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Sample records for exacerbates insulin resistance

  1. Endothelin-1 exacerbates development of hypertension and atherosclerosis in modest insulin resistant syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yan-Jie [Institute of Physiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Juan, Chi-Chang [Institute of Physiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kwok, Ching-Fai [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yung-Pei [Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shih, Kuang-Chung [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chin-Chang [Institute of Physiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ho, Low-Tone, E-mail: ltho@vghtpe.gov.tw [Institute of Physiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-08

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is known as potent vasoconstrictor, by virtue of its mitogenic effects, and may deteriorate the process of hypertension and atherosclerosis by aggravating hyperplasia and migration in VSMCs. Our previous study demonstrated that insulin infusion caused sequential induction of hyperinsulinemia, hyperendothelinemia, insulin resistance, and then hypertension in rats. However, the underlying mechanism of ET-1 interfere insulin signaling in VSMCs remains unclear. To characterize insulin signaling during modest insulin resistant syndrome, we established and monitored rats by feeding high fructose-diet (HFD) until high blood pressure and modest insulin resistance occurred. To explore the role of ET-1/ET{sub A}R during insulin resistance, ET{sub A}R expression, ET-1 binding, and insulin signaling were investigated in the HFD-fed rats and cultured A-10 VSMCs. Results showed that high blood pressure, tunica medial wall thickening, plasma ET-1 and insulin, and accompanied with modest insulin resistance without overweight and hyperglycemia occurred in early-stage HFD-fed rats. In the endothelium-denuded aorta from HFD-fed rats, ET{sub A}R expression, but not ET{sub B}R, and ET-1 binding in aorta were increased. Moreover, decreasing of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and increasing of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation were observed in aorta during modest insulin resistance. Interestingly, in ET-1 pretreated VSMCs, the increment of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was decreased whereas the increment of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation was increased. In addition, insulin potentiated ET-1-induced VSMCs migration and proliferation due to increasing ET-1 binding. ETAR antagonist reversed effects of ET-1 on insulin-induced signaling and VSMCs migration and proliferation. In summary, modest insulin resistance syndrome accompanied with hyperinsulinemia leading to the potentiation on ET-1-induced actions in aortic VSMCs. ET-1 via ET{sub A}R pathway

  2. Selenite exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Gang; Bai, Zhaoshuai; Li, Kaicheng; Yan, Junyan; Li, Fen; Ma, Shuai; Xu, Huibi; Huang, Kaixun

    2015-12-15

    Recent evidence suggests a potential pro-diabetic effect of selenite treatment in type 2 diabetics; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we investigated the effects and the underlying mechanisms of selenite treatment in a nongenetic mouse model of type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet (HFD)/streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were orally gavaged with selenite at 0.5 or 2.0mg/kg body weight/day or vehicle for 4 weeks. High-dose selenite treatment significantly elevated fasting plasma insulin levels and insulin resistance index, in parallel with impaired glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and pyruvate tolerance. High-dose selenite treatment also attenuated hepatic IRS1/Akt/FoxO1 signaling and pyruvate kinase gene expressions, but elevated the gene expressions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxyl kinase (PEPCK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase), peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and selenoprotein P (SelP) in the liver. Furthermore, high-dose selenite treatment caused significant increases in MDA contents, protein carbonyl contents, and a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver, concurrent with enhanced ASK1/MKK4/JNK signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that high-dose selenite treatment exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes, at least in part through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway, providing new mechanistic insights into the pro-diabetic effect of selenite in type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  4. [The investigation of the relationship between Leptin-insulin resistance and pulmonary function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with acute exacerbation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hai-Yan; Lu, Xiao-Zhuo; Wang, De-Xi; Zeng, Yu; Zhong, Hai-Bo

    2007-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between Leptin-insulin resistance and pulmonary function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with acute exacerbation. Fifty-six patients with COPD with acute exacerbation were divided into two groups according to the fasting plasma glucose level [the hyperglycemia group: fasting blood glucose (FBG)> or =6.2 mmol/L, n=42. the hypoglycemia group: FBG 3.1-6.2 mmol/L, n=14], and 20 normal healthy controls [the control group, FBG (5.49+/-1.06) mmol/L)] were also included in the study. All patients had complete data of FBG, C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin (ALB), Leptin, fasting serum insulin (FISN), counting insulin sensitivity index (ISI), and pulmonary function tests [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1 in percentage of forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF), maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF), total respiratory impedance (Zrs), airway resistance at 5, 20 Hz (R5, R20), airway resistance of capacitance and inertance at 5, 20 Hz (X5, X20), core resistance (Rc), periphery resistance (Rp), frequency resonant (Fres)]. The FBG, FISN, CRP were significantly higher and body mass index (BMI), ALB, ISI were significantly lower in the hyperglycemia group compared with control group (all PLeptin level (P>0.05). However, BMI, ALB, Leptin, ISI were significantly decreased and CRP, FISN were significantly increased in hypoglycemia group compared with the control group (PLeptin, CRP were significantly higher and ISI was significantly lower in hyperglycemia group compared with the hypoglycemia group (all P0.05). The serum levels of Leptin was significantly positively correlated with Zrs, R5, R20, Rc, BMI (all P0.05). ISI had significant positive correlations with FEV1/FVC, FEV1, PEF, MMEF (PLeptin-insulin resistance may aggravate the impairment of pulmonary function, prolong the length of hospital stay in the patient with COPD.

  5. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...

  6. Sarcopenia exacerbates obesity-associated insulin resistance and dysglycemia: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Srikanthan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia often co-exists with obesity, and may have additive effects on insulin resistance. Sarcopenic obese individuals could be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. We performed a study to determine whether sarcopenia is associated with impairment in insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis in obese and non-obese individuals.We performed a cross-sectional analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III data utilizing subjects of 20 years or older, non-pregnant (N = 14,528. Sarcopenia was identified from bioelectrical impedance measurement of muscle mass. Obesity was identified from body mass index. Outcomes were homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA IR, glycosylated hemoglobin level (HbA1C, and prevalence of pre-diabetes (6.0≤ HbA1C<6.5 and not on medication and type 2 diabetes. Covariates in multiple regression were age, educational level, ethnicity and sex.Sarcopenia was associated with insulin resistance in non-obese (HOMA IR ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.26 to 1.52 and obese individuals (HOMA-IR ratio 1.16, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.18. Sarcopenia was associated with dysglycemia in obese individuals (HbA1C ratio 1.021, 95% CI 1.011 to 1.043 but not in non-obese individuals. Associations were stronger in those under 60 years of age. We acknowledge that the cross-sectional study design limits our ability to draw causal inferences.Sarcopenia, independent of obesity, is associated with adverse glucose metabolism, and the association is strongest in individuals under 60 years of age, which suggests that low muscle mass may be an early predictor of diabetes susceptibility. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, further research is urgently needed to develop interventions to prevent sarcopenic obesity and its metabolic consequences.

  7. Severe Maternal Hyperglycemia Exacerbates the Development of Insulin Resistance and Fatty Liver in the Offspring on High Fat Diet

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    Yong Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adverse maternal environments may predispose the offspring to metabolic syndrome in adulthoods, but the underlying mechanism has not been fully understood. Methods. Maternal hyperglycemia was induced by streptozotocin (STZ injection while control (CON rats received citrate buffer. Litters were adjusted to eight pups per dam and then weaned to standard diet. Since 13 weeks old, a subset of offspring from STZ and CON dams were switched to high fat diet (HFD for another 13 weeks. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests (GTT and ITT and insulin secretion assay were performed; serum levels of lipids and leptin were measured. Hepatic fat accumulation and islet area were evaluated through haematoxylin and eosin staining. Results. STZ offspring exhibited lower survival rate, lower birth weights, and growth inhibition which persisted throughout the study. STZ offspring on HFD showed more severe impairment in GTT and ITT, and more profound hepatic steatosis and more severe hyperlipidemia compared with CON-HFD rats. Conclusions. Offspring from diabetic dams would be prone to exhibit low birth weight and postnatal growth inhibition, but could maintain normal glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. HFD accelerates development of insulin resistance in the offspring of diabetic dams mainly via a compensatory response of islets.

  8. Liver-specific G0 /G1 switch gene 2 (G0s2) expression promotes hepatic insulin resistance by exacerbating hepatic steatosis in male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Yoshiyuki; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2017-08-01

    Hepatic steatosis is strongly associated with insulin resistance. It has been reported that G0 /G1 switch gene 2 (G0s2) inhibits the lipolytic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase, which is a major lipase in the liver as well as in adipocytes. Moreover, G0s2 protein content is increased in the livers of high-fat diet (HFD)-fed rats. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hepatic G0s2 on insulin sensitivity in male Wistar rats. Male Wistar rats were fed a 60% HFD for 4 weeks. After 3 weeks of feeding, rats were injected with adenovirus-expressing green fluorescent protein (Ad-GFP; control) or adenovirus-expressing mouse G0s2 (Ad-G0s2). On Day 7 after injection, a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats fasted for 8 h. Body weight and fasting glucose levels were not significantly different between the Ad-GFP and Ad-G0s2 groups. During the clamp study, the glucose infusion rate required for euglycemia decreased significantly by 16% in the Ad-G0s2 compared with Ad-GFP group. The insulin-suppressed hepatic glucose output increased significantly in the Ad-G0s2 group, but the insulin-stimulated glucose disposal rate was not significantly different between the two groups. Consistent with the clamp data, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt decreased significantly in livers of rats injected with Ad-G0s2. Furthermore, Oil Red O-staining indicated that overexpression of G0s2 protein in the liver promoted hepatic steatosis by 2.5-fold in HFD-fed rats. The results of the present study indicate that hepatic G0s2 protein may promote hepatic insulin resistance by exacerbating hepatic steatosis. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Intermittent fasting reduces body fat but exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in young rats regardless of high protein and fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Yoo, Kyung Min; Hyun, Joo Suk; Kang, Suna

    2017-02-01

    Intermittent fasting (IMF) is a relatively new dietary approach to weight management, although the efficacy and adverse effects have not been full elucidated and the optimal diets for IMF are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that a one-meal-per-day intermittent fasting with high fat (HF) or protein (HP) diets can modify energy, lipid, and glucose metabolism in normal young male Sprague-Dawley rats with diet-induced obesity or overweight. Male rats aged 5 weeks received either HF (40% fat) or HP (26% protein) diets ad libitum (AL) or for 3 h at the beginning of the dark cycle (IMF) for 5 weeks. Epidydimal fat pads and fat deposits in the leg and abdomen were lower with HP and IMF. Energy expenditure at the beginning of the dark cycle, especially from fat oxidation, was higher with IMF than AL, possibly due to greater activity levels. Brown fat content was higher with IMF. Serum ghrelin levels were higher in HP-IMF than other groups, and accordingly, cumulative food intake was also higher in HP-IMF than HF-IMF. HF-IMF exhibited higher area under the curve (AUC) of serum glucose at the first part (0-40 min) during oral glucose tolerance test, whereas AUC of serum insulin levels in both parts were higher in IMF and HF. During intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test, serum glucose levels were higher with IMF than AL. Consistently, hepatic insulin signaling (GLUT2, pAkt) was attenuated and PEPCK expression was higher with IMF and HF than other groups, and HOMA-IR revealed significantly impaired attenuated insulin sensitivity in the IMF groups. However, surprisingly, hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogen storage was higher in IMF groups than AL. The higher glycogen storage in the IMF groups was associated with the lower expression of glycogen phosphorylase than the AL groups. In conclusion, IMF especially with HF increased insulin resistance, possibly by attenuating hepatic insulin signaling, and lowered glycogen phosphorylase expression despite decreased fat mass in young

  10. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...... with IR independent of weight gain. In conclusion, the data presented in the current thesis, supported by a thorough review of available literature, advocate that 1) Inflammation is a triggering event fueling IR; 2) Commensal microbes can, when mistreated, aggravate IR and glucose intolerance; and 3) Diet...

  11. Lack of Adipocyte AMPK Exacerbates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis through Brown and Beige Adipose Tissue Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mottillo, Emilio P; Desjardins, Eric M; Crane, Justin D

    2016-01-01

    in regulating BAT and WAT metabolism is unclear. We generated an inducible model for deletion of the two AMPK β subunits in adipocytes (iβ1β2AKO) and found that iβ1β2AKO mice were cold intolerant and resistant to β-adrenergic activation of BAT and beiging of WAT. BAT from iβ1β2AKO mice had impairments...... in mitochondrial structure, function, and markers of mitophagy. In response to a high-fat diet, iβ1β2AKO mice more rapidly developed liver steatosis as well as glucose and insulin intolerance. Thus, AMPK in adipocytes is vital for maintaining mitochondrial integrity, responding to pharmacological agents...

  12. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  13. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Your Baby is Born Monogenic Diabetes Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, ... body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose ...

  14. Overexpression of protein kinase STK25 in mice exacerbates ectopic lipid accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chursa, Urszula; Nuñez-Durán, Esther; Cansby, Emmelie

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Understanding the molecular networks controlling ectopic lipid deposition and insulin responsiveness in skeletal muscle is essential for developing new strategies to treat type 2 diabetes. We recently identified serine/threonine protein kinase 25 (STK25) as a critical regulator...... of liver steatosis, hepatic lipid metabolism and whole body glucose and insulin homeostasis. Here, we assessed the role of STK25 in control of ectopic fat storage and insulin responsiveness in skeletal muscle. METHODS: Skeletal muscle morphology was studied by histological examination, exercise performance...... and insulin sensitivity were assessed by treadmill running and euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp, respectively, and muscle lipid metabolism was analysed by ex vivo assays in Stk25 transgenic and wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet. Lipid accumulation and mitochondrial function were also studied in rodent...

  15. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    de Luca, Carl; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2007-01-01

    Obesity-induced chronic inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the Metabolic syndrome. In this review, we focus on the interconnection between obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause insulin resistance in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver by inhibiting insulin signal transduction. The sources of cytokines in insulin resistant states are the insulin target tissue themselves, primarily fat and liver, but t...

  16. Insulin Resistance, Hyperglycemia, and Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Tabas, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Progress in preventing atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) has been stalled by the epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Further advances in this area demand a thorough understanding of how two major features of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia, impact atherosclerosis. Insulin resistance is associated with systemic CAD risk factors, but increasing evidence suggests that defective insulin signaling in atherosclerotic lesional cells also plays an important role. The role of hyperglycemia in CAD associated with type 2 diabetes is less clear. Understanding the mechanisms whereby type 2 diabetes exacerbates CAD offers hope for new therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22055501

  17. Overexpression of protein kinase STK25 in mice exacerbates ectopic lipid accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chursa, Urszula; Nuñez-Durán, Esther; Cansby, Emmelie

    2017-01-01

    increases intramyocellular lipid accumulation, impairs skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and sarcomeric ultrastructure, and induces perimysial and endomysial fibrosis, thereby reducing endurance exercise capacity and muscle insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, we observed enhanced lipid accumulation...... and impaired mitochondrial function in rodent myoblasts overexpressing STK25, demonstrating an autonomous action for STK25 within cells. Global phosphoproteomic analysis revealed alterations in the total abundance and phosphorylation status of different target proteins located predominantly to mitochondria...

  18. Glycosphingolipids and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, Mirjam; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for insulin resistance, a state characterized by impaired responsiveness of liver, muscle and adipose tissue to insulin. One class of lipids involved in the development of insulin resistance are the (glyco)sphingolipids. Ceramide, the most simple

  19. [Insulin resistance in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Joanna; Witek, Przemysław; Pańkowska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance is characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to insulin. The hallmark of insulin resistance is decreased tissue glucose uptake despite normal or elevated insulin concentration. There has been an upward trend in the incidence of insulin resistance in developed countries, although in pediatric population it is difficult to assess. Both genetic and environmental factors play an important role in the etiology of insulin resistance, namely increased diet caloricity and decreased physical activity. Gradually, this leads to adipose tissue build-up. The role of visceral adipose tissue is of particular importance, mainly due to its significant endocrine activity, leading to adverse metabolic effects. The most important consequences of insulin resistance in children include increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, atherogenic dyslipidemia and arterial hypertension, which lead to increased cardiovascular risk. Children with insulin resistance can develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and sleep apnea syndrome. In case of female pediatric patients a higher incidence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is observed. Furthermore, the authors reviewed opinions on risk factors for insulin resistance, as well as direct and indirect insulin resistance assessment methods. The article presents the principles of primary and secondary prevention of insulin resistance in children, with particular allowance for dietary recommendations and recommendations to increase physical activity, and, in selected cases, current guidelines on pharmacological treatment.

  20. Beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon E Cerf

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance are inherently complex with their interrelation for triggering the pathogenesis of diabetes also somewhat undefined. Both pathogenic states induce hyperglycemia and therefore increase insulin demand. Beta cell dysfunction results from inadequate glucose sensing to stimulate insulin secretion therefore elevated glucose concentrations prevail. Persistently elevated glucose concentrations above the physiological range result in the manifestation of hyperglycemia. With systemic insulin resistance, insulin signaling within glucose recipient tissues is defective therefore hyperglycemia perseveres. Beta cell dysfunction supersedes insulin resistance in inducing diabetes. Both pathological states influence each other and presumably synergistically exacerbate diabetes. Preserving beta cell function and insulin signaling in beta cells and insulin signaling in the glucose recipient tissues will maintain glucose homeostasis.

  1. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the association between insulin resistance and vascular disease, and this has led to wide acceptance of the clustering of hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and obesity as a clinical entity, the metabolic syndrome. While insulin resistance, by promoting dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities, is part of the proatherogenic milieu, it is possible that insulin resistance itself in the vascular wall does not promote atherosclerosis. Recent fi...

  2. Insulin Resistance and Hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahana Shermin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Backgound: The number of hypogonads is increasing day by day. It may be due to sedentary life style with increased obesity, increased tension or stressed lifestyle among all groups of populations. Visceral obesity is associated with insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and also with hypogonadism.Objective: This study was carried out to determine the proportion of insulin resistance among male subjects with hypogonadism in different age groups along with status of erectile quality among diabetics and non diabetics.Materials and method: This cross sectional study among 161 adult male subjects aged ≥ 20 to ≤ 60 years were purposively selected from Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh between May 2009 to September 2010. Glycemic status and insulin resistance (by HOMA-R were done and relevant history were documented.Results: The highest proportion (38.9% of hypogonadism was in ≥ 50 years age group whereas highest proportion (39.6% of the eugonads was in the age group of 40 to 49 years. More than half of the hypogonad subjects had weak erectile quality (54.0% which were followed by absent erectile quality in 32.7% and 13.3% subjects had normal erectile quality. Among the eugonad subjects 41.7% had normal erectile quality, 41.6% subjects had weak erectile quality and 16.7% subjects had no erectile quality. More than ninety percent of the hypogonad subjects and about 60% of the eugonad subjects had insulin resistance. The average HOMA-R was more in the subjects with hypogonadism with diabetes which was highly significant (p-value < 0.001.Conclusion: Hypogonadism is associated with insulin resistance.

  3. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    studies in β cell-specific IR knockout mice, which develop peripheral insulin resistance and diabetes, most probably due to the changes in the pattern of insulin secretion (Kulkarni et al 1999). FFA also affects downstream insulin signalling molecules. It inhibits insulin activation of IRS-1-associated PI3K activity in muscle.

  4. Adipokines and Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adipose tissue is now considered to be an active endocrine organ that secretes various adipokines such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin, tumour necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Recent studies have shown that these factors might provide a molecular link between increased adiposity and impaired insulin sensitivity. Since hepatic insulin resistance plays the key role in the whole body insulin resistance, clarification of the regulatory processes about hepatic insulin resistance by adipokines in rodents and human would seem essential in order to understand the mechanism of type 2 diabetes and for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat it. PMID:23762871

  5. Insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchison, Samantha Kate

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 8-18% of women, presenting a major public health and economic burden. Women with PCOS have insulin resistance (IR) independent of obesity. IR has an integral aetiological role in the reproductive and metabolic consequences of PCOS including obesity, type 2 diabetes (diabetes) and cardiovascular risk factors. Excess weight exacerbates IR and increases PCOS severity. PCOS combined with obesity presents a useful model to study IR before confounding hyperg...

  6. Insulin resistance and chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Matulewicz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a condition of reduced biological response to insulin. Growing evidence indicates the role of the chronic low-grade inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Adipose tissue in obesity is characterized by increased lipolysis with the excessive release of free fatty acids, and is also a source of proinflammatory cytokines. Both these factors may inhibit insulin action. Proinflammatory cytokines exert their effect by stimulating major inflammatory NFκB and JNK pathways within the cells. Inflammatory processes in other insulin responsive tissues may also play a role in inducing insulin resistance. This paper is an overview of the chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, liver and endothelial cells during the development of insulin resistance.

  7. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Free fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting loss of insulin sensitivity, thereby causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism involved is still unclear. In searching for the cause of the mechanism, it has been found that palmitate inhibits insulin receptor (IR) gene expression, ...

  8. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    basis of insulin resistance could ultimately lead to a better understanding of the causation of these conditions and the design of rational therapy to ameliorate them. Here, particular attention is devoted to the initial events that follow the binding of insulin to its receptor, including changes in insulin receptor phosphorylation.

  9. Selective Insulin Resistance in Adipocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Ng, Yvonne; Pant, Himani; Li, Jia; Meoli, Christopher C.; Coster, Adelle C. F.; Stöckli, Jacqueline; James, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Aside from glucose metabolism, insulin regulates a variety of pathways in peripheral tissues. Under insulin-resistant conditions, it is well known that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is impaired, and many studies attribute this to a defect in Akt signaling. Here we make use of several insulin resistance models, including insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 adipocytes and fat explants prepared from high fat-fed C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice, to comprehensively distinguish defective from unaffected aspects of insulin signaling and its downstream consequences in adipocytes. Defective regulation of glucose uptake was observed in all models of insulin resistance, whereas other major actions of insulin such as protein synthesis and anti-lipolysis were normal. This defect corresponded to a reduction in the maximum response to insulin. The pattern of change observed for phosphorylation in the Akt pathway was inconsistent with a simple defect at the level of Akt. The only Akt substrate that showed consistently reduced phosphorylation was the RabGAP AS160 that regulates GLUT4 translocation. We conclude that insulin resistance in adipose tissue is highly selective for glucose metabolism and likely involves a defect in one of the components regulating GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface in response to insulin. PMID:25720492

  10. Insulin Resistance: Causes And Metabolic Implications | Igharo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin is an anabolic hormone that plays key roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin resistance is a decreased biological response to normal concentration of circulating insulin. In insulin resistance, normal amounts of insulin are inadequate to produce a normal insulin response from fat, muscle and liver cells. Insulin ...

  11. Insulin Resistance, Hyperglycemia, and Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Tabas, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Progress in preventing atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) has been stalled by the epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Further advances in this area demand a thorough understanding of how two major features of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia, impact atherosclerosis. Insulin resistance is associated with systemic CAD risk factors, but increasing evidence suggests that defective insulin signaling in atherosclerotic lesional cells also plays an important role. The role o...

  12. The evolutionary benefit of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeters, Maarten R.; Soeters, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is perceived as deleterious, associated with conditions as the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus and critical illness. However, insulin resistance is evolutionarily well preserved and its persistence suggests that it benefits survival. Insulin resistance is important in

  13. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glu......Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin...... of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion...... present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D....

  14. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues, increased hepatic glucose production, increased lipolysis in adipose tissue, and altered insulin secretion. Studies of individuals with insulin resistance, both with established T2D and high-risk individuals, have consistently demonstrated a diverse array of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D.

  15. High Protein Intake Improves Insulin Sensitivity but Exacerbates Bone Resorption in Immobility (WISE Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Martina; Smith, Scott M.; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Zwart, Sara R.; Baecker, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Inactivity, like bed rest (BR), causes insulin resistance (IR) and bone loss even in healthy subjects. High protein intake seems to mitigate this IR but might exacerbate bone loss. We hypothesized that high protein intake (animal:vegetable protein ratio: 60:40), isocaloric, compared to the control group plus high potassium intake would prevent IR without affecting bone turnover. After a 20-day ambulatory adaptation to controlled confinement and diet, 16 women participated in a 60-day, 6 deg head-down-tilt BR and were assigned randomly to one of the two groups. Control subjects (CON, n=8) received 1g/kg body mass/d dietary protein. Nutrition subjects (NUT, n=8) received 1.45g/kg body mass/d dietary protein plus 7.2g branched chain amino acids per day during BR. All subjects received 1670 kcal/d. Bed rest decreased glucose disposal by 35% (pprotein intake prevented insulin resistance, but exacerbated bed rest induced increase in bone resorption markers C-telopeptide (> 30%) and Ntelopeptide (>20%) (both: pprotein intake. We conclude from these results that high protein intake might positively affect glucose tolerance, but might also foster bone loss. Further long-duration studies are mandatory before high protein intake for diabetic patients, who have an increased fracture risk, might be recommended.

  16. Metabolic flexibility and insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Galgani, Jose E.; Moro, Cedric; Ravussin, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the capacity for the organism to adapt fuel oxidation to fuel availability. The inability to modify fuel oxidation in response to changes in nutrient availability has been implicated in the accumulation of intramyocellular lipid and insulin resistance. The metabolic flexibility assessed by the ability to switch from fat to carbohydrate oxidation is usually impaired during a hyperinsulinemic clamp in insulin-resistant subjects; however, this “metabolic inflexibility” i...

  17. Insulin Resistance, Obesity and Lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazıcı, Dilek; Sezer, Havva

    2017-01-01

    Lipotoxicity , originally used to describe the destructive effects of excess fat accumulation on glucose metabolism, causes functional impairments in several metabolic pathways, both in adipose tissue and peripheral organs, like liver, heart, pancreas and muscle. Lipotoxicity has roles in insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. Increased circulating levels of lipids and the metabolic alterations in fatty acid utilization and intracellular signaling, have been related to insulin resistance in muscle and liver. Different pathways, like novel protein kinase c pathways and the JNK-1 pathway are involved as the mechanisms of how lipotoxicity leads to insulin resistance in nonadipose tissue organs, such as liver and muscle. Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum stress, through mainly increased oxidative stress, also plays important role in the etiology of insulin resistance, especially seen in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Visceral adiposity and insulin resistance both increase the cardiometabolic risk and lipotoxicity seems to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of these associations.

  18. Can resistive breathing injure the lung? Implications for COPD exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilakopoulos T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theodoros Vassilakopoulos, Dimitrios Toumpanakis Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece Abstract: In obstructive lung diseases, airway inflammation leads to bronchospasm and thus resistive breathing, especially during exacerbations. This commentary discusses experimental evidence that resistive breathing per se (the mechanical stimulus in the absence of underlying airway inflammation leads to lung injury and inflammation (mechanotransduction. The potential implications of resistive breathing-induced mechanotrasduction in COPD exacerbations are presented along with the available clinical evidence. Keywords: resistive breathing, COPD, mechanotransduction, bronchoconstriction, inflammation

  19. Obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Mota Martins

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available White adipose tissue (WAT is considered an endocrine organ. When present in excess, WAT can influence metabolism via biologically active molecules. Following unregulated production of such molecules, adipose tissue dysfunction results, contributing to complications associated with obesity. Previous studies have implicated pro- and anti-inflammatory substances in the regulation of inflammatory response and in the development of insulin resistance. In obese individuals, pro-inflammatory molecules produced by adipose tissue contribute to the development of insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, the molecules with anti-inflammatory action, that have been associated with the improvement of insulin sensitivity, have your decreased production. Imbalance of these substances contributes significantly to metabolic disorders found in obese individuals. The current review aims to provide updated information regarding the activity of biomolecules produced by WAT.

  20. Nutritional Modulation of Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin O. Weickert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance has been proposed as the strongest single predictor for the development of Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM. Chronic oversupply of energy from food, together with inadequate physical activity, have been recognized as the most relevant factors leading to overweight, abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and finally T2DM. Conversely, energy reduced diets almost invariably to facilitate weight loss and reduce abdominal fat mass and insulin resistance. However, sustained weight loss is generally difficult to achieve, and distinct metabolic characteristics in patients with T2DM further compromise success. Therefore, investigating the effects of modulating the macronutrient composition of isoenergetic diets is an interesting concept that may lead to additional important insights. Metabolic effects of various different dietary concepts and strategies have been claimed, but results from randomized controlled studies and particularly from longer-term-controlled interventions in humans are often lacking. However, some of these concepts are supported by recent research, at least in animal models and short-term studies in humans. This paper provides an update of the current literature regarding the role of nutrition in the modulation of insulin resistance, which includes the discussion of weight-loss-independent metabolic effects of commonly used dietary concepts.

  1. Pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we studied pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance in different conditions in humans, i.e. in obesity, during lipid infusions, after hypercaloric feeding, and glucocorticoid treatment. We focused on 3 important hypotheses that are suggested to be implicated in the

  2. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, K. W.; Gilijamse, P. W.; Koopman, K. E.; de Weijer, B. A.; Brands, M.; Kootte, R. S.; Romijn, J. A.; Ackermans, M. T.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Soeters, M. R.; Serlie, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely

  3. Mitochondrial efficiency and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella eCrescenzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance, ‘a relative impairment in the ability of insulin to exert its effects on glucose,protein and lipid metabolism in target tissues’, has many detrimental effects on metabolism and is strongly correlated to deposition of lipids in non-adipose tissues. Mitochondria are the main cellular sites devoted to ATP production and fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the onset of skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been proposed and many studies have dealt with possible alteration in mitochondrial function in obesity and diabetes, both in humans and animal models. Data reporting evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus are numerous, even though the issue that this reduced mitochondrial function is causal in the development of the disease is not yet solved, also because a variety of parameters have been used in the studies carried out on this subject. By assessing the alterations in mitochondrial efficiency as well as the impact of this parameter on metabolic homeostasis of skeletal muscle cells, we have obtained results that allow us to suggest that an increase in mitochondrial efficiency precedes and therefore can contribute to the development of high-fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  4. Fasting insulin, insulin resistance and risk of hypertension in the general population: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Han, Lili; Hu, Dayi

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the association of fasting insulin concentrations or insulin resistance with subsequent risk of hypertension have yielded conflicting results. To quantitatively assess the association of fasting insulin concentrations or homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) with incident hypertension in a general population by performing a meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed and Embase databases until August 31, 2016 for prospective observational studies investigating the elevated fasting insulin concentrations or HOMA-IR with subsequent risk of hypertension in the general population. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of hypertension was calculated for the highest versus the lowest category of fasting insulin or HOMA-IR. Eleven studies involving 10,230 hypertension cases were identified from 55,059 participants. Meta-analysis showed that the pooled adjusted RR of hypertension was 1.54 (95% CI 1.34-1.76) for fasting insulin concentrations and 1.43 (95% CI 1.27-1.62) for HOMA-IR comparing the highest to the lowest category. Subgroup analysis results showed that the association of fasting insulin concentrations with subsequent risk of hypertension seemed more pronounced in women (RR 2.07; 95% CI 1.19-3.60) than in men (RR 1.48; 95% CI 1.17-1.88). This meta-analysis suggests that elevated fasting insulin concentrations or insulin resistance as estimated by homeostasis model assessment is independently associated with an exacerbated risk of hypertension in the general population. Early intervention of hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance may help clinicians to identify the high risk of hypertensive population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanisms of insulin resistance in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianping

    2013-03-01

    Obesity increases the risk for type 2 diabetes through induction of insulin resistance. Treatment of type 2 diabetes has been limited by little translational knowledge of insulin resistance although there have been several well-documented hypotheses for insulin resistance. In those hypotheses, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, hyperinsulinemia and lipotoxicity have been the major concepts and have received a lot of attention. Oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, genetic background, aging, fatty liver, hypoxia and lipodystrophy are active subjects in the study of these concepts. However, none of those concepts or views has led to an effective therapy for type 2 diabetes. The reason is that there has been no consensus for a unifying mechanism of insulin resistance. In this review article, literature is critically analyzed and reinterpreted for a new energy-based concept of insulin resistance, in which insulin resistance is a result of energy surplus in cells. The energy surplus signal is mediated by ATP and sensed by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Decreasing ATP level by suppression of production or stimulation of utilization is a promising approach in the treatment of insulin resistance. In support, many of existing insulin sensitizing medicines inhibit ATP production in mitochondria. The effective therapies such as weight loss, exercise, and caloric restriction all reduce ATP in insulin sensitive cells. This new concept provides a unifying cellular and molecular mechanism of insulin resistance in obesity, which may apply to insulin resistance in aging and lipodystrophy.

  6. Mechanisms of insulin resistance in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk for type 2 diabetes through induction of insulin resistance. Treatment of type 2 diabetes has been limited by little translational knowledge of insulin resistance although there have been several well-documented hypotheses for insulin resistance. In those hypotheses, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, hyperinsulinemia and lipotoxicity have been the major concepts and have received a lot of attention. Oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, genetic background, aging, fatty liver, hypoxia and lipodystrophy are active subjects in the study of these concepts. However, none of those concepts or views has led to an effective therapy for type 2 diabetes. The reason is that there has been no consensus for a unifying mechanism of insulin resistance. In this review article, literature is critically analyzed and reinterpreted for a new energy-based concept of insulin resistance, in which insulin resistance is a result of energy surplus in cells. The energy surplus signal is mediated by ATP and sensed by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Decreasing ATP level by suppression of production or stimulation of utilization is a promising approach in the treatment of insulin resistance. In support, many of existing insulin sensitizing medicines inhibit ATP production in mitochondria. The effective therapies such as weight loss, exercise, and caloric restriction all reduce ATP in insulin sensitive cells. This new concept provides a unifying cellular and molecular mechanism of insulin resistance in obesity, which may apply to insulin resistance in aging and lipodystrophy. PMID:23471659

  7. Patients with psoriasis are insulin resistant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldenløve, Mette; Storgaard, Heidi; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with psoriasis have increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The pathophysiology is largely unknown, but it is hypothesized that systemic inflammation causes insulin resistance. Insulin sensitivity has only been sparsely investigated in patients with psoriasis, and previous studies...

  8. SORLA facilitates insulin receptor signaling in adipocytes and exacerbates obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Vanessa; Schulz, Nadja; Yan, Xin; Schürmann, Annette; Kempa, Stefan; Kern, Matthias; Blüher, Matthias; Poy, Matthew N; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Willnow, Thomas E

    2016-07-01

    In humans, genetic variation of sortilin-related receptor, L(DLR class) A repeats containing (SORL1), which encodes the intracellular sorting receptor SORLA, is a major genetic risk factor for familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease. Recent GWAS analysis has also associated SORL1 with obesity in humans and in mouse models, suggesting that this receptor may play a role in regulating metabolism. Here, using mouse models with genetic loss or tissue-specific overexpression of SORLA as well as data from obese human subjects, we observed a gene-dosage effect that links SORLA expression to obesity and glucose tolerance. Overexpression of human SORLA in murine adipose tissue blocked hydrolysis of triacylglycerides and caused excessive adiposity. In contrast, Sorl1 gene inactivation in mice accelerated breakdown of triacylglycerides in adipocytes and protected animals from diet-induced obesity. We then identified the underlying molecular mechanism whereby SORLA promotes insulin-induced suppression of lipolysis in adipocytes. Specifically, we determined that SORLA acts as a sorting factor for the insulin receptor (IR) that redirects internalized receptor molecules from endosomes to the plasma membrane, thereby enhancing IR surface expression and strengthening insulin signal reception in target cells. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism for the association of SORL1 with human obesity and confirm a genetic link between neurodegeneration and metabolism that converges on the receptor SORLA.

  9. Pathogenesis of Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A. Abdul-Ghani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is manifested by decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and results from impaired insulin signaling and multiple post-receptor intracellular defects including impaired glucose transport, glucose phosphorylation, and reduced glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis. Insulin resistance is a core defect in type 2 diabetes, it is also associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Recent studies have reported a mitochondrial defect in oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle in variety of insulin resistant states. In this review, we summarize the cellular and molecular defects that contribute to the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  10. Traumatic brain injury and obesity induce persistent central insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelina, Kate; Sarac, Benjamin; Freeman, Lindsey M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Weil, Zachary M

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced impairments in cerebral energy metabolism impede tissue repair and contribute to delayed functional recovery. Moreover, the transient alteration in brain glucose utilization corresponds to a period of increased vulnerability to the negative effects of a subsequent TBI. In order to better understand the factors contributing to TBI-induced central metabolic dysfunction, we examined the effect of single and repeated TBIs on brain insulin signalling. Here we show that TBI induced acute brain insulin resistance, which resolved within 7 days following a single injury but persisted until 28 days following repeated injuries. Obesity, which causes brain insulin resistance and neuroinflammation, exacerbated the consequences of TBI. Obese mice that underwent a TBI exhibited a prolonged reduction of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) signalling, exacerbated neuroinflammation (microglial activation), learning and memory deficits, and anxiety-like behaviours. Taken together, the transient changes in brain insulin sensitivity following TBI suggest a reduced capacity of the injured brain to respond to the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of insulin and Akt signalling, and thus may be a contributing factor for the damaging neuroinflammation and long-lasting deficits that occur following TBI. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Insulin and insulin signaling play a critical role in fat induction of insulin resistance in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jie; Hong, Tao; Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Liu, Zhenqi; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The primary player that induces insulin resistance has not been established. Here, we studied whether or not fat can cause insulin resistance in the presence of insulin deficiency. Our results showed that high-fat diet (HFD) induced insulin resistance in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. The HFD-induced insulin resistance was prevented largely by the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced moderate insulin deficiency. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD-induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and gastrocnemius. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD- or insulin-induced increase in hepatic expression of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which are necessary for fatty acid activation. HFD increased mitochondrial contents of long-chain acyl-CoAs, whereas it decreased mitochondrial ADP/ATP ratio, and these HFD-induced changes were prevented by the STZ-induced insulin deficiency. In cultured hepatocytes, we observed that expressions of ACSL1 and -5 were stimulated by insulin signaling. Results in cultured cells also showed that blunting insulin signaling by the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 prevented fat accumulation, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to either insulin or oleate plus sera that normally contain insulin. Finally, knockdown of the insulin receptor prevented the oxidative stress and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to insulin or oleate plus sera. Together, our results show that insulin and insulin signaling are required for fat induction of insulin resistance in mice and cultured mouse hepatocytes. PMID:21586696

  12. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Napolitano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient’s overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism.

  13. Associations between depressive symptoms and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriaanse, M C; Dekker, J M; Nijpels, G

    2006-01-01

    .942). The association between depressive symptoms and insulin resistance was similar for men and women. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: We found only weak associations between depressive symptoms and insulin resistance, which did not differ among different glucose metabolism subgroups or between men and women.......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The association between depression and insulin resistance has been investigated in only a few studies, with contradictory results reported. The aim of this study was to determine whether the association between symptoms of depression and insulin resistance varies across glucose...... established type 2 diabetes mellitus. Main outcome measures were insulin resistance defined by the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and symptoms of depression using the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). RESULTS: In the total sample, we found a weak...

  14. Unbuckling lipodystrophy from insulin resistance and hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, Robert A.; Leff, Todd

    2004-01-01

    Lipodystrophy and insulin resistance are the core features of human PPARγ deficiency states. Metabolic complications in PPARγ deficiency, such as hypertension, have been considered to be secondary to insulin resistance. However, a new mouse model that expresses the analog of a human PPARG mutation displays minimal lipodystrophy and insulin resistance but rather severe hypertension. Furthermore, the mutant protein appears to directly modulate the renin-angiotensin system in adipose tissue, providing evidence of the pleiotropic effects of PPARγ. PMID:15254581

  15. Antibody-Mediated Insulin Resistance: When Insulin and Insulin Receptor Act as Autoantigens in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liminet, Christelle; Vouillarmet, Julien; Chikh, Karim; Disse, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of a patient with diabetes presenting a severe insulin-resistance syndrome due to the production of insulin autoantibodies by a lymphocytic lymphoma. We describe the various mechanisms leading to the production of insulin autoantibodies and insulin receptor autoantibodies and review the therapeutic possibilities. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Selective Insulin Resistance in the Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Shoko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Masashi; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Seki, George

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been characterized as attenuation of insulin sensitivity at target organs and tissues, such as muscle and fat tissues and the liver. The insulin signaling cascade is divided into major pathways such as the PI3K/Akt pathway and the MAPK/MEK pathway. In insulin resistance, however, these pathways are not equally impaired. For example, in the liver, inhibition of gluconeogenesis by the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) 2 pathway is impaired, while lipogenesis by the IRS1 pathway is preserved, thus causing hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. It has been recently suggested that selective impairment of insulin signaling cascades in insulin resistance also occurs in the kidney. In the renal proximal tubule, insulin signaling via IRS1 is inhibited, while insulin signaling via IRS2 is preserved. Insulin signaling via IRS2 continues to stimulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule and causes sodium retention, edema, and hypertension. IRS1 signaling deficiency in the proximal tubule may impair IRS1-mediated inhibition of gluconeogenesis, which could induce hyperglycemia by preserving glucose production. In the glomerulus, the impairment of IRS1 signaling deteriorates the structure and function of podocyte and endothelial cells, possibly causing diabetic nephropathy. This paper mainly describes selective insulin resistance in the kidney, focusing on the proximal tubule. PMID:27247938

  17. Insulin resistance, insulin sensitization and inflammation in polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhindsa G

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 5-10% of women of reproductive age have polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. While insulin resistance is not part of the diagnostic criteria for PCOS, its importance in the pathogenesis of PCOS cannot be denied. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance independent of total or fat-free body mass. Post-receptor defects in the action of insulin have been described in PCOS which are similar to those found in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Treatment with insulin sensitizers, metformin and thiazolidinediones, improve both metabolic and hormonal patterns and also improve ovulation in PCOS. Recent studies have shown that PCOS women have higher circulating levels of inflammatory mediators like C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor- , tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 . It is possible that the beneficial effect of insulin sensitizers in PCOS may be partly due to a decrease in inflammation.

  18. [Insulin resistance pathogenesis in metabolic obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, L S; Kirienkova, E V; Mazunin, I O; Vasilenko, M A; Fattakhov, N S

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance concomitant with metabolic inflammation. We also analyze the world results of experimental and clinical studies which aimed at identifying the molecular targets for the development of new prevention and treatment of insulin resistance.

  19. Insulin resistance and maximal oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibaek, Marie; Vestergaard, Henrik; Burchardt, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, and physical fitness all correlate with insulin resistance, but the relative importance of each component is unknown.......Type 2 diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, and physical fitness all correlate with insulin resistance, but the relative importance of each component is unknown....

  20. Microvascular Recruitment in Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    In this PhD work a new method for measuring microvascular recruitment was developed and evaluated, using continues real-time imaging of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Gas-filled microbubbles were infused intravenously and by taking advantage of the echogenic properties of the microbubbles the reso......In this PhD work a new method for measuring microvascular recruitment was developed and evaluated, using continues real-time imaging of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Gas-filled microbubbles were infused intravenously and by taking advantage of the echogenic properties of the microbubbles...... the resonating sound from the microbubbles in the systemic circulation were recorded for determination of microvascular recruitment in designated muscle segments. Results showed that microvascular recruitment increased with insulin stimulation by ~30% in rats and ~40% in humans (study I). Furthermore...... hormone glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the microcirculation. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogs are drugs used for treatments of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes but the vascular effects of GLP-1 in vivo are elusive. Here it was shown that GLP-1 rapidly increased the microvascular recruitment...

  1. Treatment Approach to Patients With Severe Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    In Brief Patients with severe insulin resistance require >2 units/kg of body weight or 200 units/day of insulin. Yet, many patients do not achieve glycemic targets despite using very high doses of insulin. Insulin can cause weight gain, which further contributes to worsening insulin resistance. This article describes the pharmacological options for managing patients with severe insulin resistance, including the use of U-500 insulin and newer agents in combination with insulin. PMID:27092020

  2. Insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Kirti; Apostolopoulou, Maria; Roden, Michael

    2015-12-01

    For long the presence of insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes has been questioned. Detailed metabolic analyses revealed 12%-61% and up to 20% lower whole-body (skeletal muscle) and hepatic insulin sensitivity in type 1 diabetes, depending on the population studied. Type 1 diabetes patients feature impaired muscle adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis and enhanced oxidative stress, predominantly relating to hyperglycemia. They may also exhibit abnormal fasting and postprandial glycogen metabolism in liver, while the role of hepatic energy metabolism for insulin resistance remains uncertain. Recent rodent studies point to tissue-specific differences in the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance. In non-obese diabetic mice, increased lipid availability contributes to muscle insulin resistance via diacylglycerol/protein kinase C isoforms. Furthermore, humans with type 1 diabetes respond to lifestyle modifications or metformin by 20%-60% increased whole-body insulin sensitivity, likely through improvement in both glycemic control and oxidative phosphorylation. Intensive insulin treatment and islet transplantation also increase but fail to completely restore whole-body and hepatic insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, insulin resistance is a feature of type 1 diabetes, but more controlled trials are needed to address its contribution to disease progression, which might help to optimize treatment and reduce comorbidities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravinthan, Aloysious [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Challis, Benjamin [Institute of Metabolic Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Shannon, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hoare, Matthew [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Heaney, Judith [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Foundation for Liver Research, Institute of Hepatology, London (United Kingdom); Alexander, Graeme J.M., E-mail: gja1000@doctors.org.uk [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance.

  4. Lipodystrophy: Syndrome of severe insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindlish, Shagun; Presswala, Lubaina S; Schwartz, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Lipodystrophy (LD) is a relatively rare complex collection of diseases that can be congenital or acquired. It is commonly missed in the clinical setting. Thus, the spectrum of disease presentation mandates clinician expertise in the pathophysiology and management of all forms of LD, obesity, and insulin resistance. An extensive literature search of clinical trials, systematic reviews, and narrative reviews was completed in PubMed for the years 1970 to 2013. The search terms were lipodystrophy, congenital LD, acquired LD, HIV-associated LD, severe insulin resistance, adiposity, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Lipodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of disorders with abnormal adipose tissue distribution, utilization, and metabolism. Adipose tissue can undergo significant changes in composition (hypertrophy and atrophy) in response to a nutritional state. Paradoxically, both excess and deficient adipose tissue is associated with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Bone density scan (DEXA) for body fat composition analysis or magnetic resonance imaging are optimal modalities for the assessment of abnormal adipose tissue distribution. Ongoing clinical studies suggest thiazolidinediones, insulin like growth factor-1, leptin, and growth hormone-releasing hormone as possible treatment for LPD; however, none of them is approved to reverse fat loss or treat severe insulin resistance due to LPD. The underlying mechanisms for LPD causing insulin resistance may be lipotoxicity and derangements in adipose tissue-derived proteins (adipocytokines). However, the lack of evidence to support this model means that clinicians are on their own as they navigate through the phenotypic presentation of lipodystrophies, obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome.

  5. Insulin resistance and maximal oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibaek, Marie; Vestergaard, Henrik; Burchardt, Hans

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, and physical fitness all correlate with insulin resistance, but the relative importance of each component is unknown. HYPOTHESIS: This study was undertaken to determine the relationship between insulin resistance, maximal oxygen uptake......, and the presence of either diabetes or ischemic heart disease. METHODS: The study population comprised 33 patients with and without diabetes and ischemic heart disease. Insulin resistance was measured by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; maximal oxygen uptake was measured during a bicycle exercise test. RESULTS......: There was a strong correlation between maximal oxygen uptake and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (r = 0.7, p = 0.001), and maximal oxygen uptake was the only factor of importance for determining insulin sensitivity in a model, which also included the presence of diabetes and ischemic heart disease. CONCLUSION...

  6. Role of mitochondrial function in insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, Myrte; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2012-01-01

    The obesity pandemic increases the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (DM2).DM2 develops when pancreatic β-cells fail and cannot compensate for the decrease in insulin sensitivity. How excessive caloric intake and weight gain cause insulin resistance has not completely been elucidated.Skeletal muscle is

  7. Ghrelin- and GH-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Esben Thyssen; Krag, Morten B; Poulsen, Morten M

    2013-01-01

    Supraphysiological levels of ghrelin and GH induce insulin resistance. Serum levels of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) correlate inversely with insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to determine whether ghrelin and GH affect RBP4 levels in human subjects....

  8. A novel surrogate index for hepatic insulin resistance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vangipurapu, J

    2011-03-01

    In epidemiological and genetic studies surrogate indices are needed to investigate insulin resistance in different insulin-sensitive tissues. Our objective was to develop a surrogate index for hepatic insulin resistance.

  9. Insulin resistance: regression and clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangho Yoon

    Full Text Available In this paper we try to define insulin resistance (IR precisely for a group of Chinese women. Our definition deliberately does not depend upon body mass index (BMI or age, although in other studies, with particular random effects models quite different from models used here, BMI accounts for a large part of the variability in IR. We accomplish our goal through application of Gauss mixture vector quantization (GMVQ, a technique for clustering that was developed for application to lossy data compression. Defining data come from measurements that play major roles in medical practice. A precise statement of what the data are is in Section 1. Their family structures are described in detail. They concern levels of lipids and the results of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. We apply GMVQ to residuals obtained from regressions of outcomes of an OGTT and lipids on functions of age and BMI that are inferred from the data. A bootstrap procedure developed for our family data supplemented by insights from other approaches leads us to believe that two clusters are appropriate for defining IR precisely. One cluster consists of women who are IR, and the other of women who seem not to be. Genes and other features are used to predict cluster membership. We argue that prediction with "main effects" is not satisfactory, but prediction that includes interactions may be.

  10. Fatty Acids, Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Peter; Rydén, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Although elevated free fatty acid (FFA) levels in obesity have been considered to be of importance for insulin resistance, a recent meta-analysis suggested normal FFA levels in obese subjects. We investigated fasting circulating FFA and glycerol levels in a large cohort of non-obese and obese subjects. Subjects recruited for a study on obesity genetics were investigated in the morning after an overnight fast (n = 3,888). Serum FFA (n = 3,306), plasma glycerol (n = 3,776), and insulin sensitivity index (HOMA-IR,n = 3,469) were determined. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 and insulin resistance as HOMA-IR ≥ 2.21. In obese subjects, circulating FFA and glycerol levels were higher than in non-obese individuals (by 26% and 47%, respectively; both p Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes were associated with a further minor increase in FFA/glycerol among obese subjects. When comparing insulin-sensitive non-obese with insulin-sensitive or -resistant obese individuals, FFA and glycerol were 21–29% and 43–49% higher in obese individuals, respectively. Circulating FFA and glycerol levels are markedly elevated in obesity but only marginally influenced by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Whether these differences persist during diurnal variations in circulating FFA/glycerol, remains to be established

  11. Role of Vitamin D in Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chien Sung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is characterized as a regulator of homeostasis of bone and mineral metabolism, but it can also provide nonskeletal actions because vitamin D receptors have been found in various tissues including the brain, prostate, breast, colon, pancreas, and immune cells. Bone metabolism, modulation of the immune response, and regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation are all biological functions of vitamin D. Vitamin D may play an important role in modifying the risk of cardiometabolic outcomes, including diabetes mellitus (DM, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. The incidence of type 2 DM is increasing worldwide and results from a lack of insulin or inadequate insulin secretion following increases in insulin resistance. Therefore, it has been proposed that vitamin D deficiency plays an important role in insulin resistance resulting in diabetes. The potential role of vitamin D deficiency in insulin resistance has been proposed to be associated with inherited gene polymorphisms including vitamin D-binding protein, vitamin D receptor, and vitamin D 1alpha-hydroxylase gene. Other roles have been proposed to involve immunoregulatory function by activating innate and adaptive immunity and cytokine release, activating inflammation by upregulation of nuclear factor κB and inducing tumor necrosis factor α, and other molecular actions to maintain glucose homeostasis and mediate insulin sensitivity by a low calcium status, obesity, or by elevating serum levels of parathyroid hormone. These effects of vitamin D deficiency, either acting in concert or alone, all serve to increase insulin resistance. Although there is evidence to support a relationship between vitamin D status and insulin resistance, the underlying mechanism requires further exploration. The purpose of this paper was to review the current information available concerning the role of vitamin D in insulin resistance.

  12. Insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romualdo, Monica Cristina dos Santos; Nóbrega, Fernando José de; Escrivão, Maria Arlete Meil Schimith

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of insulin resistance and its association with other metabolic abnormalities in obese children and adolescents. Retrospective study of 220 children and adolescents aged 5-14 years. Anthropometric measurements were performed (weight, height, and waist circumference) and clinical (gender, age, pubertal stage, and degree of obesity) and biochemical (glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, and fractions, triglycerides) data were analyzed. Insulin resistance was identified by the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. The analysis of the differences between the variables of interest and the HOMA-IR quartiles was performed by ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests. Insulin resistance was diagnosed in 33.20% of the sample. It was associated with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; p=0.044), waist circumference measurement (p=0.030), and the set of clinical and metabolic (p=0.000) alterations. Insulin-resistant individuals had higher mean age (p=0.000), body mass index (BMI; p=0.000), abdominal circumference (p=0.000), median triglycerides (p=0.001), total cholesterol (p≤0.042), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; p≤0.027); and lower HDL-C levels (p=0.005). There was an increase in mean BMI (p=0.000), abdominal circumference (p=0.000), and median triglycerides (p=0.002) as the values of HOMA -IR increased, with the exception of HDL-C, which decreased (p=0.001). Those with the highest number of simultaneous alterations were between the second and third quartiles of the HOMA-IR index (p=0.000). The results confirmed that insulin resistance is present in many obese children and adolescents, and that this condition is associated with alterations that represent an increased risk for developing metabolic disorders in adulthood. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Insulin sensitizers prevent fine particulate matter-induced vascular insulin resistance and changes in endothelial progenitor cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberzettl, Petra; McCracken, James P; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to fine particular matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. Because blood vessels are sensitive targets of air pollutant exposure, we examined the effects of concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) on vascular insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which reflect cardiovascular health. We found that CAP exposure for 9 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the aorta of mice maintained on control diet. This change was accompanied by the induction of IL-1β and increases in the abundance of cleaved IL-18 and p10 subunit of Casp-1, consistent with the activation of the inflammasome pathway. CAP exposure also suppressed circulating levels of EPCs (Flk-1(+)/Sca-1(+) cells), while enhancing the bone marrow abundance of these cells. Although similar changes in vascular insulin signaling and EPC levels were observed in mice fed high-fat diet, CAP exposure did not exacerbate diet-induced changes in vascular insulin resistance or EPC homeostasis. Treatment with an insulin sensitizer, metformin or rosiglitazone, prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and NF-κB and inflammasome activation and restored peripheral blood and bone marrow EPC levels. These findings suggest that PM2.5 exposure induces diet-independent vascular insulin resistance and inflammation and prevents EPC mobilization, and that this EPC mobilization defect could be mediated by vascular insulin resistance. Impaired vascular insulin sensitivity may be an important mechanism underlying PM2.5-induced vascular injury, and pharmacological sensitization to insulin action could potentially prevent deficits in vascular repair and mitigate vascular inflammation due to exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance in Endocrine Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melpomeni Peppa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the existing literature data concerning the involvement of skeletal muscle (SM in whole body glucose homeostasis and the contribution of SM insulin resistance (IR to the metabolic derangements observed in several endocrine disorders, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, adrenal disorders and thyroid function abnormalities. IR in PCOS is associated with a unique postbinding defect in insulin receptor signaling in general and in SM in particular, due to a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Adrenal hormone excess is also associated with disrupted insulin action in peripheral tissues, such as SM. Furthermore, both hyper- and hypothyroidism are thought to be insulin resistant states, due to insulin receptor and postreceptor defects. Further studies are definitely needed in order to unravel the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms. In summary, the principal mechanisms involved in muscle IR in the endocrine diseases reviewed herein include abnormal phosphorylation of insulin signaling proteins, altered muscle fiber composition, reduced transcapillary insulin delivery, decreased glycogen synthesis, and impaired mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.

  15. Insulin resistance syndrome in Australian aboriginal people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, K G; Best, J D; McDermott, R; Green, E A; Piers, L S; O'Dea, K

    1997-01-01

    1. Like many indigenous populations, Australian Aboriginal people have developed high rates of obesity, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and cardiovascular and renal disease following the transition from a traditional to an 'urbanized' lifestyle. These conditions tend to cluster as part of the insulin resistance syndrome. 2. The prevalence of overweight people and obesity in Australian Aboriginal populations ranges from 0% in communities with a traditionally orientated lifestyle to well over 50% in the worst affected communities. There is a predominantly central pattern of fat deposition in both men and women, which is associated with greater insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk than is peripheral fat deposition. 3. Data from four previously published, population-based surveys in Aboriginal communities were combined to give a cohort of 1079 subjects of 15 years and older. Several conditions of the insulin resistance syndrome had a strong, positive association with increasing body mass index (BMI): NIDDM (both cross-sectionally and longitudinally), hypertension, dyslipidaemia and albuminuria. Remaining lean (BMI physical activity and improve dietary quality are likely to be the major means by which conditions associated with insulin resistance can be prevented in Aboriginal populations.

