardt's disease (STGD), and Best disease in the Indian population. This retrospective consecutive case series included 309 eyes of 157 patients with RP (183 eyes), STGD (93 eyes), and Best disease (33 eyes) with good-quality, enhanced-depth spectral domain optical coherence tomography scans. Comprehensive ophthalmic examination data were collected. Characteristics of FCE, including location of FCE, type (conforming and non-conforming), maximal width, and depth, were noted. FCE was found in 2 out of 33 (6%) eyes with Best disease and no FCE was found in eyes with RP or STGD. The location of the FCE was extrafoveal in both cases. The first case had non-conforming FCE while the second case had the conforming type and the FCE occurred in association with choroidal neovascularization in the second case. The first case maintained good visual acuity of 20/20 over the entire period of follow-up (14 months), while the second case had a visual acuity of 20/200 at the last follow-up (three years) due to scarred choroidal neovascular membranes. The FCE showed no change in both eyes over the entire duration of follow-up. Focal choroidal excavation was found in 6% of eyes with Best disease, which remained stable throughout follow up. Eyes with RP and STGD did not have any FCE. Further studies are required to determine the role of vitelliform material in FCE development in Best disease.

  15. Woodpecker Excavation and Use of Cavities in Polystyrene Snags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz

    1996-01-01

    We examined woodpecker excavation and use of artificial polystyrene snags in four forest types in eastern Texas for five years. Twenty-three of 47 artificial snags were used by Downy Woodpeckers (Picoides pubescens) for cavity excavation and subsequent nocturnal roosting; they did not use the artificial snags for nesting. Although six ather species of woodpeckers...

  16. Preliminary results of excavations at Lincoln Cave, Sterkfontein, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Reynolds, SC

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent excavations of undisturbed deposits within the Lincoln Cave, Sterkfontein, have conclusively demonstrated that at least one of the deposits is mid-late Pleistocene in age. The artefacts recovered from this excavation are in a datable context...

  17. Reducing Extra-Terrestrial Excavation Forces with Percussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert; Schuler, Jason M.; Smith, Jonathan Drew; Nick, Andrew J.; Lippitt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High launch costs and mission requirements drive the need for low mass excavators with mobility platforms, which in turn have little traction and excavation reaction capacity in low gravity environments. This presents the need for precursor and long term future missions with low mass robotic mining technology to perform In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) tasks. This paper discusses a series of experiments that investigate the effectiveness of a percussive digging device to reduce excavation loads and thereby the mass of the excavator itself. A percussive mechanism and 30" wide pivoting bucket were attached at the end of the arm simulating a basic backhoe with a percussion direction tangent to the direction of movement. Impact energies from 13.6J to 30.5J and frequencies from 0 BPM to 700 BPM were investigated. A reduction in excavation force of as much as 50% was achieved in this experimental investigation.

  18. Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

  19. Methods to ensure the quality of excavated soil material from geogenically metalliferous sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebhard, Peter; Sager, Manfred

    2017-04-01

    Soils at geogenically metalliferous sites might exceed heavy metal threshold levels with respect to agricultural use, apart from anthropogenic contamination sources. As a fundamental substrate for green plants and green plant production, soil is not easily renewable, its formation needs long time (e.g. 500 years for 20 mm). In Austria, about 10ha of soil get sealed every day, resulting in complete loss of its biological functions. Excavated soil material has been classified as waste from a legal point of view, which made 33 mill. tons resp. 48% of total waste in Austria in 2010. Recycling of excavated soil material for agricultural use will be an important task to reduce future waste and to enlarge agricultural substrate volumes, but methods to ensure proper qualities are needed to improve regulations. Within this investigation, the transfer of various metals from geogenically metalliferous soils to various crop plants will be investigated, and correlated with various simple soil test methods. Four excavated soil materials from the metalliferous schist zone within the Austrian province of Styria (Kraubath/Mur, Übelbach) and a low-metal reference sample have been taken as substrates to grow raygrass (lolium multiflorum) as a green cover, salad (Lactuca sativa) as a vegetable food item, oats (Avena sativa), maize (Zea mais) and stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) as a hyperaccumulating species. Results and recommendations will be presented.

  20. DECOVALEX II project. Nirex RCF Shaft Excavation Task 1C - Coupled hydro-mechanical effects of shaft sinking within Sector 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakami, H. [Itasca Geomekanik AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    from both Mohr-Coulomb and Hoek-Brown failure criteria - that takes care of the onset of a brittle failure more explicitly, numerical analyses were carried out in order to capture the Excavation Damage Zone, a feature that could not be studied under the failure criterion and the input data incorporated in the first modelling approach. Regardless of which of the two failure criteria was active in the simulations, the deformational disturbances caused by the numerical excavation of the shaft were typical for stiff and competent crystalline rock masses. The mechanically disturbed zone did not effectively extend farther than about three times the diameter of the shaft, beyond which the disturbance was insignificant. Also, the convergence of the shaft was confined to about 3 mm at the most, once again typical for the hard rocks. As was expected, there was a very significant difference in flow characteristics associated with the two model set-ups; with and without the outstanding flow zones. While both the modelled rock matrices had almost similar flow properties, the flow zones only appearing in the second model were supplied with uppermost values of the permeability and porosity from ranges estimated from the site and laboratory investigations. The extreme values were between x - y order of magnitudes greater than the corresponding values from the rock matrix. Extremely low volumes of water, up to about 2.5 lit/min percolated into a 20-m long section of the shaft, by using the first model set-up with no flow zones included. On the other hand much greater values; e.g. as high as about 260 lit/min flowed into the same section of the shaft, having the three flow zones active. The latter case may be considered as a possible upper bound for the inflow into the shaft over a section of 20 meters long that may take place. An Excavation Damage Zone was numerically captured that extended, at certain points, to about 60 centimetres into the rock from the shaft walls. The thickness of

  1. FOCAL CHOROIDAL EXCAVATION AND CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION WITH ASSOCIATED PACHYCHOROID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiali, Quraish; Dansingani, Kunal K; Freund, K Bailey

    2016-01-01

    To report a case of focal choroidal excavation and choroidal neovascularization in the setting of pachychoroid disease. Multimodal imaging, including fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography, indocyanine green angiography, and en face structural and angiographic optical coherence tomography. The authors describe a 39-year-old female with moderately high myopia presenting with focal choroidal excavation and associated choroidal neovascularization. Multimodal imaging demonstrated pachychoroid features with dilated choroidal vessels surrounding the lesion. Optical coherence tomography angiography showed Type 2 neovascularization. Some cases of focal choroidal excavation and associated neovascularization may be related to structural abnormalities of the associated choroidal vasculature.

  2. Chemomechanical Excavation is More Time-consuming Than Rotary, but not Necessarily Hand Excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, Falk

    2015-12-01

    Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials on chemomechanical caries removal. Hamama, H., et al.Oper Dent 2015;40(4):E167-178. Falk Schwendicke, DDS, PhD PURPOSE/QUESTION: How valid were the methodologies of studies on chemomechnical caries removal, and is chemomechanical caries removal more time-consuming than conventional hand or rotary excavation? Information not available Systematic review with meta-analysis of data Level 3: Other evidence Grade C (no patient-centered/relevant outcomes). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantity of remaining bacteria and cavity size after excavation with FACE, caries detector dye and conventional excavation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Aine M; Attin, Thomas; Buchalla, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    In this in vitro study, quantitative confocal microscopy was used to show differences in the quantity of bacteria remaining in dentin after excavation with different methods. A further parameter was the cavity volume after excavation relative to the original lesion size. Teeth with dentin caries were divided into three groups of 20 each. The caries was removed by a single operator using a slow handpiece and a round bur. In the first group, Fluorescence Aided Caries Excavation (FACE) was carried out: violet light was used to illuminate the operating field and the operator observed the cavity through a high-pass filter and removed the orange-red fluorescing areas. The second group was excavated using Caries Detector, while the third group used conventional excavation. After excavation, cavity volume was measured; samples were stained for bacteria with ethidium bromide, and they were examined using confocal microscopy under standardized conditions. The bound stain was quantified in terms of fluorescence intensity on the confocal images. Total pixel intensity was significantly lower in the FACE Group than in the Caries Detector group (p = 0.046) and in the conventional excavation group (p = 0.021). Differences in cavity volume relative to original lesion size were not statistically significant (p = 0.86, 0.35 and 0.51). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that FACE is more effective in removing infected dentin without significantly increasing cavity size when compared to conventional excavation and excavation with the aid of caries detector dye.

  4. CRIEPI and SKB cooperation report No. 4. Numerical analysis for the effect of tunnel excavation on groundwater flow at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Yasuharu; Miyakawa, Kimio; Igarashi; Toshifumi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Abiko Research Lab

    2000-05-01

    A numerical analysis was performed for the hydraulic impact of the tunnel excavated in crystalline rock for the construction of an underground research laboratory at Aespoe Island in Sweden. The subject of this study is to clarify the influence of excavation of the tunnel section from 700 m to 2,545 m. The size of the modeled region for the analysis is 1,800 meters from east to west and 2,000 meters from north to south so that it includes all the area of Aespoe Island. The lower boundary of the model is 1,000 meters under the ground. The existence of 19 major fracture zones was confirmed through geological survey and values of transmissivity, storativity and width were assigned to the fracture zones individually in the numerical model. On the other hand, uniform hydraulic characteristics were assigned to the whole rock formation except the fracture zones. Reduction of the hydraulic conductivities was taken into account for the grouted fracture zones. The analysis was performed by using a numerical code, FEGM, developed by CRIEPI for three-dimensional groundwater flow analysis. Drawdowns were observed during tunnel excavation at the boreholes excavated from the ground surface in Aespoe Island and were compared with the calculated results. The calculated drawdowns agreed will with the observed ones, indicating that the analytical method was proved effective. (author)

  5. Impact-Actuated Digging Tool for Lunar Excavation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Honeybee Robotics proposes to develop a vacuum compatible, impact-actuated digging tool for the excavation of frozen and compacted regolith on the lunar surface and...

  6. MPED: An ISRU Bucket Ladder Excavator Demonstrator System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a planetary surface tool called the Multi Purpose Excavation Demonstrator (MPED), which is intended to both extract Lunar Soil to feed an...

  7. Effect of Process Parameters on the Total Heat Damaged Zone (HDZ) during Micro-EDM of Plastic Mold Steel 1.2738

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puthumana, Govindan

    2016-01-01

    stresses.This paper presents the effect of process parameters on the HDZ in micro-EDM of plastic mold steel 1.2738.As the energy of the sparks increases, the thickness of the HDZ increases and the average coefficient ofcorrelation between energy and HDZ considering three different sections of the zone is 0......In micro electrical discharge machining, three subsurface layersare formed on the workpiece, they are;recast zone, heat affected zone and converted zone, primarily due to heating-quenching cycles. The HDZ inmicro-EDM is characterized by cracks and weakness in the grain boundary and thermal residual...

  8. Telerobotic Excavator Designed to Compete in NASA's Lunabotics Mining Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Rodney; Santin, Cara; Yousef, Ahmed; Nguyen, Thien; Helferty, John; Pillapakkam, Shriram

    2011-01-01

    The second annual NASA Lunabotics Mining competition is to be held in May 23-28, 2011. The goal of the competition is for teams of university level students to design, build, test and compete with a fully integrated lunar excavator on a simulated lunar surface. Our team, named Lunar Solutions I, will be representing Temple University's College of Engineering in the competition. The team's main goal was to build a robot which is able to compete with other teams, and ultimately win the competition. The main challenge of the competition was to build a wireless robot that can excavate and collect a minimum of 10 kilograms of the regolith material within 15 minutes. The robot must also be designed to operate in conditions similar to those found on the lunar surface. The design of the lunar excavator is constrained by a set of requirements determined by NASA and detailed in the competition's rulebook. The excavator must have the ability to communicate with the "main base" wirelessly, and over a Wi-Fi network. Human operators are located at a remote site approximately 60 meters away from the simulated lunar surface upon which the robot must excavate the lunar regolith surface. During the competition, the robot will operate in a separate area from the control room in an area referred to as the "Lunarena." From the control room, the operators will have to control the robot using visual feedback from cameras placed both within the arena and on the robot. Using this visual feedback the human operators control the robots movement using both keyboard and joystick commands. In order to place in the competition, a minimum of 10 kg of regolith material has to be excavated, collected, and dumped into a specific location. For that reason, the robot must be provided with an effective and powerful excavation system. Our excavator uses tracks for the drive system. After performing extensive research and trade studies, we concluded that tracks would be the most effective method for

  9. Impact-Actuated Digging Tool for Lunar Excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jak; Chu, Philip; Craft, Jack; Zacny, Kris; Santoro, Chris

    2013-01-01

    NASA s plans for a lunar outpost require extensive excavation. The Lunar Surface Systems Project Office projects that thousands of tons of lunar soil will need to be moved. Conventional excavators dig through soil by brute force, and depend upon their substantial weight to react to the forces generated. This approach will not be feasible on the Moon for two reasons: (1) gravity is 1/6th that on Earth, which means that a kg on the Moon will supply 1/6 the down force that it does on Earth, and (2) transportation costs (at the time of this reporting) of $50K to $100K per kg make massive excavators economically unattractive. A percussive excavation system was developed for use in vacuum or nearvacuum environments. It reduces the down force needed for excavation by an order of magnitude by using percussion to assist in soil penetration and digging. The novelty of this excavator is that it incorporates a percussive mechanism suited to sustained operation in a vacuum environment. A percussive digger breadboard was designed, built, and successfully tested under both ambient and vacuum conditions. The breadboard was run in vacuum to more than 2..times the lifetime of the Apollo Lunar Surface Drill, throughout which the mechanism performed and held up well. The percussive digger was demonstrated to reduce the force necessary for digging in lunar soil simulant by an order of magnitude, providing reductions as high as 45:1. This is an enabling technology for lunar site preparation and ISRU (In Situ Resource Utilization) mining activities. At transportation costs of $50K to $100K per kg, reducing digging forces by an order of magnitude translates into billions of dollars saved by not launching heavier systems to accomplish excavation tasks necessary to the establishment of a lunar outpost. Applications on the lunar surface include excavation for habitats, construction of roads, landing pads, berms, foundations, habitat shielding, and ISRU.

  10. Dépistage de grandes excavations papillaires dans la population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectif : Décrire les caractéristiques de l'excavation papillaire et déterminer la prévalence de grandes excavations papillaires dans une population jeune mélanoderme. Patients et Méthodes : Il s'agit d'une étude de population conduite dans des agglomérations rurales du district de Bassar au Nord du Togo où la ...

  11. Choroidal Excavation in Eye with Normal Tension Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunobu Asao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the case of an eye with normal tension glaucoma and a choroidal excavation. Methods: This is an observational case report. Results: A 59-year-old woman with normal tension glaucoma had a choroidal excavation in the left eye. Her best-corrected visual acuity and intraocular pressure were within normal limits and had been stable for 5 years. Fundus examination showed a small white lesion inferior to the macula and a nerve fiber layer defect at the inferior edge of the optic disc. Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA showed visual field defects corresponding to the nerve fiber layer defect with C30-2, and a central scotoma superior to the macula with C10-2. Optical coherence tomography (OCT showed a 150-µm deep choroidal excavation. Disruptions of the IS/OS line were detected only in the area inferior to the choroidal excavation. During the 5 months of follow-up, her best-corrected visual acuity remained at 1.0 and the IOP ranged from 12 to 14 mm Hg in the left eye. The fundus and OCT images did not deteriorate and the choroidal excavation did not enlarge. Conclusions: The disruption of the inner/outer segment (IS/OS line was detected only at the area surrounding the choroidal excavation. OCT examinations are useful in assessing the area of the residual IS/OS line, and HFA can be used to estimate the residual central visual field.

  12. Choroidal excavation in vogt-koyanagi-harada disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashida, Noriyasu; Fok, Andrew; Nishida, Kohji

    2014-05-01

    To report a case of choroidal excavation accompanied by Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH). A 54-year-old Japanese woman who was complaining of bilateral blurring of vision associated with headache underwent optical coherence tomography (OCT), fluorescein angiography, and indocyanine green angiography as well as a routine ophthalmological examination. Fundoscopy showed papilloedema and serous retinal detachment in both eyes. Fluorescein angiography detected bilateral multifocal leakage with pooling of dye in the subretinal space. Indocyanine green angiography showed patches of hyperfluorescence and hypofluorescent spots bilaterally. A diagnosis of VKH was reached soon afterwards. OCT of the left eye revealed the presence of a unilateral choroidal excavation under the fovea and subretinal fibrin over the site of the excavation. Treatment successfully resolved VKH symptoms with gradual resolution of subretinal fibrin and fluid; however, the choroidal excavation remained. This case is the first report of choroidal excavation associated with VKH. Our results suggest that choroidal excavation can be induced by choroidal inflammation caused by VKH.

  13. Choroidal excavation in eye with normal tension glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Kazunobu; Morimoto, Takeshi; Nakada, Atsuko; Kawasaki, Yoshimi

    2014-05-01

    To report the case of an eye with normal tension glaucoma and a choroidal excavation. This is an observational case report. A 59-year-old woman with normal tension glaucoma had a choroidal excavation in the left eye. Her best-corrected visual acuity and intraocular pressure were within normal limits and had been stable for 5 years. Fundus examination showed a small white lesion inferior to the macula and a nerve fiber layer defect at the inferior edge of the optic disc. Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA) showed visual field defects corresponding to the nerve fiber layer defect with C30-2, and a central scotoma superior to the macula with C10-2. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) showed a 150-µm deep choroidal excavation. Disruptions of the IS/OS line were detected only in the area inferior to the choroidal excavation. During the 5 months of follow-up, her best-corrected visual acuity remained at 1.0 and the IOP ranged from 12 to 14 mm Hg in the left eye. The fundus and OCT images did not deteriorate and the choroidal excavation did not enlarge. The disruption of the inner/outer segment (IS/OS) line was detected only at the area surrounding the choroidal excavation. OCT examinations are useful in assessing the area of the residual IS/OS line, and HFA can be used to estimate the residual central visual field.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Excavation on Residential Construction Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Forsythe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable research concerning the manifestation of greenhouse gases in the usage of buildings, little has been done concerning emissions arising from the construction process itself. This paper specifically examines emissions arising from cut and fill excavation on residential construction sites. Even though such excavation is often seen as being economical in terms of providing a flat base for concrete raft slab construction, the environmental consequences of this approach need to be considered more fully in terms of impact on the environment. This is particularly important when steeply sloping sites are involved and for different soil types. The paper undertakes a study that quantitatively assesses the cumulative greenhouse gas emissions caused by cut and fill excavation on 52 residential projects in Australia for a range of slope and soil types. The paper presents results from the study and concludes that greenhouse gas emissions increase as site slope increases; the building footprint area (as distinct from Gross Floor Area, exposes the need to reduce the area of the building to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; excavation of rock soils creates higher emissions than other soil types; and cut and fill excavation on steeply slope sites increase emissions. Potential alternative construction includes suspended floor construction systems which involve less excavation.

  15. Research on Trajectory Planning and Autodig of Hydraulic Excavator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the advances in computer control technology keep emerging, robotic hydraulic excavator becomes imperative. It can improve excavation accuracy and greatly reduce the operator’s labor intensity. The 12-ton backhoe bucket excavator has been utilized in this research work where this type of excavator is commonly used in engineering work. The kinematics model of operation device (boom, arm, bucket, and swing in excavator is established in both Denavit-Hartenberg coordinates for easy programming and geometric space for avoiding blind spot. The control approach is based on trajectory tracing method with displacements and velocities feedbacks. The trajectory planning and autodig program is written by Visual C++. By setting the bucket teeth’s trajectory, the program can automatically plan the velocity and acceleration of each hydraulic cylinder and motor. The results are displayed through a 3D entity simulation environment which can present real-time movements of excavator kinematics. Object-Oriented Graphics Rendering Engine and skeletal animation are used to give accurate parametric control and feedback. The simulation result shows that a stable linear autodig can be achieved. The errors between trajectory planning command and simulation model are analyzed.

  16. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Excavation on Residential Construction Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Forsythe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable research concerning the manifestation of greenhouse gases in the usage of buildings, little has been done concerning emissions arising from the construction process itself. This paper specifically examines emissions arising from cut and fill excavation on residential construction sites. Even though such excavation is often seen as being economical in terms of providing a flat base for concrete raft slab construction, the environmental consequences of this approach need to be considered more fully in terms of impact on the environment. This is particularly important when steeply sloping sites are involved and for different soil types. The paper undertakes a study that quantitatively assesses the cumulative greenhouse gas emissions caused by cut and fill excavation on 52 residential projects in Australia for a range of slope and soil types. The paper presents results from the study and concludes that greenhouse gas emissions increase as site slope increases; the building footprint area (as distinct from Gross Floor Area, exposes the need to reduce the area of the building to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; excavation of rock soils creates higher emissions than other soil types; and cut and fill excavation on steeply slope sites increase emissions. Potential alternative construction includes suspended floor construction systems which involve less excavation

  17. Cratos: A Simple Low Power Excavation and Hauling System for Lunar Oxygen Production and General Excavation Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, John J.; Greer, Lawrence C.; John, Wentworth T.; Spina, Dan C.; Krasowski, Mike J.; Abel, Phillip B.; Prokop, Norman F.; Flatico, Joseph M.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a robust excavating and hauling system for lunar and planetary excavation is critical to the NASA mission to the Moon and Mars. Cratos was developed as a low center of gravity, small (.75m x .75m x 0.3m), low power tracked test vehicle. The vehicle was modified to excavate and haul because it demonstrated good performance capabilities in a laboratory and field testing. Tested on loose sand in the SLOPE facility, the vehicle was able to pick up, carry, and dump sand, allowing it to accomplish the standard requirements delivery of material to a lunar oxygen production site. Cratos can pick up and deliver raw material to a production plant, as well as deliver spent tailings to a disposal site. The vehicle can complete many other In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) excavation chores and in conjunction with another vehicle or with additional attachments may be able to accomplish all needed ISRU tasks.

  18. Heart rot hotel: fungal communities in red-cockaded woodpecker excavations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle A. Jusino; Daniel L. Lindner; Mark T. Banik; Jeffrey R. Walters

    2015-01-01

    Tree-cavity excavators such as woodpeckers are ecosystem engineers that have potentially complex but poorly documented associations with wood decay fungi. Fungi facilitate cavity excavation by preparing and modifying excavation sites for cavity excavators. Associations between fungi and endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers (RCWs) are particularly interesting because...

  19. Assessment of pile response due to deep excavation in close proximity—A case study based on DTL3 Tampines West Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.G. Chinnaswamy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ground movements during deep excavations and tunnelling, especially in urban areas, may potentially have major impact on adjacent buildings, structures and utilities. This impact on buildings and structures needs to be assessed by considering the horizontal and vertical displacements induced by deep excavations to determine the necessary mitigation measures. One major factor affecting the degree of severity the impact due to deep excavation may have on the buildings and structures is the type of foundation systems. While methodology in determining the damage category for the buildings on shallow foundation has been quite well established, the methodology for assessing the impact on the pile foundation is not straightforward due to the geometry and complexity of soil structure interaction. Often simplified two-dimensional (2D or comprehensive three-dimensional (3D finite element analyses would be carried out for the stage excavation to predict the displacement and stresses in the piles. Suitable protective and preventive measures would need to be designed and implemented for the existing buildings/structures if the damage category falls within the unacceptable range. This paper discusses the analysis and methodology to assess the effect on the pile foundation of a high-rise building due to the deep excavation of the Down Town Line Stage 3 (DTL3 Tampines West (TPW Station. The approach to assess the geotechnical capacity of the pile as a result of the deep excavation is presented in this paper. Based on the assessment of pile response, predicted movement, structural and geotechnical capacities of the pile, it was found to be within the acceptable limit and the pile foundation has adequate factor of safety with the deep excavation in close proximity.

  20. Excavation-caused extra deformation of existing masonry residence in soft soil region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y.; Franceschelli, S.

    2017-04-01

    Growing need for construction of infrastructures and buildings in fast urbanization process creates challenges of interaction between buildings under construction and adjacent existing buildings. This paper presents the mitigation of contradiction between two parties who are involved the interaction using civil engineering techniques. Through the in-depth analysis of the results of monitoring surveys and enhanced accuracy and reliability of surveys, a better understanding of the behavior of deformable buildings is achieved. Combination with the original construction documents, the two parties agree that both of them are responsible for building damages and a better understanding for the rehabilitation of the existing buildings is focused on. Two cases studies are used to demonstrate and describe the importance of better understanding of the behavior of existing buildings and their rehabilitations. The objective of this study is to insight into mechanisms of soil-structure interaction for buildings adjacent to deep excavations, which can result in a damage in existing masonry residence, and to take the optimized measures to make deep excavations safety and economic and adjacent buildings keep good serviceability in urban areas with soft soil conditions.

  1. Collective workload organization in confined excavation of granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaenkova, Daria; Linevich, Vadim; Goodisman, Michael A.; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    Many social insects collectively construct large nests in complex substrates; such structures are often composed of narrow tunnels. The benefits of collective construction, including reduced construction costs per worker come with challenges of navigation in crowded, confined spaces. Here we study the workforce organization of groups of S. invicta fire ants creating tunnels in wet granular media. We monitor the activity levels of marked (painted) workers-defined as a number of tunnel visits over 12 hours- during initiation of tunnels. The activity levels are described by a Lorenz curve with a Gini coefficient of ~ 0 . 7 indicating that a majority of the excavation is performed by a minority of workers. We hypothesize that this workload distribution is beneficial for excavation in crowded conditions, and use a 2D cellular automata (CA) model to reproduce behaviors of the excavating ants. CA simulations reveal that tunnel construction rates decrease in groups of equally active animals compared to groups with the natural workload distribution. We use predictions of the CA model to organize collective excavation of granular material by teams of digging robots, and use the robots to test hypotheses of crowded excavation in the physical world. We acknowledge support of National Science Foundation, Physics of Living Systems division.

  2. Radiopaque Tagging Masks Caries Lesions following Incomplete Excavation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, F; Meyer-Lueckel, H; Schulz, M; Dörfer, C E; Paris, S

    2014-06-01

    One-step incomplete excavation seals caries-affected dentin under a restoration and appears to be advantageous in the treatment of deep lesions. However, it is impossible to discriminate radiographically between intentionally left, arrested lesions and overlooked or active lesions. This diagnostic uncertainty decreases the acceptance of minimally invasive excavation and might lead to unnecessary re-treatment of incompletely excavated teeth. Radiopaque tagging of sealed lesions might mask arrested lesions and assist in discrimination from progressing lesions. Therefore, we microradiographically screened 4 substances (SnCl2, AgNO3, CsF, CsCH3COO) for their effect on artificial lesions. Since water-dissolved tin chloride (SnCl2×Aq) was found to stably mask artificial lesions, we then investigated its radiographic effects on progressing lesions. Natural lesions were incompletely excavated and radiopaque tagging performed. Grey-value differences (△GV) between sound and carious dentin were determined and radiographs assessed by 20 dentists. While radiographic effects of SnCl2×Aq were stable for non-progressing lesions, they significantly decreased during a second demineralization (p excavation. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  3. The Excavation and Remediation of the Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Waste Landfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KWIECINSKI,DANIEL ALBERT; METHVIN,RHONDA KAY; SCHOFIELD,DONALD P.; YOUNG,SHARISSA G.

    1999-11-23

    The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a 1.9-acre disposal site that was used for the disposal of chemical wastes generated by many of SNL/NM research laboratories from 1962 until 1985. These laboratories were primarily involved in the design, research and development of non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons and the waste generated by these labs included small quantities of a wide assortment of chemical products. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan for the Chemical Waste Landfill was approved by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in 1992. Subsequent site characterization activities identified the presence of significant amounts of chromium in the soil as far as 80 feet below ground surface (fbgs) and the delineation of a solvent plume in the vadose zone that extends to groundwater approximately 500 fbgs. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was detected in some groundwater samples at concentrations slightly above the drinking water limit of 5 parts per billion. In 1997 an active vapor extraction system reduced the size of the TCE vapor plume and for the last six quarterly sampling events groundwater samples have not detected TCE above the drinking water standard. A source term removal, being conducted as a Voluntary Corrective Measure (VCM), began in September 1998 and is expected to take up to two years. Four distinct disposal areas were identified from historical data and the contents of disposal pits and trenches in these areas, in addition to much of the highly contaminated soil surrounding the disposal cells, are currently being excavated. Buried waste and debris are expected to extend to a depth of 12 to 15 fbgs. Excavation will focus on the removal of buried debris and contaminated soil in a sequential, area by area manner and will proceed to whatever depth is required in order to remove all pit contents. Up to 50,000 cubic yards of soil and debris will be removed and managed during

  4. A novel energy recovery system for parallel hybrid hydraulic excavator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Cao, Baoyu; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic excavator energy saving is important to relieve source shortage and protect environment. This paper mainly discusses the energy saving for the hybrid hydraulic excavator. By analyzing the excess energy of three hydraulic cylinders in the conventional hydraulic excavator, a new boom potential energy recovery system is proposed. The mathematical models of the main components including boom cylinder, hydraulic motor, and hydraulic accumulator are built. The natural frequency of the proposed energy recovery system is calculated based on the mathematical models. Meanwhile, the simulation models of the proposed system and a conventional energy recovery system are built by AMESim software. The results show that the proposed system is more effective than the conventional energy saving system. At last, the main components of the proposed energy recovery system including accumulator and hydraulic motor are analyzed for improving the energy recovery efficiency. The measures to improve the energy recovery efficiency of the proposed system are presented.

  5. A Novel Energy Recovery System for Parallel Hybrid Hydraulic Excavator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic excavator energy saving is important to relieve source shortage and protect environment. This paper mainly discusses the energy saving for the hybrid hydraulic excavator. By analyzing the excess energy of three hydraulic cylinders in the conventional hydraulic excavator, a new boom potential energy recovery system is proposed. The mathematical models of the main components including boom cylinder, hydraulic motor, and hydraulic accumulator are built. The natural frequency of the proposed energy recovery system is calculated based on the mathematical models. Meanwhile, the simulation models of the proposed system and a conventional energy recovery system are built by AMESim software. The results show that the proposed system is more effective than the conventional energy saving system. At last, the main components of the proposed energy recovery system including accumulator and hydraulic motor are analyzed for improving the energy recovery efficiency. The measures to improve the energy recovery efficiency of the proposed system are presented.

  6. Excavation Equipment Recognition Based on Novel Acoustic Statistical Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiuwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jianzhong; Wang, Ruirong

    2017-12-01

    Excavation equipment recognition attracts increasing attentions in recent years due to its significance in underground pipeline network protection and civil construction management. In this paper, a novel classification algorithm based on acoustics processing is proposed for four representative excavation equipments. New acoustic statistical features, namely, the short frame energy ratio, concentration of spectrum amplitude ratio, truncated energy range, and interval of pulse are first developed to characterize acoustic signals. Then, probability density distributions of these acoustic features are analyzed and a novel classifier is presented. Experiments on real recorded acoustics of the four excavation devices are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Comparisons with two popular machine learning methods, support vector machine and extreme learning machine, combined with the popular linear prediction cepstral coefficients are provided to show the generalization capability of our method. A real surveillance system using our algorithm is developed and installed in a metro construction site for real-time recognition performance validation.

  7. Development of Force Reflecting Joystick for Hydraulic Excavator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyoungkwan

    In teleoperation field robotic system such as hydraulically actuated robotic excavator, the maneuverability and convenience is the most important in the operation of robotic excavator. Particularly the force information is important in dealing with digging and leveling operation in the teleoperated excavator. This paper presents a new force reflecting joystick in a velocity-force type bilateral teleoperation system. The master system is electrical joystick and the slave system is hydraulic cylinder. Particularly pneumatic motor is used newly in the master joystick for force reflection and the information of the pressure of slave cylinder is measured and utilized as force feedback signal. This paper also proposes a novel force-reflection gain selecting algorithm based on artificial neural network. Finally a series of experiments are conducted under various load conditions using a laboratory-made one axis slave cylinder and load simulator.

  8. Case Study on Influence of Step Blast-Excavation on Support Systems of Existing Service Tunnel with Small Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorui Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the construction of newly built tunnel (NBT adjacent to the existing service tunnel (EST, stability of the EST with small interval is affected by vibration waves which are caused by blasting load. The support structures of the EST will be cracked and damaged, while the unreasonable blast-excavation methods are adopted. Presently, the studies on behavior of support structure in the EST under blasting load are not totally clear, especially for the bolts system. Besides, the responses of support structure on blasting load are lacking comprehensive research. In this paper, New Zuofang tunnel is taken as a study case to study the influence of step blast-excavation in NBT on support structures of the EST through field experiment and numerical simulation. Some data, such as blasting vibration velocity (BVV and frequency of support structures, are obtained through field measurement. Based on these data, the formula of BVVs is obtained. Research on stability of tunnel support structures affected by step blast-excavation is conducted using numerical simulation method. The dynamic-plastic constitutive model is adopted in the software ABAQUS to assess safety of support structures. The range and degree of damage for the support structures are obtained. In addition, change laws of axial force and stress with time for the bolts are analyzed.

  9. Modelling of settlement induced building damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giardina, G.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the modelling of settlement induced damage to masonry buildings. In densely populated areas, the need for new space is nowadays producing a rapid increment of underground excavations. Due to the construction of new metro lines, tunnelling activity in urban areas is growing.

  10. Support system, excavation arrangement, and process of supporting an object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Bill W.

    2017-08-01

    A support system, an excavation arrangement, and a process of supporting an object are disclosed. The support system includes a weight-bearing device and a camming mechanism positioned below the weight-bearing device. A downward force on the weight-bearing device at least partially secures the camming mechanism to opposing surfaces. The excavation arrangement includes a borehole, a support system positioned within and secured to the borehole, and an object positioned on and supported by the support system. The process includes positioning and securing the support system and positioning the object on the weight-bearing device.

  11. Asteroid Icy Regolith Excavation and Volatile Capture Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Mantovani, James; Swanger, Adam; Townsend, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Icy regolith simulants will be produced in a relevant vacuum environment using various minerals, including hydrated minerals, that are found in C-type meteorites and in other types of planetary regolith. This will allow us to characterize the mechanical strength of the icy regolith as a function of ice content using penetration, excavation, and sample capture devices. The results of this study will benefit engineers in designing efficient regolith excavators and ISRU processing systems for future exploration missions to asteroids and other planetary bodies.

  12. Rock Properties Determined Continuously from TBM Excavation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edita Lazarová

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The computer monitoring system used at excavation of exploratory galleries of motorway tunnels Branisko and Višòové-Dubná skala (excavated by Wirth TB-II-330H/M and Voest Alpine ATB 35H, respectively brought an ample study material. Several characteristics of rock environment in the line of exploratory galleries were determined using developed mathematical models. The verification of the models was carried out based on the comparison of results of mathematical models with results of common procedures of detailed engineering-geological investigation. The description of the continuous method and the results of comparisons are subject of this paper.

  13. Treatment of anisotropic damage development within a scalar damage formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. S.; Bodner, S. R.; Munson, D. E.

    This paper is concerned with describing a damage mechanics formulation which provides for non-isotropic effects using a scalar damage variable. An investigation has been in progress for establishing the constitutive behavior of rock salt at long times and low to moderate confining pressures in relation to the possible use of excavated rooms in rock salt formations as repositories for nuclear waste. An important consideration is the effect of damage manifested principally by the formation of shear induced wing cracks which have a stress dependent orientation. The analytical formulation utilizes a scalar damage parameter, but is capable of indicating the non-isotropic dependence of inelastic straining on the stress state and the confining pressure. Also, the equations indicate the possibility of volumetric expansions leading to the onset of tertiary creep and eventually rupture if the damage variable reaches a critical value.

  14. Comparison of visual observation and excavation to quantify density of the endangered bivalve Unio crassus in rivers of north-eastern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamand F.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the context of a rapid decline in several protected unionid species, government agencies urgently require a reliable method to estimate population size for the most endangered species. We used a dataset collected from 16 river stations in north-eastern France to compare the efficiency of visual estimation (bathyscope and a manual excavation to estimate numbers of the endangered bivalve Unio crassus. Our investigations indicated that, whereas a visual approach was sufficient to detect unionid presence, only 10% of all individuals were registered compared with manual excavation at the same site. In order to obtain an accurate density estimate (especially as regards the juvenile population, sediment excavation is necessary, despite it being time consuming and damaging to the mussel’s habitat.

  15. Effect of Process Parameters on the Total Heat Damaged Zone (HDZ) during Micro-EDM of Plastic Mold Steel 1.2738

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puthumana, Govindan

    2016-01-01

    stresses.This paper presents the effect of process parameters on the HDZ in micro-EDM of plastic mold steel 1.2738.As the energy of the sparks increases, the thickness of the HDZ increases and the average coefficient ofcorrelation between energy and HDZ considering three different sections of the zone is 0...

  16. Detecting defects in diaphragm walls prior to excavation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, R.; Hopman, V.; Van Tol, A.F.; Broere, W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent incidents with leaking diaphragm walls during construction of subway lines in Amsterdam and Rotterdam (Netherlands) have led to reconsideration of the diaphragm wall as a retaining wall construction for deep excavations. In our opinion the joints between the panels are the weak spot. During

  17. Choroidal excavation with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Wataru; Abe, Toshiaki; Tamai, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    This is a report of a case of choroidal excavation accompanied by polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) and retinal pigment epithelium detachment (PED). A 57-year-old Japanese woman who had begun complaining of metamorphopsia in her left eye 7 months earlier underwent spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fluorescein angiography (FA), and indocyanine green angiography (IA), as well as a routine ophthalmological examination. The patient's intraocular pressure, visual acuity, and visual field were within normal range. Ophthalmoscopy revealed a serous macular detachment, soft drusen, exudates, and a reddish-orange elevated lesion in the macula of the left eye. The right eye was normal. SD-OCT revealed two lesions in the left eye. One was a PED accompanied by a notch sign, and the other was a choroidal excavation. Additionally, FA revealed a window defect in the PED, and IA showed typical PCV. Three monthly injections of antivascular endothelial growth factor preserved visual acuity, but failed to have any visible effect on the lesion during the 6-month follow up period. This is the first report of choroidal excavation accompanied by PED and PCV. The data suggest that choroidal excavation may be associated with various changes that have not been previously reported. Careful observation of such cases may therefore be necessary.

  18. Excavations at Wodoku and Lodoku and their implications for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finds from excavations at Wodoku and Ladoku, the original home of the Nungwa and La people respectively are described, and their implications for the archaeology of the Accra Plains, particularly as they relate to the pottery sequence, Ga-Dangme origins, chronology of settlements, economy and subsistence practices ...

  19. Complete excavation and mapping of a Texas leafcutting ant nest

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Moser

    2006-01-01

    A medium-sized nest of the Texas leafcutting ant, Atta texana (Buckley), in northern Louisiana was excavated completely, and a three-dimensional model of its external and subterranean features was constructed. In total, 97 fungus gardens, 27 dormancy cavities, and 45 detritus cavities were located. At the lower center of the funnel-shaped nest was a...

  20. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF ATTITUDE CONTROL BUCKET‐WHEEL EXCAVATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana ONDERKOVÁ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This lecture deals with the application problems of convertibility GPS system at paddle excavator K 800. The claims of the modern operating surface mining of the excavators requires a lot of information for monitoring of mining process, capacity mining, selective extraction etc. The utilization of monitoring the excavator setting by GPS system proved to be the only one proper because the receivers are resistant to the vibration, dust, temperature divergence and weather changeable. Only the direct contact with communications satellite is required. It means that they can´t be located in a metal construction space (shadow caused by construction elements, influence of electrical high voltage cables even they can´t be located close to the paddle wheel on the paddle boom (shadow possibility caused by cuttinng edge created during lower gangplanks mining. This is the reason that GPS receivers are set uppermost on the metal construction excavator and the mathematical formulation is required for determination of paddle wheel petting. The relations for calculation of the paddle wheel coordinate were defined mathematically and after that the mathematical model was composed.

