WorldWideScience

Sample records for exacerbates cerebral amyloidosis

  1. Insulin deficiency exacerbates cerebral amyloidosis and behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Wei-Ping

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although increasing evidence has indicated that brain insulin dysfunction is a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD, the underlying mechanisms by which insulin deficiency may impact the development of AD are still obscure. Using a streptozotocin (STZ-induced insulin deficient diabetic AD transgenic mouse model, we evaluated the effect of insulin deficiency on AD-like behavior and neuropathology. Results Our data showed that administration of STZ increased the level of blood glucose and reduced the level of serum insulin, and further decreased the phosphorylation levels of insulin receptors, and increased the activities of glycogen synthase kinase-3α/β and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in the APP/PS1 mouse brain. We further showed that STZ treatment promoted the processing of amyloid-β (Aβ precursor protein resulting in increased Aβ generation, neuritic plaque formation, and spatial memory deficits in transgenic mice. Conclusions Our present data indicate that there is a close link between insulin deficient diabetes and cerebral amyloidosis in the pathogenesis of AD.

  2. Cystatin C modulates cerebral beta-amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Stephan A; Herzig, Martin C; Coomaraswamy, Janaky; Kilger, Ellen; Selenica, Maj-Linda; Winkler, David T; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Levy, Efrat; Grubb, Anders; Jucker, Mathias

    2007-12-01

    The CST3 Thr25 allele of CST3, which encodes cystatin C, leads to reduced cystatin C secretion and conveys susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that overexpression of human cystatin C in brains of APP-transgenic mice reduces cerebral amyloid-beta deposition and that cystatin C binds amyloid-beta and inhibits its fibril formation. Our results suggest that cystatin C concentrations modulate cerebral amyloidosis risk and provide an opportunity for genetic risk assessment and therapeutic interventions.

  3. Peripherally Applied Aβ-Containing Inoculates Induce Cerebral β-Amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisele, Yvonne S.; Obermüller, Ulrike; Heilbronner, Götz; Baumann, Frank; Kaeser, Stephan A.; Wolburg, Hartwig; Walker, Lary C.; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Jucker, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    The intracerebral injection of β-amyloid-containing brain extracts can induce cerebralβ-amyloidosis and associated pathologies in susceptible hosts. We found that intraperitoneal inoculation with β-amyloid-rich extracts inducesβ-amyloidosis in the brains of β-amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice after prolonged incubation times. PMID:20966215

  4. Cerebral amyloidosis associated with cognitive decline in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Gordon, Brian A; Ryman, Davis C; Ma, Shengmei; Xiong, Chengjie; Hassenstab, Jason; Goate, Alison; Fagan, Anne M; Cairns, Nigel J; Marcus, Daniel S; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Ghetti, Bernardino; Farlow, Martin R; Sperling, Reisa; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N; Rossor, Martin N; Jucker, Mathias; Danek, Adrian; Förster, Stefan; Lane, Christopher A S; Morris, John C; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the associations of cerebral amyloidosis with concurrent cognitive performance and with longitudinal cognitive decline in asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD). Two hundred sixty-three participants enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network observational study underwent neuropsychological evaluation as well as PET scans with Pittsburgh compound B. One hundred twenty-one participants completed at least 1 follow-up neuropsychological evaluation. Four composite cognitive measures representing global cognition, episodic memory, language, and working memory were generated using z scores from a battery of 13 standard neuropsychological tests. General linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate the relationship between baseline cerebral amyloidosis and baseline cognitive performance and whether baseline cerebral amyloidosis predicts cognitive change over time (mean follow-up 2.32 years ± 0.92, range 0.89-4.19) after controlling for estimated years from expected symptom onset, APOE ε4 allelic status, and education. In asymptomatic mutation carriers, amyloid burden was not associated with baseline cognitive functioning but was significantly predictive of longitudinal decline in episodic memory. In symptomatic mutation carriers, cerebral amyloidosis was correlated with worse baseline performance in multiple cognitive composites and predicted greater decline over time in global cognition, working memory, and Mini-Mental State Examination. Cerebral amyloidosis predicts longitudinal episodic memory decline in presymptomatic ADAD and multidomain cognitive decline in symptomatic ADAD. These findings imply that amyloidosis in the brain is an indicator of early cognitive decline and provides a useful outcome measure for early assessment and prevention treatment trials. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Multiple factors contribute to the peripheral induction of cerebral beta-amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Eisele, Y.S.; Fritschi, S.K.; Hamaguchi, T.; Obermüller, U.; Füger, P.; Skodras, A.; Schäfer, C; Odenthal, J.; Heikenwalder, M.; Staufenbiel, M; Jucker, M.

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide in brain is an early event and hallmark pathology of Alzheimer's disease and cerebral Abeta angiopathy. Experimental evidence supports the concept that Abeta multimers can act as seeds and structurally corrupt other Abeta peptides by a self-propagating mechanism. Here we compare the induction of cerebral beta-amyloidosis by intraperitoneal applications of Abeta-containing brain extracts in three Abeta-precursor protein (APP) transgenic mou...

  6. Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in patients of Dutch origin is related to Alzheimer disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Duinen, S.G.; Castano, E.M.; Prelli, F.; Bots, G.T.A.B.; Luyendijk, W.; Frangione, B.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in Dutch patients is an autosomal dominant form of vascular amyloidosis restricted to the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Clinically the disease is characterized by cerebral hemorrhages leading to an early death. Immunohistochemical studies of five patients revealed that the vascular amyloid deposits reacted intensely with an antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide homologous to the Alzheimer disease-related ..beta..-protein. Silver stain-positive, senile plaque-like structures were also labeled by the antiserum, yet these lesions lacked the dense amyloid cores present in typical plaques of Alzheimer disease. No neurofibrillary tangles were present. Amyloid fibrils were purified from the leptomeningeal vessels of one patient who clinically had no signs of dementia. The protein had a molecular weight of approx. 4000 and its partial amino acid sequence to position 21 showed homology to the ..beta..-protein of Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. These results suggest that hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Dutch origin is pathogenetically related to Alzheimer disease and support the concept that the initial amyloid deposition in this disorder occurs in the vessel walls before damaging the brain parenchyma. Thus, deposition of ..beta..-protein in brain tissue seems to be related to a spectrum of diseases involving vascular syndromes, progressive dementia, or both.

  7. Methylene Blue Modulates β-Secretase, Reverses Cerebral Amyloidosis, and Improves Cognition in Transgenic Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takashi; Koyama, Naoki; Segawa, Tatsuya; Maeda, Masahiro; Maruyama, Nobuhiro; Kinoshita, Noriaki; Hou, Huayan; Tan, Jun; Town, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) proteolysis is required for production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that comprise β-amyloid plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, we tested whether the experimental agent methylene blue (MB), used for treatment of methemoglobinemia, might improve AD-like pathology and behavioral deficits. We orally administered MB to the aged transgenic PSAPP mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis and evaluated cognitive function and cerebral amyloid pathology. Beginning at 15 months of age, animals were gavaged with MB (3 mg/kg) or vehicle once daily for 3 months. MB treatment significantly prevented transgene-associated behavioral impairment, including hyperactivity, decreased object recognition, and defective spatial working and reference memory, but it did not alter nontransgenic mouse behavior. Moreover, brain parenchymal and cerebral vascular β-amyloid deposits as well as levels of various Aβ species, including oligomers, were mitigated in MB-treated PSAPP mice. These effects occurred with inhibition of amyloidogenic APP proteolysis. Specifically, β-carboxyl-terminal APP fragment and β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 protein expression and activity were attenuated. Additionally, treatment of Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing human wild-type APP with MB significantly decreased Aβ production and amyloidogenic APP proteolysis. These results underscore the potential for oral MB treatment against AD-related cerebral amyloidosis by modulating the amyloidogenic pathway. PMID:25157105

  8. Association of Cerebral Amyloidosis, Blood Pressure, and Neuronal Injury with Late-life Onset Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soo Byun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous literature suggests that Alzheimer’s disease (AD process may contribute to late-life onset depression (LLOD. Therefore, we investigated the association of LLOD with cerebral amyloidosis and neuronal injury, the two key brain changes in AD, along with vascular risks. Twenty nine non-demented individuals who first experienced major depressive disorder (MDD after age of 60 years were included as LLOD subjects, and 27 non-demented elderly individuals without lifetime experience of MDD were included as normal controls (NC. Comorbid mild cognitive impairment (MCI was diagnosed in 48% of LLOD subjects and in 0% of NC. LLOD, irrespective of comorbid MCI diagnosis, was associated with prominent prefrontal cortical atrophy. Compared to NC, LLOD subjects with comorbid MCI (LLODMCI showed increased cerebral 11C-Pittsburg compound B (PiB retention and plasma beta-amyloid 1-40 and 1-42 peptides, as measures of cerebral amyloidosis; and, such relationship was not observed in overall LLOD or LLOD without MCI (LLODwoMCI. LLOD subjects, particularly the LLODwoMCI, had higher systolic blood pressure (SBP than NC. When analyzed in the same multiple logistic regression model that included prefrontal gray matter (GM density, cerebral amyloidosis and SBP as independent variables, only prefrontal GM density showed a significant independent association with LLOD regardless of MCI comorbidity status. Our findings suggest AD process might be related to LLOD via prefrontal neuronal injury in the MCI stage, whereas vascular processes—SBP elevation, in particular—are associated with LLOD via prefrontal neuronal injury even in cognitively intact or less impaired individuals.

  9. Cellular processing of the amyloidogenic cystatin C variant of hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, Icelandic type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Merz, G S; Schwenk, V

    1999-01-01

    of an amyloidogenic mutation on the intracellular processing of its protein product. The protein, a mutant of the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C, is the amyloid precursor protein in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage with Amyloidosis--Icelandic type (HCHWA-I). The amyloid fibers are composed of mutant cystatin C...... several alterations in its intracellular trafficking. It forms a stable intracellular dimer that is partially retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and degraded. The bulk of mutant cystatin C that is secreted does not dissociate and is secreted as an inactive dimer. Thus, formation of the stable mutant...

  10. Extracellular matrix modulator lysyl oxidase colocalizes with amyloid-beta pathology in Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.M.; Bol, J.G.J.M.; van Duinen, S.G.; Drukarch, B.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) in brain vessel walls and parenchyma, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and senile plaques (SPs), respectively, plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type (HCHWA-D) pathogenesis.

  11. Senile systemic amyloidosis, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and dementia in a very old Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanskanen, Maarit; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Tienari, Pentti; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Verkkoniemi, Auli; Rastas, Sari; Sulkava, Raimo; Paetau, Anders

    2006-09-01

    Senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) are amyloid disorders, which typically manifest with old age. The aim of our study was to examine the possible association of these disorders in very old Finns. We performed a prospective, population-based post mortem study and used histological and immunohistochemical staining methods to verify the presence of these types of amyloid. All 63 subjects (59% of the 107 individuals 95 years of age or more, who died during the 10-year follow-up study), 53 women and 10 men), had been neurologically examined. The prevalence of SSA and its association with CAA, dementia, and neuropathologically verified AD was analyzed. Overall SSA occurred in 23 (37%) and CAA in 28 (44%) of the 63 subjects. At clinical examination 41 individuals (65%) were demented; 24 (38%) had Alzheimer's disease. SSA showed no association with the presence of CAA (P = 0.45), clinical dementia (P = 0.09), or Alzheimer's disease (P = 0.21), or sex (P = 0.53). Our prospective population based study shows that SSA and CAA are frequent in very old Finns, but they do not associate.

  12. Aβ seeding potency peaks in the early stages of cerebral β-amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lan; Rasmussen, Jay; Kaeser, Stephan A; Marzesco, Anne-Marie; Obermüller, Ulrike; Mahler, Jasmin; Schelle, Juliane; Odenthal, Jörg; Krüger, Christian; Fritschi, Sarah K; Walker, Lary C; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Baumann, Frank; Jucker, Mathias

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about the extent to which pathogenic factors drive the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at different stages of the long preclinical and clinical phases. Given that the aggregation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is an important factor in AD pathogenesis, we asked whether Aβ seeds from brain extracts of mice at different stages of amyloid deposition differ in their biological activity. Specifically, we assessed the effect of age on Aβ seeding activity in two mouse models of cerebralamyloidosis (APPPS1 and APP23) with different ages of onset and rates of progression of Aβ deposition. Brain extracts from these mice were serially diluted and inoculated into host mice. Strikingly, the seeding activity (seeding dose SD50) in extracts from donor mice of both models reached a plateau relatively early in the amyloidogenic process. When normalized to total brain Aβ, the resulting specific seeding activity sharply peaked at the initial phase of Aβ deposition, which in turn is characterized by a temporary several-fold increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio. At all stages, the specific seeding activity of the APPPS1 extract was higher compared to that of APP23 brain extract, consistent with a more important contribution of Aβ42 than Aβ40 to seed activity. Our findings indicate that the Aβ seeding potency is greatest early in the pathogenic cascade and diminishes as Aβ increasingly accumulates in brain. The present results provide experimental support for directing anti-Aβ therapeutics to the earliest stage of the pathogenic cascade, preferably before the onset of amyloid deposition. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. Clinical and Pulmonary Function Markers of Respiratory Exacerbation Risk in Subjects With Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Carraro, Elena; Pipitone, Emanuela; Marchese-Ragona, Rosario; Arcaro, Giovanna; Ferraro, Marco; Paladini, Luciana; Martinuzzi, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Although respiratory exacerbations are common in patients with quadriplegic cerebral palsy (CP), little is known about the factors that are related to increased exacerbation risk. This study aimed to identify the clinical and pulmonary function variables signaling risk of exacerbation in this type of patient. Thirty-one children and young adults with quadriplegic CP underwent a comprehensive history, physical examination, and pulmonary function test, including arterial blood gas analysis, airway resistance using the interrupter technique, and home overnight SpO2 monitoring. Subjects were divided into 2 groups depending on the number of respiratory exacerbations reported during the year before study entry: frequent exacerbators (ie, ≥ 2 exacerbations) and infrequent exacerbators (ie, < 2 exacerbations). The frequent exacerbators were more likely to require hospitalization due to respiratory disorders compared with the infrequent exacerbators (13/14 vs 9/17, P = .02). Respiratory exacerbation was found to be associated with diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux (adjusted odds ratio of 23.95 for subjects with confirmed diagnosis, P = .02) and higher PaCO2 levels (adjusted odds ratio of 12.60 for every 5-mm Hg increase in PaCO2 , P = .05). Subjects with PaCO2 ≥ 35 mm Hg showed an exacerbation odds ratio of 15.2 (95% CI 1.5-152.5, P = .01). Gastroesophageal reflux and increased PaCO2 can be considered simple, clinically useful markers of increased exacerbation risk in young subjects with quadriplegic CP. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  14. Aging Exacerbates Pressure-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Mouse Cerebral Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springo, Zsolt; Tarantini, Stefano; Toth, Peter; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Koller, Akos; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate that in addition to the increased prevalence of hypertension in old patients, the deleterious cerebrovascular effects of hypertension (including atherosclerosis, stroke, and vascular cognitive impairment) are also exacerbated in elderly individuals. The cellular mechanisms by which aging and hypertension interact to promote cerebrovascular pathologies are not well understood. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates high pressure-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, we exposed isolated segments of the middle cerebral arteries of young (3 months) and aged (24 months) C57BL/6 mice to 60 or 140 mmHg intraluminal pressure and assessed changes in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production using a mitochondria-targeted redox-sensitive fluorescent indicator dye (MitoSox) by confocal microscopy. Perinuclear MitoSox fluorescence was significantly stronger in high pressure-exposed middle cerebral arteries compared with middle cerebral arteries of the same animals exposed to 60 mmHg, indicating that high pressure increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in the smooth muscle cells of cerebral arteries. Comparison of young and aged middle cerebral arteries showed that aging exacerbates high pressure-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in cerebral arteries. We propose that increased mechanosensitive mitochondrial oxidative stress may potentially exacerbate cerebrovascular injury and vascular inflammation in aging. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Multiple factors contribute to the peripheral induction of cerebral beta-amyloidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisele, Y.S.; Fritschi, S.K.; Hamaguchi, T.; Obermüller, U.; Füger, P.; Skodras, A.; Schäfer, C.; Odenthal, J.; Heikenwalder, M.; Staufenbiel, M.; Jucker, M.

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide in brain is an early event and hallmark pathology of Alzheimer's disease and cerebral Abeta angiopathy. Experimental evidence supports the concept that Abeta multimers can act as seeds and structurally corrupt other Abeta peptides by a

  16. Familial Danish dementia: a novel form of cerebral amyloidosis associated with deposition of both amyloid-Dan and amyloid-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holton, J.L; Lashley, T.; Ghiso, J.

    2002-01-01

    Familial Danish dementia (FDD) is pathologically characterized by widespread cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), parenchymal protein deposits, and neurofibrillary degeneration. FDD is associated with a mutation of the BRI2 gene located on chromosome 13. In FDD there is a decamer duplication, which......-fibrillary) lesions was found. A[beta] was also present in a proportion of both vascular and parenchymal lesions. There was severe neurofibrillary pathology, and tau immunoblotting revealed a triplet electrophoretic migration pattern comparable with PHF-tau. FDD is a novel form of CNS amyloidosis with extensive...

  17. Hereditary cerebral haemorrhage with amyloidosis, Dutch type (HCHWA-D): clinicopathological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattendorff, A R; Frangione, B; Luyendijk, W; Bots, G T

    1995-01-01

    Clinical and neuropathological findings are reported in 63 patients with hereditary cerebral haemorrhage with amyloid angiopathy. Patients had mostly recurrent strokes, and at least 80% of these were haemorrhages. Almost a third of the patients died within a year of their first and only recorded haemorrhage, half of them within two weeks. This angiopathy was restricted to the cerebral and cerebellar cortex and its covering leptomeninges. As the most important consequence, haemorrhagic infarcts and haemorrhages occurred in the subcortical white matter--that is, the region most vulnerable to impaired cortical circulation. Further development of these subcortical lesions gives rise to the fatal haemorrhages seen at necropsy. In so far as dementia occurs this is likely to result from multiple microinfarcts or haemorrhages. In most cases preamyloid lesions or diffuse plaques and early plaques were seen. No other type of plaque or neurofibrillary degeneration was found. The plaques occur in conjunction with the angiopathy, but may not occur even when the angiopathy is severe. In one patient plaques were totally absent. Angiopathy and plaques may be the result of the same mutation, the expression of which is governed by tissue factors or phenotypic differences between individual subjects. Images PMID:7608669

  18. Aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cerebral microhemorrhages in mice: role of resveratrol treatment in vasoprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Springo, Zsolt; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Koller, Akos; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cognitive decline, but the specific age-related mechanisms remain elusive. Cerebral microhemorrhages (CMHs) are associated with rupture of small intracerebral vessels and are thought to progressively impair neuronal function. To determine whether aging exacerbates hypertension-induced CMHs young (3 months) and aged (24 months) mice were treated with angiotensin II plus L-NAME. We found that the same level of hypertension leads to significantly earlier onset and increased incidence of CMHs in aged mice than in young mice, as shown by neurological examination, gait analysis, and histological assessment of CMHs in serial brain sections. Hypertension-induced cerebrovascular oxidative stress and redox-sensitive activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were increased in aging. Treatment of aged mice with resveratrol significantly attenuated hypertension-induced oxidative stress, inhibited vascular MMP activation, significantly delayed the onset, and reduced the incidence of CMHs. Collectively, aging promotes CMHs in mice likely by exacerbating hypertension-induced oxidative stress and MMP activation. Therapeutic strategies that reduce microvascular oxidative stress and MMP activation may be useful for the prevention of CMHs, protecting neurocognitive function in high-risk elderly patients. PMID:25677910

  19. Aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cerebral microhemorrhages in mice: role of resveratrol treatment in vasoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Springo, Zsolt; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Koller, Akos; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cognitive decline, but the specific age-related mechanisms remain elusive. Cerebral microhemorrhages (CMHs) are associated with rupture of small intracerebral vessels and are thought to progressively impair neuronal function. To determine whether aging exacerbates hypertension-induced CMHs young (3 months) and aged (24 months) mice were treated with angiotensin II plus L-NAME. We found that the same level of hypertension leads to significantly earlier onset and increased incidence of CMHs in aged mice than in young mice, as shown by neurological examination, gait analysis, and histological assessment of CMHs in serial brain sections. Hypertension-induced cerebrovascular oxidative stress and redox-sensitive activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were increased in aging. Treatment of aged mice with resveratrol significantly attenuated hypertension-induced oxidative stress, inhibited vascular MMP activation, significantly delayed the onset, and reduced the incidence of CMHs. Collectively, aging promotes CMHs in mice likely by exacerbating hypertension-induced oxidative stress and MMP activation. Therapeutic strategies that reduce microvascular oxidative stress and MMP activation may be useful for the prevention of CMHs, protecting neurocognitive function in high-risk elderly patients. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Bone Fracture Pre-Ischemic Stroke Exacerbates Ischemic Cerebral Injury in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a devastating complication of bone fracture. Bone fracture shortly after stroke enhances stroke injury by augmenting inflammation. We hypothesize that bone fracture shortly before ischemic stroke also exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Tibia fracture was performed 6 or 24 hours before permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO on C57BL/6J mice or Ccr2RFP/+Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice that have the RFP gene knocked into one allele of Ccr2 gene and GFP gene knocked into one allele of Cx3cr1 gene. Behavior was tested 3 days after pMCAO. Infarct volume, the number of CD68+ cells, apoptotic neurons, bone marrow-derived macrophages (RFP+, and microgila (GFP+ in the peri-infarct region were quantified. Compared to mice subjected to pMCAO only, bone fracture 6 or 24 hours before pMCAO increased behavioral deficits, the infarct volume, and the number of CD68+ cells and apoptotic neurons in the peri-infarct area. Both bone marrow-derived macrophages (CCR2+ and microglia (CX3CR1+ increased in the peri-infarct regions of mice subjected to bone fracture before pMCAO compared to stroke-only mice. The mice subjected to bone fracture 6 hours before pMCAO had more severe injury than mice that had bone fracture 24 hours before pMCAO. Our data showed that bone fracture shortly before stroke also increases neuroinflammation and exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Our findings suggest that inhibition of neuroinflammation or management of stroke risk factors before major bone surgery would be beneficial for patients who are likely to suffer from stroke.

  1. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussabah, Elhem; Zakhama, Lilia; Ksontini, Iméne; Ibn Elhadj, Zied; Boukhris, Besma; Naffeti, Sana; Thameur, Moez; Ben Youssef, Soraya

    2008-09-01

    PREREQUIS: Amyloidosis is a rare infiltrative disease characterized by multiple clinical features. Various organs are involved and the cardiovascular system is a common target of amyloidosis. Cardiac involvement may occur with or without clinical manifestations and is considered as a major prognostic factor. To analyze the clinical features of cardiac involvement, to review actual knowledgement concerning echocardiographic diagnostic and to evaluate recent advances in treatment of the disease. An electronic search of the relevant literature was carried out using Medline and Pubmed. Keys words used for the final search were amyloidosis, cardiopathy and echocardiography. We considered for analysis reviews, studies and articles between 1990 and 2007. Amyloidosis represents 5 to 10% of non ischemic cardiomyoparhies. Cardiac involvement is the first cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy witch must be evoked in front of every inexplained cardiopathy after the age of forty. The amyloid nature of cardiopathy is suggered if some manifestations were associated as a peripheric neuropathy, a carpal tunnel sydrome and proteinuria > 3g/day. Echocardiography shows dilated atria, a granular sparkling appearance of myocardium, diastolic dysfunction and thickened left ventricle contrasting with a low electric voltage. The proof of amyloidosis is brought by an extra-cardiac biopsy, the indications of endomyocardial biopsy are very limited. The identification of the amyloid nature of cardiopathy has an direct therapeutic implication: it indicates the use of digitalis, calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers. Today the treatment of amyloidosis remains very unsatisfactory especially in the cardiac involvement. An early diagnosis before the cardiac damage may facilitate therapy and improve prognosis.