  16. Can prokineticin prevent obesity and insulin resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Hunolstein, Jean-Jacques; Nebigil, Canan G

    2015-10-01

    Because of its increasing prevalence and morbi-mortality, obesity is a major health problem. Obesity etiology includes a combination of excess dietary calories and decreased physical activity, coupled with either predisposing genetic factors or metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance. Adipose tissue secretes several metabolically important proteins known as 'adipokines' that play a major role in obesity and insulin resistance. High levels of a newly identified group of adipokines, called prokineticins, have been found in obese adipose tissues. Prokineticins are peptide hormones released principally from macrophages and reproductive organs. They act on the G protein-coupled receptors PKR1 and PKR2. This review aims to provide an overview of current knowledge of the role of prokineticins and their receptors in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. The principal biological effect of prokineticins in the central nervous system is the control of food intake. Nevertheless, peripheral biological effects of prokineticin are associated with increasing insulin sensitivity and suppressing the adipose tissue expansion. We outline the biological significance of the central and peripheral effects of prokineticins, and the potential of their receptors as targets for the treatment of obesity and insulin resistance.

  17. Insulin resistance in the elderly: The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Stolk (Ronald)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractInsulin resistance is a diminished ability to keep the serum glucose low with insulin levels in the normal range. Subjects with raised insulin resistance therefore usually have increased serum insulin levels. When the B-cells of the pancreas are no longer able to produce these increased

  18. Insulin resistance vs. hyperinsulinemia in hypertension: insulin regulation of Ca2+ transport and Ca(2+)-regulation of insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, M B

    1995-06-01

    Hypertension in obesity and insulin resistance has been attributed to insulin stimulation of sympathetic neural output and renal sodium retention. However, recent data demonstrates a significant vasodilatory effect of insulin and suggests that vascular smooth muscle resistance to this action may instead be the cause of hypertension in insulin resistance. This concept is supported by the observation that pharmacological amplification of peripheral insulin sensitivity results in reduced arterial pressure. Insulin attenuates vasoconstrictor responses to pressor agonists and accelerates vascular smooth muscle relaxation, while these effects are blunted in obesity and insulin resistance. Insulin regulation of vasoconstriction and vascular relaxation appears to be secondary to regulation of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), as insulin attenuates both voltage- and receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx and stimulates both the transcription and activity of Ca(2+)-ATPase in vascular smooth muscle cells. Further, these effects are also blunted in insulin resistance. Although [Ca2+]i plays a poorly understood role in insulin signalling, increases beyond an optimal range results in impaired insulin sensitivity, possibly by Ca(2+)-inhibition of insulin-induced dephosphorylation of insulin-sensitive substrates. Consistent with this concept, ectopic overexpression of the agouti gene in the viable yellow (Avy) mouse results in increased skeletal myocyte [Ca2+]i. Accordingly, increased [Ca2+]i in primary insulin target tissues appears to result in peripheral insulin resistance which then results in aberrant regulation of vascular smooth muscle [Ca2+]i and increases in arterial pressure.

  19. Obesity-induced miR-15b is linked causally to the development of insulin resistance through the repression of the insulin receptor in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Won-Mo; Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Park, Se-Whan; Lee, Wan

    2015-11-01

    Obesity increases intracellular lipid accumulation in key tissues or organs, which often leads to metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance. Diets rich in saturated fatty acid (SFA) exacerbate obesity and hepatic steatosis, which accentuate the risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Although microRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in the regulation of gene expression, the implication of obesity-induced miRNAs in metabolic disorders particularly in the development of insulin resistance is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the implication of miR-15b, which is induced by SFA palmitate or obesity, in hepatic insulin resistance. Diet-induced obesity (DIO) in mice developed hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, accompanying with a reduction of insulin receptor (INSR) expression. Palmitate impaired insulin signaling as well as a decrease of INSR in hepatocytes. The expression of miR-15b was upregulated by DIO or palmitate in hepatocytes. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-15b suppressed the protein expression of INSR through targeting INSR 3' untranslated region directly, resulting in an impairment of the insulin signaling and glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes. These results unveil a novel mechanism whereby miR-15b is linked causally to the pathogenesis of hepatic insulin resistance in SFA-induced obesity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    J. Physiol. Sci. 28(December 2013) 179–185 www.njps.com.ng. Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose. Intolerance in Rats fed on High-Sucrose Diet. Morakinyo AO*, Adekunbi DA, Dada KA and Adegoke OA. Department of Physiology, College of Medicine of the University of Lagos, Lagos. Nigeria.

  1. Body Fat Distribution and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Abate

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The burden of obesity has increased globally over the last few decades and its association with insulin resistance and related cardio-metabolic problems have adversely affected our ability to reduce population morbidity and mortality. Traditionally, adipose tissue in the visceral fat depot has been considered a major culprit in the development of insulin resistance. However, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the role of subcutaneous truncal/abdominal adipose tissue in the development of insulin resistance. There are significant differences in the functional characteristics of subcutaneous abdominal/truncal vs. intraabdominal vs. gluteo-femoral fat depots. More recently, mounting evidence has been supporting the role of adipose tissue function in the development of metabolic complications independent of adipose tissue volume or distribution. Decreased capacity for adipocyte differentiation and angiogenesis along with adipocyte hypertrophy can trigger a vicious cycle of inflammation leading to subcutaneous adipose tissue dysfunction and ectopic fat deposition. Therapeutic lifestyle change continues to be the most important intervention in clinical practice to improve adipose tissue function and avoid development of insulin resistance and related cardio-metabolic complications.

  2. Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance in Rats fed on High-Sucrose Diet. ... Summary: Several epidemiological evidences indicate that consumption of coffee is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) however; there is dearth of experimental data to support these ...

  3. Insulin resistance in Nigerians with essential hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Essential hypertension accounts for as many as 95% of cases of hypertension2. Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are interrelated metabolic disorders that strongly predispose an individual to macrovascular and microvascular complications. In recent years insulin resistance has been shown ...

  4. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoi, Sanjeev K; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with migraine but there is no study comparing the characteristics of migraine with and without metabolic syndrome from Southeast Asia. This study was therefore undertaken to compare the clinical characteristics of migraine in patients with and without metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. 135 consecutive patients with migraine diagnosed on the basis of International Headache Society criteria were subjected to clinical evaluation as per fixed protocol. Headache severity, frequency and functional disability were recorded. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed as per National Cholesterol Education Programme: Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetic Federation criteria. Insulin resistance was calculated by homeostases model assessment. Their age ranged between 14 and 61 years and 108 were females. Metabolic syndrome was present in 31.9% patients and only 13 were obese. Insulin resistance was present in 11.1%. Metabolic syndrome was correlated with age, gender, number of triggers, years of headache and duration of migraine attacks. Insulin resistance correlated with duration of migraine attacks. From this study, it can be concluded that metabolic syndrome was present in 31.9% of the migraineurs which was mainly in elderly who had longer duration of headache and multiple triggers.

  5. Cardiac Insulin Resistance and MicroRNA Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Pulakat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac insulin resistance is a metabolic and functional disorder that is often associated with obesity and/or the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS, and this disorder may be accentuated by chronic alcohol consumption. In conditions of over-nutrition, increased insulin (INS and angiotensin II (Ang II activate mammalian target for rapamycin (mTOR/p70 S6 kinase (S6K1 signaling, whereas chronic alcohol consumption inhibits mTOR/S6K1 activation in cardiac tissue. Although excessive activation of mTOR/S6K1 induces cardiac INS resistance via serine phosphorylation of INS receptor substrates (IRS-1/2, it also renders cardioprotection via increased Ang II receptor 2 (AT2R upregulation and adaptive hypertrophy. In the INS-resistant and hyperinsulinemic Zucker obese (ZO rat, a rodent model for CRS, activation of mTOR/S6K1signaling in cardiac tissue is regulated by protective feed-back mechanisms involving mTOR↔AT2R signaling loop and profile changes of microRNA that target S6K1. Such regulation may play a role in attenuating progressive heart failure. Conversely, alcohol-mediated inhibition of mTOR/S6K1, down-regulation of INS receptor and growth-inhibitory mir-200 family, and upregulation of mir-212 that promotes fetal gene program may exacerbate CRS-related cardiomyopathy.

  6. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Horst, K W; Gilijamse, P W; Koopman, K E; de Weijer, B A; Brands, M; Kootte, R S; Romijn, J A; Ackermans, M T; Nieuwdorp, M; Soeters, M R; Serlie, M J

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely measured variables. We assembled data from non-obese (n=112) and obese (n=100) men who underwent two-step EHCs using [6,6-(2)H2]glucose as tracer (insulin infusion dose 20 and 60 mU m(-2) min(-1), respectively). Reference ranges for hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity were calculated from healthy non-obese men. Based on these reference values, obese men with preserved insulin sensitivity or insulin resistance were identified. Cutoff points for insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production (EGP) and insulin-stimulated glucose disappearance rate (Rd) were 46.5% and 37.3 μmol kg(-)(1) min(-)(1), respectively. Most obese men (78%) had EGP suppression within the reference range, whereas only 12% of obese men had Rd within the reference range. Obese men with Rd insulin-sensitive obese men in age, body mass index (BMI), body composition, fasting glucose or cholesterol, but did have higher fasting insulin (110±49 vs 63±29 pmol l(-1), Pinsulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (4.5±2.2 vs 2.7±1.4, P=0.004). Insulin-resistant obese men could be identified with good sensitivity (80%) and specificity (75%) from fasting insulin >74 pmol l(-1). Most obese men have hepatic insulin sensitivity within the range of non-obese controls, but below-normal peripheral insulin sensitivity, that is, insulin resistance. Fasting insulin (>74 pmol l(-1) with current insulin immunoassay) may be used for identification of insulin-resistant (or metabolically unhealthy) obese men in research and clinical settings.

  7. Fatty Acids, Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Arner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although elevated free fatty acid (FFA levels in obesity have been considered to be of importance for insulin resistance, a recent meta-analysis suggested normal FFA levels in obese subjects. We investigated fasting circulating FFA and glycerol levels in a large cohort of non-obese and obese subjects. Methods: Subjects recruited for a study on obesity genetics were investigated in the morning after an overnight fast (n = 3,888. Serum FFA (n = 3,306, plasma glycerol (n = 3,776, and insulin sensitivity index (HOMA-IR,n = 3,469 were determined. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 and insulin resistance as HOMA-IR ≥ 2.21. Results: In obese subjects, circulating FFA and glycerol levels were higher than in non-obese individuals (by 26% and 47%, respectively; both p Conclusion: Circulating FFA and glycerol levels are markedly elevated in obesity but only marginally influenced by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Whether these differences persist during diurnal variations in circulating FFA/glycerol, remains to be established.

  8. Relationship between adiponectin, obesity and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Ardenghi Balsan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: the conditions of obesity and overweight pose a major risk for a number of comorbidities, including clinical syndromes resulting from atherosclerotic disease. Recent studies strongly indicate that adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ that secretes bioactive factors such as adipokines. Adiponectin appears to have a regulatory role in the mechanism of insulin resistance and in the development of atherosclerosis. This systematic review aims to evaluate the anti-atherogenic effects of adiponectin and its properties to improve and mimic metabolic and vascular actions of insulin and its influence on endothelial function. Methods: a qualitative, exploratory and literature review was performed in the PubMed, Portal Capes and Scielo databases using as key-words "adiponectin", "obesity", "insulin resistance", "anti-inflammatory", "therapeutic strategies" and "future prospects". Results: evidence suggests that adiponectin has anti-atherogenic properties with anti-inflammatory effects on the vascular wall. Moreover, it modifies the vascular intracellular signaling and has indirect antioxidant effects on the human myocardium. On the other hand, there are studies suggesting that increased levels of adiponectin are paradoxically associated with a worse prognosis in heart failure syndrome, although the mechanisms are not clear. Conclusion: it is not clear whether adiponectin levels have any clinical significance for risk stratification in cardiovascular disease or if they simply reflect the activation of complex underlying mechanisms. Changes in lifestyle and some drug treatments for hypertension and coronary heart disease have shown significant effect to increase adiponectin levels, and simultaneously decrease in insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction.

  9. MODELS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE AND HEART FAILURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Mauricio; Kohli, Smita; Sabbah, Hani N.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing and is associated with poor prognosis. In spite of the advances in therapy, HF remains a major health problem with high morbidity and mortality. When HF and diabetes coexist, clinical outcomes are significantly worse. The relationship between these two conditions has been studied in various experimental models. However, the mechanisms for this interrelationship are complex, incompletely understood, and have become a matter of considerable clinical and research interest. There are only few animal models that manifest both HF and diabetes. However, the translation of results from these models to human disease is limited and new models are needed to expand our current understanding of this clinical interaction. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of insulin signaling and insulin resistance, the clinical association between insulin resistance and HF and its proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms. Finally, we discuss available animal models of insulin resistance and HF and propose requirements for future new models. PMID:23456447

  10. Insulin resistance alters islet morphology in nondiabetic humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezza, Teresa; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Sorice, Gian Pio

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by poor glucose uptake in metabolic tissues and manifests when insulin secretion fails to cope with worsening insulin resistance. In addition to its effects on skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue metabolism, it is evident that insulin resistance also affects...... pancreatic β-cells. To directly examine the alterations that occur in islet morphology as part of an adaptive mechanism to insulin resistance, we evaluated pancreas samples obtained during pancreatoduodenectomy from nondiabetic subjects who were insulin-resistant or insulin-sensitive. We also compared...... insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and incretin levels between the two groups. We report an increased islet size and an elevated number of β- and α-cells that resulted in an altered β-cell-to-α-cell area in the insulin- resistant group. Our data in this series of studies suggest that neogenesis from...

  11. South Asian diets and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Anoop; Khurana, Lokesh; Isharwal, Sumit; Bhardwaj, Swati

    2009-02-01

    A role of dietary nutrients in relation to insulin resistance has been suggested but conclusive evidence in human beings is lacking. Asian Indians and South Asians are prone to develop insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. In the present paper, data pertaining to nutrient intake, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indians and South Asians have been reviewed. In these populations, several dietary imbalances have been reported: low intake of MUFA, n-3 PUFA and fibre, and high intake of fats, saturated fats, carbohydrates and trans-fatty acids (mostly related to the widespread use of Vanaspati, a hydrogenated oil). Some data suggest that these nutrient imbalances are associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and subclinical inflammation in South Asians. Specifically, in children and young individuals, a high intake of n-6 PUFA is correlated with fasting hyperinsulinaemia, and in adults, high-carbohydrate meal consumption was reported to cause hyperinsulinaemia, postprandial hyperglycaemia and hypertriacylglycerolaemia. Dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFA leads to an improved lipid profile but not insulin sensitivity. Inadequate maternal nutrition in pregnancy, low birth weight and childhood 'catch-up' obesity may be important for the development of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Even in rural populations, who usually consume traditional frugal diets, there is an increasing prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome due to changes in diets and lifestyle. Nationwide community intervention programmes aimed at creating awareness about the consequences of unhealthy food choices and replacing them by healthy food choices are urgently needed in urban and rural populations in India, other countries in South Asia and in migrant South Asians.

  12. Tau hyperphosphorylation induces oligomeric insulin accumulation and insulin resistance in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Patricia; Sandebring-Matton, Anna; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Parrado-Fernandez, Cristina; Rabano, Alberto; Winblad, Bengt; Ávila, Jesús; Ferrer, Isidre; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel

    2017-12-01

    Insulin signalling deficiencies and insulin resistance have been directly linked to the progression of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease. However, to date little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms or insulin state and distribution in the brain under pathological conditions. Here, we report that insulin is accumulated and retained as oligomers in hyperphosphorylated tau-bearing neurons in Alzheimer's disease and in several of the most prevalent human tauopathies. The intraneuronal accumulation of insulin is directly dependent on tau hyperphosphorylation, and follows the tauopathy progression. Furthermore, cells accumulating insulin show signs of insulin resistance and decreased insulin receptor levels. These results suggest that insulin retention in hyperphosphorylated tau-bearing neurons is a causative factor for the insulin resistance observed in tauopathies, and describe a novel neuropathological concept with important therapeutic implications. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Blueberries? Impact on Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    April J. Stull

    2016-01-01

    Blueberries are a rich source of polyphenols, which include anthocyanin bioactive compounds. Epidemiological evidence indicates that incorporating blueberries into the diet may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). These findings are supported by pre-clinical and clinical studies that have shown improvements in insulin resistance (i.e., increased insulin sensitivity) after obese and insulin-resistant rodents or humans consumed blueberries. Insulin resistance was assessed by hom...

  14. Periodontitis and Insulin Resistance: Casual or Causal Relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit N. Gurav

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is now considered as a chronic and low level inflammatory condition. It is closely related to altered glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, abdominal obesity, and coronary heart disease. IR is accompanied by the increase in the levels of inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1 and 6, tumor necrosis factor-α. These inflammatory cytokines also play a crucial part in pathogenesis and progression of insulin resistance. Periodontitis is the commonest of oral diseases, affecting tooth investing tissues. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are released in the disease process of periodontitis. Periodontitis can be attributed with exacerbation of IR. Data in the literature supports a "two way relationship" between diabetes and periodontitis. Periodontitis is asymptomatic in the initial stages of disease process and it often escapes diagnosis. This review presents the blurred nexus between periodontitis and IR, underlining the pathophysiology of the insidious link. The knowledge of the association between periodontitis and IR can be valuable in planning effectual treatment modalities for subjects with altered glucose homeostasis and diabetics. Presently, the studies supporting this association are miniscule. Further studies are mandatory to substantiate the role of periodontitis in the deterioration of IR.

  15. Insulin resistance, HIV infection, and anti-HIV therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiwo, Babafeni O

    2005-04-01

    Insulin resistance, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is increasingly seen in persons infected with HIV. In those affected, it is unclear whether insulin resistance is a direct result of HIV infection alone; however, the development of insulin resistance has been established as a complication of antiretroviral therapies. Some protease inhibitors (PIs) are culpable, and there are significant differences in the impact of different PIs on glucose metabolism, with current evidence suggesting that atazanavir does not cause insulin resistance. The paucity of standardized laboratory tests makes early diagnosis of insulin resistance relatively elusive. Still, there are some clinically useful methods for assessing its presence. For prevention and/or treatment, exercise and optimal diet are useful, and metformin and rosiglitazone have been shown to improve insulin resistance. Changing an effective antiretroviral regimen to counter insulin resistance must be approached thoughtfully in carefully selected patients.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sandhya S.; Zhang, Liping; Mitch, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance refers to reduced sensitivity of organs to insulin-initiated biologic processes that result in metabolic defects. Insulin resistance is common in patients with end-stage renal disease but also occurs in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), even when the serum creatinine is minimally increased. Following insulin binding to its receptor, auto-phosphorylation of the insulin receptor is followed by kinase reactions that phosphorylate insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. In fact, low levels of Akt phosphorylation (p-Akt) identifies the presence of the insulin resistance that leads to metabolic defects in insulin-initiated metabolism of glucose, lipids and muscle proteins. Besides CKD, other complex conditions (e.g., inflammation, oxidative stress, metabolic acidosis, aging and excess angiotensin II) reduce p-Akt resulting in insulin resistance. Insulin resistance in each of these conditions is due to activation of different, E3 ubiquitin ligases which specifically conjugate ubiquitin to IRS-1 marking it for degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Consequently, IRS-1 degradation suppresses insulin-induced intracellular signaling, causing insulin resistance. Understanding mechanisms of insulin resistance could lead to therapeutic strategies that improve the metabolism of patients with CKD. PMID:26444029

  17. Insulin resistance in reproductive aged women

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Cheryce

    2017-01-01

    Overweight and obesity rates are consistently increasing worldwide. Many countries, including Australia report higher increases in obesity rates in women compared to men. In particular, weight gain in younger, reproductive aged women is escalating. Obesity, being an insulin resistant state, has serious health consequences. Traditionally, the focus has been on type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease in older individuals. However, in women of reproductive age, adverse lifestyle, obesity...

  18. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Bhoi, Sanjeev K.; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with migraine but there is no study comparing the characteristics of migraine with and without metabolic syndrome from Southeast Asia. This study was therefore undertaken to compare the clinical characteristics of migraine in patients with and without metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. 135 consecutive patients with migraine diagnosed on the basis of International Headache Society criteria were subjected to clinical evaluation as per fixed protocol. Hea...

  19. Defective NOD2 peptidoglycan sensing promotes diet-induced inflammation, dysbiosis, and insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denou, Emmanuel; Lolmède, Karine; Garidou, Lucile; Pomie, Celine; Chabo, Chantal; Lau, Trevor C; Fullerton, Morgan D; Nigro, Giulia; Zakaroff-Girard, Alexia; Luche, Elodie; Garret, Céline; Serino, Matteo; Amar, Jacques; Courtney, Michael; Cavallari, Joseph F; Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Barra, Nicole G; Foley, Kevin P; McPhee, Joseph B; Duggan, Brittany M; O'Neill, Hayley M; Lee, Amanda J; Sansonetti, Philippe; Ashkar, Ali A; Khan, Waliul I; Surette, Michael G; Bouloumié, Anne; Steinberg, Gregory R; Burcelin, Rémy; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors link metabolite and bacteria-derived inflammation to insulin resistance during obesity. We demonstrate that NOD2 detection of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan (PGN) regulates metabolic inflammation and insulin sensitivity. An obesity-promoting high-fat diet (HFD) increased NOD2 in hepatocytes and adipocytes, and NOD2−/− mice have increased adipose tissue and liver inflammation and exacerbated insulin resistance during a HFD. This effect is independent of altered adiposity or NOD2 in hematopoietic-derived immune cells. Instead, increased metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance in NOD2−/− mice is associated with increased commensal bacterial translocation from the gut into adipose tissue and liver. An intact PGN-NOD2 sensing system regulated gut mucosal bacterial colonization and a metabolic tissue dysbiosis that is a potential trigger for increased metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance. Gut dysbiosis in HFD-fed NOD2−/− mice is an independent and transmissible factor that contributes to metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance when transferred to WT, germ-free mice. These findings warrant scrutiny of bacterial component detection, dysbiosis, and protective immune responses in the links between inflammatory gut and metabolic diseases, including diabetes. PMID:25666722

  20. Insulin Resistance Induced by Short term Fructose Feeding may not ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fructose feeding causes insulin resistance and invariably Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM) in rats and genetically predisposed humans. The effect of insulin resistance induced by short term fructose feeding on fertility in female rats was investigated using the following parameters: oestrous phase and ...

  1. Hypertension and dyslipidaemia in obesity and insulin resistance: pathophysiology, impact on atherosclerotic disease and pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M John; Sposito, Andrei C

    2008-03-01

    Hypertension, a prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, frequently occurs in conjunction with metabolic disturbances and in particular with dyslipidaemia; such comorbidity presents in more than one-third of hypertensive patients. Moreover, hypertension and dyslipidaemia often manifest concomitantly in the clinical context of obesity and insulin resistance. In this setting, distinct metabolic anomalies may account for the development of both conditions, and may equally act to exacerbate their effects on vascular dysfunction. Significantly, hypertension and dyslipidaemia are linked mechanistically and may act in synergy at the arterial wall to enhance atherosclerosis. In this review, we identify potential mechanisms underlying the pathophysiological interaction between hypertension and dyslipidaemia at the cellular and molecular levels, and which may underlie elevated cardiovascular risk in obesity and insulin resistance. Finally, the clinical evidence supporting the beneficial effects of an integrated pharmacotherapeutic strategy to the reduction of cardiovascular risk in patients with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome is critically discussed.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobato, Amanda Oliva; Vasques, Ana Carolina J; Zambon, Mariana Porto; Barros Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    To verify the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents and its relationship with different body composition indicators. A cross-sectional study comprising 79 adolescents aged ten to 18 years old. The assessed body composition indicators were: body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, abdominal circumference, and subcutaneous fat. The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the criteria proposed by Cook et al. The insulin resistance was determined by the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index for values above 3.16. The analysis of ROC curves was used to assess the BMI and the abdominal circumference, aiming to identify the subjects with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The cutoff point corresponded to the percentage above the reference value used to diagnose obesity. The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 45.5% of the patients and insulin resistance, in 29.1%. Insulin resistance showed association with HDL-cholesterol (p=0.032) and with metabolic syndrome (p=0.006). All body composition indicators were correlated with insulin resistance (pinsulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. The best cutoff point for abdominal circumference to identify insulin resistance was 40%. All body composition indicators, HDL-cholesterol and metabolic syndrome showed correlation with insulin resistance. The BMI was the most effective anthropometric indicator to identify insulin resistance.

  3. Plasma leptin and insulin-like growth factor I levels during acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kythreotis, Prokopis; Kokkini, Ageliki; Avgeropoulou, Stavrina; Hadjioannou, Argyro; Anastasakou, Efgenia; Rasidakis, Antonis; Bakakos, Petros

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent studies have provided evidence for a link between leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) mediates the metabolic effects of growth hormone (GH). The GH axis is believed to be suppressed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study is to find out whether acute exacerbations of COPD are followed by changes in plasma leptin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels and furthermore, whether the...

  4. Lipid-induced insulin resistance does not impair insulin access to skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Joyce M.; Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Broussard, Josiane L.; Ionut, Viorica; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acids (FFA) induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Previously, we have shown that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion prevents the dispersion of insulin through the muscle, and we hypothesized that this would lead to an impairment of insulin moving from the plasma to the muscle interstitium. Thus, we infused lipid into our anesthetized canine model and measured the appearance of insulin in the lymph as a means to sample muscle interstitium under hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp conditions. Although lipid infusion lowered the glucose infusion rate and induced both peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance, we were unable to detect an impairment of insulin access to the lymph. Interestingly, despite a significant, 10-fold increase in plasma FFA, we detected little to no increase in free fatty acids or triglycerides in the lymph after lipid infusion. Thus, we conclude that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion does not reduce insulin access to skeletal muscle under clamp conditions. This would suggest that the peripheral insulin resistance is likely due to reduced cellular sensitivity to insulin in this model, and yet we did not detect a change in the tissue microenvironment that could contribute to cellular insulin resistance. PMID:25852002

  5. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel regulates diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and leptin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjung; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Patel, Payal R; Hu, Xiaodi; Lee, Yongjin; Azuma, Yoshihiro; Wang, Hsun-Fan; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K

    2015-08-01

    Insulin resistance is a major characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Recent studies have shown a metabolic role of capsaicin that may be mediated via the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel. In this study, TRPV1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice (as controls) were fed a high-fat diet (HFD), and metabolic studies were performed to measure insulin and leptin action. The TRPV1 KO mice became more obese than the WT mice after HFD, partly attributed to altered energy balance and leptin resistance in the KO mice. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp experiment showed that the TRPV1 KO mice were more insulin resistant after HFD because of the ∼40% reduction in glucose metabolism in the white and brown adipose tissue, compared with that in the WT mice. Leptin treatment failed to suppress food intake, and leptin-mediated hypothalamic signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 activity was blunted in the TRPV1 KO mice. We also found that the TRPV1 KO mice were more obese and insulin resistant than the WT mice at 9 mo of age. Taken together, these results indicate that lacking TRPV1 exacerbates the obesity and insulin resistance associated with an HFD and aging, and our findings further suggest that TRPV1 has a major role in regulating glucose metabolism and hypothalamic leptin's effects in obesity. © FASEB.

  6. Globular adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance via AMPK-mediated restoration of microvascular insulin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-09-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in muscle microvasculature and this may contribute to decreased insulin delivery to, and action in, muscle. In this study we examined whether adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance by affecting muscle microvascular recruitment. We demonstrated that a high-fat diet induces vascular adiponectin and insulin resistance but globular adiponectin administration can restore vascular insulin responses and improve insulin's metabolic action via an AMPK- and nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. This suggests that globular adiponectin might have a therapeutic potential for improving insulin resistance and preventing cardiovascular complications in patients with diabetes via modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and microvasculature plays a critical role in the regulation of insulin action in muscle. Here we tested whether adiponectin replenishment could improve metabolic insulin sensitivity in male rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) via the modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) for 4 weeks. Small resistance artery myograph changes in tension, muscle microvascular recruitment and metabolic response to insulin were determined. Compared with rats fed a LFD, HFD feeding abolished the vasodilatory actions of globular adiponectin (gAd) and insulin on pre-constricted distal saphenous arteries. Pretreatment with gAd improved insulin responses in arterioles isolated from HFD rats, which was blocked by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibition. Similarly, HFD abolished microvascular responses to either gAd or insulin and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose disposal by

  7. Maladaptive immune and inflammatory pathways lead to cardiovascular insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroor, Annayya R.; McKarns, Susan; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Guanghong, Jia; Sowers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of obesity, the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The progression of insulin resistance increases the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The significance of insulin resistance is underscored by the alarming rise in the prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities in the Unites States and worldwide over the last 40-50 years. The incidence of obesity is also on the rise in adolescents. Furthermore, premenopausal women have lower CVD risk compared to men, but this protection is lost in the setting of obesity and insulin resistance. Although systemic and cardiovascular insulin resistance are associated with impaired insulin metabolic signaling and cardiovascular dysfunction, the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance and cardiovascular dysfunction remain poorly understood. Recent studies show that insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes is linked to a metabolic inflammatory response, a state of systemic and tissue specific chronic low grade inflammation. Evidence is also emerging that there is polarization of macrophages and lymphocytes towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype that contribute to progression of insulin resistance in obesity, cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In this review, we provide new insights into factors, such as, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic activation and incretin modulators (e.g., DPP-4) and immune responses that mediate this inflammatory state in obesity and other conditions characterized by insulin resistance. PMID:23932846

  8. Maladaptive immune and inflammatory pathways lead to cardiovascular insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroor, Annayya R; McKarns, Susan; Demarco, Vincent G; Jia, Guanghong; Sowers, James R

    2013-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of obesity, the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The progression of insulin resistance increases the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The significance of insulin resistance is underscored by the alarming rise in the prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities in the Unites States and worldwide over the last 40-50 years. The incidence of obesity is also on the rise in adolescents. Furthermore, premenopausal women have lower CVD risk compared to men, but this protection is lost in the setting of obesity and insulin resistance. Although systemic and cardiovascular insulin resistance is associated with impaired insulin metabolic signaling and cardiovascular dysfunction, the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance and cardiovascular dysfunction remain poorly understood. Recent studies show that insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes is linked to a metabolic inflammatory response, a state of systemic and tissue specific chronic low grade inflammation. Evidence is also emerging that there is polarization of macrophages and lymphocytes towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype that contributes to progression of insulin resistance in obesity, cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In this review, we provide new insights into factors, such as, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic activation and incretin modulators (e.g., DPP-4) and immune responses that mediate this inflammatory state in obesity and other conditions characterized by insulin resistance. © 2013.

  9. Insulin resistance in three dogs with hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, S L; Nelson, R W; Feldman, E C; Niwa, D

    1993-05-01

    Insulin resistance resolved in 3 dogs with hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus after treatment with sodium levothyroxine. A thorough diagnostic evaluation failed to identify any other cause of insulin resistance in these dogs. Hypothyroidism was diagnosed in each dog on the basis of clinical signs, physical findings, hyperlipidemia, and results of thyrotropin or thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test. Hypoglycemia was documented in each dog within 2 weeks of starting sodium levothyroxine administration. The insulin dosage was decreased by 60 to 62% during the ensuing months and good glycemic control was obtained at these lower insulin dosages in all dogs. These findings would suggest hypothyroidism-induced insulin resistance in these dogs.

  10. [The use of human insulin in 3 patients with diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khristov, V; Manov, A

    1989-01-01

    Human insulin was applied to three insulin resistant diabetic patients with moderate insulin needs of 1.9 U/kg body mass/24 hours. The mean level of the insulin antibodies was 61%. In all three patients biostator control was carried out before beginning the treatment with human insulin. After an 8 month treatment a satisfactory compensation of diabetes was achieved with an average insulin dose of 1.02 U/kg body mass, a considerable lowering of the mean blood sugar level and a reduction of the glycosilated hemoglobin examined in two of the patients. At the end of the 8 month period the level of the insulin antibodies was considerably lowered in all three patients. The advantage of human insulin as an alternative for the treatment of immunologic insulin resistance is pointed out.

  11. Adiposity and insulin resistance in nondiabetic hemodialysis patients: effects of high energy supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Szu-Chun; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2009-07-01

    In contrast to the general population, a higher body mass index is associated with better survival among hemodialysis patients. Theoretically, high energy supplementation in these patients ought to lead to weight gain over time, but the benefits of this strategy are unclear. The objective was to assess whether high energy supplementation in nondiabetic hemodialysis patients might adversely affect insulin resistance -- a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We first investigated the association between body fat mass and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance; HOMA-IR) in nondiabetic hemodialysis patients in a cross-sectional analysis (study 1). Of the 106 individuals studied, 55 were randomly assigned to either high energy supplementation (an extra 475 kcal/d; n = 28) or not (n = 27) for 12 wk to assess prospective changes in body fat mass and insulin resistance (study 2). In study 1, body fat mass (P protein (CRP) (P supplementation had a significantly greater increase in body fat mass (P supplementation, because it increases adiposity and inflammation, exacerbates insulin resistance. A long-term study is needed to clarify the metabolic effects of high energy supplementation on cardiovascular disease outcomes in hemodialysis patients.

  12. Maladaptive immune and inflammatory pathways lead to cardiovascular insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Aroor, Annayya R.; McKarns, Susan; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Guanghong, Jia; Sowers, James R

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of obesity, the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The progression of insulin resistance increases the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The significance of insulin resistance is underscored by the alarming rise in the prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities in the Unites States and worldwide over the last 40-50 years. The incidence of obesity is also on the rise in adolescents. Furthermore, premenopausal wo...

  13. Insulin resistance in aging is related to abdominal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrt, W M; Kirwan, J P; Staten, M A; Bourey, R E; King, D S; Holloszy, J O

    1993-02-01

    Studies have shown that insulin resistance increases with age, independent of changes in total adiposity. However, there is growing evidence that the development of insulin resistance may be more closely related to abdominal adiposity. To evaluate the independent effects of aging and regional and total adiposity on insulin resistance, we performed hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps on 17 young (21-33 yr) and 67 older (60-72 yr) men and women. We assessed FFM and total and regional adiposity by hydrodensitometry and anthropometry. Insulin-stimulated GDRs at a plasma insulin concentration of approximately 450 pM averaged 45.6 +/- 3.3 mumol.kg FFM-1 x min-1 (mean +/- SE) in the young subjects, 45.6 +/- 10.0 mumol.kg FFM-1 x min-1 in 24 older subjects who were insulin sensitive, and 23.9 +/- 11.7 mumol.kg FFM-1 x min-1 in 43 older subjects who were insulin resistant. Few significant differences were apparent in skin-fold and circumference measurements between young and insulin-sensitive older subjects, but measurements at most central body sites were significantly larger in the insulin-resistant older subjects. Waist girth accounted for > 40% of the variance in insulin action, whereas age explained only 10-20% of the total variance and < 2% of the variance when the effects of waist circumference were statistically controlled. These results suggest that insulin resistance is more closely associated with abdominal adiposity than with age.

  14. Retinol binding protein 4, obesity, and insulin resistance in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldi Noor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Obesity is a global problem. Even in poor and developing countries, obesity has reached alarming levels. In childhood, obesity may lead to insulin resistance. Retinol binding protein (RBP4, secreted primarily by liver and adipose tissues, was recently proposed as a link between obesity and insulin resistance. The role of RBP4 in pediatric obesity and its relationship with insulin resistance have not been well elucidated. Objective To compare RBP4 levels in obese and lean adolescents and to assess for a relationship between RBP4 levels and insulin resistance. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted in three senior high schools in Padang, West Sumatera, Indonesia. Subjects were adolescents aged 14-18 years, who were obese or normal weight (n=56. We measured subjects’ body mass index (BMI and serum RBP4 concentrations. Insulin resistance was assessed using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index. Results Similar RBP4 levels were found in the obese and normoweight groups (P>0.05. Higher RBP4 levels were found in the insulin resistant compared to the non-insulin resistant group, but the difference was not significant (P > 0.05. Conclusion There is no significant difference in mean RBP4 levels in obese adolescents compared to normoweight adolescents. Nor are mean RBP4 levels significantly different between obese adolescents with and without insulin resistance.

  15. Insulin resistance in severe acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiroğlu, Nazan; Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Kemeriz, Funda

    2015-08-01

    Acne vulgaris is a pilosebaceous gland disease that usually affects people from puberty to young adulthood. It is seen especially on the face, neck, trunk and arms. Its severity differs from patient to patient and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. The main pathogenic factors of acne are high sebaceous gland secretion, follicular hyperproliferation, high androgen effects, propionibacterium acnes colonization and inflammation. Diet is always thought a probable reason for acne and many studies are done about acne and diet. To determine the effect of insulin resistance in severe acne vulgaris. Two hundred and forty-three acne vulgaris patients and 156 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. The blood levels of insulin and glucose were measured. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) Index was calculated. The values were compared with the control group. All of the patients were in the severe acne group according to their scores on the global acne scoring scale. While fasting blood glucose levels were not different between the groups (p > 0.05, 82.91 ±9.76 vs. 80.26 ±8.33), the fasting insulin levels were significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (p pathogenesis of acne.

  16. Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance and Absence of Inflammation Characterize Insulin-Resistant Grade I Obese Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cacylde Amouzou

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with insulin-resistance (IR, the key feature of type 2 diabetes. Although chronic low-grade inflammation has been identified as a central effector of IR development, it has never been investigated simultaneously at systemic level and locally in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in obese humans characterized for their insulin sensitivity.We compared metabolic parameters and inflammation at systemic and tissue levels in normal-weight and obese subjects with different insulin sensitivity to better understand the mechanisms involved in IR development.30 post-menopausal women were classified as normal-weight insulin-sensitive (controls, CT and obese (grade I insulin-sensitive (OIS or insulin-resistant (OIR according to their body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of IR index. They underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, blood sampling, skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies, an activity questionnaire and a self-administrated dietary recall. We analyzed insulin sensitivity, inflammation and IR-related parameters at the systemic level. In tissues, insulin response was assessed by P-Akt/Akt expression and inflammation by macrophage infiltration as well as cytokines and IκBα expression.Systemic levels of lipids, adipokines, inflammatory cytokines, and lipopolysaccharides were equivalent between OIS and OIR subjects. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, the number of anti-inflammatory macrophages was higher in OIR than in CT and OIS and was associated with higher IL-6 level. Insulin induced Akt phosphorylation to the same extent in CT, OIS and OIR. In skeletal muscle, we could not detect any inflammation even though IκBα expression was lower in OIR compared to CT. However, while P-Akt/Akt level increased following insulin stimulation in CT and OIS, it remained unchanged in OIR.Our results show that systemic IR occurs without any change in systemic and tissues inflammation. We identified a muscle

  17. Muramyl Dipeptide-Based Postbiotics Mitigate Obesity-Induced Insulin Resistance via IRF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Joseph F; Fullerton, Morgan D; Duggan, Brittany M; Foley, Kevin P; Denou, Emmanuel; Smith, Brennan K; Desjardins, Eric M; Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Kim, Kalvin J; Tuinema, Brian R; Stearns, Jennifer C; Prescott, David; Rosenstiel, Philip; Coombes, Brian K; Steinberg, Gregory R; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2017-05-02

    Intestinal dysbiosis contributes to obesity and insulin resistance, but intervening with antibiotics, prebiotics, or probiotics can be limited by specificity or sustained changes in microbial composition. Postbiotics include bacterial components such as lipopolysaccharides, which have been shown to promote insulin resistance during metabolic endotoxemia. We found that bacterial cell wall-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) is an insulin-sensitizing postbiotic that requires NOD2. Injecting MDP lowered adipose inflammation and reduced glucose intolerance in obese mice without causing weight loss or altering the composition of the microbiome. MDP reduced hepatic insulin resistance during obesity and low-level endotoxemia. NOD1-activating muropeptides worsened glucose tolerance. IRF4 distinguished opposing glycemic responses to different types of peptidoglycan and was required for MDP/NOD2-induced insulin sensitization and lower metabolic tissue inflammation during obesity and endotoxemia. IRF4 was dispensable for exacerbated glucose intolerance via NOD1. Mifamurtide, an MDP-based drug with orphan drug status, was an insulin sensitizer at clinically relevant doses in obese mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypothalamic Insulin Resistance in Obesity: Effects on Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiyi; Balland, Eglantine; Cowley, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    The central link between obesity and type 2 diabetes is the development of insulin resistance. To date, it is still not clear whether hyperinsulinemia causes insulin resistance, which underlies the pathogenesis of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes, owing to the sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that exist in the periphery and in the brain. In recent years, accumulating evidence has demonstrated the existence of insulin resistance within the hypothalamus. In this review, we have integrated the recent discoveries surrounding both central and peripheral insulin resistance to provide a comprehensive overview of insulin resistance in obesity and the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. In particular, this review will discuss how hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia in obesity impair insulin sensitivity in tissues such as the liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the brain. In addition, this review highlights insulin transport into the brain, signaling pathways associated with hypothalamic insulin receptor expression in the regulation of hepatic glucose production, and finally the perturbation of systemic glucose homeostasis as a consequence of central insulin resistance. We also suggest future approaches to overcome both central and peripheral insulin resistance to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Acceptance of insulin therapy: a long shot? Psychological insulin resistance in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenberg, Y. J. C.; Lucas, C.; Latour, C.; Scholte Op Reimer, W. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Diabet. Med. 29, 796802 (2012) Abstract Aim To explore which factors are associated with psychological insulin resistance in insulin-naive patients with Type 2 diabetes in primary care. Methods A sample of 101 insulin-naive patients with Type 2 diabetes completed self-administered questionnaires

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Chromium in Alleviating Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yinan; Clark, Suzanne; Ren, Jun; Sreejayan, Nair

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular anomalies and is a major health problem approaching global epidemic proportions. Insulin resistance, a prediabetic condition, precedes the onset of frank type 2 diabetes and offers potential avenues for early intervention to treat the disease. Although lifestyle modifications and exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes, compliance has proved to be difficult, warranting pharmacological interventions. However, most of the currently available drugs that improve insulin sensitivity have adverse effects. Therefore, attractive strategies to alleviate insulin resistance include dietary supplements. One such supplement is chromium, which has been shown reduce insulin resistance in some, but not all, studies. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of chromium in alleviating insulin resistance remain elusive. This review examines emerging reports on the effect of chromium, as well as molecular and cellular mechanisms by which chromium may provide beneficial effects in alleviating insulin resistance. PMID:22423897

  1. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance | Pillay | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved understanding of the molecular basis of insulin resistance could ultimately lead to a better understanding of the causation of these conditions and the ... Here, particular attention is devoted to the initial events that follow the binding of insulin to its receptor, including changes in insulin receptor phosphorylation.

  2. Peripheral nervous system insulin resistance in ob/ob mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A reduction in peripheral nervous system (PNS) insulin signaling is a proposed mechanism that may contribute to sensory neuron dysfunction and diabetic neuropathy. Neuronal insulin resistance is associated with several neurological disorders and recent evidence has indicated that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in primary culture display altered insulin signaling, yet in vivo results are lacking. Here, experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that the PNS of insulin-resistant mice displays altered insulin signal transduction in vivo. For these studies, nondiabetic control and type 2 diabetic ob/ob mice were challenged with an intrathecal injection of insulin or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and downstream signaling was evaluated in the DRG and sciatic nerve using Western blot analysis. Results The results indicate that insulin signaling abnormalities documented in other “insulin sensitive” tissues (i.e. muscle, fat, liver) of ob/ob mice are also present in the PNS. A robust increase in Akt activation was observed with insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in nondiabetic mice in both the sciatic nerve and DRG; however this response was blunted in both tissues from ob/ob mice. The results also suggest that upregulated JNK activation and reduced insulin receptor expression could be contributory mechanisms of PNS insulin resistance within sensory neurons. Conclusions These findings contribute to the growing body of evidence that alterations in insulin signaling occur in the PNS and may be a key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24252636

  3. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in healthy and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest tissues in the human body and is considered the primary target for insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. In skeletal muscle, binding of the insulin to insulin receptor (IR) initiates a signaling cascade that results in the translocation of the insulin-sensitive glucose...... transporter protein 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane which leads to facilitated diffusion of glucose into the cell. Understanding the precise signaling events guiding insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is pivotal, because impairment in these signaling events leads to development of insulin resistance and type...... 2 diabetes. This review summarizes current understanding of insulin signaling pathways mediating glucose uptake in healthy and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle....

  4. I.c.v. administration of the nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, CP-472555, prevents exacerbated hypoglycemia during repeated insulin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, A Y; Paranjape, S A; Briski, K P

    2006-06-30

    Hypoglycemia elicits an integrated array of CNS-mediated counterregulatory responses, including activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The role of antecedent adrenocortical hypersecretion in impaired glucose counterregulation remains controversial. The present studies utilized the selective, nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, CP-472555, as a pharmacological tool to investigate the hypothesis that hypoglycemic hypercorticosteronemia modulates CNS efferent autonomic and neuroendocrine motor responses to recurring insulin-induced hypoglycemia via glucocorticoid receptor-dependent mechanisms. Groups of adult male rats were injected s.c. with either one or four doses of the intermediate-acting insulin, Humulin neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH), on as many days, while controls were injected with diluent alone. Animals injected with four doses of insulin were pretreated by i.c.v. administration of graded doses of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist or vehicle alone prior to the first three doses of insulin. Repeated daily injection of NPH exacerbated hypoglycemia, attenuated patterns of glucagon and epinephrine secretion, and diminished neuronal transcriptional activation in discrete CNS metabolic loci, including the lateral hypothalamic area, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the solitary tract. While i.c.v. delivery of 25 or 100 ng doses of CP-472555 did not alter any of these parameters, animals treated with 500 ng exhibited circulating glucose, glucagon, and epinephrine levels that were similar to those in rats injected with one dose of insulin, as well as a reversal of recurring insulin-induced hypoglycemia-associated reductions in Fos immunolabeling in the lateral hypothalamic area, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. These results provide unique pharmacological evidence that antecedent activation of central glucocorticoid receptor is required

  5. Third Exposure to a Reduced Carbohydrate Meal Lowers Evening Postprandial Insulin and GIP Responses and HOMA-IR Estimate of Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Ju; Borer, Katarina T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease mortality. Postprandial hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia also occur in metabolically healthy subjects consuming high-carbohydrate diets particularly after evening meals and when carbohydrate loads follow acute exercise. We hypothesized the involvement of dietary carbohydrate load, especially when timed after exercise, and mediation by the glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) in this phenomenon, as this incretin promotes insulin secretion after carbohydrate intake in insulin-sensitive, but not in insulin-resistant states. Methods Four groups of eight metabolically healthy weight-matched postmenopausal women were provided with three isocaloric meals (a pre-trial meal and two meals during the trial day) containing either 30% or 60% carbohydrate, with and without two-hours of moderate-intensity exercise before the last two meals. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, GIP, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFAs), and D-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured during 4-h postprandial periods and 3-h exercise periods, and their areas under the curve (AUCs) were analyzed by mixed-model ANOVA, and insulin resistance during fasting and meal tolerance tests within each diet was estimated using homeostasis-model assessment (HOMA-IR). Results The third low-carbohydrate meal, but not the high-carbohydrate meal, reduced: (1) evening insulin AUC by 39% without exercise and by 31% after exercise; (2) GIP AUC by 48% without exercise and by 45% after exercise, and (3) evening insulin resistance by 37% without exercise and by 24% after exercise. Pre-meal exercise did not alter insulin-, GIP- and HOMA-IR- lowering effects of low-carbohydrate diet, but exacerbated evening hyperglycemia. Conclusions Evening postprandial insulin and GIP responses and insulin resistance declined by over 30% after three meals

  6. Third Exposure to a Reduced Carbohydrate Meal Lowers Evening Postprandial Insulin and GIP Responses and HOMA-IR Estimate of Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Ju; Borer, Katarina T

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease mortality. Postprandial hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia also occur in metabolically healthy subjects consuming high-carbohydrate diets particularly after evening meals and when carbohydrate loads follow acute exercise. We hypothesized the involvement of dietary carbohydrate load, especially when timed after exercise, and mediation by the glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) in this phenomenon, as this incretin promotes insulin secretion after carbohydrate intake in insulin-sensitive, but not in insulin-resistant states. Four groups of eight metabolically healthy weight-matched postmenopausal women were provided with three isocaloric meals (a pre-trial meal and two meals during the trial day) containing either 30% or 60% carbohydrate, with and without two-hours of moderate-intensity exercise before the last two meals. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, GIP, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFAs), and D-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured during 4-h postprandial periods and 3-h exercise periods, and their areas under the curve (AUCs) were analyzed by mixed-model ANOVA, and insulin resistance during fasting and meal tolerance tests within each diet was estimated using homeostasis-model assessment (HOMA-IR). The third low-carbohydrate meal, but not the high-carbohydrate meal, reduced: (1) evening insulin AUC by 39% without exercise and by 31% after exercise; (2) GIP AUC by 48% without exercise and by 45% after exercise, and (3) evening insulin resistance by 37% without exercise and by 24% after exercise. Pre-meal exercise did not alter insulin-, GIP- and HOMA-IR- lowering effects of low-carbohydrate diet, but exacerbated evening hyperglycemia. Evening postprandial insulin and GIP responses and insulin resistance declined by over 30% after three meals that limited daily carbohydrate intake to

  7. Insulin resistance, insulin response, and obesity as indicators of metabolic risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrannini, Ele; Balkau, Beverley; Coppack, Simon W

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Insulin resistance (IR) and obesity, especially abdominal obesity, are regarded as central pathophysiological features of a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), but their relative roles remain undefined. Moreover, the differential impact of IR viz. insulin response has not been...... this pattern of associations. Each of BMI, waist girth, IR, and insulin response was independently associated with total CVRF load (all P distribution, and insulin response are measured simultaneously in a large cohort, no one factor stands out as the sole driving...

  8. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Oliva Gobato

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents and its relationship with different body composition indicators. Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising 79 adolescents aged ten to 18 years old. The assessed body composition indicators were: body mass index (BMI, body fat percentage, abdominal circumference, and subcutaneous fat. The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the criteria proposed by Cook et al. The insulin resistance was determined by the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR index for values above 3.16. The analysis of ROC curves was used to assess the BMI and the abdominal circumference, aiming to identify the subjects with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The cutoff point corresponded to the percentage above the reference value used to diagnose obesity. Results: The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 45.5% of the patients and insulin resistance, in 29.1%. Insulin resistance showed association with HDL-cholesterol (p=0.032 and with metabolic syndrome (p=0.006. All body composition indicators were correlated with insulin resistance (p<0.01. In relation to the cutoff point evaluation, the values of 23.5 and 36.3% above the BMI reference point allowed the identification of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. The best cutoff point for abdominal circumference to identify insulin resistance was 40%. Conclusions: All body composition indicators, HDL-cholesterol and metabolic syndrome showed correlation with insulin resistance. The BMI was the most effective anthropometric indicator to identify insulin resistance.

  9. Metabolism and insulin signaling in common metabolic disorders and inherited insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    . These metabolic disorders are all characterized by reduced plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. Quantitatively skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin resistance. Both low plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance contribute to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes...... and cardiovascular disease. In several studies, we have investigated insulin action on glucose and lipid metabolism, and at the molecular level, insulin signaling to glucose transport and glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle from healthy individuals and in obesity, PCOS and type 2 diabetes. Moreover, we have...... action on glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is impaired. This suggests that the defects in glucose and lipid oxidation in the common metabolic disorders are secondary to other factors. In young women with PCOS, the degree of insulin resistance was similar to that seen in middle-aged patients...

  10. Metabolism and insulin signaling in common metabolic disorders and inherited insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højlund, Kurt

    2014-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are common metabolic disorders which are observed with increasing prevalences, and which are caused by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors, including increased calorie intake and physical inactivity. These metabolic disorders are all characterized by reduced plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. Quantitatively skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin resistance. Both low plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance contribute to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In several studies, we have investigated insulin action on glucose and lipid metabolism, and at the molecular level, insulin signaling to glucose transport and glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle from healthy individuals and in obesity, PCOS and type 2 diabetes. Moreover, we have described a novel syndrome characterized by postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and insulin resistance. This syndrome is caused by a mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene (INSR). We have studied individuals with this mutation as a model of inherited insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes, obesity and PCOS are characterized by pronounced defects in the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, in particular glycogen synthesis and to a lesser extent glucose oxidation, and the ability of insulin to suppress lipid oxidation. In inherited insulin resistance, however, only insulin action on glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is impaired. This suggests that the defects in glucose and lipid oxidation in the common metabolic disorders are secondary to other factors. In young women with PCOS, the degree of insulin resistance was similar to that seen in middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes. This supports the hypothesis of an unique pathogenesis of insulin resistance in PCOS. Insulin in physiological concentrations stimulates glucose uptake in human skeletal

  11. A paradox: insulin inhibits expression and secretion of resistin which induces insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Fan, Hong-Qi; Qiu, Jie; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Min; Gu, Nan; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Fei, Li; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Guo, Mei; Chen, Rong-Hua; Guo, Xi-Rong

    2008-01-07

    To confirm whether insulin regulates resistin expression and secretion during differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and the relationship of resistin with insulin resistance both in vivo and in vitro. Supernatant resistin was measured during differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. L6 rat myoblasts and hepatoma cell line H4IIE were used to confirm the cellular function of resistin. Diet-induced obese rats were used as an insulin resistance model to study the relationship of resistin with insulin resistance. Resistin expression and secretion were enhanced during differentiation 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. This cellular differentiation stimulated resistin expression and secretion, but was suppressed by insulin. Resistin also induced insulin resistance in H4IIE hepatocytes and L6 myoblasts. In diet-induced obese rats, serum resistin levels were negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity, but not with serum insulin. Insulin can inhibit resistin expression and secretion in vitro, but insulin is not a major regulator of resistin in vivo. Fat tissue mass affects insulin sensitivity by altering the expression and secretion of resistin.

  12. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3-deficiency enhances oxidative stress and corticosteroid resistance in severe asthma exacerbation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lan

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a significant role in exacerbation of asthma. The role of vitamin D in oxidative stress and asthma exacerbation remains unclear. We aimed to determine the relationship between vitamin D status and oxidative stress in asthma exacerbation. Severe asthma exacerbation patients with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-deficiency (V-D deficiency or 25-hydroxyvitamin D-sufficiency (V-D sufficiency were enrolled. Severe asthma exacerbation with V-D-deficiency showed lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 compared to that with V-D-sufficiency. V-D-deficiency intensified ROS release and DNA damage and increased TNF-α, OGG1 and NFκB expression and NFκB phosphorylation in severe asthma exacerbation. Supplemental vitamin D3 significantly increased the rates of FEV1 change and decreased ROS and DNA damage in V-D-deficiency. Vitamin D3 inhibited LPS-induced ROS and DNA damage and were associated with a decline in TNF-α and NFκB in epithelial cells. H2O2 reduces nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptors in airway epithelial cell lines. V-D pretreatment enhanced the dexamethasone-induced nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptors in airway epithelial cell lines and monocytes from 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-deficiency asthma patients. These findings indicate that V-D deficiency aggravates oxidative stress and DNA damage, suggesting a possible mechanism for corticosteroid resistance in severe asthma exacerbation.

  13. Cerebral blood flow links insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Ryan

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance confers risk for diabetes mellitus and associates with a reduced capacity of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure. Importantly, several brain regions that comprise the central autonomic network, which controls the baroreflex, are also sensitive to the neuromodulatory effects of insulin. However, it is unknown whether peripheral insulin resistance relates to activity within central autonomic network regions, which may in turn relate to reduced baroreflex regulation. Accordingly, we tested whether resting cerebral blood flow within central autonomic regions statistically mediated the relationship between insulin resistance and an indirect indicator of baroreflex regulation; namely, baroreflex sensitivity. Subjects were 92 community-dwelling adults free of confounding medical illnesses (48 men, 30-50 years old who completed protocols to assess fasting insulin and glucose levels, resting baroreflex sensitivity, and resting cerebral blood flow. Baroreflex sensitivity was quantified by measuring the magnitude of spontaneous and sequential associations between beat-by-beat systolic blood pressure and heart rate changes. Individuals with greater insulin resistance, as measured by the homeostatic model assessment, exhibited reduced baroreflex sensitivity (b = -0.16, p < .05. Moreover, the relationship between insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity was statistically mediated by cerebral blood flow in central autonomic regions, including the insula and cingulate cortex (mediation coefficients < -0.06, p-values < .01. Activity within the central autonomic network may link insulin resistance to reduced baroreflex sensitivity. Our observations may help to characterize the neural pathways by which insulin resistance, and possibly diabetes mellitus, relates to adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  14. Blueberries’ Impact on Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April J. Stull

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Blueberries are a rich source of polyphenols, which include anthocyanin bioactive compounds. Epidemiological evidence indicates that incorporating blueberries into the diet may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM. These findings are supported by pre-clinical and clinical studies that have shown improvements in insulin resistance (i.e., increased insulin sensitivity after obese and insulin-resistant rodents or humans consumed blueberries. Insulin resistance was assessed by homeostatic model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, insulin tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. Additionally, the improvements in glucose tolerance after blueberry consumption were assessed by glucose tolerance tests. However, firm conclusions regarding the anti-diabetic effect of blueberries cannot be drawn due to the small number of existing clinical studies. Although the current evidence is promising, more long-term, randomized, and placebo-controlled trials are needed to establish the role of blueberries in preventing or delaying T2DM.