  1. Choroidal excavation with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Wataru Kobayashi,1 Toshiaki Abe,2 Hiroshi Tamai,1 Toru Nakazawa11Department of Ophthalmology, 2Division of Clinical Cell Therapy, Center for Advanced Medical Research and Development (ART, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medical Science, Sendai, JapanPurpose: This is a report of a case of choroidal excavation accompanied by polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV and retinal pigment epithelium detachment (PED.Methods: A 57-year-old Japanese woman who had begun complaining of metamorphopsia in her left eye 7 months earlier underwent spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, fluorescein angiography (FA, and indocyanine green angiography (IA, as well as a routine ophthalmological examination.Results: The patient’s intraocular pressure, visual acuity, and visual field were within normal range. Ophthalmoscopy revealed a serous macular detachment, soft drusen, exudates, and a reddish-orange elevated lesion in the macula of the left eye. The right eye was normal. SD-OCT revealed two lesions in the left eye. One was a PED accompanied by a notch sign, and the other was a choroidal excavation. Additionally, FA revealed a window defect in the PED, and IA showed typical PCV. Three monthly injections of antivascular endothelial growth factor preserved visual acuity, but failed to have any visible effect on the lesion during the 6-month follow up period.Conclusions: This is the first report of choroidal excavation accompanied by PED and PCV. The data suggest that choroidal excavation may be associated with various changes that have not been previously reported. Careful observation of such cases may therefore be necessary.Keywords: choroidal excavation, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment

  2. Corrosion and coating defects on buried pipelines under CP: Excavations data collection and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karcher, Sebastien; Campaignolle, Xavier; Masson, Bernard; Meyer, Michel [Gaz de France Research and Development Division, 361 avenue du President Wilson, BP33 93211 Saint Denis La Plaine (France)

    2004-07-01

    the surrounding ground and environment at the time of excavation, as well as a documentation of the metal damage, if any. Data analysis as well as statistics can then be applied to process these data. For instance, standard data treatment methods allow the compilation, on sub sets of pipelines with identical coating type, of the distribution of the number of coating defects and/or corrosion with respect to the pipeline age. It can also be attempted to relate those distributions with ground type or other relevant parameters, and to compare these distributions with regards to the coating type. Eventually, the studies may, for example, reveal any correlation between the type/size of coating defects (disbandment, lack of coating, etc.), and the presence (or lack) of a corrosion fault, and help to analyze the significance of such correlation. Later on, more sophisticated statistics, together with input from fundamental knowledge and expert judgment, may help to pin out the risk factors leading to corrosion. This paper will focus on the benefits of properly capitalizing field data collection and analyzing field data to better understand root causes of degradation of the (coating + CP) system protective efficiency. Ultimately, it is intended to show how such activities may support integrity and safety management of the whole transmission pipeline network. (authors)

  3. Archaeological excavations at Gamzigrad - Romuliana in 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Sofija

    2013-01-01

    , comprising the scarce fragments of the Early and Late Iron Age pottery; Virgin soil consists of yellow clay starting from a level of 184.00 m in the west and of 183.60 m in the east. In 2008, the remains of an earlier building were discovered beneath the floor of the apodyterium of Galerius' bath found in 2002 and below the foundation of the sudatorium and the tepidarium of the same structure, which were found in 2005. Also, for the purposes of conservation and restoration of the thermae, an apsidal room next to the west wall of the apodyterium, so called 'Galerius' dressing room', was completely filled with construction rubble, among which was found a part of an abraded vault (Fig. 6. Excavations proved that the apsidal room had been a pool with cold water, a frigidarium, which was twice renovated and was decorated with mosaic made of black, white and grey stone cubes (Fig. 7. The phases of reconstruction of the frigidarium could also be noticed in its eastern wall (Fig. 8. Also in the rubble inside the pool, glass mosaic cubes of deep blue and golden colours were discovered, indicating the decoration of the vault. In the latest phase, two pillars were constructed to carry the stairs made of stone slabs (Fig. 8. The earliest phase of this room, which had a rectangular layout and a mortar floor, could be part of the building dating back to before Galerius' bath (Plan 2. During the cleaning of the eastern wall of the frigidarium, a semicircular niche with a fresco decoration of geometrical and figural motives, painted in black, dark red, orange and blue on an ochre surface, was discovered (Fig. 3. Under Galerius' bath, a large earlier building was investigated (trenches 1-5/08. Only its foundation zone is preserved. The walls of the Imperial bath were founded on the earlier walls, which were 0.65 m thick and had foundations which were 0.90 m thick (Plan 2. The pilaster of the west faeade of the thermae was also founded on the earlier wall, but it destroyed a water canal

  4. Seismic Waves Scattering Impact through Tunnel Excavation on Adjacent Monuments Subjected to Far Field Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghobakhloo E.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of the effect of seismic wave scattering has attracted extensive attention in the past couple of decades especially in infrastructures like tunnels. A seismic wave, meeting the tunnel, can generate scattering which, in most cases, may incur damages in adjacent structures. In this study, using Finite Element Method (FEM, the effect of seismic wave scattering in far field has been investigated. The twin tunnels of Shiraz subway system are selected as the case study in this research and three far field seismic waves were chosen for time history analyses. Investigating the normal mode (before tunnel construction in comparison to the excavation mode (after tunnel construction enables calculation of the effect of displacement in adjacent structures. The analysis results indicate there is a significant difference between before and after tunnel construction (P-value<0.05. Accordingly, the influence of constructing a tunnel on adjacent surface structures is very important for tunnel design.

  5. Mechanical and hydrological characterization of the near-field surrounding excavations in a geologic salt formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Clifford L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The technical basis for salt disposal of nuclear waste resides in salt’s favorable physical, mechanical and hydrological characteristics. Undisturbed salt formations are impermeable. Upon mining, the salt formation experiences damage in the near-field rock proximal to the mined opening and salt permeability increases dramatically. The volume of rock that has been altered by such damage is called the disturbed rock zone (DRZ).

  6. 29 CFR 1926.913 - Blasting in excavation work under compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blasting in excavation work under compressed air. 1926.913... Use of Explosives § 1926.913 Blasting in excavation work under compressed air. (a) Detonators and... use in wet holes shall be water-resistant and shall be Fume Class 1. (g) When tunnel excavation in...

  7. 29 CFR 570.68 - Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). 570.68...-Being § 570.68 Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). (a) Finding and declaration of fact. The following occupations in excavation operations are particularly hazardous for the employment of persons...

  8. Does the availability of artificial cavities affect cavity excavation rates in red-cockaded woodpeckers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; D. Craig Rudolph; Richard R. Schaefer

    2002-01-01

    Rates of cavity excavation by Red-cockaded Woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) were examined from 1983 to 1999 on the Angelina National Forest in east Texas. We compared the rare of natural cavity excavation between 1983 and 1990 (before artificial cavities were available) with the rate of cavity excavation between 1992 and 1993, a period when...

  9. 18 CFR 1304.207 - Channel excavation on TVA-owned residential access shoreland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Channel excavation on... OF STRUCTURES AND OTHER ALTERATIONS TVA-Owned Residential Access Shoreland § 1304.207 Channel excavation on TVA-owned residential access shoreland. (a) Excavation of individual boat channels shall be...

  10. A Review of Lunar Regolith Excavation Robotic Device Prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Van Susante, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    The excavation of lunar regolith is desirable for use as a feedstock for oxygen production processes as well as civil engineering purposes and for the fabrication of parts and structures. This is known as In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). More recently, there has been mounting evidence that water ice exists at the poles of the Moon, buried in the regolith where thermally stable conditions exist. This means that regolith excavation will be required to mine the water ice which is believed to be. mixed in with the regolith, or bonded to it. The mined water ice can then be electrolyzed to produce hydrogen and oxygen propellants which could form the basis of a cis-lunar transportation system using in-situ derived propellants. In 2007, the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) sponsored a Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition as part of its Centennial Challenges program, The competition was not won and it was held again in 2008 and 2009, when it was won by a university team. A $500,000 prize was awarded to the winning team by NASA. In 2010, NASA continued the competition as a spinoff of the Centennial Challenges, which is restricted to university participation only. This competition is known as the "Lunabotics Mining Competition" and is hosted by NASA at Kennedy Space Center. Twenty three American university teams competed in the 2010 Lunabotics Mining Competition. The competition was held again in May 2011 with over 60 teams registered, including international participation. The competition will be held again in May 2012 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. . This paper contains a thorough review of the various regolith eX,cavation robotic device prototypes that competed in these NASA competitions, and will. classify the machines and their methods of excavation to document the variety of ideas that were spawned and built to compete at these events. It is hoped that documentation of these robots will serve to help future robotic excavation designers and

  11. Various Tunnel Excavation Methods used on the LHC Project

    CERN Document Server

    Fielder, R

    2000-01-01

    Civil Engineering construction work for the LHC Project began in April 1998 and is now well underway. A major part of this work is the construction of the new tunnels, caverns and cavern enlargements for the LHC experiments and machine. Currently, this underground work is being carried out for the two injection tunnels, TI2 and TI8, and at Point 1 for the Atlas Experiment. There are three contractors involved in these tunnelling works and each contactor is using a different technique. This paper will outline the different methods used for excavation and the reasons for these differences. It will also examine the other operations involved in the construction of major underground structures such as supply of materials to the tunnel face, evacuation of excavated material and ventilation.

  12. Hierarchical stochastic model of terrain subsidence during tunnel excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Tomáš; Šejnoha, Jiří; Šejnoha, Michal

    2017-09-01

    In this contribution the Bayesian statistical method is applied to assess the expected probability distribution of the terrain subsidence in the course of tunnel excavation. The approach utilizes a number of simplifying assumptions regarding the system kinematics to arrive at a very simple model with just a few degrees of freedom. This deterministic model together with the intrinsic uncertainties of its parameters and measurement inaccuracies are used to formulate the stochastic model which defines a distribution of the predicted values of terrain subsidence. Assuming the measured data to be fixed, the stochastic model thus defines the likelihood function of the model parameters which is directly used for updating their prior distribution. This way the model parameters can be incrementally updated with each excavation step and the prediction of the model refined.

  13. The excavation stage of basin formation - A qualitative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S. K.

    1981-01-01

    One of the most complex problems in planetary geology and geophysics is the determination of the nature of the impact cratering processes at scales of tens to thousands of kilometers that produce the complex morphological structures of multiring basins. The cratering process is frequently considered to be divided into three stages, including a short high-pressure stage of initial contact between the projectile and the planetary crust, a longer excavation or cratering flow stage culminating in the formation of a transient crater, and a still longer modification stage during which the transient crater is modified into the observed final geologic form. The transient crater may be considered as the initial boundary condition of the modification stage. In the present investigation, the nature of the transient crater is indicated by the cratering flow field determined from numerical simulations of the excavation stage. Attention is given to empirical and theoretical scaling.

  14. Real-Time Engineering Simulation of Lunar Excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Damer, George Tompkins, Sheldon Freid, Dave Rasmussen, Peter Newman, Brad Blair

    2007-06-12

    DigitalSpace Corporation has been building an open source real-time three-dimensional (3-D) collaborative design engineering and training platform called Digital Spaces (DSS) in support of the Exploration Vision of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Real-time 3-D simulation has reached a level of maturity where it is capable of supporting engineering design and operations using off-the-shelf game chipsets and open source physics and rendering technologies. This paper will illustrate a state-of-the-art real-time engineering simulation utilizing DSS in support of NASA lunar excavation studies. During the project DigitalSpace building driveable 3-D models of lunar excavators and South Polar terrain, and added a soil mechanics physics model as well as a random failure generator to the repertoire of standard mobility platform physics in prior use for real-time engineering and operational analysis at NASA.

  15. Emergency Survey and Excavation in Southwestern New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Period 90 * The Apache 90 The Spanish, Mexican, and American Occupations 90 ii *li APPENDIX B - BOTANICAL RIMAIS 92 Mollie Struever and Marcia Donaldson...probably the scene of seasonal mesquite-gathering and hunting expeditions. The Cochise Cul- ture is also known from Tularosa and Cordova Caves near the upper... Cordova Caves (Martin and Rinaldo 1952). Additional chronology was provided by excavations in Bat Cave (Dick 1965). Tentatively dated at 300 B.C., the

  16. Behavioral and mechanical determinants of collective subsurface nest excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaenkova, Daria; Gravish, Nick; Rodriguez, Greggory; Kutner, Rachel; Goodisman, Michael A D; Goldman, Daniel I

    2015-05-01

    Collective construction of topologically complex structures is one of the triumphs of social behavior. For example, many ant species construct underground nests composed of networks of tunnels and chambers. Excavation by these 'superorganisms' depends on the biomechanics of substrate manipulation, the interaction of individuals, and media stability and cohesiveness. To discover principles of robust social excavation, we used X-ray computed tomography to monitor the growth in three dimensions of nests built by groups of fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) in laboratory substrates composed of silica particles, manipulating two substrate properties: particle size and gravimetric moisture content. Ants were capable of nest construction in all substrates tested other than completely dry or fully saturated; for a given particle size, nest volume was relatively insensitive to moisture content. Tunnels were deepest at intermediate moisture content and the maximum tunnel depth correlated with measured yield force on small rod-shaped intruders (a proxy for cohesive strength). This implies that increased cohesive strength allowed creation of tunnels that were resistant to perturbation but did not decrease individual excavation ability. Ants used two distinct behaviors to create pellets composed of wetted particles, depending on substrate composition. However, despite the ability to create larger stable pellets in more cohesive substrates, pellet sizes were similar across all conditions. We posit that this pellet size balances the individual's load-carrying ability with the need to carry this pellet through confined crowded tunnels. We conclude that effective excavation of similarly shaped nests can occur in a diversity of substrates through sophisticated digging behaviors by individuals which accommodate both differing substrate properties and the need to work within the collective. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. The Application of Foundation Pit Monitoring Technology to the Excavation

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu Jin; Li Fei

    2015-01-01

    The foundation pit monitoring plays an important role in the foundation pit supporting projects especially in those deep foundation pit projects. Through the whole monitoring of the foundation pit construction from the excavation to the backfill, we can learn about the forcing and deforming process of the foundation pit supporting system, and grasp the impact of external condition changes on the foundation pit. This paper takes a project in Jinan as an example to establish a specific monitori...

  18. Storage solutions for excavated textiles tending to their recalcitrant behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margariti, Christina; Loukopoulou, Polytimi

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the selection of packaging and storage means that facilitate the preservation, protection andmanagerial needs for a group of excavated textiles where their physical and chemical properties have been unrecognisably altered as a result of the burial process (in this case minera...... foam, copolymer polyethylene and polypropylene board, non-woven polyethylene fabric and the antistatic type of polyester film. All materials and methods applied exhibit great versatility and are potentially useful for conservators in similar situations....

  19. Lunar Excavation Experiments in Simulant Soil Test Beds-Revisiting the Surveyor Geotechnical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2012-01-01

    (1) Establishing ISRU technologies on planetary bodies is an important long-term goal of NASA; (2) Excavation is a key component of these ISRU processes; (3) Lack of flight data relevant to lunar excavation; (4) Existing models of the excavation-cutting phenomenon give varying results; (5) The lack of predictive models of the dynamic behavior of soils in excavation implements is a major driver for these studies; and (6) Objective: Need to develop robust models of excavation cutting phenomena that generate predictive capabilities to aid the designer and engineer.

  20. Large choroidal excavation in a patient with rubella retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Romano, Francesco; Montagna, Marco; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-10-17

    To describe a case of rubella retinopathy complicated by bilateral choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and late development of large choroidal excavation (LCE). A 19-year-old woman with a diagnosis of rubella retinopathy underwent her annual ophthalmologic examination, including visual acuity testing and slit-lamp biomicroscopy with dilated fundus examination. Color fundus photography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans, and optical coherence tomography angiography were acquired to complete the investigation of her ocular condition. The main findings are described in this case report. This woman came to our attention in 2010 with a history of rubella retinopathy, complicated by bilateral CNV and treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 2006. After 6 years of annual follow-up examinations, her visual acuity remained stable in both eyes (20/100), whereas SD-OCT scans uncovered the development of a bilateral LCE in the macular area, associated with a macular hole in the right eye. Optical coherence tomography angiography revealed a vascular network surrounding the choroidal excavation. Large choroidal excavation is a rare finding that has been described in few chorioretinal diseases, e.g., North Carolina macular dystrophy and toxoplasmosis. We propose to include rubella retinopathy complicated by CNV in the differential diagnosis of LCE, although we recognize the possibility that PDT might have induced or facilitated its formation.

  1. Soil Lysimeter Excavation for Coupled Hydrological, Geochemical, and Microbiological Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Aditi; Wang, Yadi; Meira Neto, Antonio A; Matos, Katarena A; Dontsova, Katerina; Root, Rob; Neilson, Julie W; Maier, Raina M; Chorover, Jon; Troch, Peter A

    2016-09-11

    Studying co-evolution of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in the subsurface of natural landscapes can enhance the understanding of coupled Earth-system processes. Such knowledge is imperative in improving predictions of hydro-biogeochemical cycles, especially under climate change scenarios. We present an experimental method, designed to capture sub-surface heterogeneity of an initially homogeneous soil system. This method is based on destructive sampling of a soil lysimeter designed to simulate a small-scale hillslope. A weighing lysimeter of one cubic meter capacity was divided into sections (voxels) and was excavated layer-by-layer, with sub samples being collected from each voxel. The excavation procedure was aimed at detecting the incipient heterogeneity of the system by focusing on the spatial assessment of hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological properties of the soil. Representative results of a few physicochemical variables tested show the development of heterogeneity. Additional work to test interactions between hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological signatures is planned to interpret the observed patterns. Our study also demonstrates the possibility of carrying out similar excavations in order to observe and quantify different aspects of soil-development under varying environmental conditions and scale.

  2. BANGLES, BEADS AND BEDOUIN: EXCAVATING A LATE OTTOMAN CEMETERY IN JORDAN (ABSTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany J. Walker

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Transjordan witnessed significant social and economic changes in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. With the loss of agriculturally-rich territory in Europe, the Ottomans sought to make up for their economic losses by regaining control of their Arab provinces, some regions of which had been autonomous for nearly three hundred years. The application of Tanzimat legislation to the Transjordan was a success, to a large degree, in that it secured tax revenues and contributed to the general security of the region.The application of the 1858 Land Law, in which land was registered in a proprietor’s name for tax purposes, was particularly effective in transforming grazing land to productive agricultural properties. It, moreover, had a significant impact on Transjordanian society which was tribal and largely nomadic. The introduction of direct rule in the region by the Ottoman government transformed traditional tribal life, resulting in the settlement of formerly nomadic groups, the transition to an agrarian way of life, and the opening up of markets formerly inaccessible to indigenous tribal groups. A variety of urban, manufactured goods became readily available to all sectors of society throughout this frontier zone.“Bangles, Beads and Bedouin: Excavating a Late Ottoman Cemetery inJordan” considers the transformation of tribal funerary practices in the Belqa’ of central Jordan. The paper highlights the burial ground of one Transjordanian tribe, identified as the Adwan, excavated at Tall Hisban in 1998. Dated to the late nineteenth century on the basis of coins, this mass grave was one of the last of its kind, as permanent cemeteries replaced seasonal burial grounds by the early twentieth century. The composition of theburial goods indicates that members of the tribe participated in an exchange network that embraced the Red Sea, Greater Syria, and Europe.

  3. Combat damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2008-07-01

    Although the use of damage control surgery for blunt and penetrating injury has been widely reported and defined, the use of damage control surgery on the battlefield (combat damage control surgery) has not been well detailed. Damage control surgery is now well established as the standard of care for severely injured civilian patients requiring emergent laparotomy in the United States. The civilian damage control paradigm is based on a "damage control trilogy." This trilogy comprises an abbreviated operation, intensive care unit resuscitation, and a return to the operating room for the definitive operation. The goal of damage control surgery and the triology is avoidance of irreversible physiological insult termed the lethal triad. The lethal triad comprises the vicious cycle of hypothermia, acidosis, and coagulopathy. Although the damage control model involves the damage control trilogy, abbreviated operation, intensive care unit resuscitation, and definitive operation, all in the same surgical facility, the combat damage control paradigm must incorporate global evacuation through several military surgical facilities and involves up to ten stages to allow for battlefield evacuation, surgical operations, multiple resuscitations, and transcontinental transport. Combat damage control surgery represents many unique challenges for those who care for the severely injured patients in a combat zone.

  4. Safety Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  5. Rock samples from LEP/LHC tunnel excavation

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Rock samples taken from 0 to 170 m below ground on the CERN site when the LEP (Large Electron Positron collider) pit number 6 was drilled in Bois-chatton (Versonnex). The challenges of LHC civil engineering: A mosaic of works, structures and workers of differents crafts and origins. Three consulting consortia for the engineering and the follow-up of the works. Four industrial consortia for doing the job. A young team of 25 CERN staff, 30 surface buildings, 32 caverns of all sizes, 170 000 m3 of concrete, 420 000 m3 excavated. 1998-2004 : six years of work and 340 millions Swiss Francs.

  6. Kirke Hyllinge and Snesere - Romanesque Twin Towers Recently Excavated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rensbro, Henriette; Vedsø, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Mirator, 2015. Co-author: Mogens Vedsø. Romanesque twin towers in Danish village churches have long tradition of research. Two recent excavations in Kirke Hyllinge and Snesere have revealed archaeological traces of rectangular towers which in this article are compared to other examples from Denmark....... Kirke Hyllinge church is an outstanding example of twin towers due to the length of the west-section of 16 meters. The only parallel is a planned three-aisled village church in the other end of the country. While for Snesere church the main question is the design of the top section, whether...... it was a twin tower or not....

  7. Finite element analysis of residual stresses in a letter-box excavation repair weld for Chapelcross Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinas, George [Mitsui Babcock Energy Ltd, Porterfield Road, Renfrew PA4 8UW (United Kingdom); Dauda, Tamba [Mitsui Babcock Energy Ltd, Porterfield Road, Renfrew PA4 8UW (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: tdauda@mitsuibabcock.com; Moyes, Nicola [Mitsui Babcock Energy Ltd, Porterfield Road, Renfrew PA4 8UW (United Kingdom); Laird, Alan [Mitsui Babcock Energy Ltd, Porterfield Road, Renfrew PA4 8UW (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    A routine inspection on the heat exchanger 6 boiler in Chapelcross Nuclear Power Station revealed the existence of a crack in the bottom dome of the boiler. A 'letter-box' repair procedure was developed to repair the damage and justify the return to service of the boiler. Due to the location of the repair, it was undesirable to conduct post weld heat treatment (PWHT) because this could result in damage to neighbouring components. A full residual stress programme was conducted in order to justify a non-PWHT repair to the boiler using a temper bead technique on a boiler shell section of up to 44 mm. This paper describes the work conducted during the project and subsequently regarding residual stresses in letterbox excavation repairs.

  8. Environmental problems caused by Istanbul subway excavation and suggestions for remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, Ibrahim

    2009-10-01

    Many environmental problems caused by subway excavations have inevitably become an important point in city life. These problems can be categorized as transporting and stocking of excavated material, traffic jams, noise, vibrations, piles of dust mud and lack of supplies. Although these problems cause many difficulties, the most pressing for a big city like Istanbul is excavation, since other listed difficulties result from it. Moreover, these problems are environmentally and regionally restricted to the period over which construction projects are underway and disappear when construction is finished. Currently, in Istanbul, there are nine subway construction projects in operation, covering approximately 73 km in length; over 200 km to be constructed in the near future. The amount of material excavated from ongoing construction projects covers approximately 12 million m3. In this study, problems—primarily, the problem with excavation waste (EW)—caused by subway excavation are analyzed and suggestions for remediation are offered.

  9. Evaluation of bending moment and deflection of cantilever supported excavations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hamid Yasrebi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In many conditions, because of several restrictions, cantilever walls are the only way to stabilize the excavations. It is no doubt that one of the most important parameters in design of such walls is wall stiffness. Therefore, in this study, a large number of case histories are collected and the most commonly used range of wall thickness and stiffness are determined based on this database. In addition, validation of limit equilibrium method (LEM in granular soils showed that this method can only estimate bending moment of rigid walls. Therefore, for more accurate estimating, a new equation is presented for the most commonly used range of wall stiffness and various types of granular soils. Moreover, LEM based equation is replaced with a modified version. The new equation was successfully validated using 70 numerical models and results lied in range of 85% to 115% times the predicted values obtained from FEM. According to the results, in loose and very loose soils, the common cantilever walls can only stabilize the excavations with depth less than 10 m. While if depth is more than 15 m, soil type should be dense or very dense with “E” more than about 70 MPa. The results also show that the effect of wall stiffness is negligible in bending moments less than 2000 kN.m.

  10. Target and Projectile: Material Effects on Crater Excavation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. L. B.; Burleson, T.; Cintala, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Scaling relationships allow the initial conditions of an impact to be related to the excavation flow and final crater size and have proven useful in understanding the various processes that lead to the formation of a planetary-scale crater. In addition, they can be examined and tested through laboratory experiments in which the initial conditions of the impact are known and ejecta kinematics and final crater morphometry are measured directly. Current scaling relationships are based on a point-source assumption and treat the target material as a continuous medium; however, in planetary-scale impacts, this may not always be the case. Fragments buried in a megaregolith, for instance, could easily approach or exceed the dimensions of the impactor; rubble-pile asteroids could present similar, if not greater, structural complexity. Experiments allow exploration into the effects of target material properties and projectile deformation style on crater excavation and dimensions. This contribution examines two of these properties: (1) the deformation style of the projectile, ductile (aluminum) or brittle (soda-lime glass) and (2) the grain size of the target material, 0.5-1 mm vs. 1-3 mm sand.

  11. Reduction of excavation face collapse risk in tunnelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Filippo; Baldasseroni, Alberto; Muller, Alessandro; Biffino, Marco; Matteucci, Alessandro

    2017-12-14

    Two large road tunnels, recently developed near Florence, showed instabilities of the excavation face which subsequently caused sixteen collapses. Due to the risk for workers' safety, the public authority for occupational health and safety (ASL) has monitored the failure rate and other background variables in order to assess the possible correlations between risk reductions, its own actions, and those of the various safety actors involved. To evaluate if the interventions carried out by the design team were able to reduce the risks of collapse and which of the ASL actions and/or which other factors were more effective in changing the attitudes of the parties involved, leading to a more expensive but safer project variant. After adoption of the second of two project variants, no more collapses were observed. No correlation was found between trend of ASL inspections and observed variation of collapse rate. Conversely, the adoption of strongly coercive measures and investigation reporting by local media coincided with periods of risk reduction, even if the low number of events does not allow for statistical evaluation. These findings appear to be coherent with the ratio of the cost of penalties related to health and safety infringements (thousands of euros) to the overall cost of the safer project variant (a hundred times greater).  The safer variant required 7% more labour but avoided forced interruptions caused by the collapses, allowing a 13% faster excavation rate.

  12. Evaluation of excavation experience: Pierre shale. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, J.F. Jr.; Gentry, D.W.

    1975-06-27

    Pierre shale and its stratigraphic equivalents represent a potentially favorable geologic environment for underground storage of hazardous waste products. These rock formations cover great areal and vertical extents, and represent some of the least permeable rock formations within the continental United States. There are, however, several engineering problems associated with constructing underground openings in Pierre shale. This formation is relatively weak and tends to deteriorate rather rapidly if not protected from the mine environment. It will be necessary to place all underground openings below the surficially weathered upper 50 to 70 feet of Pierre shale which contains groundwater moving on fracture permeability. The optimum site for disposal of hazardous waste in Pierre shale, or its stratigraphic equivalents, would be a seismically stable platform bounded on all sides by faults. The optimum size of individual openings would be the minimum necessary for access, storage, and retrieval of waste components. Underground excavations in Pierre shale must be made with care, must be of limited dimensions, must be widely spaced, must be protected from prolonged contact with the mine environment, must be supported immediately after excavation, and must be sited to avoid areas of faulting and(or) intense jointing. Underground openings constructed with boring machines and supported with wet shotcrete are recommended.

  13. From Excavations to Web: a GIS for Archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, M. G.; Corsi, E.; Nemeti, S.; Germani, M.

    2017-05-01

    The study and the protection of Cultural Heritage in recent years have undergone a revolution about the search tools and the reference disciplines. The technological approach to the problem of the collection, organization and publication of archaeological data using GIS software has completely changed the essence of the traditional methods of investigation, paving the way to the development of several application areas, up to the Cultural Resource Management. A relatively recent specific sector of development for archaeological GIS development sector is dedicated to the intra - site analyses aimed to recording, processing and display information obtained during the excavations. The case - study of the archaeological site located in the south - east of San Pietro Vetere plateau in Aquino, in the Southern Lazio, is concerned with the illustration of a procedure describing the complete digital workflow relative to an intra-site analysis of an archaeological dig. The GIS project implementation and its publication on the web, thanks to several softwares, particularly the FOSS (Free Open Source Software) Quantum - GIS, are an opportunity to reflect on the strengths and the critical nature of this particular application of the GIS technology. For future developments in research it is of fundamental importance the identification of a digital protocol for processing of excavations (from the acquisition, cataloguing, up data insertion), also on account of a possible future Open Project on medieval Aquino.

  14. A CASE OF FULL-THICKNESS MACULAR HOLE IN EYE WITH FOCAL CHOROIDAL EXCAVATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyad, Omar Faisal; Al-Hashimi, Mustafa Raad; Fayyad, Faisal Tawfeeq

    2016-12-09

    To report an association between a Stage 4 full-thickness macular hole and focal choroidal excavation. Case report. A 46-year-old male patient with high myopia was referred for macular hole surgery and found to have an associated focal choroidal excavation. The patient underwent uneventful combined procedure with closure of macular hole. Successful macular hole surgery can be achieved even in the presence of focal choroidal excavation.

  15. Parametric Optimization and Prediction Tool for Excavation and Prospecting Tasks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Honeybee Robotics therefore proposed to develop a software tool for facilitating prospecting and excavation system trades in support of selecting an optimal...

  16. 77 FR 19799 - Pipeline Safety: Pipeline Damage Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... included excavation damage prevention. The Integrity Management for Gas Distribution, Report of Phase I...) The American Gas Association (AGA) The American Petroleum Institute (API) The American Public Gas... Locating Services, API, AOPL, INGAA, and several pipeline operators commented that PHMSA should develop the...

  17. Use of the {sup 14}C-PMMA and He-gas methods to characterise excavation disturbance in crystalline rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autio, J.; Kirkkomaeki, T. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Siitari-Kauppi, M. [University of Helsinki (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry; Timonen, J.; Laajalahti, M.; Aaltonen, T.; Maaranen, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1999-04-01

    Characterisation of the excavation disturbance caused by boring of experimental full-scale deposition holes in the Research Tunnel at Olkiluoto was carried out successfully by using two novel methods; the {sup 14}C-PMMA and He-gas methods, which were modified and applied for the first time in this type of study. The experience obtained implies that the techniques are feasible and can be used to study similar types of rock excavation disturbance such as that caused by boring with mini discs, a technique which will be used in the underground Hard Rock Laboratory at Aespoe during late 1998 and early 1999. Both of the measurement methods have been in continuous use and the work has included development of both the measuring and interpretation techniques. Use of the {sup 14}C-PMMA method is suggested for studies of rock structure and the spatial distribution of porosity. The {sup 14}C-PMMA method also provides quantitative information about nanometer-range porosity which is beyond the scope of most standard methods of microscopic investigation. The use of He-gas methods are proposed for determining the diffusion coefficient, permeability and complementary porosity of rock samples taken from the disturbed zone. (orig.) 23 refs.

  18. Shaft Excavation in Frozen Ground at Point 5

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, J

    2000-01-01

    Construction work on the 112 MCHF civil engineering contract started at Point 5 in August 1998. The new surface buildings and underground structures are necessary to accommodate the CMS detector for the LHC Project. The principal underground works consist of two new shafts, two parallel caverns separated by a supporting pillar, and a number of small connection tunnels and service galleries. The two shafts are to be sunk through approximately 50 m of water-bearing moraine to the underlying molasse rock. From a number of possible construction methods, ground freezing of the moraine was considered to be most appropriate. The ground freezing is used to control the groundwater and to support temporarily the moraine during excavation and lining of the shafts. The aim of this paper is to present the ground-freezing technique and to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the system in the light of its first few months of running on the Point 5 site.

  19. Groundwater flow modelling of the excavation and operational phases - Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Urban (Computer-aided Fluid Engineering AB, Lyckeby (Sweden)); Rhen, Ingvar (SWECO Environment AB, Falun (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    As a part of the license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken a series of groundwater flow modelling studies. These represent time periods with different hydraulic conditions and the simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. The modelling study reported here presents calculated inflow rates, drawdown of the groundwater table and upconing of deep saline water for different levels of grouting efficiency during the excavation and operational phases of a final repository at Laxemar. The inflow calculations were accompanied by a sensitivity study, which among other matters handled the impact of different deposition hole rejection criteria. The report also presents tentative modelling results for the duration of the saturation phase, which starts once the used parts of the repository are being backfilled

  20. Theoretical study of short pile effect in tunnel excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao-yan; Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiao-mei; Li, Yuan

    2017-09-01

    The Misaki Sato Go ideal elastoplastic model is adopted and the two stage analysis theory is used to study the effect of tunnel excavation on short pile effect in this paper. In the first stage, the free field vertical displacement of the soil at the corresponding pile location is obtained by using empirical formula. In the second stage, the displacement is applied to the corresponding pile location. The equilibrium condition of micro physical differential equation settlement of piles. Then through logical deduction and the boundary condition expressions of the settlement calculation, obtain the pile side friction resistance and axial force of the week. Finally, an engineering example is used to analyze the influence of the change of main parameters on their effects.

  1. Stability assessment for underground excavations and key construction techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hanhua; Zhao, Yu; Niu, Fusheng

    2017-01-01

    This book examines how the state of underground structures can be determined with the assistance of force, deformation and energy. It then analyzes mechanized shield methods, the New Austrian tunneling method (NATM) and conventional methods from this new perspective. The book gathers a wealth of cases reflecting the experiences of practitioners and administrators alike. Based on statistical and engineering studies of these cases, as well as lab and field experiments, it develops a stability assessment approach incorporating a stable equilibrium, which enables engineers to keep the structure and surrounding rocks safe as long as the stable equilibrium and deformation compliance are maintained. The book illustrates the implementation of the method in various tunneling contexts, including soil-rock mixed strata, tunneling beneath operating roads, underwater tunnels, and tunnel pit excavation. It offers a valuable guide for researchers, designers and engineers, especially those who are seeking to understand the u...

  2. Pajarito Plateau archaeological survey and excavations. [Los Alamos Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, C.R.

    1977-05-01

    Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory lands were surveyed to locate pre-Columbian Indian ruins. The survey results will permit future construction to be planned so that most of the ancient sites in the area can be preserved. Indian occupation of the area occurred principally from late Pueblo III times (late 13th century) until early Pueblo V (about the middle of the 16th century). There are evidences of sporadic Indian use of the area for some 10,000 years. One Folsom point has been found, as well as many other archaic varieties of projectile points. Continued use of the region well into the historic period is indicated by pictographic art that portrays horses. In addition to an account of the survey, the report contains summaries of excavations made on Laboratory lands between 1950 and 1975.

  3. The Application of Foundation Pit Monitoring Technology to the Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The foundation pit monitoring plays an important role in the foundation pit supporting projects especially in those deep foundation pit projects. Through the whole monitoring of the foundation pit construction from the excavation to the backfill, we can learn about the forcing and deforming process of the foundation pit supporting system, and grasp the impact of external condition changes on the foundation pit. This paper takes a project in Jinan as an example to establish a specific monitoring program, and then conducts the analysis and evaluation of the monitoring data; the real-time grasp of the foundation pit deformation and internal force changes can help to further ensure the security status of the foundation pit, thus better guiding the construction.

  4. THE EXPANDING CLINICAL SPECTRUM OF CHOROIDAL EXCAVATION IN MACULAR DYSTROPHIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Casalino, Giuseppe; Iacono, Pierluigi; Introini, Ugo; Adamyan, Tatevik; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-08-09

    To assess the prevalence and the clinical course of focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in patients affected by macular dystrophies. Prospective case series. All the patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination, including best-corrected visual acuity and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) was assessed on the basis of the leakage detected on fluorescein angiography. A total of 162 eyes from 81 patients with macular dystrophy were included in the study. FCE was diagnosed in seven eyes (4.3% of the eyes), including four eyes with Best vitelliform dystrophy, two eyes with pattern dystrophy associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, and one case of Stargardt disease. In eyes with FCE and macular dystrophy, the mean best-corrected visual acuity was 0.4 ± 0.1 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (approximately corresponding to 20/50 Snellen equivalent) at baseline and was stable to 0.41 ± 0.1 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (approximately corresponding to 20/50 Snellen equivalent) at the final visit. In four of these seven eyes, FCE was associated with a subfoveal CNV. The CNV was managed with one intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injection, achieving the complete anatomical stabilization of the CNV and recovery of the best-corrected visual acuity. Focal choroidal excavation can be infrequently encountered in patients with macular dystrophies. The presence of CNV may complicate FCE in these patients, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor seems to be an effective treatment with no progression of FCE over time.

  5. Full-face excavation of large tunnels in difficult conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Barla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a few preliminary remarks on the tunneling methods at the beginning of the 20th century, the successful applications of the full-face method also in difficult conditions are underlined. The attention is posed on the use of a systematic reinforcement of the face and of the ground, by means of fiber-glass elements. A selection of tunnels where this method was used successfully is reported with the purpose of illustrating the wide spectrum of ground conditions where it has been applied. Then, following a description of the main concepts behind the method, the attention moves from the so-called “heavy method”, where deformations are restrained, to the “light method”, where deformations are allowed with the intention to decrease the stresses acting on the primary and final linings. The progress in the application of the “light method” is underlined, up to the development of a novel technique, which relies on the use of a yielding support composed of top head steel sets with sliding joints and special deformable elements inserted in the primary lining. The well-known case study of the Saint Martin La Porte access adit, along the Lyon-Turin Base Tunnel, is described. In this tunnel, a yield-control support system combined with full-face excavation has been adopted successfully in order to cope with the large deformations experienced during face advance through the Carboniferous formation. The monitoring results obtained during excavation are illustrated, together with the modeling studies performed when paying attention to the rock mass time-dependent behavior.

  6. The excavating sponges of the Santa Marta area, Colombia, with description of a new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Caroline C.; Kielman, Margriet

    1992-01-01

    From June till December 1987 an inventory of the excavating sponges of the Santa Marta area, Colombian Caribbean, was made by scuba diving to depths not exceeding 18 m. Sixteen species were recorded and compared morphologically, using spicule sizes, papillae shapes, and excavation characteristics.

  7. The role of wood hardness in limiting nest site selection in avian cavity excavators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresa J. Lorenz; Kerri T. Vierling; Timothy R. Johnson; Philip C. Fischer

    2015-01-01

    Woodpeckers and other primary cavity excavators (PCEs) are important worldwide for excavating cavities in trees, and a large number of studies have examined their nesting preferences. However, quantitative measures of wood hardness have been omitted from most studies, and ecologists have focused on the effects of external tree- and habitat-level features on nesting....

  8. Drill, baby, drill: the influence of woodpeckers on post-fire vertebrate communities through cavity excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gina L. Tarbill; Patricia N. Manley; Angela M. White

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have addressed the importance of woodpeckers as ecological engineers in forests due to their excavation of cavities. Although research in green, unburned forests has identified the influence of different excavators on secondary use by cavity-dependent species, little is known about the relative importance of cavities created by woodpeckers in recently...

  9. Excavation of Precious-Metal-Based Alloy Nanoparticles for Efficient Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-12-05

    Methods have recently been developed for the synthesis of excavated alloy nanoparticles. However, various challenges still need to be overcome for a broad range of excavated nanoparticles with different sizes, surface structures, compositions, and constituent elements to be available for chemical and energy transformations through thermal catalysis and electrocatalysis. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Relevant risk factors associated with the construction of excavated tunnel cross-passages in soft soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chivatá Cárdenas, Ibsen; Al-Jibouri, Saad H.S.; Halman, Johannes I.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of risk factors associated with the construction of excavated tunnel cross-passages in soft soils. The investigation focused on excavations where freezing technologies are used to provide temporary support. The relevant risk factors and their associated

  11. Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Christian D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2012-11-16

    Deep excavation of soil has been conducted at the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 waste sites within the 100-BC Operable Unit at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination with the excavations reaching to near the water table. Soil sampling showed that Cr(VI) contamination was still present at the bottom of the 100-C-7:1 excavation. In addition, Cr(VI) concentrations in a downgradient monitoring well have shown a transient spike of increased Cr(VI) concentration following initiation of excavation. Potentially, the increased Cr(VI) concentrations in the downgradient monitoring well are due to Cr(VI) from the excavation site. However, data were needed to evaluate this possibility and to quantify the overall impact of the 100-C-7:1 excavation site on groundwater. Data collected from a network of aquifer tubes installed across the floor of the 100-C-7:1 excavation and from temporary wells installed at the bottom of the entrance ramp to the excavation were used to evaluate Cr(VI) releases into the aquifer and to estimate local-scale hydraulic properties and groundwater flow velocity.

  12. Soil Properties in a South Georgia, USA, Borrow Pit 40 Years After Excavation Ceased

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, E. C.