  2. Distribution of beta/A4 protein and amyloid precursor protein in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozemuller, A J; Roos, R A; Bots, G T; Kamphorst, W; Eikelenboom, P; Van Nostrand, W E

    1993-05-01

    Brain amyloidosis with abundant beta/A4 protein deposition in plaques and cortical and meningeal vessels is found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D). In contrast to AD, no neuritic pathology or classical congophilic plaques are found in HCHWA-D. Unlike most AD cases, the congophilic angiopathy in HCHWA-D is very severe. It is still unknown whether beta/A4 deposits in plaques and vessels have the same origin. In this study, we have used frozen cortical tissue of HCHWA-D and AD patients to investigate the beta/A4 amyloid protein and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in different types of plaques and congophilic angiopathy. Immunohistochemical staining was conducted using antibodies against synthetic beta/A4 proteins and antibodies against APP including MAbP2-1, a monoclonal antibody against purified protease nexin-2, which is the secreted form of APP. In contrast to immunohistochemical studies on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, frozen tissue of HCHWA-D patients revealed a very high number of beta/A4 plaques resembling AD. All plaques were of the diffuse type. Double-staining with MabP2-1 and beta/A4 antisera revealed: 1) the presence of APP immunoreactivity in classical plaques and transitional forms; 2) the absence of APP immunoreactivity in diffuse plaques in HCHWA-D and AD; and 3) pronounced APP immunoreactivity in congophilic vessels in HCHWA-D in contrast to weak APP staining in congophilic vessels in AD. Together these findings suggest that: a) the presence of APP in plaques is related to neuritic changes; b) different processes occur in amyloid formation in plaques and vessels; and c) differences exist between the process of amyloid formation in HCHWA-D and AD.

  3. AL Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desport Estelle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig light chains (LC (most commonly of lambda isotype usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and

  4. Mas receptor deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced cerebral and systemic inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Lima, Onésia C; Pinto, Mauro C X; Duchene, Johan; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Souza, Laura L; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A S; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2015-12-01

    Beyond the classical actions of the renin-angiotensin system on the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis, several studies have shown its involvement in acute and chronic inflammation. The G protein-coupled receptor Mas is a functional binding site for the angiotensin-(1-7); however, its role in the immune system has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effect of genetic deletion of Mas receptor in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic and cerebral inflammation in mice. Inflammatory response was triggered in Mas deficient (Mas(-/-)) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice (8-12 weeks-old) by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (5 mg/kg). Mas(-/-) mice presented more intense hypothermia compared to WT mice 24 h after LPS injection. Systemically, the bone marrow of Mas(-/-) mice contained a lower number of neutrophils and monocytes 3 h and 24 h after LPS injection, respectively. The plasma levels of inflammatory mediators KC, MCP-1 and IL-10 were higher in Mas(-/-) mice 24 h after LPS injection in comparison to WT. In the brain, Mas(-/-) animals had a significant increase in the number of adherent leukocytes to the brain microvasculature compared to WT mice, as well as, increased number of monocytes and neutrophils recruited to the pia-mater. The elevated number of adherent leukocytes on brain microvasculature in Mas(-/-) mice was associated with increased expression of CD11b - the alpha-subunit of the Mac-1 integrin - in bone marrow neutrophils 3h after LPS injection, and with increased brain levels of chemoattractants KC, MIP-2 and MCP-1, 24 h later. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Mas receptor deficiency results in exacerbated inflammation in LPS-challenged mice, which suggest a potential role for the Mas receptor as a regulator of systemic and brain inflammatory response induced by LPS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Transient Cerebral Ischemia Promotes Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Exacerbates Cognitive Impairments in Young 5xFAD Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Guo, Lan; Gauba, Esha; Tian, Jing; Wang, Lu; Tandon, Neha; Shankar, Malini; Beck, Simon J.; Du, Yifeng; Du, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is heterogeneous and multifactorial neurological disorder; and the risk factors of AD still remain elusive. Recent studies have highlighted the role of vascular factors in promoting the progression of AD and have suggested that ischemic events increase the incidence of AD. However, the detailed mechanisms linking ischemic insult to the progression of AD is still largely undetermined. In this study, we have established a transient cerebral ischemia model on young 5xFAD mice and their non-transgenic (nonTg) littermates by the transient occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries. We have found that transient cerebral ischemia significantly exacerbates brain mitochondrial dysfunction including mitochondrial respiration deficits, oxidative stress as well as suppressed levels of mitochondrial fusion proteins including optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) and mitofusin 2 (MFN2) in young 5xFAD mice resulting in aggravated spatial learning and memory. Intriguingly, transient cerebral ischemia did not induce elevation in the levels of cortical or mitochondrial Amyloid beta (Aβ)1-40 or 1–42 levels in 5xFAD mice. In addition, the glucose- and oxygen-deprivation-induced apoptotic neuronal death in Aβ-treated neurons was significantly mitigated by mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo which suppresses mitochondrial superoxide levels. Therefore, the simplest interpretation of our results is that young 5xFAD mice with pre-existing AD-like mitochondrial dysfunction are more susceptible to the effects of transient cerebral ischemia; and ischemic events may exacerbate dementia and worsen the outcome of AD patients by exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26632816

  6. Heat stress exacerbates the reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity during prolonged self-paced exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, J D; Racinais, S

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the influence of hyperthermia on middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean). Eleven cyclists undertook a 750 kJ self-paced time trial in HOT (35 °C) and COOL (20 °C) conditions. Exercise time was longer in HOT (56 min) compared with COOL (49 min; P level of thermal strain developing in the heat appears to have exacerbated the reduction in MCA Vmean, in part via increases in peripheral blood flow and a decrease in arterial blood pressure. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Amyloidosis in the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Jensen, Katrine Skydsgaard; Dahl, Claus; Pilt, Anette Pedersen

    2014-01-01

    Amyloidosis refers to a number of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of misfolded proteins, called amyloid fibrils, in the tissues and organs of the body. Amyloidosis in the bladder is a generally localized, rare condition, with approximately 200 cases reported in the literature....... This report presents three cases of amyloidosis in the bladder, two of which had coexisting transitional cell carcinoma. Evaluation for systemic disease is recommended in patients with newly discovered amyloidosis, even if first recognized in an area with the localized form, as in the bladder....

  8. Insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency exacerbates hypertension-induced cerebral microhemorrhages in mice, mimicking the aging phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, Stefano; Valcarcel-Ares, Noa M; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Springo, Zsolt; Fulop, Gabor A; Ashpole, Nicole; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2017-06-01

    Clinical and experimental studies show that aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cerebral microhemorrhages (CMHs), which progressively impair neuronal function. There is growing evidence that aging promotes insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) deficiency, which compromises multiple aspects of cerebromicrovascular and brain health. To determine the role of IGF-1 deficiency in the pathogenesis of CMHs, we induced hypertension in mice with liver-specific knockdown of IGF-1 (Igf1 f/f  + TBG-Cre-AAV8) and control mice by angiotensin II plus l-NAME treatment. In IGF-1-deficient mice, the same level of hypertension led to significantly earlier onset and increased incidence and neurological consequences of CMHs, as compared to control mice, as shown by neurological examination, gait analysis, and histological assessment of CMHs in serial brain sections. Previous studies showed that in aging, increased oxidative stress-mediated matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activation importantly contributes to the pathogenesis of CMHs. Thus, it is significant that hypertension-induced cerebrovascular oxidative stress and MMP activation were increased in IGF-1-deficient mice. We found that IGF-1 deficiency impaired hypertension-induced adaptive media hypertrophy and extracellular matrix remodeling, which together with the increased MMP activation likely also contributes to increased fragility of intracerebral arterioles. Collectively, IGF-1 deficiency promotes the pathogenesis of CMHs, mimicking the aging phenotype, which likely contribute to its deleterious effect on cognitive function. Therapeutic strategies that upregulate IGF-1 signaling in the cerebral vessels and/or reduce microvascular oxidative stress, and MMP activation may be useful for the prevention of CMHs, protecting cognitive function in high-risk elderly patients. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Cerebral and cardiac amyloidosis in autopsied elderly individuals Beta-fibrilose encefálica e cardíaca em idosos autopsiados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Martins de Exel Nunes

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Amyloidosis in elderly individuals can be an independent alteration and a characteristic of aging. However, the clinical, pathophysiologic, and biochemical characteristics of amyloidosis related to age remain uncertain. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the heart and/or the brain of individuals aged 60 years or over exhibits amyloid deposits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The autopsy findings of individuals who were at least 60 years old were studied. The autopsies took place between the years of 1976 and 2000. A total of 10 cases were selected that had hearts without cardiopathies, had negative serology for Chagas' disease, and had brains without morphological changes related to encephalopathies. Slides with fragments of heart and brain were processed and analyzed using polarized and common light microscopy. RESULTS: Of the 10 cases, 4 were positive for amyloidosis. All had positive findings in the brain, and 1 case also had positive findings in the heart. Among the positive cases, 50% were of people aged 60 to 69 years. There appeared to be a relationship between the presence of amyloid deposits and the ratio of brain and body weight, with the ratio in the positive cases being smaller than in the negative cases. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis of amyloid deposits in the brains and hearts of elderly individuals shows that such deposits may lead to a systemic attack of senility, common to natural aging. It is not certain that beta-amyloid deposits would alone bring such drastic repercussions to the individual. Some additional disorders of the organism could cause the breakdown of the natural balance related to the accumulation of these proteins, leading the way to the pathological contexts of amyloidosis.RESUMO INTRODUÇÃO: A amiloidose em idosos pode ser uma alteração independente e própria do envelhecimento. Entretanto, as características clínicas, fisiopatológicas e bioquímicas da Amiloidose

  10. Genetics Home Reference: transthyretin amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transthyretin amyloidosis transthyretin amyloidosis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... system, which controls involuntary body functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, and digestion, may also be affected ...

  11. Statin therapy exacerbates alcohol-induced constriction of cerebral arteries via modulation of ethanol-induced BK channel inhibition in vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakova, Maria N; Bisen, Shivantika; Dopico, Alex M; Bukiya, Anna N

    2017-12-01

    Statins constitute the most commonly prescribed drugs to decrease cholesterol (CLR). CLR is an important modulator of alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction (AICAC). Using rats on a high CLR diet (2% CLR) we set to determine whether atorvastatin administration (10mg/kg daily for 18-23weeks) modified AICAC. Middle cerebral arteries were pressurized in vitro at 60mmHg and AICAC was evoked by 50mM ethanol, that is within the range of blood alcohol detected in humans following moderate-to-heavy drinking. AICAC was evident in high CLR+atorvastatin group but not in high CLR diet+placebo. Statin exacerbation of AICAC persisted in de-endothelialized arteries, and was blunted by CLR enrichment in vitro. Fluorescence imaging of filipin-stained arteries showed that atorvastatin decreased vascular smooth muscle (VSM) CLR when compared to placebo, this difference being reduced by CLR enrichment in vitro. Voltage- and calcium-gated potassium channels of large conductance (BK) are known VSM targets of ethanol, with their beta1 subunit being necessary for ethanol-induced channel inhibition and resulting AICAC. Ethanol-induced BK inhibition in excised membrane patches from freshly isolated myocytes was exacerbated in the high CLR diet+atorvastatin group when compared to high CLR diet+placebo. Unexpectedly, atorvastatin decreased the amount and function of BK beta1 subunit as documented by immunofluorescence imaging and functional patch-clamp studies. Atorvastatin exacerbation of ethanol-induced BK inhibition disappeared upon artery CLR enrichment in vitro. Our study demonstrates for the first time statin's ability to exacerbate the vascular effect of a widely consumed drug of abuse, this exacerbation being driven by statin modulation of ethanol-induced BK channel inhibition in the VSM via CLR-mediated mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein II causes vascular leakage and exacerbates experimental cerebral malaria in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Priya; Balaban, Amanda E; Diamond, Michael S; Sinnis, Photini; Klein, Robyn S; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2017-01-01

    A devastating complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection is cerebral malaria, in which vascular leakage and cerebral swelling lead to coma and often death. P. falciparum produces a protein called histidine-rich protein II (HRPII) that accumulates to high levels in the bloodstream of patients and serves as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for falciparum malaria. Using a human cerebral microvascular endothelial barrier model, we previously found that HRPII activates the endothelial cell inflammasome, resulting in decreased integrity of tight junctions and increased endothelial barrier permeability. Here, we report that intravenous administration of HRPII induced blood-brain barrier leakage in uninfected mice. Furthermore, HRPII infusion in P. berghei-infected mice increased early mortality from experimental cerebral malaria. These data support the hypothesis that HRPII is a virulence factor that contributes to cerebral malaria by compromising the integrity of the blood-brain barrier.

  13. Quantitative μPET Imaging of Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Amyloidosis in the TASTPM Double Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Ann-Marie; Wyffels, Leonie; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Bottelbergs, Astrid; Richardson, Jill; Kelley, Jonathan; Schmidt, Mark; Stroobants, Sigrid; Langlois, Xavier; Staelens, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography studies of cerebral glucose utilization and amyloid-β deposition with fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose ([(18)F]-FDG) and amyloid tracers have shown characteristic pathological changes in Alzheimer's Disease that can be used for disease diagnosis and monitoring. Application of this technology to preclinical research with transgenic animal models would greatly facilitate drug discovery and further understanding of disease processes. The results from preclinical studies with these imaging biomarkers have however been highly inconsistent, causing doubts over whether animal models can truly replicate an AD-like phenotype. In this study we performed in vivo imaging with [(18)F]-FDG and [(18)F]-AV45 in double transgenic TASTPM mice, a transgenic model that been previously demonstrated high levels of fibrillar amyloid-β and decreases in cerebral glucose utilization with ex vivo techniques. Our results show widespread and significant retention of [(18)F]-AV45 (p < 0.0001) in aged TASTPM mice in addition to significant regional decreases in [(18)F]-FDG uptake (p < 0.05). In vivo quantification of amyloid-β showed a strong (Pearson's r = 0.7078), but not significant (p = 0.1156), positive correlation with ex vivo measures suggesting some limitations on tracer sensitivity. In the case of [(18)F]-FDG, voxelwise analysis greatly enhanced detection of hypometabolic regions. We further evidenced modest neuronal loss (thalamus p = 0.0318) that could underlie the observed hypometabolism. This research was performed in conjunction with the European Community's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) for the Innovative Medicine Initiative under the PharmaCog Grant Agreement no.115009.

  14. Complex interplay between brain function and structure during cerebral amyloidosis in APP transgenic mouse strains revealed by multi-parametric MRI comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Joanes; Derungs, Rebecca; Kulic, Luka; Welt, Tobias; Henkelman, Mark; Nitsch, Roger M; Rudin, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the aging population. Neuroimaging methods, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have helped reveal alterations in the brain structure, metabolism, and function of patients and in groups at risk of developing AD, yet the nature of these alterations is poorly understood. Neuroimaging in mice is attractive for investigating mechanisms underlying functional and structural changes associated with AD pathology. Several preclinical murine models of AD have been generated based on transgenic insertion of human mutated APP genes. Depending on the specific mutations, mouse strains express different aspects of amyloid pathology, e.g. intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates, parenchymal plaques, or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We have applied multi-parametric MRI in three transgenic mouse lines to compare changes in brain function with resting-state fMRI and structure with diffusion tensor imaging and high resolution anatomical imaging. E22ΔAβ developing intracellular Aβ aggregates did not present functional or structural alterations compared to their wild-type littermates. PSAPP mice displaying parenchymal amyloid plaques displayed mild functional changes within the supplementary and barrel field cortices, and increased isocortical volume relative to controls. Extensive reduction in functional connectivity in the sensory-motor cortices and within the default mode network, as well as local volume increase in the midbrain relative to wild-type have been observed in ArcAβ mice bearing intracellular Aβ aggregates as well as parenchymal and vascular amyloid deposits. Patterns of functional and structural changes appear to be strain-specific and not directly related to amyloid deposition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aerobic Glycolysis in the Frontal Cortex Correlates with Memory Performance in Wild-Type Mice But Not the APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard A; Tindale, Lauren; Lone, Asad; Singh, Olivia; Macauley, Shannon L; Stanley, Molly; Holtzman, David M; Bartha, Robert; Cumming, Robert C

    2016-02-10

    Aerobic glycolysis and lactate production in the brain plays a key role in memory, yet the role of this metabolism in the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains poorly understood. Here we examined the relationship between cerebral lactate levels and memory performance in an APP/PS1 mouse model of AD, which progressively accumulates amyloid-β. In vivo (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed an age-dependent decline in lactate levels within the frontal cortex of control mice, whereas lactate levels remained unaltered in APP/PS1 mice from 3 to 12 months of age. Analysis of hippocampal interstitial fluid by in vivo microdialysis revealed a significant elevation in lactate levels in APP/PS1 mice relative to control mice at 12 months of age. An age-dependent decline in the levels of key aerobic glycolysis enzymes and a concomitant increase in lactate transporter expression was detected in control mice. Increased expression of lactate-producing enzymes correlated with improved memory in control mice. Interestingly, in APP/PS1 mice the opposite effect was detected. In these mice, increased expression of lactate producing enzymes correlated with poorer memory performance. Immunofluorescent staining revealed localization of the aerobic glycolysis enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and lactate dehydrogenase A within cortical and hippocampal neurons in control mice, as well as within astrocytes surrounding amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice. These observations collectively indicate that production of lactate, via aerobic glycolysis, is beneficial for memory function during normal aging. However, elevated lactate levels in APP/PS1 mice indicate perturbed lactate processing, a factor that may contribute to cognitive decline in AD. Lactate has recently emerged as a key metabolite necessary for memory consolidation. Lactate is the end product of aerobic glycolysis, a unique form of metabolism that occurs within certain regions of the brain. Here

  16. Endocrine involvement in systemic amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Didem; Dagdelen, Selcuk; Erbas, Tomris

    2010-01-01

    To present an overview of the published data on endocrine involvement and endocrine dysfunction in patients with systemic amyloidosis. We conducted a review of the medical literature using MEDLINE data sources, including clinical trials, in vitro studies, and case reports on pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, pancreatic, adrenal, and gonadal involvement in systemic amyloidosis. Reports of endocrine involvement in systemic amyloidosis seem to consist primarily of small-samplesize clinical trials or case reports, probably because of the rarity of the disease itself. Systemic amyloidosis mainly involves and causes functional impairment in the thyroid and testes in the endocrine system. Evaluation of adrenal function necessitates special consideration because amyloid infiltration of the adrenal glands resulting in failure may be a life-threatening condition. Amyloid deposition commonly seen in the pituitary gland and the pancreas of patients with Alzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, respectively, is generally classified as local amyloidosis and should not be confused with systemic involvement. Additionally, detection of amyloid deposition in the thyroid and testes may have a diagnostic role in patients with suspected systemic or renal amyloidosis. Published data suggest that systemic amyloidosis frequently involves the endocrine system, and endocrine dysfunction seems to be not as rare as previously thought. A rapidly growing goiter or symptoms and signs of adrenal or gonadal dysfunction should raise suspicion of amyloid infiltration. Involvement of pituitary, parathyroid, and pancreatic sites in systemic amyloidosis still remains to be clarified. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed for complete characterization of the effect of systemic amyloidosis on the endocrine system.

  17. Unique type of isolated cardiac valvular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reehana Salma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid deposition in heart is a common occurrence in systemic amyloidosis. But localised valvular amyloid deposits are very uncommon. It was only in 1922 that the cases of valvular amyloidosis were reported. Then in 1980, Goffin et al reported another type of valvular amyloidosis, which he called the dystrophic valvular amyloidosis. We report a case of aortic valve amyloidosis which is different from the yet described valvular amyloidosis. Case presentation A 72 years old gentleman underwent urgent aortic valve replacement. Intraoperatively, a lesion was found attached to the inferior surface of his bicuspid aortic valve. Histopathology examination of the valve revealed that the lesion contained amyloid deposits, identified as AL amyloidosis. The serum amyloid A protein (SAP scan was normal and showed no evidence of systemic amyloidosis. The ECG and echocardiogram were not consistent with cardiac amyloidosis. Conclusion Two major types of cardiac amyloidosis have been described in literature: primary-myelomatous type (occurs with systemic amyolidosis, and senile type(s. Recently, a localised cardiac dystrophic valvular amyloidosis has been described. In all previously reported cases, there was a strong association of localised valvular amyloidosis with calcific deposits. Ours is a unique case which differs from the previously reported cases of localised valvular amyloidosis. In this case, the lesion was not associated with any scar tissue. Also there was no calcific deposit found. This may well be a yet unknown type of isolated valvular amyloidosis.

  18. Primary conjunctival amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandana Chakraborti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old previously healthy male presented with a 4 year history of painless drooping of right upper eyelid.On eversion of the right upper eyelid, a yellowish pink mass was seen in the tarsal region. Rest of the ocular examination was normal in both the eyes. Initial biopsy showed chronic inflammation. Subsequently, the entire mass was excised and histopathological examination showed the presence of amyloid in the subconjunctival stroma. At 3 months follow-up, similar lesion was detected in the right lower, left upper, and lower lid, which were treated with cryotherapy, with partial resolution. Patient has been followed up for more than 2 years without any complaints. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of an isolated primary conjunctival amyloidosis with involvement of both the upper and lower palpebral conjunctiva of either eye. It was treated successfully by excision and cryotherapy.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Amyloidosis, primary localized cutaneous, 2 Genetic Testing Registry: Primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis 1 General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic ...

  20. Localized Lymph Node Light Chain Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Dhakal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin-derived light chain amyloidosis can occasionally be associated with localized disease. We present a patient with localized lymph node light chain amyloidosis without an underlying monoclonal protein or lymphoproliferative disorder and review the literature of lymph node amyloidosis discussing work-up and risk factors for systemic progression.

  1. Amiloidosis bucal Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    2012-03-01

    , confirmado con la coloración del espécimen con el reactivo rojo congo. Los depósitos de amiloide fueron encontrados en el tejido conjuntivo, que con la luz polarizada presentó birrefringencia. Tal hallazgo fue preocupante, ya que la amiloidosis afecta diversos tejidos, lo que puede provocar complicaciones sistémicas. Por esa razón la paciente fue orientada a buscar atención médica. Sin embargo, abandonó el tratamiento y falleció 6 meses después del diagnóstico de la enfermedad. Lesiones bucales aparentemente simples pueden revelar enfermedades raras y de difícil tratamiento. El diagnóstico preciso y la supervisión médica son fundamentales para la sobrevida del paciente.Amyloidosis is an uncommon complicated disease of a difficult diagnosis occurring due to the amyloid substance depot in the extracellular medium. Being diagnosed in the oral cavity, the patient must to be supervised to assess the potential systemic complications of disease. The aim of present paper was to present a case of oral amyloidosis in a female patient ages 72 presenting with traumatic fibroma. After performance of a biopsy and the histopathological examination, the diagnosis was the presence of amyloidosis, confirmed with the help of the sample using Congo red reactant. Amyloid depots were found in the conjunctive tissue which under the polarized light showed birefringence. This finding was worrying since the amyloidosis involves different tissues leading to systemic complications. Thus, the patient was oriented to search medical care; however she abandons treatment dying 6 months after diagnosis of the disease. The apparently single oral injuries may to reveal uncommon diseases and of difficult treatment. The precise treatment and the medical supervision are essential in the patient's survival.

  2. THE AUTOIMMUNE CONSTELLATION IN LICHEN AMYLOIDOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrese, Elena; Vâţă, D; Ciobanu, Delia; Stătescu, Laura; Solovăstru, Laura Gheucă

    2015-01-01

    Localized cutaneous amyloidosis is a rare disease among white people, being more common in South-Asia, China and South America. The disease is characterized by deposition of amyloid material in the papillary dermis without visceral involvement. Nevertheless, there is a growing list of immune-mediated disorders that have been linked to cutaneous amyloidosis. We present two cases of concomitant occurrence of lichen amyloidosis and autoimmune thyroiditis/atopic dermatitis in two Caucasian women.