  15. Metformin increases insulin-stimulated glucose transport in insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuska, D; Zierath, J; Thörne, A; Sonnenfeld, T; Wallberg-Henriksson, H

    1991-05-01

    The effect of metformin (0.1 mM) on glucose transport was investigated in healthy control and in insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle. Muscle samples (200-400 mg) were obtained from the rectus abdominis muscle (abdominal surgery) or from the vastus lateralis portion of the quadriceps femoris muscle (open biopsy technique) from 8 healthy controls (age 38 +/- 4 yrs, BMI 23 +/- 1) and from 6 insulin-resistant subjects (age 53 +/- 5 yrs, BMI 30 +/- 2). Metformin had no effect on basal or insulin-stimulated (100 microU/ml) 3-0-methylglucose transport in incubated muscle strips from healthy subjects. Muscle tissue from the insulin resistant group did not respond to 100 microU/ml of insulin (0.73 +/- 0.17 for basal and 0.81 +/- 0.22 mumol x ml-1 x h-1 for insulin-stimulation, NS). Basal glucose transport was unaffected by metformin, whereas insulin-stimulated (100 microU/ml) glucose transport was increased by 63% in the insulin-resistant muscles (0.73 +/- 0.17 in the absence vs 1.19 +/- 0.18 mumol x ml-1 x h-1 in the presence of metformin, p less than 0.05). In conclusion, metformin abolishes insulin-resistance in human skeletal muscle by normalizing insulin-stimulated glucose transport accross the muscle cell membrane. The mechanism for this effect remains to be elucidated.

  16. Integrating Mechanisms for Insulin Resistance: Common Threads and Missing Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Varman T.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a complex metabolic disorder that defies a single etiological pathway. Accumulation of ectopic lipid metabolites, activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and innate immune pathways have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. However, these pathways are also closely linked to changes in fatty acid uptake, lipogenesis, and energy expenditure that can impact ectopic lipid deposition. Ultimately, accumulation of specific lipid metabolites (diacylglycerols and/or ceramides) in liver and skeletal muscle, may be a common pathway leading to impaired insulin signaling and insulin resistance. PMID:22385956

  17. [Myoinositol--alternative treatment of insulin resistance in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedikova, S; Sirakov, M; Boyadzhieva, M

    2011-01-01

    Myo-inostitol is a part of inositolphosphoglycan (IPG) mediators, which are known as putative mediators of insulin. One of the theories for insulin resistance is any deficiency in Myo-inositol. Presumably a substitution therapy with exogenous Myo-inositol could be effective for treatment of insulin resistance and PCOS. This is well established in women in reproductive age, but there is insufficient data for adolescence.

  18. Determinants of insulin resistance in renal transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, Leendert H.; de Vries, Aiko P. J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van Son, Willem J.; van der Heide, Jaap J. Homan; Ploeg, Rutger J.; de Jong, Paul E.; Gans, Reinold O. B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Insulin resistance is considered to play an important role in the development of cardiovascular disease, which limits long-term renal transplant survival. Renal transplant recipients are more insulin -resistant compared with healthy controls. It is not known to date which factors relate

  19. Insulin resistance : pathophysiology in South Asians & therapeutic strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleddering, Maria Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the pathophysiology of insulin resistance in the South Asian population and comprises studies on pharmacological and weight loss interventions in insulin resistant patients. Because of the increasing number of patients with obesity and T2DM, more research is needed to identify

  20. C16:0-Ceramide Signals Insulin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Hla, Timothy; Kolesnick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A substantive literature has accumulated implicating sphingolipids, in particular ceramides, as mediators of insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. Thanks to recent technical advances in mouse genetics and lipidomics, two independent laboratories identify the same sphingolipid, C16:0-ceramide, as principal mediator of obesity-related insulin resistance.

  1. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis : the role of visceral fat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, K.B.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to unravel relationships between obesity, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and atherosclerosis. It is well-established that patients with type 2 diabetes have a 2- to 3-fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether insulin resistance

  2. Method for preventing and/or treating insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwdorp, M.; Vos, de W.M.

    2013-01-01

    The present invention describes use of Eubacterium hallii et rel. and/or Alcaligenes faecalis et rel., as well as pharmaceutical, food, or feed compositions comprising these bacteria, as a medicament, in particular for preventing and/or treating insulin resistance and/or insulin resistance-related

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of obese children with insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aa, van der M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing. Insulin resistance is a consequence of childhood obesity, and it has a keyrole in the development of cardiometabolic complications, such as diabetes mellitus. In the first part of this thesis, the epidemiology of insulin resistance has been described.

  4. Plasma leptin and insulin-like growth factor I levels during acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kythreotis, Prokopis; Kokkini, Ageliki; Avgeropoulou, Stavrina; Hadjioannou, Argyro; Anastasakou, Efgenia; Rasidakis, Antonis; Bakakos, Petros

    2009-04-05

    Recent studies have provided evidence for a link between leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) mediates the metabolic effects of growth hormone (GH). The GH axis is believed to be suppressed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study is to find out whether acute exacerbations of COPD are followed by changes in plasma leptin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels and furthermore, whether these changes are related to systemic inflammation. We measured serum leptin, IGF-I, TNF-alpha, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) levels in 52 COPD patients with acute exacerbation on admission to hospital (Day 1) and two weeks later (Day 15). 25 healthy age-matched subjects served as controls. COPD patients were also divided into two subgroups (29 with chronic bronchitis and 23 with emphysema). Serum leptin and IGF-I were measured by radioimmunoassay and TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8 were measured by ELISA. Serum leptin levels were significantly higher and serum IGF-I levels significantly lower in COPD patients on Day 1 than in healthy controls (p leptin and TNF-alpha on Day 1 (r = 0.620, p leptin levels along with decreased IGF-I levels occurred during acute exacerbations of COPD. Compared to chronic bronchitis, patients with emphysema had lower circulating IGF-I levels both at the onset of the exacerbation and two weeks later.

  5. Plasma leptin and insulin-like growth factor I levels during acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasidakis Antonis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have provided evidence for a link between leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I mediates the metabolic effects of growth hormone (GH. The GH axis is believed to be suppressed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The aim of this study is to find out whether acute exacerbations of COPD are followed by changes in plasma leptin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I levels and furthermore, whether these changes are related to systemic inflammation. Methods We measured serum leptin, IGF-I, TNF-α, interleukin 1β (IL-1β, interleukin 6 (IL-6 and interleukin 8 (IL-8 levels in 52 COPD patients with acute exacerbation on admission to hospital (Day 1 and two weeks later (Day 15. 25 healthy age-matched subjects served as controls. COPD patients were also divided into two subgroups (29 with chronic bronchitis and 23 with emphysema. Serum leptin and IGF-I were measured by radioimmunoassay and TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were measured by ELISA. Results Serum leptin levels were significantly higher and serum IGF-I levels significantly lower in COPD patients on Day 1 than in healthy controls (p Conclusion Inappropriately increased circulating leptin levels along with decreased IGF-I levels occured during acute exacerbations of COPD. Compared to chronic bronchitis, patients with emphysema had lower circulating IGF-I levels both at the onset of the exacerbation and two weeks later.

  6. Birth weight, infant growth and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ken K; Dunger, David B

    2004-11-01

    Size at birth and early postnatal growth rates are important determinants of human perinatal survival; they also predict the tempo of growth, adult height and long-term risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Results from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood (ALSPAC) show that fetal growth is influenced by both fetal genes and maternal-uterine-placental factors. Important maternal-placental factors include parity, smoking and weight gain, but also maternal genetic factors in the mother or fetal placenta, including the mitochondrial DNA 16189 variant and H19. These maternal genetic factors particularly influence smaller, growth-restrained infants, as in first pregnancies. Fetal genes include the insulin gene (INS) VNTR (variable number of tandem repeat), which we recently confirmed to be associated with birth size and cord blood IGF-II levels; these fetal gene effects are more evident in the absence of maternal-uterine growth restraint. During postnatal life, the INS VNTR III/III genotype remains associated with body size, including body mass index and waist circumference, and also lower insulin sensitivity among girls. However, as at birth, significant gene-environment interactions are seen. Rapid 'catch-up' early postnatal weight gain follows maternal-uterine restraint, and strongly predicts later childhood obesity and insulin resistance; among these children, those with INS VNTR class I alleles are more obese. Genetic factors that influence early growth may have conferred some early survival advantage in human history during times of undernutrition. With abundant nutrition and rising obesity rates, these genetic factors and their interactions with maternal and childhood environmental factors that influence childhood growth may now contribute to the early development of adult disease risk. Their recognition may help the development of targeted early interventions to prevent the progression towards adult disease.

  7. Severe Insulin Resistance Improves Immediately After Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rahul; Hassan, Chandra; Chaiban, Joumana T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Obese individuals exhibit insulin resistance often leading to adverse health outcomes. When compared with intensive medical therapy, bariatric surgery has shown better outcomes mainly in terms of insulin resistance and glycemic control. Using the Homeostasis Model Assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), we report herein a case illustrating a drastic improvement in severe insulin resistance after sleeve gastrectomy in the immediate postoperative period. Case Report. A patient with long-standing history of morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and severe insulin resistance (requiring approximately 2 units of insulin per kg per day) was enrolled in the medical weight management program for 6 months during which he lost 40 lbs and his insulin requirements decreased. He then underwent a sleeve gastrectomy and did not require insulin therapy as of postoperative day 1. His HOMA-IR improved by about 76% between day 1 and day 14 postoperatively. Conclusion. Sleeve gastrectomy leads to a drastic improvement in severe insulin resistance as early as the first postoperative day.

  8. Severe Insulin Resistance Improves Immediately After Sleeve Gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Sharma MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obese individuals exhibit insulin resistance often leading to adverse health outcomes. When compared with intensive medical therapy, bariatric surgery has shown better outcomes mainly in terms of insulin resistance and glycemic control. Using the Homeostasis Model Assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, we report herein a case illustrating a drastic improvement in severe insulin resistance after sleeve gastrectomy in the immediate postoperative period. Case Report. A patient with long-standing history of morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and severe insulin resistance (requiring approximately 2 units of insulin per kg per day was enrolled in the medical weight management program for 6 months during which he lost 40 lbs and his insulin requirements decreased. He then underwent a sleeve gastrectomy and did not require insulin therapy as of postoperative day 1. His HOMA-IR improved by about 76% between day 1 and day 14 postoperatively. Conclusion. Sleeve gastrectomy leads to a drastic improvement in severe insulin resistance as early as the first postoperative day.

  9. [Alcohol, steatohepatitis, insulin resistance and hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzigou, P; Mathurin, P; Serfaty, L; Cacoub, P; Moussalli, J; Pialoux, G; Chossegros, P; Cattan, L; Pol, S

    2008-03-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C have frequently other morbidities, either because they are frequent in the general population (metabolic syndrome) and/or because the route of contamination (chronic alcohol consumption succeeding to drug abuse). These co-morbidities have a harmfull impact on fibrosis progression during the natural history of HCV infection and reduce the efficacy of antiviral treatments. Thus, it is crucial to diagnose early and treat these different diseases which may be combined. They are the metabolic syndrome and/or chronic alcohol consumption resulting in insuline resistance, infection by the human immune deficiency virus or by the hepatitis B virus as well as chronic tobacco use or excessive consumption of cannabis. An optimal is based on a multidisciplinary approach to reduce fibrosis progression and improve the efficiency of antiviral therapies. However, the hepatologist has to come back to a global care, which is mandatory at the individual level as well as for the public health.

  10. Linking Gut Microbiota and Inflammation to Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, M J A; Santos, A; Prada, P O

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are the major predisposing factors to comorbidities, such as Type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and several types of cancer. The prevalence of obesity is still increasing worldwide and now affects a large number of individuals. Here, we review the role of the gut microbiota in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance/obesity. The human intestine is colonized by ∼100 trillion bacteria, which constitute the gut microbiota. Studies have shown that lean and overweight rodents and humans may present differences in the composition of their intestinal flora. Over the past 10 years, data from different sources have established a causal link between the intestinal microbiota and obesity/insulin resistance. It is important to emphasize that diet-induced obesity promotes insulin resistance by mechanisms independent and dependent on gut microbiota. In this review, we present several mechanisms that contribute to explaining the link between intestinal flora and insulin resistance/obesity. The LPS from intestinal flora bacteria can induce a chronic subclinical inflammatory process and obesity, leading to insulin resistance through activation of TLR4. The reduction in circulating SCFA may also have an essential role in the installation of reduced insulin sensitivity and obesity. Other mechanisms include effects of bile acids, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), and some other lesser-known factors. In the near future, this area should open new therapeutic avenues for obesity/insulin resistance and its comorbidities. ©2016 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  11. Insulin Sensitivity Determines Effects of Insulin and Meal Ingestion on Systemic Vascular Resistance in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerdeman, Jorn; Meijer, Rick I; Eringa, Etto C; Hoekstra, Trynke; Smulders, Yvo M; Serné, Erik H

    2016-01-01

    In addition to insulin's metabolic actions, insulin can dilate arterioles which increase blood flow to metabolically active tissues. This effect is blunted in insulin-resistant subjects. Insulin's effect on SVR, determined by resistance arterioles, has, however, rarely been examined directly. We determined the effects of both hyperinsulinemia and a mixed meal on SVR and its relationship with insulin sensitivity. Thirty-seven lean and obese women underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and 24 obese volunteers underwent a mixed-meal test. SVR was assessed using CPP before and during hyperinsulinemia as well as before and 60 and 120 minutes after a meal. SVR decreased significantly during hyperinsulinemia (-13%; p Insulin decreased SVR more strongly in insulin-sensitive individuals (standardized β: -0.44; p = 0.01). In addition, SVR at 60 minutes after meal ingestion was inversely related to the Matsuda index (β: -0.39; p = 0.04) and the change in postprandial SVR was directly related to postprandial glycemia (β: 0.53; p insulin resistance. This suggests that resistance to insulin-induced vasodilatation contributes to regulation of vascular resistance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Insulin resistance and mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2013-01-01

    are used in the attempt to resolve the mechanisms of insulin resistance. In this context, a dysfunction of mitochondria in the skeletal muscle has been suggested to play a pivotal role. It has been postulated that a decrease in the content of mitochondria in the skeletal muscle can explain the insulin...... resistance. Complementary to this also specific defects of components in the respiratory chain in the mitochondria have been suggested to play a role in insulin resistance. A key element in these mechanistic suggestions is inability to handle substrate fluxes and subsequently an accumulation of ectopic...... intramyocellular lipids, interfering with insulin signaling. In this review we will present the prevailing view-points and argue for the unlikelihood of this scenario being instrumental in human insulin resistance. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Bioenergetic dysfunction....

  13. Insulin Resistance, Prediabetes, Metabolic Syndrome: What Should Every Pediatrician Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ighbariya, Ahmad; Weiss, Ram

    2017-01-01

    The Metabolic syndrome describes a clustering of typical cardiovascular risk factors. The syndrome is also known as “Insulin Resistance syndrome” as a substantial part of the pathophysiology is driven by resistance to the metabolic effects of insulin. The major cause of insulin resistance in childhood is a typical lipid partitioning pattern characterized by increased deposition of lipids within insulin responsive tissues, such as the liver and skeletal muscle and within the viscera. This lipid deposition pattern is also associated with infiltration of intra-abdominal tissues with cells of the immune system, inducing systemic, low-grade inflammation typically observed in insulin resistant obese children and adolescents. Several clues derived from a careful history and physical examination, along with a basic laboratory workup, provide clues in regards to risk stratification in obese children. PMID:29280741

  14. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Recruits Muscle Microvasculature and Improves Insulin?s Metabolic Action in the Presence of Insulin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Weidong; Zhang, Xingxing; Barrett, Eugene J.; Liu, Zhenqi

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) acutely recruits muscle microvasculature, increases muscle delivery of insulin, and enhances muscle use of glucose, independent of its effect on insulin secretion. To examine whether GLP-1 modulates muscle microvascular and metabolic insulin responses in the setting of insulin resistance, we assessed muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), flow velocity, and blood flow in control insulin-sensitive rats and rats made insulin-resistant acutely (systemic lipid in...

  15. Association Between Adiponectin and Insulin Resistance in Diabetic Urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Meiyappan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The prevalence of urolithiasis is increasing worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM is characterized by insulin resistance, which increases the risk of kidney stone formation. Adiponectin is an insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory cytokine, which is known to improve glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in humans. The association of insulin and adiponectin with kidney stones is not clear. Hence, the present study aim to assess the serum levels of adiponectin and insulin resistance in DM patients with urolithiasis in comparison to those without. Methods: This study involved two groups, group A consisted of 30 patients with DM and urolithiasis, and group B consisted of 30 patients with DM but without urolithiasis (control group. Biochemical parameters studied were serum adiponectin, insulin, glucose, urea, creatinine, and 24 hours urinary calcium and phosphate. Results: The serum adiponectin level was significantly increased in the diabetic urolithiasis cases (group A compared to the control group (group B. The levels of 24 hours urine calcium and phosphorus were also significantly increased in group A. There was no significant difference in serum insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance between the two groups. A negative correlation was seen between serum adiponectin and insulin among the cases (r = -0.368 and p = 0.045. Conclusions: We found that serum adiponectin levels are increased in patients with DM and urolithiasis.

  16. Chronic exposure to the herbicide, atrazine, causes mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Lim

    Full Text Available There is an apparent overlap between areas in the USA where the herbicide, atrazine (ATZ, is heavily used and obesity-prevalence maps of people with a BMI over 30. Given that herbicides act on photosystem II of the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts, which have a functional structure similar to mitochondria, we investigated whether chronic exposure to low concentrations of ATZ might cause obesity or insulin resistance by damaging mitochondrial function. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 48 were treated for 5 months with low concentrations (30 or 300 microg kg(-1 day(-1 of ATZ provided in drinking water. One group of animals was fed a regular diet for the entire period, and another group of animals was fed a high-fat diet (40% fat for 2 months after 3 months of regular diet. Various parameters of insulin resistance were measured. Morphology and functional activities of mitochondria were evaluated in tissues of ATZ-exposed animals and in isolated mitochondria. Chronic administration of ATZ decreased basal metabolic rate, and increased body weight, intra-abdominal fat and insulin resistance without changing food intake or physical activity level. A high-fat diet further exacerbated insulin resistance and obesity. Mitochondria in skeletal muscle and liver of ATZ-treated rats were swollen with disrupted cristae. ATZ blocked the activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I and III, resulting in decreased oxygen consumption. It also suppressed the insulin-mediated phosphorylation of Akt. These results suggest that long-term exposure to the herbicide ATZ might contribute to the development of insulin resistance and obesity, particularly where a high-fat diet is prevalent.

  17. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivit...

  18. Insulin deficiency exacerbates cerebral amyloidosis and behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Wei-Ping

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although increasing evidence has indicated that brain insulin dysfunction is a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD, the underlying mechanisms by which insulin deficiency may impact the development of AD are still obscure. Using a streptozotocin (STZ-induced insulin deficient diabetic AD transgenic mouse model, we evaluated the effect of insulin deficiency on AD-like behavior and neuropathology. Results Our data showed that administration of STZ increased the level of blood glucose and reduced the level of serum insulin, and further decreased the phosphorylation levels of insulin receptors, and increased the activities of glycogen synthase kinase-3α/β and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in the APP/PS1 mouse brain. We further showed that STZ treatment promoted the processing of amyloid-β (Aβ precursor protein resulting in increased Aβ generation, neuritic plaque formation, and spatial memory deficits in transgenic mice. Conclusions Our present data indicate that there is a close link between insulin deficient diabetes and cerebral amyloidosis in the pathogenesis of AD.

  19. Impact of insulin resistance, insulin and adiponectin on kidney stones in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Sadao; Nagaya, Teruo; Yamada, Tamaki; Okada, Atsushi; Yasui, Takahiro; Tozawa, Keiichi; Tokudome, Shinkan; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2011-02-01

    It has been reported that kidney stones are linked to metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is characterized by insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of insulin resistance, insulin and adiponectin with kidney stones in a Japanese population. From February 2007 to March 2008, 1036 (529 men and 507 women) apparently healthy Japanese subjects, aged 35-79 years, were analyzed. Weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure were measured. Overnight fasting blood was collected to measure insulin and adiponectin levels. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated to assess insulin resistance. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for a self-reported history of kidney stones across tertiles of HOMA-IR, insulin and adiponectin. Of the participants, 84 men (15.6%) and 35 women (6.9%) had a history of kidney stones. Age, body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, HOMA-IR and insulin were significantly higher in women with than in women without kidney stones. There was no difference in adiponectin level between subjects with and without a history of kidney stones in either sex. Furthermore, a significant positive trend was observed in the age-adjusted OR for a history of kidney stones across insulin tertiles (P-value for trend = 0.04) in women. For Japanese women, HOMA-IR and insulin are associated with a history of kidney stones. The findings suggest that MetS components could increase the risk of kidney stones through subclinical hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. © 2010 The Japanese Urological Association.

  20. Obesity and Insulin Resistance: An Abridged Molecular Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Biswajit Mukherjee; Chowdhury M. Hossain; Laboni Mondal; Paramita Paul; Miltu K. Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    A relationship between obesity and type 2 diabetes is now generally well accepted. This relationship represents several major health hazards including morbid obesity and cardiovascular complications worldwide. Diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disorder characterized by impaired insulin release and insulin resistance. Lipids play an important physiological role in skeletal muscle, heart, liver and pancreas. Deregulation of fatty acid metabolism is the main culprit for developing insulin...

  1. The Association Between IGF-I and Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrich, Nele; Thuesen, Betina; Jørgensen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    the association between IGF-I level and insulin resistance in a Danish general population.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSIncluded were 3,354 adults, aged 19-72 years, from the cross-sectional Health2006 study. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as the index to estimate insulin...... with intermediate (Q3) IGF-I levels. These associations remained statistically significant after the exclusion of subjects with type 2 diabetes and by using the updated computer HOMA2-IR model.CONCLUSIONSLow- and high-normal IGF-I levels are both related to insulin resistance. The biological mechanism......OBJECTIVEIGF-I has an almost 50% amino acid sequence homology with insulin and elicits nearly the same hypoglycemic response. Studies showed that low and high IGF-I levels are related to impaired glucose tolerance and to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate...

  2. Related Factors of Insulin Resistance in Korean Children: Adiposity and Maternal Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Sook Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased adiposity and unhealthy lifestyle augment the risk for type 2 diabetes in children with familial predisposition. Insulin resistance (IR is an excellent clinical marker for identifying children at high risk for type 2 diabetes. This study was conducted to investigate parental, physiological, behavioral and socio-economic factors related to IR in Korean children. This study is a cross-sectional study using data from 111 children aged 7 years and their parents. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated using fasting glucose and insulin level as a marker of IR. All children’s adiposity indices (r = 0.309–0.318, all P-value = 0.001 and maternal levels of fasting insulin (r = 0.285, P-value = 0.003 and HOMA-IR (r = 0.290, P-value = 0.002 were positively correlated with children’s HOMA-IR level. There was no statistical difference of children’s HOMA-IR level according to children’s lifestyle habits and socioeconomic status of families. An increase of 1 percentage point in body fat was related to 2.7% increase in children’s HOMA-IR (P-value < 0.001 and an increase of 1% of maternal level of HOMA-IR was related to 0.2% increase in children’s HOMA-IR (P-value = 0.002. This study shows that children’s adiposity and maternal IR are positively associated with children’s IR.

  3. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Insulin resistance in SD rats chronically treated with ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously demonstrated that hepatic insulin signaling is disrupted in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats fed EtOH-containing diets by total enteral nutrition (TEN). To determine if whole body insulin resistance could be demonstrated in the TEN model, we conducted euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp st...

  5. Insulin resistance in Nigerians with essential hypertension | Akande ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The hypertensives we studied had a higher occurrence of insulin resistance compared to the normotensives. This makes it necessary for persons with hypertensive to have regular screening for diabetes and other categories of glucose intolerance as the increased insulin increases their risk of developing type 2 ...

  6. Binge Drinking Induces Whole-Body Insulin Resistance by Impairing Hypothalamic Insulin Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindtner, Claudia; Scherer, Thomas; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Filatova, Nika; Fasshauer, Martin; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Puchowicz, Michelle; Buettner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with a history of binge drinking have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Whether binge drinking impairs glucose homeostasis and insulin action is unknown. To test this, we treated Sprague-Dawley rats daily with alcohol (3 g/kg) for three consecutive days to simulate human binge drinking and found that these rats developed and exhibited insulin resistance even after blood alcohol concentrations had become undetectable. The animals were resistant to insulin for up to 54 hours after the last dose of ethanol, chiefly a result of impaired hepatic and adipose tissue insulin action. Because insulin regulates hepatic glucose production and white adipose tissue lipolysis, in part through signaling in the central nervous system, we tested whether binge drinking impaired brain control of nutrient partitioning. Rats that had consumed alcohol exhibited impaired hypothalamic insulin action, defined as the ability of insulin infused into the mediobasal hypothalamus to suppress hepatic glucose production and white adipose tissue lipolysis. Insulin signaling in the hypothalamus, as assessed by insulin receptor and AKT phosphorylation, decreased after binge drinking. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed increased hypothalamic inflammation and expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a negative regulator of insulin signaling. Intracerebroventricular infusion of CPT-157633, a small-molecule inhibitor of PTP1B, prevented binge drinking–induced glucose intolerance. These results show that, in rats, binge drinking induces systemic insulin resistance by impairing hypothalamic insulin action and that this effect can be prevented by inhibition of brain PTP1B. PMID:23363978

  7. Link between Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluvic, Zoran; Zaric, Bozidarka; Resanovic, Ivana; Obradovic, Milan; Mitrovic, Aleksandar; Radak, Djordje; Isenovic, Esma R

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a leading public health and clinical challenge worldwide. MetS represents a group of interrelated risk factors that predict cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Its prevalence ranges between 10 and 84%, depending on the geographic region, urban or rural environment, individual demographic characteristics of the population studied (sex, age, racial and ethnic origin), as well as the criteria used to define MetS. Persons with MetS have higher mortality rate when compared with people without MetS, primarily caused by progressive atherosclerosis, accelerated by pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulation components of MetS. Considering the high prevalence of metabolic disorders (glucose metabolism disorder, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, obesity etc.), preventive healthcare should focus on changing lifestyle in order to reduce obesity and increase physical activity. This narrative review considers the available evidence from clinical and experimental studies dealing with MetS, and current treatment options for patients with insulin resistance and MetS.

  8. Hepatic insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkani, Reza; Adeli, Khosrow

    2009-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of common metabolic disorders that is associated with cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance has a central role in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. It is now commonly accepted that chronic inflammation associated with visceral obesity induces insulin resistance in the liver. Chronic inflammation is characterized by the production of abnormal adipokines and cytokines such as TNF-alpha, FFA, IL-1, IL-6, leptin and resistin. These factors inhibit insulin signalling in hepatocytes by activating SOCS proteins, several kinases such as JNK, IKK-beta and PKC and protein tyrosine phosphatases such as PTP1B and PTEN, that in turn impair insulin signalling at insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (IRS) level. Hepatic insulin resistance in turn causes impaired suppression of glucose production by insulin in hepatocytes leading to hyperglycemia. An important and early complication of hepatic insulin resistance is the induction of hepatic VLDL production, via changes in the rate of apoB synthesis and degradation and de novo lipogenesis, or increased FFA flux from adipose tissue into the liver. Insulin resistance also stimulates the production of CRP and PAI-1, both markers of an inflammatory state. All metabolic abnormalities related to hepatic insulin resistance have been shown to directly or indirectly promote atherosclerosis. Hyperglycemia induces a series of alterations including endothelial dysfunction, cellular proliferation, changes in extracellular matrix conformation and impairment of LDL receptor-mediated uptake decreasing the in vivo clearance of LDL. Small dense LDLs associated with high circulating VLDL have higher affinity to the intimal proteoglycans leading to the penetration of more LDL particles into the arterial wall. CRP can also accelerate atherosclerosis by increasing the expression of PAI-1 and adhesion molecules in endothelial cells, inhibition of nitric oxide formation and increasing LDL

  9. Correlation between White Blood Cell Count and insulin resistance in type 2 Diabetes Running title: WBC and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdiani, Armin; Kheirandish, Masoume; Bonakdaran, Shokoufeh

    2018-01-19

    The role of chronic inflammation in insulin resistance states and the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and diabetes have been reported earlier. White blood cell (WBC) count is an easy marker for estimation of systemic inflammation. This study is to clarify whether WBC count associate with insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients. This cross sectional study was conducted in 283 patients with type 2 diabetes and in 283 healthy non diabetic subjects as control group. Data including: age, gender, blood pressure, height and weight, history of smoking were collected for each patient. Fasting blood sugar, HbA1C, insulin, lipid profiles, creatinine, Urine albumin to creatinine ratio, high sensitive C- reactive protein (HCRP) and WBC was measured for all patients. WBC count was measured in control group. Two groups were compared in WBC count. Insulin resistance was calculated with HOMA-IR formula. Association of WBC count with insulin resistance and metabolic parameters was assessed in diabetic patients. WBC count was significantly associated with body mass index, hypertension, and triglyceride level. There was not significant association between WBC count and glycemic index and insulin resistance. An elevated WBC count (even in the normal range) is closely related to various components of metabolic syndrome but not related to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Obesity, insulin resistance, and pregnancy outcome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrick M Catalano

    2010-01-01

    .... The combination of obesity and decreased insulin sensitivity increases the long-term risk of these individuals developing the metabolic syndrome and associated problems of diabetes, hypertension...

  11. Prevalence of the insulin resistance syndrome in obesity

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To assess prevalence of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS: obesity, abnormal glucose homoeostasis, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension) in obese UK children and adolescents of different ethnicities and to assess whether fasting data is sufficient to identify IRS in childhood obesity.

  12. Exploring pathway interactions in insulin resistant mouse liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelder, T.; Eijssen, L.; Kleemann, R.; Erk, M. van; Kooistra, T.; Evelo, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Complex phenotypes such as insulin resistance involve different biological pathways that may interact and influence each other. Interpretation of related experimental data would be facilitated by identifying relevant pathway interactions in the context of the dataset.Results: We

  13. The etiology of oxidative stress in insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Hurrle

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a prevalent syndrome in developed as well as developing countries. It is the predisposing factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus, the most common end stage development of metabolic syndrome in the United States. Previously, studies investigating type 2 diabetes have focused on beta cell dysfunction in the pancreas and insulin resistance, and developing ways to correct these dysfunctions. However, in recent years, there has been a profound interest in the role that oxidative stress in the peripheral tissues plays to induce insulin resistance. The objective of this review is to focus on the mechanism of oxidative species generation and its direct correlation to insulin resistance, to discuss the role of obesity in the pathophysiology of this phenomenon, and to explore the potential of antioxidants as treatments for metabolic dysfunction.

  14. Insulin Resistance Induced by Hyperinsulinemia Coincides with a Persistent Alteration at the Insulin Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Karyn J.; Maddux, Betty A.; Szary, Jaroslaw; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Schaufele, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, the diminished response of target tissues to insulin, is associated with the metabolic syndrome and a predisposition towards diabetes in a growing proportion of the worldwide population. Under insulin resistant states, the cellular response of the insulin signaling pathway is diminished and the body typically responds by increasing serum insulin concentrations to maintain insulin signaling. Some evidence indicates that the increased insulin concentration may itself further dampen insulin response. If so, insulin resistance would worsen as the level of circulating insulin increases during compensation, which could contribute to the transition of insulin resistance to more severe disease. Here, we investigated the consequences of excess insulin exposure to insulin receptor (IR) activity. Cells chronically exposed to insulin show a diminished the level of IR tyrosine and serine autophosphorylation below that observed after short-term insulin exposure. The diminished IR response did not originate with IR internalization since IR amounts at the cell membrane were similar after short- and long-term insulin incubation. Förster resonance energy transfer between fluorophores attached to the IR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain showed that a change in the TK domain occurred upon prolonged, but not short-term, insulin exposure. Even though the altered ‘insulin refractory’ IR TK FRET and IR autophosphorylation levels returned to baseline (non-stimulated) levels after wash-out of the original insulin stimulus, subsequent short-term exposure to insulin caused immediate re-establishment of the insulin-refractory levels. This suggests that some cell-based ‘memory’ of chronic hyperinsulinemic exposure acts directly at the IR. An improved understanding of that memory may help define interventions to reset the IR to full insulin responsiveness and impede the progression of insulin resistance to more severe disease states. PMID:25259572

  15. ANALYSIS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE IN VARIOUS COMPONENTS OF METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Pankaj Maheria; Deepak Parchwani; Amit Upadhyay; Manoj Kumar Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a collection of health risks that increases chances of developing heart disease. The constellation of metabolic abnormalities includes glucose intolerance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. These conditions can occur in an individual more often than might be expected by chance. The aim of this study was to analyze the insulin resistance measured as Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in different variables of metabolic syndrome. In...

  16. Insulin resistance and exercise tolerance in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Martin; Monk-Hansen, Tea; Olsen, Rasmus Huan

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage.......Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage....

  17. Fatty Acid Induced Insulin Resistance in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Hyoung Il

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity, which is considered as a disease, has been increasing uncontrollably over the last two decades. Obesity is a state of disregulated energy homeostasis characterized by hypothalamic resistance to adiposity signals (insulin and leptin). While many factors are involved in the development of obesity, excess dietary fat has been proposed as one of the main causal factors. This causes disrupted energy homeostasis by inducing both leptin and insulin resistance in the centra...

  18. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Oliva Gobato; Vasques,Ana Carolina J.; Mariana Porto Zambon; Antonio de Azevedo Barros Filho; Gabriel Hessel

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To verify the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents and its relationship with different body composition indicators.Methods:A cross-sectional study comprising 79 adolescents aged ten to 18 years old. The assessed body composition indicators were: body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, abdominal circumference, and subcutaneous fat. The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the criteria proposed by Cook et al. The insulin resistance ...

  19. Acupuncture Alters Expression of Insulin Signaling Related Molecules and Improves Insulin Resistance in OLETF Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yu Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine effect of acupuncture on insulin resistance in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF rats and to evaluate expression of insulin signaling components. Rats were divided into three groups: Sprague-Dawley (SD rats, OLETF rats, and acupuncture+OLETF rats. Acupuncture was subcutaneously applied to Neiguan (PC6, Zusanli (ST36, and Sanyinjiao (SP6; in contrast, acupuncture to Shenshu (BL23 was administered perpendicularly. For Neiguan (PC6 and Zusanli (ST36, needles were connected to an electroacupuncture (EA apparatus. Fasting blood glucose (FPG was measured by glucose oxidase method. Plasma fasting insulin (FINS and serum C peptide (C-P were determined by ELISA. Protein and mRNA expressions of insulin signaling molecules were determined by Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. OLETF rats exhibit increased levels of FPG, FINS, C-P, and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, which were effectively decreased by acupuncture treatment. mRNA expressions of several insulin signaling related molecules IRS1, IRS2, Akt2, aPKCζ, and GLUT4 were decreased in OLETF rats compared to SD controls. Expression of these molecules was restored back to normal levels upon acupuncture administration. PI3K-p85α was increased in OLETF rats; this increase was also reversed by acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture improves insulin resistance in OLETF rats, possibly via regulating expression of key insulin signaling related molecules.

  20. Association of sleep duration and insulin resistance in Taiwanese vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Jiunn-Kae

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short sleep duration has been reported to associate with increased insulin resistance. However, no studies have investigated whether such association exists in vegetarians. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between sleep duration and insulin resistance in Taiwanese vegetarians. Methods A total of 1290 individuals were recruited from a regional hospital in south Taiwan during their regular routine physical examination. Only individuals who described themselves as Buddhist vegetarians were included in the study. Demographic information and clinical characteristics were collected and multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between sleep duration and insulin resistance. Results A total of 433 vegetarians were included in the study. Results from univariate logistic regression indicated that insulin resistance was significantly associated with male sex, greater waist circumference, higher triglyceride levels, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, higher plasma creatinine levels, higher alanine transaminase levels, greater energy expenditure, and sleep duration of more than 8 hours per night. Multiple logistic regression revealed that insulin resistance was significantly and independently associated with sleep duration of more than 8 hours per night (odd ratios = 2.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.24, 4.11 after adjusting for waist circumference and levels of alanine transaminase. Conclusions Sleep duration of more than 8 hours per night is an independent risk factor associated with increased insulin resistance in vegetarians.

  1. Lipid-mediated muscle insulin resistance: different fat, different pathways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Olesja; Jelenik, Tomas; Roden, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Increased dietary fat intake and lipolysis result in excessive lipid availability, which relates to impaired insulin sensitivity. Over the last years, several mechanisms possibly underlying lipid-mediated insulin resistance evolved. Lipid intermediates such as diacylglycerols (DAG) associate with changes in insulin sensitivity in many models. DAG activate novel protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms followed by inhibitory serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1). Activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) raises another lipid class, ceramides (CER), which induce pro-inflammatory pathways and lead to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of glucosylceramide and ganglioside synthesis results in improved insulin sensitivity and increased activatory tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS1 in the muscle. Incomplete fat oxidation can increase acylcarnitines (ACC), which in turn stimulate pro-inflammatory pathways. This review analyzed the effects of lipid metabolites on insulin action in skeletal muscle of humans and rodents. Despite the evidence for the association of both DAG and CER with insulin resistance, its causal relevance may differ depending on the subcellular localization and the tested cohorts, e.g., athletes. Nevertheless, recent data indicate that individual lipid species and their degree of fatty acid saturation, particularly membrane and cytosolic C18:2 DAG, specifically activate PKCθ and induce both acute lipid-induced and chronic insulin resistance in humans.

  2. Caffeine intake improves fructose-induced hypertension and insulin resistance by enhancing central insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Tung-Chen; Liu, Chun-Peng; Cheng, Wen-Han; Chen, Bo-Rong; Lu, Pei-Jung; Cheng, Pei-Wen; Ho, Wen-Yu; Sun, Gwo-Ching; Liou, Jau-Cheng; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn

    2014-03-01

    Recent clinical studies found that fructose intake leads to insulin resistance and hypertension. Fructose consumption promotes protein fructosylation and formation of superoxide. In a previous study, we revealed that inhibition of superoxide production in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) reduces blood pressure. Caffeine displays significant antioxidant ability in protecting membranes against oxidative damage and can lower the risk of insulin resistance. However, the mechanism through which caffeine improves fructose-induced insulin resistance is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caffeine consumption can abolish superoxide generation to enhance insulin signaling in the NTS, thereby reducing blood pressure in rats with fructose-induced hypertension. Treatment with caffeine for 4 weeks decreased blood pressure, serum fasting glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, and triglyceride levels and increased the serum direct high-density lipoprotein level in fructose-fed rats but not in control rats. Caffeine treatment resulted in the recovery of fructose-induced decrease in nitric oxide production in the NTS. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses further showed that caffeine reduced the fructose-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1(S307)) and reversed Akt(S473) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation. Similarly, caffeine was able to improve insulin sensitivity and decrease insulin levels in the NTS evoked by fructose. Caffeine intake also reduced the production of superoxide and expression of receptor of advanced glycation end product in the NTS. These results suggest that caffeine may enhance insulin receptor substrate 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt-neuronal nitric oxide synthase signaling to decrease blood pressure by abolishing superoxide production in the NTS.

  3. Role of Ceramide in Apoptosis and Development of Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, D I; Klimentyeva, T K

    2016-09-01

    This review presents data on the functional biochemistry of ceramide, one of the key sphingolipids with properties of a secondary messenger. Molecular mechanisms of the involvement of ceramide in apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells and its role in the formation of insulin resistance in pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes are reviewed. One of the main predispositions for the development of insulin resistance and diabetes is obesity, which is associated with ectopic fat deposition and significant increase in intracellular concentrations of cytotoxic ceramides. A possible approach to the restoration of tissue sensitivity to insulin in type 2 diabetes based on selective reduction of the content of cytotoxic ceramides is discussed.

  4. Insulin resistance: Is it time for primary prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Valentina; Carlomagno, Guido; Fazio, Valeria; Fazio, Serafino

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a clinical condition characterized by a decrease in sensitivity and responsiveness to the metabolic actions of insulin, so that a given concentration of insulin produces a less-than-expected biological effect. As a result, higher levels of insulin are needed to maintain normal glucose tolerance. Hyperinsulinemia, indeed, is one of the principal characteristics of insulin resistance states. This feature is common in several pathologic conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia, and it is also a prominent component of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and atherosclerosis. The presence of endothelial dysfunction, related to insulin resistance, plays a key role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in all of these disorders. Insulin resistance represents the earliest detectable abnormality in type 2 diabetes, and is one of the major underlying mechanisms of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Its early detection could be of great importance, in order to set a therapeutic attack and to counteract the higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22279598

  5. Childhood obesity and insulin resistance: how should it be managed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mandy; Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise A

    2014-12-01

    Concomitant with the rise in global pediatric obesity in the past decades, there has been a significant increase in the number of children and adolescents with clinical signs of insulin resistance. Given insulin resistance is the important link between obesity and the associated metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular risk, clinicians should be aware of high risk groups and treatment options. As there is no universally accepted biochemical definition of insulin resistance in children and adolescents, identification and diagnosis of insulin resistance usually relies on clinical features such as acanthosis nigricans, polycystic ovary syndrome, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Treatment for reducing insulin resistance and other obesity-associated comorbidities should focus on changes in health behaviors to achieve effective weight management. Lifestyle interventions incorporating dietary change, increased physical activity, and decreased sedentary behaviors, with the involvement of family and adoption of a developmentally appropriate approach, should be used as the first line treatment. Current evidence suggests that the primary objective of dietary interventions should be to reduce total energy intake and a combination of aerobic and resistance training should be encouraged. Metformin can be used in conjunction with a lifestyle intervention program in obese adolescents with clinical insulin resistance to achieve weight loss and to improve insulin sensitivity. Ongoing evaluation and research are required to explore optimal protocol and long-term effectiveness of lifestyle interventions, as well as to determine whether the improvements in insulin sensitivity induced by lifestyle interventions and weight loss will lead to a clinical benefit including reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  6. The gut microbiota, obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian; Obin, Martin S; Zhao, Liping

    2013-02-01

    The human gut is densely populated by commensal and symbiotic microbes (the "gut microbiota"), with the majority of the constituent microorganisms being bacteria. Accumulating evidence indicates that the gut microbiota plays a significant role in the development of obesity, obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance. In this review we discuss molecular and cell biological mechanisms by which the microbiota participate in host functions that impact the development and maintenance of the obese state, including host ingestive behavior, energy harvest, energy expenditure and fat storage. We additionally explore the diverse signaling pathways that regulate gut permeability and bacterial translocation to the host and how these are altered in the obese state to promote the systemic inflammation ("metabolic endotoxemia") that is a hallmark of obesity and its complications. Fundamental to our discussions is the concept of "crosstalk", i.e., the biochemical exchange between host and microbiota that maintains the metabolic health of the superorganism and whose dysregulation is a hallmark of the obese state. Differences in community composition, functional genes and metabolic activities of the gut microbiota appear to distinguish lean vs obese individuals, suggesting that gut 'dysbiosis' contributes to the development of obesity and/or its complications. The current challenge is to determine the relative importance of obesity-associated compositional and functional changes in the microbiota and to identify the relevant taxa and functional gene modules that promote leanness and metabolic health. As diet appears to play a predominant role in shaping the microbiota and promoting obesity-associated dysbiosis, parallel initiatives are required to elucidate dietary patterns and diet components (e.g., prebiotics, probiotics) that promote healthy gut microbiota. How the microbiota promotes human health and disease is a rich area of investigation that is likely to generate

  7. RELATIONSHIP OF SERUM RESISTIN WITH INSULIN RESISTANCE AND OBESITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syeda Ijlal Zehra; Shirwany, Tanvir Ali Khan

    2015-01-01

    Adipokines have been implicated in the modulation of insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance and have thus gained importance in the study of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Resistin, a unique signalling molecule, is being proposed as a significant factor in the pathogenesis of obesity-related insulin resistance. However, its relevance to human diabetes mellitus remains uncertain and controversial. This study was therefore planned to compare and correlate the potential role of resistin in obese patients with T2DM and obese non-diabetic controls and also to evaluate the correlation between resistin and marker of obesity and glycaemic parameters. Fasting serum resistin, glucose and insulin were measured in forty obese diabetics (mean±SD BMI 35±5 kg/m2) and forty obese non-diabetics (mean±SD BMI 33±3 kg/m2). Insulin resistance was assessed using the HOMA-IR formula derived from fasting insulin and glucose levels. Serum resistin levels (38±8 ng/ml) were significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients as compared with the controls. Fasting blood glucose (164±46 mg/dl), serum insulin (37±7 µU/ml) and insulin resistance (19±8), were considerably higher among the studied diabetics than in the controls. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed positive correlation between serum resistin and BMI (p=0.001) and HOMA-IR (p=0.561) in diabetic subjects. Similarly, a correlation also existed between serum resistin and BMI (p=0.016) and HOMA-IR (p=0.307) in control obese subjects. However, it was highly significant in diabetics as compared to non-diabetic controls. A significant BMI-dependent association exists between resistin and insulin resistance in patients with T2DM. It appears that resistin may play a role in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance and that both of these may contribute to the development of T2DM.

  8. Effect of cigarette smoking on insulin resistance risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj Mouhamed, D; Ezzaher, A; Neffati, F; Douki, W; Gaha, L; Najjar, M F

    2016-02-01

    Smoking is one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The mechanism(s) of the effects of smoking on CVD are not clearly understood; however, a number of atherogenic characteristics, such as insulin resistance have been reported. We aim to investigate the effects of cigarette smoking on insulin resistance and to determine the correlation between this parameter with smoking status characteristics. This study was conducted on 138 non-smokers and 162 smokers aged respectively 35.6±16.0 and 38.5±21.9 years. All subjects are not diabetic. Fasting glucose was determined by enzymatic methods and insulin by chemiluminescence method. Insulin resistance (IR) was estimated using the Homeostasis Model of Assessment equation: HOMA-IR=[fasting insulin (mU/L)×fasting glucose (mmol/L)]/22.5. IR was defined as the upper quartile of HOMA-IR. Values above 2.5 were taken as abnormal and reflect insulin resistance. Compared to non-smokers, smokers had significantly higher levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR index. These associations remained significant after adjustment for confounding factors (age, gender, BMI and alcohol consumption). A statistically significant association was noted between the smoking status parameters, including both the number of cigarettes smoked/day and the duration of smoking, and fasting insulin levels as well for HOMA-IR index. Among smokers, we noted a positive correlation between HOMA-IR index and both plasma thiocyanates and urinary cotinine. Our results show that smokers have a high risk to developing an insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, compared with a matched group of non-smokers, and may help to explain the high risk of cardiovascular diseases in smokers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR): A Better Marker for Evaluating Insulin Resistance Than Fasting Insulin in Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Hafsa; Masood, Qamar; Khan, Aysha Habib

    2017-03-01

    To assess the utility of HOMA-IR in assessing insulin resistance in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and compare it with fasting insulin for assessing insulin resistance (IR). Observational study. Section of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2009 to September 2012. Medical chart review of all women diagnosed with PCOS was performed. Of the 400 PCOS women reviewed, 91 met the inclusion criteria. Insulin resistance was assessed by calculating HOMA-IR using the formula (fasting glucose x fasting insulin)/405, taking normal value fasting insulin levels ≥12 µIU/ml. A total of 91 premenopausal women diagnosed with PCOS were included. Mean age was 30 ±5.5 years. Mean HOMA-IR of women was 3.1 ±1.7, respectively with IR in 69% (n=63) women, while hyperinsulinemia was present in 60% (n=55) women (fasting Insulin 18.5 ±5.8 µIU/ml). Hyperandrogenism was present in 53.8% (n=49), whereas 38.5% (n=35) women had primary infertility or subfertility, while 65.9% (n=60) had menstrual irregularities; and higher frequencies were observed in women with IR. Eight subjects with IR and endocrine abnormalities were missed by fasting insulin. Insulin resistance is common in PCOS and it is likely a pathogenic factor for development of PCOS. HOMAIR model performed better than hyperinsulinemia alone for diagnosing IR.

  10. Persistent Organic Pollutant Exposure Leads to Insulin Resistance Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzzin, Jérôme; Petersen, Rasmus; Meugnier, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of the insulin resistance syndrome has increased at an alarming rate worldwide creating a serious challenge to public health care in the 21st century. Recently, epidemiological studies have associated the prevalence of type 2 diabetes with elevated body burdens of persis...... salmon oil. We measured body weight, whole-body insulin sensitivity, POP accumulation, lipid and glucose homeostasis, gene expression and performed microarray analysis. RESULTS: Adult male rats exposed to crude, but not refined, salmon oil developed insulin resistance, abdominal obesity...... of lipid homeostasis. CONCLUSION: Our findings, for the first time, provide evidence that exposure to POPs commonly present in food chains leads to insulin resistance and associated metabolic disorders....

  11. Reversal of muscle insulin resistance with exercise reduces postprandial hepatic de novo lipogenesis in insulin resistant individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Dufour, Sylvie; Flannery, Clare; Shulman, Gerald I

    2011-08-16

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and atherogenic dyslipidemia associated with the metabolic syndrome by altering the distribution pattern of postprandial energy storage. We conducted a study to examine this hypothesis by reversing muscle insulin resistance with a single bout of exercise and measuring hepatic de novo lipogenesis and hepatic triglyceride synthesis after a carbohydrate-rich meal. We studied 12 healthy, young, lean, insulin resistant individuals in an interventional, randomized cross-over trial. The response to the ingestion of a carbohydrate-rich meal was studied at rest and after one 45-min bout of exercise on an elliptical trainer. Hepatic de novo lipogenesis was assessed by using (2)H(2)O, and changes in glycogen and fat content in liver and muscle were measured by (13)C and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Exercise resulted in a greater than threefold increase in postprandial net muscle glycogen synthesis (P novo lipogenesis (P < 0.01) and were independent of changes in fasting or postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. These data demonstrate that skeletal muscle insulin resistance is an early therapeutic target for the treatment and prevention of atherogenic dyslipidemia and NAFLD in young insulin resistant individuals who are prone to develop the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

  12. Lifecourse childhood adiposity trajectories associated with adolescent insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rae-Chi; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Smith, Anne; Kendall, Garth E; Landau, Louis I; Mori, Trevor A; Newnham, John P; Stanley, Fiona J; Oddy, Wendy H; Hands, Beth; Beilin, Lawrence J

    2011-04-01

    In light of the obesity epidemic, we aimed to characterize novel childhood adiposity trajectories from birth to age 14 years and to determine their relation to adolescent insulin resistance. A total of 1,197 Australian children with cardiovascular/metabolic profiling at age 14 years were studied serially from birth to age 14 years. Semiparametric mixture modeling was applied to anthropometric data over eight time points to generate adiposity trajectories of z scores (weight-for-height and BMI). Fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were compared at age 14 years between adiposity trajectories. Seven adiposity trajectories were identified. Three (two rising and one chronic high adiposity) trajectories comprised 32% of the population and were associated with significantly higher fasting insulin and HOMA-IR compared with a reference trajectory group (with longitudinal adiposity z scores of approximately zero). There was a significant sex by trajectory group interaction (P rising trajectory from low to moderate adiposity did not show increased insulin resistance. Maternal obesity, excessive weight gain during pregnancy, and gestational diabetes were more prevalent in the chronic high adiposity trajectory. A range of childhood adiposity trajectories exist. The greatest insulin resistance at age 14 years is seen in those with increasing trajectories regardless of birth weight and in high birth weight infants whose adiposity remains high. Public health professionals should urgently target both excessive weight gain in early childhood across all birth weights and maternal obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy.

  13. TWEAK prevents TNF-α-induced insulin resistance through PP2A activation in human adipocytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vázquez-Carballo, Ana; Ceperuelo-Mallafré, Victòria; Chacón, Matilde R; Maymó-Masip, Elsa; Lorenzo, Margarita; Porras, Almudena; Vendrell, Joan; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Visceral fat is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Obesity-associated adipose tissue inflammation and inflammatory cytokine production are considered key mediators of insulin signaling inhibition...

  14. Insulin sensitivity and metabolic flexibility following exercise training among different obese insulin resistant phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malin, Steven K; Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) blunts the reversal of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) after exercise training. Metabolic inflexibility has been implicated in the etiology of insulin resistance, however, the efficacy of exercise on peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity or substrate utilization......) and were instructed to maintain a eucaloric diet. A euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (40 mU/m(2)/min) with [6,6-(2)H]-glucose was used to determine peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity. Non-oxidative glucose disposal and metabolic flexibility (insulin-stimulated respiratory quotient [RQ] minus...... fasting RQ) were also assessed. Glucose incremental area under the curve was calculated from the OGTT (iAUCOGTT). Exercise increased clamp-derived peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity more in adults with IFG or IGT alone than IFG+IGT (P...

  15. Fasting insulin has a stronger association with an adverse cardiometabolic risk profile than insulin resistance: the RISC study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Rooij, Susanne R; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Kozakova, Michaela

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fasting insulin concentrations are often used as a surrogate measure of insulin resistance. We investigated the relative contributions of fasting insulin and insulin resistance to cardiometabolic risk and preclinical atherosclerosis. DESIGN AND METHODS: The Relationship between Insulin...... of the metabolic syndrome in 1177 participants. Carotid artery intima media thickness (IMT) was measured by ultrasound to assess preclinical atherosclerosis. RESULTS: Fasting insulin was correlated with all elements of the metabolic syndrome. Insulin sensitivity (M/I) was correlated with most elements. The odds...... ratio for the metabolic syndrome of those in the highest quartile of fasting insulin compared with those in the lower quartiles was 5.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10.3, adjusted for insulin sensitivity) in men and 5.1 (2.6-9.9) in women. The odds ratio for metabolic syndrome of those with insulin...

  16. Zataria multiflora increases insulin sensitivity and PPARγ gene expression in high fructose fed insulin resistant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Mohammadi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s:In insulin resistance, the insulin action in liver, muscles and adipocytes decreases and result in hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hyperinsulinemia. In this study we evaluate the effect of Zataria multiflora extract on insulin sensitivity in high fructose fed insulin resistant rats, since this extract was shown antihyperglycemic effect in streptozotocin induced diabetes in rats.   Materials and Methods:Experimental rats were fed with high fructose diet for 6 weeks and then were treated with Z. multiflora extractor a pioglitazone solution for 2 weeks. Blood and tissue samples were collected for analysis at the end of two weeks. Blood glucose, serum level of triglyceride and cholesterol were measured by auto analyzer. Insulin and adiponectin levels were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. Plasma free fatty acids profile was studied by gas chromatography.  Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR.γ and Glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT.4 gene expressions were assessed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and western blotting. Results: Animals were treated by Z. multiflora extractshowed insulin (43±11pmol/l, adiponectin (5.3±0.5 μg/ml, glucose (144±9.8 mg/dl, and triglyceride (120±10 mg/dl levels significantly improved as compare with the control group [insulin (137±34 pmol/l, adiponectin (3.9±0.15 μg/ml, glucose (187±15mg/dl, and triglycerides (217±18 mg/dl]. PPARγ protein level, also significantly increased in Zataria multiflora treated group. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the beneficial effects of Zataria multiflora extract on insulin resistance in rats fed with a high-fructose diet through at least three mechanisms including direct insulin like effect, increasing in adiponectin and of PPARγ protein expression.   