    2012-04-01

    This study investigates soil properties in an abandoned sand borrow pit located about 11 km south of Valdosta, GA, USA, that was used and then abandoned with no efforts at reclamation, and compares those developing soils to natural soils surrounding the pit. The pit contains two tiers, a deep lower part and an upper terrace. There are distinct vegetative zones within the pit; three are included in this study. The lowest part of the pit is characterized by a mix of slash pines (Pinus caribaea) and deciduous trees including sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) and blackgum (Nyssa biflora) with a well-developed leaf litter cover but a lack of significant underbrush or grass. Water ponds at the surface during wet periods in the lowest part of the pit. The upper terrace has sparse vegetation along its lip including a few stunted slash and longleaf (Pinus palustris) pines and a sparse lichen cover, including "deer moss" (Cladina evansii) on the ground surface, lacks leaf litter cover, and the water table is deep relative to the rest of the pit. There is a gentle slope away from this sparsely-vegetated area towards the edge of the excavation. The edge of the pit along the upper terrace has a healthy stand of mixed pine and deciduous trees similar to that found in the pit bottom, but the ground also includes a thick cover of grass (Andropogon sp.). Water ponds at the surface during wet periods here as well. Native deciduous trees including live oaks (Quercus virginiana), water oaks (Quercus nigra), and magnolias (Magnolia sp.) characterize the area outside the pit. Although soil formation over only 40 years is slight, there are distinct differences in the soils between the vegetative zones that were studied. Soil differences are attributed to differences in topographically controlled access to water and vegetation type. Study of surrounding developed soils reveals that soils within the pit still have a significant amount of development remaining before they reach equilibrium

  13. New paleoradiological investigations of ancient human remains from North West Lombardy archaeological excavations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licata, Marta; Borgo, Melania; Armocida, Giuseppe; Nicosia, Luca; Ferioli, Elena [University of Insubria (Varese), Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, Varese (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Since its birth in 1895, radiology has been used to study ancient mummies. The purpose of this article is to present paleoradiological investigations conducted on several medieval human remains in Varese province. Anthropological (generic identification) and paleopathological analyses were carried out with the support of diagnostic imaging (X-ray and CT scans). Human remains were discovered during excavations of medieval archaeological sites in northwest Lombardy. Classical physical anthropological methods were used for the macroscopic identification of the human remains. X-ray and CT scans were performed on the same scanner (16-layer Hitachi Eclos 16 X-ray equipment). Radiological analysis permitted investigating (1) the sex, (2) age of death, (3) type of trauma, (4) therapeutic interventions and (5) osteomas in ancient human remains. In particular, X-ray and CT examinations showed dimorphic facial traits on the mummified skull, and the same radiological approaches allowed determining the age at death from a mummified lower limb. CT analyses allow investigating different types of traumatic lesions in skulls and postcranial skeleton portions and reconstructing the gait and functional outcomes of a fractured femur. Moreover, one case of possible Gardner's syndrome (GS) was postulated from observing multiple osteomas in an ancient skull. Among the medical tests available to the clinician, radiology is the most appropriate first-line procedure for a diagnostic approach to ancient human remains because it can be performed without causing any significant damage to the specimen. (orig.)

  14. A minimalistic microbial food web in an excavated deep subsurface clay rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Diomidis, Nikitas; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    Clay rocks are being considered for radioactive waste disposal, but relatively little is known about the impact of microbes on the long-term safety of geological repositories. Thus, a more complete understanding of microbial community structure and function in these environments would provide further detail for the evaluation of the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste in clay rocks. It would also provide a unique glimpse into a poorly studied deep subsurface microbial ecosystem. Previous studies concluded that microorganisms were present in pristine Opalinus Clay, but inactive. In this work, we describe the microbial community and assess the metabolic activities taking place within borehole water. Metagenomic sequencing and genome-binning of a porewater sample containing suspended clay particles revealed a remarkably simple heterotrophic microbial community, fueled by sedimentary organic carbon, mainly composed of two organisms: a Pseudomonas sp. fermenting bacterium growing on organic macromolecules and releasing organic acids and H2, and a sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae able to oxidize organic molecules to CO(2). In Opalinus Clay, this microbial system likely thrives where pore space allows it. In a repository, this may occur where the clay rock has been locally damaged by excavation or in engineered backfills. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. CLINICAL COURSE OF INFLAMMATORY CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION ASSOCIATED WITH FOCAL CHOROIDAL EXCAVATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbelli, Eleonora; Sacconi, Riccardo; Querques, Lea; Carnevali, Adriano; Giuffrè, Chiara; Rabiolo, Alessandro; Bandello, Francesco; Querques, Giuseppe

    2017-10-23

    To report the clinical course of focal choroidal excavation associated with choroidal neovascularization in a case of choroidal inflammation. Case report. A 41-year-old man presented with blurred vision and metamorphopsia in his left eye. Multimodal imaging including optical coherence tomography angiography showed nonconforming focal choroidal excavation in the setting of choroidal inflammation and the presence of choroidal neovascularization at the border of the excavation, nicely visualized by optical coherence tomography angiography. Pattern alteration from nonconforming to conforming focal choroidal excavation and choroidal neovascularization involution were observed after treatment with oral steroids. Multimodal imaging, including optical coherence tomography angiography, allowed to detect and monitor pattern focal choroidal excavation transformation and choroidal neovascularization reduction after treatment with oral steroids.

  16. Dam geology and basic treatment(2). Adit substitution technique and measures against landslide involved in excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kin' ichi (Kinki Geological Center, Co. Ltd., Kyoto, Japan (JP))

    1988-12-25

    This paper discusses the adit substitution technique which is a method for special treatment of dams and measures against landslide involved in excavation. The adit substitution technique consists of excavating an adit in the natural ground, excavating another adit which is in contact with the first adit and is at a level higher than the first adit, placing concrete from the upper adit to the lower adit to fill first adit completely with concrete, excavating a third adit, filling the second adit with concrete similarly, and proceeding with this process to construct a water barrier within the natural ground until the water barrier reaches the required height. The paper explains examples of this technique used on four dams. It also explains examples of measures against excavation-induced landslide adopted on three dams. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Stability of Large Parallel Tunnels Excavated in Weak Rocks: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiuli; Weng, Yonghong; Zhang, Yuting; Xu, Tangjin; Wang, Tuanle; Rao, Zhiwen; Qi, Zufang

    2017-09-01

    Diversion tunnels are important structures for hydropower projects but are always placed in locations with less favorable geological conditions than those in which other structures are placed. Because diversion tunnels are usually large and closely spaced, the rock pillar between adjacent tunnels in weak rocks is affected on both sides, and conventional support measures may not be adequate to achieve the required stability. Thus, appropriate reinforcement support measures are needed, and the design philosophy regarding large parallel tunnels in weak rocks should be updated. This paper reports a recent case in which two large parallel diversion tunnels are excavated. The rock masses are thin- to ultra-thin-layered strata coated with phyllitic films, which significantly decrease the soundness and strength of the strata and weaken the rocks. The behaviors of the surrounding rock masses under original (and conventional) support measures are detailed in terms of rock mass deformation, anchor bolt stress, and the extent of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ), as obtained from safety monitoring and field testing. In situ observed phenomena and their interpretation are also included. The sidewall deformations exhibit significant time-dependent characteristics, and large magnitudes are recorded. The stresses in the anchor bolts are small, but the extents of the EDZs are large. The stability condition under the original support measures is evaluated as poor. To enhance rock mass stability, attempts are made to reinforce support design and improve safety monitoring programs. The main feature of these attempts is the use of prestressed cables that run through the rock pillar between the parallel tunnels. The efficacy of reinforcement support measures is verified by further safety monitoring data and field test results. Numerical analysis is constantly performed during the construction process to provide a useful reference for decision making. The calculated deformations are in

  18. Association of focal choroidal excavation with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yoshimasa; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Ooto, Sotaro; Yamashiro, Kenji; Oishi, Akio; Nakanishi, Hideo; Kumagai, Kyoko; Hata, Masayuki; Arichika, Shigeta; Ellabban, Abdallah A; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-09-04

    To study the prevalence, tomographic features, and clinical characteristics of focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in eyes with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We examined 243 consecutive eyes with exudative AMD with a prototype swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Three-dimensional images of the macular area, covering 6 × 6 mm(2), were reconstructed by segmentation of the outer surface of the retinal pigment epithelium. Three-dimensional swept-source OCT revealed 15 excavations in 12 eyes (4.9%); 10 had a single excavation and 2 had multiple excavations (2 and 3 excavations, respectively). In multiaveraged scans, unusual choroidal tissue was found beneath 5 excavations, bridging the excavation with the outer choroidal boundary. Additionally, the suprachoroidal space was observed beneath 7 excavations-the outer choroidal boundary appeared to be pulled inward by this bridging tissue. In 9 excavations, color fundus photographs showed pigmentary disturbance. Fourteen excavations (93.3%) were located within or adjacent to the choroidal neovascularization area. Compared with eyes without FCE, in eyes with FCE, the mean age was significantly higher (P = 0.040) and mean visual acuity was significantly better (P = 0.014). In addition, polypoidal lesions were observed in 8 of 12 eyes with FCE, but they appeared to have a limited effect on either the rate of FCE (P = 0.44) or the clinical characteristics of the eyes. While FCE may be partially related to the choroidal neovascularization associated with exudative AMD, other factors may also influence this association. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  19. 76 FR 19129 - Excavations (Design of Cave-in Protection Systems); Extension of the Office of Management and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Excavations (Design of Cave-in Protection Systems); Extension of... information collection requirements contained in the Standard on Excavations (Design of Cave-in Protection... use protective systems to prevent cave-ins during excavation work; these systems include sloping the...

  20. Intelligent Risk Assessment for Dewatering of Metro-Tunnel Deep Excavations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. W. Ye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, China has been undergoing a metro railway construction boom in order to alleviate the urban traffic congestion problem resulting from the rapid urbanization and population growth in many metropolises. In the construction of metro systems, deep excavations and continuous dewatering for construction of the metro tunnels and stations remain a challenging and high risk task in densely populated urban areas. Intelligent computational methods and techniques have exhibited the exceptional talent in dealing with the complicated problems inherent in the deep excavation and dewatering practice. In this paper, an intelligent risk assessment system for deep excavation dewatering is developed and has been applied in the project of Hangzhou Metro Line 1 which is the first metro line of the urban rapid rail transit system in Hangzhou, China. The specific characteristics and great challenges in deep excavation dewatering of the metro-tunnel airshaft of Hangzhou Metro Line 1 are addressed. A novel design method based on the coupled three-dimensional flow theory for dewatering of the deep excavation is introduced. The modularly designed system for excavation dewatering risk assessment is described, and the field observations in dewatering risk assessment of the airshaft excavation of Hangzhou Metro Line 1 are also presented.

  1. Two cases of focal choroidal excavation detected by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katome, Takashi; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Hotta, Fumika; Niki, Masanori; Naito, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    To report the clinical findings of 2 patients with focal choroidal excavation in the macula detected by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Three eyes of 2 patients with a focal macular choroidal excavation detected by SD-OCT were studied. The eyes were examined by fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fluorescein angiography, fundus-related microperimetry, and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). In spite of a complaint of metamorphopsia, the visual acuity was normal in 2 eyes. SD-OCT demonstrated a choroidal excavation in the macula but the foveal contour was normal in 3 eyes. The excavation involved the outer retinal layers up to the external limiting membrane in all eyes, and a type 2 secondary choroidal neovascularization (CNV) developed in 1 of the 3 eyes. There were areas of hypoautofluorescence in the FAF images, and areas of decreased retinal sensitivity determined by microperimetry. These areas corresponded to the choroidal excavation in all eyes. The P1 amplitudes of the mfERGs were decreased in the fovea of 1 eye without a CNV. The choroidal excavation remained stable for 3 years in 2 eyes, a secondary CNV developed in 1 eye during the course of the disease. More cases and longer follow-up periods will be necessary to determine the etiology, clinical course, and visual prognosis of eyes with a choroidal excavation.

  2. The use of computer-assisted FACE for minimal-invasive caries excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganter, Philip; Al-Ahmad, Ali; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Hellwig, Elmar; Altenburger, Markus Jörg

    2014-04-01

    Caries excavation is still a demanding procedure today. In the past years, methods using light-induced fluorescence have proven their ability to detect bacteria remaining in the tooth's hard tissues. However, methods to control the complete removal of infected dentine have not yet been validated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the degree of dentine removal during caries excavation using a camera- and software-based device as a guide for fluorescence-aided caries excavation (FACE) in comparison to visual-tactile inspection and a dye-staining method. One hundred teeth with carious lesions (C3) were randomly allocated to four groups and excavated with the respective method as primary excavation control method. When the first method indicated complete caries excavation, a second method was used to affirm this. Subsequently, dentine samples were taken to determine residual contamination using PCR. After embedding and sectioning the teeth dentine, microhardness was measured perpendicular to the cavity floor. By using the camera- and software-based device, 94 % of the cavities tested were free of bacterial contamination. All cavities excavated with the dye-staining or visual-tactile control method were free of bacterial contamination but resulted in a significantly higher dentine removal. The camera- and software-assisted caries excavation seems to be an adequate method to remove contaminated dentine without removing affected dentine. Beside its original application to monitor carious, the device is safe, effective, and easy to use for guided caries excavation and is of worth for both everyday practice and undergraduate education.

  3. Modeling the viscoplastic and damage behavior in deep argillaceous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souley, Mountaka; Armand, Gilles; Su, Kun; Ghoreychi, Mehdi

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone formation, the French national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) started in 2000 to build an underground research laboratory at Bure (East of France). One of the key issues is to understand long term behavior of the drifts. More than 400 m horizontal galleries at the main level of -490 m have been instrumented since April 2005. The continuous measurements of convergence of the galleries are available, allowing a better understanding of the time-dependent response of the claystone at natural scale. Results indicate that the viscoplastic strain rates observed in the undamaged area far from the gallery walls are of the same order of magnitude as those obtained on rock samples, whereas those recorded in the damaged or fractured zone near the gallery walls are one to two orders of magnitude higher, indicating the significant influence of damage or/and macro-fractures on the viscoplastic strains. Based on these observations, a macroscopic viscoplastic model which aims to improve the viscoplastic strain prediction in the EDZ is proposed and implemented in FLAC3 D©. Both the instantaneous and the time-dependent behavior are considered in the model. The short term response is assumed to be elactoplastic with strain hardening/softening whereas the time-dependent behavior is based on the concepts of viscoplasticity (Lemaıˆtre’s model). Finally, the damage-induced viscoplastic strains changes is examined through the plastic deformation (assumed to approach the damage rate). In order to verify both constitutive equations and their implementations, several simulations are performed: (a) triaxial tests at different confining pressures; (b) single- and multi-stage creep tests; (c) relaxation tests with different total axial strain levels, etc. Finally, an example of a blind prediction of the excavation of a drift parallel to the horizontal minor stress,

  4. Dye staining and excavation of a lateral preferential flow network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Anderson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Preferential flow paths have been found to be important for runoff generation, solute transport, and slope stability in many areas around the world. Although many studies have identified the particular characteristics of individual features and measured the runoff generation and solute transport within hillslopes, very few studies have determined how individual features are hydraulically connected at a hillslope scale. In this study, we used dye staining and excavation to determine the morphology and spatial pattern of a preferential flow network over a large scale (30 m. We explore the feasibility of extending small-scale dye staining techniques to the hillslope scale. We determine the lateral preferential flow paths that are active during the steady-state flow conditions and their interaction with the surrounding soil matrix. We also calculate the velocities of the flow through each cross-section of the hillslope and compare them to hillslope scale applied tracer measurements. Finally, we investigate the relationship between the contributing area and the characteristics of the preferential flow paths. The experiment revealed that larger contributing areas coincided with highly developed and hydraulically connected preferential flow paths that had flow with little interaction with the surrounding soil matrix. We found evidence of subsurface erosion and deposition of soil and organic material laterally and vertically within the soil. These results are important because they add to the understanding of the runoff generation, solute transport, and slope stability of preferential flow-dominated hillslopes.

  5. Groundwater flow modelling of the excavation and operational phases - Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Urban (Computer-aided Fluid Engineering AB, Lyckeby (Sweden)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2010-07-15

    As a part of the license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken a series of groundwater flow modelling studies. These represent time periods with different climate conditions and the simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. The modelling study reported here presents calculated inflow rates, drawdown of the groundwater table and upconing of deep saline water for different levels of grouting efficiency during the excavation and operational phases of a final repository at Forsmark. The inflow calculations are accompanied by a sensitivity study, which among other matters handles the impact of parameter heterogeneity, different deposition hole rejection criteria, and the SFR facility (the repository for short-lived radioactive waste located approximately 1 km to the north of the investigated candidate area for a final repository at Forsmark). The report also presents tentative modelling results for the duration of the saturation phase, which starts once the used parts of the repository are being backfilled.

  6. Does Avalanche Shovel Shape Affect Excavation Time: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Schindelwig

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In Europe and North America, approximately 150 fatalities occur as a result of avalanches every year. However, it is unclear whether certain shovel shapes are more effective than others in snow removal during avalanche victim recovery. The objective was to determine the performance parameters with a developed standardized test using different shovel shapes and to determine sex-specific differences. Hence, several parameters were determined for clearing the snow from a snow filled box (15 men, 14 women. A flat (F and a deep (D shovel blade with the shaft connected straight (S or in clearing mode (C were used for the investigation of the shovel shapes FS, DC and the subsequent use of DC&DS. Mean snow mass shifted per unit time increased significantly from 1.50 kg/s with FS to 1.71 kg/s (14% with DS and further to 1.79 kg/s (4% with DC&DS for all participants. Snow mass shifted per unit time was 44% higher (p < 0.05 for men than for women. In excavation operations, the sex-specific physical performance should be taken into account. The results were limited to barely binding snow, because only with this snow did the tests show a high reliability.

  7. Focal choroidal excavation in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, F O J; Fok, A C T; Lee, A; Liu, A T W; Lai, T Y Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prevalence and clinical features of focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in patients presenting with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Methods This is a retrospective consecutive case series of consecutive patients with CSC who were referred for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) between January 2010 and December 2011. Medical records were reviewed and clinical features including presence of FCE in SD-OCT, fluorescence angiography (FA), and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) were studied. Results Among the 116 CSC patients assessed, FCE was found in 11 eyes of 7 (6.0%) patients. FCE was associated with subretinal fluid in six eyes of six patients and serous pigment epithelial detachment in three eyes of two patients. The mean central subfield retinal thickness of CSC eyes with FCE was 283.7 μm, compared with 377.5 μm for CSC eyes without FCE (Mann–Whitney U-test, P=0.020). Five FCE eyes of five patients had focal leakage on FA. Choroidal hyperpermeability on ICGA was found in seven CSC eyes with FCE, with four eyes showing hypofluorescent spot corresponding to the FCE. After a mean follow-up of 16 months, visual acuity of all 11 eyes with FCE remained stable or improved at the last follow-up. Conclusion FCE is not an uncommon feature in patients with CSC and might be associated with choroidal hemodynamic disturbances. PMID:25853402

  8. Choroidal excavation in choroidal osteoma complicated by choroidal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, L; Marchese, A; Gagliardi, M; Introini, U; Battaglia Parodi, M; Casalino, G; Bandello, F

    2017-12-01

    PurposeTo describe multimodal imaging features of choroidal osteoma (CO) complicated by choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and focal choroidal excavation (FCE).MethodsPatients presenting with CO and CNV between January and October 2016 were considered for this study. Diagnosis of CO was confirmed by ultrasound examination. All patients underwent multimodal imaging including optical coherence tomography (OCT), swept-source OCT angiography (DRI OCT Triton, Topcon, Inc., Tokyo, Japan) and fluorescein angiography (Spectralis HRA+OCT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany).ResultsTwo patients (one with bilateral CO) were included in the study. OCT showed a FCE in two eyes of two patients (one in correspondence of the CNV and the other adjacent to the CNV). OCT-A demonstrated presence of microvascular flow within neovascular network of the CNVs. Decalcification of the tumor was noted in correspondence of one eye with FCE.ConclusionsFCE may be found in eyes with choroidal osteoma and CNV. OCT-A was a valuable tool for detection of CNV complicating choroidal osteoma. Decalcification of choroidal osteoma may represent a common pathogenic pathway for development of FCE and CNV in choroidal osteoma.

  9. CHOROIDAL NEVI WITH FOCAL CHOROIDAL EXCAVATION AND POLYPOIDAL CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simhaee, Daniel; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Freund, K Bailey

    2017-08-10

    To report two cases of choroidal nevi associated with focal choroidal excavation (FCE) and polypoidal choroidal neovascularization (PCN). Report of two patients with choroidal nevi showing FCE and PCN who underwent multimodal imaging including color fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, fundus autofluorescence, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, swept-source optical coherence tomography, and optical coherence tomography angiography. Two patients presented with choroidal nevi associated with FCE and PCN. In the first case, a 74-year-old woman, the nevus had sharp margins, a deep FCE, surrounding drusen, and subretinal exudation at its inferior edge due to PCN that responded well to intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. In the second case, a 64-year-old woman, the nevus had ill-defined margins, a shallow FCE, and angiographic evidence of PCN without associated exudation. There have been several reports showing an association of either choroidal nevi or FCE with PCN. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of FCE identified within choroidal nevi, with or without associated PCN. Since, in one of our cases, the FCE was not apparent on clinical examination, the prevalence of FCE within nevi may be underdiagnosed.

  10. EXCAVATION OF PITS (CHANNELS BY IMPACT OF PULSE POWER LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anakhaev Koshkinbai Nazirovich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an innovative hydromechanical solution of the problem of profiles development of pits and channels by impact of pulse (blasting power load on a surface of homogeneous soil mass, for example, when excavating solid rocks, frozen soil, etc. Thus, soil would be considered as an ideal heavy liquid (disregarding its mechanical strength and plastic properties. The solution of this problem is achieved by the method of consecutive conformal mappings of physical flow region (in the form of Kirchhoff complex on the region of complex potential (in the form of a rectangle. Thus, the new technique of geometrical image generation of the latter in the presence in the flow region of a fixed point with discontinuous variations of pressure head-flow function and the direction of speed of flow and representation of an elliptic sine of Jacobi by means of elementary functions are used. The received analytical functional dependencies allow to determine an outline of a funnel of the soil ejection and all the required hydromechanical characteristics of flow (head-flow function, function of flow, speed of flow, etc.. Thus, the soil ejection funnel outline (for a benchmark problem completely coincides with subproduct of the known rigorous solution of Lavrentyev-Kuznetsov.

  11. Research on Application of Regression Least Squares Support Vector Machine on Performance Prediction of Hydraulic Excavator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-bo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the performance prediction accuracy of hydraulic excavator, the regression least squares support vector machine is applied. First, the mathematical model of the regression least squares support vector machine is studied, and then the algorithm of the regression least squares support vector machine is designed. Finally, the performance prediction simulation of hydraulic excavator based on regression least squares support vector machine is carried out, and simulation results show that this method can predict the performance changing rules of hydraulic excavator correctly.

  12. Method of defining rational parameters for excavator buckets vibrating devices in order to reduce soil adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkov, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    The article describes the method of defining rational parameters for excavator buckets vibrating devices in order to reduce soil adhesion under various operating conditions. The method includes limits formation, calculating geometric parameters of curved mold concentrator for excavator buckets with magnetostriction vibration exciters; calculating parameters of acoustic influence equipment; calculating power demand of equipment, defining adhesive forces of soil to buckets with given values of external factors; defining equipment operation mode (turn-on frequency, exposure time). Suggested method enables one to define required parameters of vibrating equipment to excavator buckets during the design phase.

  13. Measuring radon flux across active faults: Relevance of excavating and possibility of satellite discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richon, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.richon@cea.f [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe Geologie des Systemes Volcaniques, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Klinger, Yann; Tapponnier, Paul [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe de Seismotectonique, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Li Chenxia [Institute of Geology, Chinese Earthquake Administration, P.O. Box 9803, 100029 Beijing (China); Van Der Woerd, Jerome [Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR-7516, INSU, Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg I, 5 Rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Perrier, Frederic [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe de Geomagnetisme, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS et Universite Paris 7 Denis-Diderot, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-02-15

    Searching for gas exhalation around major tectonic contacts raises important methodological issues such as the role of the superficial soil and the possible long distance transport. These effects have been studied on the Xidatan segment of the Kunlun Fault, Qinghai Province, China, using measurement of the radon-222 and carbon dioxide exhalation flux. A significant radon flux, reaching up to 538 +- 33 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} was observed in a 2-3 m deep trench excavated across the fault. On the soil surface, the radon flux varied from 7 to 38 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, including on the fault trace, with an average value of 14.1 +- 1.0 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, similar to the world average. The carbon dioxide flux on the soil surface, with an average value of 12.9 +- 3.3 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, also remained similar to regular background values. It showed no systematic spatial variation up to a distance of 1 km from the fault, and no clear enhancement in the trench. However, a high carbon dioxide flux of 421 +- 130 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} was observed near subvertical fractured phyllite outcrops on a hill located about 3 km north of the fault, at the boundary of the large-scale pull-apart basin associated with the fault. This high carbon dioxide flux was associated with a high radon flux of 607 +- 35 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. These preliminary results indicate that, at the fault trace, it can be important to measure gas flux at the bottom of a trench to remove superficial soil layers. In addition, gas discharges need to be investigated also at some distance from the main fault, in zones where morphotectonics features support associated secondary fractures.

  14. The antler finds at Bilzingsleben, excavations 1969-1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Vollbrecht

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available 2820 antler remains from the Lower Palaeolithic site of Bilzingsleben, Thuringia, Germany (excavations 1969-1993 were the subject of detailed investigations. The two major goals were: 1.the consideration of taphonomic aspects 2.the critical evaluation of suggestions about artificial modifications to the antler material A detailed morphological description of the antler material provided the basis for the investigation. A prerequisite was the transfer of provenance data onto an x-y coordinate grid. Taphonomic aspects considered in this work include the relative frequencies of antler elements, estimates regarding the minimum number of individual deer, their age structure and seasonality, and, insofar as the condition of the antlers allowed, the classification of surface preservation, size classes and spatial distribution of the finds. The assemblage of antler finds, the majority of which seems to have come from red deer, is dominated by small fragments, mostly of tines. About one quarter of the finds are larger than 150 mm. Lower beams are more abundant than upper beams (e.g. crowns. Detailed counting, substantiated by systematic reconstruction, shows that in general the antlers are incomplete. After reconstruction of unshed antlers, it was possible to assess the minimum number of heads at 150 animals. Preliminary counting of postcranial and cranial (non antler cervid material points to about 70 cervids. Intentional accumulation of antlers by hominids can only be accepted as the reason for these disproportionate figures if other site formation processes can be ruled out. In fact, the correlation between sediment thickness and maximum antler densities, at least for finds smaller than 120mm, suggests that fluvial accumulation has to be taken into account as a probable element of the site formation history. Further, the mixture of unifacially abraded finds together with finds that exhibit bifacial abrasion points to a succession of changing fluvial

  15. Energy-saving analysis of hydraulic hybrid excavator based on common pressure rail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Jiang, Jihai; Su, Xiaoyu; Karimi, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Energy-saving research of excavators is becoming one hot topic due to the increasing energy crisis and environmental deterioration recently. Hydraulic hybrid excavator based on common pressure rail (HHEC) provides an alternative with electric hybrid excavator because it has high power density and environment friendly and easy to modify based on the existing manufacture process. This paper is focused on the fuel consumption of HHEC and the actuator dynamic response to assure that the new system can save energy without sacrificing performance. Firstly, we introduce the basic principle of HHEC; then, the sizing process is presented; furthermore, the modeling period which combined mathematical analysis and experiment identification is listed. Finally, simulation results show that HHEC has a fast dynamic response which can be accepted in engineering and the fuel consumption can be reduced 21% to compare the original LS excavator and even 32% after adopting another smaller engine.

  16. Exploration and excavation of shipwrecks in Goa and adjoining waters 2005-2006

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    As a part of the institutional project, 'Application of Geological and Geophysical methods in Marine Archaeology and Underwater Explorations, (OLP 0008)', exploration and excavation of shipwrecks have been carried out from 23 Jan 2006 to 21 Feb 2006...

  17. Method of Assessment of Hard Rock Workability using Bucket Wheel Excavators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machniak, Łukasz; Kozioł, Wiesław

    2017-03-01

    A new hypothesis concerning a process of the mining solid rocks using bucket wheel excavators (BWE). Destroying of the rock mass structure is a result of breaking and not, as so far accepted, of cutting. This approach excludes, for the description of solid rock workability using bucket wheel excavators, used classifications based on individual linear or surface resistances of cutting. The possibility of a replacement mechanism for determining of the workability by bucket wheel excavators using rippers was assumed. On this basis, an innovative method for assessing the workability of solid rocks was developed, which is a combination of an derived empirical energy relationship LSE of breaking by tractor rippers from a compressive strength, a seismic wave velocity, a density of solid rock, and the modified classification of workability by bucket wheel excavators according to Bulukbasi (1991). The proposed method allows for multi-parameter assessment of the workability class based on the parameters that are independent variables in the specified dependencies.

  18. Energy-Saving Analysis of Hydraulic Hybrid Excavator Based on Common Pressure Rail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy-saving research of excavators is becoming one hot topic due to the increasing energy crisis and environmental deterioration recently. Hydraulic hybrid excavator based on common pressure rail (HHEC provides an alternative with electric hybrid excavator because it has high power density and environment friendly and easy to modify based on the existing manufacture process. This paper is focused on the fuel consumption of HHEC and the actuator dynamic response to assure that the new system can save energy without sacrificing performance. Firstly, we introduce the basic principle of HHEC; then, the sizing process is presented; furthermore, the modeling period which combined mathematical analysis and experiment identification is listed. Finally, simulation results show that HHEC has a fast dynamic response which can be accepted in engineering and the fuel consumption can be reduced 21% to compare the original LS excavator and even 32% after adopting another smaller engine.

  19. Parametric Optimization and Prediction Tool for Lunar Surface Systems Excavation Tasks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Honeybee Robotics proposes to develop a software tool for facilitating lunar excavation system trades in support of selecting an optimal architecture. This will...

  20. EXCAVATOR: detecting copy number variants from whole-exome sequencing data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magi, Alberto; Tattini, Lorenzo; Cifola, Ingrid; D'Aurizio, Romina; Benelli, Matteo; Mangano, Eleonora; Battaglia, Cristina; Bonora, Elena; Kurg, Ants; Seri, Marco; Magini, Pamela; Giusti, Betti; Romeo, Giovanni; Pippucci, Tommaso; De Bellis, Gianluca; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2013-01-01

    ...) from whole-exome sequencing data. EXCAVATOR combines a three-step normalization procedure with a novel heterogeneous hidden Markov model algorithm and a calling method that classifies genomic regions into five copy number states...

  1. Time-dependent behaviour of deep level tabular excavations in hard rock

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malan, DF

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Although hard rock is not usually associated with large creep deformation, significant time-dependent behaviour is observed in the tabular excavations of the South African gold mines. Time-dependent closure data was collected in stopes...

  2. Calculation of the Chilling Requirement for Air Conditioning in the Excavation Roadway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueping Qin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To effectively improve the climate conditions of the excavation roadway in coal mine, the calculation of the chilling requirement taking air conditioning measures is extremely necessary. The temperature field of the surrounding rock with moving boundary in the excavation roadway was numerically simulated by using finite volume method. The unstable heat transfer coefficient between the surrounding rock and air flow was obtained via the previous calculation. According to the coupling effects of the air flow inside and outside air duct, the differential calculation mathematical model of air flow temperature in the excavation roadway was established. The chilling requirement was calculated with the selfdeveloped computer program for forecasting the required cooling capacity of the excavation roadway. A good air conditioning effect had been observed after applying the calculated results to field trial, which indicated that the prediction method and calculation procedure were reliable.

  3. Focal choroidal excavation-morphological features and clinical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, C Y; Li, S H; Li, K K W

    2017-09-01

    PurposeTo describe and correlate the morphological and clinical features of focal choroidal excavation (FCE).MethodsThis is a consecutive case series from the review of the 4436 optical coherence tomography scans performed by Kowloon East Cluster Ophthalmic Service from 1 August 2014-31 January 2016. Statistical analysis was performed on SPSS 18.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). A significance level of P<0.05 was taken.ResultsAll 16 patients with FCE had unilateral involvement. The mean age of diagnosis was 52.56±14.00. The mean greatest linear dimension (GLD) of FCE was 636.25±265.11 μm. The mean choroidal thickness was 183.63±52.39 μm. Fourteen FCEs (87.5%) were conforming and two were non-conforming (12.5%). In the eyes with FCE, concurrent macular pathology was present in four cases (25.0%). Tractional pathologies of macular pucker and macular scar corresponded to the two non-conforming FCEs in the series. Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) and lacquer crack had a close topographic relationship with the FCE. The mean GLD was significantly larger in eyes with concurrent macular pathology than those without (878.00 vs 555.67 μm, P=0.029). In the fellow eyes, concurrent macular pathology was present in 5 cases (31.3%): PCV in 3 cases and chronic central serous chorioretinopathy in 2 cases.ConclusionAs a significant proportion of FCE is associated with concurrent macular pathology in the involved or fellow eye, angiography for both eyes is recommended even for asymptomatic cases. The GLD of FCE may have clinical value in risk stratification.

  4. 3D Modelling of a Tunnel Re-excavation in Soft Ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hilar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of the shallow tunnel at Brezno started using the Pre-Vault Method. The tunnel excavation, in complicated geological conditions, led to many difficulties which finally resulted in a collapse, when a significant part of the temporary tunnel lining collapsed. Various options for re-excavating the tunnel were evaluated prior to further construction. Finally a decision was made to separate the collapsed area into sections 9 m in length using 16 m-wide, transversally oriented pile walls, to improve the stability of the collapsed ground. The walls were constructed from the surface prior to excavation. It was also decided to re-excavate a collapsed area using the Sprayed Concrete Lining (SCL method. Due to problematic soft ground conditions, which had been made even worse by the collapse, some additional support measures had to be considered prior to re-excavation (ground improvement, micropile umbrellas embedded into the pile walls, etc.This paper describes numerical modelling of the tunnel re-excavation through the collapsed area. Initial calculations of the tunnel re-excavation were made using a 2D finite element method. Subsequently, further calculations to evaluate the rock mass behaviour in the collapsed area were provided in 3D. The 2D calculations were used to provide sensitivity studies, while 3D modelling was mainly used for evaluating the tunnel face stability (impact of the pile walls, impact of ground improvement together with other factors (length of advances, moment of the temporary invert closure, etc. The results of the modelling were compared with the monitoring results.The paper also briefly describes the construction experience (technical problems, performance of various support measures, etc. The excavation and the primary lining construction were completed in 2006, and the tunnel was opened for traffic in April 2007.

  5. Unilateral choroidal excavation in the macula detected by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Yuka; Nishimura, Akira; Higashide, Tomomi; Ijiri, Shigeyuki; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa

    2010-05-01

    To report clinical findings of three patients with unilateral peculiar choroidal excavation in the macula detected by spectral-domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT). Three cases with unilateral choroidal excavation in the macula detected by SD OCT. Fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (IA), ultrasonography, visual field tests and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) were performed. Although all three patients complained of metamorphopsia, visual acuity and central visual field were normal in the affected eyes. SD OCT demonstrated choroidal excavation in the macula despite a normal foveal contour along the inner retinal surface. The excavation involved the outer retinal layers up to the external limiting membrane in cases 1 and 2, while only the retinal pigment epithelium was involved in case 3. The excavation corresponded to foveal pigment mottling in cases 1 and 2 and to a parafoveal yellowish fusiform lesion in case 3. The lesions appeared hypoautofluorescent and unremarkable in FA except for circumferential hyperfluorescence in case 3 and hypofluorescent in IA. B-scan ultrasonography was unremarkable. MfERG in cases 1 and 2 was normal. SD OCT demonstrated two types of choroidal excavation in the macula. More case accumulation and a longer follow-up will elucidate the pathogenesis and prognosis of the lesions.

  6. Excavated pulmonary nodules: an unusual clinical presentation of lung metastasis in two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalya Issam

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excavated pulmonary metastasis are rare. We present two cases of excavated pulmonary nodules proved to be metastases from osteosarcoma and gallblader lymphoma. Case presentation The first one is 39-year-old man in whom cholecystectomy made the diagnosis of primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the gallbladder. He presented in chest CT scan excavated nodules that had been biopsied and confirmed the diagnosis of non hodgkin lymphoma. He underwent 8 courses of chemotherapy CHOP 21 with complete remission. The second one is an 21 years old man who presented a right leg osteoblastic osteosarcoma with only excavated pulmonary nodules in extension assessment. He had 3 courses of polychemotherapy API (doxorubicin, platinum, and ifosfamide with partial response. Unfortunately, he died following a septic shock. Review of the literature shows that excavated pulmonary nodules as metastasis are rare but we should consider this diagnosis every time we are in front of a cancer. Chest computed tomography is the best diagnosis imaging that could make this diagnosis. Differential diagnosis between benign and malignant bullous lesions is important because surgical excision affects survival in some malignancies. Conclusions Although pulmonary nodules are the most common cancer metastasis, a differential diagnosis of a concurrent primary malignancy should always be considered every time we have excavated lesions, even in patients with known malignant disease. Thorough chest evaluation is important, as multiple primary malignancies may occur concomitantly.

  7. Sampling and Hydrogeology of the Vadose Zone Beneath the 300 Area Process Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2004-08-31

    Four open pits were dug with a backhoe into the vadose zone beneath the former 300 Area Process Ponds in April 2003. Samples were collected about every 2 feet for physical, chemical, and/or microbiological characterization. This reports presents a stratigraphic and geohydrologic summary of the four excavations.

  8. NEARSHORE ZONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hb"'/ H“ —_'~. Fig. l: Schematic plan showing the incident wave and subsequent breaking in the nearshore zone. The still-water line indicates the mean water level and .... obtained by taking the square of the high frequency velocity components.

  9. Estimating environmental value losses from earth materials excavation and infilling for large-scale airport construction: a case of Dalian Offshore Airport, Dalian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hua-Kun; Wang, Nuo; Wu, Nuan; Song, Nan-Qi; Zhu, Dao-Li

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale airport construction removes large quantities of earth materials, resulting in serious environmental pollution and ecosystem damage. However, studies of environmental concerns caused by the materials used in airport construction are still preliminary, and those case studies on the impacts of large-scale offshore airport development are very limited. China's Dalian Offshore Airport is considered here to study the environmental value loss from 240 million m3 of materials excavations and 21 km2 of artificial island infillings. The findings show that the calculated annual environmental value loss for the development of the Dalian Offshore Airport is approximately US$7.75 million, including US$1.81 million and US$1.47 million of direct economic loss of timber resources and marine biology resources, respectively, and US$1.53 million and US$2.79 million value losses of forest and marine ecosystem services damaged caused by materials excavation and infilling, respectively. The conclusions of this study provide an important foundation to quantitatively analyse the environmental impact of the Dalian Offshore Airport's development and can be used as a reference for similar engineering and environment impact assessment programs.

  10. Strategy for Preservation of Ptolemaic Wrapped Mummy’s Linen in Tuna el -Gebel Excavation, Egypt: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harby E. AHMED

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This research shows the practical strategies which were chosen for maintenance and conservation of textiles discovered in Tuna el -Gebel excavations, Egypt. This process represents the first aid to these objects, hidden in tombs over thousands of years. Thus, the operations carried out are very important in detecting the state of conservation of these remains of human activity. They also aimed at reducing the damage caused by storage conditions through thousands of years. The challenge that conservators of historic textiles face in this case is the decrease of the available and necessary possibilities for conducting the process of restoration in the best way. On the other hand, leaving these textiles without a conservation process may double the causes of damage in the textiles leading eventually to their complete loss.. The process of restoration has been recorded step by step, from the historical records of textiles to the cleaning processes. Moreover, the choice of a new holder for displaying textile pieces in museum and their placement in it are discussed.

  11. The application of high resolution fluxgate gradiometery as an aid to excavation planning and strategy formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lyall

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available The excavation of the Late Roman and Anglian settlement at West Heslerton, North Yorkshire, has been one of the largest excavations undertaken in England in the last twenty years. It has been the setting for a number of developments and experiments in the application of 'the new technology' to field archaeology. Parts of the site, which extended over c.20 Ha., proved to have high magnetic susceptibility and were ideally suited for magnetic prospection techniques. Feature visibility contrasts were, however, frequently low and therefore a series of experiments were undertaken using high resolution fluxgate gradiometer surveys following removal of the topsoil. The results of the high resolution surveys undertaken on the cleaned excavation surface proved highly successful in providing an enhanced pre-excavation plan, adding considerable detail to the surveys undertaken prior to the start of the excavation. The careful examination of the results, using G-Sys geographic data management software, which enabled the magnetic data, finds plots and digitised plans to be fully integrated, indicated areas where stratigraphic relationships could be tested and assisted in the development and re-definition of the excavation strategy as it progressed. Following initial small area tests in 1991, nearly two hectares were documented in this way during 1995 facilitating the completion of a targeted sampling operation which ensured the completion of the excavation within the limited budget available. The approach proved highly successful and offers great potential for use on sites which have a high magnetic susceptibility and are liable to large area destruction as occurs in the case of mineral extraction or subsoil ploughing operations.