  3. CVID Associated with Systemic Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliha Esenboga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID is a frequent primary immune deficiency (PID, which consists of a heterogeneous group of disorders and can present with recurrent infections, chronic diarrhea, autoimmunity, chronic pulmonary and gastrointestinal diseases, and malignancy. Secondary amyloidosis is an uncommon complication of CVID. We report an unusual case of a 27-year-old male patient who presented with recurrent sinopulmonary infections, chronic diarrhea, and hypogammaglobulinemia and was diagnosed with CVID. The patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg therapy once every 21 days and daily trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for prophylaxis. Two years after initial diagnosis, the patient was found to have progressive decline in IgG levels (as low as 200–300 mg/dL despite regular Ig infusions. The laboratory tests revealed massive proteinuria and his kidney biopsy showed accumulation of AA type amyloid. We believe that the delay in the diagnosis of CVID and initiation of Ig replacement therapy caused chronic inflammation due to recurrent infections in our patient and this led to an uncommon and life-threatening complication, amyloidosis. Patients with CVID require regular follow-up for the control of infections and assessment of adequacy of Ig replacement therapy. Amyloidosis should be kept in the differential diagnosis when managing patients with CVID.

  4. Unusual presentation of oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P.P Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a rare disease of difficult diagnosis that occurs due accumulation of amyloid substance localized or systemic. The oral cavity is an unusual site and can be related to both localized and systemic forms and for that reason a full investigation is necessary to determine the extent of the disease. This study reports a case of a 58-year-old melanoderm male patient referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with white plaques on the tongue and multiple nodules in the region of the buccal mucosa and labial commissure, with 6 months of evolution and painful symptoms. An incisional biopsy was performed on both sites and histological examination indicated the presence of eosinophilic amorphous material within the connective tissue, positive for crystal violet staining, consistent with amyloidosis. At the present time, there is no consensus on the management of local amyloidosis. Surgical treatment of localized forms is indicated in some cases to reduce the functional prejudice. Moreover, follow-up is mandatory, both to manage recurrences and to monitor the possible evolution of the disease to the systemic form.

  5. Primary localised cutaneous amyloidosis - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Britta; Schmidt, Grethe; Lauritzen, Anne Falensteen

    2013-01-01

    Amyloidosis is defined as extracellular deposits of heterogenic, misfolded proteins, amyloid fibrils, in various tissues. The aim of our study was to review the literature and to evaluate the risk of developing systemic amyloidosis (SA) and the risk of local recurrence of primary localised...

  6. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  7. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia.

  8. Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis Mimicking Rheumatic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit R. Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary amyloidosis can complicate chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, the clinical findings of primary amyloidosis may mimic those of primary rheumatologic disorders. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman who presented with dystrophic nail changes, dry eyes, bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, Raynaud’s phenomenon, and high titer positive nucleolar pattern antinuclear antibody. She was initially misdiagnosed as having Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD. On further workup, she was eventually diagnosed with lambda light chain systemic amyloidosis by abdominal fat pad biopsy. Her symptoms completely resolved after autologous stem cell transplantation. With this case, we would like to highlight the similarities in the clinical features between light chain amyloidosis and rheumatological disorders. We would also like to emphasize the importance of the prompt recognition of the clinical features of amyloidosis which are crucial to triggering appropriate diagnostic procedures, since early diagnosis is a key to improving outcomes in this disease with an otherwise poor prognosis.

  9. Renal amyloidosis in cattle with inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elitok, O M; Elitok, B; Unver, O

    2008-01-01

    The association of inflammatory diseases such as traumatic reticuloperitonitis (TRP), mastitis, metritis, and pododermatitis with renal amyloidosis in cattle is poorly described. Serum amyloid A (SAA) levels are elevated during inflammatory diseases, and renal amyloidosis is formed as a complication. This study was conducted with 82 crossbred cattle with mastitis (n = 18 cows), metritis (n = 11 cows), TRP (n = 30 cows), and pododermatitis (n = 23 : 15 cows and 8 beef cattle). Ten clinically healthy cows served as controls. Hematological, urinary, and blood parameters, including SAA, were measured by an automated procedure provided with trade kits. Determination of amyloidal structures was made by histopathological examination of renal biopsy specimens. At the end of this trial, amyloidosis was detected in 5 cows displaying typical nephrotic syndrome, with hypoproteinemia and proteinuria in combination with polyuria and weight loss. Furthermore, it was observed that cows with renal amyloidosis had significantly higher (P pododermatitis have a high prevalence of systemic amyloidosis in response to inflammation.

  10. Involvement of the central nervous system and its coverings in different forms of amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, J; Störkel, S; Steinmetz, H

    1989-01-01

    The list of human amyloidoses contains at least ten different types that might be differentiated on account of their pattern of distribution (localized or generalized), on the basis of their underlying diseases and above all on account of their different amyloidogenic proteins. According to WRIGHT it was already possible to differentiate two types of amyloid by pretreating the histologic tissue sections with KMnO4 before staining them with Congored. But now nearly all different types of amyloid can be determined immunohistologically by means of specific antibodies. In the human brain and in its coverings we found as well localized as generalized amyloidoses. The most frequent localized amyloidosis is the cerebral amyloidosis in Alzheimer's disease, in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type and in "normal" aging (type ASb). The endocrine type of amyloid could be detected in the anterior pituitary lobe of old people and sometimes in adenomas of the pituitary gland (type AE). In cases of generalized amyloidosis (e.g. amyloid type AA, type AF or type AL) the intracranial amyloid deposits or precipitations are only found in those regions where the blood brain barrier is insufficient. These regions are --choroid plexus --infundibulum (hypothalamus) --pineal gland (epiphysis) --area postrema --circumventricular organs --ganglion Gasseri and --dura mater. The other parts of the CNS (the leptomeninges, cortical grey matter, subcortical white matter and basal ganglia) are always free of amyloid in these cases of generalized amyloidosis. In cases of cerebral amyloidosis (type ASb) the typical berefringent Congored deposits are found in the leptomeninges and in cortical and subcortical grey matter; white matter and all other regions are always free of amyloid. We observed several cases with more than one type of amyloidosis: e.g. a generalized form and a second local amyloidosis, two generalized forms (AA and A beta 2M) or even several localized types (ASb, AE). By paying

  11. Transmission of systemic AA amyloidosis in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, T; Ishiguro, N; Higuchi, K

    2014-03-01

    Amyloidoses are a group of protein-misfolding disorders that are characterized by the deposition of amyloid fibrils in organs and/or tissues. In reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, serum AA (SAA) protein forms deposits in mice, domestic and wild animals, and humans that experience chronic inflammation. AA amyloid fibrils are abnormal β-sheet-rich forms of the serum precursor SAA, with conformational changes that promote fibril formation. Extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils causes disease in affected animals. Recent findings suggest that AA amyloidosis could be transmissible. Similar to the pathogenesis of transmissible prion diseases, amyloid fibrils induce a seeding-nucleation process that may lead to development of AA amyloidosis. We review studies of possible transmission in bovine, avian, mouse, and cheetah AA amyloidosis.

  12. Systemic amyloidosis with an exceptional cutaneous presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barja, Juan; Piñeyro, Francisca; Almagro, Manuel; Sacristán, Felipe; Rodríguez-Lojo, Romina; Fernández-Jorge, Beatriz; Ruanova, Sonia; García-Silva, Jesus

    2013-01-15

    Alopecia and nail distrophy are rare signs of systemic amyloidosis. We present a case with both manifestations and give a brief review of the cutaneous signs of this disease. A biopsy of affected or unaffected skin may provide the diagnosis.

  13. Primary (AL) amyloidosis with gastrointestinal involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone Galmstrup; Gimsing, Peter; Schiødt, Frank V

    2009-01-01

    , patients with AL amyloidosis admitted for evaluation of malabsorption in a Department of Gastroenterology between January 2000 and December 2006 were identified. RESULTS: A total of 11 patients (4 F, age 60 years, median (range) 50-69) were included in the study. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis......OBJECTIVE: Immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is a rare disease that can affect several organs. The aim of this study was to characterize patients with gastrointestinal manifestations of AL amyloidosis, in terms of symptoms, biochemistry, and outcome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospectively...... was histologically verified in all patients. All patients had gastrointestinal symptoms, 8 of them prior to establishment of diagnosis. Median (range) delay from initial symptoms to diagnosis was 7 (0-24) months. The most prominent symptom was weight loss (n=10) averaging 7 (0-25) kg, followed by diarrhea (n=5...

  14. Renal transplantation for apolipoprotein AII amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magy, Nadine; Liepnieks, Juris J; Yazaki, Masahide; Kluve-Beckerman, Barbara; Benson, Merrill D

    2003-12-01

    Apolipoprotein AII (ApoAII) amyloidosis, first reported in 2001 in a family with renal amyloidosis, is associated with mutations in the stop codon of the apolipoprotein AII gene resulting in a carboxyl terminal peptide extension of 21 amino acid residues in the protein. Since death from this form of amyloidosis is due to renal failure, kidney dialysis and renal transplantation are presently the only two therapeutic options. We report the case of a Caucasian man who developed proteinuria in his late 20's, had renal biopsy at the age of 33 which gave the diagnosis of renal amyloidosis, and required continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis by age 45. He received a cadaver renal transplant at age 47 and has maintained stable renal function for nine years without other evidence for organ system dysfunction from amyloidosis. Laboratory studies confirmed persistence of the ApoAII variant in the patient's plasma in addition to the normal ApoAII protein. This is in agreement with the DNA analysis which showed the patient to be heterozygous for the ApoAII stop78Gly mutation. These results indicate that renal transplantation is an effective therapy for apolipoprotein AII amyloidosis since recurrence of amyloid in the graft and progression of other organ involvement may be very slow.

  15. [Amyloidosis complicating spondyloarthropathies: Study of 15 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muguruza, Samantha; Martínez-Morillo, Melania; Holgado, Susana; Saenz-Sarda, Xavier; Mateo, Lourdes; Tena, Xavier; Olivé, Alejandro

    2015-10-21

    Secondary amyloidosis (AA) is a rare complication of rheumatic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of symptomatic amyloidosis AA in patients with spondyloarthropathy. Retrospective study (1984-2013). We reviewed the medical records of patients with spondyloarthropathy who had a histological diagnosis of amyloidosis AA (15 patients). We identified 1.125 patients with spondyloarthropathies. Fifteen (1.3%) patients with amyloidosis AA were recruited. It was suspected in 14 patients (93.3%) because of nephrotic syndrome in most of them: 14 were symptomatic (93.3%): 5 (33.3%) ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 5 (33.3%) spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), 4 (26.7%) psoriatic arthritis, and one (6.7%) reactive arthritis. The mean disease duration was 23.9 years. Mortality after one and 5 years of follow-up was 30 and 50% respectively. The frequency of clinical amyloidosis AA in our patients was 1.3%. There was a marked male predominance, with AS or IBD. Clinical amyloidosis was diagnosed at a relatively late stage in spondyloarthropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Obesity is a significant susceptibility factor for idiopathic AA amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Norbert; Hegenbart, Ute; Dietrich, Sascha; Brune, Maik; Beimler, Jörg; Röcken, Christoph; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Schönland, Stefan O

    2018-01-24

    To investigate obesity as susceptibility factor in patients with idiopathic AA amyloidosis. Clinical, biochemical and genetic data were obtained from 146 patients with AA amyloidosis. Control groups comprised 40 patients with long-standing inflammatory diseases without AA amyloidosis and 56 controls without any inflammatory disease. Patients with AA amyloidosis had either familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) or long-standing rheumatic diseases as underlying inflammatory disease (n = 111, median age 46 years). However, in a significant proportion of patients with AA amyloidosis no primary disease was identified (idiopathic AA; n = 37, median age 60 years). Patients with idiopathic AA amyloidosis were more obese and older than patients with AA amyloidosis secondary to FMF or rheumatic diseases. Serum leptin levels correlated with the body mass index (BMI) in all types of AA amyloidosis. Elevated leptin levels of more than 30 µg/l were detected in 18% of FMF/rheumatic + AA amyloidosis and in 40% of patients with idiopathic AA amyloidosis (p = .018). Finally, the SAA1 polymorphism was confirmed as a susceptibility factor for AA amyloidosis irrespective of the type of the disease. Obesity, age and the SAA1 polymorphism are susceptibility factors for idiopathic AA amyloidosis. Recent advances in treatment of FMF and rheumatic disorders will decrease the incidence of AA amyloidosis due to these diseases. Idiopathic AA, however, might be an emerging problem in the ageing and increasingly obese population.

  17. Isolated Central Sulcus Hemorrhage: A Rare Presentation Most Frequently Associated with Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy R. Chamarthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Central sulcus hemorrhage is a rare imaging finding that can be related to cerebral amyloidosis in a normotensive non-traumatic elderly patient and present as an isolated finding or in association with other areas of involvement. We report a case presenting with an isolated central sulcus hemorrhage on computed tomography. Further imaging work-up excluded other potential causes of peripheral hemorrhages and established a putative diagnosis of cerebral amyloidosis.

  18. Isolated laryngeal amyloidosis nodular: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo, Andréia Aparecida de

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Isolated amyloidosis of the larynx is rare, being the single most common location in head and neck. Can be divided into diffuse and nodular, and the surgical treatment priority. Objective: To describe a case of isolated nodular amyloidosis of the larynx, with review of literature. Case report: A female patient, 23 years, presented with complaints of dysphonia and cervical cake for about three months. A laryngoscopy revealed a polypoid lesion of large volume in the left vocal cord. Underwent microsurgery for the removal of the larynx, the histopathological report was consistent with amyloidosis, and underwent further simplified for clinical research locations extralaryngeal of amyloidosis, which was negative. It remains in clinical and laryngoscopic semester. Final Comments: The isolated amyloidosis of the larynx, although rare, should always be entertained by the otolaryngologist, since it is the most frequent clinical presentation of disease in head and neck, often indistinguishable in appearance to that of other benign lesions. It is indispensable for research extralaryngeal demonstrations.

  19. Macular Amyloidosis and Epstein-Barr Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Nahidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Amyloidosis is extracellular precipitation of eosinophilic hyaline material of self-origin with special staining features and fibrillar ultrastructure. Macular amyloidosis is limited to the skin, and several factors have been proposed for its pathogenesis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV DNA in this lesion suggests that this virus can play a role in pathogenesis of this disease. Objective. EBV DNA detection was done on 30 skin samples with a diagnosis of macular amyloidosis and 31 healthy skin samples in the margin of removed melanocytic nevi by using PCR. Results. In patients positive for beta-globin gene in PCR, BLLF1 gene of EBV virus was positive in 23 patients (8 patients in case and 15 patients in the control group. There was no significant difference in presence of EBV DNA between macular amyloidosis (3.8% and control (23.8% groups (P=0.08. Conclusion. The findings of this study showed that EBV is not involved in pathogenesis of macular amyloidosis.

  20. Primary Amyloidosis of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Yuan Huang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a systemic disease that usually occurs in the gastrointestinal tract or in muscular or adipose tissue. Primary amyloidosis of the urinary bladder is a rare disease that can mimic bladder cancer on cystoscopic examination as well as in its clinical presentation of painless gross hematuria. This report describes a 49-year-old male with repeated painless gross hematuria, who underwent transurethral resection of a suspected bladder tumor. Pathologic examination revealed papillary urothelial hyperplasia with vascular ectasia and no signs of malignancy. Massive gross hematuria occurred 2.5 years later. Cystoscopy showed multiple papillary lesions with yellowish-brown submucosal plaques on the posterior bladder wall. A second transurethral tumor resection was performed and histologic examination revealed plasma cell infiltration and eosinophilic amorphous deposits in the subepithelial stroma and vascular wall. The deposits were positive for Congo red and apple-green birefringence under polarized light examination but negative for Masson's trichrome stain, indicating that they were not fibrotic in nature. Hence, the diagnosis of amyloidosis of the urinary bladder was confirmed. Screening for amyloidosis was negative in other organ systems and the patient has remained disease-free up to the last follow-up 4 years after the second transurethral resection. Amyloidosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with recurrent hematuria who have symptoms characteristic of bladder cancer but negative pathologic study for malignancy. Correct diagnosis relies on clinical alertness and the use of a special staining technique during pathologic examination.

  1. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Tanrıverdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC, and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important.

  2. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for AL Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AL amyloidosis is caused by clonal plasma cells that produce immunoglobulin light chains which misfold and get deposited as amyloid fibrils. Therapy directed against the plasma cell clone leads to clinical benefit. Melphalan and corticosteroids have been the mainstay of treatment for a number of years and the recent availability of other effective agents (IMiDs and proteasome inhibitors has increased treatment options. Autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT has been used in the treatment of AL amyloidosis for many years. It is associated with high rates of hematologic response and improvement in organ function. However, transplant carries considerable risks. Careful patient selection is important to minimize transplant related morbidity and mortality and ensure optimal patient outcomes. As newer more affective therapies become available the role and timing of ASCT in the overall treatment strategy of AL amyloidosis will need to be continually reassessed.

  3. Primary localized amyloidosis of the urinary bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, H.; Toei, H.; Furuse, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Jichi Medical School and Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Suzuki, K. [Dept. of Urology, Jichi Medical School and Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Hironaka, M.; Saito, K. [Dept. of Pathology, Jichi Medical School and Hospital, Tochigi (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    We report a rare case of localized form of primary amyloidosis (amyloidoma) of the urinary bladder with CT and MR findings. Clinically, it is difficult to distinguish from invasive transitional cell carcinoma and inflammatory lesion. We think that the MR intensity on T2-weighted images is helpful in making the diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Primary systemic amyloidosis, presenting as periorbital pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbhuiya J

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of primary systemic amyloidosis with periorbital pigmentation is reported. She had muscular weakness, weight loss, paresthesia of hand, hoarseness, oedema, dyspnoea, macroglossia, dysphagia &purpura. There was extreme fragility of both involved or non-involved skin. Fat aspirate from abdominal subcutaneous tissue was positive for amyloid.

  5. Primary Amyloidosis Presenting as Small Bowel Encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Jones

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a pathological process which encompasses a spectrum of diseases that result from extracellular deposition of pathological fibrillar proteins. Clinical presentations vary depending on the organs involved. There is no documented case of amyloidosis presenting as small bowel encapsulation. A previously healthy 62-year-old man developed a small bowel obstruction in 1997. At surgery, a peculiar membrane encasing his entire small bowel was discovered. This appeared to have no vascularity and was removed without difficulty, exposing a grossly normal bowel. Histopathology revealed thick bands of collagen overlying the peritoneal surface, which was congo red positive and showed apple green birefringence. The findings were consistent with encapsulating peritonitis due to amyloidosis. There was no history or symptoms of any chronic inflammatory condition and he became symptom-free postoperatively. An abdominal fat pad biopsy failed to demonstrate amyloidosis. Endoscopic duodenal biopsies revealed classical primary amyloidosis. Quantitative immunoglobulins, lactate dehydrogenase, C3, C4 and beta-2 microglobulin were normal. Protein electrophoresis identified monoclonal paraprotein, immunoglobulin G lambda 3.7 g/L. Bone marrow biopsy and aspirate revealed only a mild plasmacytosis (5% to 10%. Echocardiogram and skeletal survey were normal. He had mild proteinuria. Complete blood count, C-reactive protein, calcium, albumin and total protein were normal. No specific therapy was instituted. In January of 1998 the patient remained asymptomatic with no gastrointestinal, cardiovascular or constitutional symptoms. He had developed nephrotic range proteinuria (3.95 g/24 h, microalbuminuria, hypoalbuminemia and a renal biopsy consistent with renal amyloidosis. In 1999 there was an increase in the monoclonal paraprotein (6.2 g/L. The remaining investigations were normal except for an echocardiogram which showed left ventricular hypertrophy but a normal

  6. Amyloidosis and crohn's disease Amiloidosis y enfermedad de Crohn

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Guardiola-Arévalo; Mariano Alcántara-Torres; Julio Valle-Muñoz; Rufo Humberto Lorente-Poyatos; Marta Romero-Gutiérrez; Rufo Rodríguez-Merlo; Alejandro Pérez-Martínez; José María Carrobles-Jiménez

    2011-01-01

    Secondary amyloidosis is a rare but serious complication of inflammatory bowel disease that may influence the prognosis even more than the underlying disease. Due to a better knowledge of the association of secondary amyloidosis to inflammatory bowel disease, early diagnosis of this complication is becoming more frequent, but its treatment continues to pose a challenge. We report 4 cases of patients with Crohn's disease and amyloidosis diagnosed in the inflammatory bowel disease Units of Tole...

  7. Vitreous Amyloidosis: Ocular, Systemic, and Genetic Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Pradeep; Selvan, Harathy; Singh, Sundararajan Baskar; Gupta, Divya; Kashyap, Seema; Temkar, Shreyas; Gogia, Varun; Tripathy, Koushik; Chawla, Rohan; Vohra, Rajpal

    2017-07-01

    To report the unique clinical and surgical characteristics encountered in eyes with vitreous amyloidosis. Systemic evaluation and visual outcome after vitrectomy are discussed. A novel mutation in the transthyretin gene (TTR) in Indian patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is described. Retrospective, observational study. Ten eyes of 5 patients from 2 pedigrees with a diagnosis of vitreous amyloidosis. Detailed history, pedigree charting, systemic and ocular examination of 10 eyes (5 patients from 2 pedigrees) were carried out. Tests were performed to rule out vitreitis, retinal vasculitis, vitreous hemorrhage, and systemic amyloidosis. Genetic analysis to identify the mutation was performed in 1 patient. Vitreous biopsy, followed by 25-gauge pars plana vitrectomy, was performed in the same sitting in all cases. Samples were sent for Congo red staining and polarized microscopy. Patients were followed up on days 1, 7, and 28 and then every 2 months. Visual acuity assessment, intraocular pressure measurement, and fundus examination were performed each time. Mutations in TTR and postoperative visual acuity. Mean age at presentation was 32 years, with a 3:2 male-to-female distribution. Family history was positive in all patients. Nine eyes had pseudopodia lentis, whereas all 10 had glass wool-like vitreous. Glaucoma developed in 1 patient (2 eyes). Waxy paper-like vitreous with firm vitreous adhesions beyond major arcades and along retinal vessels was noted during surgery in all eyes. Congo red staining and apple green birefringence demonstrated vitreous amyloidosis. The mean preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 1.39±0.64 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR), whereas the postoperative BCVA improved to 0.17±0.07 logMAR (P = 0.004). Gene sequencing revealed a phenylalanine→isoleucine mutation in the 33rd position of exon 2 of TTR in 1 patient of 1 pedigree, confirming the diagnosis of FAP. Two patients subsequently

  8. Laryngeal Amyloidosis Mimicking Glottic Cancer: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Bum Soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hak [St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Amyloidosis is a slowly progressive, benign disease that is characterized by the extracellular deposition of fibrillar proteins in many different tissues and organs throughout the body. Primary amyloidosis can be subdivided into the systemic and localized forms. The localized form is less common than the systemic form and the larynx is the most frequently affected site. The importance of laryngeal amyloidosis lies in its possible confusion with glottic cancer because of the clinical feature. We report here on a case of laryngeal amyloidosis in a 47-year-old man who suffered from progressive dyspnea.

  9. Ultrasound findings in AL musculoskeletal amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felea, Ioana; Fodor, Daniela; Schiotis, Ruxandra; Georgiu, Carmen; Bojan, Anca; Rednic, Simona

    2011-03-01

    Systemic AL amyloidosis is one of the differential diagnosis of chronic musculoskeletal disease, especially when swollen and painful joints is associated with claw hands. Ultrasound evaluation is a good diagnosis tool, showing a characteristic joint and tendon involvement and assisting in guided biopsy procedure. We report a 55 year old caucasian woman, diagnosed for two years with RA without improvement under different DMARDs, admitted for fixed flexion contractures of both hands ("claw hands"), worsening pain and swelling of small joints of hands and feet, elbows and shoulders. Pad shoulder sign and bilateral anterior wrist and elbow pads, macroglossia, thickened skin of fingers and ecchymotic rashes on forearm and around eyes were observed. Ultrasound examinations showed subdeltoid and bicipitoradial bursitis, presence of inhomogeneous hypoechoic material around bicipital tendons and tenosinovitis of the extensor tendons of the hand, and synovial thickening of elbow and shoulder joints. Complete analysis of the bone marrow biopsy and biopsy specimens from subacromial bursa were positive for AL amyloidosis.