  17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Insulin Resistance, and Steatohepatitis in Severe Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; Patil, Susheel P.; Savransky, Vladimir; Laffan, Alison; Fonti, Shannon; Frame, Leigh A.; Steele, Kimberly E.; Schweizter, Michael A.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Torbenson, Michael S.; Schwartz, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with insulin resistance and liver injury. It is unknown whether apnea contributes to insulin resistance and steatohepatitis in severe obesity. Objectives: To examine whether sleep apnea and nocturnal hypoxemia predict the severity of insulin resistance, systemic inflammation, and steatohepatitis in severely obese individuals presenting for bariatric surgery. Methods: We performed sleep studies and measured fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, C-reactive protein, and liver enzymes in 90 consecutive severely obese individuals, 75 women and 15 men, without concomitant diabetes mellitus or preexistent diagnosis of sleep apnea or liver disease. Liver biopsies (n = 20) were obtained during bariatric surgery. Measurements and Main Results: Obstructive sleep apnea with a respiratory disturbance index greater than 5 events/hour was diagnosed in 81.1% of patients. The median respiratory disturbance index was 15 ± 29 events/hour and the median oxygen desaturation during apneic events was 4.6 ± 1.8%. All patients exhibited high serum levels of C-reactive protein, regardless of the severity of apnea, whereas liver enzymes were normal. Oxygen desaturation greater than 4.6% was associated with a 1.5-fold increase in insulin resistance, according to the homeostasis model assessment index. Histopathology data suggested that significant nocturnal desaturation might predispose to hepatic inflammation, hepatocyte ballooning, and liver fibrosis. Fasting blood glucose levels and steatosis scores were not affected by nocturnal hypoxia. There was no relationship between the respiratory disturbance index and insulin resistance or liver histopathology. Conclusions: Hypoxic stress of sleep apnea may be implicated in the development of insulin resistance and steatohepatitis in severe obesity. PMID:18990675

  18. Insulin resistance in vascular endothelial cells promotes intestinal tumour formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Häring, M-F; Rathjen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    did not change intestinal tumour number or size distribution on either a low or high-fat diet. We therefore asked whether cells in the tumour stroma might explain the association between tumour formation and insulin resistance. To this end, we generated Apc(Min/+) mice with loss of insulin receptors......The risk of several cancers, including colorectal cancer, is increased in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes, conditions characterised by hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. Because hyperinsulinaemia itself is an independent risk factor for cancer development, we examined tissue...... in vascular endothelial cells. Strikingly, these mice had 42% more intestinal tumours than controls, no change in tumour angiogenesis, but increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in primary culture of tumour endothelial cells. Insulin decreased VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte...

  19. Insulin Signaling in Insulin Resistance States and Cancer: A Modeling Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bertuzzi

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is the common denominator of several diseases including type 2 diabetes and cancer, and investigating the mechanisms responsible for insulin signaling impairment is of primary importance. A mathematical model of the insulin signaling network (ISN is proposed and used to investigate the dose-response curves of components of this network. Experimental data of C2C12 myoblasts with phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN suppressed and data of L6 myotubes with induced insulin resistance have been analyzed by the model. We focused particularly on single and double Akt phosphorylation and pointed out insulin signaling changes related to insulin resistance. Moreover, a new characterization of the upstream signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2 is presented. As it is widely recognized that ISN proteins have a crucial role also in cell proliferation and death, the ISN model was linked to a cell population model and applied to data of a cell line of acute myeloid leukemia treated with a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor with antitumor activity. The analysis revealed simple relationships among the concentrations of ISN proteins and the parameters of the cell population model that characterize cell cycle progression and cell death.

  20. Midkine, a potential link between obesity and insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengguang Fan

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with increased production of inflammatory mediators in adipose tissue, which contributes to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Midkine (MK is a heparin-binding growth factor with potent proinflammatory activities. We aimed to test whether MK is associated with obesity and has a role in insulin resistance. It was found that MK was expressed in adipocytes and regulated by inflammatory modulators (TNF-α and rosiglitazone. In addition, a significant increase in MK levels was observed in adipose tissue of obese ob/ob mice as well as in serum of overweight/obese subjects when compared with their respective controls. In vitro studies further revealed that MK impaired insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, as indicated by reduced phosphorylation of Akt and IRS-1 and decreased translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 to the plasma membrane in response to insulin stimulation. Moreover, MK activated the STAT3-suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 pathway in adipocytes. Thus, MK is a novel adipocyte-secreted factor associated with obesity and inhibition of insulin signaling in adipocytes. It may provide a potential link between obesity and insulin resistance.

  1. Midkine, a potential link between obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Nengguang; Sun, Haiyan; Wang, Yifei; Zhang, Lijuan; Xia, Zhenhua; Peng, Liang; Hou, Yanqiang; Shen, Weiqin; Liu, Rui; Peng, Yongde

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased production of inflammatory mediators in adipose tissue, which contributes to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Midkine (MK) is a heparin-binding growth factor with potent proinflammatory activities. We aimed to test whether MK is associated with obesity and has a role in insulin resistance. It was found that MK was expressed in adipocytes and regulated by inflammatory modulators (TNF-α and rosiglitazone). In addition, a significant increase in MK levels was observed in adipose tissue of obese ob/ob mice as well as in serum of overweight/obese subjects when compared with their respective controls. In vitro studies further revealed that MK impaired insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, as indicated by reduced phosphorylation of Akt and IRS-1 and decreased translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane in response to insulin stimulation. Moreover, MK activated the STAT3-suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) pathway in adipocytes. Thus, MK is a novel adipocyte-secreted factor associated with obesity and inhibition of insulin signaling in adipocytes. It may provide a potential link between obesity and insulin resistance.

  2. Assesment of propolis supplementation on insulin resistance in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nazli samadi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disease . The number of people with diabetes over the last twenty years has doubled . Asia as a result of rapid economic growth , as the center of the epidemic in the world . Iran is among the countries with a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus . Use of medicinal plants as adjunctive therapy along with medication always been original . In recent years the tendency of patients to alternative therapies and traditional medicine has increased. Methods : Among patients referred to clinics of University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran , 67 people were selected and randomly divided into two groups,intervention or placebo. Patients in the intervention group received 3 tablets of 300 mg bee propolis and in the control group received placebo . The study lasted 12 weeks . Serum insulin and insulin resistance index were evaluated at the beginning and end of the study. Results: 57 patients completed the study . The average demographic characteristics , anthropometric indices , serum insulin and insulin resistance index at the beginning and end of the study between the two groups showed no significant difference. Conclusion : In this study , supplementation with bee propolis for 12 weeks , on the serum insulin and indices of insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes is not effective . Further studies are needed to make a final decision.

  3. Salt, aldosterone, and insulin resistance: impact on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastra, Guido; Dhuper, Sonal; Johnson, Megan S; Sowers, James R

    2010-10-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are powerful risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), both of which are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of CVD and CKD risk factors has identified salt sensitivity and insulin resistance as key elements underlying the relationship between hypertension and T2DM. Excess dietary salt and caloric intake, as commonly found in westernized diets, is linked not only to increased blood pressure, but also to defective insulin sensitivity and impaired glucose homeostasis. In this setting, activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), as well as increased signaling through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), result in increased production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, which in turn contribute to insulin resistance and impaired vascular function. In addition, insulin resistance is not limited to classic insulin-sensitive tissues such as skeletal muscle, but it also affects the cardiovascular system, where it participates in the development of CVD and CKD. Current clinical knowledge points towards an impact of salt restriction, RAAS blockade, and MR antagonism on cardiovascular and renal protection, but also on improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis.

  4. Insulin resistance: the link between obesity and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaven, Gerald M

    2011-09-01

    There seems to be general agreement that the prevalence of obesity is increasing in the United States and that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic. The disease-related implications of this epidemic have received an enormous amount of publicity in the popular media, but public awareness of the untoward effects of excess weight has not led to an effective approach to dealing with the dilemma. The gravity of the problem is accentuated in light of the report that only approximately 50% of physicians polled provided weight loss counseling. Given the importance of excess adiposity as increasing the risk of CVD, 2DM, and hypertension and the combination of an increase in the prevalence of overweight/obesity and a health care system unprepared to deal with this situation, it is essential that considerable thought be given as to how to best address this dilemma. In this context, it must be emphasized that CVD, 2DM, and hypertension are characterized by resistance to insulin-mediated glucose disposal and that insulin resistance and the compensatory hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance have been shown to be independent predictors of all three clinical syndromes. It has also been apparent for many years that overweight/obese individuals tend to be insulin resistant and become more insulin sensitive with weight loss.25 In light of these observations, it seems reasonable to suggest that insulin resistance is the link between overweight/obesity and the adverse clinical syndromes related to excess adiposity. The evidence summarized in this review shows that the more overweight an individual, the more likely he or she is insulin resistant and at increased risk to develop all the abnormalities associated with this defect in insulin action. Not all overweight/obese individuals are insulin resistant, however, any more than all insulin resistant individuals are overweight/obese. More important, there is compelling evidence that CVD risk factors are present to a

  5. Lipid metabolism disturbances contribute to insulin resistance and decrease insulin sensitivity by malathion exposure in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasram, Mohamed Montassar; Bouzid, Kahena; Douib, Ines Bini; Annabi, Alya; El Elj, Naziha; El Fazaa, Saloua; Abdelmoula, Jaouida; Gharbi, Najoua

    2015-04-01

    Several studies showed that organophosphorus pesticides disturb glucose homeostasis and can increase incidence of metabolic disorders and diabetes via insulin resistance. The current study investigates the influence of malathion on glucose metabolism regulation, in vivo, during subchronic exposure. Malathion was administered orally (200 mg/kg), once a day for 28 consecutive days. Plasma glucose, insulin and Glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly increased while hepatic glycogen content was decreased in intoxicated animals compared with the control group. Furthermore, there was a significant disturbance of lipid content in subchronic treated and post-treated rats deprived of malathion for one month. In addition, we used the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) to assess insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and pancreatic β-cell function (HOMA-β). Our results show that malathion increases insulin resistance biomarkers and decreases insulin sensitivity indices. Statistical analysis demonstrates that there was a positive and strong significant correlation between insulin level and insulin resistance indices, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β. Similarly, a negative and significant correlation was also found between insulin level and insulin sensitivity indices. For the first time, we demonstrate that malathion induces insulin resistance in vivo using homeostasis model assessment and these changes were detectable one month after the end of exposure. To explain insulin resistance induced by malathion we focus on lipid metabolism disturbances and their interaction with many proteins involved in insulin signaling pathways.

  6. Validation of insulin resistance indexes in a stable renal transplant population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, Leendert H.; de Vries, Aiko P. J.; van Son, Willem J.; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; de Jong, Paul E.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of established insulin resistance indexes, based on fasting blood parameters, in a stable renal transplant population. Fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and

  7. Validation of insulin resistance indexes in a stable renal transplant population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, LH; De Vries, APJ; Van Son, WJ; Van Der Heide, JJH; Ploeg, RJ; Gansevoort, RT; De Jong, PE; Gans, ROB; Bakker, SJL

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of established insulin resistance indexes, based on fasting blood parameters, in a stable renal transplant population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), the quantitative insulin

  8. Visceral adiposity, insulin resistance and cancer risk

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, Claire L

    2011-06-22

    Abstract Background There is a well established link between obesity and cancer. Emerging research is characterising this relationship further and delineating the specific role of excess visceral adiposity, as opposed to simple obesity, in promoting tumorigenesis. This review summarises the evidence from an epidemiological and pathophysiological perspective. Methods Relevant medical literature was identified from searches of PubMed and references cited in appropriate articles identified. Selection of articles was based on peer review, journal and relevance. Results Numerous epidemiological studies consistently identify increased risk of developing carcinoma in the obese. Adipose tissue, particularly viscerally located fat, is metabolically active and exerts systemic endocrine effects. Putative pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and carcinogenesis include the paracrine effects of adipose tissue and systemic alterations associated with obesity. Systemic changes in the obese state include chronic inflammation and alterations in adipokines and sex steroids. Insulin and the insulin-like growth factor axis influence tumorigenesis and also have a complex relationship with adiposity. There is evidence to suggest that insulin and the IGF axis play an important role in mediating obesity associated malignancy. Conclusions There is much evidence to support a role for obesity in cancer progression, however further research is warranted to determine the specific effect of excess visceral adipose tissue on tumorigenesis. Investigation of the potential mechanisms underpinning the association, including the role of insulin and the IGF axis, will improve understanding of the obesity and cancer link and may uncover targets for intervention.

  9. Acute pain induces insulin resistance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, J.; Juhl, C.B.; Grøfte, Thorbjørn

    2001-01-01

    Background: Painful trauma results in a disturbed metabolic state with impaired insulin sensitivity, which is related to the magnitude of the trauma. The authors explored whether pain per se influences hepatic and extrahepatic actions of insulin. Methods: Ten healthy male volunteers underwent two...... randomly sequenced hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic (insulin infusion rate, 0.6 mU · kg-1 · min-1 for 180 min) clamp studies 4 weeks apart. Self-controlled painful electrical stimulation was applied to the abdominal skin for 30 min, to a pain intensity of 8 on a visual analog scale of 0–10, just before...... the clamp procedure (study P). In the other study, no pain was inflicted (study C). Results: Pain reduced whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake from 6.37 ± 1.87 mg · kg-1 · min-1 (mean ± SD) in study C to 4.97 ± 1.38 mg · kg-1 · min-1 in study P (P

  10. Decreased acylcarnitine content improves insulin sensitivity in experimental mice models of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepinsh, Edgars; Makrecka-Kuka, Marina; Makarova, Elina; Volska, Kristine; Svalbe, Baiba; Sevostjanovs, Eduards; Grinberga, Solveiga; Kuka, Janis; Dambrova, Maija

    2016-11-01

    The important pathological consequences of insulin resistance arise from the detrimental effects of accumulated long-chain fatty acids and their respective acylcarnitines. The aim of this study was to test whether exercise combined with decreasing the content of long-chain acylcarnitines represents an effective strategy to improve insulin sensitivity in diabetes. We used a novel compound, 4-[ethyl(dimethyl)ammonio]butanoate (methyl-GBB), treatment and exercise to decrease acylcarnitine contents in the plasma and muscles in the insulin resistance models of high fat diet (HFD) fed C57BL/6 mice and db/db mice. The methyl-GBB treatment induced a substantial decrease in all acylcarnitine concentrations in both fed and fasted states as well as when it was combined with exercise. In the HFD fed mice methyl-GBB treatment improved both glucose and insulin tolerance. Methyl-GBB administration, exercise and the combination of both improved insulin sensitivity and reduced blood glucose levels in db/db mice. Methyl-GBB administration and the combination of the drug and exercise activated the PPARα/PGC1α signaling pathway and stimulated the corresponding target gene expression. Insulin insensitivity in db/db mice was not induced by significantly increased fatty acid metabolism, while increased insulin sensitivity by both treatments was not related to decreased fatty acid metabolism in muscles. The pharmacologically reduced long-chain acylcarnitine content represents an effective strategy to improve insulin sensitivity. The methyl-GBB treatment and lifestyle changes via increased physical activity for one hour a day have additive insulin sensitizing effects in db/db mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioactives in Blueberries Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Obese, Insulin-Resistant Men and Women1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, April J.; Cash, Katherine C.; Johnson, William D.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Cefalu, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Dietary supplementation with whole blueberries in a preclinical study resulted in a reduction in glucose concentrations over time. We sought to evaluate the effect of daily dietary supplementation with bioactives from blueberries on whole-body insulin sensitivity in men and women. A double-blinded, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical study design was used. After screening to resolve study eligibility, baseline (wk 0) insulin sensitivity was measured on 32 obese, nondiabetic, and insulin-resistant subjects using a high-dose hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (insulin infusion of 120 mU(861 pmol)⋅m−2⋅min−1). Serum inflammatory biomarkers and adiposity were measured at baseline. At the end of the study, insulin sensitivity, inflammatory biomarkers, and adiposity were reassessed. Participants were randomized to consume either a smoothie containing 22.5 g blueberry bioactives (blueberry group, n = 15) or a smoothie of equal nutritional value without added blueberry bioactives (placebo group, n = 17) twice daily for 6 wk. Both groups were instructed to maintain their body weight by reducing ad libitum intake by an amount equal to the energy intake of the smoothies. Participants’ body weights were evaluated weekly and 3-d food records were collected at baseline, the middle, and end of the study. The mean change in insulin sensitivity improved more in the blueberry group (1.7 ± 0.5 mg⋅kg FFM−1⋅min−1) than in the placebo group (0.4 ± 0.4 mg⋅kg FFM−1⋅min−1) (P = 0.04). Insulin sensitivity was enhanced in the blueberry group at the end of the study without significant changes in adiposity, energy intake, and inflammatory biomarkers. In conclusion, daily dietary supplementation with bioactives from whole blueberries improved insulin sensitivity in obese, nondiabetic, and insulin-resistant participants. PMID:20724487

  12. Skeletal Muscle TRIB3 Mediates Glucose Toxicity in Diabetes and High- Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Mengrui; Kim, Teayoun; Jariwala, Ravi H; Garvey, W John; Luo, Nanlan; Kang, Minsung; Ma, Elizabeth; Tian, Ling; Steverson, Dennis; Yang, Qinglin; Fu, Yuchang; Garvey, W Timothy

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, we used muscle-specific TRIB3 overexpressing (MOE) and knockout (MKO) mice to determine whether TRIB3 mediates glucose-induced insulin resistance in diabetes and whether alterations in TRIB3 expression as a function of nutrient availability have a regulatory role in metabolism. In streptozotocin diabetic mice, TRIB3 MOE exacerbated, whereas MKO prevented, glucose-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose oxidation and defects in insulin signal transduction compared with wild-type (WT) mice, indicating that glucose-induced insulin resistance was dependent on TRIB3. In response to a high-fat diet, TRIB3 MOE mice exhibited greater weight gain and worse insulin resistance in vivo compared with WT mice, coupled with decreased AKT phosphorylation, increased inflammation and oxidative stress, and upregulation of lipid metabolic genes coupled with downregulation of glucose metabolic genes in skeletal muscle. These effects were prevented in the TRIB3 MKO mice relative to WT mice. In conclusion, TRIB3 has a pathophysiological role in diabetes and a physiological role in metabolism. Glucose-induced insulin resistance and insulin resistance due to diet-induced obesity both depend on muscle TRIB3. Under physiological conditions, muscle TRIB3 also influences energy expenditure and substrate metabolism, indicating that the decrease and increase in muscle TRIB3 under fasting and nutrient excess, respectively, are critical for metabolic homeostasis. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  13. Exercise and obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Bum Kwak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscle in our body is a major site for bioenergetics and metabolism during exercise. Carbohydrates and fats are the primary nutrients that provide the necessary energy required to maintain cellular activities during exercise. The metabolic responses to exercise in glucose and lipid regulation depend on the intensity and duration of exercise. Because of the increasing prevalence of obesity, recent studies have focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Accumulation of intramyocellular lipid may lead to insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. In addition, lipid intermediates (e.g., fatty acyl-coenzyme A, diacylglycerol, and ceramide impair insulin signaling in skeletal muscle. Recently, emerging evidence linking obesity-induced insulin resistance to excessive lipid oxidation, mitochondrial overload, and mitochondrial oxidative stress have been provided with mitochondrial function. This review will provide a brief comprehensive summary on exercise and skeletal muscle metabolism, and discuss the potential mechanisms of obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  14. Relationship between insulin resistance and inflamation markers in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borazan, Ali; Binici, Dogan Nasir

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence and risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are increasing in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In this study, we sought to research the relationship between the insulin resistance, which is one of the risk factors for CVD, and the inflammation markers, especially C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, uric acid, and homocysteine levels in our patients who were recently diagnosed with ESRD and started hemodialysis. 64 HOMA-IR-positive and 114 HOMA-IR-negative patients were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were obtained from the patients for fasting plasma glucose, insulin, CRP, fibrinogen, uric acid, total homocysteine, urea, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, total protein, and albumin analysis after physical examinations and anamnesis were completed. Fibrinogen and CRP levels of HOMA-IR-positive HD patients were significantly increased compared to non-insulin resistants. Furthermore, there is significant positive relationship between insulin resistance and serum CRP and fibrinogen levels in these HOMA-IR-positive HD patients (r = 0.258, p < 0.001). We found out that the fibrinogen and CRP levels are significantly high in HOMA-IR positive HD patients, according to determine the risk ratio for coronary artery disease in HD patients, and think that an assessment of insulin resistance is necessary.

  15. Resistance training, insulin sensitivity and muscle function in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a loss in both muscle mass and in the metabolic quality of skeletal muscle. This leads to sarcopenia and reduced daily function, as well as to an increased risk for development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A major part, but not all, of these changes...... are associated with an age-related decrease in the physical activity level and can be counteracted by increased physical activity of a resistive nature. Strength training has been shown to improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in both healthy elderly individuals and patients with manifest diabetes...

  16. Hypothalamic Inflammation in Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Tsaousidou, Eva

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the role of hypothalamic inflammation in obesity, insulin resistance and the regulation of the ageing process is investigated. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1- and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase (IKK)2-dependent signalling plays a crucial role in the development of obesity-associated insulin and leptin resistance not only in peripheral tissues but also in the CNS. This study demonstrates that constitutive JNK1 activation in agouti-related peptide (AgRP)...

  17. The Insulin-Like Growth Factor System in Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira S. Lewitt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The insulin-like growth factor (IGF system, acting in concert with other hormone axes, is important in normal metabolism. In obesity, the hyperinsulinaemia that accompanies peripheral insulin resistance leads to reduced growth hormone (GH secretion, while total IGF-I levels are relatively unchanged due to increased hepatic GH sensitivity. IGF-binding protein (IGFBP-1 levels are suppressed in relation to the increase in insulin levels in obesity and low levels predict the development of type 2 diabetes several years later. Visceral adiposity and hepatic steatosis, along with a chronic inflammation, contribute to the IGF system phenotype in individuals with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus, including changes in the normal inverse relationship between IGFBP-1 and insulin, with IGFBP-1 concentrations that are inappropriately normal or elevated. The IGF system is implicated in the vascular and other complications of these disorders and is therefore a potential therapeutic target.

  18. Gut microbiota interactions with obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes: did gut microbiote co-evolve with insulin resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, Eduardo; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernández-Real, Jose-Manuel

    2011-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes has steadily increased in the last decades. In addition to the genetic and environmental factors, gut microbiota may play an important role in the modulation of intermediary phenotypes leading to metabolic disease. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with specific changes in gut microbiota composition. The mechanisms underlying the association of specific gut microbiota and metabolic disease include increasing energy harvest from the diet, changes in host gene expression, energy expenditure and storage, and alterations in gut permeability leading to metabolic endotoxemia, inflammation and insulin resistance. In some studies, the modifications of gut microbiota induced by antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics led to improved inflammatory activity in parallel to amelioration of insulin sensitivity and decreased adiposity. However, these effects were mainly observed in animal models. Their extrapolation to humans awaits further studies. The fascinating role of gut microbiota on metabolic disease opens new avenues in the treatment of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A co-evolutionary clue for microbiota and insulin resistance is suggested.

  19. Investigation of pancreas indocrine function in order to reveal subclinical insulin resistence in women with acne

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, T.; Rudykh, N.; Shevchuk, A

    2008-01-01

    Changed glycemic curves and indices of insulin resistance, the increase of insulin basal level in comparison with healthy persons, presence of antibodies to insulin antigen, decrease of level sex hormone bilding globulin were revealed in patients with acne. It can be considered as sign of formation of subclinical insulin resistance.

  20. Familial juvenile autoimmune hypothyroidism, pituitary enlargement, obesity, and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Hathout, Eba H; Janner, Donald; Hara, Manami; Donfack, Joseph; Bass, Joseph; Refetoff, Samuel

    2004-04-01

    The proband, a 9-year-old Hispanic female, presented with hair loss, strabismus, and weight gain. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) she was found to have severe primary hypothyroidism and a large pituitary mass. In addition, acanthosis nigricans, obesity, and hyperinsulinism were observed. Findings were similar in three of four siblings. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies were detected in the father and three of four siblings. Although all family members were obese, and hyperinsulinemia with high proinsulin and C-peptide was found in all except one sibling, only the mother and one child had overt type 2 diabetes mellitus. Because of the unusual association of autoimmune thyroid disease, insulin resistance and obesity rather than insulin deficiency, we searched for possible genetic abnormalities. The HLA haplotypes did not cosegregate with autoimmune thyroid disease or insulin resistance. Mutational analysis of known obesity genes was done. Leptin was not deficient, and sequencing of the proband's DNA showed no mutations in the perixisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma, PPAR-gamma(2), PPAR-alpha or melanocortin 4 receptor genes. Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness was ruled out since no mutations were found in mitochondria DNA. Insulin receptor antibodies were not detected. In conclusion, the remarkably high incidence of childhood autoimmune hypothyroidism, pituitary enlargement, insulin resistance and obesity in this family is not linked to known HLA types or known gene defects.

  1. Role of PTEN in TNFα induced insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulger, David A. [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Wellcome Trust Medical Research Council Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Disease, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Conley, Jermaine [Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Conner, Spencer H.; Majumdar, Gipsy [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Solomon, Solomon S., E-mail: ssolomon@uthsc.edu [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States)

    2015-06-05

    Aims/hypothesis: PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results: Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion: The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. - Highlights: • TNFα treatment induced a significant increase in PTEN in H-411E liver cells. • PTEN siRNA knockdown prevented this effect. • VO-OHpic (vanadium complex) treatment, like insulin, decreased PTEN protein levels. • Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential therapeutic target in DM Type 2.

  2. Insulin resistance and postreceptor changes of liver metabolism in fat-fed mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedeskov, Carl Jørgen; Capito, Kirsten; Hansen, Svend Erik

    1992-01-01

    Medicinsk biokemi, animal diabetes, insulin resistance, postreceptor defects, liver metabolism, high-fat diet......Medicinsk biokemi, animal diabetes, insulin resistance, postreceptor defects, liver metabolism, high-fat diet...

  3. Abdominal adiposity largely explains associations between insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and subclinical atherosclerosis: the NEO study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, K.B.; Smit, J.W.A.; Heijer, M. den; Middeldorp, S.; Rippe, R.C.; Cessie, S. le; Koning, E.J. de; Jukema, J.W.; Rabelink, T.J.; Roos, A. de; Rosendaal, F.R.; Mutsert, R. de; Assendelft, P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relative importance of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia to the development of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Furthermore, adiposity may be responsible for observed associations. Our aim was to study the relative contributions of adiposity, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia to

  4. Cancer-drug induced insulin resistance : Innocent bystander or unusual suspect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariaans, G.; de Jong, S.; Gietema, J. A.; Lefrandt, J. D.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Jalving, M.

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence strongly suggests an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer. Insulin resistance, causing hyperinsulinaemia and eventually hyperglycaemia, appears to increase cancer incidence and disease progression. In addition, insulin resistance seems to

  5. Losartan reduces insulin resistance by inhibiting oxidative stress and enhancing insulin signaling transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y; Qiao, Q Y; Pan, L H; Zhou, D C; Hu, C; Gu, H F; Fu, S K; Liu, X L; Jin, H M

    2015-03-01

    Inhibition of the rennin-angiotensin system (RAS) could reduce insulin resistance in patients with hypertension and diabetic kidney disease (DKD), but whether the effect of losartan on insulin resistance is associated with reduction of oxidative stress and enhancement of insulin signaling transduction has not been fully elucidated. 130 patients with type 2 DKD were randomly assigned into 2 groups, the losartan group (n=65, 100 mg orally daily for 12 months) and the amlodipine group (n=65, 10 mg orally daily for 12 months). Oxidative stress markers in plasma, urine concentrations of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and nitrotyrosine (NT) as well as SOD activity were measured by ELISA. After in vitro treatment with different doses of losartan (10, 100 μmol/L) or amlodipine for 48 h, the size of H2O2-induced adipocytes and glucose consumption were measured. Western blot was performed to investigate IRS-1 serine phosphorylation level as well as the protein expressions of phosphorylated insulin receptor (pIR), phosphatidylinositol 3- kinase (PI3K) and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. After 12-month treatment, there were no significant differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreases, plasma fasting blood glucose and HbA1c between the 2 groups. Compared with amlodipine group, fasting blood insulin levels and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) were significantly decreased in losartan group, and in addition, the circulating levels of 8-OHdG and NT were significantly decreased in losartan group, while the serum SOD activity was enhanced. There were significant positively correlations of HOMA-IR with inflammatory oxidative stress markers. In vitro study showed that losartan could increase glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (Padipocyte size (Preduction of oxidative stress and inflammation in patients with type 2 DKD as well as the activation of insulin signal pathway in insulin-resistance 3T3-L1 adipocytes through

  6. Dopamine D2 receptors in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw van Weenen, Judith Elisabeth de

    2011-01-01

    Extensive literature links the dopamine receptor D2 to insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus type 2. However, many aspects of the functional relationship remain unclear. In this thesis we focused on unraveling the characteristics of the interplay between dopamine D2 receptors and glucose

  7. Insulin resistance as a physiological defense against metabolic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolan, Christopher J; Ruderman, Neil B; Kahn, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    challenging subgroup of patients with T2D who are overweight or obese with insulin resistance (IR) and the most refractory hyperglycemia due to an inability to change lifestyle to reverse positive energy balance. For this subgroup of patients with T2D, we question the dogma that IR is primarily harmful...

  8. Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and lipids in African women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Background: The metabolic syndrome is closely related to insulin resistance (IR) and cardiovascular disease. This study examined the ... Representatives from the World Heart Federation,. International Atherosclerosis ... circumference as a marker of central obesity, such data are not available for the African ...

  9. Physical Training Improves Insulin Resistance Syndrome Markers in Obese Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Sik; Gutin, Bernard; Barbeau, Paule; Owens, Scott; Lemmon, Christian R.; Allison, Jerry; Litaker, Mark S.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2002-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that physical training (PT), especially high-intensity PT, would favorably affect components of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in obese adolescents. Data on teens randomized into lifestyle education (LSE) alone, LSE plus moderate -intensity PT, and LSE plus high-intensity PT indicated that PT, especially high-intensity…

  10. Evidence to Support a Putative Role for Insulin Resistance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the renal patient is a cardiovascular event. Insulin resistance (IR) contributes to this event by increasing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and accelerating rates of decline in kidney function. Here we review the historical background of IR in patients with chronic ...

  11. Alloxan-induced diabetes and insulin resistant effects on ovulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    (w/w). Cervical dislocation was carried out on the animals in the three groups on the morning of specific phases of the ..... Cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance in rats with fructose-induced hypertension. Am. J. Hypertens. 16. (11 Pt 1): 973 – 978. Chabrolle, C., Jeanpierre, E., Tosca, L., et al. (2008). Effects of high levels ...

  12. Alloxan-induced and Insulin-resistant Diabetes Mellitus affect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance on semen parameters, histology of reproductive organs and serum concentrations of testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH). Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 180 - 200g were made diabetic by intravenous injection of ...

  13. Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and lipids in African women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The metabolic syndrome is closely related to insulin resistance (IR) and cardiovascular disease. This study examined the prevalence of IR and metabolic syndrome as well as factors associated with IR among Nigerian women. Materials and Methods: Eighty‑six women living in an urban area in Enugu, ...

  14. Acanthosis nigricans: A flag for insulin resistance | Venkatswami ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Acanthosis nigricans refers to the velvety, black hyperpigmentation seen in the flexures. It is a cutaneous marker for insulin resistance (IR), some metabolic disorders and rarely malignancy. When secondary to IR, it is asymptomatic, except for the hyperpigmentation. The neck is the most accessible and easiest to ...

  15. Skeletal muscle lipid metabolism in exercise and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiens, Bente

    2006-01-01

    Lipids as fuel for energy provision originate from different sources: albumin-bound long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) in the blood plasma, circulating very-low-density lipoproteins-triacylglycerols (VLDL-TG), fatty acids from triacylglycerol located in the muscle cell (IMTG), and possibly fatty acids...... of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, including possible molecular mechanisms involved, is discussed....

  16. Lipid Profile and Insulin Resistance in Pregnant Women with Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The underlying disorders in DM and GDM are known to have genetic predispositions. The pregnancy state is a stressor that reveals underlying metabolic derangements particularly with respect to glucose and lipid metabolism. We investigated if the lipid profile and insulin resistance in pregnant women with family history of ...

  17. Neuroendocrinology of insulin resistance : metabolic and endocrine aspects of adiposity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, G; de Vries, K; Benthem, L; Nyakas, C; Buwalda, B; Scheurink, AJW

    2003-01-01

    Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor to attract the insulin resistance syndrome. It is proposed that abdominal obesity exposes the liver to elevated levels of free fatty acids, which activate a neuroendocrine reflex, leading to increased circulating levels of glucocorticoids. Besides directly

  18. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    CRP), endothelial activation (soluble E-selectin, sEsel)), endothelial damage/dysfunction (von Willebrand factor, vWf) and insulin resistance (IR) and prognosis in CHF remains unknown. Design. We investigated the association(s) between plasma sMAC, hsCRP, sEsel, vWf and IR (assessed by homeostatic model assessment...

  19. The impact of insulin resistance, gender, genes, glucocorticoids and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-15

    Nov 15, 2010 ... Review: The impact of insulin resistance, gender, genes, glucocorticoids and ethnicity on body fat distribution. 2010 Volume 15 No 3 ... Understanding the factors that regulate body fat distribution should not only give insight ... glucocorticoids may sculpture body fat and change the pathogenicity of obesity.

  20. Associations of erythrocyte fatty acid patterns with insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Synergistic and/or additive effects on cardiometabolic risk may be missed by examining individual fatty acids (FA). A pattern analysis may be a more useful approach. As well, it remains unclear whether erythrocyte fatty acid composition relates to insulin resistance among Hispanic/Latino...

  1. Subchronic Sleep Restriction Causes Tissue-Specific Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neylan, Thomas C.; Grunfeld, Carl; Mulligan, Kathleen; Schambelan, Morris; Schwarz, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Context: Short sleep duration is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Subchronic sleep restriction (SR) causes insulin resistance, but the mechanisms and roles of specific tissues are unclear. Objective: The purpose of this article was to determine whether subchronic SR altered (1) hepatic insulin sensitivity, (2) peripheral insulin sensitivity, and (3) substrate utilization. Design: This was a randomized crossover study in which 14 subjects underwent 2 admissions separated by a washout period. Each admission had 2 acclimatization nights followed by 5 nights of either SR (4 hours time in bed) or normal sleep (8 hours time in bed). Main Outcome Measure/Methods: Insulin sensitivity (measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) and hepatic insulin sensitivity (measured by stable isotope techniques) were measured. In addition, we assayed stress hormone (24-hour urine free cortisol, metanephrine, and normetanephrine), nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA), and β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OH butyrate) levels. Resting energy expenditure (REE) and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured by indirect calorimetry. Results: Compared to normal sleep, whole-body insulin sensitivity decreased by 25% (P = .008) with SR and peripheral insulin sensitivity decreased by 29% (P = .003). Whereas hepatic insulin sensitivity (endogenous glucose production) did not change significantly, percent gluconeogenesis increased (P = .03). Stress hormones increased modestly (cortisol by 21%, P = .04; metanephrine by 8%, P = .014; normetanephrine by 18%, P = .002). Fasting NEFA and β-OH butyrate levels increased substantially (62% and 55%, respectively). REE did not change (P = 0.98), but RQ decreased (0.81±.02 vs 0.75±0.02, P = .045). Conclusion: Subchronic SR causes unique metabolic disturbances characterized by peripheral, but not hepatic, insulin resistance; this was associated with a robust increase in fasting NEFA levels (indicative of increased lipolysis), decreased RQ, and

  2. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin-resistance

  3. On the paradox insulin resistance/insulin hypersensitivity and obesity: two tales of the same history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiducci, Letizia; Iervasi, Giorgio; Quinones-Galvan, Alfredo

    2014-06-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) associated with obesity represents a well-known risk factor for chronic disease. IR development may occur to hinder stressful conditions to provide an appropriate energetic supply to non-insulin-sensitive tissues. However, conditions of stress turn out to be 'maladaptive' in the long term, leading to chronic diseases. Paradoxically, insulin hypersensitivity and/or hypersecretion causing post-prandial hypoglycemia resulting in increased food intake and weight gain, can represent an event preceding obesity and IR. By performing an OGTT in obese or obese-prone individuals we observed that tardive post-prandial hypoglycemia (3h from glucose load) is not a rare event (32%); in 12% of cases it paralleled with low insulin levels, resulting in the 'true insulin hypersensitivity'. By using Matsuda-method, we confirmed the presence of insulin hypersensitivity in this group. Therefore the early recognition of this phenomenon could be useful as a predictive biomarker to identify patients prone to develop obesity and obesity related-disorders.

  4. Association of Insulin Resistance and Hematologic Parameters: Study of a Middle-aged and Elderly Chinese Population in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Kung Chen

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: Elevated WBC count but not RBC count was significantly associated with insulin resistance and glycemic metabolism. The relationship between platelet count and insulin resistance deserves further investigations.

  5. Non functioning adrenal incidentalomas may be associated with insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezgin Barutçu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Adrenal incidentaloma are bulks which are stated incidentally by imagining methods or in abdominal laparotomy when there is no suspicion of any disease in adrenal gland. With increase in using abdominal ultrasonography and BT, the frequency of determining adrenal incidentaloma also increases. In this study, we aimed to examine demographical features and insulin resistance in patients with non functioning adrenal incidentaloma (NFAI. Methods: 30 (20 female–10 male patients, who followed due to NFAI at Dicle University Medical Faculty Department of Endocrinology between years of 2007-2013, and age, BMI matched 66 healthy subjects were included in the study. Results of physical examination, USG and BT were recorded from patients’ files. All patients were underwent following analyses for excluding a functioning adrenal mass, overnight dexamethasone suppression test, 24 hour urinary metanephrine and normetanephrine, plasma aldosterone/ renin activity ratio. Insulin resistance was calculated in accordance with homeostatic model assessment- insulin resistance formula. Results: The average of age was 45.9 ± 10.9 years and body mass ındex (BMI 28.5 ± 5.8. There were no significantly difference in terms of age, gender and BMI between groups. Fasting blood glucose and insulin resistance were significantly higher in patients with non-functional adrenal incidentaloma than control group (p=0.022, p=0.005i respectively. No significant difference was found between groups, in terms of LDL, HDL and triglyceride levels. Conclusion: patients with NFAI are more prone to have insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Thus, clinicians should evaluate those patients with NFAI, in terms of metabolic parameters. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (4: 589-591

  6. Anaesthesia generates neuronal insulin resistance by inducing hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutherland Calum

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthesia is commonly employed prior to surgical investigations and to permit icv injections in rodents. Indeed it is standard practise in many studies examining the subsequent actions of hormones and growth factors on the brain. Recent evidence that the basal activity of specific intracellular signalling proteins can be affected by anaesthesia prompted us to examine the effect of anaesthesia not only on the basal activity but also the insulin sensitivity of the major insulin signalling pathways. Results We find that urethane- and ketamine-induced anaesthesia results in rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI 3-kinase-protein kinase B (PKB signalling pathway in the brain, increases tau phosphorylation while at the same time reducing basal activity of the Ras-ERK pathway. Subsequent injection of insulin does not alter the activity of either the PI 3-kinase or ERK signalling pathways, indicating a degree of neuronal molecular insulin resistance. However, if body temperature is maintained during anaesthesia then there is no alteration in the basal activity of these signalling molecules. Subsequent response of both pathways to insulin injection is restored. Conclusion The data is consistent with a hypothermia related alteration in neuronal signalling following anaesthesia, and emphasises the importance of maintaining the body temperature of rodents when monitoring insulin (or growth factor/neurotrophic agent action in the brain of anesthetised rodents.

  7. Intensive insulin treatment induces insulin resistance in diabetic rats by impairing glucose metabolism-related mechanisms in muscle and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Maristela Mitiko; Anhê, Gabriel Forato; Sabino-Silva, Robinson; Marques, Milano Felipe dos Santos Ferreira; Freitas, Helayne Soares; Mori, Rosana Cristina Tieko; Melo, Karla Fabiana S; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres

    2011-10-01

    Insulin replacement is the only effective therapy to manage hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Nevertheless, intensive insulin therapy has inadvertently led to insulin resistance. This study investigates mechanisms involved in the insulin resistance induced by hyperinsulinization. Wistar rats were rendered diabetic by alloxan injection, and 2 weeks later received saline or different doses of neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin (1.5, 3, 6, and 9 U/day) over 7 days. Insulinopenic-untreated rats and 6U- and 9U-treated rats developed insulin resistance, whereas 3U-treated rats revealed the highest grade of insulin sensitivity, but did not achieve good glycemic control as 6U- and 9U-treated rats did. This insulin sensitivity profile was in agreement with glucose transporter 4 expression and translocation in skeletal muscle, and insulin signaling, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase/glucose-6-phosphatase expression and glycogen storage in the liver. Under the expectation that insulin resistance develops in hyperinsulinized diabetic patients, we believe insulin sensitizer approaches should be considered in treating T1DM.

  8. In nondiabetic, human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy, hepatic insulin extraction and posthepatic insulin clearance rate are decreased in proportion to insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte R

    2005-01-01

    In healthy, nondiabetic individuals with insulin resistance, fasting insulin is inversely correlated to the posthepatic insulin clearance rate (MCRi) and the hepatic insulin extraction (HEXi). We investigated whether similar early mechanisms to facilitate glucose homeostasis exist in nondiabetic......, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with and without lipodystrophy. We studied 18 HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy (LIPO) on antiretroviral therapy and 25 HIV-infected patients without lipodystrophy (controls) of whom 18 were on antiretroviral therapy and 7 were not. Posthepatic...... insulin (130%, P .8). In LIPO, HEXi and MCRi correlated inversely with fasting insulin (r = -0.56, P

  9. Recent Advances in Obesity-Induced Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateya, Sanshiro; Kim, Francis; Tamori, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in rodents and humans that chronic inflammation characterized by macrophage infiltration occurs mainly in adipose tissue or liver during obesity, in which activation of immune cells is closely associated with insulin sensitivity. Macrophages can be classified as classically activated (M1) macrophages that support microbicidal activity or alternatively activated (M2) macrophages that support allergic and antiparasitic responses. In the context of insulin action, M2 macrophages sustain insulin sensitivity by secreting IL-4 and IL-10, while M1 macrophages induce insulin resistance through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα. Polarization of M1/M2 is controlled by various dynamic functions of other immune cells. It has been demonstrated that, in a lean state, TH2 cells, Treg cells, natural killer T cells, or eosinophils contribute to the M2 activation of macrophages by secreting IL-4 or IL-10. In contrast, obesity causes alteration of the constituent immune cells, in which TH1 cells, B cells, neutrophils, or mast cells induce M1 activation of macrophages by the elevated secretion of TNFα and IFNγ. Increased secretion of TNFα and free fatty acids from hypertrophied adipocytes also contributes to the M1 activation of macrophages. Since obesity-induced insulin resistance is established by macrophage infiltration and the activation of immune cells inside tissues, identification of the factors that regulate accumulation and the intracellular signaling cascades that define polarization of M1/M2 would be indispensable. Regulation of these factors would lead to the pharmacological inhibition of obesity-induced insulin resistance. In this review, we introduce molecular mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology and review the most recent studies of clinical applications targeting chronic inflammation. PMID:23964268

  10. Severe insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia after childhood total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayson, Sarah E; Parker, Victoria E R; Schutta, Mark H; Semple, Robert K; Rickels, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the metabolic phenotype of 2 cases of normal weight young women who developed type 2 diabetes (T2D), severe insulin resistance (insulin requirement >200 units/day), marked hypertriglyceridemia (>2000 mg/dL), and hepatic steatosis beginning 9 years after undergoing total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation for childhood cancer. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acids (FFAs), leptin, adiponectin, resistin, TNFα, and IL-6 were measured in each case and in 8 healthy women; Case 1 was also assessed after initiating pioglitazone. Coding regions and splice junctions of PPARG, LMNA, and AKT2 were sequenced in Case 1 and of PPARG in Case 2 to evaluate for familial partial lipodystrophies. Genotyping of APOE was performed in Case 1 to rule out type III hyperlipoproteinemia. Both cases had elevated plasma levels of insulin, leptin, resistin, and IL-6, high-normal to elevated TNFα, and low to low-normal adiponectin in keeping with post-receptor insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation. Case 1 experienced a biochemical response to pioglitazone. No causative mutations for partial lipodystrophies or type III hyperlipoproteinemia were identified. Though metabolic derangements have previously been reported in association with TBI, few cases have described insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia as severe as that seen in our patients. We speculate that early childhood TBI may impede adipose tissue development leading to metabolic complications from an attenuated ability of adipose tissue to accommodate caloric excess, and propose that this extreme metabolic syndrome be evaluated for as a late complication of TBI.

  11. The Contribution of Singlet Oxygen to Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold N. Onyango

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance contributes to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular dysfunctions. Recent studies showed that elevated singlet oxygen-mediated lipid peroxidation precedes and predicts diet-induced insulin resistance (IR, and neutrophils were suggested to be responsible for such singlet oxygen production. This review highlights literature suggesting that insulin-responsive cells such as endothelial cells, hepatocytes, adipocytes, and myocytes also produce singlet oxygen, which contributes to insulin resistance, for example, by generating bioactive aldehydes, inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and modifying mitochondrial DNA. In these cells, nutrient overload leads to the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 and other receptors, leading to the production of both peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide, which react to produce singlet oxygen. Cytochrome P450 2E1 and cytochrome c also contribute to singlet oxygen formation in the ER and mitochondria, respectively. Endothelial cell-derived singlet oxygen is suggested to mediate the formation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein which perpetuates IR, partly through neutrophil recruitment to adipose tissue. New singlet oxygen-involving pathways for the formation of IR-inducing bioactive aldehydes such as 4-hydroperoxy-(or hydroxy or oxo-2-nonenal, malondialdehyde, and cholesterol secosterol A are proposed. Strategies against IR should target the singlet oxygen-producing pathways, singlet oxygen quenching, and singlet oxygen-induced cellular responses.

  12. Influence of Gut Microbiota on Subclinical Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Bruno Melo; Abdalla Saad, Mario Jose

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is the main condition that is correlated with the appearance of insulin resistance, which is the major link among its comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and several types of cancer. Obesity affects a large number of individuals worldwide; it degrades human health and quality of life. Here, we review the role of the gut microbiota in the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes, which is promoted by a bacterial diversity shift mediated by overnutrition. Whole bacteria, their products, and metabolites undergo increased translocation through the gut epithelium to the circulation due to degraded tight junctions and the consequent increase in intestinal permeability that culminates in inflammation and insulin resistance. Several strategies focusing on modulation of the gut microbiota (antibiotics, probiotics, and prebiotics) are being experimentally employed in metabolic derangement in order to reduce intestinal permeability, increase the production of short chain fatty acids and anorectic gut hormones, and promote insulin sensitivity to counteract the inflammatory status and insulin resistance found in obese individuals. PMID:23840101

  13. Influence of Gut Microbiota on Subclinical Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Melo Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is the main condition that is correlated with the appearance of insulin resistance, which is the major link among its comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and several types of cancer. Obesity affects a large number of individuals worldwide; it degrades human health and quality of life. Here, we review the role of the gut microbiota in the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes, which is promoted by a bacterial diversity shift mediated by overnutrition. Whole bacteria, their products, and metabolites undergo increased translocation through the gut epithelium to the circulation due to degraded tight junctions and the consequent increase in intestinal permeability that culminates in inflammation and insulin resistance. Several strategies focusing on modulation of the gut microbiota (antibiotics, probiotics, and prebiotics are being experimentally employed in metabolic derangement in order to reduce intestinal permeability, increase the production of short chain fatty acids and anorectic gut hormones, and promote insulin sensitivity to counteract the inflammatory status and insulin resistance found in obese individuals.

  14. Insulin induces a shift in lipid and primary carbon metabolites in a model of fasting-induced insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral insulin resistance shifts metabolic fuel use away from carbohydrates, and towards lipids, and is most commonly associated with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, regulated insulin resistance is an evolved mechanism to preserve glucose for the brain in conditions of high demand or carbohy...

  15. Pulmonary arterial dysfunction in insulin resistant obese Zucker rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cogolludo Angel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance and obesity are strongly associated with systemic cardiovascular diseases. Recent reports have also suggested a link between insulin resistance with pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of this study was to analyze pulmonary vascular function in the insulin resistant obese Zucker rat. Methods Large and small pulmonary arteries from obese Zucker rat and their lean counterparts were mounted for isometric tension recording. mRNA and protein expression was measured by RT-PCR or Western blot, respectively. KV currents were recorded in isolated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells using the patch clamp technique. Results Right ventricular wall thickness was similar in obese and lean Zucker rats. Lung BMPR2, KV1.5 and 5-HT2A receptor mRNA and protein expression and KV current density were also similar in the two rat strains. In conductance and resistance pulmonary arteries, the similar relaxant responses to acetylcholine and nitroprusside and unchanged lung eNOS expression revealed a preserved endothelial function. However, in resistance (but not in conductance pulmonary arteries from obese rats a reduced response to several vasoconstrictor agents (hypoxia, phenylephrine and 5-HT was observed. The hyporesponsiveness to vasoconstrictors was reversed by L-NAME and prevented by the iNOS inhibitor 1400W. Conclusions In contrast to rat models of type 1 diabetes or other mice models of insulin resistance, the obese Zucker rats did not show any of the characteristic features of pulmonary hypertension but rather a reduced vasoconstrictor response which could be prevented by inhibition of iNOS.

  16. Insulin resistance and fertility in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albu, A; Constantin, M; Dobri, GA

    2008-01-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) represents a common endocrinopathy, with anovulation and hyperandrogenism as cardinal symptoms. In recent years it has been recognized that insulin resistance is an intrinsec feature of the disorder and plays a central role in pathogenesis. PCOS is associated with important reproductive morbidity as shown by high prevalence of anovulatory infertility, spontaneous abortion, gestational diabetes and pre–eclampsia. The association of insulin resistance with this reproductive pathology has been well documented. Due to major implication of insulin resistance in PCOS pathogenesis, insulin reduction strategies were studied as a possible treatment for infertility in PCOS patients. Weight loss, even modest was proved to be a simple and efficient method to improve reproductive parameters in PCOS patients and should be recommended to all overweight and obese patients with infertility. Metformin was showed to induce ovulation, at least in a subset of patients with PCOS, but there are not unequivocal proves concerning its efficacy for pregnancies and live–birth rate, mainly because few trials studied this aspect. Therefore there are not enough evidences to recommend metformin for infertility treatment in PCOS. Few small studies with newer thiazolidindiones suggest their efficacy for ovulation induction, but further extensive studies are needed to confirm these results. In conclusion, reduction of insulin resistance was proved to ameliorate ovulation rate in PCOS patients, but strong evidences to sustain the utility of insulin–sensitizing drugs as a therapeutic option for infertility are lacking. Future studies are needed to elucidate these aspects and to characterize the particular subtype of patients with higher probability to respond to this treatment. PMID:20108521

  17. miRNA Signatures of Insulin Resistance in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Angela; Danielson, Kirsty M; Benton, Miles C; Ziegler, Olivia; Shah, Ravi; Stubbs, Richard S; Das, Saumya; Macartney-Coxson, Donia

    2017-10-01

    Extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) represent functional biomarkers for obesity and related disorders; this study investigated plasma miRNAs in insulin resistance phenotypes in obesity. One hundred seventy-five miRNAs were analyzed in females with obesity (insulin sensitivity, n = 11; insulin resistance, n = 19; type 2 diabetes, n = 15) and without obesity (n = 12). Correlations between miRNA level and clinical parameters and levels of 15 miRNAs in a murine obesity model were investigated. One hundred six miRNAs were significantly (adjusted P ≤ 0.05) different between controls and at least one obesity phenotype, including miRNAs with the following attributes: previously reported roles in obesity and altered circulating levels (e.g., miR-122, miR-192); known roles in obesity but no reported changes in circulating levels (e.g., miR-378a); and no current reported role in, or association with, obesity (e.g., miR-28-5p, miR-374b, miR-32). The miRNAs in the latter group were found to be associated with extracellular vesicles. Forty-eight miRNAs showed significant correlations with clinical parameters; stepwise regression retained let-7b, miR-144-5p, miR-34a, and miR-532-5p in a model predictive of insulin resistance (R 2  = 0.57, P = 7.5 × 10 -8 ). Both miR-378a and miR-122 were perturbed in metabolically relevant tissues in a murine model of obesity. This study expands on the role of extracellular miRNAs in insulin-resistant phenotypes of obesity and identifies candidate miRNAs not previously associated with obesity. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency exacerbates hypertension-induced cerebral microhemorrhages in mice, mimicking the aging phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, Stefano; Valcarcel-Ares, Noa M; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Springo, Zsolt; Fulop, Gabor A; Ashpole, Nicole; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2017-06-01

    Clinical and experimental studies show that aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cerebral microhemorrhages (CMHs), which progressively impair neuronal function. There is growing evidence that aging promotes insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) deficiency, which compromises multiple aspects of cerebromicrovascular and brain health. To determine the role of IGF-1 deficiency in the pathogenesis of CMHs, we induced hypertension in mice with liver-specific knockdown of IGF-1 (Igf1 f/f  + TBG-Cre-AAV8) and control mice by angiotensin II plus l-NAME treatment. In IGF-1-deficient mice, the same level of hypertension led to significantly earlier onset and increased incidence and neurological consequences of CMHs, as compared to control mice, as shown by neurological examination, gait analysis, and histological assessment of CMHs in serial brain sections. Previous studies showed that in aging, increased oxidative stress-mediated matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activation importantly contributes to the pathogenesis of CMHs. Thus, it is significant that hypertension-induced cerebrovascular oxidative stress and MMP activation were increased in IGF-1-deficient mice. We found that IGF-1 deficiency impaired hypertension-induced adaptive media hypertrophy and extracellular matrix remodeling, which together with the increased MMP activation likely also contributes to increased fragility of intracerebral arterioles. Collectively, IGF-1 deficiency promotes the pathogenesis of CMHs, mimicking the aging phenotype, which likely contribute to its deleterious effect on cognitive function. Therapeutic strategies that upregulate IGF-1 signaling in the cerebral vessels and/or reduce microvascular oxidative stress, and MMP activation may be useful for the prevention of CMHs, protecting cognitive function in high-risk elderly patients. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  20. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  1. Glucose and lipid metabolism in insulin resistance : an experimental study in fat cells

    OpenAIRE

    Burén, Jonas

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is usually caused by a combination of pancreatic β-cell failure and insulin resistance in target tissues like liver, muscle and fat. Insulin resistance is characterised by an impaired effect of insulin to reduce hepatic glucose production and to promote glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. The focus of this study was to further elucidate cellular mechanisms for insulin resistance that may be of relevance for type 2 diabetes in humans. We used rat and human adipocytes as an es...

  2. Antibody-Mediated Extreme Insulin Resistance: A Report of Three Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Na; Fesseha, Betiel; Anzaldi, Laura; Tsao, Allison; Galiatsatos, Panagis; Sidhaye, Aniket

    2018-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by relative insulin deficiency and insulin resistance. Features suggesting severe insulin resistance include acanthosis nigricans, hyperandrogenism, weight loss, and recurrent hospital admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis. In rare circumstances, hyperglycemia persists despite administration of massive doses of insulin. In these cases, it is important to consider autoimmune etiologies for insulin resistance, such as type B insulin resistance and insulin antibody-mediated extreme insulin resistance, which carry high morbidity and mortality if untreated. Encouragingly, immunomodulatory regimens have recently been published that induce remission at high rates. We describe 3 cases of extreme insulin resistance mediated by anti-insulin receptor autoantibodies or insulin autoantibodies. All cases were effectively treated with an immunomodulatory regimen. Although cases of extreme insulin resistance are rare, it is important to be aware of autoimmune causes, recognize suggestive signs and symptoms, and pursue appropriate diagnostic evaluation. Prompt treatment with immunomodulators is key to restoring euglycemia in patients with autoimmune etiologies of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatocyte TRAF3 promotes liver steatosis and systemic insulin resistance through targeting TAK1-dependent signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pi-Xiao; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Luo, Pengcheng; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Peng; Guo, Junhong; Zhao, Guang-Nian; Zhu, Xueyong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Sijun; Li, Hongliang

    2016-02-17

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance and a systemic pro-inflammatory response. Here we show that tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) is upregulated in mouse and human livers with hepatic steatosis. After 24 weeks on a high-fat diet (HFD), obesity, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and inflammatory responses are significantly ameliorated in liver-specific TRAF3-knockout mice, but exacerbated in transgenic mice overexpressing TRAF3 in hepatocytes. The detrimental effects of TRAF3 on hepatic steatosis and related pathologies are confirmed in ob/ob mice. We further show that in response to HFD, hepatocyte TRAF3 binds to TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) to induce TAK1 ubiquitination and subsequent autophosphorylation, thereby enhancing the activation of downstream IKKβ-NF-κB and MKK-JNK-IRS1(307) signalling cascades, while disrupting AKT-GSK3β/FOXO1 signalling. The TRAF3-TAK1 interaction and TAK1 ubiquitination are indispensable for TRAF3-regulated hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, hepatocyte TRAF3 promotes HFD-induced or genetic hepatic steatosis in a TAK1-dependent manner.

  4. Extreme Insulin Resistance in a Patient with Diabetes Ketoacidosis and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin H. Oo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia is common in hospitalized patients and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. In hospitalized patients, multiple factors contribute to hyperglycemia, such as underlying medical conditions, pathophysiological stress, and medications. The development of transient insulin resistance is a known cause of hyperglycemia in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Though physicians are familiar with common diseases that are known to be associated with insulin resistance, the majority of us rarely come across a case of extreme insulin resistance. Here, we report a case of prolonged course of extreme insulin resistance in a patient admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and acute myocardial infarction (MI. The main purpose of this paper is to review the literature to identify the underlying mechanisms of extreme insulin resistance in a patient with DKA and MI. We will also briefly discuss the different clinical conditions that are associated with insulin resistance and a general approach to a patient with severe insulin resistance.