  12. SLOPE STABILITY EVALUATION AND EQUIPMENT SETBACK DISTANCES FOR BURIAL GROUND EXCAVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCSHANE DS

    2010-03-25

    After 1970 Transuranic (TRU) and suspect TRU waste was buried in the ground with the intention that at some later date the waste would be retrieved and processed into a configuration for long term storage. To retrieve this waste the soil must be removed (excavated). Sloping the bank of the excavation is the method used to keep the excavation from collapsing and to provide protection for workers retrieving the waste. The purpose of this paper is to document the minimum distance (setback) that equipment must stay from the edge of the excavation to maintain a stable slope. This evaluation examines the equipment setback distance by dividing the equipment into two categories, (1) equipment used for excavation and (2) equipment used for retrieval. The section on excavation equipment will also discuss techniques used for excavation including the process of benching. Calculations 122633-C-004, 'Slope Stability Analysis' (Attachment A), and 300013-C-001, 'Crane Stability Analysis' (Attachment B), have been prepared to support this evaluation. As shown in the calculations the soil has the following properties: Unit weight 110 pounds per cubic foot; and Friction Angle (natural angle of repose) 38{sup o} or 1.28 horizontal to 1 vertical. Setback distances are measured from the top edge of the slope to the wheels/tracks of the vehicles and heavy equipment being utilized. The computer program utilized in the calculation uses the center of the wheel or track load for the analysis and this difference is accounted for in this evaluation.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of caries excavations in different risk groups - a micro-simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Paris, Sebastian; Stolpe, Michael

    2014-12-15

    Whilst being the most prevalent disease worldwide, dental caries is increasingly concentrated in high-risk populations. New caries treatments should therefore be evaluated not only in terms of their cost-effectiveness in individuals, but also their effects on the distribution of costs and benefits across different populations. To treat deep caries, there are currently three strategies: selective (one-step incomplete), stepwise (two-step incomplete) and complete excavation. Building on prior research that found selective excavation generally cost-effective, we compared the costs-effectiveness of different excavations in low- and high-risk patients, hypothesizing that selective excavation had greater cost-effectiveness-advantages in patients with high compared with low risk. An average tooth-level Markov-model was constructed following the posterior teeth in an initially 18-year old male individual, either with low or high risk, over his lifetime. Risk was assumed to be predicted by several parameters (oral hygiene, social position, dental service utilization), with evidence-based transition probabilities or hazard functions being adjusted for different risk status where applicable. Total lifetime treatment costs were estimated for German healthcare, with both mixed public-private and only private out-of-pocket costs being calculated. For cost-effectiveness-analysis, micro-simulations were performed and joint parameter uncertainty introduced by random sampling of probabilities. Cohort analyses were used for assessing the underlying reasons for potential differences between strategies and populations. Selective excavation was more effective and less costly than both alternatives regardless of an individual's risk. All three strategies were less effective and more costly in patients with high compared with low risk, whilst the differences between risk groups were smallest for selective excavation. Thus, the cost-effectiveness-advantages of selective excavation were

  14. Mechanical analysis about the influence of tunnel excavation on vertical effect of adjacent bridge pile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoyan

    2017-08-01

    Tunnel excavation will bring additional deformation and internal force of adjacent bridge piles, if the deformation is large, it will threat the upper structure safety of the bridge. According to the complexity of the existing three - dimensional numerical simulation modeling and the time - consuming calculation, a two - stage analysis method of tunnel excavation based on Winkler foundation model was proposed. Firstly, Loganathan and Polous solutions were used to obtain the vertical displacement of the soil free field at the pile position when tunnel excavated, and the corresponding polynomial fitting displacement curve was taken. Secondly, the differential equation was established by means of the equilibrium condition of micro - element physical force and considering the pile group effect. Then, through the logical derivation, the calculation expressions of the tunnel excavation on the effect of the adjacent bridge pile (settlement, axial force and friction resistance) were obtained. Finally, based on the background of the tunnel project of Yanxing Door Station ∼ Xianning Road Station in Xi’an Metro Line 3, the feasibility and applicability of the proposed method were proved by comparing the calculated values with the numerical simulation values. It provides theoretical guidance for the effective analysis about the influence of tunnel excavation on the adjacent pile foundation effect.

  15. In Appreciation of Claude Warren and Susan Rose's "William Pengelly's Techniques of Archaeological Excavation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Browman

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The short (40 pages pamphlet by Warren and Rose (1994 provides the answer to a complex question regarding credit for an important archaeological methodology, stratigraphic excavation. Let me set the stage for this appreciation. Continuing research on the beginnings of stratigraphic excavations in North America (Browman and Givens 1996, I sought the origins of the idea of actually excavating by strata, rather than post-facto interpretation, seen in North American as early as 1895 in the work of Henry Chapman Mercer, but not really introduced into the repertoire of American techniques until the work of Gamio, Kidder and Nelson between 1911 and 1914. The roots of the latter three seemed to lie with individuals such as Reisner, Boas, Uhle, who in turn seemed to rely on Hugo Obennaier, Gabriel de Mortillet, Marcellin Boule, and perhaps Pitt-Rivers, while Mercer's work could be traced to Boule and Albert Gaudry. Doggedly following back the roots, I found that Chapman (1989 could make a reasonable case that Pitt-Rivers had actually learned of the idea of strati­graphic excavation from Evans, Prestwich, and Lubbock, from the British scientists working with the Upper and Middle Paleolithic excavations during 1858-1868.

  16. Light induced fluorescence evaluation: A novel concept for caries diagnosis and excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugnani, Neeraj; Pandit, Ik; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gupta, Monika; Gugnani, Shalini

    2011-10-01

    In the era of minimal invasive dentistry, every effort should be directed to preserve the maximum tooth structure during cavity preparation. However, while making cavities, clinicians usually get indecisive at what point caries excavation should be stopped, so as to involve only the infected dentin. Apparent lack of valid clinical markers, difficulties with the use of caries detector dyes and chemo mechanical caries removal systems carve out a need for an improved system, which would be helpful to differentiate between the healthy and infected dentin during caries excavation. Light induced fluorescence evaluation is a novel concept implicated for caries detection and for making decisions while cavity preparation. This paper describes a few cases that explain the clinical applicability of this concept, using the SoproLife camera that works on this principle. Autofluorescence masking effect was found to be helpful for caries detection and the red fluorescence in the treatment mode was found helpful in deciding 'when to stop the excavation process.' Light induced fluorescence evaluation - Diagnosis - Treatment concept concept can be used as a guide for caries detection and excavation. It also facilitates decision making for stopping the caries excavation so as to involve infected dentin only.

  17. Virtual taphonomy: A new method integrating excavation and postprocessing in an archaeological context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmson, Helene; Dell'Unto, Nicoló

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to integrate excavation and post-processing of archaeological and osteological contexts and material to enhance the interpretation of these with specific focus on the taphonomical aspects. A method was designed, Virtual Taphonomy, based on the use and integration of image-based 3D modeling techniques into a 3D GIS platform, and tested on a case study. Merging the 3D models and a database directly in the same virtual environment allowed the authors to fully integrate excavation and post-processing in a complex spatial analysis reconnecting contexts excavated on different occasions in the field process. The case study further demonstrated that the method enabled a deeper understanding of the taphonomic agents at work and allowed the construction of a more detailed interpretation of the skeletal remains than possible with more traditional methods. The method also proved to add transparency to the entire research process from field to post-processing and interpretation. Other benefits were the timesaving aspects in documentation, not only in the excavation process but also in post-processing without creating additional costs in material, as the equipment used is available in most archaeological excavations. The authors conclude that this methodology could be employed on a variety of investigations from archaeological to forensic contexts and add significant value in many different respects (for example, detail, objectivity, complexity, time-efficiency) compared to methods currently used. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Tomographic and angiographic characteristics of eyes with macular focal choroidal excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Ryo; Takahashi, Hidenori; Ueta, Takashi; Yuda, Kentaro; Kure, Kayo; Yanagi, Yasuo

    2013-06-01

    To describe detailed clinical features of eyes with focal choroidal excavation. Twenty-one eyes of 17 patients with focal choroidal excavation were retrospectively studied. All eyes underwent thorough examination including funduscopy, visual field analysis, fundus autofluorescence imaging, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and B-scan ultrasonography. Patients' age ranged between 25 years and 70 years. Four patients (24%) were affected bilaterally. Spherical equivalent of refractive error ranged from 0.5 diopters to -10.0 diopters (D). Funduscopic examination showed hypopigmentation (n = 12) and yellowish plaquelike appearances (n = 2). Indocyanine green angiography showed not only filling defects at the excavation (n = 16) but also choroidal vascular hyperpermeability (n = 7) and punctate hyperfluorescent spots (n = 7). Cicatrized subretinal neovascularization was seen in three eyes. The mean follow-up period was 37 months (6-66 months). There was no change in the appearance of excavation. Central serous chorioretinopathy (n = 1) and choroidal neovascularization (n = 1) developed during follow-up. Background factors and ophthalmic findings are similar to those that have been reported previously, including relatively stable findings even after a long observation and the occurrence of central serous chorioretinopathy and choroidal neovascularization. Bilateral cases are not rare in the current cohort, and choroidal vascular hyperpermeability is frequently observed in indocyanine green angiography, suggesting there were choroidal hemodynamic changes around the excavation.

  19. Numerical study on lateral wall displacement of deep excavation supported by IPS earth retention system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugen Feng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the 3D behavior characteristics of an excavation supported by an innovative prestressed support (IPS earth retention system. A numerical simulation was conducted in order to provide insight into the IPS system behavior by using the FLAC3D package. Prior to the parametric study, validation work was conducted by means of a comparison of the deformation between the field test data and numerical analysis results, and strong agreement was obtained. The reasonable excavation location, layered excavation thickness, and blocked excavation sequence are presented according to variable parameter analysis. In view of the previous findings, certain measurements are proposed in order to control the foundation pit deformation. The results indicate that prestress compensation has a significant effect on the IPS system behavior, while an optimized excavation sequence slightly improves its behavior. With the conclusion proposed based on the numerical results, the aim is to provide reference data for optimization design and the construction sequence.

  20. Study of Ground Response Curve (GRC) Based on a Damage Model / Badanie Krzywej Odpowiedzi Gruntu (Grc) W Oparciu O Model Pękania Skał

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molladavoodi, H.

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of stresses and displacements around underground openings is necessary in a wide variety of civil, petroleum and mining engineering problems. In addition, an excavation damaged zone (EDZ) is generally formed around underground openings as a result of high stress magnitudes even in the absence of blasting effects. The rock materials surrounding the underground excavations typically demonstrate nonlinear and irreversible mechanical response in particular under high in situ stress states. The dominant cause of irreversible deformations in brittle rocks is damage process. One of the most widely used methods in tunnel design is the convergence-confinement method (CCM) for its practical application. The elastic-plastic models are usually used in the convergence-confinement method as a constitutive model for rock behavior. The plastic models used to simulate the rock behavior, do not consider the important issues such as stiffness degradation and softening. Therefore, the use of damage constitutive models in the convergence-confinement method is essential in the design process of rock structures. In this paper, the basic concepts of continuum damage mechanics are outlined. Then a numerical stepwise procedure for a circular tunnel under hydrostatic stress field, with consideration of a damage model for rock mass has been implemented. The ground response curve and radius of excavation damage zone were calculated based on an isotropic damage model. The convergence-confinement method based on damage model can consider the effects of post-peak rock behavior on the ground response curve and excavation damage zone. The analysis of results show the important effect of brittleness parameter on the tunnel wall convergence, ground response curve and excavation damage radius. Analiza naprężeń i przemieszczeń powstałych wokół otworu podziemnego wymagana jest przy szerokiej gamie projektów z zakresu budownictwa lądowego, inżynierii górniczej oraz naftowej. Ponadto

  1. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  2. Sound Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Sound zones, i.e. spatially confined regions of individual audio content, can be created by appropriate filtering of the desired audio signals reproduced by an array of loudspeakers. The challenge of designing filters for sound zones is twofold: First, the filtered responses should generate...... an acoustic separation between the control regions. Secondly, the pre- and post-ringing as well as spectral deterioration introduced by the filters should be minimized. The tradeoff between acoustic separation and filter ringing is the focus of this paper. A weighted L2-norm penalty is introduced in the sound...

  3. A Comparison Between The NORCAT Rover Test Results and the ISRU Excavation System Model Predictions Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Christopher A.; Agui, Juan H.; Creager, Colin M.; Oravec, Heather A.

    2012-01-01

    An Excavation System Model has been written to simulate the collection and transportation of regolith on the moon. The calculations in this model include an estimation of the forces on the digging tool as a result of excavation into the regolith. Verification testing has been performed and the forces recorded from this testing were compared to the calculated theoretical data. The Northern Centre for Advanced Technology Inc. rovers were tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center Simulated Lunar Operations facility. This testing was in support of the In-Situ Resource Utilization program Innovative Partnership Program. Testing occurred in soils developed at the Glenn Research Center which are a mixture of different types of sands and whose soil properties have been well characterized. This testing is part of an ongoing correlation of actual field test data to the blade forces calculated by the Excavation System Model. The results from this series of tests compared reasonably with the predicted values from the code.

  4. Comparison of ISRU Excavation System Model Blade Force Methodology and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Christopher A.; Wilkinson, R. Allen; Mueller, Robert P.; Schuler, Jason M.; Nick, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    An Excavation System Model has been written to simulate the collection and transportation of regolith on the Moon. The calculations in this model include an estimation of the forces on the digging tool as a result of excavation into the regolith. Verification testing has been performed and the forces recorded from this testing were compared to the calculated theoretical data. A prototype lunar vehicle built at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) was tested with a bulldozer type blade developed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) attached to the front. This is the initial correlation of actual field test data to the blade forces calculated by the Excavation System Model and the test data followed similar trends with the predicted values. This testing occurred in soils developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) which are a mixture of different types of sands and whose soil properties have been well characterized. Three separate analytical models are compared to the test data.

  5. Control strategy of a novel energy recovery system for parallel hybrid hydraulic excavator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the high fuel prices, the demands for energy saving and green emission of engineering machinery have been increased rapidly. Due to the complex working condition and frequent load changing, the efficiency of the hydraulic excavator is low. The aim of this article is to propose a control strategy for energy recovery system of hydraulic excavator driven by the parallel hybrid system. The mathematical models of the main components and the simulation models of the proposed system and a conventional energy recovery system are built. Then, according to the load characteristic, a control strategy based on the working condition and state of charge of the battery is given. The co-simulation for the hybrid hydraulic excavator system is established. The results show that the proposed energy recovery system and control strategy can not only improve the energy recovery efficiency but also reduce fuel consumption and emission of the power system.

  6. Performance Evaluation of Bucket based Excavating, Loading and Transport (BELT) Equipment - An OEE Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mousa; Rai, Piyush; Gupta, Suprakash

    2017-03-01

    Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) has been used since last over two decades as a measure of performance in manufacturing industries. Unfortunately, enough, application of OEE in mining and excavation industry has not been duly adopted. In this paper an effort has been made to identify the OEE for performance evaluation of Bucket based Excavating, Loading and Transport (BELT) equipment. The conceptual model of OEE, as used in the manufacturing industries, has been revised to adapt to the BELT equipment. The revised and adapted model considered the operational time, speed and bucket capacity utilization losses as the key OEE components for evaluating the performance of BELT equipment. To illustrate the efficacy of the devised model on real-time basis, a case study was undertaken on the biggest single bucket excavating equipment - the dragline, in a large surface coal mine. One-year data was collected in order to evaluate the proposed OEE model.

  7. Clinical and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography findings in patients with focal choroidal excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher Seungkyu; Woo, Se Joon; Kim, Yong-Kyu; Hwang, Duck Jin; Kang, Hae Min; Kim, Hyesun; Lee, Sung Chul

    2014-05-01

    To describe the clinical and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) findings in patients with focal choroidal excavation (FCE). Retrospective case series. Forty-one eyes of 38 patients with FCE identified in 2 tertiary medical centers in Korea. Clinical features, SD-OCT findings, and associated macular disorders of FCE were analyzed and detailed. Statistical associations among clinical features, including lesion type, size, and choroidal thickness, and frequency of association with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC), choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV). Mean patient age was 50.1 years (range, 25-76 years). The mean spherical equivalent of refractive error was -3.7 diopters (range, -10.0 to +1.5 diopters). Three patients (8%) had bilateral lesions, and 1 patient (3%) had 2 distinct lesions in the same eye. The mean FCE width and depth were 757 μm and 107 μm, respectively, with a positive correlation between width and depth (P = 0.003). The mean subfoveal choroidal thickness of FCE eyes was 284 μm, which was not statistically different from that of age-, sex-, and refractive error-matched normal subjects. Choroidal thickness in FCE was less in eyes with hyperreflective choroidal tissue under the excavation that was present in 22 eyes (54%) versus eyes without excavation (128 vs. 190 μm, respectively; P = 0.009). Twelve FCEs (29%) were the nonconforming type, revealing separation between the photoreceptor tips and the retinal pigment epithelium on SD-OCT. Nonconforming FCE was associated with visual symptoms (P excavation, and the excavated area in 1 eye with PCV enlarged slightly during follow-up. Focal choroidal excavation is a relatively common entity and frequently associated with choroidal diseases, including CSC, CNV, and PCV. Although FCE is classically thought to be a congenital malformation, acquired FCE forms possibly exist. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by

  8. [Distribution and health risk of HCHs and DDTs in a contaminated site with excavation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Lei; Xue, Nan-Dong; Yang, Bing; Li, Fa-Sheng; Chen, Xuan-Yu; Liu, Bo; Meng, Lei

    2015-02-01

    Air samples were collected to analyze the distribution of HCHs and DDTs around a contaminated site during its excavation. The carcinogenic risks and non-carcinogenic risks through breath exposure were studied by health risk assessment modes. The results showed that, there was an obvious seasonal variation of HCHs and DDTs in air around the excavating area. The concentrations of HCHs and DDTs were higher in winter and autumn, lower in spring and summer. The Σ HCHs concentration ranged from 5.65 ng x m(-3) to 133 ng x m(-3), and the average value was 28.6 ng x m(-3); Σ DDTs concentration ranged from 4.48 ng x m(-3) to 2 800 ng x m(-3), and the average value was 457.3 ng x m(-3) in winter. However, the Σ HCHs concentration was between 6.23 ng x m(-3) and 26.4 ng x m(-3), and the average value was 15.1 ng x m(-3) in spring; the Σ DDTs concentration was between 3.17 ng x m(-3) and 8.1 ng x m(-3), and the average value was 6.1 ng x m(-3) in summer. So the pollution could be reduced by excavating in spring and summer. The concentrations of HCHs and DDTs in the residents area were negatively correlated to the height (P excavating area were lower than the acceptable level, while the excavating process caused carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks to young residents to some extent. In order to decrease the risks, measures should be taken to restrain the pollutants in the excavation area diffusing into the air.

  9. Selection of Excavators for Earth Work on the Basis of their Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondráčková, Terezie; Voštová, Věra

    2017-10-01

    For the specific construction of the reconstruction of the railway section Ostrov nad Oslavou and Žďár nad Sázavou will be done removed the railway superstructure and the partial adjustment of the substructure including drainage. For the earthwork will be used excavators of the company Komatsu, with the possibility of adjustment of parameters of the working tool – the length of the bracket and the volume of the shovel. The determined value will be purely indicative, as it does not affect how the operator of the excavator handles the discharge of cargo means.

  10. Stepwise Excavation Allows Apexogenesis in Permanent Molars with Deep Carious Lesions and Incomplete Root Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandéz-Gatón, Patrícia; Serrano, César Ruiz; Nelson Filho, Paulo; De Castañeda, Esther Ruiz; Lucisano, Marília P; Silva, Raquel A B da; Silva, Léa A B da

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the stepwise excavation technique in 138 permanent molars with deep carious lesions and incomplete root formation within a 24-month clinical and radiographic follow-up period. In 96.7% of the cases, success was observed (no pain, integrity of restoration margins, absence of radiographic alterations and apexogenesis). The cases of failure (3.3%) were due to the loss of the temporary restoration. In conclusion, the stepwise excavation is a promising technique for permanent teeth with deep carious lesions and incomplete root formation as a minimally invasive approach because it allows the preservation of pulp vitality and occurrence of apexogenesis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Improved Concrete Cutting and Excavation Capabilities for Crater Repair Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    than the goal of 1 ft/min. The SW60 wheel saw was the only option tested for saw cutting 24-in.-thick PCC to full depth. • The Volvo EW180D...excavator with the Volvo HB1400 moil point hammer was the most efficient technology for breaking up the 18- and 24-in.-thick PCC and required far less...time than the goal of 16 min per repair slab. The Volvo EW180D excavator with the Volvo HB1400 chisel point hammer was also capable of requiring less

  12. Digging the termite way: crowding simple robots to excavate ramification structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardunias, Paul

    The complex ramification network that termites excavate in soil in search of resources has been shown to emerge from interactions between individuals during periodic crowding at the tips of tunnels. Excavation in these social insects is carried out by a rotation of termites removing soil from the tip of an expanding tunnel and depositing it back along the tunnel walls. Bristle bots, modified to either rock or turn on contact with soil in an artificial tunnel, were used to replicate this process. As in termites, congestion at tunnel tips leads to the widening and branching of tunnels.

  13. National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Institute. Status report, March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.

    1997-12-31

    The National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) program is intended to pool support, talent, and technologies of the industries dependent upon drilling and excavation technologies to initiate, coordinate, and sustain programs capable of developing substantial technological advances. The NADET Institute has been funded by the DOE Office of Geothermal Technologies and is now supporting seven projects aimed at advanced geothermal drilling technologies. The Institute seeks to broaden its base of funding and technological support from both government and industry sources. Encouraging progress has been made with the support of dues-paying industrial members and industrial sponsorship of a substantial drilling research study.

  14. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  15. Excavating differentially expressed antimicrobial peptides from transcriptome of Larimichthys crocea liver in response to Cryptocaryon irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Bing; Mao, Yong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Ruan-Ni; Su, Yong-Quan; Hong, Yue-Qun; Hong, Yu-Jian; Hong, Yu-Cong

    2018-02-01

    Larimichthys crocea, the special marine economy fish, owns the largest annual yield for a single species in China. One of the most significant factors affecting large yellow croaker culture is the diseases, especially the threat of marine white spot disease which caused by a protozoan Cryptocaryon irritans. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been demonstrated to be active against bacterium, fungi and parasites, showing their potential usefulness in aquaculture as substitutes for antibiotics. Many researches have been carried out about the AMPs concentrating on the activity resist on C. irritans, and piscidin-like of L. crocea owning widely antibacterial spectrum and strong activity against C. irritans was screened in our team. In the paper, taking advantage of the large yellow croaker hepatic comparison transcriptome in response to C. irritans at 3d post infection, seven kinds of AMPs have been excavated from the differently expressed genes, including LEAP2 like, LEAP-2A, hepcidin, hepcidin-like, piscidin-5-like, piscidin-5-like type 4 and bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI). Hepcidin, hepcidin-like, piscidin-5-like, piscidin-5-like type4 and BPI were up-regulated to protect large yellow croaker from being damaged by C. irritans infection; while LEAP2 like and LEAP-2A were down-regulated, they might be as a negative-feedback regulation factor or some other regulatory mechanisms to adjust the immune response in the process of C. irritans infection. The differential expression changes were verified with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to illustrate the reliability of the sequenced data. Hearteningly, piscidin-5-like type 4 was a novel type which was high similar to other piscidin-5-like types. Interestingly, the infection may well cause alternative splicing of LEAP-2A mRNA, which was a surprised phenomenon and finding after C. irritans infection, but more further study was needed to be conducted. Therefore, the data showed that these AMPs were

  16. Nest enlargement in leaf-cutting ants: relocated brood and fungus trigger the excavation of new chambers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Römer

    Full Text Available During colony growth, leaf-cutting ants enlarge their nests by excavating tunnels and chambers housing their fungus gardens and brood. Workers are expected to excavate new nest chambers at locations across the soil profile that offer suitable environmental conditions for brood and fungus rearing. It is an open question whether new chambers are excavated in advance, or will emerge around brood or fungus initially relocated to a suitable site in a previously-excavated tunnel. In the laboratory, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the excavation of new nest chambers in the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex lundi. Specifically, we asked whether workers relocate brood and fungus to suitable nest locations, and to what extent the relocated items trigger the excavation of a nest chamber and influence its shape. When brood and fungus were exposed to unfavorable environmental conditions, either low temperatures or low humidity, both were relocated, but ants clearly preferred to relocate the brood first. Workers relocated fungus to places containing brood, demonstrating that subsequent fungus relocation spatially follows the brood deposition. In addition, more ants aggregated at sites containing brood. When presented with a choice between two otherwise identical digging sites, but one containing brood, ants' excavation activity was higher at this site, and the shape of the excavated cavity was more rounded and chamber-like. The presence of fungus also led to the excavation of rounder shapes, with higher excavation activity at the site that also contained brood. We argue that during colony growth, workers preferentially relocate brood to suitable locations along a tunnel, and that relocated brood spatially guides fungus relocation and leads to increased digging activity around them. We suggest that nest chambers are not excavated in advance, but emerge through a self-organized process resulting from the aggregation of workers and their density

  17. Nest enlargement in leaf-cutting ants: relocated brood and fungus trigger the excavation of new chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römer, Daniela; Roces, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    During colony growth, leaf-cutting ants enlarge their nests by excavating tunnels and chambers housing their fungus gardens and brood. Workers are expected to excavate new nest chambers at locations across the soil profile that offer suitable environmental conditions for brood and fungus rearing. It is an open question whether new chambers are excavated in advance, or will emerge around brood or fungus initially relocated to a suitable site in a previously-excavated tunnel. In the laboratory, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the excavation of new nest chambers in the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex lundi. Specifically, we asked whether workers relocate brood and fungus to suitable nest locations, and to what extent the relocated items trigger the excavation of a nest chamber and influence its shape. When brood and fungus were exposed to unfavorable environmental conditions, either low temperatures or low humidity, both were relocated, but ants clearly preferred to relocate the brood first. Workers relocated fungus to places containing brood, demonstrating that subsequent fungus relocation spatially follows the brood deposition. In addition, more ants aggregated at sites containing brood. When presented with a choice between two otherwise identical digging sites, but one containing brood, ants' excavation activity was higher at this site, and the shape of the excavated cavity was more rounded and chamber-like. The presence of fungus also led to the excavation of rounder shapes, with higher excavation activity at the site that also contained brood. We argue that during colony growth, workers preferentially relocate brood to suitable locations along a tunnel, and that relocated brood spatially guides fungus relocation and leads to increased digging activity around them. We suggest that nest chambers are not excavated in advance, but emerge through a self-organized process resulting from the aggregation of workers and their density-dependent digging behavior

  18. U-PLANT GEOGRAPHIC ZONE CLEANUP PROTOTYPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROMINE, L.D.

    2006-02-01

    The U Plant geographic zone (UPZ) occupies 0.83 square kilometers on the Hanford Site Central Plateau (200 Area). It encompasses the U Plant canyon (221-U Facility), ancillary facilities that supported the canyon, soil waste sites, and underground pipelines. The UPZ cleanup initiative coordinates the cleanup of the major facilities, ancillary facilities, waste sites, and contaminated pipelines (collectively identified as ''cleanup items'') within the geographic zone. The UPZ was selected as a geographic cleanup zone prototype for resolving regulatory, technical, and stakeholder issues and demonstrating cleanup methods for several reasons: most of the area is inactive, sufficient characterization information is available to support decisions, cleanup of the high-risk waste sites will help protect the groundwater, and the zone contains a representative cross-section of the types of cleanup actions that will be required in other geographic zones. The UPZ cleanup demonstrates the first of 22 integrated zone cleanup actions on the Hanford Site Central Plateau to address threats to groundwater, the environment, and human health. The UPZ contains more than 100 individual cleanup items. Cleanup actions in the zone will be undertaken using multiple regulatory processes and decision documents. Cleanup actions will include building demolition, waste site and pipeline excavation, and the construction of multiple, large engineered barriers. In some cases, different cleanup actions may be taken at item locations that are immediately adjacent to each other. The cleanup planning and field activities for each cleanup item must be undertaken in a coordinated and cohesive manner to ensure effective execution of the UPZ cleanup initiative. The UPZ zone cleanup implementation plan (ZCIP) was developed to address the need for a fundamental integration tool for UPZ cleanup. As UPZ cleanup planning and implementation moves forward, the ZCIP is intended to be a living

  19. Probabilistic analysis of soil : Diaphragm wall friction used for value engineering of deep excavation, north/south metro Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buykx, S.M.; Delfgaauw, S.; Bosch, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The excavation of deep building pits often requires a check against failure by uplift of low permeability ground layers below excavation level. Whenever the weight of these soil layers is less than the pore-water pressure underneath, measures to resist buoyancy are to be considered. The measures

  20. A Comparative Evaluation of the Efficacy of Different Caries Excavation Techniques in reducing the Cariogenic Flora: An in vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Afrah Fatima; Yadav, Gunjan; Tripathi, Abhay Mani; Mehrotra, Mridul; Saha, Sonali; Garg, Nishita

    2016-01-01

    Caries excavation is a noninvasive technique of caries removal with maximum preservation of healthy tooth structure. To compare the efficacy of three different caries excavation techniques in reducing the count of cariogenic flora. Sixty healthy primary molars were selected from 26 healthy children with occlusal carious lesions without pulpal involvement and divided into three groups in which caries excavation was done with the help of (1) carbide bur; (2) polymer bur using slow-speed handpiece; and (3) ultrasonic tip with ultrasonic machine. Samples were collected before and after caries excavation for microbiological analysis with the help of sterile sharp spoon excavator. Samples were inoculated on blood agar plate and incubated at 37°C for 48 hours. After bacterial cultivation, the bacterial count of Streptococcus mutans was obtained. All statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13 statistical software version. Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance, Wilcoxon matched pairs test, and Z test were performed to reveal the statistical significance. The decrease in bacterial count of S. mutans before and after caries excavation was significant (p excavation. Hassan AF, Yadav G, Tripathi AM, Mehrotra M, Saha S, Garg N. A Comparative Evaluation of the Efficacy of Different Caries Excavation Techniques in reducing the Cariogenic Flora: An in vivo Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):214-217.

  1. Stability calculation method of slope reinforced by prestressed anchor in process of excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Wei, Jia; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper takes the effect of supporting structure and anchor on the slope stability of the excavation process into consideration; the stability calculation model is presented for the slope reinforced by prestressed anchor and grillage beam, and the dynamic search model of the critical slip surface also is put forward. The calculation model of the optimal stability solution of each anchor tension of the whole process is also given out, through which the real-time analysis and checking of slope stability in the process of excavation can be realized. The calculation examples indicate that the slope stability is changed with the dynamic change of the design parameters of anchor and grillage beam. So it is relatively more accurate and reasonable by using dynamic search model to determine the critical slip surface of the slope reinforced by prestressed anchor and grillage beam. Through the relationships of each anchor layout and the slope height of various stages of excavation, and the optimal stability solution of prestressed bolt tension design value in various excavation stages can be obtained. The arrangement of its prestressed anchor force reflects that the layout of the lower part of bolt and the calculation of slope reinforcement is in line with the actual. These indicate that the method is reasonable and practical.

  2. The Li(f)e of the Self: Missing Persons and Auto/Archeological Excavations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Jake

    2014-01-01

    This article describes and enacts a process of autobiographical inquiry, auto/archeology, which seeks to address problematic confluences of memory and identity in reconstructing one's historical narrative. Drawing on curriculum theory and Lacanian psychoanalysis, the author describes a process of excavation in which understandings of a prior…

  3. A new empiricism. Excavating at the start of the 21st century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolen, J.C.A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the rationale for excavation against the background of a new trend in archaeology: the renewed interest in the values of experience and empiricism in both archaeological practice and interpretation. It is argued that we should seriously reconsider the principles of

  4. Identification of purple dye from molluscs on an excavated textile by non-destructive analytical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margariti, Christina; Protopapas, Stavros; Allen, Norman

    2013-01-01

    The inherent sensitivity of textile fibres to the aggressive process of burial accounts for the rarity and poor condition of excavated textile finds retrieved. However, the information contained within these finds is important and yielding it contributes to the longevity of the finds. Therefore...

  5. Excavation-drier method of energy-peat extraction reduces long-term climatic impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvan, N.; Silvan, K.; Laine, J. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Parkano (Finland)], e-mail: niko.silvan@metla.fi; Vaisanen, S.; Soukka, R. [Lappeenranta Univ.of Techology (Finland)

    2012-11-01

    Climatic impacts of energy-peat extraction are of increasing concern due to EU emissions trading requirements. A new excavation-drier peat extraction method has been developed to reduce the climatic impact and increase the efficiency of peat extraction. To quantify and compare the soil GHG fluxes of the excavation drier and the traditional milling methods, as well as the areas from which the energy peat is planned to be extracted in the future (extraction reserve area types), soil CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O fluxes were measured during 2006-2007 at three sites in Finland. Within each site, fluxes were measured from drained extraction reserve areas, extraction fields and stockpiles of both methods and additionally from the biomass driers of the excavation-drier method. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), described at a principal level in ISO Standards 14040:2006 and 14044:2006, was used to assess the long-term (100 years) climatic impact from peatland utilisation with respect to land use and energy production chains where utilisation of coal was replaced with peat. Coal was used as a reference since in many cases peat and coal can replace each other in same power plants. According to this study, the peat extraction method used was of lesser significance than the extraction reserve area type in regards to the climatic impact. However, the excavation-drier method seems to cause a slightly reduced climatic impact as compared with the prevailing milling method. (orig.)

  6. Ways of enhancing pulp preservation by stepwise excavation--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Mikako; Fujitani, Morioki; Yamaki, Chinami; Momoi, Yasuko

    2011-02-01

    The best possible methods and materials in stepwise excavation for deep caries in permanent teeth were investigated. The review considers the questions from many aspects including clinical success, effects of reducing cariogenic bacteria, possibility of hardening softened dentin, and likelihood of generating tertiary dentin. This systematic review includes the use of data from randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials as well as from case series in which pulp exposure resulted following the treatment and removal of deep caries. Only studies of caries in permanent teeth were considered. Those involving treatment of primary teeth were excluded. An electronic search was conducted in the databases of MEDLINE and Igaku Chuo Zasshi (Japanese) from 1970 to 2008. The electronic search was supplemented by a manual search of the references lists of all the relevant studies. The electronic and manual searches of journals retrieved a total of 266 English and 130 Japanese papers. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 10 English and 3 Japanese studies were finally identified. Our research suggests that stepwise excavation is effective for pulp preservation in extremely deep caries that do not show clinical symptoms of irreversible pulpitis. Calcium hydroxide, as well as antimicrobials and polycarboxylate cement combined with tannin-fluoride preparation, is effective in reducing bacteria and promoting remineralization of the carious dentin that remained after stepwise excavation. Further clinical trials with a high level of study design should be conducted to identify the best methods of removing carious dentin using stepwise excavation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The 2010-2011 excavation season at Al Zubarah, north-west Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Tobias; al-Naimi, Faisal; Yeomans, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the results of the 2010–2011 archaeological fieldwork at the late eighteenth–twentieth-century abandoned city of al-Zubarah in north-west Qatar. The excavations in five areas inside the town, covering courtyard houses, a suq, a palatial compound, and a midden...

  8. Nonconforming Deep Focal Choroidal Excavation in a Patient With Choroidal Osteoma: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Rohan; Azad, Shorya Vardhan; Takkar, Brijesh; Sharma, Anu; Kashyap, Bibhuti

    2017-11-01

    Evolution of an osteoma may result in neurosensory detachment, deossification, and choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The authors report a rare case of choroidal osteoma with CNV associated with a deep non-conforming focal choroidal excavation. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:944-947.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Myelinated nerve fiber-associated local scleral excavation and induced axial myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Baek-Lok; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Woo, Se Joon

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the association between the distributions of local scleral excavation and myelinated nerve fibers (MNF) and to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism of axial myopia in eyes with MNF. In six eyes of six pediatric patients with MNF, the distribution of the MNF on fundus photography was compared with the regional excavation of the sclera on linear scans across the fovea and a peripapillary circular scan of spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The tilting of Bruch membrane on vertical scan of spectral domain optical coherence tomography was associated with the major distribution of MNF (κ = 1, Cohen's kappa coefficient). The area of MNF of 12 clock-hour segments and focal scleral excavation on circular scan of spectral domain optical coherence tomography were significantly correlated (P excavation was strongly associated with the distribution of the MNF. This result indicates that the retinal areas deprived of visual stimulation by the MNF contribute to the development of axial myopia through local effects on the underlying sclera in early life.

  10. Cup-shaped choroidal excavation detected by optical coherence tomography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Sachi; Yamamoto, Teiko; Kirii, Eriko; Yamashita, Hidetoshi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report a case with a cup-shaped choroidal excavation in the fovea. This condition was detected only by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and seems to be rare. This was an observational case report. A 29-year-old man had a central scotoma in his right eye. Color photography showed a reddish lesion in the fovea of the right eye, which was shown as a window defect on fluorescein angiography. Tomography with time-domain OCT showed a retinal pigment epithelial and choroidal excavation corresponding to the reddish macular lesion in the right eye. By using spectral-domain OCT, the inner segment and outer segment junctions of photoreceptors line thickening was detected by tomography, and the retinal pigment epithelium line was observed in the area of choroidal excavation by segmentation analysis. The reddish lesion on ophthalmoscope corresponded to the excavation lesion, detected in the fovea only by OCT; this indicates a new clinical availability of OCT in clinical diagnosis.

  11. Endoscopic excavation for the treatment of small esophageal subepithelial tumors originating from the muscularis propria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Li-ping; Zhu, Lin-hong; Zhou, Xian-bin; Mao, Xin-li; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic excavation for esophageal subepithelial tumors originating from the muscularis propria. Forty-five patients with esophageal subepithelial tumors originating from the muscularis propria were treated with endoscopic excavation between January 2010 and June 2012. The key steps were: (1) making several dots around the tumor; (2) incising the mucosa along with the marker dots, and then seperating the tumor from the muscularis propria by using a hook knife or an insulated-tip knife; (3) closing the artificial ulcer with clips after the tumor was removed. The mean tumor diameter was 1.1 ± 0.6 cm. Endoscopic excavation was successfully performed in 43 out of 45 cases (95.6%), the other 2 cases were ligated with nylon rope. During the procedure perforation occurred in 4 (8.9%) patients, who recovered after conservative treatment. No massive bleeding or delayed bleeding occurred. Histologic diagnosis was obtained from 43 (95.6%) patients. Pathological diagnoses of these tumors were leiomyomas (38/43) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (5/43). Endoscopic excavation is a safe and effective method for the treatment of small esophageal subepithelial tumors originating from the muscularis propria.

  12. Characteristics of H2S emission from aged refuse after excavation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dong-Sheng; Du, Yao; Fang, Yuan; Hu, Li-Fang; Fang, Cheng-Ran; Long, Yu-Yang

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S(g)) emission from landfills is a widespread problem, especially when aged refuse is excavated. H2S(g) emission from aged refuse exposed to air was investigated and the results showed that large amounts of H2S(g) can be released, especially in the first few hours after excavation, when H2S(g) concentrations in air near refuse could reach 2.00 mg m(-3). Initial exposure to air did not inhibit the emission of H2S(g), as is generally assumed, but actually promoted it. The amounts of H2S(g) emitted in the first 2 d after excavation can be very dangerous, and the risks associated with the emission of H2S(g) could decrease significantly with time. Unlike a large number of sulfide existed under anaerobic conditions, the sulfide in aged municipal solid waste can be oxidized chemically to elemental sulfur (but not sulfate) under aerobic conditions, and its conversion rate was higher than 80%. Only microorganisms can oxidize the reduced sulfur species to sulfate, and the conversion rate could reach about 50%. Using appropriate techniques to enhance these chemical and biological transformations could allow the potential health risks caused by H2S(g) after refuse excavation to be largely avoided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Content Literacy for the 21st Century: Excavation, Elevation, and Relational Cosmopolitanism in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, James S.; Baildon, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This article makes the a case for conceptualizing content literacy, especially in social studies, as inquiry-based social practices for understanding and addressing complex, multifaceted problems. Two core practices especially needed for a Web-dominated 21st century are then described--excavation and elevation. Next, these two practices are…

  14. APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT - DEMONSTRATION OF A TRIAL EXCAVATION AT THE MCCOLL SUPERFUND SITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    In June 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Region IX Superfund Program, in cooperation with EPA’s Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL), and EPA’s Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program performed a trial excavation of approximatel...