  10. Secondary Cutaneous Amyloidosis Associated with Mycosis Fungoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-16

    34" Secondary localized cutaneous amyloidosis is often not clinically apparent, but may be seen histologically.lt is associated with several skin ...wood’s lamp, the lesions did not fluoresce. The differential diagnosis included morphea. hypopigmcnted mycosis fungoidcs. post-inflammatory...It is associated with several skin tumors, and has been reported with PUVA use. To date, there are three reported cases of secondary localized

  11. Transmission of Systemic AA Amyloidosis in Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, T.; Ishiguro, N; Higuchi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloidoses are a group of protein-misfolding disorders that are characterized by the deposition of amyloid fibrils in organs and/or tissues. In reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, serum AA (SAA) protein forms deposits in mice, domestic and wild animals, and humans that experience chronic inflammation. AA amyloid fibrils are abnormal beta-sheet-rich forms of the serum precursor SAA, with conformational changes that promote fibril formation. Extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils causes ...

  12. A case of intramural coronary amyloidosis associated with hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronny, Faisal M Huq; Kleinman, George; Kurtin, Paul James; Fallon, John Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Dialysis-related amyloidosis predominantly occurs in osteo-articular structures and dialysis-related amyloid (DRA) substances also deposit in extra-articular tissues. Clinical manifestations of DRA include odynophagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, intestinal obstruction, kidney stones, myocardial dysfunction, and subcutaneous tumors. The pathological characteristics of DRA in the heart of hemodialysis patients have rarely been reported. We report the case of a 73-year-old female with a history of cerebral palsy and end-stage renal disease status post two failed renal transplants who had been on hemodialysis for 30 years. The patient was admitted with the working diagnosis of pneumonia. An echocardiography showed markedly reduced biventricular function manifested by low blood pressure with systolic in the 70s and elevated pulmonary artery pressure of 45 mmHg, which did not respond to therapy. Following her demise, the autopsy revealed bilateral pulmonary edema and pleural effusions. There was cardiac amyloid deposition exclusively in the coronary arteries but not in the perimyocytic interstitium. Amyloids were also found in pulmonary and intrarenal arteries and the colon wall. Previous case reports showed that beta 2-microglobulin amyloid deposits in various visceral organs but less frequently in the atrial and/or the ventricular myocardium. In the present case, amyloids in the heart were present in the intramural coronary arteries causing myocardial ischemia and infarction, which was the immediate cause of death.

  13. The Prevalence and Management of Systemic Amyloidosis in Western Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, Hans L A; Bijzet, Johan; Hazenberg, Bouke P C

    BACKGROUND: Amyloidosis has been a mystery for centuries, but research of the last decennia has clarified many of the secrets of this group of diseases. A protein-based classification of amyloidosis helps to understand problems that were part of the obsolete clinical classification in primary,

  14. [Value of aspiration biopsy of subcutaneous fat in amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, P; Carvalho, F; Coelho, A

    1986-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration of subcutaneous fat (FNAF) was performed in 24 patients, 12 with previously diagnosed amyloidosis presenting with proteinuria or nephrotic syndrome, and 12 presenting a nephrotic syndrome without amyloidosis on renal biopsy. FNAF was positive in 10 of 12 patients with amyloidosis (sensitivity: 83%) and negative in 12 of 12 patients with non-amyloid nephrotic syndrome (specificity: 100%). Considering a 2.5 to 10% prevalence of amyloidosis in adult patients with proteinuria or nephrotic syndrome, a positive FNAF is diagnostic of amyloidosis, and a negative FNAF rules out the diagnosis with a probability of 98 to 99%. FNAF is a simple and safe method which can be useful in patients who cannot undergo a renal biopsy.

  15. 75 FR 65279 - Schedule for Rating Disabilities; AL Amyloidosis (Primary Amyloidosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... fatal within 1 to 2 years of diagnosis. Because of its rarity and rapid progression, AL amyloidosis may..., spleen, intestine, etc.). At the time of diagnosis, the most common findings are nephrotic syndrome with or without renal insufficiency, congestive cardiomyopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and hepatomegaly...

  16. Systemic AA amyloidosis in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papendick, R E; Munson, L; O'Brien, T D; Johnson, K H

    1997-11-01

    Ongoing disease surveillance of necropsied captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) (n = 141) revealed a high prevalence of renal amyloidosis (n = 54 [38%]; age 1 to 16 years). The prevalence increased from 20% in pre- 1990 necropsies to 70% of cheetahs necropsied in 1995. In 74% of the cheetahs with amyloidosis, renal failure was determined to be the sole or partial cause of death. Papillary necrosis was seen only in affected cheetahs and involved 25% of these animals. Amyloid was present predominantly in the medullary interstitium, with minimal glomerular involvement. The amyloid deposits were immunohistochemically identified as AA type using antisera to both human and canine protein AA. A high percentage (52%) of animals with renal amyloid also had subsinusoidal hepatic AA amyloid deposits. Inflammatory diseases were identified in 100% of affected cheetahs. The most common inflammatory disease was chronic lymphoplasmacytic gastritis. The prevalence and severity of gastritis was higher in cheetahs with amyloidosis, and the prevalence of severe gastritis increased from 16% to 43%, coinciding with the increase in prevalence of amyloidosis. These findings suggest that cheetahs have a high prevalence of systemic amyloidosis in response to inflammation and that renal amyloidosis is an increasingly significant cause of morbidity and mortality in captive cheetah populations. Factors of potential importance in the apparent high prevalence of AA amyloidosis in cheetahs are currently being investigated in our laboratories.

  17. Experimental murine amyloidosis II: effect of penicillamine therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, A; Hinton, C.; Tribe, C R

    1980-01-01

    D-penicillamine was used in 2 different doses to treat experimental amyloidosis in mice. No beneficial effect, as measured by duration of survival or amount of amyloid in the liver, could be demonstrated.

  18. Dialysis-related amyloidosis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarpioni R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available R Scarpioni, M Ricardi, V Albertazzi, S De Amicis, F Rastelli, L Zerbini Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, Azienda Unità Sanitaria Local (AUSL Hospital “Guglielmo da Saliceto”, Piacenza, Italy Abstract: Amyloidosis refers to the extracellular tissue deposition of fibrils composed of low-molecular-weight subunits of a variety of proteins. These deposits may result in a wide range of clinical manifestations depending upon their type, location, and the amount of deposition. Dialysis-related amyloidosis is a serious complication of long-term dialysis therapy and is characterized by the deposition of amyloid fibrils, principally composed of β2 microglobulins (β2M, in the osteoarticular structures and viscera. Most of the β2M is eliminated through glomerular filtration and subsequent reabsorption and catabolism by the proximal tubules. As a consequence, the serum levels of β2M are inversely related to the glomerular filtration rate; therefore, in end-stage renal disease patients, β2M levels increase up to 60-fold. Serum levels of β2M are also elevated in several pathological conditions such as chronic inflammation, liver disease, and above all, in renal dysfunction. Retention of amyloidogenic protein has been attributed to several factors including type of dialysis membrane, prolonged uremic state and/or decreased diuresis, advanced glycation end products, elevated levels of cytokines and dialysate. Dialysis treatment per se has been considered to be an inflammatory stimulus, inducing cytokine production (such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and complement activation. The released cytokines are thought to stimulate the synthesis and release of β2M by the macrophages and/or augment the expression of human leukocyte antigens (class I, increasing β2M expression. Residual renal function is probably the best determinant of β2M levels. Therefore, it has to be maintained as long as possible. In this article

  19. Solitary plasmacytoma of spine with amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui-yun SUN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report the diagnosis and treatment of one case of solitary plasmacytoma of spine with amyloidosis and investigate the clinicopathological features combined with literatures. Methods and Results The patient was a 46-year-old woman. She suffered from weakness of both lower limbs, unsteady gait and numbness of toes for 20 d. MRI examination revealed an irregular mass behind the spinal cord at T5-7 level and T6-7 vertebral body accessory. The enhanced MRI showed obvious heterogeneous enhancement. The border was clear and spinal dura mater was compressed to shift forward. During operation, T5-7 processus spinosus and vertebral laminae were eroded, and the cortex of bone showed "moth-eaten" erosion. The intraspinal and extradural lesion had rich blood supply, loose bone structure and intact spinal dura mater. Histologically, tumor cells were composed of intensive small cells, and focal plasmacytoid cells were seen. Flake pink staining substance was among them. Artificial cracks were common and multinuclear giant tumor cells were scatteredly distributed. Immunohistochemical analysis showed the cytoplasm of tumor cells were diffusely positive for CD138, CD38 and vimentin (Vim,scatteredly positive for leukocyte common antigen (LCA, and negative for immune globulin κ light chain(IgGκ and λ light chain (IgGλ, CD99, S-100 protein (S-100, pan cytokeratin (PCK, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, HMB45 and CD34. The Ki-67 labeling index was 1.25%. Congo red staining showed the pink staining substance was brownish red. Hybridization in situ examination showed the DNA content of IgGκ was more than that of IgGλ. The final pathological diagnosis was solitary plasmacytoma of spine with amyloidosis. The patient was treated with postoperative chemotherapy, and there was no recurrence or metastasis during 18-month follow-up period. Conclusions Solitary plasmacytoma of spine with amyloidosis is a rare tumor. The imaging features can offer a few

  20. Cardiac amyloidosis detection with pyrophosphate-99mTc scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, D.S.F.; Ichiki, W.A.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Izaki, M.; Giorgi, M.C.P.; Soares Junior, J; Meneghetti, J.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Instituto do Coracao. Servico de Medicina Nuclear e Imagem Molecular

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Amyloidosis is a rare disease, characterized by extracellular deposition of insoluble amyloid fibrils in organs and tissues. It may affect virtually any system, preferably heart, kidneys and liver. The cardiac involvement produces a spectrum of clinical features, usually with progressive dysfunction. Early diagnosis is important for institution of appropriate therapy. Case report: Male patient, 75 years old, with diagnosed congestive heart failure functional class III and Mobitz II second-degree atrial-ventricular block, was hospitalized for implantation of definitive cardiac pacemaker. Patient mentioned history of worsening effort dyspnoea over a one-month period, progressing to minimum effort, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea and paroxysms of dry cough, and swelling of lower limbs. Echocardiography showed diffuse hypertrophy of left ventricle (LV), with systolic dysfunction due to diffuse hypokinesia and hyperrefringent aspect in the septum. It was questioned a cardiac infiltrating process. Cardiac amyloidosis was considered as a diagnostic hypothesis. The patient underwent a pyrophosphate-{sup 99m}Tc scintigraphy, which showed abnormal tracer uptake in the heart projection, with diffuse pattern on the left ventricle walls, compatible with the clinical suspicion cardiac amyloidosis, which was later confirmed by endomyocardial biopsy. Discussion: In this case report, the patient had clinical and other auxiliary examinations, such as electrocardiography and Doppler echocardiography, compatible with cardiac amyloidosis, which led to implementation with pyrophosphate-{sup 99m}Tc scintigraphy and later endomyocardial biopsy. Cardiac amyloidosis occurs in about half the cases of primary amyloidosis (AL) and is rare in secondary amyloidosis (AA). Its clinical presentation is polymorphic and it can be classified into four distinctive types: restrictive cardiomyopathy, systolic dysfunction, postural hypotension and conduction disorders

  1. Prevention of COPD exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Exacerbations have significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Most guidelines emphasise prevention of exacerbations by treatment with long-acting bronchodilators and/or anti-inflammatory drugs. Whereas most of this treatment is eviden...

  2. Hereditary apolipoprotein AI-associated renal amyloidosis: A diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samillán-Sosa, Kelly Del Rocío; Sención-Martínez, Gloria; Lopes-Martín, Vanessa; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel; Solé, Manel; Arostegui, Jose Luis; Mesa, Jose; García-Díaz, Juan de Dios; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego; Martínez-Miguel, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary renal amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant condition with considerable overlap with other amyloidosis types. Differential diagnosis is complicated, but is relevant for prognosis and treatment. We describe a patient with nephrotic syndrome and progressive renal failure, who had a mother with renal amiloidosis. Renal biopsy revealed amyloid deposits in glomerular space, with absence of light chains and protein AA. We suspected amyloidosis with fibrinogen A alpha chain deposits, which is the most frequent cause of hereditary amyloidosis in Europe, with a glomerular preferential affectation. However, the genetic study showed a novel mutation in apolipoprotein AI. On reviewing the biopsy of the patient's mother similar glomerular deposits were found, but there were significant deposits in the renal medulla as well, which is typical in APO AI amyloidosis. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Apo AI amyloidosis is characterized by slowly progressive renal disease and end-stage renal disease occurs aproximately 3 to 15 years from initial diagnosis. Renal transplantation offers an acceptable graft survival and in these patients with hepatorenal involvement simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation could be considered. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    . Skin from 12 individuals who served as controls and skin from 14 close relatives of the patients was negative for amyloid. Punch biopsy of the skin is a simple procedure which is of value for the diagnosis of HCCA, even before the appearance of clinical symptoms. This method might also be of use......Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  4. The Prevalence and Management of Systemic Amyloidosis in Western Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuis, Hans L A; Bijzet, Johan; Hazenberg, Bouke P C

    2016-04-01

    Amyloidosis has been a mystery for centuries, but research of the last decennia has clarified many of the secrets of this group of diseases. A protein-based classification of amyloidosis helps to understand problems that were part of the obsolete clinical classification in primary, secondary, and familial amyloidosis. All types of amyloid are secondary to some underlying precursor-producing process: each type is caused by a misfolded soluble precursor protein that becomes deposited as insoluble amyloid fibrils. The incidence of amyloidosis is not well documented, but probably falls between 5 and 13 per million per year. Prevalence data are scarce, but one UK study indicates about 20 per million inhabitants. Amyloidosis can be localized (amyloid deposited in the organ or tissue of precursor production) or systemic (amyloid at one or more sites distant from the site of precursor production). The major systemic types of amyloidosis are AL (associated with a light chain-producing plasma cell dyscrasia), AA (associated with longstanding inflammation), wild-type ATTR (associated with normal transthyretin and old age), and hereditary ATTR (associated with a transthyretin mutation) amyloidosis. Imaging techniques, such as cardiac ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scintigraphy, and serum amyloid P component scintigraphy, are useful both for diagnosing amyloidosis and for assessing disease severity. Serologic markers are useful for detecting organ disease and disease monitoring during follow-up. Current treatment modalities are directed against the ongoing supply of precursor proteins and thereby aim to stop further accumulation of amyloid. Novel treatment modalities, such as interference with amyloid formation and even removal of amyloid, are being studied. A well-thought and planned monitoring during follow-up helps to assess the effect of treatment and to early detect possible progression of amyloidosis. Clinical management comprises histologic proof of amyloid

  5. Fecal transmission of AA amyloidosis in the cheetah contributes to high incidence of disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Beiru; Une, Yumi; Fu, Xiaoying; Yan, Jingmin; Ge, FengXia; Yao, Junjie; Sawashita, Jinko; Mori, Masayuki; Tomozawa, Hiroshi; Kametani, Fuyuki; Higuchi, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is one of the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), which are in danger of extinction, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Given the transmissible characteristics of AA amyloidosis, transmission between captive cheetahs may be a possible mechanism involved in the high incidence of AA amyloidosis. In this study of animals with AA amyloidosis, we found that cheetah feces contained AA amyloid fibrils that were differen...

  6. Hereditary Fibrinogen Aα-Chain Amyloidosis in Asia: Clinical and Molecular Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Masahide; Yoshinaga, Tsuneaki; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Kametani, Fuyuki; Okumura, Nobuo

    2018-01-22

    Hereditary fibrinogen Aα-chain amyloidosis (Aα-chain amyloidosis) is a type of autosomal dominant systemic amyloidosis caused by mutations in fibrinogen A α -chain gene ( FGA ). Patients with Aα-chain amyloidosis have been mainly reported in Western countries but have been rarely reported in Asia, with only five patients with Aα-chain amyloidosis being reported in Korea, China, and Japan. Clinically, the most prominent manifestation in Asian patients with Aα-chain amyloidosis is progressive nephropathy caused by excessive amyloid deposition in the glomeruli, which is similar to that observed in patients with Aα-chain amyloidosis in Western countries. In molecular features in Asian Aα-chain amyloidosis, the most common variant, E526V, was found in only one Chinese kindred, and other four kindred each had a different variant, which have not been identified in other countries. These variants are located in the C-terminal region (amino acid residues 517-555) of mature Aα-chain, which was similar to that observed in patients with Aα-chain amyloidosis in other countries. The precise number of Asian patients with Aα-chain amyloidosis is unclear. However, patients with Aα-chain amyloidosis do exist in Asian countries, and the majority of these patients may be diagnosed with other types of systemic amyloidosis.

  7. Breast amyloidosis in a female patient with multiple myeloma: Ultrasonographic and mammographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Ah Rhm; Kim, Joon Mee; Nam, Se Jin [Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Amyloidosis is a rare disease characterized by pathological protein deposits in organs or tissues. Breast involvement by amyloidosis is rare. We report a female patient with amyloidosis in the breast, with underlying multiple myeloma, which presents as a focal asymmetry on a screening mammogram and a low suspicious mass lesion by ultrasonography.

  8. Amyloidosis cutis dyschromica: A rare reticulate pigmentary dermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a rare case of amyloidosis cutis dyschromica in a 41-year-old man. This is a rare form of primary cutaneous amyloidosis characterized by reticulate pigmentation with hypopigmented and hyperpigmented macules, onset in childhood, familial tendency in some, occasional mild itching and deposition of amyloid in the papillary dermis. Our case also had multiple bilaterally symmetrical hyperpigmented keratotic papules abutting the axillary vault resembling those seen in Dowling-Deogs disease. The other unusual feature in this patient was the strong family history of vitiligo, which we are unable to explain. We have also tried to explain the mechanism leading to the hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation in amyloidosis cutis dyschromica.

  9. Symptomatic Primary (AL Amyloidosis of the Stomach and Duodenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidar Fossmark

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary (AL amyloidosis of the gastrointestinal tract is relatively rare, and symptomatic amyloidosis of the stomach is even more seldom. We present the case of a patient who was referred to upper endoscopy because of weight loss, nausea, and vomiting. Large areas of intramucosal hemorrhages were seen, and biopsies resulted in profuse bleeding stopped with endoscopic clips. The biopsies showed amyloid depositions and further workup revealed that the patient also had cardiac and neuropathic involvements. The patient started treatment with dexamethasone, melphalan and bortezomib. After treatment was started the nausea and epigastric discomfort improved, and a reduction in the biochemical markers troponin T, NT-proBNP, and M-component was observed. Gastric amyloidosis is rarely seen at upper endoscopy in patients without a previously established diagnosis, but the unusual endoscopic findings and bleeding tendency after biopsy should be kept in mind by gastroenterologists.

  10. Stabilisation of Laryngeal AL Amyloidosis with Long Term Curcumin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Golombick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM, smoldering myeloma (SMM, and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS represent a spectrum of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs. Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL falls within the spectrum of these diseases and has a mortality rate of more than 80% within 2 years of diagnosis. Curcumin, derived from turmeric, has been shown to have a clinical benefit in some patients with PCDs. In addition to a clinical benefit in these patients, curcumin has been found to have a strong affinity for fibrillar amyloid proteins. We thus administered curcumin to a patient with laryngeal amyloidosis and smoldering myeloma and found that the patient has shown a lack of progression of his disease for a period of five years. This is in keeping with our previous findings of clinical benefits of curcumin in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. We recommend further evaluation of curcumin in patients with primary AL amyloidosis.

  11. "HOARSENESS AS PRESENTING SYMPTOM OF PEDIATRIC LARYNGEAL AMYLOIDOSIS "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Naraghi M. Kazemi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis of the upper aerodigestive tract is rare in the pediatric age group. We present two cases of pediatric laryngeal amyloidosis. Both of them had hoarseness as the presenting symptom. Diagnostic evaluation included flexible nasopharyngoscopy, rigid laryngoscopy, biopsy, computed tomography scan and laboratory tests. The results of Congo red staining of the specimen were characteristic of amyloid. The most common area of reported laryngeal involvement have been the vestibule, followed by the false cords, the aryepiglottic folds and subglottic region. In our cases, the masses were limited to supraglottic larynx. Management depends on the severity of the symptoms regarding the individual patient.

  12. [A rare concurrence of polymyalgia rheumatica and AA-amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenska-Lopovok, S G; Kotenko, O N; Frolova, N F; Zagrebneva, A I; Stolyarevich, E S; Volodina, E V; Chervinko, V I; Kryukov, E V; Zubkin, M L

    2017-01-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a rare chronic inflammatory disease. It predominantly affects the elderly. The disease has a slow onset, pain and stiffness in the muscles of the shoulder and pelvic girdle, fever, weight loss, and a high acute-phase inflammatory response. The disease is concurrent with giant cell arteritis in a quarter of cases, which allows some authors to consider them as two different manifestations of the same pathological process. The kidneys are rarely involved. This disease is rarely complicated by AA amyloidosis. The authors describe a case of RPM in a patient who has developed secondary AA amyloidosis.

  13. [Hepatic amyloidosis as cause of severe intrahepatic cholestasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilán, J C; Bermúdez, F J; Márquez, A; Sánchez-Carrillo, J J; González-Santos, P

    2003-01-01

    The liver is frequently involved by amyloidosis, but hyperbilirubinemia and liver failure are uncommon features. A mild elevation of the serum alkaline phosphatase value and, less frequently, hepatomegaly are the most common findings. Usually the patients have no symptoms related with the liver involvement; the clinical manifestation and the long term prognosis depends on the renal and cardiac disease. We report an unusual clinical presentation of primary amyloidosis in a previously asymptomatic 65 years old woman who was admitted to the hospital because of ictericia and ascitis mimicking a drug induced acute hepatic failure.

  14. Unusual presentation of generalized macular amyloidosis in a young adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudur Mohan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Macular amyloidosis is a common problem seen dermatology out-patient department. Generalized macular amyloidosis presenting with a poikilodermatous appearance is rare. In our case, an 18-year-old male presented with generalized hypopigmented macules with a poikilodermatous appearance of 10-year duration. His developmental milestones were normal with negative family history of similar complaints. Histopathology of hyperpigmented lesions revealed hyperkeratosis and acanthosis of epidermis and hypopigmented lesion showing only hyperkeratosis. Both lesions were showing the deposition of amorphous, hazy material in the tips of papillary dermis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrate. Congo red staining of the amorphous material was positive for amyloid.

  15. An immunohistochemical study on cerebral vascular and senile plaque amyloid in Alzheimer's dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Stam, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Senile cerebral amyloidosis has been investigated using immunoperoxidase and enzyme histochemical techniques in six unfixed brains. Our findings do not support the opinion that vascular and senile plaque amyloid are immunoglobulin-derived. In contrast with recent reports we did not detect prealbumin

  16. Experimental induction and oral transmission of avian AA amyloidosis in vaccinated white hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Muhammad, Naeem; Inoshima, Yasuo; Yanai, Tokuma; Goryo, Masanobu; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2013-06-01

    Avian AA amyloidosis is commonly observed in adult birds afflicted with bacterial infections or chronic inflammatory disorders. Experimental AA amyloidosis in birds can be induced by repeated inflammatory stimulation, such as injection with casein or vaccination with oil-emulsified bacterins. However, the transmission of amyloidosis among avian species has not been studied well to date. In the present study, we confirm the potential induction of avian AA amyloidosis by inoculation of Salmonella enteritidis (SE) vaccine or Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine. To determine the transmission of chicken AA amyloidosis among white hens, we induced experimental AA amyloidosis in vaccinated chickens by intravenous or oral administration of chicken AA fibrils. Amyloid deposits were observed in chickens injected with SE and inoculated with chicken AA fibrils intravenously (21/26: 81%) and orally (8/12: 67%). These results suggest that chicken AA amyloidosis can be induced by vaccinations, and may be transmitted among like species by oral administration.