  5. Abdominal obesity in BTBR male mice is associated with peripheral but not hepatic insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jessica B; Oler, Angie T; Nadler, Samuel T; Choi, YounJeong; Schueler, Kathryn L; Yandell, Brian S; Kendziorski, Christina M; Attie, Alan D

    2007-03-01

    Insulin resistance is a common feature of obesity. BTBR mice have more fat mass than most other inbred mouse strains. On a chow diet, BTBR mice have elevated insulin levels relative to the C57BL/6J (B6) strain. Male F1 progeny of a B6 x BTBR cross are insulin resistant. Previously, we reported insulin resistance in isolated muscle and in isolated adipocytes in this strain. Whereas the muscle insulin resistance was observed only in male F1 mice, adipocyte insulin resistance was also present in male BTBR mice. We examined in vivo mechanisms of insulin resistance with the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique. At 10 wk of age, BTBR and F1 mice had a >30% reduction in whole body glucose disposal primarily due to insulin resistance in heart, soleus muscle, and adipose tissue. The increased adipose tissue mass and decreased muscle mass in BTBR and F1 mice were negatively and positively correlated with whole body glucose disposal, respectively. Genes involved in focal adhesion, actin cytoskeleton, and inflammation were more highly expressed in BTBR and F1 than in B6 adipose tissue. The BTBR and F1 mice have higher levels of testosterone, which may be related to the pathological changes in adipose tissue that lead to systemic insulin resistance. Despite profound peripheral insulin resistance, BTBR and F1 mice retained hepatic insulin sensitivity. These studies reveal a genetic difference in body composition that correlates with large differences in peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  6. [Factors associated with insulin resistence in rural populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Larissa Loures; Gazzinelli, Andréa; Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo

    2009-04-01

    This study explores the relations of anthropometric, body composition assessments, biochemical and hemodynamic parameters with insulin resistance in two rural communities. Sample was composed by adults aged 18 or older, both sexes. Participants were excluded if pregnant and diabetic. Data collection included demographic lifestyle, hemodynamic, anthropometric and biochemical variables. From the 567 subjects, 50.4% were men and 49.6%, women. Most of the sample was non-white (75.7%), lived with partner (69.3%) and had low educational level. Overweight and obesity prevalences were 17.4% and 5.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis found risk factors associated to insulin resistance for non-diabetic adults with low income and educational level: overweight, obesity, elevated waist-to-hip ratio, C-reactive protein and skin color.

  7. The Impact of Organokines on Insulin Resistance, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Mook Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Immoderate energy intake, a sedentary lifestyle, and aging have contributed to the increased prevalence of obesity, sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. There is an urgent need for the development of novel pharmacological interventions that can target excessive fat accumulation and decreased muscle mass and/or strength. Adipokines, bioactive molecules derived from adipose tissue, are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, inflammation, energy expenditure, insulin resistance and secretion, glucose and lipid metabolism, and atherosclerosis. Recently, there is emerging evidence that skeletal muscle and the liver also function as endocrine organs that secrete myokines and hepatokines, respectively. Novel discoveries and research into these organokines (adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines may lead to the development of promising biomarkers and therapeutics for cardiometabolic disease. In this review, I summarize recent data on these organokines and focus on the role of adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines in the regulation of insulin resistance, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

  8. [Implication of MAP kinases in obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppo, Franck; Jager, Jennifer; Berthou, Flavien; Giorgetti-Peraldi, Sophie; Cormont, Mireille; Bost, Fréderic; Tanti, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance is often associated with obesity and is a major risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes as well as cardiovascular and hepatic diseases. Insulin resistance may also increase the incidence or the aggressiveness of some cancers. Insulin resistance occurs owing to defects in insulin signaling in target tissues of this hormone. During the last ten years, it became evident that the chronic low-grade inflammatory state that develops during obesity plays an important role in insulin resistance development. Indeed, inflammatory cytokines activate several signaling pathways that impinge on the insulin signaling pathway. Among them, this review will focus on the implication of the MAP kinases JNK and ERK1/2 signaling in the development of insulin signaling alterations and will discuss the possibility to target these pathways in order to fight insulin resistance. © Société de Biologie, 2014.

  9. Effects of pioglitazone and metformin on NEFA-induced insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, R.; Basu, A.; Chandramouli, V.; Norby, B.; Dicke, B.; Shah, P.; Cohen, O.; Landau, B. R.; Rizza, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We sought to determine whether pioglitazone and metformin alter NEFA-induced insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes and, if so, the mechanism whereby this is effected. Methods Euglycaemic–hyperinsulinaemic clamps (glucose ∼5.3 mmol/l, insulin ∼200 pmol/l) were performed in the presence of Intralipid–heparin (IL/H) or glycerol before and after 4 months of treatment with pioglitazone (n=11) or metformin (n=9) in diabetic participants. Hormone secretion was inhibited with somatostatin in all participants. Results Pioglitazone increased insulin-stimulated glucose disappearance (pMetformin increased (pmetformin, indicating persistence of NEFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance. Conclusions/interpretation We conclude that pioglitazone improves both the hepatic and the extrahepatic action of insulin but does not prevent NEFA-induced insulin resistance. In contrast, whereas metformin prevents NEFA-induced extrahepatic insulin resistance, it does not protect against NEFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:18769904

  10. Assessing Psychological Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth; Pouwer, F; Speight, Jane

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This study aims to examine the operationalisation of 'psychological insulin resistance' (PIR) among people with type 2 diabetes and to identify and critique relevant measures. RECENT FINDINGS: PIR has been operationalised as (1) the assessment of attitudes or beliefs about....... This paper provides guidance on the selection of questionnaires for clinical or research purpose and the development of new, or improvement of existing, questionnaires....

  11. Role of insulin resistance in uric acid nephrolithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hanhan; Klett, Dane E; Littleton, Raymond; Elder, Jack S; Sammon, Jesse D

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of uric acid stones. Although not completely understood, its role is supported by many studies demonstrating increased prevalence of uric acid stones in patients with metabolic syndrome and in particular insulin resistance, a major component of metabolic syndrome. This review presents epidemiologic studies demonstrating the association between metabolic syndrome and nephrolithiasis in general as well as the relationship between insuli...

  12. Relationship between insulin resistance and plasma vitamin D in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badawi A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alaa Badawi,1 Suzan Sayegh,2 Eman Sadoun,3 Mohamed Al-Thani,2 Paul Arora,4 Pierre S Haddad51Office of Biotechnology, Genomics and Population Health, Public Health Agency of Canada, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Public Health, 3Clinical Research Division, Supreme Council of Health, Doha, Qatar; 4Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, CanadaAbstract: A recent relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and insulin resistance has been established through several studies. Research suggests a correlation between serum vitamin D and glycemic status measures. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the plasma vitamin D levels (25[OH]D and the factors linked to insulin resistance in a representative sample of Canadians ranging in age from 16–79 years. Data were used from the Canadian Health Measures Survey where direct measures of health and wellness were reported from 1,928 subjects. These data were gathered from March 2007–February 2009 at 15 sites selected through a multistage sampling strategy. An inverse relationship between insulin resistance and plasma vitamin D level in both men and women was observed. This study provides additional evidence for the role of vitamin D in T2DM. If causally associated, the supplementation of vitamin D may help in preventing insulin resistance and subsequent T2DM.Keywords: HOMA-IR, plasma 25(OHD, diabetes

  13. Insulin Resistance and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle D; Hedlin, Haley; Stefanick, Marcia L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance is associated with diabetes mellitus, but it is uncertain whether it improves cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified 15,288 women from the Women's Health Initiative Biomarkers s......-cholesterol and did not provide independent prognostic information in postmenopausal women without diabetes mellitus. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrial.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000611....

  14. Enhanced skeletal muscle lipid oxidative efficiency in insulin-resistant vs insulin-sensitive nondiabetic, nonobese humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, Jose E; Vasquez, Karla; Watkins, Guillermo; Dupuy, Aude; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Levade, Thierry; Moro, Cedric

    2013-04-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is proposed to result from impaired skeletal muscle lipid oxidative capacity. However, there is no evidence indicating that muscle lipid oxidative capacity is impaired in healthy otherwise insulin-resistant individuals. The objective of the study was to assess muscle lipid oxidative capacity in young, nonobese, glucose-tolerant, insulin-resistant vs insulin-sensitive individuals. In 13 insulin-sensitive [by Matsuda index (MI) (22.6 ± 0.6 [SE] kg/m(2)); 23 ± 1 years; MI 5.9 ± 0.1] and 13 insulin-resistant (23.2 ± 0.6 kg/m(2); 23 ± 3 years; MI 2.2 ± 0.1) volunteers, skeletal muscle biopsy, blood extraction before and after an oral glucose load, and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry were performed. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial to nuclear DNA ratio, oxidative phosphorylation protein content, and citrate synthase and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activities were assessed. Muscle lipids and palmitate oxidation ((14)CO2 and (14)C-acid soluble metabolites production) at 4 [1-(14)C]palmitate concentrations (45-520 μM) were also measured. None of the muscle mitochondrial measures showed differences between groups, except for a higher complex V protein content in insulin-resistant vs insulin-sensitive volunteers (3.5 ± 0.4 vs 2.2 ± 0.4; P = .05). Muscle ceramide content was significantly increased in insulin-resistant vs insulin-sensitive individuals (P = .04). Total palmitate oxidation showed a similar concentration-dependent response in both groups (P = .69). However, lipid oxidative efficiency (CO2 to (14)C-acid soluble metabolites ratio) was enhanced in insulin-resistant vs insulin-sensitive individuals, particularly at the highest palmitate concentration (0.24 ± 0.04 vs 0.12 ± 0.02; P = .02). We found no evidence of impaired muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity in young, nonobese, glucose-tolerant, otherwise insulin-resistant vs insulin-sensitive individuals. Enhanced muscle lipid oxidative efficiency in insulin

  15. Insulin Resistance and Alzheimer’s Disease: Bioenergetic Linkages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan J. Neth

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic dysfunction is a well-established feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, evidenced by brain glucose hypometabolism that can be observed potentially decades prior to the development of AD symptoms. Furthermore, there is mounting support for an association between metabolic disease and the development of AD and related dementias. Individuals with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D, hyperlipidemia, obesity, or other metabolic disease may have increased risk for the development of AD and similar conditions, such as vascular dementia. This association may in part be due to the systemic mitochondrial dysfunction that is common to these pathologies. Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is a significant feature of AD and may play a fundamental role in its pathogenesis. In fact, aging itself presents a unique challenge due to inherent mitochondrial dysfunction and prevalence of chronic metabolic disease. Despite the progress made in understanding the pathogenesis of AD and in the development of potential therapies, at present we remain without a disease-modifying treatment. In this review, we will discuss insulin resistance as a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of AD, as well as the metabolic and bioenergetic disruptions linking insulin resistance and AD. We will also focus on potential neuroimaging tools for the study of the metabolic dysfunction commonly seen in AD with hopes of developing therapeutic and preventative targets.

  16. Exploring pathway interactions in insulin resistant mouse liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelder Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex phenotypes such as insulin resistance involve different biological pathways that may interact and influence each other. Interpretation of related experimental data would be facilitated by identifying relevant pathway interactions in the context of the dataset. Results We developed an analysis approach to study interactions between pathways by integrating gene and protein interaction networks, biological pathway information and high-throughput data. This approach was applied to a transcriptomics dataset to investigate pathway interactions in insulin resistant mouse liver in response to a glucose challenge. We identified regulated pathway interactions at different time points following the glucose challenge and also studied the underlying protein interactions to find possible mechanisms and key proteins involved in pathway cross-talk. A large number of pathway interactions were found for the comparison between the two diet groups at t = 0. The initial response to the glucose challenge (t = 0.6 was typed by an acute stress response and pathway interactions showed large overlap between the two diet groups, while the pathway interaction networks for the late response were more dissimilar. Conclusions Studying pathway interactions provides a new perspective on the data that complements established pathway analysis methods such as enrichment analysis. This study provided new insights in how interactions between pathways may be affected by insulin resistance. In addition, the analysis approach described here can be generally applied to different types of high-throughput data and will therefore be useful for analysis of other complex datasets as well.

  17. Heart Rate Variability, Insulin Resistance, and Insulin Sensitivity in Japanese Adults: The Toon Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Saito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although impaired cardiac autonomic function is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians, evidence in Asian populations with a lower body mass index is limited. Methods: Between 2009–2012, the Toon Health Study recruited 1899 individuals aged 30–79 years who were not taking medication for diabetes. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was used to diagnose type 2 diabetes, and fasting and 2-h-postload glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. We assessed the homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and Gutt’s insulin sensitivity index (ISI. Pulse was recorded for 5 min, and time-domain heart rate variability (HRV indices were calculated: the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN and the root mean square of successive difference (RMSSD. Power spectral analysis provided frequency domain measures of HRV: high frequency (HF power, low frequency (LF power, and the LF:HF ratio. Results: Multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models showed decreased SDNN, RMSSD, and HF, and increased LF:HF ratio were associated significantly with increased HOMA-IR and decreased ISI. When stratified by overweight status, the association of RMSSD, HF, and LF:HF ratio with decreased ISI was also apparent in non-overweight individuals. The interaction between LF:HF ratio and decreased ISI in overweight individuals was significant, with the odds ratio for decreased ISI in the highest quartile of LF:HF ratio in non-overweight individuals being 2.09 (95% confidence interval, 1.41–3.10. Conclusions: Reduced HRV was associated with insulin resistance and lower insulin sensitivity. Decreased ISI was linked with parasympathetic dysfunction, primarily in non-overweight individuals.

  18. Obesity, ectopic lipids, and insulin resistance : Tissue-specific defects in nutrient handling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, K.W.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis described studies on the clinical, nutritional, and molecular aspects of insulin resistance in human obesity. We investigated methods for the identification of insulin resistance in high-risk patients and studied the nutritional and molecular mechanisms that may contribute to insulin

  19. Rosiglitazone treatment of patients with extreme insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus due to insulin receptor mutations has no effects on glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Lund, S; Pedersen, O

    2001-01-01

    Rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD), increases insulin sensitivity by reducing levels of plasma NEFA, triglycerides (TG), glucose and serum insulin. Rosiglitazone treatment decreases insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients, but no data exist concerning rosiglitazone treatment...... of patients with syndromes of extreme insulin resistance....

  20. Association Between Insulin Resistance and Bone Structure in Nondiabetic Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Finkelstein, Joel S; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: The clinical consequences of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia on bone remain largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of insulin resistance on peripheral bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), bone microarchitecture and estimated bone strength. DESIGN...... computed tomography was used to assess bone density and microstructure at the distal radius and tibia. Fasting insulin and glucose was measured and insulin resistance was estimated using homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) with higher values indicating greater insulin resistance...... covariates (e.g., time since menopause, cigarette smoking, physical activity, prior use of osteoporosis medications or glucocorticoids). CONCLUSIONS: In non-diabetic, postmenopausal women, insulin resistance was associated with smaller bone size, greater volumetric bone mineral density and generally...

  1. The E3 ligase tripartite motif 8 targets TAK1 to promote insulin resistance and steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Wen-Xin; Ji, Yan-Xiao; Wang, Pi-Xiao; Yang, Yang; Gong, Jun; Shen, Li-Jun; Zhu, Xue-Yong; Huang, Zan; Li, Hongliang

    2017-05-01

    Tripartite motif 8 (TRIM8), an E3 ligase ubiquitously expressed in various cells, is closely involved in innate immunity. However, its role in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is largely unknown. Here, we report evidence that TRIM8 is a robust enhancer of steatohepatitis and its complications induced by a high-fat diet or a genetic deficiency (ob/ob). Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, we observed dramatic exacerbation of insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis by hepatocyte-specific TRIM8 overexpression, whereas deletion or down-regulation of TRIM8 in hepatocytes led to a completely opposite phenotype. Furthermore, investigations of the underlying mechanisms revealed that TRIM8 directly binds to and ubiquitinates transforming growth factor-beta-activated kinase 1, thus promoting its phosphorylation and the activation of downstream c-Jun N-terminal kinase/p38 and nuclear factor κB signaling. Importantly, the participation of TRIM8 in human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis was verified on the basis of its dramatically increased expression in the livers of these patients, suggesting a promising development of TRIM8 disturbance for the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-related metabolic disorders. The E3 ligase TRIM8 is a potent regulator that exacerbates steatohepatitis and metabolic disorders dependent on its binding and ubiquitinating capacity on transforming growth factor-beta-activated kinase 1. (Hepatology 2017;65:1492-1511). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. Increased interaction with insulin receptor substrate 1, a novel abnormality in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caruso, Michael; Ma, Danjun; Msallaty, Zaher

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) is a key mediator of insulin signal transduction. Perturbations involving IRS1 complexes may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Surprisingly little is known about the proteins that interact with IRS1 in humans under health...... and disease conditions. We used a proteomic approach to assess IRS1 interaction partners in skeletal muscle from lean healthy control subjects (LCs), obese insulin-resistant nondiabetic control subjects (OCs), and participants with T2D before and after insulin infusion. We identified 113 novel endogenous IRS1...... of proteins in OCs and/or T2D patients exhibited increased associations with IRS1 compared with LCs under the basal and/or insulin-stimulated conditions, revealing multiple new dysfunctional IRS1 pathways in OCs and T2D patients. This novel abnormality, increased interaction of multiple proteins with IRS1...

  3. Grizzly bears exhibit augmented insulin sensitivity while obese prior to a reversible insulin resistance during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, O Lynne; Jansen, Heiko T; Galbreath, Elizabeth; Morgenstern, Kurt; Gehring, Jamie Lauren; Rigano, Kimberly Scott; Lee, Jae; Gong, Jianhua; Shaywitz, Adam J; Vella, Chantal A; Robbins, Charles T; Corbit, Kevin C

    2014-08-05

    The confluence of obesity and diabetes as a worldwide epidemic necessitates the discovery of new therapies. Success in this endeavor requires translatable preclinical studies, which traditionally employ rodent models. As an alternative approach, we explored hibernation where obesity is a natural adaptation to survive months of fasting. Here we report that grizzly bears exhibit seasonal tripartite insulin responsiveness such that obese animals augment insulin sensitivity but only weeks later enter hibernation-specific insulin resistance (IR) and subsequently reinitiate responsiveness upon awakening. Preparation for hibernation is characterized by adiposity coupled to increased insulin sensitivity via modified PTEN/AKT signaling specifically in adipose tissue, suggesting a state of "healthy" obesity analogous to humans with PTEN haploinsufficiency. Collectively, we show that bears reversibly cope with homeostatic perturbations considered detrimental to humans and describe a mechanism whereby IR functions not as a late-stage metabolic adaptation to obesity, but rather a gatekeeper of the fed-fasting transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Associations of erythrocyte fatty acid patterns with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigornia, Sherman J; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Harris, William S; Tucker, Katherine L

    2016-03-01

    Synergistic or additive effects or both on cardiometabolic risk may be missed by examining individual fatty acids (FAs). A pattern analysis may be a more useful approach. In addition, it remains unclear whether erythrocyte FA composition relates to insulin resistance among Hispanics/Latinos. We derived erythrocyte FA patterns for a Puerto Rican cohort and examined their association with diet and insulin resistance in cross-sectional and prospective analyses. At baseline, principal components analysis was used to derive factor patterns with the use of 24 erythrocyte FAs from 1157 participants of the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study (aged 45-75 y). Dietary intake was assessed with a validated semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated at baseline and at the 2-y follow-up. Relations between FA patterns and HOMA-IR were analyzed in a sample of 922 participants with available data. Five FA patterns were derived, differentiated by 1) relatively high de novo lipogenesis (DNL) FAs and low n-6 (ω-6) FAs, 2) high very-long-chain saturated FAs, 3) high n-3 (ω-3) FAs, 4) high linoleic acid and low arachidonic acid, and 5) high trans FAs. The DNL pattern was positively correlated with sugar and inversely with n-6 and monounsaturated FA intakes. Only the DNL pattern was positively related to baseline HOMA-IR [adjusted geometric means (95% CIs) for quartiles 1 and 4: 1.72 (1.58, 1.87) and 2.20 (2.02, 2.39); P-trend insulin sensitivity in a Hispanic/Latino cohort. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Bariatric surgery in morbidly obese insulin resistant humans normalises insulin signalling but not insulin-stimulated glucose disposal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi Z Chen

    Full Text Available Weight-loss after bariatric surgery improves insulin sensitivity, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not clear. To ascertain the effect of bariatric surgery on insulin signalling, we examined glucose disposal and Akt activation in morbidly obese volunteers before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB, and compared this to lean volunteers.The hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp, at five infusion rates, was used to determine glucose disposal rates (GDR in eight morbidly obese (body mass index, BMI=47.3 ± 2.2 kg/m(2 patients, before and after RYGB, and in eight lean volunteers (BMI=20.7 ± 0.7 kg/m2. Biopsies of brachioradialis muscle, taken at fasting and insulin concentrations that induced half-maximal (GDR50 and maximal (GDR100 GDR in each subject, were used to examine the phosphorylation of Akt-Thr308, Akt-473, and pras40, in vivo biomarkers for Akt activity.Pre-operatively, insulin-stimulated GDR was lower in the obese compared to the lean individuals (P<0.001. Weight-loss of 29.9 ± 4 kg after surgery significantly improved GDR50 (P=0.004 but not GDR100 (P=0.3. These subjects still remained significantly more insulin resistant than the lean individuals (p<0.001. Weight loss increased insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle Akt-Thr308 and Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation, P=0.02 and P=0.03 respectively (MANCOVA, and Akt activity towards the substrate PRAS40 (P=0.003, MANCOVA, and in contrast to GDR, were fully normalised after the surgery (obese vs lean, P=0.6, P=0.35, P=0.46, respectively.Our data show that although Akt activity substantially improved after surgery, it did not lead to a full restoration of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. This suggests that a major defect downstream of, or parallel to, Akt signalling remains after significant weight-loss.

  6. Mechanisms for greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in normal and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle after acute exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced skeletal muscle and whole body insulin sensitivity can persist for up to 24–48 h after one exercise session. This review focuses on potential mechanisms for greater postexercise and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU) by muscle in individuals with normal or reduced insulin sensitivity. A model is proposed for the processes underlying this improvement; i.e., triggers initiate events that activate subsequent memory elements, which store information that is relayed to mediators, which translate memory into action by controlling an end effector that directly executes increased insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Several candidates are potential triggers or memory elements, but none have been conclusively verified. Regarding potential mediators in both normal and insulin-resistant individuals, elevated postexercise ISGU with a physiological insulin dose coincides with greater Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation without improved proximal insulin signaling at steps from insulin receptor binding to Akt activity. Causality remains to be established between greater AS160 phosphorylation and improved ISGU. The end effector for normal individuals is increased GLUT4 translocation, but this remains untested for insulin-resistant individuals postexercise. Following exercise, insulin-resistant individuals can attain ISGU values similar to nonexercising healthy controls, but after a comparable exercise protocol performed by both groups, ISGU for the insulin-resistant group has been consistently reported to be below postexercise values for the healthy group. Further research is required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the improved postexercise ISGU in individuals with normal or subnormal insulin sensitivity and to explain the disparity between these groups after similar exercise. PMID:26487009

  7. Myoinositol and D-Chiro Inositol in Improving Insulin Resistance in Obese Male Children: Preliminary Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mancini, Mario; Andreassi, Alice; Salvioni, Michela; Pelliccione, Fiore; Mantellassi, Gianna; Banderali, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Myoinositol and D-chiro inositol, which are inositol isomers, have been shown to possess insulin-mimetic properties and to improve insulin resistance, especially in women with polycystic ovary syndrome...

  8. Effects of Hormone Replacement Therapy on Insulin Resistance in Postmenopausal Diabetic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskra Bitoska

    2016-02-01

    CONCLUSION: HRT was associated with statistically signifficant increase of insulin sensitivity. Larger clinical trials will be necessary to understand whether HRT may improve insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis in women with diabetes, especially when given shortly after entering menopause.

  9. Impact of Reduced ATGL-Mediated Adipocyte Lipolysis on Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoiswohl, Gabriele; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Menke, Marie N; Wills, Rachel C; Surlow, Beth A; Basantani, Mahesh K; Sitnick, Mitch T; Cai, Lingzhi; Yazbeck, Cynthia F; Stolz, Donna B; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas; O'Doherty, Robert M; Kershaw, Erin E

    2015-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that impaired regulation of adipocyte lipolysis contributes to the proinflammatory immune cell infiltration of metabolic tissues in obesity, a process that is proposed to contribute to the development and exacerbation of insulin resistance. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we generated mice with adipocyte-specific deletion of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate-limiting enzyme catalyzing triacylglycerol hydrolysis. In contrast to previous models, adiponectin-driven Cre expression was used for targeted ATGL deletion. The resulting adipocyte-specific ATGL knockout (AAKO) mice were then characterized for metabolic and immune phenotypes. Lean and diet-induced obese AAKO mice had reduced adipocyte lipolysis, serum lipids, systemic lipid oxidation, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes in adipose tissue (AT) and liver. These changes did not increase overall body weight or fat mass in AAKO mice by 24 weeks of age, in part due to reduced expression of genes involved in lipid uptake, synthesis, and adipogenesis. Systemic glucose and insulin tolerance were improved in AAKO mice, primarily due to enhanced hepatic insulin signaling, which was accompanied by marked reduction in diet-induced hepatic steatosis as well as hepatic immune cell infiltration and activation. In contrast, although adipocyte ATGL deletion reduced AT immune cell infiltration in response to an acute lipolytic stimulus, it was not sufficient to ameliorate, and may even exacerbate, chronic inflammatory changes that occur in AT in response to diet-induced obesity.

  10. Aerobic training prevents dexamethasone-induced peripheral insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionísio, T J; Louzada, J C A; Viscelli, B A; Dionísio, E J; Martuscelli, A M; Barel, M; Perez, O A B; Bosqueiro, J R; Brozoski, D T; Santos, C F; Amaral, S L

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated how proteins of the insulin signaling cascade could modulate insulin resistance after dexamethasone (Dexa) treatment and aerobic training. Rats were distributed into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary+Dexa (SD), trained control (TC), and trained+Dexa (TD), and underwent aerobic training for 70 days or remained sedentary. Dexa was administered during the last 10 days (1 mg · kg(-1) per day i. p.). After 70 days, an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (ipGTT) was performed. Protein levels of IRS-1, AKT, and PKC-α in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle were identified using Western blots. Dexa treatment increased blood glucose and the area under the curve (AUC) of ipGTT. Training attenuated the hyperglycemia and the AUC induced by Dexa. Dexa reduced IRS-1 (- 16%) and AKT (- 43%) protein level with no changes in PKC-α levels. Moreover, these effects on IRS-1 and AKT protein level were prevented in trained animals. These results show for the first time that aerobic exercise prevented reductions of IRS-1 and AKT level induced by Dexa in the TA muscle, suggesting that aerobic exercise is a good strategy to prevent Dexa-induced peripheral insulin resistance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Regulation of obesity and insulin resistance by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansbury, Brian E; Hill, Bradford G

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and has quickly become a worldwide pandemic with few tangible and safe treatment options. Although it is generally accepted that the primary cause of obesity is energy imbalance, i.e., the calories consumed are greater than are utilized, understanding how caloric balance is regulated has proven a challenge. Many "distal" causes of obesity, such as the structural environment, occupation, and social influences, are exceedingly difficult to change or manipulate. Hence, molecular processes and pathways more proximal to the origins of obesity-those that directly regulate energy metabolism or caloric intake-seem to be more feasible targets for therapy. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as a central regulator of energy metabolism and body composition. NO bioavailability is decreased in animal models of diet-induced obesity and in obese and insulin-resistant patients, and increasing NO output has remarkable effects on obesity and insulin resistance. This review discusses the role of NO in regulating adiposity and insulin sensitivity and places its modes of action into context with the known causes and consequences of metabolic disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. REGULATION OF OBESITY AND INSULIN RESISTANCE BY NITRIC OXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and has quickly become a world-wide pandemic with few tangible and safe treatment options. While it is generally accepted that the primary cause of obesity is energy imbalance, i.e., the calories consumed are greater than are utilized, understanding how caloric balance is regulated has proven a challenge. Many “distal” causes of obesity, such as the structural environment, occupation, and social influences, are exceedingly difficult to change or manipulate. Hence, molecular processes and pathways more proximal to the origins of obesity—those that directly regulate energy metabolism or caloric intake—appear to be more feasible targets for therapy. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as a central regulator of energy metabolism and body composition. NO bioavailability is decreased in animal models of diet-induced obesity and in obese and insulin resistant patients, and increasing NO output has remarkable effects on obesity and insulin resistance. This review discusses the role of NO in regulating adiposity and insulin sensitivity and places its modes of action into context with the known causes and consequences of metabolic disease. PMID:24878261

  13. Beneficial effects of ethanol consumption on insulin resistance are only applicable to subjects without obesity or insulin resistance; drinking is not necessarily a remedy for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hirokazu

    2011-07-01

    Although moderate drinking has been shown to lower insulin resistance levels, it is still unclear whether alcoholic beverages could be remedies for insulin resistance. To elucidate this, the correlation between levels of ethanol consumption and insulin resistance were cross-sectionally examined in 371 non-diabetic male Japanese workers. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the ethanol consumption level was inversely correlated with the insulin resistance level assessed by homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR, p = 0.0014), the serum insulin level (p = 0.0007), and pancreatic β-cell function, also assessed by HOMA (HOMA-β, p = 0.0002), independently from age, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure, liver function tests, and lipid profiles status, as well as serum adiponectin. The correlations were true in subjects with normal BMIs (up to 25.0 kg/m(2), n = 301) or normal HOMA-IR (up to 2.0 μIU·mg/μL·dL n = 337), whereas all of them were non-significant in those with excessive BMIs (n = 70) or in those with HOMA-IR of more than 2.0 (n = 34). Although it is still unclear whether the reductions of these parameters by ethanol consumption are truly due to the improvement of insulin resistance, at least, these effects are not applicable to subjects with obesity and/or insulin resistance. Thus, alcoholic beverages could not be remedies for insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome.

  14. The establishment of insulin resistance model in FL83B and L6 cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanlan; Han, Jizhong; Li, Haoran; Liu, Mengmeng; Zeng, Bin

    2017-10-01

    The insulin resistance models of mouse liver epithelial and rat myoblasts cells were induced by three kinds of inducers: dexamethasone, high insulin and high glucose. The purpose is to select the optimal insulin resistance model, to provide a simple and reliable TR cell model for the study of the pathogenesis of TR and the improvement of TR drugs and functional foods. The MTT method is used for toxicity screening of three compounds, selecting security and suitable concentration. We performed a Glucose oxidase peroxidase (GOD-POD) method involving FL83B and L6 cell with dexamethasone, high insulin and high glucose-induced insulin resistance. Results suggested that FL83B cells with dexamethasone-induced (0.25uM) were established insulin resistance and L6 cells with high-glucose (30mM) and dexamethasone-induced (0.25uM) were established insulin resistance.

  15. Comparability of indices for insulin resistance and insulin secretion determined during oral glucose tolerance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel, Rainer; Raber, Rüdiger; Wosniok, Werner

    2006-01-01

    Impaired insulin secretion (IS) and insulin resistance (IR) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several simplifying indices were developed that calculate IS and/or IR from venous insulin and glucose concentrations. The aim of the present study was to compare these indices with each other and with regard to their efficiency to differentiate between non-diseased and diabetic glucose tolerance states. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed in 301 subjects. The study group was divided into five groups according to WHO/American Diabetes Association (ADA) cut-off values: apparently normotolerant, diabetic, isolated 2-h post-challenge hyperglycemic, isolated fasting hyperglycemic and intermediate groups. The minimal error rate (diagnostic non-efficiency) indicating a misclassification of a diabetic tolerance state was determined for 12 indices. The error rate was lower than 15% for the index of Cederholm and Wibell and for the indices of Stumvoll et al. The misclassification rates for the other indices (index of Matsuda and de Fronzo, index of Myllynen et al., HOMA IR, HOMA beta-cell, FIRI, QUICKI, index of McAuley and insulinogenic index) were 20-27%; however, the diagnostic sensitivity was close to a 1:1 chance of a correct decision. The hypothesis that isolated post-prandial hyperglycemia (IPH) and isolated fasting hyperglycemia (IFH) differ in their insulin sensitivity and insulin response could not be supported by the present results. The indices of Cederholm and Wibell and of Stumvoll et al. were found to be appropriate as diagnostic indicators of the pathogenesis of diabetic glucose tolerance and were more closely related to the glucose tolerance state than the other indices.

  16. Fish consumption, insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C; Liese, A; Wagenknecht, L; Lorenzo, C; Haffner, S; Hanley, A

    2013-09-01

    Previous research on the association between fish consumption and incident type 2 diabetes has been inconclusive. In addition, few studies have investigated how fish consumption may be related to the metabolic abnormalities underlying diabetes. Therefore, we examined the association of fish consumption with measures of insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in a multi-ethnic population. We examined the cross-sectional association between fish consumption and measures of insulin sensitivity and secretion in 951 non-diabetic participants in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS). Fish consumption, categorized as consumption was independently associated with lower S(I)-adjusted AIR (β = -0.13 [-0.25, -0.016], p = 0.03, comparing ≥2 vs. consumption was positively associated with intact and split proinsulin/C-peptide ratios, however, these associations were confounded by ethnicity (multivariable-adjusted β = 0.073 [-0.014, 0.16] for intact proinsulin/C-peptide ratio, β = 0.031 [-0.065, 0.13] for split proinsulin/C-peptide ratio). We also observed a significant positive association between fish consumption and fasting blood glucose (multivariable-adjusted β = 2.27 [0.68, 3.86], p = 0.005). We found no association between fish consumption and S(I) (multivariable-adjusted β = -0.015 [-0.083, 0.053]) or fasting insulin (multivariable-adjusted β = 0.016 [-0.066, 0.10]). Fish consumption was not associated with measures of insulin sensitivity in the multi-ethnic IRAS cohort. However, higher fish consumption may be associated with pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of reduced insulin-stimulated bone blood flow in the pathogenesis of metabolic insulin resistance and diabetic bone fragility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Pamela S

    2016-08-01

    Worldwide, 387 million adults live with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and an additional 205 million cases are projected by 2035. Because T2D has numerous complications, there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Identification of early events in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and T2D might lead to more effective treatments that would mitigate health and monetary costs. Here, we present our hypothesis that impaired bone blood flow is an early event in the pathogenesis of whole-body metabolic insulin resistance that ultimately leads to T2D. Two recent developments in different fields form the basis for this hypothesis. First, reduced vascular function has been identified as an early event in the development of T2D. In particular, before the onset of tissue or whole body metabolic insulin resistance, insulin-stimulated, endothelium-mediated skeletal muscle blood flow is impaired. Insulin resistance of the vascular endothelium reduces delivery of insulin and glucose to skeletal muscle, which leads to tissue and whole-body metabolic insulin resistance. Second is the paradigm-shifting discovery that the skeleton has an endocrine function that is essential for maintenance of whole-body glucose homeostasis. Specifically, in response to insulin signaling, osteoblasts secret osteocalcin, which stimulates pancreatic insulin production and enhances insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle, adipose, and liver. Furthermore, the skeleton is not metabolically inert, but contributes to whole-body glucose utilization, consuming 20% that of skeletal muscle and 50% that of white adipose tissue. Without insulin signaling or without osteocalcin activity, experimental animals become hyperglycemic and insulin resistant. Currently, it is not known if insulin-stimulated, endothelium-mediated blood flow to bone plays a role in the development of whole body metabolic insulin resistance. We hypothesize that it is a key, early event. Microvascular dysfunction is a

  18. Association of fasting glucagon and proinsulin concentrations with insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrannini, E; Muscelli, E; Natali, A

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Hyperproinsulinaemia and relative hyperglucagonaemia are features of type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that raised fasting glucagon and proinsulin concentrations may be associated with insulin resistance (IR) in non-diabetic individuals. METHODS: We measured IR [by a euglycaemic......-hyperinsulinaemic (240 pmol min(-1) m(-2)) clamp technique] in 1,296 non-diabetic (on a 75 g OGTT) individuals [716 women and 579 men, mean age 44 years, BMI 26 kg/m(2) (range 18-44 kg/m(2))] recruited at 19 centres in 14 European countries. IR was related to fasting proinsulin or pancreatic glucagon concentrations......, controlling for known determinants of insulin sensitivity (i.e. sex, age, BMI and glucose tolerance) as well as factors potentially affecting glucagon and proinsulin (i.e. fasting plasma glucose and C-peptide concentrations), glucagon and proinsulin were still positively associated, and adiponectin...

  19. Temporal Relationship Between Hyperuricemia and Insulin Resistance and Its Impact on Future Risk of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tianshu; Lan, Li; Qu, Rongge; Xu, Qian; Jiang, Ruyue; Na, Lixin; Sun, Changhao

    2017-10-01

    Although hyperuricemia and insulin resistance significantly correlated, their temporal sequence and how the sequence influence on future risk of hypertension are largely unknown. This study assessed temporal relationship between uric acid and insulin resistance and its impact on future risk of hypertension by examining a longitudinal cohort including 8543 subjects aged 20 to 74 years from China, with an average follow-up of 5.3 years. Measurements of fasting uric acid, as well as fasting and 2-hour serum glucose and insulin, were obtained at baseline and follow-up. Indicators of hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance were calculated. Cross-lagged panel and mediation analysis were used to examine the temporal relationship between uric acid and insulin resistance and its impact on follow-up hypertension. After adjusting for covariates, the cross-lagged path coefficients ( β 1 values) from baseline uric acid to follow-up insulin resistance indices were significantly greater than path coefficients ( β 2 values) from baseline insulin resistance indices to follow-up uric acid ( β 1 =0.110 versus β 2 =0.017; P hypertensive group were significantly greater than that in the normotensive group ( P hypertension, and the mediation effect of peripheral insulin resistance was significantly greater than that of hepatic insulin resistance (31.3% versus 13.2%; P hypertension than hepatic insulin resistance does. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Mitochondrial CoQ deficiency is a common driver of mitochondrial oxidants and insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazakerley, Daniel J; Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Pengyi; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Thomas, Kristen C; Krycer, James R; Humphrey, Sean J; Parker, Benjamin L; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Meoli, Christopher C; Hoffman, Nolan J; Diskin, Ciana; Burchfield, James G; Cowley, Mark J; Kaplan, Warren; Modrusan, Zora; Kolumam, Ganesh; Yang, Jean YH; Chen, Daniel L; Samocha-Bonet, Dorit; Greenfield, Jerry R; Hoehn, Kyle L

    2018-01-01

    Insulin resistance in muscle, adipocytes and liver is a gateway to a number of metabolic diseases. Here, we show a selective deficiency in mitochondrial coenzyme Q (CoQ) in insulin-resistant adipose and muscle tissue. This defect was observed in a range of in vitro insulin resistance models and adipose tissue from insulin-resistant humans and was concomitant with lower expression of mevalonate/CoQ biosynthesis pathway proteins in most models. Pharmacologic or genetic manipulations that decreased mitochondrial CoQ triggered mitochondrial oxidants and insulin resistance while CoQ supplementation in either insulin-resistant cell models or mice restored normal insulin sensitivity. Specifically, lowering of mitochondrial CoQ caused insulin resistance in adipocytes as a result of increased superoxide/hydrogen peroxide production via complex II. These data suggest that mitochondrial CoQ is a proximal driver of mitochondrial oxidants and insulin resistance, and that mechanisms that restore mitochondrial CoQ may be effective therapeutic targets for treating insulin resistance. PMID:29402381

  1. Rac1 Signaling Is Required for Insulin-Stimulated Glucose Uptake and Is Dysregulated in Insulin-Resistant Murine and Human Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas E.; Kleinert, Maximilian; Højlund, Kurt; Kiens, Bente; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Prats, Clara; Schjerling, Peter; Richter, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton–regulating GTPase Rac1 is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in cultured muscle cells. However, involvement of Rac1 and its downstream signaling in glucose transport in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant mature skeletal muscle has not previously been investigated. We hypothesized that Rac1 and its downstream target, p21-activated kinase (PAK), are regulators of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse and human skeletal muscle and are dysregulated in insulin-resistant states. Muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout (KO) mice and pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 were used to determine whether Rac1 regulates insulin-stimulated glucose transport in mature skeletal muscle. Furthermore, Rac1 and PAK1 expression and signaling were investigated in muscle of insulin-resistant mice and humans. Inhibition and KO of Rac1 decreased insulin-stimulated glucose transport in mouse soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles ex vivo. Rac1 KO mice showed decreased insulin and glucose tolerance and trended toward higher plasma insulin concentrations after intraperitoneal glucose injection. Rac1 protein expression and insulin-stimulated PAKThr423 phosphorylation were decreased in muscles of high fat–fed mice. In humans, insulin-stimulated PAK activation was decreased in both acute insulin-resistant (intralipid infusion) and chronic insulin-resistant states (obesity and diabetes). These findings show that Rac1 is a regulator of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and a novel candidate involved in skeletal muscle insulin resistance. PMID:23423567

  2. Exogenous thyroxine improves glucose intolerance in insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Anaya, Guillermo; Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2017-03-01

    Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are associated with glucose intolerance, calling into question the contribution of thyroid hormones (TH) on glucose regulation. TH analogues and derivatives may be effective treatment options for glucose intolerance and insulin resistance (IR), but their potential glucoregulatory effects during conditions of impaired metabolism are not well described. To assess the effects of thyroxine (T4) on glucose intolerance in a model of insulin resistance, an oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) was performed on three groups of rats (n = 8): (1) lean, Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO), (2) obese, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) and (3) OLETF + T4 (8.0 µg/100 g BM/day × 5 weeks). T4 attenuated glucose intolerance by 15% and decreased IR index (IRI) by 34% in T4-treated OLETF compared to untreated OLETF despite a 31% decrease in muscle Glut4 mRNA expression. T4 increased the mRNA expressions of muscle monocarboxylate transporter 10 (Mct10), deiodinase type 2 (Di2), sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2) by 1.8-, 2.2-, 2.7- and 1.4-fold, respectively, compared to OLETF. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin receptor were not significantly altered suggesting that the improvements in glucose intolerance and IR were independent of enhanced insulin-mediated signaling. The results suggest that T4 treatment increased the influx of T4 in skeletal muscle and, with an increase of DI2, increased the availability of the biologically active T3 to upregulate key factors such SIRT1 and UCP2 involved in cellular metabolism and glucose homeostasis. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Differential insulin and steroidogenic signaling in insulin resistant and non-insulin resistant human luteinized granulosa cells-A study in PCOS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belani, Muskaan; Deo, Abhilash; Shah, Preeti; Banker, Manish; Singal, Pawan; Gupta, Sarita

    2018-04-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the significant aberrations in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), however is only observed in 70%-80% of obese PCOS and 20%-25% of lean PCOS. Hyperinsulinemia accompanies PCOS-IR along with hyperandrogenemia against normal insulin and androgen levels in PCOS-non insulin resistance (NIR). This could possibly be due to defects in the downstream signaling pathways. The study thus aims to unravel insulin and steroidogenic signaling pathways in luteinized granulosa cells isolated from PCOS-IR and NIR vs matched controls. Luteinized granulosa cells from 30 controls and 39 PCOS were classified for IR based on a novel method of down regulation of protein expression of insulin receptor-β (INSR- β) as shown in our previous paper. We evaluated expression of molecules involved in insulin, steroidogenic signaling and lipid metabolism in luteinized granulosa cells followed by analysis of estradiol, progesterone and testosterone in follicular fluid. Protein expression of INSR- β, pIRS (ser 307), PI(3)K, PKC-ζ, pAkt, ERK1/2, pP38MAPK and gene expression of IGF showed differential expression in the two groups. Increased protein expression of PPAR-γ was accompanied by up regulation in SREBP1c, FAS, CPT-1 and ACC-1 genes in PCOS-IR group. Expression of StAR, CYP19A1, 17 β- HSD and 3 β- HSD demonstrated significant decrease along with increase in CYP11A1, FSH-R and LH-R in both the groups. Follicular fluid testosterone increased and progesterone decreased in PCOS-IR group. This study shows how candidate molecules that were differentially expressed, aid in designing targeted therapy against the two phenotypes of PCOS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A high-sugar diet produces obesity and insulin resistance in wild-type Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Palanker Musselman

    2011-11-01

    Insulin-resistant, ‘type 2’ diabetes (T2D results from a complex interplay between genes and environment. In particular, both caloric excess and obesity are strongly associated with T2D across many genetic backgrounds. To gain insights into how dietary excess affects insulin resistance, we studied the simple model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Larvae reared on a high-sugar diet were hyperglycemic, insulin resistant and accumulated fat – hallmarks of T2D – compared with those reared on control diets. Excess dietary sugars, but not fats or proteins, elicited insulin-resistant phenotypes. Expression of genes involved in lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis and β-oxidation was upregulated in high-sugar-fed larvae, as were FOXO targets, consistent with known mechanisms of insulin resistance in humans. These data establish a novel Drosophila model of diet-induced insulin resistance that bears strong similarity to the pathophysiology of T2D in humans.

  5. A short leucocyte telomere length is associated with development of insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhulst, Simon; Dalgård, Christine; Labat, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: A number of studies have shown that leucocyte telomere length (LTL) is inversely associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present longitudinal cohort study, utilising a twin design, was to assess whether shorter LTL predicts insulin resistance...... and insulin resistance over an average of 12 years were performed in a subset of the Registry consisting of 338 (184 monozygotic and 154 dizygotic) same-sex twin pairs. RESULTS: Age at baseline examination was 37.4 ± 9.6 (mean ± SD) years. Baseline insulin resistance was not associated with age......-dependent changes in LTL (attrition) over the follow-up period, whereas baseline LTL was associated with changes in insulin resistance during this period. The shorter the LTL at baseline, the more pronounced was the increase in insulin resistance over the follow-up period (p 

  6. Myoinositol and D-Chiro Inositol in Improving Insulin Resistance in Obese Male Children: Preliminary Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Mancini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoinositol and D-chiro inositol, which are inositol isomers, have been shown to possess insulin-mimetic properties and to improve insulin resistance, especially in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. However, it has not been determined if this relationship exists also in children. Based on these previous findings, we hypothesized that inositol could be effective in improving insulin sensitivity in children with insulin resistance. To evaluate this hypothesis, we administered both inositol formulations before carrying out an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in a group of obese insulin-resistant male children with high basal insulin levels and compared the values obtained with an OGTT previously conducted without inositol, in the same group, with unchanged BMI. Our results confirm that myoinositol and D-chiro inositol acutely reduce insulin increase after glucose intake mainly in children with high basal insulin level.

  7. Myoinositol and D-Chiro Inositol in Improving Insulin Resistance in Obese Male Children: Preliminary Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Mario; Andreassi, Alice; Salvioni, Michela; Pelliccione, Fiore; Mantellassi, Gianna; Banderali, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Myoinositol and D-chiro inositol, which are inositol isomers, have been shown to possess insulin-mimetic properties and to improve insulin resistance, especially in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. However, it has not been determined if this relationship exists also in children. Based on these previous findings, we hypothesized that inositol could be effective in improving insulin sensitivity in children with insulin resistance. To evaluate this hypothesis, we administered both inositol formulations before carrying out an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a group of obese insulin-resistant male children with high basal insulin levels and compared the values obtained with an OGTT previously conducted without inositol, in the same group, with unchanged BMI. Our results confirm that myoinositol and D-chiro inositol acutely reduce insulin increase after glucose intake mainly in children with high basal insulin level.

  8. A common variation of the PTEN gene is associated with peripheral insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinder-Hansen, L; Ribel-Madsen, R; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    . RESULTS: The minor G allele of PTEN rs11202614 was associated with elevated fasting plasma insulin levels and a decreased peripheral glucose disposal rate, but not with the hepatic insulin resistance index or insulin secretion measured as the first-phase insulin response and disposition index. The single...... nucleotide polymorphism was not associated with either PI3K or Akt activities. CONCLUSION: A common PTEN variation is associated with peripheral insulin resistance and subsequent risk of developing T2D. However, the association with insulin resistance is not explained by decreased proximal insulin signalling......AIM: Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) reduces insulin sensitivity by inhibiting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue (Akt) pathway. This study investigated how a common single nucleotide polymorphism near PTEN, previously associated...

  9. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure >15mmHg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% Females, 16% Blacks, BMI 28.5±4.2 Kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mmHg) as compared to high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mmHg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and HOMA were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dl, 10.8±7.3 mIU/L and 2.6±1.9) as compared to high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dl, 9.4±5.8 mIU/L and 2.1±1.4) (p salt sensitive (N=193) versus salt resistant (N=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in HOMA on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt resistant subjects (p=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in HOMA after including age, BMI, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. PMID:25185125

  10. Skeletal muscle and plasma lipidomic signatures of insulin resistance and overweight/obesity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, Katherine T; Coster, Adelle Cf; Christopher, Michael J; Chaudhuri, Rima; Xu, Aimin; Gagnon-Bartsch, Johann; Chisholm, Donald J; James, David E; Meikle, Peter J; Greenfield, Jerry R; Samocha-Bonet, Dorit

    2016-04-01

    Alterations in lipids in muscle and plasma have been documented in insulin-resistant people with obesity. Whether these lipid alterations are a reflection of insulin resistance or obesity remains unclear. Nondiabetic sedentary individuals not treated with lipid-lowering medications were studied (n = 51). Subjects with body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg/m(2) (n = 28) were stratified based on median glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp into insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant groups (above and below median, obesity/insulin-sensitive and obesity/insulin-resistant, respectively). Lean individuals (n = 23) served as a reference group. Lipidomics was performed in muscle and plasma by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Pathway analysis of gene array in muscle was performed in a subset (n = 35). In muscle, insulin resistance was characterized by higher levels of C18:0 sphingolipids, while in plasma, higher levels of diacylglycerol and cholesterol ester, and lower levels of lysophosphatidylcholine and lysoalkylphosphatidylcholine, indicated insulin resistance, irrespective of overweight/obesity. The sphingolipid metabolism gene pathway was upregulated in muscle in insulin resistance independent of obesity. An overweight/obesity lipidomic signature was only apparent in plasma, predominated by higher triacylglycerol and lower plasmalogen species. Muscle C18:0 sphingolipids may play a role in insulin resistance independent of excess adiposity. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  11. IKK-beta links inflammation to obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkan, Melek C; Hevener, Andrea L; Greten, Florian R; Maeda, Shin; Li, Zhi-Wei; Long, Jeffrey M; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Poli, Giuseppe; Olefsky, Jerrold; Karin, Michael

    2005-02-01

    Inflammation may underlie the metabolic disorders of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. IkappaB kinase beta (IKK-beta, encoded by Ikbkb) is a central coordinator of inflammatory responses through activation of NF-kappaB. To understand the role of IKK-beta in insulin resistance, we used mice lacking this enzyme in hepatocytes (Ikbkb(Deltahep)) or myeloid cells (Ikbkb(Deltamye)). Ikbkb(Deltahep) mice retain liver insulin responsiveness, but develop insulin resistance in muscle and fat in response to high fat diet, obesity or aging. In contrast, Ikbkb(Deltamye) mice retain global insulin sensitivity and are protected from insulin resistance. Thus, IKK-beta acts locally in liver and systemically in myeloid cells, where NF-kappaB activation induces inflammatory mediators that cause insulin resistance. These findings demonstrate the importance of liver cell IKK-beta in hepatic insulin resistance and the central role of myeloid cells in development of systemic insulin resistance. We suggest that inhibition of IKK-beta, especially in myeloid cells, may be used to treat insulin resistance.

  12. Role of Insulin-Stimulated Adipose Tissue Perfusion in the Development of Whole-Body Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Anna L; Meijer, Rick I; Muskiet, Marcel H A; van Raalte, Daniël H; Eringa, Etto C; Serné, Erik H

    2017-03-01

    After food ingestion, macronutrients are transported to and stored in the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. They can be subsequently used as an energy source in times of energy deprivation. Uptake of these nutrients in myocytes and adipocytes depends largely on adequate tissue perfusion. Interestingly, insulin is able to dilate skeletal muscle arterioles, which facilitates the delivery of macronutrients and insulin itself to muscle tissue. Insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle perfusion is impaired in several insulin-resistant states and is believed to contribute to impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake and consequently impaired whole-body glucose disposal. Insulin-resistant individuals also exhibit blunted postprandial adipose tissue perfusion. However, the relevance of this impairment to metabolic dysregulation is less clear. In this review, we provide an overview of adipose tissue perfusion in healthy and insulin-resistant individuals, its regulation among others by insulin, and the possible influences of impaired adipose tissue perfusion on whole-body insulin sensitivity. Finally, we propose a novel hypothesis that acute overfeeding impacts distribution of macronutrients by reducing skeletal muscle perfusion, while adipose tissue perfusion remains intact. An online visual overview is available for this article. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Central role of E3 ubiquitin ligase MG53 in insulin resistance and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ruisheng; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Fengxiang; Wu, Hong-Kun; Guo, Jiaojiao; Cao, Yongxing; Pi, Yanbin; Zhang, Xin; Jin, Li; Zhang, Mao; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Fenghua; Meng, Shaoshuai; Zhang, Xiuqin; Jiang, Ping; Cao, Chun-Mei; Xiao, Rui-Ping

    2013-02-21

    Insulin resistance is a fundamental pathogenic factor present in various metabolic disorders including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Although skeletal muscle accounts for 70-90% of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal, the mechanism underlying muscle insulin resistance is poorly understood. Here we show in mice that muscle-specific mitsugumin 53 (MG53; also called TRIM72) mediates the degradation of the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), and when upregulated, causes metabolic syndrome featuring insulin resistance, obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. MG53 expression is markedly elevated in models of insulin resistance, and MG53 overexpression suffices to trigger muscle insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome sequentially. Conversely, ablation of MG53 prevents diet-induced metabolic syndrome by preserving the insulin receptor, IRS1 and insulin signalling integrity. Mechanistically, MG53 acts as an E3 ligase targeting the insulin receptor and IRS1 for ubiquitin-dependent degradation, comprising a central mechanism controlling insulin signal strength in skeletal muscle. These findings define MG53 as a novel therapeutic target for treating metabolic disorders and associated cardiovascular complications.

  14. Direct Evidence that Myocardial Insulin Resistance following Myocardial Ischemia Contributes to Post-Ischemic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Feng; Zhao, Kun; Li, Jia; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Chengfeng; Yang, Weidong; Gao, Chao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Yan; Cui, Qin; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling; Wang, Jing; Quon, Michael J; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    A close link between heart failure (HF) and systemic insulin resistance has been well documented, whereas myocardial insulin resistance and its association with HF are inadequately investigated. This study aims to determine the role of myocardial insulin resistance in ischemic HF and its underlying mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to myocardial infarction (MI) developed progressive left ventricular dilation with dysfunction and HF at 4 wk post-MI. Of note, myocardial insulin sensitivity was decreased as early as 1 wk after MI, which was accompanied by increased production of myocardial TNF-α. Overexpression of TNF-α in heart mimicked impaired insulin signaling and cardiac dysfunction leading to HF observed after MI. Treatment of rats with a specific TNF-α inhibitor improved myocardial insulin signaling post-MI. Insulin treatment given immediately following MI suppressed myocardial TNF-α production and improved cardiac insulin sensitivity and opposed cardiac dysfunction/remodeling. Moreover, tamoxifen-induced cardiomyocyte-specific insulin receptor knockout mice exhibited aggravated post-ischemic ventricular remodeling and dysfunction compared with controls. In conclusion, MI induces myocardial insulin resistance (without systemic insulin resistance) mediated partly by ischemia-induced myocardial TNF-α overproduction and promotes the development of HF. Our findings underscore the direct and essential role of myocardial insulin signaling in protection against post-ischemic HF. PMID:26659007

  15. Triglycerides and glucose index: a useful indicator of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Gisela; Benozzi, Silvia Fabiana; Perruzza, Fernando; Pennacchiotti, Graciela Laura

    2014-12-01

    Insulin resistance assessment requires sophisticated methodology of difficult application. Therefore, different estimators for this condition have been suggested. The aim of this study was to evaluate the triglycerides and glucose (TyG) index as a marker of insulin resistance and to compare it to the triglycerides/HDL cholesterol ratio (TG/HDL-C), in subjects with and without metabolic syndrome (MS). An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted on 525 adults of a population from Bahia Blanca, Argentina, who were divided into two groups: with MS (n=89) and without MS (n=436). The discriminating capacities for MS of the TyG index, calculated as Ln (TG [mg/dL] x glucose [mg/dL]/2), and the TG/HDL-C ratio were evaluated. Pre-test probability for MS was 30%. The mean value of the TyG index was higher in the group with MS as compared to the group without MS and its correlation with the TG/HDL-C ratio was good. The cut-off values for MS in the overall population were 8.8 for the TyG index (sensitivity=79%, specificity=86%), and 2.4 for the TG/HDL-C ratio (sensitivity=88%, specificity=72%). The positive likelihood ratios and post-test probabilities for these parameters were 5.8 vs 3.1 and 72% vs 58% respectively. The cut-off point for the TyG index was 8.8 in men and 8.7 in women; the respective values for TG/C-HDL were 3.1 in men and 2.2 in women. The TyG index was a good discriminant of MS. Its simple calculation warrants its further study as an alternative marker of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Adipose inflammation: cause or consequence of obesity-related insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Haiyan Xu; Ping Jiao

    2008-01-01

    Ping Jiao, Haiyan XuHallett Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, Brown Medical School, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Obesity constitutes a critical risk factor for the development of many life threatening diseases, particularly insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adipose tissue plays an important role in regulating whole body energy homeostatsis and obesity-related insulin resistance. Inflammation has been commonly linked to insulin resistance. Recent studies demonstrated that adipose ti...