  15. Lightweight Bulldozer Attachment for Construction and Excavation on the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert; Wilkinson, R. Allen; Gallo, Christopher A.; Nick, Andrew J.; Schuler, Jason M.; King, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    A lightweight bulldozer blade prototype has been designed and built to be used as an excavation implement in conjunction with the NASA Chariot lunar mobility platform prototype. The combined system was then used in a variety of field tests in order to characterize structural loads, excavation performance and learn about the operational behavior of lunar excavation in geotechnical lunar simulants. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate the feasibility of lunar excavation for site preparation at a planned NASA lunar outpost. Once the feasibility has been determined then the technology will become available as a candidate element in the NASA Lunar Surface Systems Architecture. In addition to NASA experimental testing of the LANCE blade, NASA engineers completed analytical work on the expected draft forces using classical soil mechanics methods. The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) team utilized finite element analysis (FEA) to study the interaction between the cutting edge of the LANCE blade and the surface of soil. FEA was also used to examine various load cases and their effect on the lightweight structure of the LANCE blade. Overall it has been determined that a lunar bulldozer blade is a viable technology for lunar outpost site preparation, but further work is required to characterize the behavior in 1/6th G and actual lunar regolith in a vacuum lunar environment.

  16. Improved Concrete Cutting and Excavation Capabilities for Crater Repair, Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    required manpower, using Caterpillar SW45 and Sw60 wheel saws and Caterpillar and Volvo excavators, respectively, in 18-in.-thick PCC pavement did not...15 3.3 Husqvarna FS 6600D walk-behind saw ..................................................................... 17 3.4 Volvo ...FS 6600D. .............................................................................................................. 18 Figure 13. Volvo EW180D

  17. National advanced drilling and excavation technologies program: Summary of third meeting of interested Federal agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-12-07

    The purpose of the meeting was: (1) to discuss a proposal by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) outlining a National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Program, (2) to brief participants on events since the last meeting, and (3) to hear about drilling research activities funded by the Department of Energy. The meeting agenda is included as Attachment B.

  18. Onshore excavation at Bet Dwarka Island, in the Gulf of Kachchh, Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh

    and bullock carts might reflect a past reality. Radiocarbon dates of the lowest level of BDK-II is 2040- 1860 years B.P. Excavation of the present Dwarka suggests that around the Christian Era the sea level was lower than the present (Sankalia 1966...

  19. Quarry Creek - Excavation, Analysis and Prospect of a Kansas City Hopewell Site, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    material, other than some debitage, burned earth and hearthstone debris, was associated with the burned wood on which this date was obtained, excavation of...throughout northeastern Kansas in uplands and valleys as glacial detritus. In addition to serving as hearthstones , they were used in a variety of

  20. Indicating street vitality in excavated towns : Spatial configurative analyses applied to Pompeii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nes, A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this contribution is to show how it is possible to indicate degrees of street life and economic attractiveness in excavated towns through micro- and macro-spatial configurative analyses. The space syntax method is able to calculate the spatial configuration of built environments and

  1. Stepwise excavation may enhance pulp preservation in permanent teeth affected by dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørndal, Lars

    2011-01-01

    ARTICLE TITLE AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION: Ways of enhancing pulp preservation by stepwise excavation-a systematic review. Hayashi M, Fujitani M, Yamaki C, Momoi Y. J Dent 2011;39(2):95-107. Epub 2010 Dec 3. REVIEWER: Lars Bjørndal, DDS, PhD, Dr Odont PURPOSE/QUESTION: To determine the clinical...

  2. The Freeze-Drying of Wet and Waterlogged Materials from Archaeological Excavations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jacqui

    2004-01-01

    Large quantities of wood and leather have been found in the waterlogged layers on archaeological excavations. Centuries of burial, however, have left these materials in a very degraded and vulnerable state such that if they dry out they will fall apart. This paper discusses the physics behind the freeze-drying techniques that allow the…

  3. A low-cost approach for the documentation and monitoring of an archaeological excavation site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Dirk; Orrin, Joel; Richter, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The documentation of archaeological excavations and in particular a constant monitoring is often time-consuming and depending on humańs capabilities. Thus, remote sensing methods, which allow an objective reproduction of the current state of an excavation and additional information are of interest. Therefore, a low-cost approach was tested on an open-air excavation site for two days in September 2015. The Magdalenian excavation site of Bad Kösen-Lengefeld, Germany is one important site in a system of about 100 sites in the area of the small rivers Saale and Unstrut. The whole site and the surrounding area (200 by 200 m) was first observed by a GoPro Hero 3+ mounted on a DJI-Phantom 2 UAV. Ground control points were set-up in a regular grid covering the whole area. The achieved accuracy is 20 mm with a ground resolution of 45 mm. As a test, the GoPro Hero 3+ camera was additionally mounted on a small, extendable pole. With this second low-cost, easy to apply monitoring approach, pictures were automatically taken every second in a stop-and-go mode. In order to capture the excavation pit (7 by 4 m), two different angles were used for holding the pole, which focused on the middle and on the border of the pit. This procedure was repeated on the following day in order to document the excavation process. For the registration of the images, the already existing and measured excavation nails were used, which are equally distributed over the whole site in a 1 m grid. Thus, a high accurate registration of the images was possible (>10 mm). In order to approve the accuracy of the already derived data, the whole site was also observed by a Faro Focus 3D LS 120 laser scanner. The measurements of this device were registered by spherical targets, which were measured in the same reference system. The accuracy of the registration and the ground resolution for the image based approach for both days was about 4 mm. From these two measurements the process of the excavation was easily

  4. Archeoseismic study of damage in Roman and Medieval structures in the center of Cologne, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzen, Klaus-G.; Schreiber, Stephan; Fleischer, Claus; Reamer, Sharon K.; Wiosna, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    The causes of damage observed in archeological records or preserved monuments are often difficult to be determined unequivocally, particularly when the possibility of secondary earthquake damage exists. Such secondary damage has been previously proposed for the Roman Praetorium, the governor's palace in the center of Cologne. Ongoing excavations since 2007 revealed additional damage. The existing ground that has been uncovered and documented extends the affected area to 175 × 180 m. We present a comprehensive virtual model of the excavation area based on 200 3D laserscans together with a systematic analysis of the damage patterns and an improved model of the terrain during Roman/Medieval times including geotechnical parameters of the subsurface. Five locations with different damage patterns, including a Roman sewer, the octagonal central part of the Praetorium, a section with strongly inclined massive walls, a 13 m deep deformed well, a collapsed hypocaust, and damages in the Medieval mikveh are analyzed in detail. We use site-specific synthetic strong ground motion seismograms to test the possibility of earthquake-induced ground failures as a cause for the observed damage. This subsurface model is also used to test the possibility of hydraulically-induced damages by seepage and erosion of fine-grained material from stray sand. Heavy rainstorms can induce a direct stream of surface water through the fine sand layers to the ground water table. Simulated ground motion for assumed worst-case earthquake scenarios do not provoke slope instability at the level necessary to explain the structural damages.

  5. Analysis of tectonic structures and excavation induced fractures in the Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaum, Ch.; Bossart, P. [Federal Office of Topography swisstopo, Wabern (Switzerland); Amann, F. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Aubourg, Ch. [Laboratoire des fluides complexes et leurs reservoirs, Centre National de la Recherche Scientitfique CNRS, Universite de Pau, Pau (France)

    2011-09-15

    Excavated in the Opalinus Clay formation, the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in the Jura Mountains of NW Switzerland is an important international test site for researching argillaceous formations, particularly in the context of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. The rock laboratory is intersected by naturally formed tectonic structures, as well as artificial fractures primarily formed as a consequence of tunnel excavation and the associated stress redistribution. The description and characterisation of tectonic and artificial structures is, in many cases, of key importance for interpreting the results of the various in situ experiments conducted in the rock laboratory. Systematic small-scale mapping of the tunnel walls and floor, and adjacent niches, provides basic information about the geometry and the kinematics of the geological fractures intersecting the underground laboratory. A compilation of all tectonic structures identified is presented in this paper. The underground laboratory is located in the backlimb of the Mont Terri anticline, a NNW-vergent imbricate fault-bend fold, which is characterised by a pronounced along-strike asymmetry resulting from variously oriented inherited faults. The total shortening accommodated by this structure was estimated by mass (area) balancing to be approximately 2.1 km. The Mont Terri area is significantly affected by N- to NNE-striking normal faults of the Eo-Oligocene Rhine-Bresse transfer zone and by ENE-striking faults of Late Variscan age. Depending on their orientation with respect to the transport direction towards the NNW, these faults served as oblique and frontal ramps during the subsequent Jura thrusting in the Late Miocene. The various fault systems identified in the underground rock laboratory clearly correlate with the regional-scale structures. In addition to classical structural analysis, the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility was measured to determine the magnetic fabric and strain

  6. Endoscopic muscularis excavation for subepithelial tumors of the esophagogastric junction originating from the muscularis propria layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Ye, Li-ping; Zhu, Lin-hong; Zhou, Xian-bin; Mao, Xin-li; Ding, Jin-xiu

    2013-05-01

    Because of complicating anatomic factors, endoscopic submucosal dissection is seldom performed in subepithelial tumors of the esophagogastric junction originating from the muscularis propria layer. This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopic muscularis excavation for treating subepithelial tumors of the esophagogastric junction originating from the muscularis propria layer. Between December 2008 and December 2011, 68 patients with subepithelial tumors of the esophagogastric junction originating from the muscularis propria layer were treated with endoscopic muscularis excavation. Key steps of the procedure included the following: (1) injecting a mixture solution into the submucosal layer after making several dots around the tumor; (2) making a cross incision of the overlying mucosa, and excavating the tumor from the muscularis propria layer; (3) closing the artificial ulcer with clips after tumor removal. The mean tumor size was 16.2 mm (range 7-35 mm). Endoscopic muscularis excavation was successfully performed in 65 out of 68 cases (success rate 95.6 %). Pathological diagnosis of these tumors included leiomyoma (39 out of 68) and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (29 out of 68). Perforation occurred in seven patients (10.3 %). No massive bleeding or delayed bleeding occurred. The median follow-up period after the procedure was 23 months (range 6-42 months). No residual or recurrent tumor was detected and no stricture occurred in patients during the follow-up period. Endoscopic muscularis excavation is a safe, effective and feasible procedure for providing accurate histopathologic evaluation and curative treatment for subepithelial tumors of the esophagogastric junction originating from the muscularis propria layer.

  7. Endoscopic excavation for gastric heterotopic pancreas: an analysis of 42 cases from a tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Huang, Qin; Zhu, Lin-hong; Zhou, Xian-bin; Ye, Li-ping; Mao, Xin-li

    2014-09-01

    Because of the difficulty associated with making an accurate diagnosis of gastric heterotopic pancreas (HP) before surgery, surgical resection is usually performed in suspected cases. However, this is an invasive procedure and prone to certain surgical complications. This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopic excavation for gastric HP, as well as the value of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in diagnosing gastric HP. Between January 2007 and January 2013, 42 consecutive patients with gastric HP were enrolled in this retrospective study. Key steps: (1) Injection of a solution (100 ml saline + 2 ml indigo carmine + 1 ml epinephrine) into the submucosal layer after making several dots around the lesion; (2) Incision of the mucosa outside the marker dots with a needle-knife, and then circumferential excavation until complete resection of the lesion; (3) Closure of the artificial ulcer with several clips after tumor removal. In this study, 18 cases (42.9%) were suspected as gastric HP (assessed by two experienced endoscopists before endoscopic excavation), 8 (19.0%) were suspected as gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 7 (16.7%) as gastric polyp, and the remaining 9 cases (21.4%) were still unknown. The mean procedure duration was 28.6 min. En bloc resection by endoscopic excavation was achieved in 40 cases (95.2%), and no massive bleeding, delayed bleeding, perforation, or other severe complication occurred in these patients. Among the 42 lesions, a tube echo could be detected in 11 cases by EUS. Those 11 cases were diagnosed as gastric HP by histopathology. Endoscopic excavation appears to be a safe and feasible procedure for accurate histopathologic evaluation and curative treatment in gastric HP. Use of EUS has some value in the diagnosis of gastric HP before the procedure

  8. Archaeological Excavation Report for Proposed Well 199-K-131 in Support of the 100-KR-4 Pump-and-Treat Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woody, Dave M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.

    2004-06-22

    An archaeological excavation was conducted at the site of proposed groundwater monitoring well 199-K-131 in support of the 100-KR-4 Pump-and-Treat Project between June 2 and 3, 2004. Excavations confirmed that there were no intact cultural deposits at the proposed well location. This report was prepared to document the findings of the test excavation.

  9. Gas and water flow in an excavation-induced fracture network around an underground drift: A case study for a radioactive waste repository in clay rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Vaissière, Rémi; Armand, Gilles; Talandier, Jean

    2015-02-01

    The Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) surrounding a drift, and in particular its evolution, is being studied for the performance assessment of a radioactive waste underground repository. A specific experiment (called CDZ) was designed and implemented in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in France to investigate the EDZ. This experiment is dedicated to study the evolution of the EDZ hydrogeological properties (conductivity and specific storage) of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone under mechanical compression and artificial hydration. Firstly, a loading cycle applied on a drift wall was performed to simulate the compression effect from bentonite swelling in a repository drift (bentonite is a clay material to be used to seal drifts and shafts for repository closure purpose). Gas tests (permeability tests with nitrogen and tracer tests with helium) were conducted during the first phase of the experiment. The results showed that the fracture network within the EDZ was initially interconnected and opened for gas flow (particularly along the drift) and then progressively closed with the increasing mechanical stress applied on the drift wall. Moreover, the evolution of the EDZ after unloading indicated a self-sealing process. Secondly, the remaining fracture network was resaturated to demonstrate the ability to self-seal of the COx claystone without mechanical loading by conducting from 11 to 15 repetitive hydraulic tests with monitoring of the hydraulic parameters. During this hydration process, the EDZ effective transmissivity dropped due to the swelling of the clay materials near the fracture network. The hydraulic conductivity evolution was relatively fast during the first few days. Low conductivities ranging at 10-10 m/s were observed after four months. Conversely, the specific storage showed an erratic evolution during the first phase of hydration (up to 60 days). Some uncertainty remains on this parameter due to volumetric strain during the

  10. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) Phase 2 and Smart Autonomous Sand-Swimming Excavator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) Phase 2 is an excavation robot for mining regolith on a planet like Mars. The robot is programmed using the Robotic Operating System (ROS) and it also uses a physical simulation program called Gazebo. This internship focused on various functions of the program in order to make it a more professional and efficient robot. During the internship another project called the Smart Autonomous Sand-Swimming Excavator was worked on. This is a robot that is designed to dig through sand and extract sample material. The intern worked on programming the Sand-Swimming robot, and designing the electrical system to power and control the robot.

  11. Application of supporting structure combining with basement slab in soft soil excavations engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rencheng; Liu, Le

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, based on the case of a soft soil excavations project in Zhongshan and the field measured data, the ABAQUS, a finite element software for engineering simulation, analyses the system which combines steel cement-soil pile and basement plate. Moreover it can simulate the deformation results and get the supporting stress model. The results show that the supporting effect of this system is remarkable. This simplified model calculation results are conservative. But there exists the problem of varying depth of excavations. As a result, the stress characteristics and design methods of the proposed scheme are less studied and need further research and discussion. The analysis method and the design scheme can provide useful reference for similar projects.

  12. Remediating Contaminant Plumes in Groundwater with Shallow Excavations Containing Coarse Reactive Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Paul F

    2018-02-01

    A groundwater flow and mass transport model tested the capability of shallow excavations filled with coarse, reactive media to remediate a hypothetical unconfined aquifer with a maximum saturated thickness of 5 m. Modeled as contaminant sinks, the rectangular excavations were 10 m downgradient of an initial contaminant plume originating from a source at the top of the aquifer. The initial plume was approximately 259 m long, 23 m wide, and 5 m thick, with a downgradient tip located approximately 100 m upgradient of the site boundary. The smallest trench capable of preventing offsite migration was 11 m long (measured perpendicular to groundwater flow), 4 m wide (measured parallel to groundwater flow), and 3 m deep. Results of this study suggest that shallow trenches filled with coarse filter media that partially penetrate unconfined aquifers may be a viable alternative for remediating contaminated groundwater at some sites.

  13. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  14. The Excavation of a Monastic Fishing Establishment at Oldstead Grange, North Yorkshire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kemp (with a pottery report by Wendy Sherlock

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Excavations directed by the writer in 1982-3 for the University of York Archaeological Society uncovered the foundations of a small structure on the shores of a fishpond that belonged to Byland Abbey in the 14th century. The site's location, combined with a number of associated lead net weights, suggest that it was connected with organised, large-scale, fish farming.

  15. Excavation and aggregation as organizing factors in de novo construction by mound-building termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ben; Bardunias, Paul; Turner, J Scott; Nagpal, Radhika; Werfel, Justin

    2017-06-14

    Termites construct complex mounds that are orders of magnitude larger than any individual and fulfil a variety of functional roles. Yet the processes through which these mounds are built, and by which the insects organize their efforts, remain poorly understood. The traditional understanding focuses on stigmergy, a form of indirect communication in which actions that change the environment provide cues that influence future work. Termite construction has long been thought to be organized via a putative 'cement pheromone': a chemical added to deposited soil that stimulates further deposition in the same area, thus creating a positive feedback loop whereby coherent structures are built up. To investigate the detailed mechanisms and behaviours through which termites self-organize the early stages of mound construction, we tracked the motion and behaviour of major workers from two Macrotermes species in experimental arenas. Rather than a construction process focused on accumulation of depositions, as models based on cement pheromone would suggest, our results indicated that the primary organizing mechanisms were based on excavation. Digging activity was focused on a small number of excavation sites, which in turn provided templates for soil deposition. This behaviour was mediated by a mechanism of aggregation, with termites being more likely to join in the work at an excavation site as the number of termites presently working at that site increased. Statistical analyses showed that this aggregation mechanism was a response to active digging, distinct from and unrelated to putative chemical cues that stimulate deposition. Agent-based simulations quantitatively supported the interpretation that the early stage of de novo construction is primarily organized by excavation and aggregation activity rather than by stigmergic deposition. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-05-17

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium.

  17. The role of wood hardness in limiting nest site selection in avian cavity excavators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Teresa J; Vierling, Kerri T; Johnson, Timothy R; Fischer, Philip C

    2015-06-01

    Woodpeckers and other primary cavity excavators (PCEs) are important worldwide for excavating cavities in trees, and a large number of studies have examined their nesting preferences. However, quantitative measures of wood hardness have been omitted from most studies, and ecologists have focused on the effects of external tree- and habitat-level features on nesting. Moreover, information is lacking on the role of wood hardness in limiting nesting opportunities for this important guild. Here, we used an information theoretic approach to examine the role of wood hardness in multi-scale nest site selection and in limiting nesting opportunities for six species of North American PCEs. We found that interior wood hardness at nests (n = 259) differed from that at random sites, and all six species of PCE had nests with significantly softer interior wood than random trees (F1,517 = 106.15, P trees within territories and in the selection of nest locations on trees. Moreover, regardless of hypothesized excavation abilities, all the species in our study appeared constrained by interior wood hardness, and only 4-14% of random sites were actually suitable for nesting. Our findings suggest that past studies that did not measure wood hardness counted many sites as available to PCEs when they were actually unsuitable, potentially biasing results. Moreover, by not accounting for nest site limitations in PCEs, managers may overestimate the amount of suitable habitat. We therefore urge ecologists to incorporate quantitative measures of wood hardness into PCE nest site selection studies, and to consider the limitations faced by avian cavity excavators in forest management decisions.

  18. Remediation of PCB contaminated soils in the Canadian Arctic: excavation and surface PRB technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinovich, Indra; Rutter, Allison; Poland, John S; Cairns, Graham; Rowe, R Kerry

    2008-12-15

    The site BAF-5 is located on the summit of Resolution Island, Nunavut, just southeast of Baffin Island at 61 degrees 35'N and 60 degrees 40'W. The site was part of a North American military defense system established in the 1950s that became heavily contaminated with PCBs during and subsequent, its operational years. Remediation through excavation of the PCB contaminated soil at Resolution Island began in 1999 and at its completion in 2006 approximately 5 tonnes of pure PCBs in approximately 20,000 m3 of soil were remediated. Remediation strategies were based on both quantity of soil and level of contamination in the soil. Excavation removed 96% of the PCB contaminated soil on site. In 2003, a surface funnel-and-gate permeable reactive barrier was design and constructed to treat the remaining contamination left in rock crevices and inaccessible areas of the site. Excavation had destabilized contaminated soil in the area, enabling contaminant migration through erosion and runoff pathways. The barrier was designed to maximize sedimentation through settling ponds. This bulk removal enabled the treatment of highly contaminated fines and water through a permeable gate. The increased sediment loading during excavation required both modifications to the funnel and a shift to a more permeable, granular system. Granulated activated charcoal was chosen for its ability to both act as a particle retention filter and adsorptive filter. The reduction in mass of PCB and volume of soils trapped by the funnel of the barrier indicate that soils are re-stabilizing. In 2007, nonwoven geotextiles were re-introduced back into the filtration system as fine filtering could be achieved without clogging. Monitoring sites downstream indicate that the barrier system is effective. This paper describes the field progress of PCB remediation at Resolution Island.

  19. The 1978 and 1979 Excavations at Strawberry Island in the McNary Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    paper for nearly two years. Lorna 4 . J vi Elliott and Dolores Lehn carried the report typing through the final draft stage. Gail Rowland...of pit feature structure is suggested, and the model’s potential application to excavation and inter - pretation of Plateau pit houses is discussed...communal semisubterranean structures, semisubterranean menstrual huts, hide-smoking pits, and lithic heat treatment pits. The prob- lem is that

  20. Tarrant Launceston: Survey and excavation of a long barrow with secondary burial at Race Down.

    OpenAIRE

    Manley, H.P.; Evans, Damian; Hewitt, Iain; Phurphy, P.; Russell, Miles; Welham, Kate

    2017-01-01

    In March 2003, it was noted that rabbit burrowing had uncovered possible human remains close to the centre of Race Down long barrow. In order to determine whether the bones were human and/or of forensic interest, the School of Conservation Sciences (now the Department of Archaeology, Anthropology & Forensic Science), Bournemouth University, carried out a limited investigation on behalf of Dorset Police and the landowner, Defence Estates. The spoil heap of the rabbit burrow was excavated and t...

  1. Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Geometry Documentation and Construction Management of Highway Tunnels during Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Gikas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered.

  2. MARSAME Radiological Release Report for Archaeological Artifacts Excavated from Area L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gillis, Jessica Mcdonnel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-03

    In 1991 Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL’s) cultural resources team excavated archaeological site LA 4618 located at Technical Area 54, within Material Disposal Area L (MDA L). MDA L received non-radioactive chemical waste from the early 1960s until 1985. Further development of the MDA required excavation of several cultural sites under National Historic Preservation Act requirements; artifacts from these sites have been subsequently stored at LANL. The LANL cultural resources group would now like to release these artifacts to the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe for curation. The history of disposal at Area L suggests that the artifact pool is unlikely to be chemically contaminated and LANL staff washed each artifact at least once following excavation. Thus, it is unlikely that the artifacts present a chemical hazard. LANL’s Environmental Stewardship group (EPC-ES) has evaluated the radiological survey results for the Area L artifact pool and found that the items described in this report meet the criteria for unrestricted radiological release under Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment and are candidates for release without restriction from LANL control. This conclusion is based on the known history of MDA L and on radiation survey data.

  3. New knowledge-based genetic algorithm for excavator boom structural optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Haiyan; Lin, Shuwen

    2014-03-01

    Due to the insufficiency of utilizing knowledge to guide the complex optimal searching, existing genetic algorithms fail to effectively solve excavator boom structural optimization problem. To improve the optimization efficiency and quality, a new knowledge-based real-coded genetic algorithm is proposed. A dual evolution mechanism combining knowledge evolution with genetic algorithm is established to extract, handle and utilize the shallow and deep implicit constraint knowledge to guide the optimal searching of genetic algorithm circularly. Based on this dual evolution mechanism, knowledge evolution and population evolution can be connected by knowledge influence operators to improve the configurability of knowledge and genetic operators. Then, the new knowledge-based selection operator, crossover operator and mutation operator are proposed to integrate the optimal process knowledge and domain culture to guide the excavator boom structural optimization. Eight kinds of testing algorithms, which include different genetic operators, are taken as examples to solve the structural optimization of a medium-sized excavator boom. By comparing the results of optimization, it is shown that the algorithm including all the new knowledge-based genetic operators can more remarkably improve the evolutionary rate and searching ability than other testing algorithms, which demonstrates the effectiveness of knowledge for guiding optimal searching. The proposed knowledge-based genetic algorithm by combining multi-level knowledge evolution with numerical optimization provides a new effective method for solving the complex engineering optimization problem.

  4. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection.

  5. Three-dimensional laser scanning for geometry documentation and construction management of highway tunnels during excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered.

  6. Theoretical Analysis on the Effect of Tunnel Excavation on Building strip foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoyan; Gu, Shuancheng; Huang, Rongbin

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, according to the characteristics of the ground settlement troughs curves, the influence of tunnel excavation on the effect of strip foundation was studied by inverse analysis firstly. The differential equation of the synergistic effect of the strip foundation and foundation under the tunnel excavation was established by using the equilibrium condition of the micro-element physical force. Then, the conceptual definite initial parameter method was used to solve the corresponding homogeneous equation. According to the plane section assumption, combined with the basic theory of material mechanics, considering the differential characteristic of hyperbolic trigonometric function, and using matlabmathmatica software, the theoretical calculation expression of displacement and internal force which is about the tunnel passes through the strip foundation was obtained. Finally, combined with engineering case analysis, changes of the relative position between the tunnel and the foundation, the influences of the main parameters on the foundation effect were studied. The results show that: The influence scope of the tunnel on the foundation is [-0.5 ~ 1.5] times of the foundation length, and when the tunnel center at the end of the foundation, there exists the maximum settlement. The parameters about the soil loss rate, the excavation section and the buried depth of the tunnel have great influence on the foundation effect. The change of foundation height has a great influence on its internal force.

  7. Morphologic features of focal choroidal excavation on spectral domain optical coherence tomography with simultaneous angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinojima, Ari; Kawamura, Akiyuki; Mori, Ryusaburo; Yuzawa, Mitsuko

    2014-07-01

    To reveal clinically relevant morphologic findings in patients with focal choroidal excavation (FCE) using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. Thirty-one FCE lesions in 29 eyes of 26 patients (21 men, 23 eyes; 5 women, 6 eyes) were studies. In all 26 patients, color fundus photographs were obtained, and fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography with simultaneous enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography were performed. Twenty-five eyes also underwent angiographic video recording. Focal choroidal excavation was detected in eyes with typical age-related macular degeneration, central serous chorioretinopathy, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy, and idiopathic choroidal neovascularization, whereas in 8 eyes, FCE was considered to be idiopathic. Morphologically, FCE lesions were classified into 3 types: cone-shaped, bowl-shaped, and mixed. The cone-shaped type was detected in 17 lesions, bowl-shaped in 8, and mixed in 6, on optical coherence tomography findings. All bowl-shaped and mixed types had retinal pigment epithelial irregularities within the FCE lesion. The cone-shaped type was not observed in eyes with typical age-related macular degeneration. Morphologically, FCE lesions were classified into cone-shaped, bowl-shaped, and mixed types, based on optical coherence tomography findings. Focal choroidal excavation formation may be associated in part with chorioretinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and central serous chorioretinopathy, whereas some eyes are considered to have idiopathic FCE.

  8. Focal choroidal excavation: a preliminary interpretation based on clinic and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang-Hui; Lin, Bing; Sun, Xin-Quan; He, Zi-Fang; Li, Ji-Rong; Zhou, Rong; Liu, Xiao-Ling

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical and imaging characteristics associated with focal choroidal excavation (FCE), analyze the possible complication, and interpret its probable etiopathogenesis. Retrospective descriptive case series of 37 eyes of 32 patients with FCE. Findings of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and clinical features were analyzed. All patients were Chinese. Five patients (15.6%) were bilaterally involved. Patients' ages ranged from 7 to 66y. Refractive error ranged between +2.0 D and -11.0 D. Mean best-corrected visual acuity was 0.6 (range, 0.1 to 1.2). Fundus examinations exhibited mild-moderate localized pigmentary disturbances in the corresponding area of 17 eyes. Fluorescein angiography performed in 18 patients showed varying degrees of hyperfluorescence and hypofluorescence related to a range of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) alterations. Indocyanine green angiography performed in 7 patients showed hypofluorescence at the excavation. SD-OCT demonstrated choroidal excavation in all 37 eyes. Twenty-nine eyes showed a single lesion of FCE, and three eyes showed 2-3 separated lesions. Fifteen eyes showed separation between the photoreceptor tips and RPE consistent with nonconforming FCE. Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC, n=1) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV, n=1) developed during follow-up. FCE could be interpreted as congenital focal choroidal dysplasia involving the RPE, choriocapillaris, and photoreceptor associated with the faulty anatomy. The abnormal anatomy of FCE was similar to anatomy at risk of CSC and CNV.

  9. Microbiological Evaluation of Ozone on Dentinal Lesions in Young Permanent Molars using the Stepwise Excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safwat, Osama; Elkateb, Mona; Dowidar, Karin; Salam, Hala Abdel; El Meligy, Omar

    2017-09-22

    To assess the microbial effect of ozone gas on dentinal lesions in young permanent molars using the stepwise excavation. An experimental, controlled clinical trial was performed. The sample included 80 immature first permanent molars, showing deep occlusal carious cavities that were indicated for stepwise excavation. Following first step of dentin excavation, the sample was divided into test (ozone gas) and control (calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) base material) groups. One half of the cases in each group were evaluated for microbiological changes after 6 months, and the other half after 12 months. Mutans streptococci (MS), Lactobacilli, and Candida counts were significantly reduced immediately after ozone application in the test group (P ≤0.05). At the final assessment period, MS and Lactobacilli were significantly reduced in the test group (P ≤0.05). Meanwhile, the Candida counts were significantly reduced only in the test group of the 6 and 12 month-cases (P ≤0.05). Regarding the control group, the significant reduction in microbial count was observed with MS after 6 and 12 months (P ≤0.05). No significant differences were observed between test and control groups at different evaluation periods (P >0.05). Ozone gas had a significant antimicrobial effect in deep class I carious lesions.

  10. Optimization design of foundation excavation for Xiluodu super-high arch dam in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixiang Fan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available With better understanding of the quality and physico-mechanical properties of rocks of dam foundation, and the physico-mechanical properties and structure design of arch dam in association with the foundation excavation of Xiluodu arch dam, the excavation optimization design was proposed for the foundation surface on the basis of feasibility study. Common analysis and numerical analysis results demonstrated the feasibility of using the weakly weathered rocks III1 and III2 as the foundation surface of super-high arch dam. In view of changes in the geological conditions at the dam foundation along the riverbed direction, the design of extending foundation surface excavation area and using consolidating grouting and optimizing structure of dam bottom was introduced, allowing for harmonization of the arch dam and foundation. Three-dimensional (3D geomechanics model test and finite element analysis results indicated that the dam body and foundation have good overload stability and high bearing capacity. The monitoring data showed that the behaviors of dam and foundation correspond with the designed patterns in the construction period and the initial operation period.

  11. Clinical Evaluation of Ozone on Dentinal Lesions in Young Permanent Molars using the Stepwise Excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safwat, Osama; Elkateb, Mona; Dowidar, Karin; El Meligy, Omar

    To evaluate the clinical changes in dentin of deep carious lesions in young permanent molars, following ozone application with and without the use of a remineralizing solution, using the stepwise excavation. The sample included 162 first permanent immature molars, showing deep occlusal carious cavities that were indicated for indirect pulp capping. Teeth were divided into 2 main groups according to the method of ozone treatment. Each group was further subdivided equally into test and control subgroups. Following caries excavation, color, consistency and DIAGNOdent assessments of dentin were evaluated after 6 and 12 months. Regarding dentin color and consistency, no significant differences were observed following ozone application, with and without a remineralizing solution. There were no significant differences between ozone treatment, and calcium hydroxide during the different evaluation periods, except in group I cases after 6 months, concerning the dentin color. The DIAGNOdent values were significantly reduced following ozone application, with or without a remineralizing solution, as well as between test and control cases in group I after 6 months. Ozone application through the stepwise excavation had no significant effect on dentin color and consistency in young permanent molars. DIAGNOdent was unreliable in monitoring caries activity.

  12. Biofuel or excavation? - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of soil remediation options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suer, Pascal; Andersson-Skoeld, Yvonne [Swedish Geotechnical Institute, 58193 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2011-02-15

    The environmental consequences of soil remediation through biofuel or through dig-and-dump were compared using life cycle assessment (LCA). Willow (Salix viminalis) was actually grown in-situ on a discontinued oil depot, as a phytoremediation treatment. These data were used for the biofuel remediation, while excavation-and-refill data were estimated from experience. The biofuel remediation had great environmental advantages compared to the ex situ excavation remediation. With the ReCiPe impact assessment method, which included biodiversity, the net environmental effect was even positive, in spite of the fact that the wood harvest was not utilised for biofuel production, but left on the contaminated site. Impact from the Salix viminalis cultivation was mainly through land use for the short rotation coppice, and through journeys of control personnel. The latter may be reduced when familiarity with biofuel as a soil treatment method increases. The excavation-and-refill remediation was dominated by the landfill and the transport of contaminated soil and backfill. (author)

  13. Clinical course of focal choroidal excavation in Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikawa Y

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yuko Nishikawa,1–3,* Kaoru Fujinami,1,2,4,5,* Ken Watanabe,1,2 Toru Noda,1,2 Kazushige Tsunoda,1,2 Kunihiko Akiyama1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, National Hospital Organization, Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan; 2Laboratory of Visual Physiology, National Institute of Sensory Organs, National Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki, Osaka, Japan; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 5UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: We describe focal choroidal excavation (FCE in a case of Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada (VKH disease and compare the findings with different chorioretinal conditions. A 55-year-old man was diagnosed with VKH based on panuveitis and exudative retinal detachments. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated a dome-shaped protrusion with a nonconforming pattern at the fovea, which had been detected as a conforming pattern 1 year before the onset. The FCE pattern returned into a conforming pattern following corticosteroid therapy. These findings suggest that the natively existent FCE could be affected by pathophysiological changes of VKH as well as other chorioretinal conditions.Keywords: choroidal excavation, focal choroidal excavation, Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada disease, optical coherence tomography

  14. Our experience with the full-profile excavation of exploratory for tunnel pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edita Lazarová

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The economic development of Slovakia places an emphasis on increasing the quality of transport infrastructure, which requires its modernization residing in building the transport network of international level and improving its efficiency and travel speed. The development of transport in Slovakia has been passing major changes related to the economic and political processes in the country. Regarding the geographical character of the land, the tunnel excavation is an inseparable feature of the road communications modernization. Approximately thirty kilometres of highway tunnels are planned for construction in Slovakia until 2020 and road tunnels should be constructed as well. The first modern highway tunnel Branisko, the longest one (4975 m in Slovakia was put into operation in 2003 with a preceding excavation of the Branisko exploratory gallery in the course of designed tunnel pipe. The tunnelling works on the exploratory gallery of Višňové tunnel started in January 1999 and finished in the late summer of 2002 due to unfavorable geological conditions. The excavation of a final profile of the Višňové tunnel is planned for 2007. The Horelica tunnel (605 m near Čadca was finished and put into operation in 2004. The tunnels Lučivná (250 m, Bôrik (999 m and Sitina (1440 m are in construction at present.

  15. Archaeological Geophysics, Excavation, and Ethnographic Approaches Toward a Deeper Understanding of an Eighteenth Century Wichita Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlock, Michael Don

    This research exemplifies a multidirectional approach to an archaeological interpretation of an eighteenth century Wichita village and fortification located on the Red River bordering Oklahoma and Texas. A battle that is believed to have occurred at the Longest site (34JF1) in 1759 between Spanish colonials and a confederation of Native Americans led to several Spanish primary documents describing the people that lived there, the fortification and surrounding village, and of course the battle itself. Investigation of the Longest site (34JF1) in Oklahoma presents a remarkable opportunity to combine extensive historical research, archaeological prospecting using geophysics, and traditional excavation techniques in order to gain a more complete understanding of this important archaeological site. The fortification at the Longest site, as well as possible associated structures and cultural features, were relocated using magnetometry, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistivity methods. Then, previously translated historical documents provided valuable insights in the interpretation of the geophysical data. Finally, archaeological excavation permitted validation of the interpretations and identification of features described in the historical accounts. As interpreted in the geophysical data and excavations, the construction of the fortification and associated interior subterranean rooms suggests that it is indeed the fortification involved in the altercation between the Taovayas and the Spanish in 1759.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Soil Desiccation for Vadose Zone Remediation: Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Andy L.; Oostrom, Mart; Bacon, Diana H.

    2008-02-04

    Apart from source excavation, the options available for the remediation of vadose zone metal and radionuclide contaminants beyond the practical excavation depth (0 to 15 m) are quite limited. Of the available technologies, very few are applicable to the deep vadose zone with the top-ranked candidate being soil desiccation. An expert panel review of the work on infiltration control and supplemental technologies identified a number of knowledge gaps that would need to be overcome before soil desiccation could be deployed. The report documents some of the research conducted in the last year to fill these knowledge gaps. This work included 1) performing intermediate-scale laboratory flow cell experiments to demonstrate the desiccation process, 2) implementing a scalable version of Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases–Water-Air-Energy (STOMP-WAE), and 3) performing numerical experiments to identify the factors controlling the performance of a desiccation system.

  17. FOCAL CHOROIDAL EXCAVATION AND ITS ASSOCIATION WITH PACHYCHOROID SPECTRUM DISORDERS: A Review of the Literature and Multimodal Imaging Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyewon; Byeon, Suk Ho; Freund, K Bailey

    2017-02-01

    To review the literature regarding focal choroidal excavation and show its association with pachychoroid features through case examples. The clinical manifestations of focal choroidal excavation are illustrated with various imaging modalities inclusive of fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), enhanced depth imaging OCT, and swept-source OCT. Diffuse or focal areas of choroidal thickening with dilated choroidal vessels (pachyvessels) on OCT and choroidal hyperpermeability on indocyanine green angiography are present in many eyes with focal choroidal excavation. Clinical and imaging features of associated comorbidities including central serous chorioretinopathy and choroidal neovascularization are described. Focal choroidal excavation appears to be a manifestation of pachychoroid spectrum disease associated with choroidal thickening and pachyvessels on structural OCT and choroidal hyperpermeability on indocyanine green angiography.

  18. Measuring Women's Influence on Roman Military Life: using GIS on published excavation reports from the German frontier

    OpenAIRE

    Penelope Allison

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines the approaches used in the Australian Research Council funded project, 'Engendering Roman Spaces', and summarises some of the results. The project investigates the distribution of artefacts and artefact assemblages and the presence, activities and status of women and children within Roman military forts. It uses data from published excavation reports of 1st- and 2nd-century AD Roman military sites on the German frontier. It includes excavation reports from throughout the...