  17. GM-CSF upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis reverses cognitive impairment and amyloidosis in Alzheimer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Tim D; Bennett, Steven P; Mori, Takashi; Governatori, Nicholas; Runfeldt, Melissa; Norden, Michelle; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Neame, Peter; Wefes, Inge; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Arendash, Gary W; Potter, Huntington

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a negative risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). While it has been commonly assumed that RA patients' usage of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) helped prevent onset and progression of AD, NSAID clinical trials have proven unsuccessful in AD patients. To determine whether intrinsic factors within RA pathogenesis itself may underlie RA's protective effect, we investigated the activity of colony-stimulating factors, upregulated in RA, on the pathology and behavior of transgenic AD mice. 5 microg bolus injections of macrophage, granulocyte, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors (M-CSF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF) were administered unilaterally into the hippocampus of aged cognitively-impaired AD mice and the resulting amyloid load reductions determined one week later, using the artificial cerebrospinal fluid-injected contralateral sides as controls. G-CSF and more significantly, GM-CSF reduced amyloidosis throughout the treated brain hemisphere one week following bolus administration to AD mice. 20 daily subcutaneous injections of 5 microg of GM-CSF (the most amyloid-reducing CSF in the bolus experiment) were administered to balanced cohorts of AD mice after assessment in a battery of cognitive tests. Reductions in amyloid load and improvements in cognitive function were assessed. Subcutaneous GM-CSF administration significantly reduced brain amyloidosis and completely reversed the cognitive impairment, while increasing hippocampal synaptic area and microglial density. These findings, along with two decades of accrued safety data using Leukine, recombinant human GMCSF, in elderly leukopenic patients, suggest that Leukine should be tested as a treatment to reverse cerebral amyloid pathology and cognitive impairment in AD.

  18. Hereditary and Sporadic Forms of Aβ-Cerebrovascular Amyloidosis and Relevant Transgenic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Kumar-Singh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA refers to the specific deposition of amyloid fibrils in the leptomeningeal and cerebral blood vessel walls, often causing secondary vascular degenerative changes. Although many kinds of peptides are known to be deposited as vascular amyloid, amyloid-β (Aβ-CAA is the most common type associated with normal aging, sporadic CAA, Alzheimer’s disease (AD and Down’s syndrome. Moreover, Aβ-CAA is also associated with rare hereditary cerebrovascular amyloidosis due to mutations within the Aβ domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP such as Dutch and Flemish APP mutations. Genetics and clinicopathological studies on these familial diseases as well as sporadic conditions have already shown that CAA not only causes haemorrhagic and ischemic strokes, but also leads to progressive dementia. Transgenic mouse models based on familial AD mutations have also successfully reproduced many of the features found in human disease, providing us with important insights into the pathogenesis of CAA. Importantly, such studies have pointed out that specific vastopic Aβ variants or an unaltered Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio favor vascular Aβ deposition over parenchymal plaques, but higher than critical levels of Aβ40 are also observed to be anti-amyloidogenic. These data would be important in the development of therapies targeting amyloid in vessels.

  19. Impaired Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation During Postraumatic Arterial Hypotension After Fluid Percussion Brain Injury is Prevented by Phenylephrine in Female but Exacerbated in Male Piglets by ERK MAPK Upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, William M.; Kiessling, J. Willis; Kofke, W. Andrew; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to morbidity and mortality in children and boys are disproportionately represented. Hypotension is common and worsens outcome after TBI. Extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) is upregulated and reduces CBF after fluid percussion brain injury (FPI) in piglets. We hypothesized that increased CPP via phenylephrine (PHE) sex dependently reduces impairment of cerebral autoregulation during hypotension after FPI through modulation of ERK MAPK. Design Prospective, randomized animal study. Setting University laboratory. Subjects Newborn (1–5 day old) pigs. Interventions CBF, pial artery diameter, ICP and autoregulatory index (ARI) were determined before and after FPI in untreated, pre- and post-injury PHE (1 μg/kg/min iv) treated male and female pigs during normotension and hemorrhagic hypotension. CSF ERK MAPK was determined by ELISA. Measurements and Main Results Reductions in pial artery diameter, CBF, CPP and elevated ICP after FPI were greater in males, which were blunted by PHE pre- or post-FPI. During hypotension and FPI, pial artery dilation was impaired more in males. PHE decreased impairment of hypotensive pial artery dilation after FPI in females, but paradoxically caused vasoconstriction after FPI in males. Papaverine induced pial artery vasodilation was unchanged by FPI and PHE. CBF, CPP, and ARI decreased markedly during hypotension and FPI in males but less in females. PHE prevented reductions in CBF, CPP, and ARI during hypotension in females but increased reductions in males. CSF ERK MAPK was increased more in males than females after FPI. PHE blunted ERK MAPK upregulation in females, but increased ERK MAPK upregulation in males after FPI. Conclusions These data indicate that elevation of CPP with PHE sex dependently prevents impairment of cerebral autoregulation during hypotension after FPI through modulation of ERK MAPK. These data suggest the potential role

  20. Churg-Strauss syndrome associated with AA amyloidosis: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Churg Strauss syndrome is a rare systemic and pulmonary vasculitis exceptionally associated with AA amyloidosis. We report the case of a 65-year old woman with past medical history of asthma. She developed polyarthralgia, headache and purpura. A laboratory workout found hypereosinophilia (1150/μL), positive ...

  1. Renal amyloid A amyloidosis as a complication of hidradenitis suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schandorff, Kristine D; Miller, Iben M; Krustrup, Dorrit

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic disease is the dominant cause of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, but other chronic inflammatory diseases may have similar consequences. Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a relatively common, but little known skin disease characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we present a case of chronic...

  2. Systemic AA amyloidosis in the red fox (Vulpes vulpes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Anna; Cederlund, Ella; Palmberg, Carina; Uhlhorn, Henrik; Gaunitz, Stefan; Nordling, Kerstin; Ågren, Erik; Ihse, Elisabet; Westermark, Gunilla T; Tjernberg, Lars; Jörnvall, Hans; Johansson, Jan; Westermark, Per

    2017-11-01

    Amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis occurs spontaneously in many mammals and birds, but the prevalence varies considerably among different species, and even among subgroups of the same species. The Blue fox and the Gray fox seem to be resistant to the development of AA amyloidosis, while Island foxes have a high prevalence of the disease. Herein, we report on the identification of AA amyloidosis in the Red fox (Vulpes vulpes). Edman degradation and tandem MS analysis of proteolyzed amyloid protein revealed that the amyloid partly was composed of full-length SAA. Its amino acid sequence was determined and found to consist of 111 amino acid residues. Based on inter-species sequence comparisons we found four residue exchanges (Ser31, Lys63, Leu71, Lys72) between the Red and Blue fox SAAs. Lys63 seems unique to the Red fox SAA. We found no obvious explanation to how these exchanges might correlate with the reported differences in SAA amyloidogenicity. Furthermore, in contrast to fibrils from many other mammalian species, the isolated amyloid fibrils from Red fox did not seed AA amyloidosis in a mouse model. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Renal Involvement in AA Amyloidosis: Clinical Outcomes and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murvet Yilmaz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The natural history of AA amyloidosis is typically progressive, leading to multiple organ failure and death. We analyzed the etiology as well as clinical and laboratory features of patients with biopsy-proven AA amyloidosis and evaluated the ultimate outcome. Methods: Seventy-three patients (24 female; mean age 41.85±15.89 years were analyzed retrospectively. Demographic, clinical and laboratory features were studied and the outcome was assessed. Results: Familial Mediterranean Fever and tuberculosis were the most frequent causes of amyloidosis. Mean serum creatinine and proteinuria at diagnosis were 4.65±4.89 mg/dl and 8.04±6.09 g/day, respectively; and stage I, II, III, IV and V renal disease were present in 19.2%, 13.7%, 16.4%, 11%, and 39.7% of the patients, respectively. ESRD developed in 16 patients during the follow-up period. All of the ESRD patients started a dialysis programme. Thirty patients (41% died during the follow-up period; median patient survival was 35.9±6.12 months. Old age, tuberculosis etiology, advanced renal disease and low serum albumin levels were associated with a worse prognosis. Serum albumin was a predictor of mortality in logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: The ultimate outcome of the patients with AA amyloidosis is poor, possibly due to the late referral to the nephrology clinics. Early referral may be helpful to improve prognosis.

  4. Primary tracheobronchial amyloidosis – Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Saleiro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a form of respiratory amyloidosis, characterised by insoluble amyloid fibril proteins deposits along the airways wall. It is an uncommon disease, requiring a tissue sample to establish the definite diagnosis based on specific pathological features.The authors report two cases of tracheobronchial amyloidosis, describing their symptoms and the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that were performed. Resumo: A amiloidose traqueobrônquica primária é uma forma de amiloidose respiratória, caracterizada pela presença de depósitos insolúveis de proteína fibrilar amilóide, ao longo da parede das vias aéreas. É uma doença pouco frequente, sendo necessário uma amostra de tecido para estabelecer o diagnóstico definitivo, com base em características histológicas específicas. Os autores relatam dois casos clínicos de amiloidose traqueobrônquica, descrevendo os seus sintomas e os procedimentos diagnósticos e terapêuticos que foram efectuados. Key-words: Amyloidosis, tracheobronchial, Palavras-chave: Amiloidose, traqueobrônquica

  5. Frictional amyloidosis in Oman - A study of ten cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Macular amyloidosis is an important cause for cutaneous pigmentation, the aetiology of which is poorly understood. Friction has recently been implicated the causation of early lesions, referred to as frictional amyloidosis. Confirmation of diagnosis by the detect on of amyloid using histochemical stains is inconsistent. Ten patients with pigmentation suggestive of macular amyloidosis were studied with detailed history, clinical examination, biopsy for histochemistry and electron microscopy. Nine out of ten patients had a history of prolonged friction with various objects such as bath sponges, brushes, towels, plant sticks and leaves. Amyloid was demonstrated by histochemical staining in only six out of ten cases. In the remaining four cases, amyloid was detected by electron microscopy. These consisted of aggregates of non-branching, extracellular, intertwining fibres measuring between 200-500 nm in length and between 20-25 nm in diameter. The study confirms the role of friction in the causation of this condition. Histochemical stains are not always successful in the detection of amyloid and electron microscopy is helpful for confirming its presence. The term frictional amyloidosis aptly describes the condition.

  6. Generalized AA-amyloidosis in Siamese and Oriental cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde-Sipman, van der J.S.; Niewold, T.A.; Tooten, P.C.J.; Neijs-Backer, de M.; Gruys, E.

    1997-01-01

    During a 7 year period (1987-1994), 194 Siamese cats including a colour variant designated Oriental cat, were presented for post-mortem examination. Twelve of these animals (6.2%) were diagnosed with amyloidosis. Major gross pathological findings included enlarged pale livers with haemorrhages, pale

  7. Spontaneous, Experimentally Induced, and Transmissible AA Amyloidosis in Japanese Quail ( Coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yumi; Kamiie, Junichi; Watanabe, Gen; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Murakami, Tomoaki

    2017-11-01

    The authors describe a spontaneous case of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis in an adult female Japanese quail ( Coturnix japonica). The bird developed AA amyloidosis secondary to chronic peritonitis caused by a Gram-negative bacillus infection. Mild amyloid deposition was also identified in the intestinal tract of apparently healthy adult individuals, suggesting that quail may develop intestinal amyloidosis with age. Based on these observations, it was hypothesized that quail can develop AA amyloidosis following inflammatory stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Therefore, adult quail were repeatedly injected with LPS and the development of AA amyloidosis was confirmed. The amyloid deposition in this model increased when quail amyloid was intravenously injected as an amyloid-enhancing factor. The experiments were repeated with young quail, but amyloid deposits were not observed following LPS injections. However, AA amyloidosis did develop when quail amyloid was injected in addition to LPS. These results indicated that adult quail develop AA amyloidosis after inflammatory stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, quail AA amyloidosis was shown to have transmissibility regardless of age. Interestingly, the authors found that administration of chicken amyloid fibrils also induced AA amyloidosis in young quail. This is the first report of cross-species transmission of avian AA amyloidosis.

  8. Dark chocolate exacerbates acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongraviopap, Saivaree; Asawanonda, Pravit

    2016-05-01

    The effects of chocolate on acne exacerbations have recently been reevaluated. For so many years, it was thought that it had no role in worsening acne. To investigate whether 99% dark chocolate, when consumed in regular daily amounts, would cause acne to worsen in acne-prone male subjects, twenty-five acne prone male subjects were asked to consume 25 g of 99% dark chocolate daily for 4 weeks. Assessments which included Leeds revised acne scores as well as lesion counts took place weekly. Food frequency questionnaire was used, and daily activities were recorded. Statistically significant changes of acne scores and numbers of comedones and inflammatory papules were detected as early as 2 weeks into the study. At 4 weeks, the changes remained statistically significant compared to baseline. Dark chocolate when consumed in normal amounts for 4 weeks can exacerbate acne in male subjects with acne-prone skin. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Mathew; Lockey, Richard F

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA). The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1). Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipoo...

  10. Fecal transmission of AA amyloidosis in the cheetah contributes to high incidence of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beiru; Une, Yumi; Fu, Xiaoying; Yan, Jingmin; Ge, FengXia; Yao, Junjie; Sawashita, Jinko; Mori, Masayuki; Tomozawa, Hiroshi; Kametani, Fuyuki; Higuchi, Keiichi

    2008-05-20

    AA amyloidosis is one of the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), which are in danger of extinction, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Given the transmissible characteristics of AA amyloidosis, transmission between captive cheetahs may be a possible mechanism involved in the high incidence of AA amyloidosis. In this study of animals with AA amyloidosis, we found that cheetah feces contained AA amyloid fibrils that were different from those of the liver with regard to molecular weight and shape and had greater transmissibility. The infectious activity of fecal AA amyloid fibrils was reduced or abolished by the protein denaturants 6 M guanidine.HCl and formic acid or by AA immunodepletion. Thus, we propose that feces are a vehicle of transmission that may accelerate AA amyloidosis in captive cheetah populations. These results provide a pathogenesis for AA amyloidosis and suggest possible measures for rescuing cheetahs from extinction.

  11. What is the role of giant cells in AL-amyloidosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K E; Sletten, K; Sandgren, O

    1999-01-01

    AL-amyloidosis is one of the most common amyloidoses and can be found in a localized and a systemic form. The precursor protein is an immunoglobulin light chain which as AL-protein in both localized and systemic AL-amyloidosis shows the same pattern of fragmentation and changes of primary structu...... in this work are two new cases of localized lung (lambda I) and ureteric (kappa I) AL-amyloidosis....

  12. Amyloidosis and crohn's disease Amiloidosis y enfermedad de Crohn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Guardiola-Arévalo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Secondary amyloidosis is a rare but serious complication of inflammatory bowel disease that may influence the prognosis even more than the underlying disease. Due to a better knowledge of the association of secondary amyloidosis to inflammatory bowel disease, early diagnosis of this complication is becoming more frequent, but its treatment continues to pose a challenge. We report 4 cases of patients with Crohn's disease and amyloidosis diagnosed in the inflammatory bowel disease Units of Toledo and Ciudad Real, which represent 0.68% of the patients with Crohn's disease of our health areas. There have been not cases of amyloidosis in patients with ulcerative colitis. In our 4 patients the secondary amyloidosis was clearly related to Crohn's disease, which was often of fistulising type. The predominant clinical picture of amyloidosis was nephrotic syndrome. The patients responded to medical and surgical treatment of Crohn's disease and colchicine, which improved renal function in all cases except in one who required kidney transplantation.La amiloidosis sistémica adquirida es una complicación rara pero grave de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal crónica, pudiendo condicionar el pronóstico más que la propia enfermedad de base. Debido al mejor conocimiento de la asociación de amiloidosis secundaria a enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, el diagnóstico temprano se hace cada vez con mayor frecuencia, pero su tratamiento continúa siendo un reto. Describimos 4 casos clínicos de pacientes con enfermedad de Crohn (EC y amiloidosis diagnosticados en las Unidades de EIIC de Toledo y Ciudad Real, lo que representa el 0,68% de los caso de EC de nuestras áreas sanitarias. No se ha descrito ningún caso de amiloidosis en pacientes con colitis ulcerosa. En los 4 pacientes la AA estaba claramente relacionada con la EC, y predominaron las formas estenosantes-perforantes. El cuadro clínico de presentación de la amiloidosis en la mayoría de los casos

  13. Guideline of transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ando Yukio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transthyretin amyloidosis is a progressive and eventually fatal disease primarily characterized by sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. Given its phenotypic unpredictability and variability, transthyretin amyloidosis can be difficult to recognize and manage. Misdiagnosis is common, and patients may wait several years before accurate diagnosis, risking additional significant irreversible deterioration. This article aims to help physicians better understand transthyretin amyloidosis—and, specifically, familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy—so they can recognize and manage the disease more easily and discuss it with their patients. We provide guidance on making a definitive diagnosis, explain methods for disease staging and evaluation of disease progression, and discuss symptom mitigation and treatment strategies, including liver transplant and several pharmacotherapies that have shown promise in clinical trials.

  14. 11C-Pittsburgh B PET imaging in cardiac amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Pyo; Lee, Eun Seong; Choi, Hongyoon; Im, Hyung-Jun; Koh, Youngil; Lee, Min-Ho; Kwon, Ji-Hyun; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Inho; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the efficacy of (11)C-Pittsburgh B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis. The PiB compound has been promising for detection of amyloid deposits in the brain. A total of 22 consecutive patients were enrolled in this prospective pilot study of monoclonal gammopathy patients with suspected cardiac amyloidosis. The study consisted of a series of (11)C-PiB PET/CT, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and endomyocardial biopsy within a 1-month period. In addition, 10 normal subjects were recruited to determine the most optimal cut-off value for a positive (11)C-PiB PET/CT scan. Among the 22 patients, 15 patients were diagnosed as cardiac amyloidosis by endomyocardial biopsy and 5 patients had undergone chemotherapy previously before the (11)C-PiB PET/CT. There were no differences in echocardiographic parameters between patients with versus without cardiac amyloidosis, except for a marginal difference in the left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (median 41.0 mm [range 33.0 to 49.0 mm] vs. 50.0 mm [range 38.0 to 55.0 mm], p = 0.066). (11)C-PiB PET/CT was positive in 13 of 15 biopsy-proven cardiac amyloidosis patients, whereas none of the patients without cardiac amyloidosis demonstrated positive (11)C-PiB PET/CT scan results. The maximal myocardium-to-blood cavity ratio was significantly different between patients with versus without cardiac amyloidosis (median 3.9 [range 1.7 to 19.9] vs. 1.0 [range 0.8 to 1.2], p < 0.001). In association with the significant difference of (11)C-PiB uptake in the myocardium between the chemotherapy naïve versus the previous chemotherapy group (median 10.4 [range 1.7 to 19.9] vs. 2.3 [range 1.7 to 3.8], p = 0.014), all except 1 patient among the 5 previously treated patients had responded to chemotherapy by serum free light chain assay results at the time of (11)C-PiB PET/CT scan. (11)C-PiB PET/CT may be valuable for the

  15. A rare cause of stridor: Isolated tracheal amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Numbere K Numbere

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old man presented to clinic with a two-year history of progressive exertional dyspnea and voice hoarseness. This history suggested upper airways obstruction, which was confirmed on computed tomography imaging that revealed extensive thickening of the proximal tracheal wall causing severe luminal narrowing. Bronchoscopic debulking was then performed and the samples obtained confirmed tracheal amyloidoisis. Extensive investigation confirmed that disease was localized solely to the trachea. Ultimately, after multiple discussions, the chosen treatment modality was radiotherapy, which proceeded relatively uneventfully and achieved excellent radiological and clinical response. Although tracheal amyloidosis is rare, it is most commonly observed as part of a multisystem presentation. The present report describes the even more uncommon diagnosis of isolated tracheal amyloidosis and highlights the role of radiotherapy in its management.

  16. Outcome of 121 patients with renal amyloid a amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbis Ahbap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amyloid A (AA amyloidosis is a multisystem, progressive and fatal disease. Renal involvement occurs early in the course of AA. We aimed to investigate the etiology, clinical and laboratory features, and outcome of patients with biopsy-proven renal AA amyloidosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 121 patients (male/female: 84/37, mean age 42.6 ± 14.4 years were analyzed retrospectively between January of 2001 and May of 2013. Demographic, clinical and laboratory features and outcomes data were obtained from follow-up charts. Results: Familial Mediterranean fever (37.2% and tuberculosis (24.8% were the most frequent causes of amyloidosis. Mean serum creatinine and proteinuria at diagnosis were 2.3 ± 2.1 mg/dL and 6.7 ± 5.3 g/day, respectively. Sixty-eight (56.2% patients were started dialysis treatment during the follow-up period. Mean duration of renal survival was 64.7 ± 6.3 months. Age, serum creatinine and albumin levels were found as predictors of end-stage renal disease. Fifty patients (%41.3 died during the follow-up period. The mean survival of patients was 88.7 ± 7.8 months (median: 63 ± 13.9. 1, 2 and 5 years survival rates of patients were 80.7%, 68.2% and 51.3%, respectively. Older age, male gender, lower levels of body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum albumin, calcium, and higher levels of phosphor, intact parathyroid hormone and proteinuria were associated with a higher mortality. Higher serum creatinine, lower albumin, dialysis requirement and short time to dialysis were predictors of mortality. Conclusion: The outcome of patients with AA amyloidosis and renal involvement is poor, particularly in those who had massive proteinuria, severe hypoalbuminemia and dialysis requirement at the outset.

  17. AA amyloidosis: Mount Sinai experience, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Daniel; Gorevic, Peter

    2012-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is a systemic disease characterized by the extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from the acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A protein. It is typically a consequence of chronic inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease, although more patients are being identified who have more unusual causes or no known inflammatory stimulus. We performed a retrospective chart review of all patients with AA amyloidosis seen at Mount Sinai during the period of 1997-2012. Particular attention was paid to the patients' underlying diseases, extent of organ involvement, levels of inflammatory markers and proinflammatory cytokines, presence of pyrin gene mutations, and outcomes. Forty-three patients were seen at Mount Sinai with AA amyloidosis during this period. The most common underlying diseases were rheumatoid arthritis (21%) and Crohn's disease (16%), though 21% of patients were considered to have idiopathic AA amyloid after an extensive search found no underlying inflammatory disease. Almost all patients (95%) had renal involvement based on biopsy or clinical criteria, with 19 patients (44%) eventually requiring dialysis and 5 (12%) undergoing renal transplantation. Inflammatory markers were elevated in most patients; however, interleukin-6 was the only consistently elevated cytokine. Three patients (of 9 tested) were found to be positive for the E148Q pyrin gene mutation. Our study confirms the increasing number of patients being seen with idiopathic AA amyloidosis. More research is needed to determine if these patients have an underlying genetic susceptibility encoded in pyrin or other genes. Our study also confirms the dominance of renal disease in this population. The elevated levels of interleukin-6, in comparison with other cytokines, could represent a therapeutic target. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  18. Pharmaceutical amyloidosis associated with subcutaneous insulin and enfuvirtide administration

    OpenAIRE

    D’Souza, Anita; Theis, Jason D.; Vrana, Julie A; Dogan, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Protein and peptide drugs administered subcutaneously, such as insulin can be amyloidogenic and result in localized amyloid deposits at the sites of medication injections. These iatrogenic amyloidoses typically present as a localized subcutaneous nodule or skin reaction at the site of administration, and often pose diagnostic challenges. We have analyzed the amyloid proteome in 52 cases of insulin and enfuvirtide associated amyloidosis using laser microdissection/tandem mass spectrometry. We ...