  17. Correlation between measures of insulin resistance in fasting and non-fasting blood

    OpenAIRE

    Hancox Robert J; Landhuis C Erik

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Epidemiological investigation of insulin resistance is difficult. Standard measures of insulin resistance require invasive investigations, which are impractical for large-scale studies. Surrogate measures using fasting blood samples have been developed, but even these are difficult to obtain in population-based studies. Measures of insulin resistance have not been validated in non-fasting blood samples. Our objective was to assess the correlations between fasting and non-f...

  18. Lipid induced insulin resistance affects women less than men and is not accompanied by inflammation or impaired proximal insulin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Louise D; Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Jeppesen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    AbstractObjective: We have previously shown that overnight fasted women have higher insulin stimulated whole body and leg glucose uptake despite a higher intramyocellular triacylglycerol concentration than men. Women also express higher muscle mRNA levels of proteins related to lipid metabolism...... (60%) after intralipid infusion. Hepatic glucose production was decreased during the clamp similarly in women and men irrespective of intralipid infusion. Intralipid did not impair insulin or AMPK signaling in muscle and subcutaneous fat, did not cause accumulation of muscle lipid intermediates...... ratio was decreased by intralipid. Conclusion: Intralipid infusion causes less insulin resistance of muscle glucose uptake in women than in men. This insulin resistance is not due to decreased canonical insulin signaling, accumulation of lipid intermediates, inflammation or direct inhibition of glucose...

  19. Obesity and insulin resistance in resistant hypertension: implications for the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Akhilesh; Pandya, Vishwam; Whaley-Connell, Adam

    2015-05-01

    There is recognition that the obesity epidemic contributes substantially to the increasing incidence of CKD and resistant hypertension (HTN). The mechanisms by which obesity promotes resistance are an area of active interest and intense investigation. It is thought that increases in visceral adiposity lead to a proinflammatory, pro-oxidative milieu that promote resistance to the metabolic actions of insulin. This resistance to insulin at the level of skeletal muscle tissue impairs glucose disposal/utilization through actions on the endothelium that include vascular rarefaction, reductions in vascular relaxation, and vascular remodeling. Insulin resistance derived from increased adipose tissue and obesity has system-wide implications for other tissue beds such as the kidney that affects blood pressure regulation. The additional autocrine and paracrine activities of adipose tissue contribute to inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the sympathetic nervous system that promote kidney microvascular remodeling, stiffness, and sodium (Na(+)) retention that in turn promote HTN and in the CKD patient, resistance. In this review, we will summarize the important mechanisms that link obesity to CKD as they relate to resistant HTN. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Role of intestinal flora in insulin resistance and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazigi, Amal; Gaborit, Bénédicte; Nogueira, Juan Patricio; Butiler, Maria-Elena; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2008-10-01

    Intestinal flora can be modified by diet in both humans and rodents. Excess caloric intake in obese humans and rodents promotes proliferation of the bacterial phylum Firmicutes. Bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum permit more efficient intestinal extraction of nutrients. Oral transplantation of Firmicutes flora into axenic mice is sufficient to make them obese. The translocation towards the general circulation of the lipopolysaccharides released by lysis of Gram-negative intestinal bacilli promotes systemic inflammation. This inflammation plays a role in the genesis of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in rodents. Pharmacological or dietary manipulation of intestinal flora may be a new strategy for treatment of overweight and its complications.

  1. Insulin resistance and associated factors: a cross-sectional study of bank employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaroli, Luciane Bresciani; Cattafesta, Monica; Molina, Maria Del Carmen Bisi; Zandonade, Eliana; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza

    2017-04-01

    Insulin resistance is characterized by the failure of target cells to respond to normal levels of circulating insulin, and this condition is related to cardiovascular disease. This study sought to evaluate the prevalence of insulin resistance and its association with markers of metabolic abnormalities and metabolic syndrome in bank employees. A cross-sectional study was performed on 498 working men and women aged ≥20 years old. The Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR) was used to determine the presence of insulin resistance based on cut-off values of ≤2.71 for normal insulin levels and >2.71 for insulin resistance, as established for the adult Brazilian population. It was observed that the 52 (10.4%) overweight individuals with insulin resistance were 4.97 times (95%CI 1.31-18.83) more likely to have high HOMA-IR values than the normal-weight participants; among those who were obese, the likelihood increased to 17.87 (95%CI 4.36-73.21). Individuals with large waist circumferences were 3.27 times (95%CI 1.03-10.38) more likely to develop insulin resistance than those who were within normal parameters. The HOMA-IR values differed between subjects with and without metabolic syndrome, with values of 2.83±2.5 and 1.10±0.81 (p=0.001), respectively. The levels of insulin, ultrasensitive C-reactive protein and uric acid were also associated with insulin resistance. The prevalence of insulin resistance among bank employees is high, and insulin resistance is associated with and serves as a marker of metabolic syndrome. Cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome-associated metabolic abnormalities were observed, and insulin resistance may be a risk factor in this group of professionals.

  2. Low Cardiorespiratory Fitness Is Associated with Markers of Insulin Resistance in Young, Normal Weight, Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Chantal A; Van Guilder, Gary P; Dalleck, Lance C

    2016-06-01

    Low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and its decline over time are predictors of the development of diabetes in black and Caucasian women, independent of obesity. It is unclear, however, if the adverse effect of low CRF on the risk of diabetes in Hispanic women is mediated by obesity. Our purpose was to determine the associations of CRF with markers of insulin resistance in 68 normal weight Hispanic women. Obesity indicators included body mass index (BMI), body composition by DXA, and waist circumference. CRF was measured by indirect calorimetry. A glucose tolerance test was used to measure markers of insulin resistance: homeostasis model assessment, fasting insulin, 2-hr insulin, area under the curve insulin, qualitative insulin sensitivity check, and insulin sensitivity index. Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were used to identify associations between CRF and markers of insulin resistance. Multivariate ANOVA was used to compare markers of insulin resistance over quartiles of CRF. Low CRF was significantly associated with all markers of insulin resistance (P  0.05). All markers of insulin resistance improved linearly across CRF quartiles (P diabetes risk in Hispanic women and that fat-free mass rather than overall body adiposity mediates these relationships.

  3. Effect of HCV on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance in first 5 years of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Naeema; Rashid, Amir; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Bashir, Qudsia

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effects of hepatitis C virus infection in the first 5 years on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance. The case-control study was conducted at the Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from December 2011 to November 2012, and comprised subjects recruited from a government hospital in Rawalpindi. The subjects included known cases of hepatitis C virus infection for at least 5 years, and normal healthy controls. Fasting blood samples of all the subjects were collected and analysed for serum fasting insulin and serum fasting glucose levels. Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance was calculated SPSS 11 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 30 subjects, 20(66.6%) were cases, while 10(33.3%) were controls. Serum fasting glucose mean level in cases was 89.55±9.53 compared to 84.40±9.80 in the controls (p=0.188). The mean serum fasting insulin in controls was 7.52±3.23 and 6.79±3.30 in cases (p=0.567). Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance level in controls was 1.60±0.76 and In the cases it was 1.49±0.74 (p=0.695). Peripheral insulin resistance and development of type 2 diabetes as a complication of hepatitis C virus infection was not likely at least within the first five years of infection.

  4. The effects of eight weeks of endurance training on BDNF, insulin and insulin resistance in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A zar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is one of the most important neurotrophin that it will lead to the development of metabolic syndrome. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor directly related to conditions such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's and depression. The purpose of this research was investigate effect of eight weeks endurance training on Neutrophic factor that derived from the rats' brain , Insulin and resistance to Insulin. Methods:  Statistical Society in this research consist of Male Sprague Dawley rats. Among them, 24 rats at 8 weeks of age and weight of 43/31 ± 72/280 grams were purchased from Pasteur Institute in Shiraz. Then transferred to the laboratory and randomly assigned to two experimental and control groups (endurance training. Also before the start of the study, the rats a period of one week to adapt to the new environment and the activities during the treadmill. During eight weeks the endurance exercise mice group running on treadmill machine without slope(zero percent slope with speeding 8 till 20 meter per minute and about 60 minute in each session and 3 session in a week. Control mice group during this time did not have any exercise activity. 24 hours after the last training session at the end of week the eighth, the rats sacrificed to measure the parameters studied until biochemical alterations resulting endurance investigate training effects. For analysis data, was used of independent T-test that was considered as significance level (a=0/05. Results: Analysis of the findings showed that Eight weeks of endurance training has not   significant effect on the Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in rat(p=0/011. Eight weeks endurance training leads to a significant reduction on Insulin (p=0/005 and eight weeks endurance training leads to significant reduction resistance to Insulin (p=0/001.  Discussion: Hence get conclusion that endurance training have significant effect on reduction of Insulin and don

  5. New measure of insulin sensitivity predicts cardiovascular disease better than HOMA estimated insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Venkataraman

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Accurate assessment of insulin sensitivity may better identify individuals at increased risk of cardio-metabolic diseases. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether a combination of anthropometric, biochemical and imaging measures can better estimate insulin sensitivity index (ISI and provide improved prediction of cardio-metabolic risk, in comparison to HOMA-IR. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Healthy male volunteers (96 Chinese, 80 Malay, 77 Indian, 21 to 40 years, body mass index 18-30 kg/m(2. Predicted ISI (ISI-cal was generated using 45 randomly selected Chinese through stepwise multiple linear regression, and validated in the rest using non-parametric correlation (Kendall's tau τ. In an independent longitudinal cohort, ISI-cal and HOMA-IR were compared for prediction of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD, using ROC curves. SETTING: The study was conducted in a university academic medical centre. OUTCOME MEASURES: ISI measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp, along with anthropometric measurements, biochemical assessment and imaging; incident diabetes and CVD. RESULTS: A combination of fasting insulin, serum triglycerides and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR provided the best estimate of clamp-derived ISI (adjusted R(2 0.58 versus 0.32 HOMA-IR. In an independent cohort, ROC areas under the curve were 0.77±0.02 ISI-cal versus 0.76±0.02 HOMA-IR (p>0.05 for incident diabetes, and 0.74±0.03 ISI-cal versus 0.61±0.03 HOMA-IR (p<0.001 for incident CVD. ISI-cal also had greater sensitivity than defined metabolic syndrome in predicting CVD, with a four-fold increase in the risk of CVD independent of metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Triglycerides and WHR, combined with fasting insulin levels, provide a better estimate of current insulin resistance state and improved identification of individuals with future risk of CVD, compared to HOMA-IR. This may be useful for estimating insulin sensitivity and cardio-metabolic risk in clinical and

  6. Mechanism of insulin resistance in a rat model of kidney disease and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Dion

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease is associated with homeostatic imbalances such as insulin resistance. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to these imbalances and whether they promote the development of type 2 diabetes is unknown. The effect of chronic kidney disease on insulin resistance was studied on two different rat strains. First, in a 5/6th nephrectomised Sprague-Dawley rat model of chronic kidney disease, we observed a correlation between the severity of chronic kidney disease and hyperglycemia as evaluated by serum fructosamine levels (p<0.0001. Further, glucose tolerance tests indicated an increase of 25% in glycemia in chronic kidney disease rats (p<0.0001 as compared to controls whereas insulin levels remained unchanged. We also observed modulation of glucose transporters expression in several tissues such as the liver (decrease of ≈40%, p≤0.01 and muscles (decrease of ≈29%, p≤0.05. Despite a significant reduction of ≈37% in insulin-dependent glucose uptake in the muscles of chronic kidney disease rats (p<0.0001, the development of type 2 diabetes was never observed. Second, in a rat model of metabolic syndrome (Zucker Leprfa/fa, chronic kidney disease caused a 50% increased fasting hyperglycemia (p<0.0001 and an exacerbated glycemic response (p<0.0001 during glucose challenge. Similar modulations of glucose transporters expression and glucose uptake were observed in the two models. However, 30% (p<0.05 of chronic kidney disease Zucker rats developed characteristics of type 2 diabetes. Thus, our results suggest that downregulation of GLUT4 in skeletal muscle may be associated with insulin resistance in chronic kidney disease and could lead to type 2 diabetes in predisposed animals.

  7. Nuclear Receptors Resolve Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress to Improve Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress culminating in proteotoxicity contributes to the development of insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pharmacologic interventions targeting several different nuclear receptors have emerged as potential treatments for insulin resistance. The mechanistic basis for these antidiabetic effects has primarily been attributed to multiple metabolic and inflammatory functions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the association of ER stress with insulin resistance and the role of nuclear receptors in promoting ER stress resolution and improving insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:28236381

  8. Ligature-Induced Periodontitis Increased Insulin Resistance and Triglyceride Levels in Wistar Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tanaka, Hideki; Nakai, Kumiko; Murakami, Fumiko; Morita, Toyoko; Yamazaki, Yoji; Matsuike, Rieko; Shibata, Chika; Nagasaki, Maki; Kanda, Mai; Tanabe, Natsuko; Kawato, Takayuki; Maeno, Masao

    2017-01-01

    .... Ligature-induced experimental periodontitis increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and triglyceride levels in the serum, as well as homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, based...

  9. Association of obesity and insulin resistance with asthma and aeroallergen sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husemoen, L L N; Glümer, C; Lau, C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that obesity and insulin resistance may play a role in the development of asthma and allergy. The aim of the study was to examine the association of obesity and insulin resistance with asthma and aeroallergen sensitization. METHODS: Cross-sectional population...... and aeroallergen sensitization. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was used to estimate the degree of insulin resistance. Body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and waist circumference were used as measures of obesity. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Obesity...

  10. Therapeutic targets of brain insulin resistance in sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence supports roles for brain insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) resistance and metabolic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether the underlying problem stems from a primary disorder of central nervous system (CNS) neurons and glia, or secondary effects of systemic diseases such as obesity, Type 2 diabetes, or metabolic syndrome, the end-results include impaired glucose utilization, mitochondrial dysfunction, increased oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the propagation of cascades that result in the accumulation of neurotoxic misfolded, aggregated, and ubiquitinated fibrillar proteins. This article reviews the roles of impaired insulin and IGF signaling to AD-associated neuronal loss, synaptic disconnection, tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloid-beta accumulation, and impaired energy metabolism, and discusses therapeutic strategies and lifestyle approaches that could be used to prevent, delay the onset, or reduce the severity of AD. Finally, it is critical to recognize that AD is heterogeneous and has a clinical course that fully develops over a period of several decades. Therefore, early and multi-modal preventive and treatment approaches should be regarded as essential.

  11. Emerging evidence for beneficial macrophage functions in atherosclerosis and obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbons, Timothy P; Czech, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    The discovery that obesity promotes macrophage accumulation in visceral fat led to the emergence of a new field of inquiry termed "immunometabolism". This broad field of study was founded on the premise that inflammation and the corresponding increase in macrophage number and activity was a pathologic feature of metabolic diseases. There is abundant data in both animal and human studies that supports this assertation. Established adverse effects of inflammation in visceral fat include decreased glucose and fatty acid uptake, inhibition of insulin signaling, and ectopic triglyceride accumulation. Likewise, in the atherosclerotic plaque, macrophage accumulation and activation results in plaque expansion and destabilization. Despite these facts, there is an accumulating body of evidence that macrophages also have beneficial functions in both atherosclerosis and visceral obesity. Potentially beneficial functions that are common to these different contexts include the regulation of efferocytosis, lipid buffering, and anti-inflammatory effects. Autophagy, the process by which cytoplasmic contents are delivered to the lysosome for degradation, is integral to many of these protective biologic functions. The macrophage utilizes autophagy as a molecular tool to maintain tissue integrity and homeostasis at baseline (e.g., bone growth) and in the face of ongoing metabolic insults (e.g., fasting, hypercholesterolemia, obesity). Herein, we highlight recent evidence demonstrating that abrogation of certain macrophage functions, in particular autophagy, exacerbates both atherosclerosis and obesity-induced insulin resistance. Insulin signaling through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a crucial regulatory node that links nutrient availability to macrophage autophagic flux. A more precise understanding of the metabolic substrates and triggers for macrophage autophagy may allow therapeutic manipulation of this pathway. These observations underscore the complexity of the field

  12. Endothelial Fcγ Receptor IIB Activation Blunts Insulin Delivery to Skeletal Muscle to Cause Insulin Resistance in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, Keiji; Chambliss, Ken L; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Ahmed, Mohamed; Atochin, Dmitriy N; Huang, Paul L; Shaul, Philip W; Mineo, Chieko

    2016-07-01

    Modest elevations in C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with type 2 diabetes. We previously revealed in mice that increased CRP causes insulin resistance and mice globally deficient in the CRP receptor Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) were protected from the disorder. FcγRIIB is expressed in numerous cell types including endothelium and B lymphocytes. Here we investigated how endothelial FcγRIIB influences glucose homeostasis, using mice with elevated CRP expressing or lacking endothelial FcγRIIB. Whereas increased CRP caused insulin resistance in mice expressing endothelial FcγRIIB, mice deficient in the endothelial receptor were protected. The insulin resistance with endothelial FcγRIIB activation was due to impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake caused by attenuated insulin delivery, and it was associated with blunted endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in skeletal muscle. In culture, CRP suppressed endothelial cell insulin transcytosis via FcγRIIB activation and eNOS antagonism. Furthermore, in knock-in mice harboring constitutively active eNOS, elevated CRP did not invoke insulin resistance. Collectively these findings reveal that by inhibiting eNOS, endothelial FcγRIIB activation by CRP blunts insulin delivery to skeletal muscle to cause insulin resistance. Thus, a series of mechanisms in endothelium that impairs insulin movement has been identified that may contribute to type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  13. Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. ameliorates insulin resistance in dexamethasone-treated mice by enhancing peripheral insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Jyotsana; Maurya, Ranjani; Raykhera, Rahul; Srivastava, Mahendra N; Yadav, Prem P; Tamrakar, Akhilesh K

    2014-08-01

    Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. is an important medicinal plant used traditionally as an antiemetic, antidiarrhoeal agent and blood purifier and as a medicine for a variety of ailments. This study investigated the effects of ethanolic extract of M. koenigii (MK) on diabetes-associated insulin resistance induced in mice by chronic low-dose injection of dexamethasone. Mice treated with dexamethasone exhibited hyperglycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance. Treatment with MK reduced the extent of dexamethasone-induced hyperglycaemia and decreased insulin resistance as indicated by improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation in skeletal muscle tissue. Further evaluation in clonal skeletal muscle cell lines suggested that MK increased glucose uptake in L6 skeletal muscle cells by increasing cell surface GLUT4 density via an AKT-mediated pathway. MK can ameliorate dexamethasone-induced hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance in part by increasing glucose disposal into skeletal muscle. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Association of MMP-8 with obesity, smoking and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauhio, Anneli; Färkkilä, Esa; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Åström, Pirjo; Winkelmann, Alina; Tervahartiala, Taina; Pirilä, Emma; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko; Sorsa, Timo A; Salo, Tuula

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has been recognized as a state of subclinical inflammation resulting in a loss of insulin receptors and decreased insulin sensitivity. We here studied in vivo the role of circulating matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) among young healthy twin adults. Also, in vitro analysis of the cleavage of human insulin receptor (INSR) by MMP-8 was investigated as well its inhibition by doxycycline and other MMP-8 inhibitor, Ilomastat/GM6001, which are broad-spectrum MMP inhibitors. We analysed serum MMP-8 levels by a time-resolved immunofluorometric assay in obese (n = 34), overweight (n = 76) and normal weight (n = 130) twin individuals. The effect of MMP-8 on INSR and the effects of synthetic MMP-8 inhibitors, doxycycline and Ilomastat/GM6001, were studied by SDS-PAGE. We found that in obese individuals relative to normal weight individuals, the serum MMP-8 levels and MMP-8/TIMP-1 ratio were significantly increased (P = 0·0031 and P = 0·031, respectively). Among normal weight and obese individuals, also smoking significantly increases serum MMP-8 and MMP-8/TIMP-1 ratio. In vitro, we found that INSR was degraded by MMP-8 and this was inhibited by doxycycline and Ilomastat/GM6001. Obesity associated with elevated circulating MMP-8 found among young adults may contribute to progression of insulin resistance by cleaving INSR. This INSR cleavage by MMP-8 can be inhibited by synthetic MMP-8 inhibitors such as doxycycline. In addition to obesity, also smoking independently explained increased MMP-8 levels. Our results suggest that MMP-8 is an essential mediator in systemic subclinical inflammatory response in obesity, and a potential drug target. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  15. Short-term interval training alters brain glucose metabolism in subjects with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkala, Sanna M; Johansson, Jarkko; Motiani, Kumail K; Eskelinen, Jari-Joonas; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Knuuti, Juhani; Nuutila, Pirjo; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Hannukainen, Jarna C

    2017-01-01

    Brain insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) is increased in obese and insulin resistant subjects but normalizes after weight loss along with improved whole-body insulin sensitivity. Our aim was to study whether short-term exercise training (moderate intensity continuous training (MICT) or sprint interval training (SIT)) alters substrates for brain energy metabolism in insulin resistance. Sedentary subjects ( n = 21, BMI 23.7-34.3 kg/m2, age 43-55 y) with insulin resistance were randomized into MICT ( n = 11, intensity≥60% of VO2peak) or SIT ( n = 10, all-out) groups for a two-week training intervention. Brain GU during insulin stimulation and fasting brain free fatty acid uptake (FAU) was measured using PET. At baseline, brain GU was positively associated with the fasting insulin level and negatively with the whole-body insulin sensitivity. The whole-body insulin sensitivity improved with both training modes (20%, p = 0.007), while only SIT led to an increase in aerobic capacity (5%, p = 0.03). SIT also reduced insulin-stimulated brain GU both in global cortical grey matter uptake (12%, p = 0.03) and in specific regions ( p Brain FAU remained unchanged after the training in both groups. These findings show that short-term SIT effectively decreases insulin-stimulated brain GU in sedentary subjects with insulin resistance.

  16. Insulin resistance and cognitive performance in type 2 diabetes : The Maastricht study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijselaers, Stefan L C; Sep, Simone J S; Schram, Miranda T; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Henry, Ronald M A; Verhey, Frans R J; Kroon, Abraham A; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Dagnelie, Pieter C; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Biessels, Geert Jan

    AIMS: Type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are associated with cognitive impairment. Experimental studies indicate that insulin signaling in the brain is related to cognitive performance. Here we evaluated whether insulin-related variables contribute to the variance in cognitive

  17. Carnitine acetyltransferase: A new player in skeletal muscle insulin resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Mikkelsen Berg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carnitine acetyltransferase (CRAT deficiency has previously been shown to result in muscle insulin resistance due to accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines. However, differences in the acylcarnitine profile and/or changes in gene expression and protein abundance of CRAT in myotubes obtained from obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and glucose-tolerant obese and lean controls remain unclear. The objective of the study was to examine whether myotubes from obese patients with T2DM express differences in gene expression and protein abundance of CRAT and in acylcarnitine species pre-cultured under glucose and insulin concentrations similar to those observed in healthy individuals in the over-night fasted, resting state. Primary myotubes obtained from obese persons with or without T2DM and lean controls (n=9 in each group were cultivated and harvested for LC-MS-based profiling of acylcarnitines. The mRNA expression and protein abundance of CRAT were determined by qPCR and Western Blotting, respectively. Our results suggest that the mRNA levels and protein abundance of CRAT were similar between groups. Of the 14 different acylcarnitine species measured by LC-MS, the levels of palmitoylcarnitine (C16 and octadecanoylcarnitine (C18 were slightly reduced in myotubes derived from T2DM patients (p<0.05 compared to glucose-tolerant obese and lean controls. This suggests that the CRAT function is not the major contributor to primary insulin resistance in cultured myotubes obtained from obese T2DM patients.

  18. AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK): Does This Master Regulator of Cellular Energy State Distinguish Insulin Sensitive from Insulin Resistant Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X Julia; Valentine, Rudy J; Ruderman, Neil B

    2014-06-01

    Although a correlation exists between obesity and insulin resistance, roughly 25 % of obese individuals are insulin sensitive. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor that among its many actions, integrates diverse physiological signals to restore energy balance. In addition, in many situations it also increases insulin sensitivity. In this context, AMPK activity is decreased in very obese individuals undergoing bariatric surgery who are insulin resistant compared to equally obese patients who are insulin sensitive. In this review, we will both explore what distinguishes these individuals, and evaluate the evidence that diminished AMPK is associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome-associated disorders in other circumstances.

  19. Prostaglandin E2 resistance in granulocytes from patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Tanya M; Cutler, Anya J; Kidder, Molly S; Liu, Tao; Cardet, Juan Carlos; Chhay, Heng; Feng, Chunli; Boyce, Joshua A

    2014-06-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an inflammatory condition of the respiratory tract and is characterized by overproduction of leukotrienes (LT) and large numbers of circulating granulocyte-platelet complexes. LT production can be suppressed by prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). To determine if PGE(2)-dependent control of LT production by granulocytes is dysregulated in AERD. Granulocytes from well-characterized patients with and without AERD were activated ex vivo and subjected to a range of functional and biochemical analyses. Granulocytes from subjects with AERD generated more LTB4 and cysteinyl LTs than did granulocytes from controls with aspirin-tolerant asthma and controls without asthma. When compared with controls, granulocytes from subjects with AERD had comparable levels of EP(2) protein expression and PGE(2)-mediated cAMP accumulation, yet were resistant to PGE(2)-mediated suppression of LT generation. Percentages of platelet-adherent neutrophils correlated positively with LTB4 generation and inversely with responsiveness to PGE(2)-mediated suppression of LTB(4). The PKA inhibitor H89 potentiated LTB4 generation by control granulocytes but was inactive in granulocytes from individuals with AERD and had no effect on platelet P-selectin induction. Both tonic PKA activity and levels of PKA catalytic gamma subunit protein were significantly lower in granulocytes from individuals with AERD relative to those from controls. Impaired granulocyte PKA function in AERD may lead to dysregulated control of 5-lipoxygenase activity by PGE(2), whereas adherent platelets lead to increased production of LTs, which contributes to the features of persistent respiratory tract inflammation and LT overproduction. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas tranplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, K; Karlsson, HRK; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied....... In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients may arise from a negative feedback regulation of the canonical insulin-signaling cascade from excessive serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, possibly as a consequence of immunosuppressive therapy and hyperinsulinemia....... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  1. No effect of modest selenium supplementation on insulin resistance in UK pregnant women, as assessed by plasma adiponectin concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jinyuan; Bath, Sarah C; Vanderlelie, Jessica J; Perkins, Anthony V; Redman, Christopher W G; Rayman, Margaret P

    2016-01-14

    Concern has been expressed recently that Se may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, but this has not been tested in a randomised-controlled trial (RCT) in pregnant women. We took advantage of having stored plasma samples from the Se in Pregnancy Intervention (SPRINT) RCT of Se supplementation in pregnancy to test the effect of Se supplementation on a marker of insulin resistance in UK pregnant women. Because our blood samples were not fasted, we measured plasma adiponectin concentration, a recognised marker of insulin resistance that gives valid measurements in non-fasted samples, as diurnal variability is minor and there is no noticeable effect of food intake. In SPRINT, 230 primiparous UK women were randomised to treatment with Se (60 μg/d) or placebo from 12 weeks of gestation until delivery. We hypothesised that supplementation with Se at a nutritional level would not exacerbate the fall in adiponectin concentration that occurs in normal pregnancy, indicating the lack of an adverse effect on insulin resistance. Indeed, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the change in adiponectin from 12 to 35 weeks (P=0·938), nor when the analysis was restricted to the bottom or top quartiles of baseline whole-blood Se (P=0·515 and 0·858, respectively). Cross-sectionally, adiponectin concentration was not associated with any parameter of Se status, either at 12 or 35 weeks. It is reassuring that a nutritional dose of Se had no adverse effect on the concentration of adiponectin, a biomarker of insulin resistance, in pregnant women of modest Se status.

  2. Forkhead box O-1 modulation improves endothelial insulin resistance in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Shakun; Farb, Melissa G; Ngo, Doan T M; Myers, Samantha; Puri, Vishwajeet; Hamburg, Naomi M; Carmine, Brian; Hess, Donald T; Gokce, Noyan

    2015-06-01

    Increased visceral adiposity has been closely linked to insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and cardiometabolic disease in obesity, but pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood. We sought to investigate mechanisms of vascular insulin resistance by characterizing depot-specific insulin responses and gain evidence that altered functionality of transcription factor forkhead box O-1 (FOXO-1) may play an important role in obesity-related endothelial dysfunction. We intraoperatively collected paired subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue samples from 56 severely obese (body mass index, 43 ± 7 kg/m(2)) and 14 nonobese subjects during planned surgical operations, and characterized depot-specific insulin-mediated responses using Western blot and quantitative immunofluorescence techniques. Insulin signaling via phosphorylation of FOXO-1 and consequent endothelial nitric oxide synthase stimulation was selectively impaired in the visceral compared with subcutaneous adipose tissue and endothelial cells of obese subjects. In contrast, tissue actions of insulin were preserved in nonobese individuals. Pharmacological antagonism with AS1842856 and biological silencing using small interfering RNA-mediated FOXO-1 knockdown reversed insulin resistance and restored endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation in the obese. We observed profound endothelial insulin resistance in the visceral adipose tissue of obese humans which improved with FOXO-1 inhibition. FOXO-1 modulation may represent a novel therapeutic target to diminish vascular insulin resistance. In addition, characterization of endothelial insulin resistance in the adipose microenvironment may provide clues to mechanisms of systemic disease in human obesity. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Serum acylated ghrelin is negatively correlated with the insulin resistance in the CODING study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyvand Amini

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid orexigenic peptide synthesized mainly in the stomach. Acute administration of ghrelin has been found to decrease insulin secretion. However, little data is available regarding whether ghrelin contributes to the long-term regulation of insulin resistance at the population level. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between circulating ghrelin and insulin resistance in a large population based study.A total of 2082 CODING study (Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland population: Environment and Genetics subjects were assessed. Subjects were of at least third generation Newfoundland descent, between the ages of 20 and 79 years, and had no serious metabolic, cardiovascular, or endocrine diseases. Ghrelin was measured with an Enzyme Immunoassay method. Insulin and fasting glucose were measured by Immulite 2500 autoanalyzer and Lx20 clinical chemistry analyzer, respectively. Homeostatic Model Assessment of β cell function (HOMA-β and Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR and Quantitative Insulin-sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI were used for measurement of insulin resistance.Partial correlation analyses showed a significant negative correlation between circulating ghrelin and insulin level and insulin resistance in the entire cohort and also in men and women separately. The aforementioned correlation was independent of age, percentage of trunk fat and HDL-cholesterol. According to menopausal status, only pre-menopausal women revealed negative correlations.Our results suggest that except for postmenopausal women, high circulating ghrelin level is associated with lower insulin resistance in the general population.

  4. Carbohydrates and insulin resistance in clinical nutrition: Recommendations from the ESPEN expert group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzoni, R; Deutz, N E P; Biolo, G; Bischoff, S; Boirie, Y; Cederholm, T; Cuerda, C; Delzenne, N; Leon Sanz, M; Ljungqvist, O; Muscaritoli, M; Pichard, C; Preiser, J C; Sbraccia, P; Singer, P; Tappy, L; Thorens, B; Van Gossum, A; Vettor, R; Calder, P C

    2017-04-01

    Growing evidence underscores the important role of glycemic control in health and recovery from illness. Carbohydrate ingestion in the diet or administration in nutritional support is mandatory, but carbohydrate intake can adversely affect major body organs and tissues if resulting plasma glucose becomes too high, too low, or highly variable. Plasma glucose control is especially important for patients with conditions such as diabetes or metabolic stress resulting from critical illness or surgery. These patients are particularly in need of glycemic management to help lessen glycemic variability and its negative health consequences when nutritional support is administered. Here we report on recent findings and emerging trends in the field based on an ESPEN workshop held in Venice, Italy, 8-9 November 2015. Evidence was discussed on pathophysiology, clinical impact, and nutritional recommendations for carbohydrate utilization and management in nutritional support. The main conclusions were: a) excess glucose and fructose availability may exacerbate metabolic complications in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver and can result in negative clinical impact; b) low-glycemic index and high-fiber diets, including specialty products for nutritional support, may provide metabolic and clinical benefits in individuals with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes; c) in acute conditions such as surgery and critical illness, insulin resistance and elevated circulating glucose levels have a negative impact on patient outcomes and should be prevented through nutritional and/or pharmacological intervention. In such acute settings, efforts should be implemented towards defining optimal plasma glucose targets, avoiding excessive plasma glucose variability, and optimizing glucose control relative to nutritional support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Hyperhomocysteinemia Promotes Insulin Resistance and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in PCOS Mice Through Modulating M2 Macrophage Polarization via Estrogen Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xinyu; Zhang, Bochun; Zhao, Yue; Li, Rong; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Pang, Yanli; Qiao, Jie

    2017-05-01

    It has been shown that serum homocysteine (Hcy) levels are higher in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, the specific role of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) in the development of PCOS has never been reported. Adipose tissue inflammation is featured by the infiltration of macrophages, which plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of glucose and insulin intolerance. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were treated with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and/or a high methionine diet to induce PCOS and HHcy mice models. We showed that DHEA induced a PCOS-like phenotypes, irregular estrous cycles, weight gain, abnormal sex hormone production, glucose and insulin resistance, and polycystic ovaries. HHcy further intensified the effects DHEA on the metabolic, endocrinal, hormonal, and morphological changes in PCOS-like mice. In addition, HHcy attenuated the DHEA-induced increase in serum estrogen levels in mice. Furthermore, HHcy may exacerbate the insulin resistance in PCOS-like mice, most likely through modulating the macrophage M1/M2 polarization pathways via the suppression of estrogen. Most important, our clinical data showed that there were increases in serum Hcy levels in patients with PCOS. These findings deepen our understanding of the pathological roles of HHcy in the development of PCOS and provide a promising target for PCOS therapy in clinical application. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  6. Evaluation of insulin resistance in idiopathic hirsutism compared with polycystic ovary syndrome patients and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdaran, Shokoufeh; Kiafar, Bita; Barazandeh Ahmadabadi, Fatemeh

    2016-02-01

    Hirsutism is defined as the excessive male-pattern growth of hair in women. Hirsutism is often idiopathic or the consequence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Insulin resistance is common in PCOS (especially in obese patients) but the association between insulin resistance and idiopathic hirsutism (IH) is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of insulin resistance in IH, compared with healthy individuals and patients with PCOS. The study included three groups, patients with idiopathic hirsutism, PCOS and healthy women. Each group included 30 non-obese women. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), insulin level and insulin resistance (estimated by the homeostasis model assessment [HOMA-IRIR]) were compared in the three groups. There was a significant difference between the age of the women with IH compared with two other groups. There were no significant difference in levels of serum insulin (P = 0.49, HOMA-IR (P = 0.47) and prevalence of insulin resistance (P = 0.07) in the three groups. The age-adjusted prevalence of insulin resistance was similar in the three groups. Insulin resistance was no more frequent in IH patients than in healthy control groups. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  7. Thyroid hormone potentiates insulin signaling and attenuates hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Sun, Zhongjie

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The thyroid hormone, triiodothyronine (T3) has many metabolic functions. Unexpectedly, exogenous T3 lowered blood glucose in db/db mice, a model of type 2 diabetes. Here, we have explored this finding and its possible mechanisms further. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH db/db and lean mice were treated with T3, the phosphoinositide 3- kinase (PI3-kinase) inhibitor, LY294002, plus T3, or vehicles. Blood glucose, insulin sensitivity, levels and synthesis were measured. Effects of T3 on intracellular insulin signaling were analyzed in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes with Western blotting. Knock-down of the thyroid hormone receptor α1 (TRα1) in 3T3-L1 cells was achieved with an appropriate silencing RNA (siRNA). KEY RESULTS Single injections of T3 (7 ng·g−1 i.p.) rapidly and markedly attenuated hyperglycemia. Treatment with T3 (14 ng·g−1·day−1, 18 days) dose-dependently attenuated blood glucose and increased insulin sensitivity in db/db mice. Higher doses of T3 (28 ng·g−1·day−1) reversed insulin resistance in db/db mice. T3 also increased insulin levels in plasma and the neurogenic differentiation factor (an insulin synthesis transcription factor) and insulin storage in pancreatic islets in db/db mice. These anti-diabetic effects of T3 were abolished by the PI3-kinase inhibitor (LY294002). In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, T3 enhanced insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and activation of PI3-kinase, effects blocked by siRNA for TRα1. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS T3 potentiated insulin signaling, improved insulin sensitivity, and increased insulin synthesis, which may contribute to its anti-diabetic effects. These findings may provide new approaches to the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:20883475

  8. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra, E-mail: jmartyn@partners.org [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  9. Insulin-sensitive adiposity is associated with a relatively lower risk of diabetes than insulin-resistant adiposity: the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Huijie; Sun, Dianjianyi; Li, Shengxu; Fernandez, Camilo; Harville, Emily; Bazzano, Lydia; He, Jiang; Chen, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are both closely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It is, however, not clear whether the role of obesity in the development of T2DM is dependent on insulin resistance. This study aims to assess the hypothesis that insulin-sensitive adiposity is associated with a relatively lower risk of T2DM than insulin-resistant adiposity, and the adiposity-T2DM association is modified by insulin resistance in middle-aged black and white adults. The longitudinal study cohort consisted of 1588 middle-aged normoglycemic black and white adults aged 18-44 years at baseline who were followed for 16 years on average. Overweight/obesity at baseline was defined as BMI ≥25, and insulin resistance was measured using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA). The prevalence of incident pre-diabetes and T2DM was compared between the insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant adiposity groups. The prevalence of both incident pre-diabetes and T2DM was higher in the insulin-resistant adiposity than in the insulin-sensitive adiposity group (11.5 vs. 7.5 %, p = 0.023 for pre-diabetes; 16.7 vs. 2.7 %, p BMI with pre-diabetes and T2DM significantly increased across increasing quartiles of baseline HOMA (p for trend = 0.032 for pre-diabetes and BMI, measured as regression coefficients (β), were significantly greater in insulin-resistant than in insulin-sensitive individuals (β = 0.86 vs. 0.38, p = 0.009 for difference in slopes). These findings suggest that insulin resistance amplifies the obesity-diabetes association and underscore the importance of preventing both adiposity and insulin resistance in young adults.

  10. Hepatocyte-Specific Ptpn6 Deletion Protects From Obesity-Linked Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Elaine; Charbonneau, Alexandre; Rolland, Yannève; Bellmann, Kerstin; Pao, Lily; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Beauchemin, Nicole; Marette, André

    2012-01-01

    The protein-tyrosine phosphatase Shp1 negatively regulates insulin action on glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle, but its potential role in obesity-linked insulin resistance has not been examined. To investigate the role of Shp1 in hepatic insulin resistance, we generated hepatocyte-specific Shp1 knockout mice (Ptpn6H-KO), which were subjected to extensive metabolic monitoring throughout an 8-week standard chow diet (SD) or high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. We report for the first time that Shp1 expression is upregulated in metabolic tissues of HFD-fed obese mice. When compared with their Shp1-expressing Ptpn6f/f littermates, Ptpn6H-KO mice exhibited significantly lowered fasting glycemia and heightened hepatic insulin sensitivity. After HFD feeding, Ptpn6H-KO mice developed comparable levels of obesity as Ptpn6f/f mice, but they were remarkably protected from liver insulin resistance, as revealed by euglycemic clamps and hepatic insulin signaling determinations. Although Ptpn6H-KO mice still acquired diet-induced peripheral insulin resistance, they were less hyperinsulinemic during a glucose tolerance test because of reduced insulin secretion. Ptpn6H-KO mice also exhibited increased insulin clearance in line with enhanced CC1 tyrosine phosphorylation in liver. These results show that hepatocyte Shp1 plays a critical role in the development of hepatic insulin resistance and represents a novel therapeutic target for obesity-linked diabetes. PMID:22698917

  11. Insulin resistance: mechanism and implications for carcinogenesis and hepatocellular carcinoma in NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, Luca; Mazzotti, Arianna; Moscatiello, Simona; Forlani, Gabriele; Marchesini, Giulio

    2013-12-01

    The effects of insulin resistance in human diseases are of paramount importance. Since the original proposal by the WHO indicating insulin resistance as the common substrate of the metabolic syndrome, large data are now available on its significance in cardiovascular diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer risk. We reviewed the evidence linking hyperinsulinemia to insulin resistance and ultimately to increased cancer risk. Insulin resistance, by reducing substrate flux along the PI3-K pathway, is followed by compensatory hyperinsulinemia, considered a potential stimulus for cancerogenesis along the MAP-K pathway. Adaptive mechanisms of fat storage, promoted by insulin resistance, chronically maintained in an obesiogenic environment, may lead to oxidative stress and inflammation and modify the immune responses, further increasing the carcinogenic potential. The increased cancer risk associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver may thus be fueled by hyperinsulinemia. Insulin secretagogs and insulin treatment, by raising circulating insulin levels, further increase cancer risk, whereas insulin sensitizers are associated with decreased cancer risk (all sites) and specifically decrease hepatocellular carcinoma. Likewise, drugs related to the incretin system, which are weight neutral or even reduce whole-body and hepatic fat, improve insulin sensitivity and potentially reduce the cancer risk. New diabetes treatments might thus help decrease the future burden of diabetes-associated cancer and particularly of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  12. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 regulates glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Stuart A

    2009-11-01

    Glucocorticoid excess is characterized by increased adiposity, skeletal myopathy, and insulin resistance, but the precise molecular mechanisms are unknown. Within skeletal muscle, 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) converts cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone in rodents) to active cortisol (corticosterone in rodents). We aimed to determine the mechanisms underpinning glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle and indentify how 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors improve insulin sensitivity.

  13. Go-6976 reverses hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance independently of cPKC inhibition in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Katherine A; Hegyi, Krisztina; Hannun, Yusuf A; Buse, Maria G; Sethi, Jaswinder K

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia induces insulin resistance by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. One model of hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance involves chronic preincubation of adipocytes in the presence of high glucose and low insulin concentrations. We have previously shown that the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a partial role in the development of insulin resistance in this model. Here, we demonstrate that treatment with Go-6976, a widely used "specific" inhibitor of cPKCs, alleviates hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance. However, the effects of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin and Go-6976 were not additive and only rapamycin restored impaired insulin-stimulated AKT activation. Although, PKCα, (but not -β) was abundantly expressed in these adipocytes, our studies indicate cPKCs do not play a major role in causing insulin-resistance in this model. There was no evidence of changes in the expression or phosphorylation of PKCα, and PKCα knock-down did not prevent the reduction of insulin-stimulated glucose transport. This was also consistent with lack of IRS-1 phosphorylation on Ser-24 in hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistant adipocytes. Treatment with Go-6976 did inhibit a component of the mTORC1 pathway, as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein. Raptor knock-down enhanced the effect of insulin on glucose transport in insulin resistant adipocytes. Go-6976 had the same effect in control cells, but was ineffective in cells with Raptor knock-down. Taken together these findings suggest that Go-6976 exerts its effect in alleviating hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistance independently of cPKC inhibition and may target components of the mTORC1 signaling pathway.

  14. Go-6976 Reverses Hyperglycemia-Induced Insulin Resistance Independently of cPKC Inhibition in Adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Katherine A.; Hegyi, Krisztina; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Buse, Maria G.; Sethi, Jaswinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia induces insulin resistance by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. One model of hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance involves chronic preincubation of adipocytes in the presence of high glucose and low insulin concentrations. We have previously shown that the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a partial role in the development of insulin resistance in this model. Here, we demonstrate that treatment with Go-6976, a widely used “specific” inhibitor of cPKCs, alleviates hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance. However, the effects of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin and Go-6976 were not additive and only rapamycin restored impaired insulin-stimulated AKT activation. Although, PKCα, (but not –β) was abundantly expressed in these adipocytes, our studies indicate cPKCs do not play a major role in causing insulin-resistance in this model. There was no evidence of changes in the expression or phosphorylation of PKCα, and PKCα knock-down did not prevent the reduction of insulin-stimulated glucose transport. This was also consistent with lack of IRS-1 phosphorylation on Ser-24 in hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistant adipocytes. Treatment with Go-6976 did inhibit a component of the mTORC1 pathway, as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein. Raptor knock-down enhanced the effect of insulin on glucose transport in insulin resistant adipocytes. Go-6976 had the same effect in control cells, but was ineffective in cells with Raptor knock-down. Taken together these findings suggest that Go-6976 exerts its effect in alleviating hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistance independently of cPKC inhibition and may target components of the mTORC1 signaling pathway. PMID:25330241

  15. The role of skeletal muscle insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Kitt Falk; Dufour, Sylvie; Savage, David B; Bilz, Stefan; Solomon, Gina; Yonemitsu, Shin; Cline, Gary W.; Befroy, Douglas; Zemany, Laura; Barbara B. Kahn; Papademetris, Xenophon; Rothman, Douglas L.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that insulin resistance in skeletal muscle promotes the development of atherogenic dyslipidemia, associated with the metabolic syndrome, by altering the distribution pattern of postprandial energy storage. Following ingestion of two high carbohydrate mixed meals, net muscle glycogen synthesis was reduced by ≈60% in young, lean, insulin-resistant subjects compared with a similar cohort of age–weight–body mass index–activity-matched, insulin-sensitive, control subject...

  16. A Comparison Between Job Stress and Insulin Resistance Among the Hospital Medical Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Zareian; Ghasemi; Abtahi,; Behzadi

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the important risk factors for insulin resistance is stress and a major source of stress is job stress. Objectives The current study aimed to determine the relationship between job stress score and insulin resistance among medical staff of the Imam Reza hospital, Tehran, Iran Methods The current descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 97 medical staff o...

  17. Insulin Resistance Is Not Conserved in Myotubes Established from Women with PCOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette; Pørneki, Ann Dorte; Skov, Vibe

    2010-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder among premenopausal women, who often develop insulin resistance. We tested the hypothesis that insulin resistance in skeletal muscle of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an intrinsic defect, by investigating...... the metabolic characteristics and gene expression of in vitro differentiated myotubes established from well characterized PCOS subjects....

  18. Effects of sex steroids on components of the insulin resistance syndrome in transsexual subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, Jolanda M H; Giltay, Erik J; Teerlink, Tom; Scheffer, Peter G; Asscheman, Henk; Seidell, Jacob C; Gooren, Louis J G

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Sex differences are found in most components of the insulin resistance syndrome and the associated cardiovascular risk profile. These differences are attributed to sex-specific sex steroid profiles, but the effects of sex steroids on the individual components of the insulin resistance

  19. Effects of sex steroids on components of the insulin resistance syndrome in transsexual subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, J.M.H.; Giltay, E.J.; Teerlink, T.; Scheffer, P.G.; Asscheman, H.; Seidell, J.C.; Gooren, L.J.G.

    2003-01-01

    objective Sex differences are found in most components of the insulin resistance syndrome and the associated cardiovascular risk profile. These differences are attributed to sex-specific sex steroid profiles, but the effects of sex steroids on the individual components of the insulin resistance

  20. Prolonged Fasting Identifies Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dysfunction as Consequence Rather Than Cause of Human Insulin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeks, J.; Herpen, N.A.; Mensink, M.R.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Beurden, van D.; Hesselink, M.K.C.; Schrauwen, P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, but it is debated whether this is a primary factor in the pathogenesis of the disease. To test the concept that mitochondrial dysfunction is secondary to the development of insulin resistance, we

  1. Role of lipotoxicity in insulin resistance in subtotally nephrectomized mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Koppe

    2012-06-01

    In subtotally nephrectomized mouse model we showed an ectopic intramuscular and intrahepatic lipid redistribution concomitant with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance and lipotoxicity may represent the missing links (beyond the classical cardiovascular risk factors that may help explain the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in CKD.

  2. Insulin resistance and the risk of stroke and stroke subtypes in the nondiabetic elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G. Wieberdink (Renske); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); A. Hofman (Albert); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); M.A. Ikram (Arfan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractInsulin resistance, which plays a key role in the development of diabetes mellitus, is a putative modifiable risk factor for stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate if markers of insulin resistance were associated with risk of stroke in the general elderly population. This study

  3. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  4. Particulate Air pollution mediated effects on insulin resistance in mice are independent of CCR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuiqing; Xu, Xiaohua; Bai, Yuntao; Zhong, Jixin; Wang, Aixia; Sun, Lixian; Kong, Liya; Ying, Zhekang; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2017-03-03

    Chronic exposure to fine ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) induces insulin resistance. CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) appears to be essential in diet-induced insulin resistance implicating an important role for systemic cellular inflammation in the process. We have previously suggested that CCR2 is important in PM2.5 exposure-mediated inflammation leading to insulin resistance under high fat diet situation. The present study assessed the importance of CCR2 in PM2.5 exposure-induced insulin resistance in the context of normal diet. C57BL/6 and CCR2(-/-) mice were subjected to exposure to concentrated ambient PM2.5 or filtered air for 6 months. In C57BL/6 mice, concentrated ambient PM2.5 exposure induced whole-body insulin resistance, macrophage infiltration into the adipose tissue, and upregulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in the liver. While CCR2 deficiency reduced adipose macrophage content in the PM2.5-exposed animals, it did not improve systemic insulin resistance. This lack of improvement in insulin resistance was paralleled by increased hepatic expression of genes in PEPCK and inflammation. CCR2 deletion failed to attenuate PM2.5 exposure-induced insulin resistance in mice fed on normal diet. The present study indicates that PM2.5 may dysregulate glucose metabolism directly without exerting proinflammatory effects.

  5. Apple polyphenol extract improves insulin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo in animal models of insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Manzano, Manuel; Giron, Mar?a D; Vilchez, Jos? D.; Sevillano, Natalia; El-Azem, Nuri; Rueda, Ricardo; Salto, Rafael; Lopez-Pedrosa, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Apple polyphenols could represent a novel nutritional approach in the management and control of blood glucose, especially in type 2 diabetics. The aim of this study was to test the therapeutic potential of an apple polyphenol extract (APE) in an insulin-resistant rat model and to determine the molecular basis of insulin sensitivity action in skeletal muscle cells. Methods Acute effect of APE on the postprandial hyperglycemic response was assayed in 15?week old obese Zucker rats (OZ...

  6. Acute Aerobic Exercise and Plasma Levels of Orexin A, Insulin, Glucose, and Insulin Resistance in Males With Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The endocrine system disruptions are the main factors in metabolic disorders which are due to lifestyle changes, obesity, and aging. Insulin resistance is impaired glucose homeostasis in the presence of insulin and is related to many diseases such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of acute aerobic exercise on plasma levels of orexin A, insulin, glucose, and insulin resistance in males with type 2 diabetes. Patients and Methods Twenty subjects (mean age = 45.40 ± 5.42 years, mean weight = 80.91 ± 6.35 kg, body mass index = 25.41 ± 2.76 kg/m2 were randomly assigned into control and experimental groups, involving 10 people in each group. The exercise protocol consisted of one session of acute aerobic exercise on a treadmill at 60% maximal oxygen uptake and the same energy expenditure (300 kcal, which were determined by gas analyzers. Subjects were subjected to samplings before, immediately after, and 24 hours after the acute aerobic exercise. Results The analysis of findings in P ≤ 0.05 indicated that acute aerobic exercise caused a significant increase in plasma levels of orexin A and a significant decrease in plasma levels of glucose immediately after the aerobic activity, but insignificantly affected the plasma levels of insulin and insulin resistance. Conclusions It seems that in people with type 2 diabetes, acute aerobic exercise can decrease the plasma levels of glucose, possibly through increasing orexin A. In addition, negative energy balance is necessary to decrease the levels of insulin and insulin resistance during acute aerobic exercise.

  7. Metformin ameliorates high uric acid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huier; Hu, Yaqiu; Zhu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Yongneng; Luo, Chaohuan; Li, Zhi; Wen, Tengfei; Zhuang, Wanling; Zou, Jinfang; Hong, Liangli; Zhang, Xin; Hisatome, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Cheng, Jidong

    2017-03-05

    Hyperuricemia occurs together with abnormal glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle is an important organ of glucose uptake, disposal, and storage. Metformin activates adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to regulate insulin signaling and promote the translocation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), thereby stimulating glucose uptake to maintain energy balance. Our previous study showed that high uric acid (HUA) induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle tissue. However, the mechanism of metformin ameliorating UA-induced insulin resistance in muscle cells is unknown and we aimed to determine it. In this study, differentiated C2C12 cells were exposed to UA (15 mg/dl), then reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected with DCFH-DA and glucose uptake with 2-NBDG. The levels of phospho-insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1; Ser307), phospho-AKT (Ser473) and membrane GLUT4 were examined by western blot analysis. The impact of metformin on UA-induced insulin resistance was monitored by adding Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and LY294002, a PI3K/AKT inhibitor. Our data indicate that UA can increase ROS production, inhibit IRS1-AKT signaling and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and induce insulin resistance in C2C12 cells. Metformin can reverse this process by increasing intracellular glucose uptake and ameliorating UA-induced insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Insulin resistance, inflammation, and serum fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Real, José-Manuel; Broch, Montserrat; Vendrell, Joan; Ricart, Wifredo

    2003-05-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) have been involved in the development of chronic inflammatory conditions such as insulin resistance and obesity. However, the relation among insulin resistance, obesity, inflammatory activity (circulating interleukin [IL]-6) and dietary FAs has been scarcely studied in otherwise healthy subjects. We aimed to study these interactions in 123 overweight (BMI 26.9 +/- 2.4 kg/m(2) [means +/- SD]) subjects and 109 lean (BMI 21.7 +/- 1.7 kg/m(2), P gas liquid cromatography. The percentage of saturated FAs (r = 0.30, P = 0.01) and omega-6 FAs (r = -0.32, P = 0.001) were significantly associated with circulating IL-6, whereas the percentage of omega-3 FAs correlated negatively with C-reactive protein in overweight subjects (P = 0.04). Saturated-to-omega-3 and saturated-to-omega-6 FA ratios were significantly and positively associated with C-reactive protein (P < 0.0001) and IL-6 (P < 0.001), respectively. In contrast, none of these associations reached statistical significance in lean subjects. Those subjects in the most insulin-sensitive quintile (homeostasis model assessment value) showed a significantly higher percentage of linoleic acid (C18:2 varpi6) (P = 0.03) and a significantly lower level of araquidic (C20:0) (P = 0.04), behenic (C22:0) (P = 0.009), lignoceric (C24:0) (P = 0.02), and nervonic (C24:1 varpi9) (P = 0.001) FAs than the remaining subjects. In parallel, the most insulin-sensitive subjects showed significantly decreased C-reactive protein (P = 0.03). Serum C-reactive protein was significantly associated with percent linoleic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in nonsmoking men (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively) and with docosahexaenoic acid in nonsmoking women (r = -0.46, P < 0.0001). We constructed a multivariant regression analysis to predict circulating IL-6. Age, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), smoking status, and the relation of saturated to omega-6 or saturated to omega-3 FAs were considered as independent variables separately in men

  9. Body trunk fat and insulin resistance in post-pubertal obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Caroline dos Santos

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Insulin resistance is a metabolic disorder commonly associated with excess body fat accumulation that may increase chronic disease risk. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between body composition and insulin resistance among obese adolescents. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study, at the Adolescence Center, Pediatric Department, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Body composition was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Dietary intake was evaluated using a three-day dietary record. The biochemical evaluation comprised glucose, insulin, serum lipid, leptin and ghrelin measurements. Insulin resistance was calculated by means of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. RESULTS: Forty-nine post-pubertal obese adolescents participated in the study: 12 boys and 37 girls of mean age 16.6 (1.4 years and mean body mass index (BMI of 35.0 (3.9 kg/m². The mean glucose, insulin and HOMA values were 90.3 (6.4 mg/dl, 16.6 (8.1 µIU/ml and 3.7 (1.9, respectively. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance were observed in 40.2% and 57.1% of the subjects, respectively. Adolescents with insulin resistance had higher BMI and body trunk fat. There was a trend towards higher leptin concentration in obese individuals with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance was positively correlated with body trunk fat, BMI, body fat mass (kg, leptin and body fat percentage. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between HOMA-IR and lean body mass. The body composition predicted 30% of the HOMA-IR levels, according to linear regression models. CONCLUSION: Body trunk fat was significantly associated with insulin resistance, demonstrating the clinical importance of abdominal obesity during adolescence.