  19. Assessment of the distortions caused by a pipe and an excavation in the electric and electromagnetic responses of a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Hilda Patricia; Robledo, Fabiana Elizabeth; Osella, Ana María; de la Vega, Matías

    2012-02-01

    Here, we present the results of a geophysical survey performed to characterize a hydrocarbon contamination plume, arising from a puncture in a master crude oil pipe in Argentina. This pipe was buried in an inhabited suburban yard with flat topography. At the moment of the event a stretch of the duct was uncovered and the leaked oil flooded the terrain up to several meters around the puncture. The contamination was produced by infiltration from the surface and also by flowing through the inner layers. The first steps in the treatment of the spill were to pump the oil, excavate the sector nearby the puncture and repair the pipe. Around one year later, we preformed the geophysical prospecting, which goal was to determine the extent of the contaminant plume, required for selecting adequate remediation strategies. We combined dual-coil, frequency domain electromagnetic induction surveys and 2D dipole-dipole geoelectrical profiling. Besides, we performed Wenner soundings at several positions on the walls of the excavation, where contaminated and clean sediments were exposed. From the 1D inversion of the electromagnetic data, 2D inversion of the dipole-dipole data, and Wenner data, we found that, in general, the contamination decreased the resistivity of the affected subsoil volumes. However, three of the geoelectrical profiles exhibited localized, very resistive anomalies, which origin was not clear. They did not seem to be associated to the presence of high concentrations of poorly or non-degraded hydrocarbon, since two of these profiles crossed the more contaminated area, but the other was located quite further away. As an attempt to identify the cause of these anomalies, we carried out a 3D numerical simulation of the effects of the pipe and the excavation on the 2D dipole-dipole images. From this study, we could effectively determine that they were mainly distortions generated by those structures. This allowed for providing a proper interpretation of the images of

  20. Glaucomatous damage of the macula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald C; Raza, Ali S; de Moraes, Carlos Gustavo V; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that early glaucomatous damage involves the macula. The anatomical basis of this damage can be studied using frequency domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT), by which the local thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and local retinal ganglion cell plus inner plexiform (RGC+) layer can be measured. Based upon averaged fdOCT results from healthy controls and patients, we show that: 1. For healthy controls, the average RGC+ layer thickness closely matches human histological data; 2. For glaucoma patients and suspects, the average RGC+ layer shows greater glaucomatous thinning in the inferior retina (superior visual field (VF)); and 3. The central test points of the 6° VF grid (24-2 test pattern) miss the region of greatest RGC+ thinning. Based upon fdOCT results from individual patients, we have learned that: 1. Local RGC+ loss is associated with local VF sensitivity loss as long as the displacement of RGCs from the foveal center is taken into consideration; and 2. Macular damage is typically arcuate in nature and often associated with local RNFL thinning in a narrow region of the disc, which we call the macular vulnerability zone (MVZ). According to our schematic model of macular damage, most of the inferior region of the macula projects to the MVZ, which is located largely in the inferior quadrant of the disc, a region that is particularly susceptible to glaucomatous damage. A small (cecocentral) region of the inferior macula, and all of the superior macula (inferior VF), project to the temporal quadrant, a region that is less susceptible to damage. The overall message is clear; clinicians need to be aware that glaucomatous damage to the macula is common, can occur early in the disease, and can be missed and/or underestimated with standard VF tests that use a 6° grid, such as the 24-2 VF test. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. CASTLE3D - A Computer Aided System for Labelling Archaeological Excavations in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshiar, H.; Borrmann, D.; Elseberg, J.; Nüchter, A.; Näth, F.; Winkler, S.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation of archaeological excavation sites with conventional methods and tools such as hand drawings, measuring tape and archaeological notes is time consuming. This process is prone to human errors and the quality of the documentation depends on the qualification of the archaeologist on site. Use of modern technology and methods in 3D surveying and 3D robotics facilitate and improve this process. Computer-aided systems and databases improve the documentation quality and increase the speed of data acquisition. 3D laser scanning is the state of the art in modelling archaeological excavation sites, historical sites and even entire cities or landscapes. Modern laser scanners are capable of data acquisition of up to 1 million points per second. This provides a very detailed 3D point cloud of the environment. 3D point clouds and 3D models of an excavation site provide a better representation of the environment for the archaeologist and for documentation. The point cloud can be used both for further studies on the excavation and for the presentation of results. This paper introduces a Computer aided system for labelling archaeological excavations in 3D (CASTLE3D). Consisting of a set of tools for recording and georeferencing the 3D data from an excavation site, CASTLE3D is a novel documentation approach in industrial archaeology. It provides a 2D and 3D visualisation of the data and an easy-to-use interface that enables the archaeologist to select regions of interest and to interact with the data in both representations. The 2D visualisation and a 3D orthogonal view of the data provide cuts of the environment that resemble the traditional hand drawings. The 3D perspective view gives a realistic view of the environment. CASTLE3D is designed as an easy-to-use on-site semantic mapping tool for archaeologists. Each project contains a predefined set of semantic information that can be used to label findings in the data. Multiple regions of interest can be joined under

  2. Evaluation of focal choroidal excavation in the macula using swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, F P M; Loh, B K; Cheung, C M G; Lim, L S; Chan, C M; Wong, D W K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate imaging findings of patients with focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in the macula using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and correlate it clinically. Methods Prospective observational case series. Eleven consecutive patients (12 eyes) with FCE were described. Data on demographics and clinical presentation were collected and imaging findings (including color photography, fundus autofluorescence imaging, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and SS-OCT) were analyzed. Results The primary diagnosis was epiretinal membrane (two eyes), choroidal neovascularization (one eye), polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (three eyes), central serous chorioretinopathy (one eye), and dry age-related macular degeneration (two eyes). Eleven out of 12 of the lesions were conforming. One presented with a non-conforming lesion that progressed to a conforming lesion. One eye had multiFCE and two had two overlapping choroidal excavations. Using the SS-OCT, we found the choroid to be thinned out at the area of FCE but sclera remained normal. The choroidal tissue beneath the FCE was abnormal, with high internal reflectivity and poor visualization of choroidal vessels. There was loss of contour of the outer choroidal boundary that appeared to be pulled inward by this abnormal choroidal tissue. A suprachoroidal space was noted beneath this choroidal tissue and the choroidal–scleral interface was smooth. Repeat SS-OCT 6 months after presentation showed the area of excavation to be stable in size. Conclusion FCE can be associated with epiretinal membrane, central serous chorioretinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration. The choroid was thinned out in the area of FCE. PMID:24946847

  3. Evaluation of focal choroidal excavation in the macula using swept-source optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, F P M; Loh, B K; Cheung, C M G; Lim, L S; Chan, C M; Wong, D W K

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate imaging findings of patients with focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in the macula using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and correlate it clinically. Prospective observational case series. Eleven consecutive patients (12 eyes) with FCE were described. Data on demographics and clinical presentation were collected and imaging findings (including color photography, fundus autofluorescence imaging, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and SS-OCT) were analyzed. The primary diagnosis was epiretinal membrane (two eyes), choroidal neovascularization (one eye), polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (three eyes), central serous chorioretinopathy (one eye), and dry age-related macular degeneration (two eyes). Eleven out of 12 of the lesions were conforming. One presented with a non-conforming lesion that progressed to a conforming lesion. One eye had multiFCE and two had two overlapping choroidal excavations. Using the SS-OCT, we found the choroid to be thinned out at the area of FCE but sclera remained normal. The choroidal tissue beneath the FCE was abnormal, with high internal reflectivity and poor visualization of choroidal vessels. There was loss of contour of the outer choroidal boundary that appeared to be pulled inward by this abnormal choroidal tissue. A suprachoroidal space was noted beneath this choroidal tissue and the choroidal-scleral interface was smooth. Repeat SS-OCT 6 months after presentation showed the area of excavation to be stable in size. FCE can be associated with epiretinal membrane, central serous chorioretinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration. The choroid was thinned out in the area of FCE.

  4. Observed positive correlation between Epstein-Barr virus infection and focal choroidal excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savastano, Maria Cristina; Rispoli, Marco; Di Antonio, Luca; Mastropasqua, Leonardo; Lumbroso, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate a possible correlation between focal choroidal excavation and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Three eyes of three patients underwent a comprehensive ophthalmologic examination including visual field testing, color fundus photography, optical coherence tomography (OCT), fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography. In addition, hematological and viral infectivity were also evaluated. Two females and one male with a mean age of 53.6 ± 5.6 years were studied. In all patients, both the anterior and posterior segment evaluations were unremarkable except for the presence of a spot with focal retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) alteration. In patients 1 and 2, OCT disclosed a normal neuroretinal structure above the lesion and a focal 'punch-out' choroidal lesion with total absence of the RPE coupled with a localized hyporeflectivity in the subretinal space. In two of the three patients, OCT showed normal outer retinal layers, including the photoreceptor layer and the external limiting membrane with a hyporeflective space under the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction. In one patient, the retinal structure appeared to descend down into the choroidal excavation with an absence of the IS/OS junction and RPE. Moreover, the outer retinal layers appeared to be deformed. In all three patients, the choriocapillaris and choroid showed significant defects as if 'punched out' and the scleral boundary was more evident. In all three patients, an active EBV infection was confirmed by hematological investigation. In all our patients with focal choroid anomalies, such as choroidal excavation observed by OCT, a systemic infection by the EBV was detected. A larger number of similar cases are necessary to corroborate these preliminary observations.

  5. Geomorphological investigation of the excavation-induced Dundar landslide, Bursa, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erginal, A.E.; Turkes, M.; Ertek, T.A.; Baba, A.; Bayrakdar, C. [Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Canakkale (Turkey). Faculty for Science & Arts

    2008-07-01

    This paper discusses the occurrence and development of the excavation-induced deep-seated landslide, which took place near Dundar village, located west of Orhaneli town in northwestern Turkey. The event occurred in the Bursa-Orhaneli lignite field. Due to undermining of a gently inclined slope (10{sup o}) to extract a coal seam, primary tension cracks, which were precursors of the movement, were first observed in the northern head area in mid- to late October 2003. This movement happened simultaneously with precipitation that was significantly above long-term average measured at a nearby climatology station (Keles). Daily climatic and synoptic meteorological data have proved that heavy showers in late April may have triggered the last slump by producing rain showers of 19.3 mm and 19.9 mm daily total on 27 and 28 April 2004, respectively. Field observations carried out along the main head scarp have shown that the slope failure was facilitated by a pre-existing normal fault with an east-west direction and 80{sup o} dip. Grain-size analysis showed that the failure occurred on clayey silt, which forms 55% of the slip surface material. The landslide occurred over an area of 600 m x 650 m with a total volume of 8775 000 m{sup 3}. Approximately 28 hectares of farm land were entirely destroyed and the excavated coal seam was buried. The mining operation was moved to 100 m north of the landslide area near Gumuspinar village. From morphological evidence, it is concluded that excavation activities caused the failure to extend in more than one direction as an enlarging sliding mechanism; this produced a high landslide risk for Gumuspinar village, where the most significant normal fault with a 75 m vertical displacement in a coal-bearing sequence is found in the lignite field.

  6. Focal choroidal excavation:a preliminary interpretation based on clinic and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Hui Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To describe the clinical and imaging characteristics associated with focal choroidal excavation (FCE, analyze the possible complication, and interpret its probable etiopathogenesis.METHODS:Retrospective descriptive case series of 37 eyes of 32 patients with FCE. Findings of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and clinical features were analyzed.RESULTS: All patients were Chinese. Five patients (15.6% were bilaterally involved. Patients’ ages ranged from 7 to 66y. Refractive error ranged between +2.0 D and −11.0 D. Mean best-corrected visual acuity was 0.6 (range, 0.1 to 1.2. Fundus examinations exhibited mild-moderate localized pigmentary disturbances in the corresponding area of 17 eyes. Fluorescein angiography performed in 18 patients showed varying degrees of hyperfluorescence and hypofluorescence related to a range of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE alterations. Indocyanine green angiography performed in 7 patients showed hypofluorescence at the excavation. SD-OCT demonstrated choroidal excavation in all 37 eyes. Twenty-nine eyes showed a single lesion of FCE, and three eyes showed 2-3 separated lesions. Fifteen eyes showed separation between the photoreceptor tips and RPE consistent with nonconforming FCE. Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC, n=1 and choroidal neovascularization (CNV, n=1 developed during follow-up.CONCLUSION:FCE could be interpreted as congenital focal choroidal dysplasia involving the RPE, choriocapillaris, and photoreceptor associated with the faulty anatomy. The abnormal anatomy of FCE was similar to anatomy at risk of CSC and CNV.

  7. Excavation and drying of compressed peat; Tiivistetyn turpeen nosto ja kuivaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkkilae, A.; Hillebrand, K.; Nurmi, H.; Frilander, P. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this three year project (1993 - 95) is to develop an energy economical excavation method for compressed peat, by which it is possible to improve the peat production efficiency. The main research areas of the project are the drying of compressed peat and the compression of the peat. The optimal density, the load carrying capacity, the degree of maceration and the shape of the drying layer of the milled compressed peat will be determined in the drying research. Energy economical excavation, maceration and compression method, by which it is possible to optimize the drying layer, will be sought using peat compression research and equipment research carried out in laboratory. An experimental model for compressed milled layer, which was in contact with the field, made of Carex peat, was compiled in 1993. Compression tests were made using roller-press equipment, and peat treatability tests with a piston- press and DMTA equipment. An experimental drying model for compressed peat layer (C-t, H7), which is partially isolated from the field, was compiled in 1994. Means for reduction of energy consumption of extrusion were sought in compression studies of 1994 by investigating the friction between peat and 20 different materials and surface coatings, and by studying the effect of electric current on the friction between peat and a nozzle. Additionally, a peat excavation research equipment was constructed, by which the factors effecting on the forming of peat were studied and extruded compressed peat was produced using a nozzle of about 1.0 m width

  8. The influence of cathode excavation of cathodic arc evaporator on thickness uniformity and erosion products angle distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Duhopel'nikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathodic arc evaporators are used for coating with functional films. Prolonged or buttend evaporators may be used for this purposes. In butt-end evaporator the cathode spots move continuously on the cathode work surface and evaporate cathode material. High depth excavation profile forms on the cathode work surface while the thick coating precipitation (tens or hundreds of microns. The cathode excavation profile is shaped like a “cup” with high walls for electrostatic discharge stabilization systems with axial magnetic fields. Cathode spots move on the bottom of the “cup”. It is very likely that high “cup” walls are formed as a result of lasting work time influence on the uniformity of precipitated films.In the present work the influence of excavation profile walls height on the uniformity of precipitated coating was carried out. The high profile walls are formed due to lasting work of DC vacuum arc evaporator. The cathode material used for tests was 3003 aluminum alloy. The extended substrate was placed parallel to the cathode work surface. Thickness distribution along the substrate length with the new cathode was obtained after 6 hours and after 12 hours of continuous operation.The thickness distribution of precipitated coating showed that the cathode excavation has an influence on the angular distribution of the matter escaping the cathode. It can be clearly seen from the normalized dependence coating thickness vs the distance from the substrate center. Also the angular distribution of the matter flow from the cathode depending on the cathode working time was obtained. It was shown that matter flow from the cathode differs from the LambertKnudsen law. The more the cathode excavation the more this difference.So, cathode excavation profile has an influence on the uniformity of precipitated coating and it is necessary to take in account the cathode excavation profile while coating the thick films.

  9. Caries-removal effectiveness and minimal-invasiveness potential of caries-excavation techniques: a micro-CT investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Aline de A; Coutinho, Eduardo; De Munck, Jan; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2011-02-01

    To determine the caries-removal effectiveness (CRE) and minimal-invasiveness potential (MIP) of contemporary caries-removal techniques. Carious molars were scanned using micro-CT, after which dentine caries was removed by 9 contemporary caries-removal techniques. The micro-CT was repeated and CRE was determined on basis of the relative volume of residual caries and the mineral density (MD) at the cavity floor. MIP was determined by measuring the cavity size relative to the initial size of the caries lesion. CRE and MIP varied most for the Er:YAG laser (Kavo) despite its laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) feedback system. Whilst some specimens revealed much residual caries, others showed over-excavation into sound dentine. With the highest Relative Cavity Size, the Er:YAG laser presented the lowest MIP. Rotary/oscillating instruments revealed a more favourable CRE with some tendency towards over-excavation, except for CeraBur (Komet-Brasseler) and Cariex (Kavo) that typically left caries at the cavity floor and cavity walls, respectively. Chemo-mechanical excavation aided by conventional metal excavators (Carisolv, MediTeam; exp. SFC-V and SFC-VIII, 3M-ESPE) combined best CRE with MIP. When however a plastic excavator was used along with exp. SFC-VIII, caries was less completely removed. Er:YAG-laser aided by LIF resulted in non-selective caries removal. Rotary/oscillating caries removal may lead to over-excavation, especially when burs are combined with Caries Detector (Kuraray). This risk for over-excavation is reduced when a tungsten-carbide bur is solely used. On the contrary, Cariex (Kavo) and CeraBur showed a tendency for under-preparation. Chemo-mechanical methods were most selective in removing caries, whilst preserving sound tissue. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Towards a web-based archaeological excavation platform for smartphones: review and potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styliaras, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    The paper conducts a review questioning the usability of a web-based platform supporting archaeological excavations and related fields, which will execute on smartphones. Based on the thorough review and comparison of related work, the basic features of such a platform are outlined. The platform should support documenting content on an underlying XML database through a content management system, producing and exchanging notes, map interaction, use of a shared whiteboard, collaboration among archaeologists etc. The architecture of the platform is presented along with two case studies supporting usual practices on an archaeological field, some primary evaluation results and future work.

  11. Deformation and failure mechanism of excavation in clay subjected to hydraulic uplift

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the latest experimental and numerical analysis work in the field of ground deformation and base instability of deep excavations in soft clay subjected to hydraulic uplift. The authors’ latest research findings, based on dimensional analyses, well-instrumented full-scale field tests, systematic coupled-consolidation finite element analyses and centrifuge tests are reported. This book shows how to systematically approach a complex geotechnical problem, from identifying existing problems, reviewing literature, to dimensional and numerical analyses, validation through full-scale testing and centrifuge model testing. The methodologies are also introduced as major tools adopted in geotechnical research.

  12. Working Performance Analysis of Rolling Bearings Used in Mining Electric Excavator Crowd Reducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. H.; Hou, G.; Chen, G.; Liang, J. F.; Zheng, Y. M.

    2017-12-01

    Refer to the statistical load data of digging process, on the basis of simulation analysis of crowd reducer system dynamics, the working performance simulation analysis of rolling bearings used in crowd reducer of large mining electric excavator is completed. The contents of simulation analysis include analysis of internal load distribution, rolling elements contact stresses and rolling bearing fatigue life. The internal load characteristics of rolling elements in cylindrical roller bearings are obtained. The results of this study identified that all rolling bearings satisfy the requirements of contact strength and fatigue life. The rationality of bearings selection and arrangement is also verified.

  13. The application of degassing to extinguish burning methane in excavated areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morev, A.M.; Sklyarov, L.A.; Romanchuk, A.L.

    1978-07-01

    The experience of extinguishing methane fires in excavated and working areas of coal mines in the Donbass are discussed. A method of extinguishing methane fires by boring shafts to the source of the methane generation, laterally through ventilation ducts and vertically from the surface, and drawing the methane off with vacuum pumps is presented. The basic equipment for this consists of portable vacuum pumps, thin walled metal pipes with rapid couplings, high capacity drilling equipment capable of boring 200 meter long shafts. Factors which must be considered in developing a degassing system and methods of preventing the flames from reaching the degassing pipes are discussed using the experience of various methods.

  14. FT-IR spectroscopic study of terra-cotta sarcophagi recently excavated in Ainos (Enez) Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurap, Gulnur; Akyuz, Sevim; Akyuz, Tanil; Basaran, Sait; Cakan, Banu

    2010-07-01

    In this study, painting materials and body samples of the decorated terra-cotta sarcophagi, and the body samples of six terra-cotta sarcophagi, recently excavated in Ancient Ainos (Enez) Turkey, were investigated, using the FT-IR spectrometry. EDXRF spectrometry was used as a complementary technique. The experimental results allowed us to identify the mineralogical composition of body samples and main pigments of the decorated parts of the terra-cotta sarcophagi. Spectroscopic results revealed that the investigated samples were fired to a temperature less than 750 °C, in the oxidising atmosphere.

  15. Influence of tectonic disturbances on the parameters of excavation support with rock anchor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyomin, V. F.; Yavorsky, V. V.; Demina, T. V.; Baidikova, N. V.; Protsenko, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The mechanism of deformation, movement and rockfalls in structurally disturbed nonuniform rock mass using analytical modeling operation for assessment of the strain-stress state (SSS) of the rock mass around mining has been investigated. The SSS research of the rock masses by means of the ANSYS program of the excavation in the “Saransk” mine of coal mining JSC “ArselorMittal Temirtau” in the Karaganda coal basin has been conducted. The parameters of the exploitation of the anchor support on the mines for fixing the rock bolts in the workings to ensure the safety of mining operations in the areas of geological disturbances have been determined.

  16. Clinical course of focal choroidal excavation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Yuko; Fujinami, Kaoru; Watanabe, Ken; Noda, Toru; Tsunoda, Kazushige; Akiyama, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    We describe focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in a case of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease and compare the findings with different chorioretinal conditions. A 55-year-old man was diagnosed with VKH based on panuveitis and exudative retinal detachments. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated a dome-shaped protrusion with a nonconforming pattern at the fovea, which had been detected as a conforming pattern 1 year before the onset. The FCE pattern returned into a conforming pattern following corticosteroid therapy. These findings suggest that the natively existent FCE could be affected by pathophysiological changes of VKH as well as other chorioretinal conditions.

  17. Clinical course of focal choroidal excavation in Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Yuko; Fujinami, Kaoru; Watanabe, Ken; Noda, Toru; Tsunoda, Kazushige; Akiyama, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    We describe focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in a case of Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada (VKH) disease and compare the findings with different chorioretinal conditions. A 55-year-old man was diagnosed with VKH based on panuveitis and exudative retinal detachments. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated a dome-shaped protrusion with a nonconforming pattern at the fovea, which had been detected as a conforming pattern 1 year before the onset. The FCE pattern returned into a conforming pattern following corticosteroid therapy. These findings suggest that the natively existent FCE could be affected by pathophysiological changes of VKH as well as other chorioretinal conditions. PMID:25506207

  18. Natural diet of coral-excavating sponges consists mainly of dissolved organic carbon (DOC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Mueller

    Full Text Available Coral-excavating sponges are the most important bioeroders on Caribbean reefs and increase in abundance throughout the region. This increase is commonly attributed to a concomitant increase in food availability due to eutrophication and pollution. We therefore investigated the uptake of organic matter by the two coral-excavating sponges Siphonodictyon sp. and Cliona delitrix and tested whether they are capable of consuming dissolved organic carbon (DOC as part of their diet. A device for simultaneous sampling of water inhaled and exhaled by the sponges was used to directly measure the removal of DOC and bacteria in situ. During a single passage through their filtration system 14% and 13% respectively of the total organic carbon (TOC in the inhaled water was removed by the sponges. 82% (Siphonodictyon sp.; mean ± SD; 13 ± 17 μmol L(-1 and 76% (C. delitrix; 10 ± 12 μmol L(-1 of the carbon removed was taken up in form of DOC, whereas the remainder was taken up in the form of particulate organic carbon (POC; bacteria and phytoplankton despite high bacteria retention efficiency (72 ± 15% and 87 ± 10%. Siphonodictyon sp. and C. delitrix removed DOC at a rate of 461 ± 773 and 354 ± 562 μmol C h(-1 respectively. Bacteria removal was 1.8 ± 0.9 × 10(10 and 1.7 ± 0.6 × 10(10 cells h(-1, which equals a carbon uptake of 46.0 ± 21.2 and 42.5 ± 14.0 μmol C h(-1 respectively. Therefore, DOC represents 83 and 81% of the TOC taken up by Siphonodictyon sp. and C. delitrix per hour. These findings suggest that similar to various reef sponges coral-excavating sponges also mainly rely on DOC to meet their carbon demand. We hypothesize that excavating sponges may also benefit from an increasing production of more labile algal-derived DOC (as compared to coral-derived DOC on reefs as a result of the ongoing coral-algal phase shift.

  19. Exploratory Excavation at Braye-en-Laonnois, Renge River, 1991: Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Scull

    1992-11-01

    Full Text Available This report is concerned with excavation at Braye-en-Laonnois, Departement Aisne, north-east France, in August and September 1991 by a team from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, and the University of Durham. The work was carried out as part of a wider programme of research into rural settlement and landscape in the Aisne Valley in the 1st millennia BC and AD (Haselgrove 1989; Haselgrove et al. 1990a, 1991, and was prompted by the need to test assumptions based on field survey data.

  20. Natural diet of coral-excavating sponges consists mainly of dissolved organic carbon (DOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Benjamin; de Goeij, Jasper M; Vermeij, Mark J A; Mulders, Yannick; van der Ent, Esther; Ribes, Marta; van Duyl, Fleur C

    2014-01-01

    Coral-excavating sponges are the most important bioeroders on Caribbean reefs and increase in abundance throughout the region. This increase is commonly attributed to a concomitant increase in food availability due to eutrophication and pollution. We therefore investigated the uptake of organic matter by the two coral-excavating sponges Siphonodictyon sp. and Cliona delitrix and tested whether they are capable of consuming dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as part of their diet. A device for simultaneous sampling of water inhaled and exhaled by the sponges was used to directly measure the removal of DOC and bacteria in situ. During a single passage through their filtration system 14% and 13% respectively of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the inhaled water was removed by the sponges. 82% (Siphonodictyon sp.; mean ± SD; 13 ± 17 μmol L(-1)) and 76% (C. delitrix; 10 ± 12 μmol L(-1)) of the carbon removed was taken up in form of DOC, whereas the remainder was taken up in the form of particulate organic carbon (POC; bacteria and phytoplankton) despite high bacteria retention efficiency (72 ± 15% and 87 ± 10%). Siphonodictyon sp. and C. delitrix removed DOC at a rate of 461 ± 773 and 354 ± 562 μmol C h(-1) respectively. Bacteria removal was 1.8 ± 0.9 × 10(10) and 1.7 ± 0.6 × 10(10) cells h(-1), which equals a carbon uptake of 46.0 ± 21.2 and 42.5 ± 14.0 μmol C h(-1) respectively. Therefore, DOC represents 83 and 81% of the TOC taken up by Siphonodictyon sp. and C. delitrix per hour. These findings suggest that similar to various reef sponges coral-excavating sponges also mainly rely on DOC to meet their carbon demand. We hypothesize that excavating sponges may also benefit from an increasing production of more labile algal-derived DOC (as compared to coral-derived DOC) on reefs as a result of the ongoing coral-algal phase shift.

  1. Crash analysis using continuum damage mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.; Paas, M.H.J.W.; Slaats, P.M.A.; Bosma, F.

    1996-01-01

    Light weight metals, like aluminum in a crumpling zone, absorb energy through plstic folding mechanisms. Composites on the other hand, typically are fully crushed under impact loadings. A numerical approach to crash analysis of composites based on a continuous damage mechanics model is discussed in

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Issues Related to Uranium Mining and Tailings Management in Continuous Permafrost Zones in Nunavut, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, X.; Booshehrian, A.; Wan, R.

    2013-12-01

    In order to understand the potential environmental effects of a uranium mining and tailings management project in northern Canada, numerical simulations have been conducted on the Kiggavik project to investigate the issues of permafrost degradation, mine pit floor heave and slope deformation, and potential inflow into the mine pits during mining and tailings disposition. The project includes the development of three open pit mines, the Main Zone, the Centre Zone, and the East Zone at the Kiggavik site, and an open pit mine and an underground mine at the Sissons site. The mined ore will be milled at the Kiggavik site and the mill tailings will be disposed back into the three open pits at Kiggavik. The mining and milling operation of the project will last about 15 to 20 years. Permafrost at the Kiggavik site extends between 220 m to 240 m below ground surface, while permafrost at the Sissons site ranges from 260 m to 280 m below ground surface. The centre zone and the east zone will be excavated within permafrost, while the main zone and the open pit at Sissons will penetrate the permafrost layer. A high artesian pressure due to the permafrost constraint was measured at both Kiggavik and Sissons sites, and was found to be higher than the ground surface. The results of numerical simulations on the behavior of the continuous permafrost layer indicate that permafrost degradation around the pits or tailings management facilities is not significant during mine operation. No open talik would form below the excavated area as a result of depositing warm tailings in both East Zone and Centre Zone pits. A thin thawed zone of 3 to 5 m on the side of Centre Zone pit is developed, while the thawed area at the bottom of the pit extends to a depth of 10 to 15 m. For the Main Zone, where the excavation breaks through the permafrost, an open talik would remain following the operation period. The warm tailings would cause a 20 m thick thawed zone along the lower sides of the pit. With

  3. Impact damage development in damaged composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Kiernan, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A procedure for predicting the nature of impact damage development based on the measured acousto-ultrasonic (AU) response of fiber reinforced crossply laminates with or without damage is described. Results of AU evaluation as well as penetrant enhanced radiographs of damaged laminates are presented.

  4. Identification of zones of strong wind events in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goliger, Adam M

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarises the initial stage of development of a wind damage/disaster risk model for South Africa. The aim is to identify the generic zones of various types of strong wind events. The extent of these zones will form the basis...

  5. A study on excavation of rock mass by lasers. Researching the possibility of utilizing low-power lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Fumio [Taisei Corporation, Technology Research Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The object of this research is to develop the techniques of rock-mass excavation by laser irradiation. This rock-mass excavation technique by lasers has a characteristic of extremely little effect to the surroundings of an excavation site no matter how the target rock mass is with regard to geological aspects and given physical property. Moreover, it could be utilized in excavation of waste dump facilities, which need to be re-buried, and applied to excavation of long piles and tunnels, which are drilled through different kinds of strata, and to improvement of rock mass and ground. Lasers have a characteristic of concentrating the energy into a limited point and not only discontinue or cut a large area with a small output like sharp scissors but also block up the cracks deep inside the rock mass by fusing vitrification for its improvement. It leads to restrain the loss of energy, minimization of the effected environment, effective utilization of resources and energy, environmental restoration, and improvement of the working environment. In the field of nuclear fuel, which includes excavating dump pits, dismantling a furnace, and taking appropriate steps of mine remains, excavating, cutting, and fusing could be required to do within a limited space of rock mass or concrete. Up to the present, those things have been done mainly by large machines, but it is too scarce in possibility for them to improve their large size, heavy weight, difficulty in unmanned operation, limited shapes of cutting, and stabilization of waste. In this research the concrete system images have been examined, doing the fundamental researches about higher-power lasers, smaller sizing, transmitting by fibers to find our the breakthrough to realization of laser excavation, This year, as the summary of examining the laser excavation techniques, utilizing a low-power laser, which is thought to be highly effective in rock-mass improvement, will be examined, considering application of the technique

  6. Fault Zone Architecture and Mineralogy: Implications in Fluid Flow and Permeability in Crustal Scale Fault Zones in the Southern Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquer, T.; Terrón, E.; Perez-Flores, P.; Arancibia, G.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow in the upper crust is controlled by the permeability and interconnection of fractures in the fault zones. The permeability within the fault zone is determined by its activity, architecture and, in particular, by the mineralogy of the core and the damage zone. Whereas the permeability structure of a fault zone can be defined by the volume proportion of the core with respect to the damage zone, the relationship between the mineralogy and permeability along fault zones still remains obscure. This work examines structural and mineralogical data to show the relationship between the mineral composition of the fault zone with its permeability in the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Arc-oblique Long-lived Fault Systems (ALFS), Southern Chile. The LOFS is an active ca. 1200 km long strike-slip Cenozoic intra-arc structure that strikes NNE in its master traces and NE in its subsidiary traces, with dextral and dextral-normal movement mostly developed in the last 6 My. Although the LOFS and the ALFS cross-cut each other, the ALFS is an apparently older basement fault system where seismic and field evidences record sinistral, sinistral-normal and sinistral-reverse movements. One 22-m-long NE transect was mapped orthogonal to a segment of the ALFS, where host rocks are Miocene andesitic rocks. Structural and XRD sampling were conducted in the core and damage zone. Structural mapping shows a multiple core, NW-striking fault zone with foliated gouge and an asymmetric damage zone, where the hanging wall has significantly higher mesoscopic fracture density than the footwall. The hanging wall is characterized by NW-striking, steeply dipping veins. Preliminary XRD results indicate the presence of homogenously distributed Ca-rich zeolite (mainly laumontite) in the core and the veins of the damage zone, which could indicate that the core acted as a conduit for low-temperature (ca. 220°C) fluids.

  7. Testing the disturbed zone around a rigid inclusion in salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowles, M.K.; Borns, D.; Fredrich, J.; Holcomb, D.; Price, R.; Zeuch, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dale, T.; Van Pelt, R.S. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Deformational processes within a zone of rock surrounding excavations in salt result in alteration of the geophysical and hydrologic properties as compared to the undisturbed condition. The disturbed rock zone offers little resistance to fluid flow. It is hypothesized that rigid inclusions such as concrete seals will arrest and subsequently reverse the disturbance process and induce healing in the disturbed This experiment gathered in situ data that substantiates this hypothesis. A series of tests was conducted in a volume of rock surrounding concrete seals that were placed in a 1-m borehole approximately eight years ago. Fluid flow measurements, measurements of geophysical parameters of the surrounding rock and petrographic analyses on core samples were performed to characterize the rock. This paper presents the testing methodology and summarizes the data gathered from the field test program.

  8. Microindentation hardness and calcium/phosphorus ratio of dentin following excavation of dental caries lesions with different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katirci, Gunseli; Ermis, R Banu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microindentation hardness and chemical composition of residual dentin left at the cavity bottom following removal of carious dentin using the Carisolv chemomechanical and Er:YAG laser caries excavation methods in comparison with the conventional tungsten-carbide bur excavation. Sixty-nine extracted permanent teeth with occlusal dentin caries were assigned into three groups according to caries removal technique. Carious dentin excavation was guided by tactile method and a caries-staining dye. In stereomicroscope images (100×) of the samples, the presence or absence of residual caries was defined. The Knoop hardness value of the cavity floor was determined and atomic analysis of treated cavities was performed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The Knoop hardness value of residual dentin left at the cavity bottom was lower (One-way ANOVA, Dunnett-C, p laser excavations (Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, p  0.05). The results indicated that Er:YAG laser was more comparable to conventional bur excavation than chemomechanical method in the efficacy of caries removal with regard to microindentation hardness of remaining dentin and both Carisolv gel and Er:YAG laser did not alter chemical composition of residual dentin in the treated cavities.

  9. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using the nanosecond pulsed laser in 5.8-μm wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of human carious dentin.

  10. Creep and damage in argillaceous rocks: microstructural change and phenomenological modeling; Fluage et endommagement des roches argileuses: evolution de la microstructure et modelisation phenomenologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabre, G

    2005-06-15

    The underground radioactive waste disposal far exceeds the period of exploitation of common civil engineering works. These specific projects require to predict the irreversible deformations over a large time scale (several centuries) in order to assess the extension and to forecast the evolution of the EDZ (Excavation Damage Zone) around the cavity. In this study, the viscosity of three sedimentary argillaceous rocks has been studied under different conditions of uniaxial compression: static or cyclic creep tests, monotonic and quasistatic tests, performed across various strata orientations. Argillaceous rocks are studied as a possible host layer for radioactive waste disposals. Indeed, they present some of the physical characteristics and mechanical properties, which are essential for being a natural barrier: low permeability, high creep potential and important holding capacity of radioactive elements. The purpose of the experimental study was to shed some light over the mechanisms governing the development of delayed deformations and damage of argillaceous rocks. It relates three rocks: an argillite from East of France, a Tournemire argillite and a marl from Jurassic Mountains. On atomic scale, viscoplastic deformations are due to irreversible displacements of crystalline defects, called dislocations. The experimental study was also supplemented with observations on thin sections extracted from the argillite and marl samples using a SEM. The aim was to identify the mechanisms responsible for the time-dependent behaviour on a microstructural scale. Analytical simulations of the mechanical behaviour of the three rocks gave parameters used in different viscoplastic models. The best modeling was obtained with the viscoplastic model which takes account of the development of volumetric strains and of the damage anisotropy. (author)

  11. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  12. Presence of a radioactive gas in archaeological excavations, determination and mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcázar, M; Gómez, S; Peña, P; Zavala Arredondo, J; Gazzola, J; Villamares, A

    2014-01-01

    During recent archaeological discovery and excavation of a tunnel build approximately 2000 years ago by the Teotihuacans under the feathered serpent temple, in Mexico, abnormal radon concentrations up to 700 Bq m(-3) were measured at several excavation stages. The tunnel is at 15m below the earth surface with a vertical rectangular entrance of 4×4 m(2), a semi cylindrical shape of 3m in diameter, with a probable length of 100 m. This study supports the assumption that at the opening of the tunnel radon concentration was around 5500 Bq m(-3); however, although natural convection in the tunnel atmosphere naturally pups radon out, it build up to a maximum concentration of 2000 Bq m(-3). This paper presents the identification of the radon problem in this archaeological site, dose determination, and the mitigation actions that reduced the radon concentration down to 40 Bq m(-3) that ensure a negligible radon risk for archaeologist. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Great Excavations: Tales of Early Southwestern Archaeology, 1888-1939, School of American Research Press, 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Nash

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Great Excavations: Tales of Early Southwestern Archaeology, 1 888-1939, is an "intentionally selective" account of eight major archaeological expeditions to the Southwest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It succeeds in achieving the goals set forth in the prologue. The reader is taken on an "armchair tour"  of early Southwestern excavations in the hope that the resulting "basic understanding of what the early archae­ologists did" will stimulate a desire to "learn more about the intriguing prehistory of the Southwest" (pp. xiii. As a student of the history of North American archaeology, I would be amiss to speak for Elion's "layperson" audience, but my suspicion is that her presentation will indeed stimulate those readers. As an archaeologist, I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and it may well be that Elliott's journalistic approach makes this book more enjoyable because she is able to remain above the level of detail that often burden archaeolo­gists' accounts of these expeditions. I must temper this statement by noting that Elliott's journalistic hyper­ bole and tendency to oversimplify complex research and analysis are at times discomforting.

  14. [Evaluation of airborne molds in Laodikeia's recreation work environment during an excavation period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Caği; Kaleli, Ilknur; Mete, Ergun; Simşek, Celal

    2009-04-01

    Microclimatic environments including hot and damp variations are convenient backgrounds to fungi-related diseases for archeology workers. In this study, indoor air viable mold flora of Laodikeia's antique recreation warehouse and their effect on archeology workers were investigated during an annual excavation period. Work environment and workers' symptoms have been detailed by a questionnaire. Air sampling of viable molds were periodically collected within the excavation period in 2005. The mean indoor viable mold concentrations were 528, 578 and 1023 cfu/m3 while outdoor mold concentrations were 352, 409 and 553 cfu/m3 during July, August and September, respectively. The prevalent culturable indoor fungal type was Cladosporium spp. (57.7%), Aspergillus spp. (17.8%), Alternaria spp. (15.8%) and Penicillium spp. (3.4%). In outdoor environment, Cladosporium spp. (60.4%) was the predominant type followed by Alternaria spp. (16.8%), Aspergillus spp. (11.8%) and Penicillium spp. (3%). Aspergillus spp. were found in higher concentrations for indoor air than outdoor samples in late-summer period owing to higher humidity and lower temperature levels (p molds and also to demonstrate the presence of xerophilic fungi in the moist environment.

  15. A Basic Robotic Excavator (the Glenn Digger): Description, Design, and Initial Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Steve; Newman, Paul; Izadnegahdar, Alain; Johnson, Kyle; Abel, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, commercial part selections, fabrication, assembly, installation, and initial operation of a two degree of freedom robotic excavator. Colloquially referred to as "the NASA Glenn Digger," it was designed specifically to be mounted onto, and to operate with, the then newly developed Centaur 2 robotic mobility base. The excavator, when mounted to Centaur 2, is designed to scoop loose regolith from the terrain, raise its loaded bucket up and dump the load into a hopper of at least a 1-m-height. The hopper represents the input to a machine that would process the raw material, such as to produce oxygen from lunar regolith as would be required for long-term lunar habitation. This equipment debuted at the annual Research and Technology Studies ("Desert RATS", Ref. 1) event held north of Flagstaff, Arizona, in September of 2010, when the Digger was successfully joined to Centaur 2 and the shoveling articulation was demonstrated. During 2011, the hardware was modified for added strength, strain gauges were added to measure loads, and the controls were improved in preparation for the 2011 Desert RATS event, where additional "field operations" experience was gained.

  16. Model uncertainty of various settlement estimation methods in shallow tunnels excavation; case study: Qom subway tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademian, Amir; Abdollahipour, Hamed; Bagherpour, Raheb; Faramarzi, Lohrasb

    2017-10-01

    In addition to the numerous planning and executive challenges, underground excavation in urban areas is always followed by certain destructive effects especially on the ground surface; ground settlement is the most important of these effects for which estimation there exist different empirical, analytical and numerical methods. Since geotechnical models are associated with considerable model uncertainty, this study characterized the model uncertainty of settlement estimation models through a systematic comparison between model predictions and past performance data derived from instrumentation. To do so, the amount of surface settlement induced by excavation of the Qom subway tunnel was estimated via empirical (Peck), analytical (Loganathan and Poulos) and numerical (FDM) methods; the resulting maximum settlement value of each model were 1.86, 2.02 and 1.52 cm, respectively. The comparison of these predicted amounts with the actual data from instrumentation was employed to specify the uncertainty of each model. The numerical model outcomes, with a relative error of 3.8%, best matched the reality and the analytical method, with a relative error of 27.8%, yielded the highest level of model uncertainty.

  17. Excavation on the Moon: Regolith Collection for Oxygen Production and Outpost Site Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, John J.; Spina, Dan C.; Greer, Lawrence C.; John, Wentworth T.; Michele, Clem; Krasowski, Mike J.; Prokop, Norman F.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a robust regolith moving system for lunar and planetary processing and construction is critical to the NASA mission to the Moon and Mars. Oxygen production may require up to 200 metric tons of regolith collection per year; outpost site development may require several times this amount. This paper describes progress in the small vehicle implement development and small excavation system development. Cratos was developed as a platform for the ISRU project to evaluate the performance characteristics of a low center of gravity, small (0.75m x 0.75m x 0.3m), low-power, tracked vehicle performing excavation, load, haul, and dump operations required for lunar ISRU. It was tested on loose sand in a facility capable of producing level and inclined surfaces, and demonstrated the capability to pick up, carry, and dump sand, allowing it to accomplish the delivery of material to a site. Cratos has demonstrated the capability to pick up and deliver simulant to a bury an inflatable habitat, to supply an oxygen production plant, and to build a ramp.