  19. Light Chain (AL) Amyloidosis: The Journey to Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCausland, Kristen L; White, Michelle K; Guthrie, Spencer D; Quock, Tiffany; Finkel, Muriel; Lousada, Isabelle; Bayliss, Martha S

    2017-08-14

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a rare, complex disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Delays in diagnosis are common and may have detrimental consequences on patients' prognosis. Too little is known regarding the patient journey to diagnosis. The objective of this study was to describe the patient-reported journey to a correct diagnosis for AL amyloidosis. Using a mixed-methods approach, data were collected from clinician (n = 4) and patient (n = 10) interviews and a survey of community-based patients with AL amyloidosis (n = 341). Data were used to document the patient experience between the onset of symptoms and the receipt of a diagnosis. Delays in diagnosis were common. Qualitative and quantitative data indicated that initial symptoms were varied and similar to other more prevalent diseases. Two themes regarding the journey to diagnosis emerged: (1) barriers to an early diagnosis; and (2) the emotional toll of the journey. Time to diagnosis was heavily influenced by how patients interpreted their initial symptoms, whether they sought early medical help, and challenges associated with making differential diagnoses. Survey results indicate that patients with primary cardiac involvement were more likely to receive a delayed diagnosis than those with primary kidney involvement. Patients described mixed emotions associated with the eventual diagnosis of AL amyloidosis. These data support a need for better early identification and support for patients seeking a diagnosis. Increasing clinician awareness may reduce the time to diagnosis. Additional research is needed to identify optimal diagnostic testing to reduce delays in treatment initiation and subsequent severe impacts on health.

  20. COPD exacerbation: Lost in translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouros Demosthenes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The introduction and acceptance of a standard definition for exacerbations of COPD can be helpful in prompt diagnosis and management of these events. The latest GOLD executive committee recognised this necessity and it has now included a definition of exacerbation in the guidelines for COPD which is an important step forward in the management of the disease. This definition is pragmatic and compromises the different approaches for exacerbation. However, the inclusion of the "healthcare utilisation" approach (".. may warrant a change in regular medication" in the definition may introduce in the diagnosis of exacerbation factors related to the access to health care services which may not be related to the underlying pathophysiologal process which characterizes exacerbations. It should be also noted that the aetiology of COPD exacerbations has not yet been included in the current definition. In this respect, the definition does not acknowledge the fact that many patients with COPD may suffer from additional conditions (i.e. congestive cardiac failure or pulmonary embolism that can masquerade as exacerbations but they should not be considered as causes of them. The authors therefore suggest that an inclusion of the etiologic factors of COPD exacerbations in the definition. Moreover, COPD exacerbations are characterized by increased airway and systemic inflammation and significant deterioration in lung fuction. These fundamental aspects should be accounted in diagnosis/definition of exacerbations. This could be done by the introduction of a "laboratory" marker in the diagnosis of these acute events. The authors acknowledge that the use of a test or a biomarker in the diagnosis of exacerbations meets certain difficulties related to performing lung function tests or to sampling during exacerbations. However, the introduction of a test that reflects airway or systemic inflammation in the diagnosis of exacerbations might be another step forward

  1. MRI of pathology-proven peripheral nerve amyloidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Gavin A.; Broski, Stephen M.; Howe, Benjamin M.; Spinner, Robert J.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Ringler, Michael D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To highlight the MRI characteristics of pathologically proven amyloidosis involving the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and determine the utility of MRI in directing targeted biopsy for aiding diagnosis. A retrospective study was performed for patients with pathologically proven PNS amyloidosis who also underwent MRI of the biopsied or excised nerve. MRI signal characteristics, nerve morphology, associated muscular denervation changes, and the presence of multifocal involvement were detailed. Pathology reports were reviewed to determine subtypes of amyloid. Charts were reviewed to gather patient demographics, neurological symptoms and radiologist interpretation. Four men and three women with a mean age of 62 ± 11 years (range 46-76) were identified. All patients had abnormal findings on EMG with mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. All lesions demonstrated diffuse multifocal neural involvement with T1 hypointensity, T2 hyperintensity, and variable enhancement on MRI. One lesion exhibited superimposed T2 hypointensity. Six of seven patients demonstrated associated muscular denervation changes. Peripheral nerve amyloidosis is rare, and the diagnosis is difficult because of insidious symptom onset, mixed sensorimotor neurologic deficits, and the potential for a wide variety of nerves affected. On MRI, peripheral nerve involvement is most commonly characterized by T1 hypointensity, T2 hyperintensity, variable enhancement, maintenance of the fascicular architecture with fusiform enlargement, multifocal involvement and muscular denervation changes. While this appearance mimics other inflammatory neuropathies, MRI can readily detect neural changes and direct-targeted biopsy, thus facilitating early diagnosis and appropriate management. (orig.)

  2. Uninvolved immunoglobulins predicting hematological response in newly diagnosed AL amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchtar, Eli; Magen, Hila; Itchaki, Gilad; Cohen, Amos; Rosenfeld, Ra'ama; Shochat, Tzippy; Kornowski, Ran; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Raanani, Pia

    2016-02-01

    Immunoparesis serves as a marker for elevated risk for progression in plasma cell proliferative disorders. However, the impact of immunoparesis in AL amyloidosis has not been addressed. Immunoparesis was defined qualitatively as any decrease below the low reference levels of the uninvolved immunoglobulins and quantitatively, as the relative difference between the uninvolved immunoglobulins and the lower reference values. Forty-one newly diagnosed AL amyloidosis patients were included. Sixty-six percent of patients had a suppression of the uninvolved immunoglobulins. The median relative difference of the uninvolved immunoglobulins was 18% above the low reference levels [range (-71%)-210%]. Ninety percent of the patients were treated with novel agents-based regimens, mostly bortezomib-containing regimens. Nineteen percent of the patients did not attain response to first line treatment. Patients with relative difference of uninvolved immunoglobulins below -25% of the low reference levels were less likely to respond to first line treatment compared to patients with a relative difference of -25% and above [odds ratio for no response vs. partial response and better 30 [(95% CI 4.1-222.2), P=0.0004]. Patients who failed first line treatment were successfully salvaged with lenalidomide-based treatment. Immunoparesis, if assessed quantitatively, may serve as a predictor of response in AL amyloidosis patients treated with bortezomib-containing regimens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Z; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, C S

    2016-01-01

    that asthma exacerbations during pregnancy increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, placental abruption and placenta praevia. Furthermore, these women also have higher risk for breech presentation, haemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, caesarean delivery, maternal admission to the intensive care...... to these outcomes. In conclusion, asthma exacerbations during pregnancy are associated with complications of pregnancy, labour and delivery. Prevention of exacerbations is essential to reduce the risk of complications and poor outcome....

  4. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Exacerbations of asthma - A descriptive study of 425 severe exacerbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tattersfield, AE; Postma, DS; Barnes, PJ; Svensson, K; Bauer, CA; O'Byrne, PM; Lofdahl, CG; Pauwels, RA; Ullman, A

    The identification, prevention, and prompt treatment of exacerbations are major objectives of asthma management. We looked at change in PEF, symptoms, and use of rescue p-agonists during the 425 severe exacerbations that occurred during a 12-mo parallel group study (FACET) in which low and high

  6. Mouse senile amyloid fibrils deposited in skeletal muscle exhibit amyloidosis-enhancing activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinze Qian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis describes a group of protein folding diseases in which amyloid proteins are abnormally deposited in organs and/or tissues as fine fibrils. Mouse senile amyloidosis is a disorder in which apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II deposits as amyloid fibrils (AApoAII and can be transmitted from one animal to another both by the feces and milk excreted by mice with amyloidosis. Thus, mouse AApoAII amyloidosis has been demonstrated to be a "transmissible disease". In this study, to further characterize the transmissibility of amyloidosis, AApoAII amyloid fibrils were injected into transgenic Apoa2(cTg(+/- and normal R1.P1-Apoa2(c mice to induce AApoAII systemic amyloidosis. Two months later, AApoAII amyloid deposits were found in the skeletal muscles of amyloid-affected mice, primarily in the blood vessels and in the interstitial tissues surrounding muscle fibers. When amyloid fibrils extracted from the skeletal muscles were subjected to Western blot analysis, apoA-II was detected. Amyloid fibril fractions isolated from the muscles not only demonstrated the structure of amyloid fibrils but could also induce amyloidosis in young mice depending on its fibril conformation. These findings present a possible pathogenesis of amyloidosis: transmission of amyloid fibril conformation through muscle, and shed new light on the etiology involved in amyloid disorders.

  7. Changing epidemiology of AA amyloidosis: clinical observations over 25 years at a single national referral centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Thirusha; Pinney, Jennifer H; Gilbertson, Janet A; Hutt, David F; Rowczenio, Dorota M; Mahmood, Shameem; Sachchithanantham, Sajitha; Fontana, Marianna; Youngstein, Taryn; Quarta, Candida C; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D; Gillmore, Julian D; Hawkins, Philip N; Lachmann, Helen J

    2017-09-01

    Systemic AA amyloidosis is a serious complication of chronic inflammation; however, there are relatively few published data on its incidence. We investigated the changing epidemiology of AA amyloidosis over a 25-year period at a single national referral centre. We conducted a retrospective study of all patients diagnosed with AA amyloidosis who had attended the centre between 1990 and 2014 inclusive. Six hundred and twenty-five patients were studied in three cohorts: C1: 1990-1997; C2: 1998-2006; C3: 2007-2014. Mean age at presentation increased from 46 in C1 to 56 in C3 (p AA amyloidosis over a quarter of a century, reflecting advances in therapeutics and overall management of complex chronic disease in an ageing population. AA amyloidosis of uncertain aetiology presents an emerging major problem. Newer techniques such as next-generation sequencing may aid diagnosis and effective treatment, thereby improving overall survival.

  8. [Pathological and clinical correlations in renal AA amyloidosis: A Moroccan series of 30 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bziz, Asmae; Rouas, Lamia; Lamalmi, Najat; Malihy, Abderrahmane; Cherradi, Nadia; Ouzeddoun, Naima; Bayahia, Rabia; Flayou, Kaoutar; Chala, Sanae; Bouclouze, Aziz; Benomar, Ali; Abouqal, Redouan; Alhamany, Zaitouna

    2015-12-01

    Study of histological and clinical correlations of 30 cases of renal amyloidosis AA diagnosed between November 2010 and December 2012. The main causes associated with amyloidosis AA were represented by chronic infectious diseases (60%). Nephrotic syndrome and renal failure were observed in 94% and 73% respectively. The distribution of amyloid deposits: 90% of patients had a glomerular form and 10% had a vascular form. Inflammatory reaction associated with AA renal amyloidosis was present in 50% of cases. This inflammation was observed near amyloid deposits associated with a deposition of immunoglobulin chains and/or complement factors. Our study confirms the predominance of AA amyloidosis complicating chronic infectious diseases, especially tuberculosis. Our data point out a relationship between the morphology of renal AA amyloidosis, its clinical presentation and prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Renal amyloidosis: a synopsis of its clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Zakharova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a heterogeneous group of hereditary and acquired diseases in which normally soluble plasma proteins are deposited in the extracellular and/or intracellular space in abnormal, insoluble, fibrillar form. Renal damage is one of the most common features of systemic amyloidosis, and the presentation is most commonly due to the consequences of renal involvement, with proteinuria and progressive renal decline. Progression to end-stage renal failure is common. Early diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis is difficult. Renal amyloidosis typically presents with nephrotic syndrome and/or renal failure. Treatment of AL amyloidosis aims to reduce production of the monoclonal immunoglobulin precursor via chemotherapy. Current options for treatment include melphalan+dexamethasone or cyclophosphamide-bortezomib-dexamethasone regimens, or in selected patients, high-dose melphalan with autologous stem cell transplantation. The focus of current research is on pharmacological therapy to solubilize amyloid fibrils and increase tissue catabolism of amyloid deposits.

  10. Transthyretin Amyloidosis: Chaperone Concentration Changes and Increased Proteolysis in the Pathway to Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo da Costa

    Full Text Available Transthyretin amyloidosis is a conformational pathology characterized by the extracellular formation of amyloid deposits and the progressive impairment of the peripheral nervous system. Point mutations in this tetrameric plasma protein decrease its stability and are linked to disease onset and progression. Since non-mutated transthyretin also forms amyloid in systemic senile amyloidosis and some mutation bearers are asymptomatic throughout their lives, non-genetic factors must also be involved in transthyretin amyloidosis. We discovered, using a differential proteomics approach, that extracellular chaperones such as fibrinogen, clusterin, haptoglobin, alpha-1-anti-trypsin and 2-macroglobulin are overrepresented in transthyretin amyloidosis. Our data shows that a complex network of extracellular chaperones are over represented in human plasma and we speculate that they act synergistically to cope with amyloid prone proteins. Proteostasis may thus be as important as point mutations in transthyretin amyloidosis.

  11. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Mathew

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA. The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1. Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipooxygenase pathway involving the enzyme 5-lipooxygenase (5-LO. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4 synthase is the enzyme responsible for the production of leukotriene C4, the chief cysteinyl leukotriene responsible for AEA. There have been familial occurences of AEA. An allele of the LTC4 synthase gene in AEA is known as allele C. Allele C has a higher frequency in AEA. Clinical presentation includes a history of asthma after ingestion of aspirin, nasal congestion, watery rhinorrhea and nasal polyposis. Treatment includes leukotriene receptor antagonists, leukotriene inhibitors, aspirin desinsitaztion and surgery. AEA is the most well-defined phenotype of asthma. Although AEA affects adults and children with physician-diagnosed asthma, in some cases there is no history of asthma and AEA often goes unrecognized and underdiagnosed.

  12. Ataque cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi Tan, Yuri; Fundación Valle de Lili

    1998-01-01

    ¿Qué es un ataque cerebral?/¿Qué tipos de ataque cerebral existen?/¿Cuáles son los síntomas de un ataque cerebral?/Factores de riesgo para un ataque cerebral/Tratamiento médico del ataque cerebral/¿por qué es importante acudir temprano cuando se presentan las señales de alarma?/ Manejo preventivo del ataque cerebral isquémico/Tratamiento quirúrgico del ataque cerebral/Enfermedad vascular cerebral hemorrágica/¿Cómo está constituido el grupo de ataque cerebral de la fundación Clínica Valle d...

  13. The burden of amyloid light chain amyloidosis on health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Martha; McCausland, Kristen L; Guthrie, Spencer D; White, Michelle K

    2017-01-19

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a rare disease characterized by misfolded amyloid protein deposits in tissues and vital organs, and little is known about the burden of AL amyloidosis on health-related quality of life. This study aimed to quantify the burden of AL amyloidosis in terms of health-related quality of life in a diverse, community-based sample of AL amyloidosis patients. The SF-36v2® Health Survey (SF-36v2), a widely used generic measure of health-related quality of life (using physical and mental summary scales and subscales assessing eight aspects of functioning and well-being), was administered as an online survey of AL amyloidosis patients with AL amyloidosis (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02574676 ; n = 341). Compared with adjusted general population sample norms, health-related quality of life of AL amyloidosis patients was significantly worse across all SF-36v2 scales and summary measures based on analysis of variance (p quality of life. These findings also help to support the use of health-related quality of life end points as important outcome measures in current and future treatment studies. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02574676 . Registered October 5, 2015.

  14. Splenic amyloidosis: correlations between chemical types of amyloid protein and morphological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, T; Shimokama, T; Yoshikawa, Y; Watanabe, T

    1990-07-01

    Sixty-one autopsy cases of splenic amyloidosis were reviewed to assess the relationship between the morphological patterns and chemical types of amyloid protein. On the basis of immunohistochemical reactions of amyloid protein, the cases were classified into 34 cases of AA and 27 of AL amyloidosis. Amyloid deposition in the spleen was divided into three major sites: the red pulp, the white pulp, and blood vessels. Red pulp involvement by amyloid was noted in 52% of the AL cases but in none of the AA cases. White pulp amyloid deposition was found in 70% of the AL and 35% of the AA cases. This difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.001). On the other hand, vascular deposition of amyloid was invariably noted in all cases with AA or AL amyloidosis, affecting the AA cases rather severely. These results strongly suggest that the widely held concept of deposition of amyloid as predominantly vascular in AL amyloidosis and parenchymal in AA amyloidosis requires revision. Our findings indicate that parenchymal, especially the red pulp, involvement is a consistent feature of AL amyloidosis, whereas vascular involvement is a finding common to both types of systemic amyloidosis.

  15. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized nasopharyngeal amyloidosis : Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Peng, Gang; Shi, Liangliang; Ming, Xing; Li, Zhenyu; Fei, Shijiang; Ding, Qian; Cheng, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Primary localized amyloidosis is characterized by the deposition of amyloid proteins restricted to one organ, without systemic involvement. Primary nasopharyngeal amyloidosis is an exceedingly rare condition, for which the standard treatment remains unknown. Because of its challenging anatomical position, surgery alone hardly results in complete resection of the localized amyloidosis. Therefore, an interdisciplinary planning board to design optimal treatment is of particular importance. A 39-year-old man presented with a several-week history of nasal obstruction and epistaxis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a retro-odontoid nonenhancing soft tissue mass. The endoscopic biopsy demonstrated that the mass was amyloid in nature. An extensive systemic workup revealed an absence of inflammatory process, systemic amyloidosis, or plasma cell dyscrasia. The patient was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy, showing no evidence of recurrence or progression at his 1‑year follow-up. Primary solitary amyloidosis is a rare form of amyloidosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a nasopharyngeal amyloidosis case treated with excision and radiation leading to complete remission. Because of the difficulty for surgeons to achieve radical resection with such lesions, radiotherapy proved to be an excellent adjuvant treatment in this case.

  16. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Gastric Amyloidosis in a Patient with Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlo Gjeorgjievski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a common complication of patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM, and multiple myeloma (MM. This proteinaceous material can be deposited intercellularly in any organ system, including the gastrointestinal (GI tract. In the GI tract, amyloidosis affects the duodenum most commonly, followed by the stomach and colorectum. Gastric amyloidosis causes symptoms of nausea, vomiting, early satiety, abdominal pain, and GI bleeding. A case of upper GI bleeding from gastric amyloidosis is presented in a patient with SMM. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD revealed a gastric mass. Endoscopic biopsies revealed amyloid deposition in the lamina propria, consistent with gastric amyloidosis. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry performed on peptides extracted from Congo red-positive microdissected areas of paraffin-embedded stomach specimens revealed a peptide profile consistent with AL- (lambda- type amyloidosis. Based on this and multiple other case reports, we recommend that patients with GI bleeding and MGUS, SMM, or MM undergo EGD and pathologic examination of endoscopic biopsies of identified lesions using Congo red stains for amyloidosis for early diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Amyloidosis involving the respiratory system: 5-year's experience of a multi-disciplinary group's activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Raffaele; Maccari, Uberto; Madioni, Chiara; Venezia, Duccio; La Magra, Lidia Calogera

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis may involve the respiratory system with different clinical-radiological-functional patterns which are not always easy to be recognized. A good level of knowledge of the disease, an active integration of the pulmonologist within a multidisciplinary setting and a high level of clinical suspicion are necessary for an early diagnosis of respiratory amyloidosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the number and the patterns of amyloidosis involving the respiratory system. We searched the cases of amyloidosis among patients attending the multidisciplinary rare and diffuse lung disease outpatients' clinic of Pulmonology Unit of the Hospital of Arezzo from 2007 to 2012. Among the 298 patients evaluated during the study period, we identified three cases of amyloidosis with involvement of the respiratory system, associated or not with other extra-thoracic localizations, whose diagnosis was histo-pathologically confirmed after the pulmonologist, the radiologist, and the pathologist evaluation. Our experience of a multidisciplinary team confirms that intra-thoracic amyloidosis is an uncommon disorder, representing 1.0% of the cases of rare and diffuse lung diseases referred to our center. The diagnosis of the disease is not always easy and quick as the amyloidosis may involve different parts of the respiratory system (airways, pleura, parenchyma). It is therefore recommended to remind this orphan disease in the differential diagnosis of the wide clinical scenarios the pulmonologist may intercept in clinical practice. PMID:26229565

  18. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Gastric Amyloidosis in a Patient with Smoldering Multiple Myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjeorgjievski, Mihajlo; Purohit, Treta; Amin, Mitual B; Kurtin, Paul J; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a common complication of patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), and multiple myeloma (MM). This proteinaceous material can be deposited intercellularly in any organ system, including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the GI tract, amyloidosis affects the duodenum most commonly, followed by the stomach and colorectum. Gastric amyloidosis causes symptoms of nausea, vomiting, early satiety, abdominal pain, and GI bleeding. A case of upper GI bleeding from gastric amyloidosis is presented in a patient with SMM. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a gastric mass. Endoscopic biopsies revealed amyloid deposition in the lamina propria, consistent with gastric amyloidosis. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry performed on peptides extracted from Congo red-positive microdissected areas of paraffin-embedded stomach specimens revealed a peptide profile consistent with AL- (lambda-) type amyloidosis. Based on this and multiple other case reports, we recommend that patients with GI bleeding and MGUS, SMM, or MM undergo EGD and pathologic examination of endoscopic biopsies of identified lesions using Congo red stains for amyloidosis for early diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Chronic cerebral ischemia, neuroplasticity, possibilities of therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Chukanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents current views on the pathogenetic mechanisms of cerebral ischemia. It discusses the role of neurotrophins in the processes of neuroplasticity. Experimental and clinical studies of the neuropeptide drug Cerebrolysin are reviewed. The authors describe in detail the results of the clinical trial and a health economic analysis of the effects of Cerebrolysin on the time course of clinical changes, progression, and risk of exacerbations in patients with chronic cerebral ischemia. 

  20. Safety of Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Kidney Biopsy in Patients with AA Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altindal, Mahmut; Yildirim, Tolga; Turkmen, Ercan; Unal, Mucahit; Boga, Ilker; Yilmaz, Rahmi; Arici, Mustafa; Altun, Bulent; Erdem, Yunus

    2015-01-01

    Bleeding is the most frequent complication of kidney biopsy. Although bleeding risk in patients with AA amyloidosis after kidney biopsy has not been studied in a large population, AA amyloidosis has long been perceived as a risk factor for bleeding. The aim of the present study was to evaluate post-biopsy bleeding risk in patients with AA amyloidosis. We retrospectively analyzed bleeding complications in 88 patients with AA amyloidosis and 202 controls after percutaneous kidney biopsy. All the kidney biopsies were performed under the guidance of real-time ultrasound with the use of an automated core biopsy system after a standard pre-biopsy screening protocol. Bleeding events were classified as major when transfusion of blood products or surgical or radiological intervention was required, or if the bleeding caused hypovolemic shock or death. Bleeding events that did not meet these criteria were accepted as minor. The incidence of post-biopsy bleeding was comparable between AA amyloidosis and control groups (5.7 vs. 5.0%, p = 0.796). Major bleeding events were observed in 3 patients from each group (p = 0.372). Selective renal angiography and embolization were applied to 2 patients from the AA amyloidosis group. One of these patients underwent colectomy and died because of infectious complications. Bleeding events were minor in 2.3% of the patients with AA amyloidosis and 3.5% of the controls (p = 0.728). AA amyloidosis was not associated with increased post-biopsy bleeding risk. Kidney biopsy is safe in AA amyloidosis when standard pre-biopsy screening is applied. Further data are needed to confirm these findings. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  2. Systemic Amyloidosis and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Associated with Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Aasems; Raj, Rishi; Walkow, Warren

    2017-01-01

    A 73-year-old male with long-standing Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia complicated with systemic amyloidosis presented with a witnessed syncopal episode. He had complaints of orthostatic dizziness and palpitations for few months. Orthostatic hypotension and peripheral neuropathy were demonstrated on physical examination. EKG, 24-hour Holter monitoring, and 2D echocardiogram were unremarkable. MRI of the brain ruled out stroke. Patients with amyloidosis can develop cardiovascular disease through amyloid cardiomyopathy, small vessel disease, conduction defects, pericardial effusion, or autonomic denervation. After ruling out other life-threatening causes, Ewing's battery of tests was done to rule out cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Two heart rate tests and one blood pressure test were abnormal which indicated severe cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy can mask symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and hence early diagnosis using the simple bedside maneuver is beneficial. The test is also important for prognostication. Absence of augmentation of cardiac output from inadequate autonomic stimulation will lead to postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, and tachycardia. There may be no change in heart rate with Valsalva or deep breathing both of which increase parasympathetic tone. As the condition progresses, it may result in cardiac denervation which can result in silent myocardial infarction, syncope, and sudden death.