  10. An Immunomodulatory Device Improves Insulin Resistance in Obese Porcine Model of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westover, Angela J; Johnston, Kimberly A; Buffington, Deborah A; Humes, H David

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with tissue inflammation which is a crucial etiology of insulin resistance. This inflammation centers around circulating monocytes which form proinflammatory adipose tissue macrophages (ATM). Specific approaches targeting monocytes/ATM may improve insulin resistance without the adverse side effects of generalized immunosuppression. In this regard, a biomimetic membrane leukocyte processing device, called the selective cytopheretic device (SCD), was evaluated in an Ossabaw miniature swine model of insulin resistance with metabolic syndrome. Treatment with the SCD in this porcine model demonstrated a decline in circulating neutrophil activation parameters and monocyte counts. These changes were associated with improvements in insulin resistance as determined with intravenous glucose tolerance testing. These improvements were also reflected in lowering of homeostatic model assessment- (HOMA-) insulin resistant (IR) scores for up to 2 weeks after SCD therapy. These results allow for the planning of first-in-man studies in obese type 2 diabetic patients.

  11. Obese children and adolescents have elevated nighttime blood pressure independent of insulin resistance and arterial stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Kristian N; Olsen, Michael H; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance has been related to elevated blood pressure (BP) in obese children and may adversely affect the vasculature by arterial stiffening. The objective was to investigate whether daytime and nighttime BP were elevated and related to insulin resistance and arterial stiffness...... in obese children and adolescents. METHODS: Ninety-two obese patients aged 10-18 years were compared with 49 healthy control individuals. Insulin resistance was measured as the homeostatic assessment model (HOMA), and arterial stiffness was measured as carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). RESULTS...... analyses, the higher nighttime BP in the obese group was independent of logHOMA and cfPWV. CONCLUSIONS: Obese children had a higher nighttime BP when compared with the control group independently of insulin resistance and arterial stiffness. No relationship was found between insulin resistance and arterial...

  12. Vascular Endothelial Regulation of Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide epidemic that predisposes individuals to metabolic complications, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, all of which are related to an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure. Identification of the pathogenic molecular mechanisms and effective therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. A well-accepted paradigm is that crosstalk between organs/tissues contributes to diseases. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes metabolic disorders and the related vascular complications. Over the past two decades, overwhelming studies have focused on mechanisms that lead to endothelial dysfunction. New investigations, however, have begun to appreciate the opposite direction of the crosstalk: endothelial regulation of metabolism, although the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This review summarizes the evidence that supports the concept of endothelial regulation of obesity and the associated insulin resistance in fat, liver, and skeletal muscles, the classic targets of insulin. Outstanding questions and future research directions are highlighted. Identification of the mechanisms of vascular endothelial regulation of metabolism may offer strategies for prevention and treatment of obesity and the related metabolic complications.

  13. Insulin Resistance in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Tser Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome and its components are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD development. Insulin resistance (IR plays a central role in the metabolic syndrome and is associated with increased risk for CKD in nondiabetic patients. IR is common in patients with mild-to-moderate stage CKD, even when the glomerular filtration rate is within the normal range. IR, along with oxidative stress and inflammation, also promotes kidney disease. In patients with end stage renal disease, IR is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and is linked to protein energy wasting and malnutrition. Systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, elevated serum adipokines and fetuin-A, metabolic acidosis, vitamin D deficiency, depressed serum erythropoietin, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and suppressors of cytokine signaling all cause IR by suppressing insulin receptor-PI3K-Akt pathways in CKD. In addition to adequate renal replacement therapy and correction of uremia-associated factors, thiazolidinedione, ghrelin, protein restriction, and keto-acid supplementation are therapeutic options. Weight control, reduced daily prednisolone dosage, and the use of cyclosporin decrease the risk of developing new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation. Improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying IR in CKD may lead to more effective therapeutic strategies to reduce uremia-associated morbidity and mortality.

  14. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... medicines. You can do it. Back to Top Insulin Safety Tips Never drink insulin. Do not share ...

  15. No exacerbation of knee joint pain and effusion following preoperative progressive resistance training in patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoffer, Birgit; Dalgas, Ulrik; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative progressive resistance training (PRT) is controversial in patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), because of the concern that it may exacerbate knee joint pain and effusion. OBJECTIVE: To examine if preoperative PRT initiated 5 weeks prior to TKA would 1...... were scheduled for TKA due to osteoarthritis and assigned for the intervention group. METHODS: Patients underwent unilateral PRT (3 sessions/week). Exercise loading was 12 repetition maximum (RM) with progression towards 8RM. The training program consisted of 6 exercises performed unilaterally. MAIN...... the training period was found (p=.21). Training load generally increased and maximal muscle strength improved; unilateral leg press: 18%±30 (p=.03), knee extension: 81%±156 (pPRT of the affected leg initiated shortly before TKA does not exacerbate knee...

  16. Habitual shortened sleep and insulin resistance: an independent relationship in obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Alice; Kushida, Clete A; Reaven, Gerald M

    2013-11-01

    Short sleep duration has been reported to be associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and pre-diabetes. Since excess weight, glucose abnormalities, and insulin resistance tend to cluster, the individual role insulin resistance may have in habitual shortened sleep is unclear. The study purpose was to assess whether habitual sleep curtailment is independently related to insulin resistance in obese individuals. Non-diabetic, overweight/obese individuals from the community were stratified as insulin-resistant (n=35) or insulin-sensitive (n=21) based on steady-state plasma glucose concentrations (SSPG) during the insulin suppression test. Seventy-five gram oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Participants were asked, "On average, how many hours of sleep do you get per night?" Shortened sleep duration was defined as less than 7h of sleep per night. SSPG concentrations differed 2.5-fold (P40%); however, body mass index, waist circumference, mean fasting or 2-h post-glucola glucose concentrations were not significantly different. Insulin-resistant individuals reported (mean±SD) fewer hours of sleep than did insulin-sensitive individuals (6.53±1.1 vs. 7.24±0.9 h, Psleep duration was more prevalent among insulin-resistant as compared with insulin-sensitive individuals (60% vs. 24%, Psleep and were more likely to report shortened sleep duration as compared with similarly obese insulin-sensitive individuals. There appears to be an independent association between habitual shortened sleep and insulin resistance among obese, dysglycemic adults without diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Amelioration of Mitochondrial Dysfunction-Induced Insulin Resistance in Differentiated 3T3-L1 Adipocytes via Inhibition of NF-κB Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB signaling pathways is among the inflammatory mechanism involved in the development of insulin resistance and chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissues derived from obese animal and human subjects. Nevertheless, little is known about the roles of NF-κB pathways in regulating mitochondrial function of the adipose tissues. In the present study, we sought to investigate the direct effects of celastrol (potent NF-κB inhibitor upon mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Celastrol ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction by altering mitochondrial fusion and fission in adipocytes. The levels of oxidative DNA damage, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation were down-regulated. Further, the morphology and quantification of intracellular lipid droplets revealed the decrease of intracellular lipid accumulation with reduced lipolysis. Moreover, massive production of the pro-inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-1β (IL-1β were markedly depleted. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity was restored with the enhancement of insulin signaling pathways. This study signified that the treatments modulated towards knockdown of NF-κB transcription factor may counteract these metabolic insults exacerbated in our model of synergy between mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. These results demonstrate for the first time that NF-κB inhibition modulates mitochondrial dysfunction induced insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  18. Glucose-induced insulin resistance of skeletal-muscle glucose transport and uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Hansen, B F; Hansen, S A

    1988-01-01

    , impairment of insulin action on muscle glucose transport and uptake. Thus maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake at 12 mM-glucose decreased from 34.8 +/- 1.9 to 11.5 +/- 1.1 mumol/h per g (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 10) during 5 h perfusion. This decrease in glucose uptake was accompanied by a similar change...... in the presence of glucose and insulin. The data indicate that exposure to a moderately increased glucose concentration (12 mM) leads to rapidly developing resistance of skeletal-muscle glucose transport and uptake to maximal insulin stimulation. The effect of glucose is enhanced by simultaneous insulin exposure......, whereas exposure for 5 h to insulin itself does not cause measurable resistance to maximal insulin stimulation....

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Amy; Mansfield, Joan

    2005-09-01

    PCOS is a complex syndrome that includes clinical and biochemical evidence of hyperandrogenism and hyperinsulinism. Adolescents with PCOS are affected by the diagnosis with both short-term and long-term consequences. Adolescents with PCOS report lower self-esteem and quality of life, based on standard assessments, when compared with age matched peers. These young women also are concerned about future fertility, which may affect psychological well being and health behaviors. In addition, patients with PCOS are at an increased risk for development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, this identified at-risk group requires rigorous evaluation, treatment and long-term counseling and management by healthcare providers.

  20. Does Inflammation Mediate the Association Between Obesity and Insulin Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabimohazab, Razieh; Garfinkel, Amanda; Milam, Emily C; Frosch, Olivia; Mangone, Alexander; Convit, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    In adult obesity, low-grade systemic inflammation is considered an important step in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance (IR). The association between obesity and inflammation is less well established in adolescents. Here, we ascertain the importance of inflammation in IR among obese adolescents by utilizing either random forest (RF) classification or mediation analysis approaches. The inflammation balance score, composed of eight pro- and anti-inflammatory makers, as well as most of the individual inflammatory markers differed significantly between lean and overweight/obese. In contrast, adiponectin was the only individual marker selected as a predictor of IR by RF, and the balance score only revealed a medium-to-low importance score. Neither adiponectin nor the inflammation balance score was found to mediate the relationship between obesity and IR. These findings do not support the premise that low-grade systemic inflammation is a key for the expression of IR in the human. Prospective longitudinal studies should confirm these findings.

  1. Insulin resistance is associated with the aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugnani, Erica; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Pasquale, Valentina; Scavini, Marina; Aleotti, Francesca; Liberati, Daniela; Di Terlizzi, Gaetano; Gandolfi, Alessandra; Petrella, Giovanna; Reni, Michele; Doglioni, Claudio; Bosi, Emanuele; Falconi, Massimo; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2016-12-01

    To study whether insulin resistance accelerates the development and/or the progression of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we hypothesized that patients with insulin resistance, compared with those without insulin resistance, show: (1) a younger age and more advanced PDAC stage at diagnosis and (2) a shorter disease-free and overall survival after PDAC diagnosis. Prospective observational study of patients admitted to a referral center for pancreatic disease. Insulin resistance was defined as a HOMA-IR value greater than the 66th percentile value of the patients included in this study. Survival was estimated according to Kaplan-Meier and by Cox regression. Of 296 patients with PDAC, 99 (33 %) met criteria for being classified as insulin resistant at diagnosis. Median follow-up time after diagnosis was 5.27 ± 0.23 years. Patients with insulin resistance received a diagnosis of PDAC at a similar age compared to patients without insulin resistance (67.1 ± 9 vs. 66.8 ± 10 years, p = 0.68), but were more likely to have a cancer stage ≥3 (23.2 vs. 14.2 %, p = 0.053) and a residual disease after surgery (R1 56.4 vs. 38 %; p = 0.007). The median overall survival was 1.3 ± 0.14 and 1.79 ± 0.11 years for the patients with and without insulin resistance, respectively (p = 0.016). Results did not change when patients with diabetes at PDAC diagnosis were excluded from the analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that insulin resistance was independently associated with overall survival. Insulin resistance is associated with the aggressiveness of PDAC.

  2. Ten-year improvement of insulin resistance and growth with recombinant human insulin-like growth factor 1 in a patient with insulin receptor mutations resulting in leprechaunism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kerdanet, M; Caron-Debarle, M; Nivot, S; Gaillot, T; Lascols, O; Fremont, B; Bonnaure-Mallet, M; Gie, S; Massart, C; Capeau, J

    2015-09-01

    Leprechaunism, a rare genetic disease resulting from mutations in two alleles of the insulin receptor gene, is characterized by severe insulin resistance, retarded growth and, usually, premature death. The ability of treatment with recombinant human insulin-like growth factor 1 (rhIGF1) to improve metabolic and clinical parameters in the long-term is still controversial. Mutations were looked for in the insulin receptor gene of a four-month-old female baby with leprechaunism. The patient's skin fibroblasts were analyzed for response to insulin and IGF1. At the clinical level, the very long-term effects of treatment with rhIGF1/rhIGFBP3 were evaluated by clinical and metabolic parameters. The patient's diagnosis was based on compound heterozygous mutations in two alleles of the insulin receptor gene, thus confirming leprechaunism. Cultured fibroblasts showed a decreased number of insulin receptors and were insulin-resistant. However, IGF1 was able to stimulate IGF1 receptor signalling, suggesting possible activation of a salvage pathway. Treatment with IGF1/IGFBP3 for 8.7 years, then IGF1 for 2 years, resulted in normalization of circulating levels of IGF1 and IGFBP3. Large daily variations in glycaemia and insulinaemia persisted, but mean glycaemia decreased. Regarding growth, the patient's BMI Z score normalized and length/height score improved. Our patient presented normal neurological development and academic achievement. The treatment was free of adverse effects. Our results provide evidence that rhIGF1 with and without rhIGFBP3 can prevent fatal outcomes, and improve growth and metabolic parameters, for more than 10 years in a patient with leprechaunism. Long-term rhIGF1 for severe insulin resistance syndrome should be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of Biochemical and Anthropometric Factors on the Presence of Insulin Resistance in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Jiménez, Emilio; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline; Montero-Alonso, Miguel A; Padez, Cristina; García-García, Carmen J; Perona, Javier S

    2016-10-01

    Insulin resistance plays a determinant role in the development of metabolic syndrome in adolescents. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of factors commonly associated with insulin resistance in a sample of adolescents. This cross-sectional study included 976 adolescents from southeast Spain. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements were performed, and insulin resistance was assessed using the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Subjects with abnormal HOMA-IR values had significantly higher body mass index (BMI), body fat content, waist circumference, and systolic blood pressure (BP) than those with normal values. Furthermore, levels of glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, homocysteine, nonesterified fatty acids, and ceruloplasmin were higher in subjects with abnormal HOMA-IR values. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed the highest odds ratio (OR) for BMI and that combinations of BMI with body fat content or systolic BP can increase the risk of insulin resistance 7-fold. Anthropometric indicators have different levels of influence on the risk of insulin resistance in adolescents, and a combination of two of these indicators is enough to increase the risk 7-fold. Since the highest OR was observed for BMI, the greatest effort should be directed to reducing this parameter in adolescents. An adequate understanding by nursing personnel of factors associated with insulin resistance is a key factor in the prevention of this pathophysiological condition and its complications in adolescents. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Hematopoietic-Derived Galectin-3 Causes Cellular and Systemic Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pingping; Liu, Shuainan; Lu, Min; Bandyopadhyay, Gautum; Oh, Dayoung; Imamura, Takeshi; Johnson, Andrew M F; Sears, Dorothy; Shen, Zhufang; Cui, Bing; Kong, Lijuan; Hou, Shaocong; Liang, Xiao; Iovino, Salvatore; Watkins, Steven M; Ying, Wei; Osborn, Olivia; Wollam, Joshua; Brenner, Martin; Olefsky, Jerrold M

    2016-11-03

    In obesity, macrophages and other immune cells accumulate in insulin target tissues, promoting a chronic inflammatory state and insulin resistance. Galectin-3 (Gal3), a lectin mainly secreted by macrophages, is elevated in both obese subjects and mice. Administration of Gal3 to mice causes insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, whereas inhibition of Gal3, through either genetic or pharmacologic loss of function, improved insulin sensitivity in obese mice. In vitro treatment with Gal3 directly enhanced macrophage chemotaxis, reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in myocytes and 3T3-L1 adipocytes and impaired insulin-mediated suppression of glucose output in primary mouse hepatocytes. Importantly, we found that Gal3 can bind directly to the insulin receptor (IR) and inhibit downstream IR signaling. These observations elucidate a novel role for Gal3 in hepatocyte, adipocyte, and myocyte insulin resistance, suggesting that Gal3 can link inflammation to decreased insulin sensitivity. Inhibition of Gal3 could be a new approach to treat insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reduction of insulinotropic properties of GLP-1 and GIP after glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Marie; Jensen, David H; Tribler, Siri

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated the insulinotropic properties of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in healthy individuals at risk of developing type 2 diabetes before and after glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance. METHODS: Nineteen healthy....... In addition, first-phase insulin responses were determined at 7 mmol/l and 15 mmol/l and second-phase insulin responses at 7 mmol/l. RESULTS: After dexamethasone treatment, all 19 participants had increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and insulin sensitivity index [M/I] values) and 2 h plasma glucose...... concentrations, while beta cell function indices generally increased according to the increased resistance. First-phase insulin responses induced by GLP-1 and GIP at 7 mmol/l and maximal beta cell secretory capacity did not differ before and after dexamethasone, while second-phase responses to 7 mmol/l and first...

  6. Analysis of In Vitro Insulin-Resistance Models and Their Physiological Relevance to In Vivo Diet-Induced Adipose Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinyui Alice Lo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Diet-induced obesity (DIO predisposes individuals to insulin resistance, and adipose tissue has a major role in the disease. Insulin resistance can be induced in cultured adipocytes by a variety of treatments, but what aspects of the in vivo responses are captured by these models remains unknown. We use global RNA sequencing to investigate changes induced by TNF-α, hypoxia, dexamethasone, high insulin, and a combination of TNF-α and hypoxia, comparing the results to the changes in white adipose tissue from DIO mice. We found that different in vitro models capture distinct features of DIO adipose insulin resistance, and a combined treatment of TNF-α and hypoxia is most able to mimic the in vivo changes. Using genome-wide DNase I hypersensitivity followed by sequencing, we further examined the transcriptional regulation of TNF-α-induced insulin resistance, and we found that C/EPBβ is a potential key regulator of adipose insulin resistance.

  7. Insulin and fiber type in the offspring of T2DM subjects with resistance training and detraining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schofield, Katherine L; Rehrer, Nancy J; Perry, Tracy L

    2012-01-01

    Effects of resistance training and detraining on glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose load, muscle fiber type, and muscular performance in the offspring of those with type 2 diabetes (familial insulin resistant (FIR)) were investigated.......Effects of resistance training and detraining on glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose load, muscle fiber type, and muscular performance in the offspring of those with type 2 diabetes (familial insulin resistant (FIR)) were investigated....

  8. Insulin resistance and inflammation are a cause of hyperglycemia after pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floh, Alejandro A; Manlhiot, Cedric; Redington, Andrew N; McCrindle, Brian W; Clarizia, Nadia A; Caldarone, Christopher A; Schwartz, Steven M

    2015-09-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery and is attributed to a state of insulin resistance. We examined the role of CPB-induced inflammation on postoperative plasma glucose, insulin, and the glucose-to-insulin ratio, which was used as a marker of insulin resistance; a decrease in the ratio reflects increased resistance. We conducted an ancillary study on a previously published randomized trial of children undergoing CPB surgery. Serial blood glucose, insulin, and cytokines were drawn after CPB and at selected intervals for up to 48 hours after surgery. The primary outcome was plasma insulin levels and glucose-to-insulin ratio. Glucose delivery and feeding status were monitored for potential modifying effects. The 299 children studied were predominantly male (55%) with a median age of 2.7 (interquartile range [IQR]: 0.5-6.5) years, and weight of 12.6 (IQR: 6.4-10.8) kg. Operations had a median Society of Thoracic Surgery-European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery complexity score of 1 (IQR: 1-2) and CPB time of 82 (IQR: 58-122) minutes. Hyperglycemia occurred in 85% of subjects; odds of hyperglycemia peaked at 6 hours after CPB. Plasma glucose was associated with increased insulin and a lower glucose-to-insulin ratio. Increased interleukin (IL)-6 concentrations were associated with increased glucose (estimate [EST]: 0.55 (±0.13) mmol/L; P insulin (EST: 1.14 (±0.12) μmol/L; P insulin ratio (EST: 0.21 (±0.03) mmol/μmol; P Hyperglycemia after pediatric CPB surgery is associated with hyperinsulinemia, which may reflect insulin resistance in some patients. Inflammation induced by CPB may play a causative role in insulin resistance. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exercise protects against diet-induced insulin resistance through downregulation of protein kinase Cβ in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoquan Rao

    Full Text Available Physical exercise is an important and effective therapy for diabetes. However, its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Protein kinase Cβ (PKCβ has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance, but the role of PKCβ in exercise-induced improvements in insulin resistance is completely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the involvement of PKCβ in exercise-attenuated insulin resistance in high-fat diet (HFD-fed mice. PKCβ(-/- and wild-type mice were fed a HFD with or without exercise training. PKC protein expression, body and tissue weight change, glucose and insulin tolerance, metabolic rate, mitochondria size and number, adipose inflammation, and AKT activation were determined to evaluate insulin sensitivity and metabolic changes after intervention. PKCβ expression decreased in both skeletal muscle and liver tissue after exercise. Exercise and PKCβ deficiency can alleviate HFD-induced insulin resistance, as evidenced by improved insulin tolerance. In addition, fat accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by HFD were also ameliorated by both exercise and PKCβ deficiency. On the other hand, exercise had little effect on PKCβ(-/- mice. Further, our data indicated improved activation of AKT, the downstream signal molecule of insulin, in skeletal muscle and liver of exercised mice, whereas PKCβ deficiency blunted the difference between sedentary and exercised mice. These results suggest that downregulation of PKCβ contributes to exercise-induced improvement of insulin resistance in HFD-fed mice.

  10. Relationship between leptin, insulin resistance, insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamer, A; Alisir Ecder, S; Akkus, Z; Kocyigit, Y; Atamer, Y; Ilhan, N; Ecder, T

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between leptin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and insulin resistance in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Levels of leptin, insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and common routine parameters were measured in 45 patients (23 males and 22 females) with CKD and 45 healthy controls matched for age, gender and body mass index. IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels were measured using a two-site immunoradiometric assay. Leptin levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A homeostasis model assessment computer-solved model was used to assess insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Levels of serum leptin, insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and HOMA-IR were significantly increased in patients with CKD compared with healthy subjects, whereas fasting blood glucose was not significantly different between the two groups. In patients with CKD, the serum leptin level was significantly correlated with IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and HOMA-IR. In conclusion, this study suggests that there is an interaction between leptin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and insulin resistance in patients with CKD.

  11. Silymarin ameliorates fructose induced insulin resistance syndrome by reducing de novo hepatic lipogenesis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Prem; Singh, Vishal; Jain, Manish; Rana, Minakshi; Khanna, Vivek; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu

    2014-03-15

    High dietary fructose causes insulin resistance syndrome (IRS), primarily due to simultaneous induction of genes involved in glucose, lipid and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The present study evaluates effect of a hepatoprotective agent, silymarin (SYM) on fructose-induced metabolic abnormalities in the rat and also assessed the associated thrombotic complications. Wistar rats were kept on high fructose (HFr) diet throughout the 12-week study duration (9 weeks of HFr feeding and subsequently 3 weeks of HFr plus SYM oral administration [once daily]). SYM treatment significantly reduced the HFr diet-induced increase expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1α/β, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1c, liver X receptor (LXR)-β, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and PPARγ genes in rat liver. SYM also reduced HFr diet mediated increase in plasma triglycerides (TG), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), uric acid, malondialdehyde (MDA), total nitrite and pro-inflammatory cytokines (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6], interferon-gamma [IFN-γ] and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]) levels. Moreover, SYM ameliorated HFr diet induced reduction in glucose utilization and endothelial dysfunction. Additionally, SYM significantly reduced platelet activation (adhesion and aggregation), prolonged ferric chloride-induced blood vessel occlusion time and protected against exacerbated myocardial ischemia reperfusion (MI-RP) injury. SYM treatment prevented HFr induced mRNA expression of hepatic PGC-1α/β and also its target transcription factors which was accompanied with recovery in insulin sensitivity and reduced propensity towards thrombotic complications and aggravated MI-RP injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Critical evaluation of adult treatment panel III criteria in identifying insulin resistance with dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Youlian; Kwon, Soonho; Shaughnessy, Sara; Wallace, Penny; Hutto, Amy; Jenkins, Alicia J; Klein, Richard L; Garvey, W Timothy

    2004-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (ATP III) in identifying insulin resistance. This study included 74 nondiabetic Caucasians who were evaluated for insulin resistance and risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome. Glucose disposal rate (GDR) was measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and was used to quantify insulin resistance. Sensitivity and specificity of ATP III criteria in detecting insulin resistance were calculated for various cutoffs of GDR. Insulin resistance was associated with increased waist circumference, fasting glucose, blood pressure, triglycerides, and decreased levels of HDL cholesterol. Only 12.2% of study subjects met ATP III criteria for metabolic syndrome, and ATP III criteria exhibited low sensitivity for detecting insulin resistance. Although high in specificities (>90%), the sensitivities of ATP III criteria ranged only between 20 and 50% when insulin resistance was defined as various GDR cutoff values below 10 to 12 mg.kg(-1).min(-1). The larger number of subjects who were insulin resistant but did not meet ATP III criteria were found to have an adverse cardiovascular disease risk profile, including higher BMI, waist circumference, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and an unfavorable lipoprotein subclass profile determined by nuclear magnetic resonance compared with insulin-sensitive individuals (i.e., increased large VLDL, increased small LDL, and decreased large HDL particle concentrations). ATP III criteria have low sensitivity for identifying insulin resistance with dyslipidemia in nondiabetic individuals who are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. More sensitive criteria should be developed for clinical assessment of metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk relevant to the metabolic syndrome.

  13. Ca(2+) mishandling and cardiac dysfunction in obesity and insulin resistance: role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Karla; Balderas-Villalobos, Jaime; Bello-Sanchez, Ma Dolores; Phillips-Farfán, Bryan; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilu; Aldana-Quintero, Hugo; Gómez-Viquez, Norma L

    2014-11-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance (IR) are strongly connected to the development of subclinical cardiac dysfunction and eventually can lead to heart failure, which is the main cause of morbidity and death in patients having these metabolic diseases. It has been considered that excessive fat tissue may play a critical role in producing systemic IR and enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This oxidative stress (OS) may elicit or exacerbate IR. On the other hand, evidence suggests that some of the cellular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of obesity and IR-related cardiomyopathy are excessive myocardial ROS production and abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that augmented ROS production may contribute to Ca(2+) mishandling by affecting the redox state of key proteins implicated in this process. In this review, we focus on the role of Ca(2+) mishandling in the development of cardiac dysfunction in obesity and IR and address the evidence suggesting that OS might also contribute to cardiac dysfunction by affecting Ca(2+) handling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Similar and Additive Effects of Ovariectomy and Diabetes on Insulin Resistance and Lipid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shady H. Tawfik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is among the leading causes of death in postmenopausal women. The disruption of ovarian function may contribute to the incidence of T2DM. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ovariectomy and T2DM on glucose and lipid homeostasis, perilipin levels in adipose tissues, as a lipolytic regulator, and levels of certain adipokines. Ovariectomized (OVX rats were used as a model for postmenopausal women. The study was performed on sham, OVX, sham diabetic, and OVX diabetic female rats. The results indicated that ovariectomy alters adipose tissue metabolism through reducing perilipin content in white adipose tissue (WAT; however it has no effect on perilipin level in brown adipose tissue (BAT. OVX diabetic females suffer from serious metabolic disturbances, suggested by exacerbation of insulin resistance in terms of disrupted lipid profile, higher HOMA-IR, hyperinsulinemia, higher leptin, and lower adiponectin concentrations. These metabolic derangements may underlie the predisposition for cardiovascular disease in women after menopause. Therefore, for efficient treatment, the menopausal status of diabetic female should be addressed, and the order of events is of great importance because ovariectomy following development of diabetes has more serious complications compared to development of diabetes as result of menopause.

  15. Insights into the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity and insulin resistance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Finucane, Orla M

    2012-11-01

    High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity has emerged as a state of chronic low-grade inflammation characterised by a progressive infiltration of immune cells, particularly macrophages, into obese adipose tissue. Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) present immense plasticity. In early obesity, M2 anti-inflammatory macrophages acquire an M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype. Pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β produced by M1 ATM exacerbate local inflammation promoting insulin resistance (IR), which consequently, can lead to type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the triggers responsible for ATM recruitment and activation are not fully understood. Adipose tissue-derived chemokines are significant players in driving ATM recruitment during obesity. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a chemokine-like inflammatory regulator, is enhanced during obesity and is directly associated with the degree of peripheral IR. This review focuses on the functional role of macrophages in obesity-induced IR and highlights the importance of the unique inflammatory cytokine MIF in propagating obesity-induced inflammation and IR. Given MIF chemotactic properties, MIF may be a primary candidate promoting ATM recruitment during obesity. Manipulating MIF inflammatory activities in obesity, using pharmacological agents or functional foods, may be therapeutically beneficial for the treatment and prevention of obesity-related metabolic diseases.

  16. Chronic TNF-a neutralization does not improve insulin resistance or endothelial function in "healthy" men with metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wascher, T.C.; Lindeman, J.H.N.; Sourij, H.; Kooistra, T.; Pacini, G.; Roden, M.

    2011-01-01

    The possible contribution of tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) to the development of obesity associated insulin resistance in humans is still controversial. Our study investigated the effect of TNF-a neutralization on insulin resistance in healthy, obese and insulin resistant men. We performed a

  17. Efficacy of 2-hour post glucose insulin levels in predicting insulin resistance in polycystic ovarian syndrome with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikee Saxena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Insulin resistance (IR is central to the pathogenesis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS, but tests for determining IR are elaborate, tedious and expensive. Aims : To evaluate if "2-hour post-glucose insulin level" is an effective indicator of IR and can aid in diagnosing IR in infertile PCOS women. Settings and Design : Observational study at infertility clinic of a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods : 50 infertile women with PCOS and 20 females with tubal/male factor infertility were evaluated for the presence of IR, as defined by the fasting/2-hour post-glucose insulin levels cutoffs of >25/>41 μU/mL, respectively. The clinical, metabolic and endocrinologic profile was determined in both the groups. Statistical Analysis : Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS (Chicago, IL, USA. Results : Body mass index, post load glucose, insulin, glucose/insulin ratio, area under curve (AUC of glucose and insulin and insulinogenic index were significantly lower in the controls as compared to the PCOS group. "2-hour post-glucose insulin levels" were elevated in 88% of PCOS individuals but were normal in all females not suffering from PCOS. These levels significantly correlated with AUC of glucose and insulin, and insulinogenic index and inversely correlated with 2-hour glucose to insulin ratio (r=0.827, 0.749 and −0.732, respectively. Conclusions : "2-hour post-glucose insulin levels" appears to be a good indicator of IR. It can be a useful tool, especially in low resource setting where a single sample can confirm the diagnosis, thus reducing cost and repeat visits.

  18. Treatment of insulin resistance by acupuncture: a review of human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bridget; Peplow, Philip V

    2016-08-01

    Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that acupuncture can correct various metabolic disorders such as hyperglycaemia, overweight, hyperphagia, hyperlipidaemia, inflammation, altered activity of the sympathetic nervous system, and insulin signalling defects, all of which contribute to the development of insulin resistance. To review human and animal studies investigating acupuncture as a treatment for insulin resistance, and to evaluate its potential to increase insulin sensitivity. PubMed was searched for relevant articles published between January 2008 and October 2015. Search terms used were 'acupuncture', 'insulin resistance', 'insulin sensitivity', and 'blood glucose'. Additional secondary sources of information included reference lists from retrieved papers and pertinent papers identified by hand searches of relevant journals not found in the database. In total, 31 articles were included in this review and comprised studies of the following insulin resistant conditions: obesity (n=9); diabetes mellitus (n=12); polycystic ovarian syndrome (n=7); skeletal muscle atrophy (n=1); ischaemic heart disease (n=1); and fatty liver disease (n=1). Of these articles, seven were human trials and 24 animal experiments. Collectively, the studies suggest that electroacupuncture (EA) at low intensity and low frequency can reduce insulin resistance and increase insulin sensitivity in a range of different insulin-resistant conditions. EA, used alone or in combination with other therapies, such as Chinese herbs or diet-exercise interventions, has the potential to be an effective treatment for insulin resistance. Additional controlled clinical studies of acupuncture are needed in subjects with diabetes mellitus, ischaemic heart disease, muscle atrophy, and fatty liver disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Silymarin induces insulin resistance through an increase of phosphatase and tensin homolog in Wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chun Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that regulates crucial cellular functions, including insulin signaling, lipid and glucose metabolism, as well as survival and apoptosis. Silymarin is the active ingredient in milk thistle and exerts numerous effects through the activation of PTEN. However, the effect of silymarin on the development of insulin resistance remains unknown. METHODS: Wistar rats fed fructose-rich chow or normal chow were administered oral silymarin to identify the development of insulin resistance using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemic- euglycemic clamping. Changes in PTEN expression in skeletal muscle and liver were compared using western blotting analysis. Further investigation was performed in L6 cells to check the expression of PTEN and insulin-related signals. PTEN deletion in L6 cells was achieved by small interfering ribonucleic acid transfection. RESULTS: Oral administration of silymarin at a dose of 200 mg/kg once daily induced insulin resistance in normal rats and enhanced insulin resistance in fructose-rich chow-fed rats. An increase of PTEN expression was observed in the skeletal muscle and liver of rats with insulin resistance. A decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt in L6 myotube cells, which was maintained in a high-glucose condition, was also observed. Treatment with silymarin aggravated high-glucose-induced insulin resistance. Deletion of PTEN in L6 cells reversed silymarin-induced impaired insulin signaling and glucose uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Silymarin has the ability to disrupt insulin signaling through increased PTEN expression. Therefore, silymarin should be used carefully in type-2 diabetic patients.

  20. The Comparison of Two Methods of Exercise (intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on Fasting Sugar, Insulin and Insulin Resistance in Women with Mellitus Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bazyar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Exercise is an important component of health and an integral approach to the management of diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on fasting sugar, insulin and insulin resistance in women with mellitus diabetes.   Methods: Fifty-two overweight female diabetic type 2 patients (aged 45-60 years old with fasting blood glucose≥ 126 mg/dl were selected to participate in the present study. Participants were assigned to intense interval training group (N=17, concurrent resistance- endurance training group (N=17 and control group (N=18. The exercises incorporated 10 weeks of concurrent resistance- endurance training and intense interval training. Fasting blood sugar, serum insulin concentrations levels were measured. Concurrent training group trained eight weeks, three times a week of endurance training at 60% of maximum heart rate (MHR and two resistance training sessions per week with 70% of one repetition maximum (1-RM. Intense interval training group trained for eight weeks, three sessions per week for 4 to 10 repeats Wingate test on the ergometer 30s performed with maximum effort. The control group did no systematic exercise. At the end of experiment 42 subjects were succeed and completed the study period, and 10 subjects were removed due to illness and absence in the exercise sessions. Fasting blood sugar and insulin levels 24 hours before and 48 hours after the last training session was measured.   Results: The findings indicated that in periodic fasting, the blood sugar in intensive training group had a marked decrease (p= 0.000 however, the fasting blood sugar of exercise and power stamina groups reduced significantly (p=0.062. The results showed no significant difference between the groups (171/0 p =0.171. Fasting insulin (p <0.001 and insulin resistance (0001/0 = p=0.001 in periodic intensive training group were

  1. [Concept Analysis for Psychological Insulin Resistance in Korean People with Diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youngshin

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the concept for psychological insulin resistance in the Korean population with diabetes. The Hybrid model was used to perform the concept analysis of psychological insulin resistance. Results from both the theoretical review with 26 studies and a field study including 19 participants with diabetes were included in final process. The preceding factors of psychological insulin resistance were uncontrolled blood glucose and change in daily life. The concept of psychological insulin resistance was found to have three categories with 8 attributes such as emotional factors (negative feeling), cognitive factors (low awareness and knowledge, low confidence for self-injection) and supportive factors (economic burden, dependency life, embarrassing, feeling about supporters, feeling of trust in, vs mistrust of health care providers). The 8 attributes included 30 indicators. The psychological insulin resistance of population with diabetes in Korea was defined as a complex phenomenon associated with insulin therapy that can be affected by emotional factors, cognitive factors, and supportive relational factors. Based on the results, a tool for measuring psychological insulin resistance of Koreans with diabetes and effective programs for enhancing insulin adherence should be developed in future studies.

  2. TAB3 involves in hepatic insulin resistance through activation of MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Tang, Zhuqi; Zhu, Xiaohui; Wang, Xueqin; Wang, Cuifang; Zhang, Wanlu; Xia, Nana; Wang, Suxin; Huang, Jieru; Cui, Shiwei

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance is often accompanied by chronic inflammatory responses. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is rapidly activated in response to many inflammatory cytokines. But the functional role of MAPKs in palmitate-induced insulin resistance has yet to be clarified. In this study, we found that transforming growth factor β-activated kinase binding protein-3 (TAB3) was up-regulated in insulin resistance. Considering the relationship between transforming growth factor β-activated kinase (TAK1) and MAPK pathway, we assumed TAB3 involved in insulin resistance through activation of MAPK pathway. To certify this hypothesis, we knocked down TAB3 in palmitate treated HepG2 cells and detected subsequent biological responses. Importantly, TAB3 siRNA directly reversed insulin sensitivity by improving insulin signal transduction. Moreover, silencing of TAB3 could facilitate hepatic glucose uptake, reverse gluconeogenesis and improve ectopic fat accumulation. Meanwhile, we found that the positive effect of knocking down TAB3 was more significant when insulin resistance occurred. All these results indicate that TAB3 acts as a negative regulator in insulin resistance through activation of MAPK pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Glucocorticoid Antagonism Reduces Insulin Resistance and Associated Lipid Abnormalities in High-Fructose-Fed Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Emayavaramban; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2017-02-01

    High intake of dietary fructose causes perturbation in lipid metabolism and provokes lipid-induced insulin resistance. A rise in glucocorticoids (GCs) has recently been suggested to be involved in fructose-induced insulin resistance. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of GC blockade on lipid abnormalities in insulin-resistant mice. Insulin resistance was induced in mice by administering a high-fructose diet (HFrD) for 60 days. Mifepristone (RU486), a GC antagonist, was administered to HFrD-fed mice for the last 18 days, and the intracellular and extracellular GC levels, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation and the expression of GC-regulated genes involved in lipid metabolism were examined. HFrD elevated the intracellular GC content in both liver and adipose tissue and enhanced the GR nuclear translocation. The plasma GC level remained unchanged. The levels of free fatty acids and triglycerides in plasma were elevated, accompanied by increased plasma insulin and glucose levels and decreased hepatic glycogen content. Treatment with RU486 reduced plasma lipid levels, tissue GC levels and the expression of GC-targeted genes involved in lipid accumulation, and it improved insulin sensitivity. This study demonstrated that HFrD-induced lipid accumulation and insulin resistance are mediated by enhanced GC in liver and adipose tissue and that GC antagonism might reduce fructose-induced lipid abnormalities and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Role of lysophosphatidic acide (LPA) in the insulin resistence of the pancreatic β-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mourad Agha, Zein

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the type-2-diabetes mellitus underlying is characterized by a combination of peripheral insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction and reduction in the β cell mass. The increasing of FFA level or their metabolites lead to inhibition of insulin signaling. Consequent, the ability of insulin is reduced and therefore lead to insulin resistance. LPA is a lipid mediator that is associated with a progression of T2D. It has been suggested that LPA and the development of obesity are st...

  5. Rosmarinic Acid Mediates Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Insulin Resistant Skeletal Muscle Through Activation of AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthy, Govindaraj; Roshana Devi, Vellai; Ilango, Kaliappan; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai

    2017-07-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA), a polyphenol, is known to improve hepatic insulin sensitivity in experimental type 2 diabetes. However, its effect on skeletal muscle insulin resistance is meagerly understood. The present study was aimed to investigate the up- and downstream mediators of the molecular targets of RA in attenuating insulin resistance in the skeletal muscle both in vivo and in vitro. We found that supplementation of RA increased the expression of key genes involved in the mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1α, SIRT-1, and TFAM via activation of AMPK in the skeletal muscle of insulin resistant rats as well as in L6 myotubes. Further, RA treatment increased the glucose uptake and decreased the phosphorylation of serine IRS-1 while increasing the translocation of GLUT 4. Together, our findings evidenced that RA treatment significantly inhibit insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells by enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1839-1848, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mechanism by which arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 ablation causes insulin resistance in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Camporez, João Paulo; Wang, Yongliang; Faarkrog, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (Nat2) gene has recently been identified as associated with insulin resistance in humans. To understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which alterations in Nat2 activity might cause insulin resistance, we...... examined murine ortholog Nat1 knockout (KO) mice. Nat1 KO mice manifested whole-body insulin resistance, which could be attributed to reduced muscle, liver, and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. Hepatic and muscle insulin resistance were associated with marked increases in both liver and muscle...... triglyceride (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) content, which was associated with increased PKCϵ activation in liver and increased PKCθ activation in skeletal muscle. Nat1 KO mice also displayed reduced whole-body energy expenditure and reduced mitochondrial oxygen consumption in white adipose tissue, brown...

  7. The "thrifty" gene encoding Ahsg/Fetuin-A meets the insulin receptor: Insights into the mechanism of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goustin, Anton-Scott; Abou-Samra, Abdul B

    2011-06-01

    Ahsg (fetuin-A) is a 55-59kDa phosphorylated glycoprotein synthesized in the adult predominantly by hepatocytes, from which it enters the circulation. When dysregulated, this glycoprotein operates to influence the clinical sequelae of insulin resistance-type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The pathological sequelae likely arise from two separable molecular "faces" of Ahsg-one acting at the level of the insulin receptor and a second face influencing ectopic biomineralization in the intima. A detailed understanding of these two functional faces of Ahsg is not yet clear for lack of structural studies. Ahsg has a physiological role in the biomineralization of bone, which when dysregulated can lead to ectopic calcification of soft tissues in the vasculature. Ahsg has a second physiological function in regulating how insulin signals through its receptor, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase. Dysregulation of this "face" of Ahsg results in morbid sequelae such as impaired glucose disposal and fatty liver. Ahsg binds to tandem fibronectin type 3 (Fn3) domains present in the 194 amino acid residue extracellular portion of the β-subunit of the insulin receptor, distant from the high-affinity pocket formed by two complementing α-subunits where insulin binds. Only two proteins are known to bind directly to the insulin receptor ectodomain - insulin and Ahsg - the former turns on the receptor's intrinsic tyrosine kinase (TK) activity, and the latter shuts it down. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies of the ectodomain of the insulin receptor now sharpen our understanding of the receptor's extracellular α-subunit and linked β-subunit. Ahsg genotype and its circulating level have been correlated with body morphometrics (obese versus lean and visceral adiposity) in epidemiological studies enrolling thousands of patients. Epidemiological studies from the clinic reveal high levels of circulating Ahsg in insulin resistance and diabetes. This review endeavors to explain how one

  8. Over-nutrition, obesity and insulin resistance in the development of β-cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepashree; Krueger, Charles B; Lastra, Guido

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) has increased dramatically over the last several decades, largely driven by equally worrisome growing rates of obesity. Chronic diabetic complications are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Key players in the pathophysiology of DM2 are insulin resistance and β cell dysfunction, which in turn is a result of both β cell functional abnormality as well as reduced β cell mass. The mechanisms implicated are multifactorial and include genetic and environmental factors related to obesity. Glucose homeostasis is critically dependent on a finely regulated balance between insulin sensitivity and output in the pancreas, and insulin resistance demands a corresponding rise in insulin output in order to maintain normal glycemia. However, this compensation is lost in individuals predisposed to DM2, resulting in overt hyperglycemia. Furthermore, insulin resistance related to excess adiposity is linked to several abnormalities which impact β cell function and viability. These include glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, increased oxidative stress, and inflammation. In addition, insulin signaling in the β cell is essential to its own functionality and viability, and obesity-related abnormalities in insulin signaling are known to induce failure of insulin secretion and hyperglycemia. Insulin resistance in the β cell arises from defects in phosphorylation/activation of insulin receptor substrates (IRS) proteins, which result in impairment in glucose sensing, glucose stimulated insulin secretion, and also in increased loss of β cells. This review intends to provide an update on the main characteristics and mechanisms that link obesity and insulin resistance to β cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of DM2. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers

  9. Akt/mTOR Role in Human Foetoplacental Vascular Insulin Resistance in Diseases of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Villalobos-Labra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is characteristic of pregnancies where the mother shows metabolic alterations, such as preeclampsia (PE and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, or abnormal maternal conditions such as pregestational maternal obesity (PGMO. Insulin signalling includes activation of insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS1/2 as well as Src homology 2 domain-containing transforming protein 1, leading to activation of 44 and 42 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinases and protein kinase B/Akt (Akt signalling cascades in the human foetoplacental vasculature. PE, GDM, and PGMO are abnormal conditions coursing with reduced insulin signalling, but the possibility of the involvement of similar cell signalling mechanisms is not addressed. This review aimed to determine whether reduced insulin signalling in PE, GDM, and PGMO shares a common mechanism in the human foetoplacental vasculature. Insulin resistance in these pathological conditions results from reduced Akt activation mainly due to inhibition of IRS1/2, likely due to the increased activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR resulting from lower activity of adenosine monophosphate kinase. Thus, a defective signalling via Akt/mTOR in response to insulin is a central and common mechanism of insulin resistance in these diseases of pregnancy. In this review, we summarise the cell signalling mechanisms behind the insulin resistance state in PE, GDM, and PGMO focused in the Akt/mTOR signalling pathway in the human foetoplacental endothelium.

  10. Effect of Sanguis draxonis (a Chinese traditional herb) on the formation of insulin resistance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhenqing; Zhang, Zhenxi; Wu, Hong

    2005-04-01

    Sanguis draxonis (SD) is a Chinese traditional herb that is prescribed for the handling of diabetic disorders. In this study, the effects of an oral administration of SD at dosages of 100, 300, and 500 mg kg(-1) once a day, respectively, on the formation of insulin resistance were investigated in vivo in two models of insulin-resistant rats, HFD rats (high-fat diet-induced insulin-resistant rats) and IILI rats (induced by the intraperitoneal injections of long-acting insulin at dosage of 0.5 U kg(-1) three times daily). The insulin resistance was indicated using the loss of tolbutamide-induced hypoglycemic activity. After the oral administration of SD (300 and 500 mg kg(-1) once a day for 7 days) to HFD rats, both plasma glucose and insulin concentration were decreased significantly, while the hypoglycemic activity of tolbutamide (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) was significantly enhanced as compared with that of the vehicle-treatment (0.9% saline solution used as vehicle to disperse SD, w/v). Moreover, the formation of insulin resistance in IILI rats had been improved significantly with SD treatment (100, 300, 500 mg kg(-1) once a day for 14 days), but the influence of SD treatment on both plasma glucose and insulin concentration was not observed. For STZ-induced diabetic rats, the action of SD (300 and 500 mg kg(-1) once a day for 14 days) showed more effective on an increase of response to the exogenous short-acting porcine insulin than that of the metformin administrated orally at dosage of 320 mg kg(-1) three times daily. The present studies suggest that an oral administration of SD can increase insulin sensitivity and improve the development of insulin resistance in rats.

  11. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Ricardo K; Brito, Gleisson A P; Coelho, Isabela; Pequitto, Danielle C T; Yamaguchi, Adriana A; Borghetti, Gina; Schiessel, Dalton Luiz; Kryczyk, Marcelo; Machado, Juliano; Rocha, Ricelli E R; Aikawa, Julia; Iagher, Fabiola; Naliwaiko, Katya; Tanhoffer, Ricardo A; Nunes, Everson A; Fernandes, Luiz Claudio

    2011-04-28

    Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (4 mg/g body weight) was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C), coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO), fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO), obese control group (Ob), coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO) and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO). Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Obese animals (Ob) presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt) showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO) similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30%) and triacylglycerol (TG; 33%) compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day) was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms.

  12. Omentin, an adipokine with insulin-sensitizing properties, is negatively associated with insulin resistance in normal gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Benny; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Hemi, Rina; Yinon, Yoav; Schiff, Eyal; Mashiach, Roy; Kanety, Hannah; Sivan, Eyal

    2015-05-01

    Omentin, a newly identified adipokine, enhances insulin mediated glucose uptake in human adipocytes, thus, inducing systemic insulin-sensitizing effect. The aims of this study were to determine whether circulating maternal omentin levels are associated with insulin resistance indices and to assess which compartment, maternal, fetal, or placental, is the source of omentin in maternal circulation. Fasting serum glucose, insulin, and omentin were determined in 25 healthy pregnant women at the third trimester, before and 3 days after elective cesarean section. Cord blood omentin was measured in the 25 term neonates. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) was used to evaluate insulin sensitivity before and after delivery. Antepartum maternal omentin levels were negatively correlated with insulin levels (r=-0.41, P=0.04) and positively correlated with insulin sensitivity (HOMA%S; r=0.4, P=0.04). Postpartum omentin levels were negatively correlated with maternal body mass index (r=-0.44, P=0.02). Median maternal omentin levels was comparable before and after delivery (57.2, inter-quartile range: 38.2-76.2 ng/mL vs. 53.4, 39.8-69.4 ng/mL, respectively, P=0.25) and highly correlated (r=0.83, P<0.001). Antepartum maternal and neonatal omentin levels did not differ significantly (fetal: 62.2, 44.3-74.2 ng/mL, P=0.77) and did not correlate (P=0.6). Circulating maternal omentin levels are correlated with insulin resistance indices, suggesting that this adipokine may play a role in metabolic adaptations of normal gestation. The strong correlation between anteparum and postpartum maternal omentin levels, as well as the lack of association between maternal and neonatal omentin levels, suggest that placental or fetal compartments are unlikely as the main source of circulating maternal omentin.

  13. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iagher Fabiola

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Methods Monosodium glutamate (MSG (4 mg/g body weight was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C, coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO, fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO, obese control group (Ob, coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO. Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Results Obese animals (Ob presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30% and triacylglycerol (TG; 33% compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Conclusions Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms.

  14. Adiponectin resistance precedes the accumulation of skeletal muscle lipids and insulin resistance in high-fat-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Kerry L; Pritchard, Janet; Ritchie, Ian; Snook, Laelie A; Chabowski, Adrian; Bonen, Arend; Wright, David; Dyck, David J

    2009-02-01

    High-fat (HF) diets can induce insulin resistance (IR) by altering skeletal muscle lipid metabolism. An imbalance between fatty acid (FA) uptake and oxidation results in intramuscular lipid accumulation, which can impair the insulin-signaling cascade. Adiponectin (Ad) is an insulin-sensitizing adipokine known to stimulate skeletal muscle FA oxidation and reduce lipid accumulation. Evidence of Ad resistance has been shown in obesity and following chronic HF feeding and may contribute to lipid accumulation observed in these conditions. Whether Ad resistance precedes and is associated with the development of IR is unknown. We conducted a time course HF feeding trial for 3 days, 2 wk, or 4 wk to determine the onset of Ad resistance and identify the ensuing changes in lipid metabolism and insulin signaling leading to IR in skeletal muscle. Ad stimulated FA oxidation (+28%, P increased, and insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of both protein kinase B and protein kinase B substrate 160 was blunted compared with control animals. After 4 wk of HF feeding, maximal insulin-stimulated glucose transport was impaired compared with control. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an early loss of Ad's stimulatory effect on FA oxidation precedes an increase in plasmalemmal FA transporters and the accumulation of intramuscular DAG and ceramide, blunted insulin signaling, and ultimately impaired maximal insulin-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle induced by HF diets.

  15. Insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in nonobese Indian patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Ganesh; Baba, Chalamalasetty Sreenivasa; Pandey, Amaresh; Kumari, Neeraj; Choudhuri, Gourdas

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been recognized as a major factor in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The association between insulin resistance and NAFLD, as a risk factor independent of obesity has been less well established. This study aims to determine presence of insulin resistance and components of metabolic syndrome in non-obese patients with NAFLD. 150 patients (mean age 42.25 _ 10.50 y; 115 (76%) male, 35 (24%) female) diagnosed with NAFLD participated in the study. We measured body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist hip ratio (WHR), fasting lipid profile, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and liver function. Insulin resistance was calculated using the homeostasis model of assessment (HOMA) formula. Insulin resistance was arbitrarily considered altered when it was >1.64. 120 (80%) of the 150 patients were pbese (BMI >23) according to the Asia Pacific criteria. 40 (30%) had metabolic syndrome. 97.5% (117/120) had insulin resistance with mean HOMA-insulin resistance (IR) of 10.9+/-5.3. Thirty (20%) were non-obese; of these, 7 had central obesity (WC > 90 cm for men, > 80 cm for women). Twenty-three (15.3%) patients were lean NAFLD with BMI 21.6+/-1.5, WC 82.9+/-4.7 (BMIinsulin resistance with mean HOMA-IR of 3.4+/-1.9. Only 4 (17%) did not have any component of metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance often associated with metabolic syndrome is common and plays a key role amongst lean Indian patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  16. Distinct gene signatures predict insulin resistance in young mice with high fat diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Katherine; Jih, Alice; Osborn, Olivia; Kavaler, Sarah T; Fu, Wenxian; Sasik, Roman; Saito, Rintaro; Kim, Jane J

    2018-01-08

    Highly inbred C57BL/6 mice show wide variation in their degree of insulin resistance in response to diet-induced obesity even though they are almost genetically identical. Here we employed transcriptional profiling by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver in young mice to determine how gene expression patterns correlate with the later development of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance in adulthood. To accomplish this goal, we partially removed and banked tissues from pubertal mice. Mice subsequently received HFD followed by metabolic phenotyping to identify two well-defined groups of mice with either severe or mild insulin resistance. The remaining tissues were collected at study termination. We then applied RNA-Seq to generate transcriptome profiles associated with worsened insulin resistance prior to and after the initiation of HFD. We found 244 up- and 109 downregulated genes in VAT of the most insulin resistant mice even prior to HFD exposure. Downregulated genes included serine protease inhibitor, major urinary protein, and complement genes; upregulated genes represented mostly muscle constituents. These gene families were also differentially expressed in VAT of mice with high or low insulin resistance after HFD. Inflammatory genes predicted insulin resistance in liver, but not in VAT. In contrast, when comparing VAT of all mice before and after HFD, differentially expressed genes were predominantly composed of immune response genes. These data show a distinct set of gene transcripts in young mice correlates with the severity of insulin resistance in adulthood, providing insight into the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in early life.

  17. The significance of impaired fasting glucose versus impaired glucose tolerance: importance of insulin secretion and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale Schianca, Gian Piero; Rossi, Antonello; Sainaghi, Pier Paolo; Maduli, Elisabetta; Bartoli, Ettore

    2003-05-01

    The American Diabetes Association recommended substituting 2hBS (glycemia at the second hour of an oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]) for fasting blood glucose (FBS) in screening for glucose intolerance. It is debated whether these tests measure the same abnormality and relate to defective insulin secretion or resistance. This study examines the diagnostic effectiveness of FBS versus 2hBS and their relationship with insulin secretion and resistance. Based on history or physical findings suggesting glucose intolerance, we enrolled 398 unselected subjects admitted to a general Internal Medicine ward. After 5 days of a weight-maintaining diet, FBS, 2hBS, and insulin were measured during OGTT. The homeostatic model assessment was used to assess beta-cell function and insulin resistance. Excluding 19 patients with diabetes (5%), we identified 284 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 22 with isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 59 with isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 14 with associated IFG/IGT. The sensitivity of FBS in predicting 2hBS was 19%, specificity 93%. Positive and negative predictive values were 39% and 83%, respectively. Insulin resistance was absent in NGT and IFG and markedly elevated in IGT and IFG/IGT, whereas defective insulin release was significant only in isolated IFG. In unselected patients, elevated FBS depends primarily on defective insulin secretion, and impaired 2hBS on insulin resistance. Because these tests measure different alterations, they are useful in combination.

  18. Insulin resistance, lipotoxicity, type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis: the missing links. The Claude Bernard Lecture 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFronzo, R A

    2010-07-01

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus and is associated with a metabolic and cardiovascular cluster of disorders (dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obesity [especially visceral], glucose intolerance, endothelial dysfunction), each of which is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Multiple prospective studies have documented an association between insulin resistance and accelerated CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes, as well as in non-diabetic individuals. The molecular causes of insulin resistance, i.e. impaired insulin signalling through the phosphoinositol-3 kinase pathway with intact signalling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, are responsible for the impairment in insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism and contribute to the accelerated rate of CVD in type 2 diabetes patients. The current epidemic of diabetes is being driven by the obesity epidemic, which represents a state of tissue fat overload. Accumulation of toxic lipid metabolites (fatty acyl CoA, diacylglycerol, ceramide) in muscle, liver, adipocytes, beta cells and arterial tissues contributes to insulin resistance, beta cell dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis, respectively, in type 2 diabetes. Treatment with thiazolidinediones mobilises fat out of tissues, leading to enhanced insulin sensitivity, improved beta cell function and decreased atherogenesis. Insulin resistance and lipotoxicity represent the missing links (beyond the classical cardiovascular risk factors) that help explain the accelerated rate of CVD in type 2 diabetic patients.