  18. Comparative clinical evaluation of the efficacy of a new method for caries diagnosis and excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskersoy, Cem; Turkun, Murat; Onal, Banu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficiency of fluorescence-aided caries excavation (FACE) to remove carious dentin primary teeth with that of conventional methods. After caries excavation was carried out, dentin surfaces were conventionally inspected using visual tactile criteria and 415 cavities which were classified as caries-free, re-inspected with Face-Light and caries detector dye (CDD) methods. Orange-red fluorescing areas classified as carious dentin, as well as stained carious dentin. All the data were recorded according to localization of the caries and determination efficiency of the methods. X(2) test was used to compare the mean values of both Face-Light and dye applications, while Wilcoxon test performed to evaluate the effectiveness for each diagnostic method. A total of 273 patients with 415 Class II (OM/OD) cavities (1.65 ± 0.52 teeth per patient) with carious lesions in molar and premolar teeth, were examined. Out of 415 teeth, in 149 teeth (35.9%) no caries findings had been illustrated. While FACE detected remaining carious or partially removed areas in 237 teeth (57.2%), CDD stained only 29 teeth by itself (P < 0.05). In conclusion, FACE has a higher detectability compared to visual inspection and caries detector dye in diagnosis and removal of carious dentin.

  19. Fish Remains from Excavations near the Riverfront at Newcastle upon Tyne, England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Nicholson

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The City of Newcastle, situated some 10 miles inland on the River Tyne in north-east England, is not now an important fishing port. Most of the fresh fish marketed in the city has been landed at the nearby coastal ports of North and South Shields. Excavations at two sites behind the present Quayside in Newcastle, however, have yielded quantities of fish bones, representing a wide variety of species. This is in contrast to excavations in other parts of the city, where few fish remains have been recovered, and suggests that the quayside in Newcastle was an important centre for the fishing industry during the medieval period. It seems likely that most of the fish remains represent waste from landing and processing fish on or near the quayside. Yet, when taphonomic factors are taken into account, the limitations of using even large bone assemblages to interpret processing activities is demonstrated. As always, the need for a programme of on-site sieving to obtain representative samples of fish bone is evident.

  20. Results of Hazardous and Mixed Waste Excavation from the Chemical Waste Landfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, S. G.; Schofield, D. P.; Kwiecinski, D.; Edgmon, C. L.; Methvin, R.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the results of the excavation of a 1.9-acre hazardous and mixed waste landfill operated for 23 years at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Excavation of the landfill was completed in 2 1/2 years without a single serious accident or injury. Approximately 50,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organics, metals, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and radioactive constituents was removed. In addition, over 400 cubic yards of buried debris was removed, including bulk debris, unknown chemicals, compressed gas cylinders, thermal and chemical batteries, explosive and ordnance debris, pyrophoric materials and biohazardous waste. Removal of these wastes included negotiation of multiple regulations and guidances encompassed in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and risk assessment methodology. RCRA concepts that were addressed include the area of contamination, permit modification, emergency treatment provision, and listed waste designation. These regulatory decisions enabled the project to overcome logistical and programmatic needs such as increased operational area, the ability to implement process improvements while maintaining a record of decisions and approvals.

  1. Re-Excavation of Seti First Tomb, Kv17, Luxor, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman HAMED

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is discussing technical challenges within engineering works made during re-excavation of the 174 m long tunnel which was cut into bedrock of desert shale known as 'Esna shale'. Recent historical events, during the last decade, explained much of the tunnel deformations and dirt filling inside tunnel space "Debris", caused by multiple water runoff attack to king's valley. The author is also discussing the challenging work under severe financial regime; using non conventional solutions adopted with extraordinary actions in using junk yard equipment. Seti I tomb, is considered as the deepest opening in the valley, not mentioning the risk in re-excavation the tomb, harsh atmospheric conditions inside the tunnel, measured and monitored by author, needed a serious ventilation system to serve workers during removal of dirt. Through that, an interesting mathematical relation between atmospheric variables has been emphasized. Design of steel supporting system serving an inclined deep tunnel with irregular circumference, under strict condition of reversibility, has been performed as a remarkable topic, to solve and apply in such archaeological site. Finally, the article is considered as a scientific pattern for application of geo-engineering in conservation of underground archaeological sites.

  2. How to estimate green house gas (GHG) emissions from an excavator by using CAT's performance chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajji, Apif M.; Lewis, Michael P.

    2017-09-01

    Construction equipment activities are a major part of many infrastructure projects. This type of equipment typically releases large quantities of green house gas (GHG) emissions. GHG emissions may come from fuel consumption. Furthermore, equipment productivity affects the fuel consumption. Thus, an estimating tool based on the construction equipment productivity rate is able to accurately assess the GHG emissions resulted from the equipment activities. This paper proposes a methodology to estimate the environmental impact for a common construction activity. This paper delivers sensitivity analysis and a case study for an excavator based on trench excavation activity. The methodology delivered in this study can be applied to a stand-alone model, or a module that is integrated with other emissions estimators. The GHG emissions are highly correlated to diesel fuel use, which is approximately 10.15 kilograms (kg) of CO2 per gallon of diesel fuel. The results showed that the productivity rate model as the result from multiple regression analysis can be used as the basis for estimating GHG emissions, and also as the framework for developing emissions footprint and understanding the environmental impact from construction equipment activities introduction.

  3. Characterisation of excavated fine fraction and waste composition from a Swedish landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Yahya; Kaczala, Fabio; Marchand, Charlotte; Hogland, Marika; Kriipsalu, Mait; Hogland, William; Kihl, Anders

    2016-12-01

    The present research studies the characterisation and the physico-chemical properties of an excavated fine fraction (landfill, the Högbytorp. The results showed that the fine fraction represents 38% by mass of the total excavated wastes and it contains mainly soil-type materials and minerals. Higher concentrations of zinc, copper, barium and chromium were found with concentrations higher than the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for contaminated soil. The found moisture and organic contents of the fine fraction were 23.5% and 16.6%, respectively. The analysed calorific value (1.7 MJ kg(-1)), the potential of CH4 (4.74 m(3) t(-1) dry matter) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) (5.6%) were low and offer low potential of energy. Sieving the fine fraction further showed that 80% was smaller than 2 mm. The fine represents a major fraction at any landfill (40%-70%), therefore, characterising the properties of this fraction is essential to find the potential of reusing/recycling or safely redisposing. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Brittle Rock Modeling Approach and its Validation Using Excavation-Induced Micro-Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chun-Chi; Li, Tian-Bin; Xing, Hui-Lin; Zhang, Hang; Wang, Min-Jie; Liu, Tian-Yi; Chen, Guo-Qing; Chen, Zi-Quan

    2016-08-01

    With improvements to the bonded-particle model, a custom indicator of crack intensity is introduced to grade rock fractures accurately. Brittle fracturing of rock mass is studied using the bonded-particle model; here, "brittle" refers to the process where more energy is released towards making particles collide and disperse, and hence results in the quick emergence of "chain cracks". Certain principles concerning how to construct brittle rock are then proposed. Furthermore, a modeling approach for brittle rocks based on the adaptive continuum/discontinuum (AC/DC) method is proposed to aid the construction of large-scale models of tunnel excavations. To connect with actual tunneling conditions, fundamental mechanical properties, the mechanism for brittle fracturing, the joint distribution, and the initial stress field are considered in the modeling approach. Results from micro-seismic monitoring of a tunnel excavation confirmed the suitability of this modeling approach to simulate crack behavior, and results show that simulated cracking exhibit similar trends (evolution, location, and intensity) with micro-seismic cracking.

  5. New drainage tunnel of the tunnel Višňové - design and excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurík, Igor; Grega, Ladislav; Valko, Jozef; Janega, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The actual pilot tunnel dated to the period of geological and hydrogeological survey, is designed as a part of the tunnel Višňové, which is located at the section of the D1 motorway Lietavská Lúčka - Višňové - Dubná Skala in Slovakia. Drainage tunnel will be used for the drainage of the main tunnel tubes, where the maximum inflow from the eastern portal is greater than 250 l.s-1. Overlapping of the initial pilot tunnel with the profile of the southern tunnel tube led to the demolition of the portal sections of the pilot tunnel during the excavation of main tunnel tubes. These sections were replaced by new drainage tunnels, with the lengths of 288.0 meters from west portal and 538.0 meters from eastern portal, to ensure access from both portals. The new drainage tunnel is excavated under the level of the two main tunnel tubes. Drainage pipes with a diameter of 250 mm will be installed from cleaning niches in the main tunnel tubes to the new drainage tunnel.

  6. Vadose zone microbiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results in the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.

  7. Treatment of deep caries lesions in adults: randomized clinical trials comparing stepwise vs. direct complete excavation, and direct pulp capping vs. partial pulpotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørndal, Lars; Reit, Claes; Bruun, Gitte; Markvart, Merete; Kjaeldgaard, Marianne; Näsman, Peggy; Thordrup, Marianne; Dige, Irene; Nyvad, Bente; Fransson, Helena; Lager, Anders; Ericson, Dan; Petersson, Kerstin; Olsson, Jadranka; Santimano, Eva M; Wennström, Anette; Winkel, Per; Gluud, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Less invasive excavation methods have been suggested for deep caries lesions. We tested the effects of stepwise vs. direct complete excavation, 1 yr after the procedure had been carried out, in 314 adults (from six centres) who had received treatment of a tooth with deep caries. The teeth had caries lesions involving 75% or more of the dentin and were centrally randomized to stepwise or direct complete excavation. Stepwise excavation resulted in fewer pulp exposures compared with direct complete excavation [difference: 11.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.2; 21.3)]. At 1 yr of follow-up, there was a statistically significantly higher success rate with stepwise excavation, with success being defined as an unexposed pulp with sustained pulp vitality without apical radiolucency [difference: 11.7%, 95% CI (0.5; 22.5)]. In a subsequent nested trial, 58 patients with exposed pulps were randomized to direct capping or partial pulpotomy. We found no significant difference in pulp vitality without apical radiolucency between the two capping procedures after more than 1 yr [31.8% and 34.5%; difference: 2.7%, 95% CI (-22.7; 26.6)]. In conclusion, stepwise excavation decreases the risk of pulp exposure compared with direct complete excavation. In view of the poor prognosis of vital pulp treatment, a stepwise excavation approach for managing deep caries lesions is recommended.

  8. An application of the ground laser scanning to recognise terrain surface deformation over a shallowly located underground excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilecka, Elżbieta; Szwarkowski, Dariusz

    2017-11-01

    In the Upper Silesian Coal Basin area, there are post-mining sites of shallow exploitation of metal ores and hard coal deposits that reveal discontinuous deformations. Most often, these areas are heavily urbanised and the appearing deformations may be dangerous to the existing building infrastructure. The work, described in this article, presents the results of the research, which aimed to rate the usefulness of laser scanning to recognize discontinuous deformations on surface areas located over shallow mining excavations. Two laser scanning measurements were taken over the course of a few months. The surface area images were compared to identify changes in its deformation, especially those areas located above mining excavations. The tests carried out by the laser scanning method showed that some of the identified discontinuous deformations could have been connected to the shallowly located mining excavations.

  9. Measuring Women's Influence on Roman Military Life: using GIS on published excavation reports from the German frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Allison

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the approaches used in the Australian Research Council funded project, 'Engendering Roman Spaces', and summarises some of the results. The project investigates the distribution of artefacts and artefact assemblages and the presence, activities and status of women and children within Roman military forts. It uses data from published excavation reports of 1st- and 2nd-century AD Roman military sites on the German frontier. It includes excavation reports from throughout the 20th century, which have varying levels of comprehensiveness. The relevant data from these excavation reports are digitised and manipulated, through a series of software packages, and then classified according to gender and function, so that spatial distribution patterns of people's activities can be visualised and analysed using GIS. Interpretations of these data are indicating that women played a greater role in military life in the early Roman Empire than has previously been acknowledged.

  10. Application of a damage model for rock fragmentation to the Straight Creek Mine blast experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorne, B.J.

    1991-09-01

    Early attempts at estimation of stress wave damage due to blasting by use of finite element calculations met with limited success due to numerical instabilities that prevented calculations from being carried past the fragmentation limit. More recently, the improved damage model PRONTO has allowed finite element calculations which remain stable and yield good agreement between calculated fragmented regions and excavated crater profiles for blasting experiments in granite. Application of this damage model to blast experiments at the Straight Creek Mine in Bell County, Kentucky were complicated by anisotropic conditions and uncertainties in material properties. It appears that significant modifications to the damage model and extensive material testing may be necessary in order to estimate damage in these anisotropic materials. 18 refs., 18 figs.

  11. Boring crustaceans damage polystyrene floats under docks polluting marine waters with microplastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Timothy M

    2012-09-01

    Boring isopods damage expanded polystyrene floats under docks and, in the process, expel copious numbers of microplastic particles. This paper describes the impacts of boring isopods in aquaculture facilities and docks, quantifies and discusses the implications of these microplastics, and tests if an alternate foam type prevents boring. Floats from aquaculture facilities and docks were heavily damaged by thousands of isopods and their burrows. Multiple sites in Asia, Australia, Panama, and the USA exhibited evidence of isopod damage. One isopod creates thousands of microplastic particles when excavating a burrow; colonies can expel millions of particles. Microplastics similar in size to these particles may facilitate the spread of non-native species or be ingested by organisms causing physical or toxicological harm. Extruded polystyrene inhibited boring, suggesting this foam may prevent damage in the field. These results reveal boring isopods cause widespread damage to docks and are a novel source of microplastic pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Report of Fourth Season Excavations at Tol- e Bondu and Discovery of a Temple, West of Fars, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Atabaki

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper underlines the important archaeological evidence unearthed from four seasons of excavation at Tol-e Bondu, located at Rostam-Du, Noorabad city, Fars province. The most significant information acquired from this excavation is the discovery of a temple from the 16th layer, exactly similar to the one from the middle phase of the Elamite culture. This paper discusses the structures and other features showing similarity between the two regions. Studying the history of the Elamites via relief and inscriptions in Mesopotamia leads us to the belief that performing religious ceremonies played an important role in the civilization and culture of Elam.

  13. Design aspects of the Alpha Repository. V. Suite selection and cost analysis of excavation/hauling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeller, T.J.; Grams, W.H.

    1975-06-30

    The various types of haulage and excavation equipment that may be suitable for use in the development and excavation of the Alpha repository are described with discussion of the advantages, disadvantages, expected costs, availability, and special features of each. The various equipment suites are delineated, and the costs of mining and transportation of the salt are presented and discussed. Individual manufacturers contacted and equipment considered are listed. Most of the equipment is ''off-the-shelf''; however, some manufactuers were contacted that do custom work because of their expertise in salt mining equipment. The costs of custom equipment are comparable to those for standard equipment.

  14. [Chemical-microbiological diagnosis of stress-corrosive damage to pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodenko, V P; Zhigletsova, S K; Chugunov, V A; Rodin, V B; Kobelev, V S; Karpov, S V

    2000-01-01

    Samples of soil, ground, electrolyte, corrosion products, and protective coating were taken after excavating pipelines. The depth of stress corrosion cracks of the pipe steel was mostly related to the numbers of sulfate-reducing and denitrifying bacteria. In certain types of soil, damage correlated with the number of acid-producing microorganisms and aerobic chemoorganotrophs (saprophytes). A correlation was found between the extent of stress-corrosion damage to pipelines and the contents of reduced iron, sulfides, and organic carbon in surrounding ground.

  15. Automatic Estimation of Excavation Volume from Laser Mobile Mapping Data for Mountain Road Widening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Menenti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Roads play an indispensable role as part of the infrastructure of society. In recent years, society has witnessed the rapid development of laser mobile mapping systems (LMMS which, at high measurement rates, acquire dense and accurate point cloud data. This paper presents a way to automatically estimate the required excavation volume when widening a road from point cloud data acquired by an LMMS. Firstly, the input point cloud is down-sampled to a uniform grid and outliers are removed. For each of the resulting grid points, both on and off the road, the local surface normal and 2D slope are estimated. Normals and slopes are consecutively used to separate road from off-road points which enables the estimation of the road centerline and road boundaries. In the final step, the left and right side of the road points are sliced in 1-m slices up to a distance of 4 m, perpendicular to the roadside. Determining and summing each sliced volume enables the estimation of the required excavation for a widening of the road on the left or on the right side. The procedure, including a quality analysis, is demonstrated on a stretch of a mountain road that is approximately 132 m long as sampled by a Lynx LMMS. The results in this particular case show that the required excavation volume on the left side is 8% more than that on the right side. In addition, the error in the results is assessed in two ways. First, by adding up estimated local errors, and second, by comparing results from two different datasets sampling the same piece of road both acquired by the Lynx LMMS. Results of both approaches indicate that the error in the estimated volume is below 4%. The proposed method is relatively easy to implement and runs smoothly on a desktop PC. The whole workflow of the LMMS data acquisition and subsequent volume computation can be completed in one or two days and provides road engineers with much more detail than traditional single-point surveying methods such as

  16. Archaeogeophysical Studies in the Ruins of Kars-Ani (Turkey) in the 2009 Excavation Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskan, Nihan; Ahmet Yuksel, Fethi; Gorucu, Ziya; Coruhlu, Yasar

    2010-05-01

    The Ani ancient city, which is at 48 km distance to Kars (Turkey), is founded at the banks of the Arpacay River flowing in the vicinity of Turkey - Armenia border and is in the borders of Mevcut Ocakli Village. Recent studies show that the first settlement in Ani ancient city could be in the 5th millenium B.C.(Chalcolithic Period) and moreover, there were some buildings built in the Iron and Bronze Period. In the early 9th century, Ashot Msaker, who was Bagratuni dynasty (806-827), declared their first capital city at Bagaran, some 40 km south of Ani, and then transferred it to Kars in the year 929. In 961, King Ashot III (953-977) transferred the capital city from Kars to Ani. Ani expanded during the reign of King Smbat II (977-989). Recent research shows that by the early 11th century the population of Ani was over 100,000. After capture of Ashot, Ani surrendered to Byzantine controlled in 1045. A Greek governor was installed in the city. In 1064 a Seljuk Turkish army, headed by Sultan Alparslan, attacked and captured Ani. Then the Georgians captured Ani in 1124, 1161 and 1174. By the 14th century Ani was ruled by the Turkish dynasties, namely Jalayrids and the Kara Koyunlu. After the Persian Safavids ruled Ani, it became part of the Turkish Ottoman Empire in 1579. A small town remained within its walls until 1650 A.C. and it was completely abandoned by the middle of the 18th century. Examples of Sasani, Arabic, Armenian, and Seljuk architecture can be found among the Ani ruins. Ani is home to the first Turkish mosque built in Anatolia, namely Ebul Menucehr. The mosque was erected by the members of the Seljuk Dynasty in 1072. The first archaeological excavations were conducted at Ani in 1892. Since then, several archaeological excavations have been done in Ani. In the 2009 excavation season, magnetic methods were applied in Ani ruins to find the exact locations of the ruins. Magnetic Gradient Measurements were taken in front of Ebul Menucehr Mosque. After

  17. Archaeology Through Computational Linguistics: Inscription Statistics Predict Excavation Sites of Indus Valley Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Gabriel L; Louwerse, Max M

    2016-11-01

    Computational techniques comparing co-occurrences of city names in texts allow the relative longitudes and latitudes of cities to be estimated algorithmically. However, these techniques have not been applied to estimate the provenance of artifacts with unknown origins. Here, we estimate the geographic origin of artifacts from the Indus Valley Civilization, applying methods commonly used in cognitive science to the Indus script. We show that these methods can accurately predict the relative locations of archeological sites on the basis of artifacts of known provenance, and we further apply these techniques to determine the most probable excavation sites of four sealings of unknown provenance. These findings suggest that inscription statistics reflect historical interactions among locations in the Indus Valley region, and they illustrate how computational methods can help localize inscribed archeological artifacts of unknown origin. The success of this method offers opportunities for the cognitive sciences in general and for computational anthropology specifically. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  18. Excavating a Silk Road City: the Medieval Citadel of Taraz, Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles Dawkes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The city of Taraz, located near the southern border with Uzbekistan, is one of the most significant historic settlements in Kazakhstan, and two seasons of fieldwork in the central market-place have revealed a substantial depth of medieval stratigraphy. Despite frequent mentions in Arabic and Chinese written sources, both the form and evolution of this important Silk Road city remain poorly understood. Evidence for a series of successive medieval buildings, including a bathhouse and a Zoroastrian flame shrine, was found in the area of the former citadel. These excavations, undertaken as a joint initiative between the Centre for Applied Archaeology and Kazakh archaeologists, were the first for 50 years in the city and form part of a wider public outreach programme.

  19. From "The Depleted Self" to "The Will to Believe": Excavating the Hermeneutics of Donald Capps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Yolanda

    2017-09-05

    The concept of "reframing" lies at the heart of the pastoral psychology of Donald Capps. In previous articles I have argued that the process of reframing follows a circular hermeneutics. An excavation of Capps' hermeneutics reveals foundations in the fields of philosophy and psychology. This article focuses on the legacy of Johann Gottfried von Herder, Friedrich Schleiermacher, William James and Paul Ricoeur. It explores the differences and commonalities between William James and Friedrich Schleiermacher's understanding of religious experience as well as Paul Ricoeur's understanding of narrativity and traces these strains to Capps' pastoral psychology. As illustration of his pastoral approach to healing and wholeness the problem of "the depleted self," so prevalent in "our narcissistic age," encounters the healing narrative of Jesus that appeals to "the will to believe."

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Study of Choroidal Neovascularization Associated With Focal Choroidal Excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Rohan; Mittal, Kanhaiya; Vohra, Rajpal

    2016-10-01

    The authors report the use of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) (DRI OCT Triton; Topcon, Tokyo, Japan) to localize, characterize, and confirm the presence of a choroidal neovascular membrane in a patient of focal choroidal excavation (FCE) with recent-onset metamorphopsia and visual blurring. En face OCTA images just above the level of the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch's membrane complex typically showed the presence of a glomerulus-like neovascular network with an adjacent dark area suggestive of a Type 2 choroidal neovascularization (CNV). OCTA was found to be a very useful, noninvasive, and quick imaging modality to detect secondary CNV formation in a case of FCE. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:969-971.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Clinical Efficiency of Three Caries Removal Systems: Rotary Excavation, Carisolv, and Papacarie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Sapna; Kakti, Ateet; Bolar, Dinesh Rao; Bhaskar, Shubha Arehalli

    2016-01-01

    The removal of dentinal caries using the rotary method of excavation is most often associated with pain and anxiety in children. Chemo-mechanical caries removal may eliminate some of the drawbacks of the rotary technique and improve patient comfort. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficiency of the rotary, Carisolv, and Papacarie methods for caries removal in primary teeth, length of time needed, influence on child behavior, pain perception, and treatment preference of the child. This controlled, split-mouth study with a cross-over design compared three caries removal methods in the primary molars of 50 five- to 12-year-old children. The rotary method was the most efficient and least time-consuming (Pperception, however, was highest with this method (Pcaries removal may be a promising alternative treatment procedure, particularly for anxious young patients.

  2. Pilot-Scale Bio-Augmented Aerobic Composting of Excavated Foot-And-Mouth Disease Carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonghoon Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we tested the validity of using novel, bio-augmented, aerobic composting with carcass-degrading microorganisms for the ex situ stabilization of carcasses at pilot scale with previously poorly decomposed carcasses excavated from a 3-year old burial site. The significantly decreased chemical oxygen demand (COD, 160,000 mg/kg to 40,000 mg/kg and inorganic nitrogen species (total nitrogen, 5000 mg/kg to 2000 mg/kg indicated effective bio-stabilization of carcasses by bio-augmented composting. The subsequent germination assays and the quantitative characterization of potentially pathogenic bacteria using NGS (next-generation sequencing showed that the burial–composting sequential system with the carcass-degrading microorganisms and mechanical agitation successfully reduced plant toxicity as well as microbial risk to human health, suggesting that the composting by-product is suitable for farming or/and landfill use(s.

  3. SHAPING AND REDESTINATION OF EXCAVATED AREAS IN THE COURSE OF THE EXPLOITATION OF CRUSHED STONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerko Nuić

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available In the construction of devastated and demolished country the want for crushed stone is ever more greater. The opening of new quarryes is subject to strict ecological norms. The location of activity as well as the concept of the mining works represent a matter of consideration. Excavated areas should be shaped in a way to be integrated into immediate and wider environment most conveniently and then be redestinated with the purpose of the economic, sporting-recreation or some other usage. On the existing model in nature (»Široki Čelac« quarry, Novalja on the island of Pag, the specific characteristics of the locality and region have been respected. There have been also given adequate solutions for a possible deposit of communal waste (the paper is published in Croatian.

  4. STUDY on Quality Control of SMW Construction Pile in Foundation Pit Excavation of Soft Soil Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fei

    2017-11-01

    In order to further meet the needs of the development of the time and promote the improvement of the construction efficiency of our country, the construction units in our country have strengthened the application of new technologies and new process in the process of project construction. At present, the construction units generally encounter the construction conditions of soft soil foundation in the process of construction of the project, then the project quality will reduce because of improper operation, which hinders the improvement of construction efficiency and is bad to acquire relevant benefits. So, in order to ensure the steady development of soft soil foundation construction and promote to acquire various benefits, the construction units strengthen the application of technology of SMW construction pile, and thus contribute to steady development of foundation pit excavation work of soft soil foundation, as well as gain the efficiency .

  5. Root Apex Transition Zone as Oscillatory Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek Baluska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command centre. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwins, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone.

  6. Particle Size Distributions Measured in B757 Engine Plume During EXCAVATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Terry; Penko, Paul; Culler, Steve; Rivera, Monica

    2005-01-01

    A ground-based test, the Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile Aerosols and Trace Species Emissions (EXCAVATE), was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center, January 26 - 27, 2002, with a Boeing 757 aircraft. The aircraft was anchored on a tarmac and two probes were positioned downstream of the right-side engine, a Rolls Royce RB211-585. One probe was designed and fabricated by Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) and had a 45.6 mm (1.794 in.) ID. A second probe, constructed of 6.4 mm (0.25 in.) stainless-steel tubing at NASA Langley Research Center, had a 6 mm (0.22 in.) ID. The engine was run on JP-5 with three different sulfur concentrations, 810 ppm, 1050 ppm, 1820 ppm; and was operated over a range of power settings from idle to near-full power. Particulate size-distributions and concentrations were measured at four downstream axial locations: 1 m and 10 m with the AEDC particulate probe, and 25 m and 35 m with the Langley probe. Fuel with various sulfur contents was tested to address the long-standing question of the role of sulfur in the formation of volatile species. Several experimental and modeling studies have shown a correlation between fuel sulfur-content and particulate-emissions. The object of EXCAVATE was to further study the effect of sulfur content on particulate number concentration and size-distribution as a function of location in the engine plume and engine operating conditions.

  7. Nest relocation and excavation in the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R Tschinkel

    Full Text Available The Florida harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex badius excavates deep nests in the sandy soils of the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plains. Nest relocations of over 400 colonies in a north Florida coastal plains pine forest were tracked and mapped from 2010 to 2013. Individual colonies varied from one move in two years to four times a year, averaging about one per year. Almost all moves occurred between May and November peaking in July when more than 1% of the colonies moved per day. Move directions were random, and averaged 4 m, with few moves exceeding 10 m. Distance moved was not related to colony size. Over multiple moves, paths were random walks around the original nest location. Relocation is probably intrinsic to the life history of this species, and the causes of relocation remain obscure--the architecture of old and new nests was very similar, and neither the forest canopy nor the density or size of neighbors was correlated with relocation. Monitoring entire relocations (n = 20 showed that they were usually completed in 4 to 6 days. Moves were diurnal, peaking in the mornings and afternoons dipping during mid-day, and ceasing before sundown. Workers excavated the new nest continuously during the daytime throughout the move and beyond. A minority of workers carried seeds, charcoal and brood, with seeds being by far the most common burden. The proportion of burdened workers increased throughout the move. Measured from year to year, small colonies gained size and large ones lost it. Colonies moving more than once in two years lost more size than those moving less often, suggesting that moving may bear a fitness cost. Colony relocation is a dramatic and consistent feature of the life history of the Florida harvester ant, inviting inquiry into its proximal and ultimate causes.

  8. Monitoring DNA contamination in handled vs. directly excavated ancient human skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli, Elena; Modi, Alessandra; Serpico, Ciro; Achilli, Alessandro; Lancioni, Hovirag; Lippi, Barbara; Bertoldi, Francesca; Gelichi, Sauro; Lari, Martina; Caramelli, David

    2013-01-01

    Bones, teeth and hair are often the only physical evidence of human or animal presence at an archaeological site; they are also the most widely used sources of samples for ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis. Unfortunately, the DNA extracted from ancient samples, already scarce and highly degraded, is widely susceptible to exogenous contaminations that can affect the reliability of aDNA studies. We evaluated the molecular effects of sample handling on five human skeletons freshly excavated from a cemetery dated between the 11 to the 14(th) century. We collected specimens from several skeletal areas (teeth, ribs, femurs and ulnas) from each individual burial. We then divided the samples into two different sets: one labeled as "virgin samples" (i.e. samples that were taken by archaeologists under contamination-controlled conditions and then immediately sent to the laboratory for genetic analyses), and the second called "lab samples"(i.e. samples that were handled without any particular precautions and subject to normal washing, handling and measuring procedures in the osteological lab). Our results show that genetic profiles from "lab samples" are incomplete or ambiguous in the different skeletal areas while a different outcome is observed in the "virgin samples" set. Generally, all specimens from different skeletal areas in the exception of teeth present incongruent results between "lab" and "virgin" samples. Therefore teeth are less prone to contamination than the other skeletal areas we analyzed and may be considered a material of choice for classical aDNA studies. In addition, we showed that bones can also be a good candidate for human aDNA analysis if they come directly from the excavation site and are accompanied by a clear taphonomic history.

  9. Experimental study on the artificial recharge of semiconfined aquifers involved in deep excavation engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, G.; Cao, J. R.; Cheng, X. S.; Ha, D.; Wang, F. J.

    2018-02-01

    Artificial recharge measures have been adopted to control the drawdown of confined aquifers and the ground subsidence caused by dewatering during deep excavation in Tianjin, Shanghai and other regions in China. However, research on recharge theory is still limited. Additionally, confined aquifers consisting of silt and silty sand in Tianjin have lower hydraulic conductivities than those consisting of sand or gravel, and the feasibility and effectiveness of recharge methods in these semiconfined aquifers urgently require investigation. A series of single-well and multiwell pumping and recharge tests was conducted at a metro station excavation site in Tianjin. The test results showed that it was feasible to recharge silt and silty sand semiconfined aquifers, and, to a certain extent, the hydrogeological parameters obtained from the pumping tests could be used to predict the water level rise during single-well recharge. However, the predicted results underestimated the water level rise near the recharge well (within 7 m) by approximately 10-25%, likely because the permeability coefficient around the well was reduced during the recharge process. Pressured recharge significantly improved the efficiency of the recharge process. Maintaining the recharge and pumping rates at a nearly equal level effectively controlled the surrounding surface and building settlement. However, the surrounding surface subsidence tended to rapidly develop when recharge stopped. Therefore, the recharge process should continue and gradually stop after the pumping stops. The twin-well combined recharge technique can be used to control the head loss of an aquifer when one of the recharge wells requires pumping to solve the associated clogging problems.

  10. Excavations in 2014 at Wade Street, Bristol - a documentary and archaeological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Corcos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A staged programme of historical research and archaeological fieldwork, involving a desk-based assessment in 2000 (Smith and Erskine 2000, an evaluation in 2013 (Mason 2013, and an excavation followed by a watching brief in 2014, the latter two by Avon Archaeology Ltd, was undertaken in order to mitigate the archaeological impact of a proposed residential development on a site of 1,260m² at the corner and on the north-west side of Little Anne Street and Wade Street, St Jude’s, Bristol. The site was formerly occupied by residential dwellings, originally established in the very early 18th century as part of a then newly planned development of artisans’ houses. In combination, the data from these studies indicate that the Wade Street site has a history of continuous occupation, from c. 1700 until the buildings on it were removed in the years on either side of the Second World War as part of a so-called 'slum clearance' project. A very small assemblage of medieval pottery recovered from the lower contexts of the site during the excavation hints at some level of activity in the vicinity during the medieval period. This publication offers an opportunity to link the results of the fieldwork to an outline study of a sample of the 19th-century census records, to give a picture of the social dynamics of a highly diverse community in the second half of that century, and which presents a surprisingly mixed picture of both long stability, and incessant change in terms of the movement of people into and out of this part of Wade Street.

  11. The Role of Cell Compartmentalization and Cell Differentiation in Cyanobacterial Excavation of Miineral Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Guida, B. S.; Couradeau, E.

    2015-12-01

    The bioerosion of coastal limestones and biogenic carbonates by boring filamentous or pseudo-filamentous cyanobacteria is not only a geomicrobial phenomenon of global proportions, but also plays an important role in the demise of coral reefs, and affects significantly human enterprises like bivalve fisheries. In spite of its importance, the mechanism by which cyanobacteria excavate carbonates constitutes an apparent paradox, in that their metabolism will tend to precipitate carbonates, not dissolved them. We have previously advanced, and obtained evidence for, a mechanism of excavation that relies on the uptake of Ca2+ by cells at the boring front, its trans-cellular transport along the filaments, and its eventual active excretion at the solid/liquid interface. It was postulated that the mechanism involved the strategically organized deployment of Ca2+ transport enzymes like P-type Ca2+ ATPases and Ca2+ channels. Here we present evidence that confirms this basic mechanism, but also reveals that it is based on an unexpected level of cellular complexity. The model organism Mastigocoleus testarum BC008, transports Ca2+ from the mineral to the external medium using a repetitive, polar arrangement of Ca2+ ATPases, localized preferentially on one cellular pole, in a ring conformation on the cell membrane adjacent to the trans-cellular septum, pumping Ca2+ locally towards the periplasmic space, from which it passively enters the next cell. This strain also develops specialized groups of cells, which we named calcicytes, often but not exclusively located at the ends of filaments, that accumulate large concentrations of Ca2+, some 40-fold higher than typical in microbes, and seem to act as sinks or capacitors in the trans-cellular Ca2+ transport. Calcicytes are also characterized by a lack of photosynthetic pigments, and a very high intracellular pH. These cellular adaptations can also be found in evolutionary distant euendoliths such as the pseudofilamentous Hyella sp.

  12. Fish remnants from the excavations of the Bronze Age barrow near Maryanskoe village (Dnepropetrovsk region, Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Kovalchuk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Bronze Age mound (2.5–2.3 kya BC is located near the Maryanskoe village (Apostolovskyi district, Dnepropetrovsk region and was excavated in 1953. The results of determination of the fish remnants, which were found during the excavation, are presented in the paper. Eleven species belonging to 9 genera, 5 families and 5 orders (Acipenseriformes, Cypriniformes, Siluriformes, Esociformes, Perciformes were identified: russian sturgeon Acipenser gueldenstaedtii Brandt et Ratzeburg, 1833, stellate sturgeon A. stellatus Pallas, 1771, common ide Idus idus (Linnaeus, 1758, common roach Rutilus rutilus (Linnaeus, 1758, pontic roach R. frisii (Nordmann, 1840, common bream Abramis brama (Linnaeus, 1758, common carp Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus, 1758, tench Tinca tinca (Linnaeus, 1758, european catfish Silurus glanis Linnaeus, 1758, northern pike Esox lucius (Linnaeus, 1758, and zander Sander lucioperca (Linnaeus, 1758. Most of them are quite common in the Dnieper river basin. It was found that carp fishes predominate in the number of species. Most of the bone remnants in the collection belong to zander, catfish and pike, while common roach, pontic roach and common bream are identified by the few bones. This may indicate a different role of these species in the diet of the local population. The ratio of skeletal elements in the collection is the evidence of the fish cutting on the site. Body length and weight was reconstructed for 64 fish specimens. It was found that they were mature and small-sized, except for catfish, pike and perch. Taking into account the characteristics of the funeral rituals of the Yamna culture population, fish bones from the mound near Maryanskoe can be remnants of the parting meal.

  13. Long-term monitoring of rock mass properties in the underground excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Jirků, Jaroslav; Slavík, Lubomír; Bárta, Jaroslav

    2015-04-01

    It is generally agreed today that hazardous waste should be placed in repositories hundreds of meters below the Earth's surface. In our research we deal with the long-term monitoring of the underground excavation by seismic and electrical resistivity measurements. Permanent measuring system was developed and installed at the Bedřichov gallery test site (northern Bohemia). The gallery was excavated using TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) in granitic rocks. Realized repeated measurements include ultrasonic time of flight measurement and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). The seismic measurements are performed by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock wall using one seismic source and three receivers in the distances of 1, 2 and 3 m. The main emphasis is devoted to P-waves; however, recording of full waveform enables analyzing of S- waves and other types of waves as well. The comparison of repeated measurements is used for an assessment of changes in seismic velocities with very high-accuracy. The repetition rate of measurements can be selected from seconds; however such fast changes in the rock mass are unexpected. The ERT measurement is performed on the same rock wall using 48 electrodes. The spacing between electrodes is 20 centimeters. The conductivity of undisturbed granitic rocks is extremely low. Therefore the observed local increase of conductivity can be associated with joints and fractures saturated with water, resulting in their ionic conductivity. Repeated ERT measurement can reveal some changes in the rock mass. Due to time requirements of ERT measurement the repetition rate can be about three hours. The data collected by measuring system is transferred by means of computer network and can be accessed via internet. This contribution deals with preliminary results gained so far during the testing of developed monitoring system. Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, project No. TA

  14. Pre-excavation studies of prehistoric cave sites by magnetic prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkis., Sonia; Matskevich, Zinovii; Meshveliani, Tengiz

    2014-05-01

    Detailed magnetic survey was performed for caves study in Israel (1995-1996) within the framework of the Beit Shemesh Regional Project (Judean Shephelah). The experience accumulated in Israel we applied later (2010) in two Georgian prehistoric cave sites: Cherula and Kotias-Klde. The magnetic method is based on the contrast in magnetic properties between a target object (e.g., buried archaeological feature) and the host medium (i.e, the surrounding bedrock and soil). The feasibility of the magnetic method for cave revealing was evaluated by magnetic susceptibility (κ) measurements of surrounding soil and rocks, and archaeological features: stones making up the walls, ceramic fragments and cave fill. According to data obtained, the κ of soil within caves (cave fill) is higher than that of surrounding soil. The enhancement of cave fill κ occurs because processes associated with human habitation: repeated heating and accumulation of organic debris. Both these processes provide good conditions for the conversion of the iron oxide found within the soil to a strongly ferromagnetic form (Mullins, 1977; Maher, 1986; Dalan and Banerjee, 1998, Itkis and Eppelbaum, 1999; Itkis, 2003) The presence of highly magnetic ceramics in caves also enhances magnetic contrast between practically non-magnetic bed rock (chalk in Ramat Beit Shemesh Site (Israel) and limestone (Georgian sites) and the cave fill, increasing the potential of the magnetic method to reveal caves (Itkis, 2011). Based on magnetic survey results, an excavation revealed a cave with a large amount of well preserved pottery and finds typical of the Early Bronze Age. Both studied cave sites in Georgia were located in Chiatura region of Imeretia province. Cherula site is a karstic rockshelter with a single chamber, ca 100 sq. m. The site was briefly tested in 1970s'. The area excavated in 2010 went to the depth of 60 cm below the present day surface; the limestone bedrock was not reached. The excavation revealed

  15. Treatment of deep caries lesions in adults: randomized clinical trials comparing stepwise vs. direct complete excavation, and direct pulp capping vs. partial pulpotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørndal, Lars; Reit, Claes; Bruun, Gitte Hoffmann

    2010-01-01

    Less invasive excavation methods have been suggested for deep caries lesions. We tested the effects of stepwise vs. direct complete excavation, 1 yr after the procedure had been carried out, in 314 adults (from six centres) who had received treatment of a tooth with deep caries. The teeth had car...

  16. A multi-method luminescence dating of the Palaeolithic sequence of La Ferrassie based on new excavations adjacent to the La Ferrassie 1 and 2 skeletons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerin, Guillaume; Frouin, Marine; Talamo, Sahra

    2015-01-01

    A new interdisciplinary project was initiated to excavate a portion of the Palaeolithic site of La Ferrassie left intact by earlier excavations. One of the aims of this project was to provide chronological information on the succession of Middle and Upper Palaeolithic layers, as well as on the sk...