  3. Therapeutic regional dermabrasion in papular lichen amyloidosis of shins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savant S

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic regional dermabrasion of shins is a useful surgical method for planing away the persistent pruritic lichenified hyperkeratotic eruptions of papular lichen amyloidosis. Nine patients (6 females and 3 males of 35 to 52 years age having papular lichen amyloidosis on shins, refractory to various medical lines of treatment for 5-12 years duration were subjected to regional dermabrasion. Extensor surfaces (shins of both lower extremities (18 sites in all 9 cases were treated by multiple sittings of spot dermabrasion. All 18 sites healed with superficial scarring and complete response (100% with total clearance of lesions was observed in all 18 sites. Pruritus stopped in all the 18 dermabraded sites immediately. No local recurrence has been observed in any sites over a minimum follow up peroid of 1½ years. Apart from superficial scarring occurring at all 18 sites the other side effect observed was varying degree of hypopigmentation in 10 out of the 18 sites dermabraded. Complication in the form of parchment like deep atrophic scarring with persistant hypopigmentation, erythema and at places depigmentation were obseved at 2 sites which were dermabraded deeply. Similar complications with delayed wound healing were observed at the 3rd site as sequel to secondary bacterial infection following spot dermabrasion

  4. Localized amyloidosis of the stomach mimicking a superficial gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Miwako; Fujino, Yasuteru; Muguruma, Naoki; Murayama, Noriaki; Okamoto, Koichi; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Uehara, Hisanori; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-06-01

    A 73-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further examination of a depressed lesion in the stomach found by cancer screening gastroscopy. A barium upper gastrointestinal series showed an area of irregular mucosa measuring 15 mm on the anterior wall of the gastric body. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 15 mm depressed lesion on the anterior wall of the lower gastric body. We suspected an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma from the appearance and took some biopsies. However, histology of the specimens revealed amyloidal deposits in the submucosal layer without malignant findings. Congo red staining was positive for amyloidal protein and green birefringence was observed under polarized light microscopy. Congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the light chain (AL) amyloid type. There were no amyloid deposits in the colon or duodenum. Computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no remarkable findings. Thus, this case was diagnosed as a localized gastric amyloidosis characterized by AL type amyloid deposition in the mucosal or submucosal layer. As the clinical outcome of gastric AL amyloidosis seems favorable, this case is scheduled for periodic examination to recognize potential disease progression and has been stable for 2 years.

  5. Light chain (AL amyloidosis: update on diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenzweig Michael

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Light chain (AL amyloidosis is a plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by the pathologic production of fibrillar proteins comprised of monoclonal light chains which deposit in tissues and cause organ dysfunction. The diagnosis can be challenging, requiring a biopsy and often specialized testing to confirm the subtype of systemic disease. The goal of treatment is eradication of the monoclonal plasma cell population and suppression of the pathologic light chains which can result in organ improvement and extend patient survival. Standard treatment approaches include high dose melphalan (HDM followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT or oral melphalan with dexamethasone (MDex. The use of novel agents (thalidomide, lenalidomide and bortezomib alone and in combination with steroids and alkylating agents has shown efficacy and continues to be explored. A risk adapted approach to SCT followed by novel agents as consolidation reduces treatment related mortality with promising outcomes. Immunotherapeutic approaches targeting pathologic plasma cells and amyloid precursor proteins or fibrils are being developed. Referral of patients to specialized centers focusing on AL amyloidosis and conducting clinical trials is essential to improving patient outcomes.

  6. A prospective study of nutritional status in immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sattianayagam, Prayman T; Lane, Thirusha; Fox, Zoe

    2013-01-01

    -diagnosed, treatment-naïve patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis attending the UK National Amyloidosis Centre. At study entry, 72 of 110 (66%) patients had a PG-SGA score of 4 or over, indicating malnutrition requiring specialist nutritional intervention. Number of amyloidotic organs, elevated alkaline......Weight loss is common in systemic immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis but there are limited data on the impact of nutritional status on outcome. Using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) score, we prospectively examined nutritional status in 110 consecutive newly...... phosphatase, presence of autonomic neuropathy and advanced Mayo disease stage were independently associated with poor nutritional status (P...

  7. Renal AA amyloidosis in a patient with hereditary complete complement C4 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Helal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary complete C4 deficiency has until now been reported in 30 cases only. A disturbed clearance of immune- complexes probably predisposes these individuals to systemic lupus erythematosus, other immune- complex diseases and recurrent microbial infections. We present here a 20- year- old female with hereditary complete C4 deficiency. Renal biopsy demonstrated renal AA amyloidosis. This unique case further substantiates that deficiency of classical pathway components predisposes to the development of recurrent microbial infections and that the patients may develop AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, in clinical practice, the nephrotic syndrome occurring in a patient with hereditary complete complement C4 deficiency should lead to the suspicion of renal AA amyloidosis.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging with liver-specific contrast agent in primary amyloidosis and intrahepatic cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, J.M.; Santoni-Rugiu, E.; Chabanova, E.; Logager, V.; Hansen, A.B.; Thomsen, H.S. [Depts. of Radiology and Pathology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital, Herlev (Denmark)

    2007-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in hepatic amyloidosis are not well defined. Here, we report on a patient with renal failure caused by primary amyloidosis (AL type) who developed jaundice. Ultrasound and computed tomography were normal except for some ascites. MRI with oral manganese-containing contrast agent revealed several focal areas without contrast uptake in the hepatocytes and no bile secretion after 8 hours. No extrahepatic bile obstructions were found. Liver biopsy showed severe intraportal, vascular, and parenchymal amyloidosis causing severe cholestasis and atrophy of hepatocytes.

  9. Cerebral malaria Malaria cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blair Trujillo

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia. La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC.

  10. Dual-Energy SPECT and the Development of Peptide p5+14 for Imaging Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S. Wall PhD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is associated with a number of rare diseases and is characterized by the deposition, in abdominothoracic organs and peripheral nerves, of extracellular protein fibrils, which leads to dysfunction and severe morbidity. Effective clinical evaluation and management of patients with systemic amyloidosis are hampered by the lack of a noninvasive, quantitative method for detecting whole-body amyloid load. We have used a battery of assays including dual-energy SPECT imaging and comparative effectiveness studies in support of translation of a synthetic polybasic peptide, p5+14, as a novel radiotracer for visualization of amyloidosis by molecular imaging. These data provide support for a phase 1 positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging trial of this reagent, labeled with iodine-124, in patients with all forms of systemic amyloidosis.

  11. Ventricular fibrillation after bortezomib therapy in a patient with systemic amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yamasaki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old female was diagnosed with systemic amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma. Bortezomib and dexamethasone-therapy was initiated; however, she developed lethal ventricular fibrillation (VF and cardiac arrest after 84 hours of therapy. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using direct current shocks with epinephrine and amiodarone was initiated but failed to receive cardiac function. Although her arterial pulsations recovered immediately after the injection of vasopressin, she died of heart failure 8 hours after the onset of VF. Cardiac amyloidosis was verified by autopsy. Although the direct association of bortezomib with lethal VF remained to be clarified in our patient, the current report emphasizes on bortezomib as a substantial risk factor for cardiomyocyte damage. The potential risk of lethal events associated with cardiac amyloidosis should be carefully considered during bortezomib treatment for patients with AL amyloidosis.

  12. Dual-Energy SPECT and the Development of Peptide p5+14 for Imaging Amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, Stephen J.; Martin, Emily B.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloidosis is associated with a number of rare diseases and is characterized by the deposition, in abdominothoracic organs and peripheral nerves, of extracellular protein fibrils, which leads to dysfunction and severe morbidity. Effective clinical evaluation and management of patients with systemic amyloidosis are hampered by the lack of a noninvasive, quantitative method for detecting whole-body amyloid load. We have used a battery of assays including dual-energy SPECT imaging and comparative effectiveness studies in support of translation of a synthetic polybasic peptide, p5+14, as a novel radiotracer for visualization of amyloidosis by molecular imaging. These data provide support for a phase 1 positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging trial of this reagent, labeled with iodine-124, in patients with all forms of systemic amyloidosis. PMID:28654386

  13. Primary localized cutaneous nodular amyloidosis and CREST syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Erika M; Kendrick, Christina G

    2008-07-01

    Primary localized cutaneous nodular amyloidosis (PLCNA) is a form of primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis (PLCA) that presents as yellowish waxy nodules on the extremities, face, trunk, or genitalia. We report the case of a patient with PLCNA and CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal motility disorders, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) syndrome. A diagnosis of her extensive PLCNA was made after biopsy specimens from the bilateral shins stained positive for amyloid extending from the superficial papillary dermis to the subcutis. Results of a workup were negative for paraproteinemia or signs of systemic amyloidosis and have remained so after 8 years of follow-up. We present a review of the literature describing the presentation and histopathology of the varying forms of amyloidosis.

  14. Incidence of hereditary amyloidosis and autoinflammatory diseases in Sweden: endemic and imported diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hemminki, Kari; Li, Xinjun; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of progressive diseases caused by tissue deposition of misfolded proteins. According to the International Classification of Diseases, hereditary amyloidosis is divided into neuropathic and non-neuropathic forms. In Sweden, neuropathic heredofamilial amyloidosis has been identified as familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a fatal disease that is treated by liver transplantation. The non-neuropathic form includes familial autoinflammatory d...

  15. Long-term TNF-alpha blockade in patients with amyloid A amyloidosis complicating rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Olivé, Alejandro; Castro, María Carmen; Varela, Angela Herranz; Riera, Elena; Irigoyen, Maria V; García de Yébenes, María Jesús; García-Vicuña, Rosario

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with amyloid A amyloidosis. Multicenter, controlled, dynamic prospective cohort study of 36 patients with amyloid A amyloidosis (94% kidney involvement) treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor agents (drug exposure of 102.97 patient-years). As an external control group, 35 propensity score-matched non-amyloid patients were chosen from the Base de Datos de Productos Biológicos de la Sociedad Española de Reumatología registry. The end points were kidney response and progression, anti-tumor necrosis factor continuation rate, patient survival, and adverse events. At the end of follow-up, a kidney response was observed in 12 of 22 patients (54.5%) and a kidney progression was observed in 6 of 36 patients (17%). The kidney amyloidosis remained stable in 16 of 36 patients (44%). The level of acute phase reactants diminished but did not reach the normal level. The continuation rates of anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs among patients with amyloid A amyloidosis after 1, 2, 3, and 4 or more years were 80%, 80%, 61%, and 52%, respectively, comparable to controls. The 5-year cumulative survival of amyloid A amyloidosis cases was 90.6%, and the 10-year survival was 78.5%. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the duration of amyloidosis and the level of proteinuria at the onset of anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment were independent predictors of treatment failure, whereas the level of proteinuria was the only factor that predicts mortality. Most adverse events were similar in both groups, although the number of infections was 3 times higher in amyloid A amyloidosis cases. Anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs are effective in treating amyloid A amyloidosis, although they might increase the risk of infection. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cardiac amyloidosis induces up-regulation of Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hanna; Renner, Marcus; Bergmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a life-threatening protein misfolding disease and affects cardiac tissue, leading to heart failure, myocardial ischemia and arrhythmia. Amyloid deposits result in oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of innate defense...... components, i.e., Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) and the complement system, in different types of cardiac amyloidosis....

  17. A case of dialysis-related amyloidosis of the hip and cervical spine: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Ik Won; Min, Seon Jung; Cho, Seong Whi; Kim, Seok Woo; Jang, Woo Young [Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seon Joo [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung Jin [Dankook University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    Dialysis-related amyloidosis is a complication of long-term hemodialysis and it is characterized by the accumulation of {beta} 2-microglobulin in the osteoarticular structures. We describe here the imaging findings of a case of dialysis-related amyloidosis involving the hip and cervical spine in a 62-year-old woman who received long-term dialysis. We focus here on the CT and MR imaging findings of the cervical spine and we include a review of the relevant literatures.

  18. Nonsecretory Multiple Myeloma and AL Amyloidosis Presenting with Nephrotic Range Proteinuria

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Beyler Kilic; Ali Kemal Oguz; Ihsan Ergun; Dilek Ertoy Baydar; Meltem Ayli

    2015-01-01

    Nonsecretory multiple myeloma (NSMM) is the absence of a detectable monoclonal protein in serum and urine of a multiple myeloma (MM) patient and immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a significantly rare complication. A case of NSMM with AL amyloidosis and nephrotic range proteinuria is presented. Sharing clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic characteristics with MM, real challenge may be during initial diagnosis of NSMM and assessment of treatment response. In elderly patients with ...

  19. Ursodeoxycholic acid for treatment of cholestasis in patients with hepatic amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faust Dominik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Amyloidosis represents a group of different diseases characterized by extracellular accumulation of pathologic fibrillar proteins in various tissues and organs. Severe amyloid deposition in the liver parenchyma has extrahepatic involvement predominantly in the kidney or heart. We evaluated the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid, in four patients with severe hepatic amyloidosis of different etiologies, who presented with increased alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyl transferase. Case report. The study included four patients who presented with amyloidosis-associated intrahepatic cholestasis. Three of them had renal amyloidosis which developed 1-3 years before cholestasis occurred, the remaining one having intrahepatic cholestasis as the primary sign of the disease. Amyloidosis was identified from liver biopsies in all patients by its specific binding to Congo red and green birefringence in polarized light. The biochemical nature and the class of amyloid deposits were identified immunohistochemically. In addition to their regular treatment, the patients received 750 mg ursodeoxycholic acid per day. After 2-4 weeks all patients had a significant decrease of serum alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyl transferase, and their general status significantly improved. Conclusion. Treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid may be beneficial in patients with hepatic amyloidosis, and do extend indications for the use of ursodeoxycholic acid in amyloidotic cholestatic liver disease.

  20. Abnormal heart rate variability in AA amyloidosis of familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinovitch, Udi; Volovitz, Benjamin; Nussinovitch, Moshe; Lidar, Merav; Feld, Olga; Nussinovitch, Naomi; Livneh, Avi

    2011-12-01

    A scarcity of data exists relating to the effect of amyloidosis of Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) on the autonomic nervous system. Our aim was to further investigate the presence of dysautonomia in FMF-AA amyloidosis, using a comparative case series design. The study group consisted of 40 patients with FMF: 20 without co-morbidities or amyloidosis and 20 in various stages of renal amyloidosis. Time domain and power spectral analyses of heart rate dynamics were performed according to accepted procedures. Findings were compared with 20 healthy control subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in any of the studied heart rate variability (HRV) parameters between patients with uncomplicated FMF and controls. In contrast, patients with progressive amyloidosis (post renal transplantation or on dialysis) had significantly lower HRV parameters compared to control subjects (i.e. mean low frequency power spectral components 104.30 ms² vs. 172.09 ms², p components values lower than 142.35 ms², and 12.67 (95%CI 1.04-153.96, p = 0.04) for standard deviation of all normal RR intervals values lower than 40.15?ms. Amyloidosis of FMF, particularly at a progressive stage, is associated with HRV abnormalities suggestive of the presence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction.

  1. Pretargeting immunotherapy: a novel treatment approach for systemic amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Jonathan S; Foster, James S; Martin, Emily B; Kennel, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    The amyloidoses are a complex group of disorders characterized by the deposition of proteinaceous amyloid fibrils in vital organs. The deposits are nonimmunogenic and may be composed of one of more than 35 proteins. We have developed a two-stage immunotherapeutic approach using peptides that recognize most, if not all, amyloid deposits to facilitate amyloid clearance. In the first embodiment, we have developed a bifunctional peptope to enhance and expand the utility of currently available antibodies. In the second, we have generated peptide-reactive antibodies that can be targeted to the amyloid deposits by peptides thereby providing alternative reagents for immunotherapy of amyloidosis. These technologies provide tools for treating the many forms of amyloid disease, restoring organ function and enhancing patient survival.

  2. Plasmacytoma with amyloidosis masquerding as tuberculosis on cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Neelam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid material on lymph node cytology smears can mimic caseous necrosis. We report one such case where a 50-year-old lady presented with a nasal mass and cervical lymphadenopathy. Fine needle aspiration cytology smears of the cervical lymph node were interpreted as tuberculous lymphadenitis based on the presence of an occasional epithelioid cell and caseous material. The patient did not respond to antituberculous therapy and was revaluated. Repeat aspiration from the lymph node showed numerous plasma cells and myeloma cells in addition to the amorphous material which was confirmed to be amyloid on staining with congo red. A diagnosis of plasmacytoma with amyloidosis was rendered. Imprint smears from nasal mass, detailed hematology workup and subsequent histology confirmed the diagnosis.

  3. Advances in proteomic study of cardiac amyloidosis: progress and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavatelli, Francesca; Merlini, Giampaolo

    2016-10-19

    More than ten distinct forms of amyloidoses that can involve the heart have been described, classified according to which protein originates the deposits. Cardiac amyloid infiltration translates into progressive and often life-threatening cardiomyopathy, but disease severity, prognosis and treatment drastically differ according to the amyloidosis type. The notion that protein misfolding and aggregation play a more general role in human cardiomyopathies has further raised attention towards the definition of the proteotoxicity mechanisms. Areas covered: Mass spectrometry-based proteomics plays an important role as a diagnostic tool and for understanding the molecular bases of amyloid cardiomyopathies. The landscape of applications of proteomics to the study of cardiac amyloidoses and amyloid-related cardiotoxicity is summarized, with a critical synthesis of the major achievements. Expert commentary: Current strengths and limitations of proteomics in the clinical setting and in translational research on amyloid cardiomyopathy are discussed, with the foreseen potential future directions in the field.

  4. Acute asthma exacerbations: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lorenzo Urso

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. All patient with asthma are at risk of having exacerbations characterized by worsening symptoms, airflow obstruction, and an increased requirement for rescue bronchodilators. Asthma exacerbations can be classified as mild, moderate, severe, or life threatening. The goals of treatment are correction of severe hypoxemia, rapid reversal of airflow obstruction, and reduction of the risk of relapse.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v5i3.932

  5. Increased regional cerebral glucose uptake in an APP/PS1 model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisnel, Géraldine; Hérard, Anne-Sophie; El Tannir El Tayara, Nadine; Bourrin, Emmanuel; Volk, Andreas; Kober, Frank; Delatour, Benoit; Delzescaux, Thierry; Debeir, Thomas; Rooney, Thomas; Benavides, Jésus; Hantraye, Philippe; Dhenain, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the invariant cerebral accumulation of β-amyloid peptide. This event occurs early in the disease process. In humans, [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is largely used to follow-up in vivo cerebral glucose utilization (CGU) and brain metabolism modifications associated with the Alzheimer's disease pathology. Here, [18F]-FDG positron emission tomography was used to study age-related changes of cerebral glucose utilization under resting conditions in 3-, 6-, and 12-month-old APP(SweLon)/PS1(M146L), a mouse model of amyloidosis. We showed an age-dependent increase of glucose uptake in several brain regions of APP/PS1 mice but not in control animals and a higher [18F]-FDG uptake in the cortex and the hippocampus of 12-month-old APP/PS1 mice as compared with age-matched control mice. We then developed a method of 3-D microscopic autoradiography to evaluate glucose uptake at the level of amyloid plaques and showed an increased glucose uptake close to the plaques rather than in amyloid-free cerebral tissues. These data suggest a macroscopic and microscopic reorganization of glucose uptake in relation to cerebral amyloidosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term prognosis of AL and AA renal amyloidosis: a Japanese single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Masatoyo; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Nara, Mizuho; Sato, Ryuta; Togashi, Masaru; Takahashi, Naoto; Wakui, Hideki

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the long-term prognosis of patients with amyloid light chain (AL) and amyloid A (AA) renal amyloidosis in the same cohort. We retrospectively examined 68 patients with biopsy-proven renal amyloidosis (38 AL and 30 AA). Clinicopathological findings at the diagnosis and follow-up data were evaluated in each patient. We analyzed the relationship between clinicopathological parameters and survival data. Significant differences were observed in several clinicopathological features, such as proteinuria levels, between the AL and AA groups. Among all patients, 84.2 % of the AL group and 93.3 % of the AA group received treatments for the underlying diseases of amyloidosis. During the follow-up period (median 18 months in AL and 61 months in AA), 36.8 % of the AL group and 36.7 % of the AA group developed end-stage renal failure requiring dialysis, while 71.1 % of the AL group and 56.7 % of the AA group died. Patient and renal survivals were significantly longer in the AA group than in the AL group. eGFR of >60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 at biopsy and an early histological stage of glomerular amyloid deposition were identified as low-risk factors. A multivariate analysis showed that cardiac amyloidosis and steroid therapy significantly influenced patient and renal survivals. Our results showed that heart involvement was the major predictor of poor outcomes in renal amyloidosis, and that the prognosis of AA renal amyloidosis was markedly better than that in previously reported cohorts. Therapeutic advances in inflammatory diseases are expected to improve the prognosis of AA amyloidosis.

  7. Coronary microvascular dysfunction is related to abnormalities in myocardial structure and function in cardiac amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbala, Sharmila; Vangala, Divya; Bruyere, John; Quarta, Christina; Kruger, Jenna; Padera, Robert; Foster, Courtney; Hanley, Michael; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Falk, Rodney

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that coronary microvascular function is impaired in subjects with cardiac amyloidosis. Effort angina is common in subjects with cardiac amyloidosis, even in the absence of epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD). Thirty-one subjects were prospectively enrolled in this study, including 21 subjects with definite cardiac amyloidosis without epicardial CAD and 10 subjects with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). All subjects underwent rest and vasodilator stress N-13 ammonia positron emission tomography and 2-dimensional echocardiography. Global left ventricular myocardial blood flow (MBF) was quantified at rest and during peak hyperemia, and coronary flow reserve (CFR) was computed (peak stress MBF/rest MBF) adjusting for rest rate pressure product. Compared with the LVH group, the amyloid group showed lower rest MBF (0.59 ± 0.15 ml/g/min vs. 0.88 ± 0.23 ml/g/min; p = 0.004), stress MBF (0.85 ± 0.29 ml/g/min vs. 1.85 ± 0.45 ml/g/min; p coronary vascular resistance (111 ± 40 ml/g/min/mm Hg vs. 70 ± 19 ml/g/min/mm Hg; p = 0.004). Of note, almost all subjects with amyloidosis (>95%) had significantly reduced peak stress MBF (coronary vasodilator function. Coronary microvascular dysfunction is highly prevalent in subjects with cardiac amyloidosis, even in the absence of epicardial CAD, and may explain their anginal symptoms. Further study is required to understand whether specific therapy directed at amyloidosis may improve coronary vasomotion in amyloidosis. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Renal Amyloidosis Associated With 5 Novel Variants in the Fibrinogen A Alpha Chain Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowczenio, Dorota; Stensland, Maria; de Souza, Gustavo A; Strøm, Erik H; Gilbertson, Janet A; Taylor, Graham; Rendell, Nigel; Minogue, Shane; Efebera, Yvonne A; Lachmann, Helen J; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D; Hawkins, Philip N; Heimdal, Ketil R; Selvig, Kristian; Lægreid, Inger K; Demoulin, Nathalie; Aydin, Selda; Gillmore, Julian D; Wien, Tale N

    2017-05-01

    Fibrinogen A alpha chain amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disease associated with mutations in the fibrinogen A alpha chain ( FGA ) gene, and it is the most common cause of hereditary renal amyloidosis in the UK. Patients typically present with kidney impairment and progress to end-stage renal disease over a median time of 4.6 years. Six patients presented with proteinuria, hypertension, and/or lower limb edema and underwent detailed clinical and laboratory investigations. A novel FGA gene mutation was identified in each case: 2 frameshift mutations F521Sfs*27 and G519Efs*30 and 4 single base substitutions G555F, E526K, E524K, R554H. In 5 subjects, extensive amyloid deposits were found solely within the glomeruli, which stained specifically with antibodies to fibrinogen A alpha chain, and in one of these cases, we found coexistent fibrinogen A alpha chain amyloidosis and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease. One patient was diagnosed with light-chain amyloidosis after a bone marrow examination revealed a small clonal plasma cell population, and laser microdissection of the amyloid deposits followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry identified kappa light chain as the fibril protein. We report 6 novel mutations in the FGA gene: 5 were associated with renal fibrinogen A alpha chain amyloidosis and 1 was found to be incidental to light-chain amyloid deposits discovered in a patient with a plasma cell dyscrasia. Clinical awareness and suspicion of hereditary amyloidosis corroborated by genetic analysis and adequate typing using combined immunohistochemistry and laser microdissection and mass spectrometry is valuable to avoid misdiagnosis, especially when a family history of amyloidosis is absent.