  19. Cannabis use in relation to obesity and insulin resistance in the Inuit population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngueta, Gerard; Bélanger, Richard E; Laouan-Sidi, Elhadji A; Lucas, Michel

    2015-02-01

    To ascertain the relationship between cannabis use, obesity, and insulin resistance. Data on 786 Inuit adults from the Nunavik Inuit Health Survey (2004) were analyzed. Information on cannabis use was obtained from a self-completed, confidential questionnaire. Fasting blood glucose and insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) served as surrogate markers of insulin resistance. Analysis of covariance and multivariate logistic regression ascertained relationships between cannabis use and outcomes. Cannabis use was highly prevalent in the study population (57.4%) and was statistically associated with lower body mass index (BMI) (P insulin (P = 0.04), and lower HOMA-IR (P = 0.01), after adjusting for numerous confounding variables. Further adjustment for BMI rendered fasting insulin and HOMA-IR differences statistically nonsignificant between past-year cannabis users and nonusers. Mediation analysis showed that the effect of cannabis use on insulin resistance was indirect, through BMI. In multivariate analysis, past-year cannabis use was associated with 0.56 lower likelihood of obesity (95% confidence interval 0.37-0.84). Cannabis use was associated with lower BMI, and such an association did not occur through the glucose metabolic process or related inflammatory markers. The association between cannabis use and insulin resistance was mediated through its influence on weight. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  20. Insulin resistance, lipotoxicity, type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis: the missing links. The Claude Bernard Lecture 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus and is associated with a metabolic and cardiovascular cluster of disorders (dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obesity [especially visceral], glucose intolerance, endothelial dysfunction), each of which is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Multiple prospective studies have documented an association between insulin resistance and accelerated CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes, as well as in non-diabetic individuals. The molecular causes of insulin resistance, i.e. impaired insulin signalling through the phosphoinositol-3 kinase pathway with intact signalling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, are responsible for the impairment in insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism and contribute to the accelerated rate of CVD in type 2 diabetes patients. The current epidemic of diabetes is being driven by the obesity epidemic, which represents a state of tissue fat overload. Accumulation of toxic lipid metabolites (fatty acyl CoA, diacylglycerol, ceramide) in muscle, liver, adipocytes, beta cells and arterial tissues contributes to insulin resistance, beta cell dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis, respectively, in type 2 diabetes. Treatment with thiazolidinediones mobilises fat out of tissues, leading to enhanced insulin sensitivity, improved beta cell function and decreased atherogenesis. Insulin resistance and lipotoxicity represent the missing links (beyond the classical cardiovascular risk factors) that help explain the accelerated rate of CVD in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:20361178

  1. Assessing Psychological Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes: a Critical Comparison of Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Truscott, E; Pouwer, F; Speight, J

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to examine the operationalisation of 'psychological insulin resistance' (PIR) among people with type 2 diabetes and to identify and critique relevant measures. PIR has been operationalised as (1) the assessment of attitudes or beliefs about insulin therapy and (2) hypothetical or actual resistance, or unwillingness, to use to insulin. Five validated PIR questionnaires were identified. None was fully comprehensive of all aspects of PIR, and the rigour and reporting of questionnaire development and psychometric validation varied considerably between measures. Assessment of PIR should focus on the identification of negative and positive attitudes towards insulin use. Actual or hypothetical insulin refusal may be better conceptualised as a potential consequence of PIR, as its assessment overlooks the attitudes that may prevent insulin use. This paper provides guidance on the selection of questionnaires for clinical or research purpose and the development of new, or improvement of existing, questionnaires.

  2. Sedentary lifestyle and its relation to cardiovascular risk factors, insulin resistance and inflammatory profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Latre, Montserrat; Moreno-Franco, Belén; Andrés-Esteban, Eva M; Ledesma, Marta; Laclaustra, Martín; Alcalde, Víctor; Peñalvo, José L; Ordovás, José M; Casasnovas, José A

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the association between sitting time and biomarkers of insulin resistance and inflammation in a sample of healthy male workers. Cross-sectional study carried out in a sample of 929 volunteers belonging to the Aragon Workers' Health Study cohort. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, pharmacological and laboratory data were collected: lipids-total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoproteins A-1 and B-100, lipoprotein (a)-, insulin resistance-glucose, glycated hemoglobin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, insulin, and triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio-, and inflammatory profile-C-reactive protein and leukocytes. Information on sitting time and physical activity was assessed using a questionnaire. Sedentary behavior was analyzed in terms of prevalences and medians, according to tertiles, using a multivariate model (crude and adjusted linear regression) with biomarkers of inflammation and insulin resistance. The most sedentary individuals had higher body mass index, greater waist circumference, and higher systolic blood pressure, with a significant upward trend in each tertile. Likewise, they had a worse lipid profile with a higher C-reactive protein level, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and insulin concentration. In the multivariate analysis, we observed a significant association between the latter parameters and sitting time in hours (log C-reactive protein [β = 0.07], log homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index [β = 0.05], triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio [β = 0.23], and insulin [β = 0.44]), which remained after adjustment for metabolic equivalents-h/week. Workers who spend more time sitting show a worse inflammatory and insulin resistance profile independently of the physical activity performed. Copyright © 2013

  3. Interplay between lipids and branched-chain amino acids in development of insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgard, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fatty acids (FA) and FA-derived metabolites have long been implicated in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, application of metabolomics technologies has revealed that branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and related metabolites are more strongly associated with insulin resistance than many common lipid species. Moreover, the BCAA-related signature is predictive of incident diabetes and intervention outcomes, and uniquely responsive to therapeutic interventions. Nevertheless, in animal feeding studies, BCAA supplementation requires the background of a high-fat diet to promote insulin resistance. This article develops a model to explain how lipids and BCAA may synergize to promote metabolic diseases. PMID:22560213

  4. A post-weaning obesogenic diet exacerbates the detrimental effects of maternal obesity on offspring insulin signaling in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Faria, Juliana; Duque-Guimarães, Daniella; Carpenter, Asha A M; Loche, Elena; Ozanne, Susan E

    2017-03-24

    Previous studies have shown that maternal diet-induced obesity leads to increased risk of type 2 diabetes in offspring. The current study investigated if weaning onto an obesogenic diet exaggerated the detrimental effects of maternal diet-induced obesity in adipose tissue. Maternal obesity and offspring obesity led to reduced expression of key insulin signalling proteins, including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). The effects of maternal obesity and offspring obesity were, generally, independent and additive. Irs1 mRNA levels were similar between all four groups of offspring, suggesting that in both cases post-transcriptional regulation was involved. Maternal diet-induced obesity increased miR-126 expression however levels of this miR were not influenced by a post-weaning obesogenic diet. In contrast, a post-weaning obesogenic diet was associated with increased levels of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1, implicating increased degradation of IRS-1 as an underlying mechanism. Our results suggest that whilst programmed reductions in IRS-1 are associated with increased levels of miR-126 and consequently reduced translation of Irs1 mRNA, the effects of a post-weaning obesogenic diet on IRS-1 are mediated by miR-126 independent mechanisms, including increased IRS-1 protein degradation. These divergent mechanisms explain why the combination of maternal obesity and offspring obesity leads to the most pronounced effects on offspring metabolism.

  5. Current approaches for assessing insulin sensitivity and resistance in vivo: advantages, limitations, and appropriate usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyappa, Ranganath; Lee, Sihoon; Chen, Hui; Quon, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Insulin resistance contributes to the pathophysiology of diabetes and is a hallmark of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and many cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, quantifying insulin sensitivity/resistance in humans and animal models is of great importance for epidemiological studies, clinical and basic science investigations, and eventual use in clinical practice. Direct and indirect methods of varying complexity are currently employed for these purposes. Some methods rely on steady-state analysis of glucose and insulin, whereas others rely on dynamic testing. Each of these methods has distinct advantages and limitations. Thus, optimal choice and employment of a specific method depends on the nature of the studies being performed. Established direct methods for measuring insulin sensitivity in vivo are relatively complex. The hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp and the insulin suppression test directly assess insulin-mediated glucose utilization under steady-state conditions that are both labor and time intensive. A slightly less complex indirect method relies on minimal model analysis of a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Finally, simple surrogate indexes for insulin sensitivity/resistance are available (e.g., QUICKI, HOMA, 1/insulin, Matusda index) that are derived from blood insulin and glucose concentrations under fasting conditions (steady state) or after an oral glucose load (dynamic). In particular, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) has been validated extensively against the reference standard glucose clamp method. QUICKI is a simple, robust, accurate, reproducible method that appropriately predicts changes in insulin sensitivity after therapeutic interventions as well as the onset of diabetes. In this Frontiers article, we highlight merits, limitations, and appropriate use of current in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity/resistance.

  6. Insulin resistance in penile arteries from a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Cristina; Sánchez, Ana; Martínez, Pilar; Raposo, Rafaela; Climent, Belén; García-Sacristán, Albino; Benedito, Sara; Prieto, Dolores

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities accompanying metabolic syndrome, such as obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension, are all associated with endothelial dysfunction and are independent risk factors for erectile dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the vascular effects of insulin in penile arteries and whether these effects are impaired in a rat model of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Penile arteries from obese Zucker rats (OZR) and their counterpart, lean Zucker rats (LZR), were mounted on microvascular myographs and the effects of insulin were assessed in the absence and presence of endothelium and of specific inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Insulin-induced changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i) were also examined. KEY RESULTS OZR exhibited mild hyperglycaemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypertryglyceridemia and hyperinsulinemia. Insulin induced endothelium- and NO-dependent relaxations in LZR that were impaired in OZR. Inhibition of PI3K reduced relaxation induced by insulin and by the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline, mainly in arteries from LZR. Antagonism of endothelin 1 (ET-1) receptors did not alter insulin-induced relaxation in either LZR or OZR, but MAPK blockade increased the responses in OZR. Insulin decreased [Ca(2+)](i), a response impaired in OZR. Insulin-induced relaxation was impaired in penile arteries of OZR due to altered NO release through the PI3K pathway and unmasking of a MAPK-mediated vasoconstriction. This vascular insulin resistance is likely to contribute to the endothelial dysfunction and erectile dysfunction associated with insulin resistant states.

  7. Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Myotonic Dystrophy: DMPK Gene Mutation, Insulin Resistance and Development of Steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhardwaj, Rishi R.; Andrea Duchini

    2010-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is a multisystemic disorder characterized by repeat expansion mutations of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene resulting in a defective muscular insulin receptor and insulin resistance. We describe a patient with myotonic dystrophy who developed biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. We suggest that patients with myotonic dystrophy are at risk of developing steatohepatitis. The relationship between defective insulin receptor and development of steatohe...

  8. The association between TNF-α and insulin resistance in euglycemic women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2013-10-01

    Chronic low levels of inflammation have links to obesity, diabetes and insulin resistance. We sought to assess the relationship between cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and insulin resistance in a healthy, euglycemic population. This is a prospective study of 574 non-diabetic mother and infant pairs. Maternal body mass index (BMI), TNF-α, glucose and insulin were measured in early pregnancy and at 28 weeks. Insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA index. At delivery birthweight was recorded and cord blood analysed for fetal C-peptide and TNF-α. In a multivariate model, maternal TNF-α in early pregnancy was predicted by maternal insulin resistance at the same time-point, (β=0.54, p<0.01), and maternal TNF-α at 28 weeks was predicted by maternal insulin resistance in early pregnancy (β=0.24, p<0.01) and at 28 weeks (β=0.39, p<0.01). These results, in a large cohort of healthy, non-diabetic women have shown that insulin resistance, even at levels below those diagnostic of gestational diabetes, is associated with maternal and fetal inflammatory response. These findings have important implications for defining the pathways of fetal programming of later metabolic syndrome and childhood obesity.

  9. Obesity Mediates the Association between Mediterranean Diet Consumption and Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in US Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Moon; Zhang, Jiajia; Steck, Susan E; Fung, Teresa T; Hazlett, Linda J; Han, Kyungdo; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Merchant, Anwar T

    2017-04-01

    Background: The inverse association between Mediterranean diet (Med-diet) consumption and insulin resistance or inflammatory markers is well known. However, the extent to which obesity may act directly on or mediate this association is unclear.Objective: We aimed to investigate whether the associations between Med-diet consumption and markers of insulin resistance and inflammation are mediated by body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC) in a representative US population.Methods: We used cross-sectional data from 4700 adults aged 20-90 y without any previous diagnosis of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or hypertension based on the NHANES III, 1988-1994. A Med-diet score (MDS) was created to assess adherence to the Med-diet. Linear regression models were fitted in conventional and causal mediation analyses comparing extreme MDS tertiles.Results: Compared with the lowest MDS tertile, the highest tertile of MDS was associated with a 0.77 lower BMI (in kg/m(2); P = 0.004) and a 2.7 cm lower WC (P insulin resistance and glucose intolerance markers (log insulin, log homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin) and inflammatory markers (white blood cell count and fibrinogen), whereas BMI mediated the association between MDS and insulin resistance and glucose intolerance markers only (all P obesity may play an important role in the pathway through which Med-diet consumption reduces insulin resistance and inflammation. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Relationship between Serum Lipoprotein Ratios and Insulin Resistance in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Kui Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the association between serum lipoprotein ratios and insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. Methods. 105 PCOS patients and 109 controls were randomly enrolled in the study. Serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, estradiol (E2, total testosterone (T, fasting glucose (FBG, fasting insulin (FINS, serum triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C levels were checked, and then TG/HDL-C ratio, TC/HDL-C, ratio and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio were calculated. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was used to calculate the insulin resistance. Results. All lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in PCOS patients as compared to healthy controls (<0.05. TG/HDL-C ratio, TC/HDL-C ratio, and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (<0.05. The ROC curve demonstrated that TC/HDL-C ratio had higher sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing PCOS with insulin resistance. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that serum lipoprotein ratio significantly correlates with insulin resistance and can be used as the marker of insulin resistance in PCOS patients.

  11. Unaltered Prion Pathogenesis in a Mouse Model of High-Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caihong Zhu

    Full Text Available Epidemiological, clinical, and experimental animal studies suggest a strong correlation between insulin resistance and Alzheimer's disease. In fact, type-2 diabetes is considered an important risk factor of developing Alzheimer's disease. In addition, impaired insulin signaling in the Alzheimer's disease brain may promote Aβ production, impair Aβ clearance and induce tau hyperphosphorylation, thereby leading to deterioration of the disease. The pathological prion protein, PrPSc, deposits in the form of extracellular aggregates and leads to dementia, raising the question as to whether prion pathogenesis may also be affected by insulin resistance. We therefore established high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in tga20 mice, which overexpress the prion protein. We then inoculated the insulin-resistant mice with prions. We found that insulin resistance in tga20 mice did not affect prion disease progression, PrPSc deposition, astrogliosis or microglial activation, and had no effect on survival. Our study demonstrates that in a mouse model, insulin resistance does not significantly contribute to prion pathogenesis.

  12. Microvascular dysfunction as a link between obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ü; Schram, M T; Houben, A J H M; Muris, D M J; Stehouwer, C D A

    2014-03-01

    Impaired microvascular dilatation from any cause and impaired insulin-mediated capillary recruitment in particular result in suboptimal delivery of glucose and insulin to skeletal muscle, and subsequently impairment of glucose disposal (insulin resistance). In addition, microvascular dysfunction, through functional and/or structural arteriolar and capillary drop-out, and arteriolar constriction, increases peripheral resistance and thus blood pressure. Microvascular dysfunction may thus constitute a pathway that links insulin resistance and hypertension. Overweight and obesity may be an important cause of microvascular dysfunction. Mechanisms linking overweight and obesity to microvascular dysfunction include changes in the secretion of adipokines leading to increased levels of free fatty acids and inflammatory mediators, and decreased levels of adiponectin all of which may impair endothelial insulin signaling. Microvascular dysfunction may thus constitute a new treatment target in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance: Underlying Causes and Modification by Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K.; Hevener, Andrea L.; Barnard, R. James

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a collection of cardiometabolic risk factors that includes obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Although there has been significant debate regarding the criteria and concept of the syndrome, this clustering of risk factors is unequivocally linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Regardless of the true definition, based on current population estimates, nearly 100 million have MS. It is often characterized by insulin resistance, which some have suggested is a major underpinning link between physical inactivity and MS. The purpose of this review is to: (i) provide an overview of the history, causes and clinical aspects of MS, (ii) review the molecular mechanisms of insulin action and the causes of insulin resistance, and (iii) discuss the epidemiological and intervention data on the effects of exercise on MS and insulin sensitivity. PMID:23720280

  14. Associations of insulin resistance and glycemic control with the risk of kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeya, Yusuke; Kato, Kiyoe; Tomita, Masuomi; Katsuki, Takeshi; Oikawa, Yoichi; Shimada, Akira; Atsumi, Yoshihito

    2012-01-01

    The associations of insulin resistance and glycemic control with the risk of kidney stones were explored. Generally healthy Japanese (n=2,171) who visited Saiseikai Central Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) for a health check were included in a cross-sectional study. We calculated odds ratios (OR) of having kidney stones in terms of four measures: fasting serum insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), adjusting for possible risk factors for kidney stones. Fasting serum insulin and HOMA-IR were non-significantly associated with the risk of kidney stones, whereas FPG and HbA1c were significantly associated. Compared with those with an FPG of kidney stones were preserved even after the adjustment for factors related to insulin resistance. Glycemic control could be an independent risk factor for kidney stones.

  15. SOCS-1 deficiency does not prevent diet-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Macotela, Yazmin; Boucher, Jérémie

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and increased expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins, which inhibit cytokine and insulin signaling. Thus, reducing SOCS expression could prevent the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. Using SOCS-1 knockout mice, we...... investigated the contribution of SOCS-1 in the development of insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet (HFD). SOCS-1 knockout mice on HFD gained 70% more weight, displayed a 2.3-fold increase in epididymal fat pads mass and increased hepatic lipid content. This was accompanied by increased mRNA expression...... of leptin and the macrophage marker CD68 in white adipose tissue and of SREBP1c and FAS in liver. HFD also induced hyperglycemia in SOCS-1 deficient mice with impairment of glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Thus, despite the role of SOCS proteins in obesity-related insulin resistance, SOCS-1 deficiency...

  16. GCKR variants increase triglycerides while protecting from insulin resistance in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue; Wu, Lijun; Xi, Bo; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Cheng, Hong; Hou, Dongqing; Wang, Xingyu; Mi, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Variants in gene encoding glucokinase regulator protein (GCKR) were found to have converse effects on triglycerides and glucose metabolic traits. We aimed to investigate the influence of GCKR variants for triglycerides and glucose metabolic traits in Chinese children and adults. We genotyped two GCKR variants rs1260326 and rs1260333 in children and adults, and analyzed the association between two variants and triglycerides, glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR using linear regression model, and estimated the effect on insulin resistance using logistic regression model. Rs1260326 and rs1260333 associated with increased triglycerides in children and adults (ptriglycerides in Chinese children and adults. Triglycerides-increasing alleles of GCKR variants reduce insulin and HOMA-IR index, and protect from insulin resistance in children. Our results suggested GCKR has an effect on development of insulin resistance in Chinese children.

  17. Correspondence between the adult treatment panel III criteria for metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Johnson, Justo; Johnson, Bruce D; Allison, Thomas G; Bailey, Kent R; Schwartz, Gary L; Turner, Stephen T

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III) definition of the metabolic syndrome in identifying insulin-resistant individuals and to explore alternative approaches to improve identification of insulin-resistant individuals among asymptomatic adults from the general population. The sample consisted of 256 non-Hispanic white subjects without treated hypertension or diabetes, from the Rochester (Minnesota) Heart Family Study (123 men and 133 women; aged 20-60 years). Frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed in all subjects. The reference standard for insulin resistance was determined by Bergman's minimal model; insulin resistance was defined as an insulin sensitivity index III criteria, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 15.6% (16.3% in men and 15.1% in women; P = 0.465). The presence of metabolic syndrome had low sensitivity to identify insulin resistance (45% in men and 39% in women; sex difference, P = 0.137) but high specificity (93% in men and 95% in women; sex difference, P = 0.345). Based on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) constructed by counting metabolic syndrome components as recommended by ATP-III, diagnostic accuracy was fair (AUC = 0.797 in men and 0.747 in women). When component metabolic syndrome measures were considered as quantitative traits rather than dichotomized, use of waist circumference alone, rather than counting metabolic syndrome components, improved diagnostic accuracy for insulin resistance (in men, AUC = 0.906, P = 0.001; in women, AUC = 0.822, P = 0.10). Application of the ATP-III metabolic syndrome criteria provides good specificity but low sensitivity to screen asymptomatic white adults for insulin resistance. Measuring just waist circumference is simpler and may provide greater accuracy for identifying insulin resistance.

  18. Effect of fat loss on arterial elasticity in obese adolescents with clinical insulin resistance: RESIST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mandy; Gow, Megan; Baur, Louise A; Benitez-Aguirre, Paul Z; Tam, Charmaine S; Donaghue, Kim C; Craig, Maria E; Cowell, Chris T; Garnett, Sarah P

    2014-10-01

    Reduced arterial elasticity contributes to an obesity-related increase in cardiovascular risk in adults. To evaluate the effect of fat loss on arterial elasticity in obese adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes. A secondary data analysis of the RESIST study was performed in two hospitals in Sydney, Australia. The study included 56 subjects (ages, 10 to 17 y; 25 males) with prediabetes and/or clinical features of insulin resistance. A 12-month lifestyle plus metformin intervention. Arterial elasticity and systemic vascular resistance were measured using radial tonometry pulse contour analysis, percentage body fat (%BF) was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and insulin sensitivity index was derived from an oral glucose tolerance test and lipids. Adolescents (n = 31) with decreased %BF (mean change [range], -4.4% [-18.3 to -0.01%]) after the intervention had significant increases in the mean large arterial elasticity index (mean change [95%CI], 5.1 [1.9 to 8.2] mL/mm Hg * 10; P = .003) and insulin sensitivity index (0.5 [0.1 to 0.9]; P = .010) and a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (-82 [-129 to -35] dyne * s * cm(-5); P = .001). There were no significant changes in these parameters in adolescents who increased their %BF. Nor was there any significant change in the mean small arterial elasticity index in either group. Long-term follow-up of these adolescents is warranted to assess whether the observed changes in vascular elasticity will lead to a clinical benefit including reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  19. Folate and vitamin B12 status is associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Gueant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Quilliot, Didier; Sirveaux, Marie-Aude; Meyre, David; Gueant, Jean-Louis; Brunaud, Laurent

    2017-07-24

    Low vitamin B12 and high folate during pregnancy are associated with visceral obesity and insulin resistance in offspring. In the general population, high folate exacerbates the increase of methylmalonic acid, a marker of vitamin B12 deficiency. However, the influence of vitamin B12 and folate and their related markers on insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome remains unknown in severe obesity. To evaluate the influence of vitamin B12 and folate on HOMA-IR and components of metabolic syndrome in severe obesity. 278 consecutive obese patients were assessed prospectively for HOMA-IR, red blood cell (RBC) folates, homocysteine and methylmalonic acid. We compared the associations with the components of metabolic syndrome during the preoperative multidisciplinary evaluation (period-1) and before bariatric surgery (period-2). The HOMA-IR was higher in patients with highest tertile of RBC and either lowest tertile of plasma B12 or highest tertile of MMA (p metabolic syndrome components (p = 0.006 and 0.020, respectively). RBC folate, homocysteine, and MMA predict HOMA-IR in severe obesity. Our findings challenge the benefit of folate fortified food in severe obesity, in particular in patients with a deficit of vitamin B12. The cohort study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02663388. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Curcumin reverses the depressive-like behavior and insulin resistance induced by chronic mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji-Duo; Wei, Yu; Li, Yu-Jie; Qiao, Jing-Yi; Li, Yu-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that patients with depression have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance has been identified as the key mechanism linking depression and diabetes. The present study established a rat model of depression complicated by insulin resistance using a 12-week exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS) and investigated the therapeutic effects of curcumin. Sucrose intake tests were used to evaluate depressive-like behaviors, and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests (IPITT) were performed to evaluate insulin sensitivity. Serum parameters were detected using commercial kits. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to examine mRNA expression. CMS rats exhibited reduced sucrose consumption, increased serum glucose, insulin, triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), glucagon, leptin, and corticosterone levels, as well as impaired insulin sensitivity. Curcumin upregulated the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and protein kinase B (Akt) in the liver, enhanced insulin sensitivity, and reversed the metabolic abnormalities and depressive-like behaviors mentioned above. Moreover, curcumin increased the hepatic glycogen content by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β and prevented gluconeogenesis by inhibiting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase). These results suggest that curcumin not only exerted antidepressant-like effects, but also reversed the insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities induced by CMS. These data may provide evidence to support the potential use of curcumin against depression and/or metabolic disorders.

  1. Rac1 signaling is required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and is dysregulated in insulin-resistant murine and human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2013-01-01

    The actin-cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase Rac1 is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in cultured muscle cells. However, involvement of Rac1 and its downstream signaling in glucose transport in insulin sensitive and insulin resistant mature skeletal muscle has not previously been...... inhibition of Rac1 were used to determine whether Rac1 regulates insulin-stimulated glucose transport in mature skeletal muscle. Furthermore, Rac1 and PAK1 expression and signalling were investigated in muscle of insulin resistant mice and humans.Inhibition and KO of Rac1 decreased insulin-stimulated glucose...... transport in mouse soleus and EDL muscles ex vivo. Rac1 KO mice showed decreased insulin and glucose tolerance and trended towards higher plasma insulin concentrations following intraperitoneal glucose injection. Rac1 protein expression and PAK(Thr423) phosphorylation were decreased in muscles of high fat...

  2. Association of Serum Magnesium Deficiency with Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutia, Happy; Lynrah, Kyrshanlang G

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is the key pathophysiological defect that leads to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to estimate serum magnesium level and insulin sensitivity indices among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and to see an association between them. This study was carried out among 38 type 2 diabetic patients and forty age and sex matched controls. Serum fasting glucose, magnesium, insulin, urea, and creatinine levels were estimated. Insulin sensitivity indices, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) levels were calculated as per formulae. A highly significant low serum magnesium level was found in diabetic subjects as compared to the controls. Statistically significant high HOMA levels (>2.6) and low QUICKI levels (magnesium and fasting insulin level. A highly statistically significant inverse correlation was found between serum magnesium and HOMA level, and a positive correlation was found between serum magnesium and QUICKI level, that is, serum magnesium level decreases with increase in IR. A strong association was also found between fasting serum insulin level and insulin sensitivity indices. This study showed a lower serum magnesium level in diabetic patients compared to control. A strong association was also found between serum magnesium level and insulin sensitivity indices. For proper management of type 2 diabetes, it may, therefore, be necessary to treat hypomagnesemia in these patients.

  3. Insulin resistance and cognitive performance in type 2 diabetes - The Maastricht study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijselaers, Stefan L C; Sep, Simone J S; Schram, Miranda T; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Henry, Ronald M A; Verhey, Frans R J; Kroon, Abraham A; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Dagnelie, Pieter C; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2017-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are associated with cognitive impairment. Experimental studies indicate that insulin signaling in the brain is related to cognitive performance. Here we evaluated whether insulin-related variables contribute to the variance in cognitive performance among individuals with type 2 diabetes. A total of 806 individuals with type 2 diabetes (mean age 62±8years, HbA1c 6.9±1.1%) completed a neuropsychological test battery. Insulin-related variables evaluated were: fasting plasma insulin, C-peptide, and the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2-IR; in individuals without insulin treatment; n=641). The unadjusted coefficient of determination (R(2)), obtained from multiple linear regression analyses, was used to estimate the proportion of variance in cognition explained by insulin-related variables. Sex, age, and educational level together explained 18.0% (R(2)) of the variance in memory function, 26.5% in information processing speed, and 22.8% in executive function and attention. Fasting insulin, C-peptide, or HOMA2-IR did not increase the explained variance (maximum ΔR(2) 0.3%, P≥0.14). Similar results were obtained when insulin-related variables were added to models that additionally included glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors, and depression. Our results show that measures of peripheral insulin resistance are unrelated to cognitive performance among individuals with adequately controlled type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved insulin sensitivity and resistance to weight gain in mice null for the Ahsg gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Suresh T; Singh, Gurmant P; Ranalletta, Mollie; Cintron, Vivian J; Qiang, Xiaoling; Goustin, Anton Scott; Jen, Kai-Lin Catherine; Charron, Maureen J; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Grunberger, George

    2002-08-01

    Fetuin inhibits insulin-induced insulin receptor (IR) autophosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity in vitro, in intact cells, and in vivo. The fetuin gene (AHSG) is located on human chromosome 3q27, recently identified as a susceptibility locus for type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Here, we explore insulin signaling, glucose homeostasis, and the effect of a high-fat diet on weight gain, body fat composition, and glucose disposal in mice carrying two null alleles for the gene encoding fetuin, Ahsg (B6, 129-Ahsg(tm1Mbl)). Fetuin knockout (KO) mice demonstrate increased basal and insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of IR and the downstream signaling molecules mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt in liver and skeletal muscle. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests in fetuin KO mice indicate significantly enhanced glucose clearance and insulin sensitivity. Fetuin KO mice subjected to euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp show augmented sensitivity to insulin, evidenced by increased glucose infusion rate (P = 0.077) and significantly increased skeletal muscle glycogen content (P < 0.05). When fed a high-fat diet, fetuin KO mice are resistant to weight gain, demonstrate significantly decreased body fat, and remain insulin sensitive. These data suggest that fetuin may play a significant role in regulating postprandial glucose disposal, insulin sensitivity, weight gain, and fat accumulation and may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and other insulin-resistant conditions.

  5. Allergic Conjunctivitis Renders CD4+ T Cells Resistant to T Regulatory Cells and Exacerbates Corneal Allograft Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nancy J.; Chen, Peter W.; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic diseases rob corneal allografts of immune privilege and increase immune rejection. Corneal allograft rejection in BALB/c allergic hosts was analyzed using a short ragweed (SWR) pollen model of allergic conjunctivitis. Allergic conjunctivitis did not induce exaggerated T cell responses to donor C57BL/6 (B6) alloantigens or stimulate cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Allergic conjunctivitis did affect T regulatory cells (Tregs) that support graft survival. Exogenous IL-4, but not IL-5 or IL-13, prevented Treg suppression of CD4+ effector T cells isolated from naïve mice. However, mice with allergic conjunctivitis developed Tregs that suppressed CD4+ effector T cell proliferation. In addition, IL-4 did not inhibit Treg suppression of IL-4Rα−/− CD4+ T cell responses, suggesting that IL-4 rendered effector T cells resistant to Tregs. SRW-sensitized IL-4Rα−/− mice displayed the same 50% graft survival as non-allergic WT mice, that was significantly less than the 100% rejection that occurred in allergic WT hosts, supporting the role of IL-4 in the abrogation of immune privilege. Moreover, exacerbation of corneal allograft rejection in allergic mice was reversed by administering anti-IL-4 antibody. Thus, allergy-induced exacerbation of corneal graft rejection is due to the production of IL-4, which renders effector T cells resistant to Treg suppression of alloimmune responses. PMID:23489547

  6. Nutritional and endocrine modulation of intracellular calcium: implications in obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, M B

    1998-11-01

    Regulation of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) plays a key role in obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension, and [Ca2+]i disorders may represent a fundamental factor linking these three conditions. We have shown insulin to be a direct vasodilator, attenuating voltage-gated Ca2+ influx and stimulating Ca(2+)-ATPase transcription via a glucose-6-phosphate response element. These result in a net decrease in [Ca2+]i and thereby decrease vascular resistance, while these effects are blunted in insulin resistance, leading to increased vascular resistance. Consistent with this concept, pharmacological amplification of peripheral insulin sensitivity results in reduced arterial pressure. While insulin regulates [Ca2+]i, Ca2+ also regulates insulin signaling, as increasing [Ca2+]i impairs insulin signaling in some systems, possibly due to Ca2+ inhibition of insulin-regulated dephosphorylation. Finally, in recent studies of the mouse agouti gene, we have also demonstrated increased [Ca2+]i to play a key role in adipocyte lipogenesis, as follows. We have found dominant agouti mutants to exhibit increased [Ca2+]i in most tissues, leading to increased vascular reactivity and insulin resistance in vascular smooth muscle and skeletal muscle cells, respectively. Further, we have found recombinant agouti protein to directly increase [Ca2+]i in a variety of cells, including murine and human adipocytes, and to stimulate both the expression and activity of adipocyte fatty acid synthase and increase triglyceride accumulation in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. These effects can be mimicked by stimulation of Ca2+ influx and blocked by Ca2+ channel inhibition, while treatment of mice with a Ca2+ antagonist attenuates agouti-induced obesity. Since humans express agouti in adipose tissue, it may similarly exert paracrine effects on [Ca2+]i and thereby stimulate de novo lipogenesis and promote obesity. Thus, Ca2+ signaling represents a target for therapeutic intervention in obesity as well as

  7. Acute insulin resistance mediated by advanced glycation endproducts in severely burned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Xu, Jie; Cai, Xiaoqing; Ji, Lele; Li, Jia; Cao, Bing; Li, Jun; Hu, Dahai; Li, Yan; Wang, Haichang; Xiong, Lize; Xiao, Ruiping; Gao, Feng

    2014-06-01

    Hyperglycemia often occurs in severe burns; however, the underlying mechanisms and importance of managing postburn hyperglycemia are not well recognized. This study was designed to investigate the dynamic changes of postburn hyperglycemia and the underlying mechanisms and to evaluate whether early glycemic control is beneficial in severe burns. Prospective, randomized experimental study. Animal research laboratory. Sprague-Dawley rats. Anesthetized rats were subjected to a full-thickness burn injury comprising 40% of the total body surface area and were randomized to receive vehicle, insulin, and a soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts treatments. An in vitro study was performed on cultured H9C2 cells subjected to vehicle or carboxymethyllysine treatment. We found that blood glucose change presented a distinct pattern with two occurrences of hyperglycemia at 0.5- and 3-hour postburn, respectively. Acute insulin resistance evidenced by impaired insulin signaling and glucose uptake occurred at 3-hour postburn, which was associated with the second hyperglycemia and positively correlated with mortality. Mechanistically, we found that serum carboxymethyllysine, a dominant species of advanced glycation endproducts, increased within 1-hour postburn, preceding the occurrence of insulin resistance. More importantly, treatment of animals with soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, blockade of advanced glycation endproducts signaling, alleviated severe burn-induced insulin resistance. In addition, early hyperglycemic control with insulin not only reduced serum carboxymethyllysine but also blunted postburn insulin resistance and reduced mortality. These findings suggest that severe burn-induced insulin resistance is partly at least mediated by serum advanced glycation endproducts and positively correlated with mortality. Early glycemic control with insulin or inhibition of advanced glycation endproducts with soluble form of receptor

  8. Metabolic flexibility in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes : effects of lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corpeleijn, E.; Saris, W. H. M.; Blaak, E. E.

    Lipotoxicity in skeletal muscle plays a critical role in the aetiology of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus by interference of lipid metabolites with insulin signalling and action. The dynamics of lipid oxidation and fine tuning with fatty acid uptake and intramyocellular

  9. Is fasting leptin associated with insulin resistance among nondiabetic individuals? The Miami Community Health Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donahue, R P; Prineas, R J; Donahue, R D

    1999-01-01

    Whether serum leptin levels are associated with insulin resistance independent of the effects of hyperinsulinemia and adiposity is an important unanswered question. We examined the relationship between the rate of insulin-mediated glucose uptake and serum leptin concentrations among nondiabetic men...

  10. IL-37 protects against obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballak, D.B.; Diepen, van J.A.; Moschen, A.R.; Jansen, H.; Hijmans, A.; Groenhof, G.J.; Leenders, F.; Bufler, P.; Boekschoten, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines of the IL-1 family are important modulators of obesity-induced inflammation and the development of systemic insulin resistance. Here we show that IL-1 family member ¿IL-37, recently characterized as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, ameliorates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin

  11. Elevated hepatic DPP4 activity promotes insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Baumeier

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Our results give evidence that elevated expression of DPP4 in the liver promotes NAFLD and insulin resistance. This is linked to reduced levels of active GLP-1, but also to auto- and paracrine effects of DPP4 on hepatic insulin signaling.

  12. IL-37 protects against obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballak, D.B.; Diepen, J.A. van; Moschen, A.R.; Jansen, H.J.; Hijmans, A.G.; Groenhof, G.J.; Leenders, F.; Bufler, P.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Muller, M; Kersten, S.; Li, S.; Kim, S.; Eini, H.; Lewis, E.C.; Joosten, L.A.; Tilg, H.; Netea, M.G.; Tack, C.J.; Dinarello, C.A.; Stienstra, R.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines of the IL-1 family are important modulators of obesity-induced inflammation and the development of systemic insulin resistance. Here we show that IL-1 family member IL-37, recently characterized as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, ameliorates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin

  13. Insulin resistance in the NIDDM model Psammomys obesus in the normoglycaemic, normoinsulinaemic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, E; Kalman, R; Hershkop, K; Barash, V; Shafrir, E; Bar-On, H

    1996-11-01

    The desert gerbil Psammomys obesus ("sand rat"), a model of nutritionally induced insulin resistance and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, was treated after weaning with exogenous insulin implants in the normoglycaemic, normoinsulinaemic state. Albino rats matched for weight and age served as high energy diet adjusted reference animals. Insulin administration, elevating the serum insulin to 6000 pmol/l resulted in only a mild reduction in blood glucose levels in Psammomys, but caused a severe, often fatal hypoglycaemia in the albino rats. The hepatic response to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in rats involved a significant loss in glycogen and suppression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity. In Psammomys under similar hyperinsulinaemia no appreciable changes in liver glycogen and PEPCK activity were evident, indicating that blood glucose was replenished by continuing gluconeogenesis. Euglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic clamp caused a complete shut-down of hepatic glucose production in albino rats. However, in both diabetes-prone and diabetes-resistant Psammomys lines, mean hepatic glucose production was reduced by only 62 to 53% respectively, despite longer lasting and higher levels of hyperinsulinaemia. These results indicate that Psammomys is characterized by muscle and liver insulin resistance prior to diet-induced hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia. This is assumed to be a species feature of Psammomys, exemplifying a metabolic adjustment to survival in conditions of food scarcity of both animal and human populations. It may reflect a propensity to insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia in population groups exposed to affluent nutrition.

  14. A Study of Insulin Resistance and its Clinico‑Metabolic Associations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The new millennium has witnessed the emergence of the epidemic of non-communicable diseases, with frightful consequences to the health of people world‑wide. Insulin resistance (IR), defined as a reduced biological action of insulin, has emerged as a major pathophysiological factor in the development and ...

  15. GLUT4 and glycogen synthase are key players in bed rest-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biensø, Rasmus Sjørup; Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm; Kiilerich, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    than before bed rest. This bed rest-induced insulin resistance occurred together with reduced muscle GLUT4, hexokinase II, protein kinase B/Akt1, and Akt2 protein level, and a tendency for reduced 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity. The ability of insulin to phosphorylate Akt and activate...

  16. Insulin resistance in obese pre-pubertal children: Relation to body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heba Elsedfy

    2014-04-16

    Apr 16, 2014 ... Abstract Background: Abdominal obesity is a strong determinant of obesity related metabolic complications. Data about pre-pubertal children are scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the presence of insulin resistance using different insulin sensitivity indices and investigate its relationship with ...

  17. Insulin resistance in obese pre-pubertal children: Relation to body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Abdominal obesity is a strong determinant of obesity related metabolic complications. Data about pre-pubertal children are scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the presence of insulin resistance using different insulin sensitivity indices and investigate its relationship with abdominal fat distribution by Dual ...

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in insulin resistance and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustin; Leon-Aparicio, Daniel; Chavez-Reyes, Jesus; Olivares-Reyes, Jesus A; DeJesus, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is the main intracellular Ca(2+) store for Ca(2+) release during cell signaling. There are different strategies to avoid ER Ca(2+) depletion. Release channels utilize first Ca(2+)-bound to proteins and this minimizes the reduction of the free luminal [Ca(2+)]. However, if release channels stay open after exhaustion of Ca(2+)-bound to proteins, then the reduction of the free luminal ER [Ca(2+)] (via STIM proteins) activates Ca(2+) entry at the plasma membrane to restore the ER Ca(2+) load, which will work provided that SERCA pump is active. Nevertheless, there are several noxious conditions that result in decreased activity of the SERCA pump such as oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and saturated fatty acids, among others. These conditions result in a deficient restoration of the ER [Ca(2+)] and lead to the ER stress response that should facilitate recovery of the ER. However, if the stressful condition persists then ER stress ends up triggering cell death and the ensuing degenerative process leads to diverse pathologies; particularly insulin resistance, diabetes and several of the complications associated with diabetes. This scenario suggests that limiting ER stress should decrease the incidence of diabetes and the mobility and mortality associated with this illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Obesity, insulin resistance and comorbidities – Mechanisms of association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Kolka, Cathryn M.; Kim, Stella P.; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Overall excess of fat, usually defined by the body mass index, is associated with metabolic (e.g. glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), dyslipidemia) and non-metabolic disorders (e.g. neoplasias, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fat liver disease, glomerulopathy, bone fragility etc.). However, more than its total amount, the distribution of adipose tissue throughout the body is a better predictor of the risk to the development of those disorders. Fat accumulation in the abdominal area and in non-adipose tissue (ectopic fat), for example, is associated with increased risk to develop metabolic and non-metabolic derangements. On the other hand, observations suggest that individuals who present peripheral adiposity, characterized by large hip and thigh circumferences, have better glucose tolerance, reduced incidence of T2DM and of metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the main culprits in the association between obesity, particularly visceral, and metabolic as well as non-metabolic diseases. In this review we will highlight the current pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms possibly involved in the link between increased VAT, ectopic fat, IR and comorbidities. We will also provide some insights in the identification of these abnormalities. PMID:25211442

  20. Interacting epidemics? Sleep curtailment, insulin resistance, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Eliane A; Rother, Kristina I; Cizza, Giovanni

    2012-08-01

    In the last 50 years, the average self-reported sleep duration in the United States has decreased by 1.5-2 hours in parallel with an increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Epidemiological studies and meta-analyses report a strong relationship between short or disturbed sleep, obesity, and abnormalities in glucose metabolism. This relationship is likely to be bidirectional and causal in nature, but many aspects remain to be elucidated. Sleep and the internal circadian clock influence a host of endocrine parameters. Sleep curtailment in humans alters multiple metabolic pathways, leading to more insulin resistance, possibly decreased energy expenditure, increased appetite, and immunological changes. On the other hand, psychological, endocrine, and anatomical abnormalities in individuals with obesity and/or diabetes can interfere with sleep duration and quality, thus creating a vicious cycle. In this review, we address mechanisms linking sleep with metabolism, highlight the need for studies conducted in real-life settings, and explore therapeutic interventions to improve sleep, with a potential beneficial effect on obesity and its comorbidities. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences. No claim to original U.S. Government works.

  1. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Treatment on Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Insulin resistance (IR is a common pathogenic factor of several diseases: diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, etc. There are many therapeutic factors involved in decreasing IR. Among them we mention metformin, pioglitazone, physical activity, weight loss, diet, etc. In the last decade, there are more observations of the influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids on IR. The most powerful seem to be omega-3 fatty acids. In our study, we wanted to asses if the administration of omega-3 fatty acids is involved in modifying IR. Materials and methods: We evaluated 126 diabetic patients with IR from January 2011 until July 2014. The study was open-label and non-randomized. For the determination of IR we used the HOMA-IR method. Results: For both males and females there was a regression of HOMA-IR during the 4 weeks of treatment with omega-3 and also after 2 weeks after stopping the administration of these fatty acids. The decrease of HOMA-IR was statistically significant (p<0.05. The statistic result observed in the next 2 weeks after stopping administration of omega-3 was also significant (p<0.05.

  2. Interacting epidemics? Sleep curtailment, insulin resistance, and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Eliane A; Rother, Kristina I; Cizza, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    In the last 50 years, the average self-reported sleep duration in the United States has decreased by 1.5–2 hours in parallel with an increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Epidemiological studies and meta-analyses report a strong relationship between short or disturbed sleep, obesity, and abnormalities in glucose metabolism. This relationship is likely to be bidirectional and causal in nature, but many aspects remain to be elucidated. Sleep and the internal circadian clock influence a host of endocrine parameters. Sleep curtailment in humans alters multiple metabolic pathways, leading to more insulin resistance, possibly decreased energy expenditure, increased appetite, and immunological changes. On the other hand, psychological, endocrine, and anatomical abnormalities in individuals with obesity and/or diabetes can interfere with sleep duration and quality, thus creating a vicious cycle. In this review, we address mechanisms linking sleep with metabolism, highlight the need for studies conducted in real-life settings, and explore therapeutic interventions to improve sleep, with a potential beneficial effect on obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:22827862

  3. Insulin Resistance: A Proinflammatory State Mediated by Lipid-Induced Signaling Dysfunction and Involved in Atherosclerotic Plaque Instability

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    François Mach

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The dysregulation of the insulin-glucose axis represents the crucial event in insulin resistance syndrome. Insulin resistance increases atherogenesis and atherosclerotic plaque instability by inducing proinflammatory activities on vascular and immune cells. This condition characterizes several diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, impaired fasting glucose (IFG, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and other endocrinopathies, but also cancer. Recent studies suggest that the pathophysiology of insulin resistance is closely related to interferences with insulin-mediated intracellular signaling on skeletal muscle cells, hepatocytes, and adipocytes. Strong evidence supports the role of free fatty acids (FFAs in promoting insulin resistance. The FFA-induced activation of protein kinase C (PKC delta, inhibitor kappaB kinase (IKK, or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK modulates insulin-triggered intracellular pathway (classically known as PI3-K-dependent. Therefore, reduction of FFA levels represents a selective target for modulating insulin resistance.

  4. S961, an insulin receptor antagonist causes hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistance and depletion of energy stores in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikram, Ajit [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), SAS Nagar, Mohali, Punjab 160 062 (India); Jena, Gopabandhu, E-mail: gbjena@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), SAS Nagar, Mohali, Punjab 160 062 (India)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields}Insulin receptor antagonist S961 causes hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in rats. {yields}Peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone improves S961 induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. {yields}Long term treatment with insulin receptor antagonist S961 results in the decreased adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. {yields}Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. -- Abstract: Impairment in the insulin receptor signaling and insulin mediated effects are the key features of type 2 diabetes. Here we report that S961, a peptide insulin receptor antagonist induces hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia ({approx}18-fold), glucose intolerance and impairment in the insulin mediated glucose disposal in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Further, long-term S961 treatment (15 day, 10 nM/kg/day) depletes energy storage as evident from decrease in the adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. However, peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone significantly (P < 0.001) restored S961 induced hyperglycemia (196.73 {+-} 16.32 vs. 126.37 {+-} 27.07 mg/dl) and glucose intolerance ({approx}78%). Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. Further, results of the present study reconfirms and provide direct evidence to the crucial role of insulin receptor signaling in the glucose homeostasis and fuel metabolism.

  5. A small amount of dietary carbohydrate can promote the HFD-induced insulin resistance to a maximal level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Mei

    Full Text Available Both dietary fat and carbohydrates (Carbs may play important roles in the development of insulin resistance. The main goal of this study was to further define the roles for fat and dietary carbs in insulin resistance. C57BL/6 mice were fed normal chow diet (CD or HFD containing 0.1-25.5% carbs for 5 weeks, followed by evaluations of calorie consumption, body weight and fat gains, insulin sensitivity, intratissue insulin signaling, ectopic fat, and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle. The role of hepatic gluconeogenesis in the HFD-induced insulin resistance was determined in mice. The role of fat in insulin resistance was also examined in cultured cells. HFD with little carbs (0.1% induced severe insulin resistance. Addition of 5% carbs to HFD dramatically elevated insulin resistance and 10% carbs in HFD was sufficient to induce a maximal level of insulin resistance. HFD with little carbs induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle and addition of carbs to HFD dramatically enhanced ectopic fat and oxidative stress. HFD increased hepatic expression of key gluconeogenic genes and the increase was most dramatic by HFD with little carbs, and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis prevented the HFD-induced insulin resistance. In cultured cells, development of insulin resistance induced by a pathological level of insulin was prevented in the absence of fat. Together, fat is essential for development of insulin resistance and dietary carb is not necessary for HFD-induced insulin resistance due to the presence of hepatic gluconeogenesis but a very small amount of it can promote HFD-induced insulin resistance to a maximal level.

  6. A Small Amount of Dietary Carbohydrate Can Promote the HFD-Induced Insulin Resistance to a Maximal Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huailan; Gu, Haihua; Zha, Longying; Cai, Junwei; Li, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi; Bennett, Brian J.; He, Ling; Cao, Wenhong

    2014-01-01

    Both dietary fat and carbohydrates (Carbs) may play important roles in the development of insulin resistance. The main goal of this study was to further define the roles for fat and dietary carbs in insulin resistance. C57BL/6 mice were fed normal chow diet (CD) or HFD containing 0.1–25.5% carbs for 5 weeks, followed by evaluations of calorie consumption, body weight and fat gains, insulin sensitivity, intratissue insulin signaling, ectopic fat, and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle. The role of hepatic gluconeogenesis in the HFD-induced insulin resistance was determined in mice. The role of fat in insulin resistance was also examined in cultured cells. HFD with little carbs (0.1%) induced severe insulin resistance. Addition of 5% carbs to HFD dramatically elevated insulin resistance and 10% carbs in HFD was sufficient to induce a maximal level of insulin resistance. HFD with little carbs induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle and addition of carbs to HFD dramatically enhanced ectopic fat and oxidative stress. HFD increased hepatic expression of key gluconeogenic genes and the increase was most dramatic by HFD with little carbs, and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis prevented the HFD-induced insulin resistance. In cultured cells, development of insulin resistance induced by a pathological level of insulin was prevented in the absence of fat. Together, fat is essential for development of insulin resistance and dietary carb is not necessary for HFD-induced insulin resistance due to the presence of hepatic gluconeogenesis but a very small amount of it can promote HFD-induced insulin resistance to a maximal level. PMID:25055153

  7. Improvement of obesity-linked skeletal muscle insulin resistance by strength and endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meo, Sergio; Iossa, Susanna; Venditti, Paola

    2017-09-01

    Obesity-linked insulin resistance is mainly due to fatty acid overload in non-adipose tissues, particularly skeletal muscle and liver, where it results in high production of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction. Accumulating evidence indicates that resistance and endurance training alone and in combination can counteract the harmful effects of obesity increasing insulin sensitivity, thus preventing diabetes. This review focuses the mechanisms underlying the exercise role in opposing skeletal muscle insulin resistance-linked metabolic dysfunction. It is apparent that exercise acts through two mechanisms: (1) it stimulates glucose transport by activating an insulin-independent pathway and (2) it protects against mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance by increasing muscle antioxidant defenses and mitochondrial biogenesis. However, antioxidant supplementation combined with endurance training increases glucose transport in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle in an additive fashion only when antioxidants that are able to increase the expression of antioxidant enzymes and/or the activity of components of the insulin signaling pathway are used. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  8. LECT2 functions as a hepatokine that links obesity to skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Fei; Misu, Hirofumi; Chikamoto, Keita; Takayama, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Mohri, Kensuke; Takata, Noboru; Hayashi, Hiroto; Matsuzawa-Nagata, Naoto; Takeshita, Yumie; Noda, Hiroyo; Matsumoto, Yukako; Ota, Tsuguhito; Nagano, Toru; Nakagen, Masatoshi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takatsuki, Kanako; Seo, Toru; Iwayama, Kaito; Tokuyama, Kunpei; Matsugo, Seiichi; Tang, Hong; Saito, Yoshiro; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2014-05-01

    Recent articles have reported an association between fatty liver disease and systemic insulin resistance in humans, but the causal relationship remains unclear. The liver may contribute to muscle insulin resistance by releasing secretory proteins called hepatokines. Here we demonstrate that leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 (LECT2), an energy-sensing hepatokine, is a link between obesity and skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Circulating LECT2 positively correlated with the severity of both obesity and insulin resistance in humans. LECT2 expression was negatively regulated by starvation-sensing kinase adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in H4IIEC hepatocytes. Genetic deletion of LECT2 in mice increased insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscle. Treatment with recombinant LECT2 protein impaired insulin signaling via phosphorylation of Jun NH2-terminal kinase in C2C12 myocytes. These results demonstrate the involvement of LECT2 in glucose metabolism and suggest that LECT2 may be a therapeutic target for obesity-associated insulin resistance.

  9. A review on the molecular mechanisms involved in insulin resistance induced by organophosphorus pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasram, Mohamed Montassar; Dhouib, Ines Bini; Annabi, Alya; El Fazaa, Saloua; Gharbi, Najoua

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing evidence reporting that organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) impair glucose homeostasis and cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is a complex metabolic disorder that defies explanation by a single etiological pathway. Formation of advanced glycation end products, accumulation of lipid metabolites, activation of inflammatory pathways and oxidative stress have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Ultimately, these molecular processes activate a series of stress pathways involving a family of serine kinases, which in turn have a negative effect on insulin signaling. Experimental and clinical data suggest an association between these molecular mechanisms and OPs compounds. It was first reported that OPs induce hyperglycemia. Then a concomitant increase of blood glucose and insulin was pointed out. For some years only, we have begun to understand that OPs promote insulin resistance and increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Overall, this review outlines various mechanisms that lead to the development of insulin resistance by OPs exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of myoinositol supplementation on insulin resistance in patients with gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, F; D'Anna, R; Di Vieste, G; Giordano, D; Pintaudi, B; Santamaria, A; Di Benedetto, A

    2011-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that myoinositol supplementation will improve insulin sensitivity as measured by markers of insulin resistance such as homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and adiponectin in women with gestational diabetes. The trial was carried out in diet-treated patients with gestational diabetes diagnosed in our department between April 2008 and September 2009. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either myoinositol supplementation (4 g daily) plus folic acid (400 μg daily)-the study group-or folic acid only (400 μg daily)-the control group. Both groups received the same diet prescription. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and adiponectin were assayed while fasting at the time of the diagnostic oral glucose tolerance test and after 8 weeks of treatment. There were 69 evaluable patients, 24 in the study group and 45 in the control group. Fasting glucose and insulin, and consequently homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, decreased in both groups (50% in the study group vs. 29% in the control group), but the decline in the study group was significantly greater than that in the control group (P = 0.0001). Adiponectin increased in the myoinositol group while it decreased in the control group (P = 0.009). Myoinositol improves insulin resistance in patients with gestational diabetes. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  11. Inactivation of fatty acid transport protein 1 prevents fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jason K.; Gimeno, Ruth E.; Higashimori, Takamasa; Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Choi, Hyejeong; Punreddy, Sandhya; Mozell, Robin L.; Tan, Guo; Stricker-Krongrad, Alain; Hirsch, David J.; Fillmore, Jonathan J.; Liu, Zhen-Xiang; Dong, Jianying; Cline, Gary; Stahl, Andreas; Lodish, Harvey F.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2004-01-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle plays a major role in the development of type 2 diabetes and may be causally associated with increases in intramuscular fatty acid metabolites. Fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1) is an acyl-CoA synthetase highly expressed in skeletal muscle and modulates fatty acid uptake and metabolism by converting fatty acids into fatty acyl-CoA. To investigate the role of FATP1 in glucose homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, we examined the effect of acute lipid infusion or chronic high-fat feeding on insulin action in FATP1 KO mice. Whole-body adiposity, adipose tissue expression of adiponectin, intramuscular fatty acid metabolites, and insulin sensitivity were not altered in FATP1 KO mice fed a regular chow diet. In contrast, FATP1 deletion protected the KO mice from fat-induced insulin resistance and intramuscular accumulation of fatty acyl-CoA without alteration in whole-body adiposity. These findings demonstrate an important role of intramuscular fatty acid metabolites in causing insulin resistance and suggest that FATP1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:14991074

  12. G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Plays a Relevant Role in Insulin Resistance and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Guerra, Lucia; Nieto-Vazquez, Iria; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Jurado-Pueyo, María; Zalba, Guillermo; Díez, Javier; Murga, Cristina; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Mayor, Federico; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Given the emerging role of signal transduction in these syndromes, we set out to explore the possible role that G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), first identified as a G protein–coupled receptor regulator, could have as a modulator of insulin responses. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed the influence of GRK2 levels in insulin signaling in myoblasts and adipocytes with experimentally increased or silenced levels of GRK2, as well as in GRK2 hemizygous animals expressing 50% lower levels of this kinase in three different models of insulin resistance: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) infusion, aging, and high-