  17. Predicting severe winter coastal storm damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondula, David M; Dolan, Robert, E-mail: hondula@virginia.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, PO Box 400123, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Over the past 40 years residents of, and visitors to, the North Carolina coastal barrier islands have experienced the destructive forces of several 'named' extratropical storms. These storms have caused large-scale redistributions of sand and loss of coastal structures and infrastructure. While most of the population living on the islands are familiar with the wintertime storms, the damage and scars of the 'super northeasters'-such as the Ash Wednesday storm of 7 March 1962, and the Halloween storm of 1989-are slipping away from the public's memory. In this research we compared the damage zones of the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm, as depicted on aerial photographs taken after the storm, with photos taken of the same areas in 2003. With these high-resolution aerial photos we were able to estimate the extent of new development which has taken place along the Outer Banks of North Carolina since 1962. Three damage zones were defined that extend across the islands from the ocean landward on the 1962 aerial photos: (1) the zone of almost total destruction on the seaward edge of the islands where the storm waves break; (2) the zone immediately inland where moderate structural damage occurs during severe storms; and (3) the zone of flood damage at the landward margin of the storm surge and overwash. We considered the rate of coastal erosion, the rate of development, and increases in property values as factors which may contribute to changing the financial risk for coastal communities. In comparing the values of these four factors with the 1962 damage data, we produced a predicted dollar value for storm damage should another storm of the magnitude of the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm occur in the present decade. This model also provides an opportunity to estimate the rate of increase in the potential losses through time as shoreline erosion continues to progressively reduce the buffer between the development and the edge of the sea. Our data suggest that the

  18. The early medieval tesserae from the St Servatius Church excavations in Maastricht - The Netherlands (1981-1989)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panhuysen, T.

    2016-01-01

    In the eighties of the last century a massive excavation was carried out in the Church of St Servatius in Maastricht in the context of an overall restoration of the church building which dates from the 11th to 15th century. The Servatius Church was originally a grave church that was founded in the

  19. Sibudu Cave, KwaZulu-Natal: Background to the excavations of middle stone age and iron age occupations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wadley, L

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Sibudu Cave excavations have yielded an Iron Age occupation directly overlying a long sequence of final Middle Stone Age (MSA)layers dating c. 61 000–26 000 years ago. Older, undated layers contain a Howiesons Poort Industry. A diverse animal...

  20. A Survey of Commercially Available and Proven Remote Control Machines for Excavation and Recovery of Buried Ordnance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruneda, C; Bilstrom, A

    2002-03-01

    The issue of unexploded ordnance excavation and removal is complicated by the interaction between the independent robotics systems (e.g. manipulator, sensors, and software). A review of commercially available robotic systems highlights the specificity of the design and intent of each for the application and problem being addressed. Although multiple parties, including universities, research institutes, and manufacturers worldwide are concerned with removing explosive ordnance (EOD) and unexploded ordnance (UXO), the exact details of the problems and tasks at each site differ between projects, even slightly. The risks associated with the excavation and removal of ordnance require a level of robustness that necessitates extensive testing and engineering despite project similarities. Based on the experience of researchers, the integration of systems at unique excavation sites will be the critical element of the project to ensure the safe and robust removal of buried ordnance. Although this report touches on some systems integration issues to a limited degree, the report at this stage is primarily a survey of commercially available, proven robotics components and systems for the excavation and recovery of buried ordnance.

  1. FREESURF: A three-dimensional finite-element model for simulating groundwater flow into and around an excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzman, Morley

    1992-07-15

    A three-dimensional finite-element code was developed and used to simulate the flow of groundwater towards an excavation in a saturated porous medium, allowing for seepage faces. An iterative procedure was used to predict the movement of the water table and the seepage flux. The numerical solution agreed well with experimental results from a sandbox experiment. (auth)

  2. Does red-cockaded woodpecker excavation of resin wells increase risk of bark beetle infestation of cavity trees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; D. Craig Rudolph; William G. Ross; David L. Kulhavy; Robert N. Coulson

    2001-01-01

    The red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) is unique among North American woodpeckers in that it nests and roosts almost exclusively in living pines (Pinus spp.) The red-cockaded woodpecker makes daily excavations at small wounds, termed "resin wells," around the cavity entrance and on the bole of the cavity tree...

  3. Prospects for application of robotic mechano-hydraulical excavation of gas-bearing coal layers at great depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryanov, V. N.; Pavlova, L. D.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper the scientific basis for robotic technology of excavation prone to gas- dynamic phenomena of a coal layer with high gas-bearing capacity at great depths is developed. The constructive scheme of automated remote-controlled mining robot, that fractures coal by high-pressure hydraulic jets in the gas polluted environment, is proposed.

  4. The Balance of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers to Limiting Factors Nutrient, Soil Fertility and Maize (Zea mays L Yield on Paddy Soil of C-Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slamet Minardi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The activities for other purposes in the paddy soil will cause soil damage and reduce the values of soil productivity. The use of organic fertilizer is one of efforts to recover and rehabilitate the soil, because it is the key to improve its properties. The purposes of this research were to identify the characteristics of the soil (chemical as a component of soil fertility, nutrition limiting factors and knowing the balance of organic and inorganic fertilizers on the optimum cultivation of maize (Zea mays L to achieve maximum production. Research was conducted by using Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD with single factor: consisting of six treatments, as follows consisted of control, treatment of inorganic fertilizer as recommended, organic fertilizer (manure, and the balance between organic and inorganic fertilizers. The results showed that the balance between organic and inorganic fertilizers can increase nutrition limiting factors (N and P and soil fertility in paddy soil of C-excavation. It has been proved by the increasing growth and yield of maize, such as plant height, fresh and dry weight of plant, weight and girth of cob. The highest yield of maize was shown in weight cobs per plant, i.e 190 g as shown in the treatment of the balance between organic and inorganic fertilizers (75: 25%. It is significantly different than the control treatment, however it showed no significant difference with other treatments.

  5. Zoning Districts - Volusia County HUB Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) Zones in Volusia County. Go to http://www.sba.gov/hubzone or contact the Department of Economic Development (386) 248-8048...

  6. Characterization of mechanical damage in granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh-Phong Luong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to illustrate the use of infrared thermography as a non-destructive and non-contact technique to observe the phenomenological manifestation of damage in granite under unconfined compression. It allows records and observations in real time of heat patterns produced by the dissipation of energy generated by plasticity. The experimental results show that this technique, which couples mechanical and thermal energy, can be used for illustrating the onset of damage mechanism by stress concentration in weakness zones.

  7. Characteristics of Fault Zones in Volcanic Rocks Near Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

    2007-11-27

    During 2005 and 2006, the USGS conducted geological studies of fault zones at surface outcrops at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives of these studies were to characterize fault geometry, identify the presence of fault splays, and understand the width and internal architecture of fault zones. Geologic investigations were conducted at surface exposures in upland areas adjacent to Yucca Flat, a basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site; these data serve as control points for the interpretation of the subsurface data collected at Yucca Flat by other USGS scientists. Fault zones in volcanic rocks near Yucca Flat differ in character and width as a result of differences in the degree of welding and alteration of the protolith, and amount of fault offset. Fault-related damage zones tend to scale with fault offset; damage zones associated with large-offset faults (>100 m) are many tens of meters wide, whereas damage zones associated with smaller-offset faults are generally a only a meter or two wide. Zeolitically-altered tuff develops moderate-sized damage zones whereas vitric nonwelded, bedded and airfall tuff have very minor damage zones, often consisting of the fault zone itself as a deformation band, with minor fault effect to the surrounding rock mass. These differences in fault geometry and fault zone architecture in surface analog sites can serve as a guide toward interpretation of high-resolution subsurface geophysical results from Yucca Flat.

  8. UV Habitable Zones Further Constrain Possible Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Where should we search for life in the universe? Habitable zones are traditionallydetermined based on the possibility of liquid water existing on a planet but ultraviolet (UV) radiation also plays a key role.The UV Habitable ZoneSchematic showing how the traditional habitable zones location and width changes around different types of stars. The UV habitable zone also hasdifferent locations and widths depending on the mass and metallicity of the star. [NASA/Kepler Mission/Dana Berry]Besides the presence of liquid water, there are other things life may need to persist. For life as we know it, one important elementis moderate UV radiation: if a planet receives too little UV flux, many biological compounds cant be synthesized. If it receives too much, however, then terrestrial biological systems (e.g. DNA) can be damaged.To determinethe most likely place to findpersistent life, we should therefore look for the region where a stars traditional habitable zone, within which liquid water is possible, overlaps with its UV habitable zone, within which the UV flux is at the right level to support life.Relationship between the stellar mass and location of the boundaries of the traditional and UV habitable zones for a solar-metallicity star. din and dout denote inner and outer boundaries, respectively. ZAMS and TMS denote when the star joins and leaves the main sequence, respectively. The traditional and UV habitable zones overlap only for stars of 11.5 solar masses. [Adapted from Oishi and Kamaya 2016]Looking for OverlapIn a recent study, two scientists from the National Defense Academy of Japan, Midori Oishi and Hideyuki Kamaya, explored howthe location of this UV habitable zone and that of its overlap with the traditional habitable zone might be affected by a stars mass and metallicity.Oishi and Kamaya developed a simple evolutional model of the UV habitable zone in stars in the mass range of 0.084 solar masses with metallicities of roughly solar metallicity (Z=0.02), a

  9. a 3d Information System for the Documentation of Archaeologica L Excavations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardissone, P.; Bornaz, L.; Degattis, G.; Domaine, R.

    2013-07-01

    Documentation of archaeological and cultural heritage sites is at the heart of the archaeological process and an important component in cultural heritage research, presentation and restorations. In 2012 the Superintendence of Cultural Heritage of Aosta Valley - IT (Soprintendenza per i Beni e le Attività Culturali della Region e Autonoma Valle d'Aosta) carried out a complex archaeological excavation in a composite archaeological context, situated an urban background: the Aosta city centre. This archaeological excavation has been characterized by the classical urban archaeological issues: little space, short time, complex stratigraphy. Moreover the investigations have come out several structures and walls that required safety and conservation measures. Ad hoc 3D solutions carried out a complete 3D survey of the area in 10 different time/situations of the Archaeological digs, chosen in collaborations with the archaeological staff. In this way a multi temporal 3D description of the site has been provided for the archaeological analysis and for the project of the restorations activities. The 3D surveys has been carried out integrating GPS, laser scanner technology and photogrammetry. In order to meet the needs of the site, and its complex logistics and to obtain products that guarantee the high quality and detail required for archaeological analysis, we have developed different procedures and methodologies: hdr imaging for 3D model with correct, consistent and uniform colours, noise filtering and people filtering, for the removal of interference between laser instrument and object of the survey, Advanced laser scanner triangulation, in order to consider both artificial and natural tie points, for a correct registration of a huge amount of scans. Single image orientation on 3D data, in order to integrate the laser data with data coming from digital photogrammetry (faster on the field than the laser scanner survey, than used in certain situations). The results of all

  10. A 3D INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR THE DOCUMENTATION OF ARCHAEOLOGICA L EXCAVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ardissone

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Documentation of archaeological and cultural heritage sites is at the heart of the archaeological process and an important component in cultural heritage research, presentation and restorations. In 2012 the Superintendence of Cultural Heritage of Aosta Valley – IT (Soprintendenza per i Beni e le Attività Culturali della Region e Autonoma Valle d'Aosta carried out a complex archaeological excavation in a composite archaeological context, situated an urban background: the Aosta city centre. This archaeological excavation has been characterized by the classical urban archaeological issues: little space, short time, complex stratigraphy. Moreover the investigations have come out several structures and walls that required safety and conservation measures. Ad hoc 3D solutions carried out a complete 3D survey of the area in 10 different time/situations of the Archaeological digs, chosen in collaborations with the archaeological staff. In this way a multi temporal 3D description of the site has been provided for the archaeological analysis and for the project of the restorations activities. The 3D surveys has been carried out integrating GPS, laser scanner technology and photogrammetry. In order to meet the needs of the site, and its complex logistics and to obtain products that guarantee the high quality and detail required for archaeological analysis, we have developed different procedures and methodologies: hdr imaging for 3D model with correct, consistent and uniform colours, noise filtering and people filtering, for the removal of interference between laser instrument and object of the survey, Advanced laser scanner triangulation, in order to consider both artificial and natural tie points, for a correct registration of a huge amount of scans. Single image orientation on 3D data, in order to integrate the laser data with data coming from digital photogrammetry (faster on the field than the laser scanner survey, than used in certain situations

  11. Comparison between air and carbon dioxide insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Bin; Wang, Zi-Hao; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Han; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2012-12-28

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CO(2) insufflation compared with air insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Sixty patients were randomized to undergo endoscopic submucosal excavation, with the CO(2) group (n = 30) and the air group (n = 30) undergoing CO(2) insufflation and air insufflation in the ESE, respectively. The end-tidal CO(2) level (pETCO(2)) was observed at 4 time points: at the beginning of ESE, at total removal of the tumors, at completed wound management, and 10 min after ESE. Additionally, the patients' experience of pain at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after the examination was registered using a visual analog scale (VAS). Both the CO(2) group and air group were similar in mean age, sex, body mass index (all P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in PetCO(2) values before and after the procedure (P > 0.05). However, the pain scores after the ESE at different time points in the CO(2) group decreased significantly compared with the air group (1 h: 21.2 ± 3.4 vs 61.5 ± 1.7; 3 h: 8.5 ± 0.7 vs 42.9 ± 1.3; 6 h: 4.4 ± 1.6 vs 27.6 ± 1.2; 24 h: 2.3 ± 0.4 vs 21.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the percentage of VAS scores of 0 in the CO(2) group after 1, 3, 6 and 24 h was significantly higher than that in the air group (60.7 ± 1.4 vs 18.9 ± 1.5, 81.5 ± 2.3 vs 20.6 ± 1.2, 89.2 ± 0.7 vs 36.8 ± 0.9, 91.3 ± 0.8 vs 63.8 ± 1.3, respectively, P < 0.05). Moreover, the condition of the CO(2) group was better than that of the air group with respect to anal exsufflation. Insufflation of CO(2) in the ESE of gastrointestinal stromal tumors will not cause CO(2) retention and it may significantly reduce the level of pain, thus it is safe and effective.

  12. Forensic Excavation of Rock Masses: A Technique to Investigate Discontinuity Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, J.; Hencher, S. R.; West, L. J.; Handley, K.

    2017-11-01

    True persistence of rock discontinuities (areas with insignificant tensile strength) is an important factor controlling the engineering behaviour of fractured rock masses, but is extremely difficult to quantify using current geological survey methodologies, even where there is good rock exposure. Trace length as measured in the field or using remote measurement devices is actually only broadly indicative of persistence for rock engineering practice and numerical modelling. Visible traces of discontinuities are treated as if they were open fractures within rock mass classifications, despite many such traces being non-persistent and actually retaining considerable strength. The common assumption of 100% persistence, based on trace length, is generally extremely conservative in terms of strength and stiffness, but not always so and may lead to a wrong prediction of failure mechanism or of excavatability. Assuming full persistence would give hopelessly incorrect predictions of hydraulic conductivity. A new technique termed forensic excavation of rock masses is introduced, as a procedure for directly investigating discontinuity persistence. This technique involves non-explosive excavation of rock masses by injecting an expansive chemical splitter along incipient discontinuities. On expansion, the splitter causes the incipient traces to open as true joints. Experiments are described in which near-planar rock discontinuities, through siltstone and sandstone, were opened up by injecting the splitter into holes drilled along the lines of visible traces of the discontinuities in the laboratory and in the field. Once exposed the surfaces were examined to investigate the pre-existing persistence characteristics of the incipient discontinuities. One conclusion from this study is that visible trace length of a discontinuity can be a poor indicator of true persistence (defined for a fracture area with negligible tensile strength). An observation from this series of experiments

  13. Optimal design of hydraulic excavator working device based on multiple surrogate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Qiu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The optimal design of hydraulic excavator working device is often characterized by computationally expensive analysis methods such as finite element analysis. Significant difficulties also exist when using a sensitivity-based decomposition approach to such practical engineering problems because explicit mathematical formulas between the objective function and design variables are impossible to formulate. An effective alternative is known as the surrogate model. The purpose of this article is to provide a comparative study on multiple surrogate models, including the response surface methodology, Kriging, radial basis function, and support vector machine, and select the one that best fits the optimization of the working device. In this article, a new modeling strategy based on the combination of the dimension variables between hinge joints and the forces loaded on hinge joints of the working device is proposed. In addition, the extent to which the accuracy of the surrogate models depends on different design variables is presented. The bionic intelligent optimization algorithm is then used to obtain the optimal results, which demonstrate that the maximum stresses calculated by the predicted method and finite element analysis are quite similar, but the efficiency of the former is much higher than that of the latter.

  14. Particle Size Distributions Measured in the B757 Engine Plume During EXCAVATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Terry; Penko, Paul; Rivera, Monica; Culler, Steve

    2005-01-01

    The Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile Aerosols and Trace Species Emissions (EXCAVATE) took place at NASA Langley Research Center during January 2002. This ground based study was conducted to examine the role of fuel sulfur content on particulate emissions. Size distributions as a function of engine operating conditions were measured in the exhaust plume of a B-757 at four downstream axial locations (1 m, 10 m, 25 m and 35 m). The engine was run on JP-5 with three different sulfur concentrations, 810 ppm, 1050 ppm, 1820 ppm; and was operated over a range of power settings from idle to near-full power. Zalabsky differential-mobility analyzers DMAS), Met One condensation-nuclei counters (CNCs), and a TSI 3022 condensation-particle counter (CPC) were used to measure the size distributions. The total number-count (particle concentration), number-based Emissions Index (EInumber) and mass-based Emissions Index (E1-J increased with fuel sulfur-content and engine pressure ratio (EPR). Count Mean Diameter (Ch4D) also increased with EPR yet remained fairly constant with fuel sulfur-content for a fixed location in the exhaust plume. Also the mode and CMD both increased with distance in the plume.

  15. Characterization of Ancient Egyptian Wall Paintings, the Excavations of Cairo University at Saqqara

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    Hussein MAREY MAHMOUD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at characterizing some Egyptian wall paintings discovered during the excavations of Cairo University (since 1988 and recently in 2005 at Saqqara area in the south of Cairo. There, a number of tombs dating back to the 19th dynasty (c.1293–1185 BC were discovered. The walls of these tombs are carved with bass and raised reliefs and painted with different colours. The characterization of the wall paintings was done by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (backscattered electron mode, BSE equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS, micro XRF spectrometry (µ-XRF, and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The analysis of the examined samples indicated that the blue pigment is Egyptian blue (Cuprorivaite, the green pigment is Egyptian green, the red pigment is red ochre, and the yellow pigment is a blended layer of yellow ochre and orpiment (As2S3. The results will help in providing an image concerning some painting materials used during the new Kingdom in ancient Egypt

  16. Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile Aerosol and Trace-Species Emissions (EXCAVATE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. E.; Branham, H.-S.; Hudgins, C. H.; Plant, J. V.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Miller, T. M.; Viggiano, A. A.; Blake, D. R.; Boudries, H.; Canagaratna, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile and Trace Species Emissions (EXCAVATE) was conducted at Langley Research Center (LaRC) in January 2002 and focused upon assaying the production of aerosols and aerosol precursors by a modern commercial aircraft, the Langley B757, during ground-based operation. Remaining uncertainty in the postcombustion fate of jet fuel sulfur contaminants, the need for data to test new theories of particle formation and growth within engine exhaust plumes, and the need for observations to develop air quality models for predicting pollution levels in airport terminal areas were the primary factors motivating the experiment. NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) and the Ultra Effect Engine Technology (UEET) Program sponsored the experiment which had the specific objectives of determining ion densities; the fraction of fuel S converted from S(IV) to S(VI); the concentration and speciation of volatile aerosols and black carbon; and gas-phase concentrations of long-chain hydrocarbon and PAH species, all as functions of engine power, fuel composition, and plume age.

  17. Catalogue of small finds from excavations outside the fortified palace of Romuliana, 2005-2007

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    Živić Maja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The excavations of the trial trenches extra muros Romuliana, in the 2005-2007 period, were carried out in cooperation with the DAI RGK (Römisch-Germanische Kommission des Deutches Arhäologische Instituts, in order to verify the results of a previously conducted geophysical survey. Although the number of finds obtained from the eight test-pits (05/1, 05/2, 06/1, 06/2, 07/1, 07/2 07/3 and 07/4, that had been explored during four campaigns, was not big among them we can still find artifacts of great importance for studying the history of Romuliana, relating to the Late Classical and Early Byzantine period, from the end of the III up to the end of the VI century A.D. We point out finds of cruciform, gold fibula, coming from the tomb explored in the year 2005, and a gilded specimen with imperial portraits, from grave 6 explored in 2006. Finds of early Byzantine bronze fibulae, with a reversed back foot, are also of some importance, as well as glass vessels and a large number of iron tools. The finds in the catalogue are listed according to the explored units.

  18. Hard-Rock Stability Analysis for Span Design in Entry-Type Excavations with Learning Classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza García-Gonzalo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The mining industry relies heavily on empirical analysis for design and prediction. An empirical design method, called the critical span graph, was developed specifically for rock stability analysis in entry-type excavations, based on an extensive case-history database of cut and fill mining in Canada. This empirical span design chart plots the critical span against rock mass rating for the observed case histories and has been accepted by many mining operations for the initial span design of cut and fill stopes. Different types of analysis have been used to classify the observed cases into stable, potentially unstable and unstable groups. The main purpose of this paper is to present a new method for defining rock stability areas of the critical span graph, which applies machine learning classifiers (support vector machine and extreme learning machine. The results show a reasonable correlation with previous guidelines. These machine learning methods are good tools for developing empirical methods, since they make no assumptions about the regression function. With this software, it is easy to add new field observations to a previous database, improving prediction output with the addition of data that consider the local conditions for each mine.

  19. Hard-Rock Stability Analysis for Span Design in Entry-Type Excavations with Learning Classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gonzalo, Esperanza; Fernández-Muñiz, Zulima; García Nieto, Paulino José; Bernardo Sánchez, Antonio; Menéndez Fernández, Marta

    2016-06-29

    The mining industry relies heavily on empirical analysis for design and prediction. An empirical design method, called the critical span graph, was developed specifically for rock stability analysis in entry-type excavations, based on an extensive case-history database of cut and fill mining in Canada. This empirical span design chart plots the critical span against rock mass rating for the observed case histories and has been accepted by many mining operations for the initial span design of cut and fill stopes. Different types of analysis have been used to classify the observed cases into stable, potentially unstable and unstable groups. The main purpose of this paper is to present a new method for defining rock stability areas of the critical span graph, which applies machine learning classifiers (support vector machine and extreme learning machine). The results show a reasonable correlation with previous guidelines. These machine learning methods are good tools for developing empirical methods, since they make no assumptions about the regression function. With this software, it is easy to add new field observations to a previous database, improving prediction output with the addition of data that consider the local conditions for each mine.

  20. A Mobility-Aware Adaptive Duty Cycling Mechanism for Tracking Objects during Tunnel Excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taesik; Min, Hong; Jung, Jinman

    2017-02-23

    Tunnel construction workers face many dangers while working under dark conditions, with difficult access and egress, and many potential hazards. To enhance safety at tunnel construction sites, low latency tracking of mobile objects (e.g., heavy-duty equipment) and construction workers is critical for managing the dangerous construction environment. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are the basis for a widely used technology for monitoring the environment because of their energy-efficiency and scalability. However, their use involves an inherent point-to-point delay caused by duty cycling mechanisms that can result in a significant rise in the delivery latency for tracking mobile objects. To overcome this issue, we proposed a mobility-aware adaptive duty cycling mechanism for the WSNs based on object mobility. For the evaluation, we tested this mechanism for mobile object tracking at a tunnel excavation site. The evaluation results showed that the proposed mechanism could track mobile objects with low latency while they were moving, and could reduce energy consumption by increasing sleep time while the objects were immobile.

  1. Efficacy of Endoscopic Submucosal Excavation for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors in the Cardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Shen, Lei

    2016-12-01

    Our goal was to estimate the feasibility and efficacy of endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in the cardia. We analyzed the clinical data of 30 patients who were diagnosed with GISTs after ESE in the cardia at the Endoscopy Center of Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University (China) from June 2009 to 2015. We evaluated the operative and postoperative conditions and long-term follow-up of these patients. The success rate and the complete resection rate were both 100%. The maximum diameter of the tumor ranged from 1.0 to 3.5 cm (2.2±0.2 cm). The operation time was 20 to 120 min (50±5 min). During ESE, bleeding occurred in all cases (100%) with a mean blood loss of 50 mL, and perforation in 6 (20%), including 2 full-thickness resections. GIST was confirmed by pathology in all cases. Follow-up included endoscopy at 1, 3, and 6 months, and at 1 year. At 1 month, ulcer was detected in 23 cases (76.67%), titanium clips remained in 17 cases (56.67%), and scar tissues were observed in the remainder. No recurrence was found with gastroscopy. The cardia is a unique anatomic location for GISTs, which often requires complex surgeries prone to complications. ESE for GISTs of the cardia is a challenging, but safe and effective procedure.

  2. The effect of MTA application on the affected dentine remineralization after partial caries excavation (in vivo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, A. R.; Meidyawati, R.; Djauharie, N.

    2017-08-01

    On deep carious lesions, only thin dentine remains, causing a high risk of pulp exposure during the removal of all infected dentine. A minimally invasive technique is required, such as a partial caries excavation method in the infected dentine tissue and the use of bioactive material that can promote (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate) MTA remineralization. To compare the remineralization of deep carious lesion-affected dentine with the removal of some and all the infected dentine after the application of MTA. Subjects were divided into two groups: group I had only some parts of the infected dentine removed before MTA application, while group II had all the infected dentine removed before MTA application. Each group was measured on the pixel grey value before the treatment and again four weeks after the MTA application, and then the results were compared. Furthermore, the enhancement of both groups’ grey values were compared. Remineralization occurred in both groups after the MTA application. There was no significant difference in the remineralization level of the affected dentine in both groups I and II four weeks after the MTA application. Remineralization occurred in the affected dentine in both groups, either by removing only some parts or all the infected dentine in the deep carious lesion.

  3. A Mobility-Aware Adaptive Duty Cycling Mechanism for Tracking Objects during Tunnel Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taesik Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel construction workers face many dangers while working under dark conditions, with difficult access and egress, and many potential hazards. To enhance safety at tunnel construction sites, low latency tracking of mobile objects (e.g., heavy-duty equipment and construction workers is critical for managing the dangerous construction environment. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are the basis for a widely used technology for monitoring the environment because of their energy-efficiency and scalability. However, their use involves an inherent point-to-point delay caused by duty cycling mechanisms that can result in a significant rise in the delivery latency for tracking mobile objects. To overcome this issue, we proposed a mobility-aware adaptive duty cycling mechanism for the WSNs based on object mobility. For the evaluation, we tested this mechanism for mobile object tracking at a tunnel excavation site. The evaluation results showed that the proposed mechanism could track mobile objects with low latency while they were moving, and could reduce energy consumption by increasing sleep time while the objects were immobile.

  4. Analysis of post-mining excavations as places for municipal waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Górniak-Zimroz Justyna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste management planning is an interdisciplinary task covering a wide range of issues including costs, legal requirements, spatial planning, environmental protection, geography, demographics, and techniques used in collecting, transporting, processing and disposing of waste. Designing and analyzing this issue is difficult and requires the use of advanced analysis methods and tools available in GIS geographic information systems containing readily available graphical and descriptive databases, data analysis tools providing expert decision support while selecting the best-designed alternative, and simulation models that allow the user to simulate many variants of waste management together with graphical visualization of the results of performed analyzes. As part of the research study, there have been works undertaken concerning the use of multi-criteria data analysis in waste management in areas located in southwestern Poland. These works have proposed the inclusion in waste management of post-mining excavations as places for the final or temporary collection of waste assessed in terms of their suitability with the tools available in GIS systems.

  5. Laboratory and field testing for utilization of an excavated soil as landfill liner material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozbey, Ilknur; Guler, Erol

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using a silty soil excavated in highway construction as landfill liner material. The tests were conducted both at laboratory and in situ scales, and the soil was tested in pure and lime treated forms. Different levels of compaction energy were used. For the field study, a test pad was constructed and in situ hydraulic conductivity experiments were conducted by sealed double ring infiltrometers (SDRI). Laboratory testing revealed that while lime treatment improved the shear strength, it resulted in higher hydraulic conductivity values compared to pure soil. It was observed that leachate permeation did not change the hydraulic conductivity of the pure and lime treated samples. Laboratory hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 10(-9) m/s and met the 1.0E-08 m/s criterion in the Turkish regulations, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value allowed in most developed countries. SDRI testing, which lasted for 6 mo, indicated that lime treatment increased the hydraulic conductivity of pure soil significantly in the field scale tests. In situ hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 1E-08 and 1E-07 m/s, and exceeded the allowable value in the Turkish regulations. Undisturbed samples collected from the test pad were not representative of field hydraulic conductivities. Contrary to laboratory findings, higher compaction efforts did not result in lower hydraulic conductivities in field scales. The study verified the importance of in situ hydraulic conductivity testing in compacted liners.

  6. Comparison of Management Oversight and Risk Tree and Tripod-Beta in Excavation Accident Analysis

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    Mohamadfam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Accident investigation programs are a necessary part in identification of risks and management of the business process. Objectives One of the most important features of such programs is the analysis technique for identifying the root causes of accidents in order to prevent their recurrences. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP was used to compare management oversight and risk tree (MORT with Tripod-Beta in order to determine the superior technique for analysis of fatal excavation accidents in construction industries. Materials and Methods MORT and Tripod-Beta techniques were used for analyzing two major accidents with three main steps. First, these techniques were applied to find out the causal factors of the accidents. Second, a number of criteria were developed for the comparison of the techniques and third, using AHP, the techniques were prioritized in terms of the criteria for choosing the superior one. Results The Tripod-Beta investigation showed 41 preconditions and 81 latent causes involved in the accidents. Additionally, 27 root causes of accidents were identified by the MORT analysis. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP investigation revealed that MORT had higher priorities only in two criteria than Tripod-Beta. Conclusions Our findings indicate that Tripod-Beta with a total priority of 0.664 is superior to MORT with the total priority of 0.33. It is recommended for future research to compare the available accident analysis techniques based on proper criteria to select the best for accident analysis.

  7. The Earliest Chinese Proto-Porcelain Excavated from Kiln Sites: An Elemental Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Huansheng; Zheng, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    In June 2012, the Piaoshan kiln site was excavated in Huzhou, Zhejiang Province, which hitherto proved to be the earliest known Chinese proto-porcelain kiln. Judging from the decorative patterns of unearthed impressed stoneware and proto-porcelain sherds, the site was determined to date to the late Xia (c. 2070–c. 1600 BC), the first dynasty of China. Here, we report on proton-induced X-ray emission analyses of 118 proto-porcelain and 35 impressed stoneware sherds from Piaoshan and five subsequent kiln sites in the vicinity. Using principal components analysis on the major chemical compositions, we reveal the relationships between impressed stoneware and proto-porcelain samples from the six kiln sites. The sherds from different sites have distinctive chemical profiles. The results indicate that the raw materials were procured locally. We find a developmental tendency for early glazes towards mature calcium-based glaze. It is most likely that woody plant ashes with increased calcia-potash ratios were applied to the formula. PMID:26535583

  8. Impact of municipal wastewater effluent on seed bank response and soils excavated from a wetland impoundment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchiaro, R.G.; Kremer, R.J.; Fredrickson, L.H.

    2009-01-01

    Intensive management of wetlands to improve wildlife habitat typically includes the manipulation of water depth, duration, and timing to promote desired vegetation communities. Increased societal, industrial, and agricultural demands for water may encourage the use of alternative sources such as wastewater effluents in managed wetlands. However, water quality is commonly overlooked as an influence on wetland soil seed banks and soils. In four separate greenhouse trials conducted over a 2-yr period, we examined the effects of municipal wastewater effluent (WWE) on vegetation of wetland seed banks and soils excavated from a wildlife management area in Missouri, USA. We used microcosms filled with one of two soil materials and irrigated with WWE, Missouri River water, or deionized water to simulate moist-soil conditions. Vegetation that germinated from the soil seed bank was allowed to grow in microcosms for approximately 100 d. Vegetative taxa richness, plant density, and biomass were significantly reduced in WWE-irrigated soil materials compared with other water sources. Salinity and sodicity rapidly increased in WWE-irrigated microcosms and probably was responsible for inhibiting germination or interfering with seedling development. Our results indicate that irrigation with WWE promoted saline-sodic soil conditions, which alters the vegetation community by inhibiting germination or seedling development. ?? 2009, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  9. Turbulent flow over craters on Mars: Vorticity dynamics reveal aeolian excavation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William; Day, Mackenzie

    2017-10-01

    Impact craters are scattered across Mars. These craters exhibit geometric self-similarity over a spectrum of diameters, ranging from tens to thousands of kilometers. The late Noachian-early Hesperian boundary marks a dramatic shift in the role of mid-latitude craters, from depocenter sedimentary basins to aeolian source areas. At present day, many craters contain prominent layered sedimentary mounds with maximum elevations comparable to the rim height. The mounds are remnants of Noachian deposition and are surrounded by a radial moat. Large-eddy simulation has been used to model turbulent flows over synthetic craterlike geometries. Geometric attributes of the craters and the aloft flow have been carefully matched to resemble ambient conditions in the atmospheric boundary layer of Mars. Vorticity dynamics analysis within the crater basin reveals the presence of counterrotating helical vortices, verifying the efficacy of deflationary models put forth recently by Bennett and Bell [K. Bennett and J. Bell, Icarus 264, 331 (2016)], 10.1016/j.icarus.2015.09.041 and Day et al. [M. Day et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 43, 2473 (2016)], 10.1002/2016GL068011. We show how these helical counterrotating vortices spiral around the outer rim, gradually deflating the moat and carving the mound; excavation occurs faster on the upwind side, explaining the radial eccentricity of the mounds relative to the surrounding crater basin.

  10. Iron Age Settlement at Blackstone, Worcestershire: Excavations 1972, 1973, and 1977

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Hurst

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerial photography in 1957 resulted in the discovery of a rectangular double-ditched enclosure overlooking the Severn floodplain near Bewdley, Worcestershire (UK. Excavation in the 1970s, in advance of gravel extraction, provided limited evidence of Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age activity prior to occupation in the later Iron Age, when the enclosure was established. This comprised a ditch and bank, and later a palisade and ditch, with single and double portal gateways respectively, and with buildings internally. Pottery and briquetage indicate trading links with the wider region, respectively with west and north Worcestershire, and with Droitwich. The main Iron Age occupation is dated from the 2nd century into the 1st century BC. By the 3rd-4th centuries AD the site was apparently cultivated, as small quantities of Romano-British pottery were scattered across it, probably as a result of manuring arable fields associated with a nearby, but as yet unlocated, settlement. Similarly, in the medieval and post-medieval periods a thin scatter of finds in the overlying soils indicated further agricultural activity. Unusually, the 1979 Iron Age site structural analysis has been largely retained in the current report without full revision but accompanied by a separate modern commentary, allied with the updated finds and environmental reporting, and overall discussion.

  11. Hard-Rock Stability Analysis for Span Design in Entry-Type Excavations with Learning Classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gonzalo, Esperanza; Fernández-Muñiz, Zulima; García Nieto, Paulino José; Bernardo Sánchez, Antonio; Menéndez Fernández, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The mining industry relies heavily on empirical analysis for design and prediction. An empirical design method, called the critical span graph, was developed specifically for rock stability analysis in entry-type excavations, based on an extensive case-history database of cut and fill mining in Canada. This empirical span design chart plots the critical span against rock mass rating for the observed case histories and has been accepted by many mining operations for the initial span design of cut and fill stopes. Different types of analysis have been used to classify the observed cases into stable, potentially unstable and unstable groups. The main purpose of this paper is to present a new method for defining rock stability areas of the critical span graph, which applies machine learning classifiers (support vector machine and extreme learning machine). The results show a reasonable correlation with previous guidelines. These machine learning methods are good tools for developing empirical methods, since they make no assumptions about the regression function. With this software, it is easy to add new field observations to a previous database, improving prediction output with the addition of data that consider the local conditions for each mine. PMID:28773653

  12. Develop a quantitative understanding of rockmass behaviour near excavations in deep mines, part 1

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Napier, JAL

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of the rock mass deformation near deep level stopes and the avoidance of damaging incidents of violent rock failure require a fundamental understanding of rock failure mechanisms. Research work to gain this understanding has been undertaken...

  13. Single-charge craters excavated during subsurface high-explosive experiments at Big Black Test Site, Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.R.; Bryan, J.B.

    1978-10-19

    Single-charge and row-charge subsurface cratering experiments were performed to learn how close-spacing enhances single-crater dimensions. Our first experimental phase established cratering curves for 60-lb charges of the chemical explosive. For the second phase, to be described in a subsequent report, the Row-cratering experiments were designed and executed. This data report contains excavated dimensions and auxiliary data for the single-charge cratering experiments. The dimensions for the row-charge experiments will be in the other report. Significant changes in the soil's water content appeared to cause a variability in the excavated dimensions. This variability clouded the interpretation and application of the cratering curves obtained.

  14. Discussion on the mechanism of ground improvement method at the excavation of shallow overburden tunnel in difficult ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Kishida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel construction opportunities involving shallow overburdens under difficult (e.g., soft, unconsolidated grounds have been increasing in Japan. Various auxiliary methods for excavating mountain tunnels have been developed and can satisfy stringent construction requirements. The ground improvement method, which is one of the auxiliary methods for shallow overburden tunnels, has demonstrated its ability to effectively control the amount of settlement under soft ground. However, the mechanism of the ground improvement method has not been clarified, nor has a suitable design code been established for it. Therefore, because the strength of the improved ground and the suitable length and width of the improved area have not been fully understood, an empirical design has been applied in every case. In this paper, the mechanical behavior during the excavation, including that of the stabilized ground, is evaluated through trapdoor experiments and numerical analyses. In addition, the enhancement of tunnel stability resulting from the application of the ground improvement method is discussed.

  15. The Discovery and Excavation of a Human Burial from the Mini-athiliya Shell Midden in Southern Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanti Kulatilake

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Several shell middens of coastal Sri Lanka indicate human occupation in the mid-Holocene and are recognized as being of prime importance in the archaeological narrative of the island. A salvage archaeology operation conducted at the Mini-athiliya shell midden in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, yielded ancient human remains associated with stone implements and culturally modified faunal remains. The main objective of this rescue operation was to mitigate the destruction to this archaeological site. We report the excavation strategy and dating of this mid-Holocene shell midden, while focusing on the discovery and extraction of a complete human burial that had not been disturbed by the shell mining activity at the site. This excavation is intended to serve as a precursor to systematic investigation of the coastal shell middens of southern Sri Lanka.

  16. Hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone, North Ramp area of the Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, J.P.; Kwicklis, E.M.; Gillies, D.C. [eds.

    1999-03-01

    Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being investigated by the US Department of Energy as a potential site for a repository for high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of surface-based geologic, pneumatic, hydrologic, and geochemical studies conducted during 1992 to 1996 by the US Geological Survey in the vicinity of the North Ramp of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) that are pertinent to understanding multiphase fluid flow within the deep unsaturated zone. Detailed stratigraphic and structural characteristics of the study area provided the hydrogeologic framework for these investigations. Shallow infiltration is not discussed in detail in this report because the focus in on three major aspects of the deep unsaturated-zone system: geologic framework, the gaseous-phase system, and the aqueous-phase system. However, because the relation between shallow infiltration and deep percolation is important to an overall understanding of the unsaturated-zone flow system, a summary of infiltration studies conducted to date at Yucca Mountain is provided in the section titled Shallow Infiltration. This report describes results of several Site Characterization Plan studies that were ongoing at the time excavation of the ESF North Ramp began and that continued as excavation proceeded.

  17. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  18. Work zone safety analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  19. Fractionation of Pb and Cu in the fine fraction (<10 mm) of waste excavated from a municipal landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczala, Fabio; Orupõld, Kaja; Augustsson, Anna; Burlakovs, Juris; Hogland, Marika; Bhatnagar, Amit; Hogland, William

    2017-11-01

    The fractionation of metals in the fine fraction (circular economy and recovery of such valuables back into the economy. To conclude, not only the total concentration of metals but also a better understanding of fractionation and in which form metals are bound is very important to bring information on how to manage the fine fraction from excavated waste both in terms of environmental impacts and also recovery of such valuables in the economy.

  20. Modeling the damage of welded steel, using the GTN model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Ahmar Kadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work is the modeling of the damage in the weld metal according to the finite element method and the concepts of fracture mechanics based on local approaches using the code ABAQUS calculates. The use of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model axisymmetric specimens AE type to three different zones (Base metal, molten metal and heat affected Zone with four levels of triaxiality (AE2, AE4, AE10 and AE80, we have used to model the behavior of damage to welded steel, which is described as being due to the growth and coalescence of cavities with high rates of triaxiality