  9. Localized gastric amyloidosis differentiated histologically from scirrhous gastric cancer using endoscopic mucosal resection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamata Tsugumasa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Amyloidosis most often manifests as a systemic involvement of multiple tissues and organs, and an amyloidal deposit confined to the stomach is extremely rare. It is sometimes difficult to provide a definitive diagnosis of localized gastric amyloidosis by biopsy specimen and diagnosis of amyloidosis in some cases has been finalized only after surgical resection of the stomach. Case presentation A 76-year-old Japanese woman with epigastric discomfort underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy procedure. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed gastric wall thickening, suggesting scirrhous gastric carcinoma, at the greater curvature from the upper to the lower part of the gastric corpus. A biopsy specimen revealed amyloid deposits in the submucosal layer with no malignant findings. We resected a representative portion of the lesion by endoscopic mucosal resection using the strip biopsy method to obtain sufficient tissue specimens, and then conducted a detailed histological evaluation of the samples. The resected specimens revealed deposition of amyloidal materials in the gastric mucosa and submucosa without any malignant findings. Congo red staining results were positive for amyloidal protein and exhibited green birefringence under polarized light. Congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the light chain (AL amyloid protein type. Based on these results, gastric malignancy, systemic amyloidosis and amyloid deposits induced by inflammatory disease were excluded and this lesion was consequently diagnosed as localized gastric amyloidosis. Our patient was an older woman and there were no findings relative to an increase in gastrointestinal symptoms or anemia, so no further treatment was performed. She continued to be in good condition without any finding of disease progression six years after verification of our diagnosis. Conclusions We report an unusual case of primary amyloidosis of the stomach

  10. Cerebral hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before, during, or soon after birth such as cerebral palsy Stroke Very low blood pressure Brain cells are very sensitive to a lack of ... of the eye to light Exams and Tests Cerebral hypoxia can usually be diagnosed based on the person's medical history and a physical exam. Tests are done to ...

  11. Toward a Consensus Definition for COPD Exacerbations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberto Rodriguez-Roisin

    2000-01-01

    .... Exacerbations are associated with a significant increase in mortality, hospitalization, and health-care utilization, but there is currently no widely accepted definition of what constitutes an exacerbation of COPD...

  12. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography might be useful for diagnosis of hepatic amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawada A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Akinobu Tawada,1 Tatsuo Kanda,1 Takashi Oide,2 Toshio Tsuyuguchi,1 Fumio Imazeki,1,3 Yukio Nakatani,2 Osamu Yokosuka11Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Chiba University Hospital, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan; 3Safety and Health Organization, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba, JapanAbstract: We report on a woman with hepatic involvement of primary systemic (immunoglobulin light chain, AL amyloidosis. Her diagnosis was confirmed by liver biopsy. Clinical symptoms of hepatic amyloidosis are generally mild at its first stage, with most frequent findings being hepatomegaly and alkaline phosphatase elevation. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of systemic amyloidosis have made several treatments available. However, its prognosis is occasionally poor. Because liver biopsy is not always safe, other modalities for the diagnosis are needed. Of interest was that fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG uptake into the liver was observed, compared with that into the spleen, in this patient, indicating that FDG positron emission tomography and computed tomography might be useful for the diagnosis of hepatic amyloidosis with mild liver dysfunction.Keywords: amyloidosis, diagnosis, hepatic involvement, FDG PET

  13. Review of eprodisate for the treatment of renal disease in AA amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid MM

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Adam Rumjon1, Thomas Coats1, Muhammad M Javaid21Department of Nephrology, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, 2Department of Nephrology, Dartford and Gravesham NHS Trust, Darent Valley Hospital, Dartford, UKAbstract: Secondary (AA amyloidosis is a multisystem disorder complicating chronic infections or inflammatory diseases. It is characterized by extracellular deposit of fibrils composed of fragments of serum amyloid A (SAA, an acute phase reactant protein. The kidney is the most frequent organ involved, manifesting as progressive proteinuria and renal impairment. Attenuation of the level of circulating SAA protein by treating the underlying inflammatory condition remains the primary strategy in treating AA amyloidosis. However, at times, achieving adequate control of protein production can prove difficult. In addition, relapse of renal function often occurs rapidly following any subsequent inflammatory stimulus in patients with existing amyloidosis. Recently there has been an interest in finding other potential strategies targeting amyloid deposits themselves. Eprodisate is a sulfonated molecule with a structure similar to heparan sulfate. It competitively binds to the glycosaminoglycan-binding sites on SAA and inhibits fibril polymerization and amyloid deposition. Recent randomized clinical trial showed that it may slow down progressive renal failure in patients with AA amyloidosis. However confirmatory studies are needed and results of a second Phase III study are eagerly awaited to clarify whether or not eprodisate has a place in treating renal amyloid disease.Keywords: AA amyloidosis, eprodisate, pathogenesis

  14. IgG,kappa monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance with AL amyloidosis simulating giant cell arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pompilian Valer Mihai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal gammopathies complicated by AL amyloidosis can mimic giant cell arteritis (GCA. We hereby present the case of a 63 year old woman in whom symptoms consistent with GCA were the first manifestations of a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS associated with amyloidosis. A 63 year old woman was admitted for temporal headache, maseterine claudication, neck and shoulder stiffness. She was recently diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. On physical examination she had prominent temporal arteries, macroglosia and orthostatic hypotension. Muscular strength was normal. She had high ESR and CRP; in this clinical context, GCA was suspected. A gamma spike on serum protein electrophoresis raised the suspicion of monoclonal gammopathy (MG. Immunoelectrophoresis revealed monoclonal bands for IgG and kappa chains. Massive deposits of amyloid and no inflammation were found on temporal artery biopsy. Multiple myeloma and lymphoma were ruled out. A diagnosis of AL amyloidosis complicating MGUS was formulated. She did well on therapy with bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone. Cases published in medical literature reveal amyloidosis mimicking GCA in the setting of established MGUS. As far as we know, this is the first case of MGUS with IgG and kappa chains in which a GCA-like picture induced by amyloidosis was present from the very onset.

  15. Anticipation of presbyopia in Portuguese familial amyloidosis ATTR V30M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirão, Melo; Matos, Eduarda; Beirâo, Idalina; Costa, Paulo Pinho E; Torres, Paulo

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if Portuguese patients with familial amyloidosis, liver transplanted and not, have an earlier development of presbyopia compared with a normal population and its relation with the presence or the absence of anterior capsule opacification of the lens. This study was performed to evaluate if Portuguese patients with familial amyloidosis and in a blood donors population (control group). Three hundred and fifty-six subjects, 144 amyloidotic patients and 212 healthy individuals, were evaluated for the need of plus lenses for normal near reading (Jaeger chart 1 at 33 cm). In familial amyloidosis patients, the value of the add-power was related to age, liver transplantation status, and presence of visible anterior capsule opacification of the lens. In both groups, the value of add-power was positively correlated with age (r=0.91; Ppresbyopia in familial amyloidosis patients was significantly lower than in control individuals (32 years vs. 42 years). Adjusting for age, no significant difference was observed in add-power values between liver transplanted and not transplanted amyloidotic patients, suggesting that liver transplantation has no influence on presbyopia evolution in these patients. Familial amyloidosis patients had an earlier onset of presbyopia, probably related to amyloid deposition on the anterior capsule of the lens, which is not halted by liver transplantation.

  16. [Amyloidosis associated with chronic granulomatous disease in a patient with a renal transplant and recurrent urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Ablanedo, P; Seco, M

    2002-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a group of syndromes which share a defect in a component of the phagocyte NADPH-oxidase complex. Without this enzyme activity, phagocytic cells cannot produce superoxide, peroxide, and other potent microbicidal radicals, and are less able to kill ingested pathogens. The clinical picture is characterised by recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and abnormal tissue granuloma formation. On the other hand, amyloidosis is a systemic disease with renal involvement occurring in the majority of cases. Recurrent amyloidosis is a rare but well documented event in renal transplant recipients. However, graft loss secondary to amyloidosis has been noted infrequently. In addition, de novo amyloidosis has not been previously associated with graft loss. We report here a renal transplant recipient with chronic granulomatous disease and history of recurrent urinary tract infections, who developed nephrotic syndrome and progressive renal insufficiency secondary to de novo AA amyloidosis leading to graft loss 66 months after transplantation.

  17. Nanolayers for early diagnostics of proteins involved in degenerative amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina M.R.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available FK-506 binding protein (FKBP12 is a protein of the family of immunophilins, involved in many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s syndrome where FKBP12 is known to be over-expressed in early stages of the disease. We designed and built Langmuir-Blodgett nanostructures incorporating ligands with high affinity for FKBP12: Tacrolimus (FK506 and Rifaximin as candidate nanosensors to detect low FKBP12 concentration in the initial phase of the amyloidosis. The binding process of the different ligands has been studied by means of photophysical measurements investigating the fluorescence quenching of the tryptophan residue in the binding pocket of FKBP12 by addition of the ligand in solution. Immobilization of the ligands was achieved adopting biomimetic strategy: phospholipid Langmuir-Blodgett films are proposed as nanoscaffolds for ligand inclusion. Several phospholipid nanoarchitectures differing in lipid composition, fluidity, number of layers and method of production (incubation versus co-spreading were screened. The results have shown that both FK506 and Rifaximin ligands penetrate the lipid matrix either as monomers or as aggregates depending on their initial concentration. More importantly, the experiments demonstrated that the ligands in the LB scaffolds efficiently quench FKBP12 fluorescence in solution as a consequence of ligand binding to the protein.

  18. Protein/Peptide Aggregation and Amyloidosis on Biointerfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Lu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, studies of protein/peptide aggregation, particularly the amyloidosis, have attracted considerable attention in discussions of the pathological mechanisms of most neurodegenerative diseases. The protein/peptide aggregation processes often occur at the membrane–cytochylema interface in vivo and behave differently from those occurring in bulk solution, which raises great interest to investigate how the interfacial properties of artificial biomaterials impact on protein aggregation. From the perspective of bionics, current progress in this field has been obtained mainly from four aspects: (1 hydrophobic–hydrophilic interfaces; (2 charged surface; (3 chiral surface; and (4 biomolecule-related interfaces. The specific physical and chemical environment provided by these interfaces is reported to strongly affect the adsorption of proteins, transition of protein conformation, and diffusion of proteins on the biointerface, all of which are ultimately related to protein assembly. Meanwhile, these compelling results of in vitro experiments can greatly promote the development of early diagnostics and therapeutics for the relevant neurodegenerative diseases. This paper presents a brief review of these appealing studies, and particular interests are placed on weak interactions (i.e., hydrogen bonding and stereoselective interactions that are also non-negligible in driving amyloid aggregation at the interfaces. Moreover, this paper also proposes the future perspectives, including the great opportunities and challenges in this field as well.

  19. Histochemical Differential Diagnosis and Polarization Optical Analysis of Amyloid and Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bély

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is characterized by extracellular deposition of protein fibrils of chemically heterogeneous composition. Early recognition and identification of amyloid deposits allows an early start of therapy, which may entail a better prognosis. Congo red staining according to Romhányi (1971 is a highly specific and sensitive method for early microscopic recognition of amyloidosis. The main and most important types of amyloidosis may be distinguished by classic histochemical methods of performate pretreatment according to Romhányi (1979, or by KMnO4 oxidation according to Wright (1977 followed by Congo red staining and viewed under polarized light. Differences in the speed of breakdown (disintegration of amyloid deposits according to Bély and Apáthy allow a more precise distinction of various types of amyloid.

  20. Bendamustine-Induced Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus in a Patient With AL Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwumugambi, Nsabimana A; Sanchorawala, Vaishali; Shelton, Anthony C; Stern, Lauren; Gordon, Craig E

    2017-02-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a condition characterized by polyuria with dilute urine due to the inability of the principal cells of the renal collecting ducts to respond to antidiuretic hormone and concentrate urine. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus can be drug induced, and several chemotherapeutic agents have been reported to cause it. Bendamustine is a traditional chemotherapeutic agent being studied for treatment for relapsed systemic AL amyloidosis. We report a case of a 59-year-old man with AL amyloidosis who developed partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus after receiving bendamustine for treatment of AL amyloidosis. The nephrogenic diabetes insipidus responded well to sodium restriction, hydrochlorothiazide, and desmopressin treatment, allowing the patient to receive subsequent bendamustine cycles without polyuria. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus resolved shortly after completion of bendamustine therapy. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fibrinogen A alpha-chain amyloidosis: report of the first case in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Juliana Reis; Silva, Marcos Vinícius da; Neves, Precil Diego Miranda de Menezes; Oliveira, Flavia Aparecida de; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda; Rodrigues, Willians Vinícius Dutra; Benson, Merril; Reis, Marlene Antônia Dos

    2013-03-01

    Hereditary fibrinogen A alpha-chain (AFib) amyloidosis affects different organs, especially the kidneys. No case of this disease has been reported in Latin America. A 52-year-old previously healthy Brazilian woman presented with a seven-month history of proteinuria in the absence of hematuria. The patient had normal blood pressure and reported no other symptoms. A renal biopsy was obtained and light microscopy revealed the presence of Congo red positive deposits (apple-green birefringence under polarized light) only in the glomerular compartment. These deposits were strongly immunoreactive to fibrinogen in all glomeruli. Electron microscopy showed the presence of organized deposits compatible with AFib. The diagnosis was confirmed by DNA analysis of the AFib gene, which demonstrated a Glu526Val mutation in one allele. This first description of hereditary AFib amyloidosis in Latin America highlights the need to include this type of amyloidosis in the differential diagnosis, especially in Brazil where the degree of miscegenation is high.

  2. Generalized AA-amyloidosis in Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) with predominant renal medullary amyloid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, C; Brügmann, M; Böer, M; Brandt, H P; Pohlenz, J; Linke, R P

    1998-01-01

    Generalized amyloidosis with predominant renal medullary amyloid deposition was found in four closely related Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) suffering from end stage kidney diseases. Only minimal to mild amounts of amyloid were deposited in various organs outside the kidneys with individually variable organ involvement. The Congo red staining affinity of amyloid deposits was sensitive to potassium permanganate oxidation. The deposits were further characterized as being of the amyloid-A (AA) type by immunohistochemistry using the mouse monoclonal antibody mc4 directed against a conserved region of the human AA-protein. A combination of immunohistochemistry and Congo red staining was much more sensitive for the diagnosis of amyloid deposits than Congo red staining alone. With this combination, even minimal amyloid deposits were detected that had been missed in the first reading using Congo-red-stained slides alone. Since no common primary cause was identified, the amyloidosis was classified as idiopathic generalized AA-amyloidosis with a potential familial predisposition.

  3. AA-amyloidosis caused by visceral leishmaniasis in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vallière, Serge; Mary, Charles; Joneberg, Jeanna E; Rotman, Samuel; Bullani, Roberto; Greub, Gilbert; Gillmore, Julian D; Buffet, Pierre A; Tarr, Philip E

    2009-08-01

    AA-amyloidosis in the setting of chronic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) has been reported in animal models but documentation in humans is unavailable. Here, we report on a Portuguese man who in 1996 was diagnosed with both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infection and VL. Antiretroviral treatment led to sustained suppression of HIV viremia but CD4+ lymphocytes rose from 8 to only 160 cells/mL. Several courses of antimony treatment did not prevent VL relapses. Renal failure developed in 2006 and renal biopsy revealed AA-amyloidosis. The patient had cryoglobulinemia and serum immune complexes containing antibodies directed against seven leishmanial antigens. Antimony plus amphotericin B, followed by oral miltefosine resulted in a sustained VL treatment response with elimination of circulating Leishmania infantum DNA and CD4+ recovery. The concomitant reduction of serum AA levels and disappearance of circulating leishmanial immune complexes suggests that prolonged VL may lead to AA-amyloidosis in immunocompromised humans.

  4. Light-chain cardiac amyloidosis with neuropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu ZW

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhan-Wen Xu,1 Ya-Qin Li,1 Li-xia Liu,2 Bing-Juan Zhou3 1Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Ultrasound, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, 3Department of Pathology, Baoding First Central Hospital, Baoding, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Light-chain amyloidosis is a relatively rare multisystem disorder. The disease often is normally difficult to diagnose due to its broad range of characters without specific symptoms. A 62-year-old male patient presented with heart failure after experiencing a long period of unexplained and untreated gastrointestinal symptoms. Clinical examination and laboratory findings indicated a systemic process with cardiac involvement. Echocardiography revealed concentric left ventricular hypertrophy with enhanced echogenicity and preserved ejection fraction. Rectum biopsy confirmed amyloid deposition. The side effect of delayed diagnosis on prognosis and the appropriate diagnostic strategy has been discussed. Keywords: light-chain amyloidosis, cardiac amyloidosis, echocardiography, autonomic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy

  5. Cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who are affected by cerebral palsy) Social stigma When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ... chap 598. Nass R, Sidhu R, Ross G. Autism and other developmental disabilities. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  6. Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Cephalic Disorders Information Page NINDS Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Information Page NINDS Chronic Pain Information Page ... Information Page Adrenoleukodystrophy Information Page Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum Information Page Agnosia Information Page Aicardi-Goutieres ...

  7. Evaluation of 61 Secondary Amyloidosis Patients: A Single-Center Experience from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Huzmeli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate demographic,clinical and laboratory characteristics, causes, MEFV gene mutations, and mortality rates of patients with secondary amyloidosis. Material and Method: 61 patients who had been diagnosed with secondary amyloidosis by renal and rectal biopsy between 2007 and 2013 in the nephrology clinic of Cumhuriyet University, Faculty of Medicine, were included in the study. Demographic characteristics, causes of secondary amyloidosis, MEFV gene mutations, end-stage renal failure (ESRF, renal transplantation, and mortality rates were examined retrospectively. Results: In etiological terms, Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF occurrence was 62.2% (38, bronchiectasis and emphysema 9.8% (6, tuberculosis 4.9% (3, coexistence of FMF and ankylosing spondylitis 3.2% (2, coexistence of FMF and rheumatoid arthritis 1.6% (1, coexistence of FMF and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE 1.6% (1, osteomyelitis 1.6% (1, septic arthritis 1.6% (1, Crohn%u2019s disease 1.6% (1, colon cancer 1.6% (1, coexistence of bronchiectasis and tuberculosis 1.6% (1, rheumatoid arthritis 1.6% (1, and idiopathic cases 6.5% (4. Proteinuria was determined at nephrotic level among 68% (32 of 47 patients who had secondary amyloidosis. MEFV gene mutation of 45 patients with secondary amyloidosis was assessed. Most patients had M694V gene mutation. Surprisingly, we detected heterozygous E148Q mutation in 3 cases. 12 cases died; of these, 9 had ESRF. Five cases with ESRF underwent renal transplantation. Discussion: We found FMF as the most common cause for secondary AA amyloidosis in this study. Further studies should be done with larger or multicenter cohorts.

  8. MRI in cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis; MRT bei kardialer Sarkoidose und Amyloidose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauner, K.U. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Wintersperger, B. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Sarcoidosis and amyloidosis are both multisystem disorders, which may involve the heart; however, isolated cardiac disease is rare. Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis is crucial because the patient prognosis is dependent on cardiac involvement and early treatment. Echocardiography is the first line imaging modality in the diagnostic work-up of both diseases, possibly giving hints towards the correct diagnosis. Besides myocardial biopsy and radionuclide studies cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely performed in patients suspect of having infiltrative cardiomyopathy. The T1 mapping procedure is currently being evaluated as a new technique for detection and quantification of global myocardial enhancement, as seen in cardiac amyloidosis. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis can be significantly improved by MRI, especially with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. In cardiac sarcoidosis the use of LGE is outcome-related while in amyloidosis analysis of T1-mapping may be of prognostic value. If cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis or amyloidosis is suspected cardiac MRI including LGE should be performed for establishing the diagnosis. (orig.) [German] Die Sarkoidose und Amyloidose sind Multisystemerkrankungen, in deren Verlauf es zu einer kardialen Beteiligung kommen kann. Bildgebend wird als primaeres Verfahren die Echokardiographie eingesetzt. Zur weiteren Diagnostik wird neben der Biopsie und nuklearmedizinischen Verfahren v. a. die MRT herangezogen. Als neuere Technik zur Darstellung globaler diffuser Kontrastmittelanreicherungen, wie sie im Rahmen der Amyloidose vorkommen, wird z. Z. das T1-Mapping evaluiert. Durch den Einsatz der MRT, insbesondere des Late-Gadolinium-Enhancements (LGE), koennen die Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet in der Diagnostik der kardialen Sarkoidose und Amyloidose entscheidend verbessert werden. Bei der Sarkoidose stellt das Vorhandensein eines LGE einen

  9. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  10. Significant association between renal function and area of amyloid deposition in kidney biopsy specimens in both AA amyloidosis associated with rheumatoid arthritis and AL amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Tanabe, Naohito; Hasegawa, Eriko; Wakamatsu, Ayako; Nozawa, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroe; Nakatsue, Takeshi; Wada, Yoko; Ito, Yumi; Imai, Naofumi; Ueno, Mitsuhiro; Nakano, Masaaki; Narita, Ichiei

    2017-06-01

    The kidney is a major target organ for systemic amyloidosis, which results in proteinuria and an elevated serum creatinine level. The clinical manifestations and precursor proteins of amyloid A (AA) and light-chain (AL) amyloidosis are different, and the renal damage due to amyloid deposition also seems to differ. The purpose of this study was to clarify haw the difference in clinical features between AA and AL amyloidosis are explained by the difference in the amount and distribution of amyloid deposition in the renal tissues. A total of 119 patients participated: 58 patients with an established diagnosis of AA amyloidosis (AA group) and 61 with AL amyloidosis (AL group). We retrospectively investigated the correlation between clinical data, pathological manifestations, and the area occupied by amyloid in renal biopsy specimens. In most of the renal specimens the percentage area occupied by amyloid was less than 10%. For statistical analyses, the percentage area of amyloid deposition was transformed to a common logarithmic value (Log 10 %amyloid). The results of sex-, age-, and Log 10 %amyloid-adjusted analyses showed that systolic blood pressure (SBP) was higher in the AA group. In terms of renal function parameters, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance (Ccr) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) indicated significant renal impairment in the AA group, whereas urinary protein indicated significant renal impairment in the AL group. Pathological examinations revealed amyloid was predominantly deposited at glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and easily transferred to the mesangial area in the AA group, and it was predominantly deposited at in the AL group. The degree of amyloid deposition in the glomerular capillary was significantly more severe in AL group. The frequency of amyloid deposits in extraglomerular mesangium was not significantly different between the two groups, but in AA group, the degree amyloid deposition was significantly more severe, and

  11. Endobronchial amyloidosis mimicking bronchial asthma: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Hyun-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among two tracheobronchial forms (local and diffuse and two parenchymal forms (nodular and alveolar septal that were reported in previous literature, localized endobronchial amyloidosis is an uncommon disease of unknown cause. Bronchial amyloid deposits can occur as focal nodules or multifocal infiltration of the submucosa. We report the case of a 47-year-old man who had complained of dyspnea and wheezing for 1 month and who had been treated for severe asthma at another hospital. Endobronchial amyloidosis was confirmed by histological examination of the bronchial biopsies.

  12. Primary amyloidosis with high grade transitional cell carcinoma of bladder: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary amyloidosis of bladder is a rare disease that closely resembles bladder cancer on clinical presentation with painless gross hematuria. Pathologically this is a totally benign non-neoplastic lesion and its association with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is rare. We herein report a 64-year-old diabetic male who has been treated for primary amyloidosis of bladder for the last 26 years presented recently with high-grade solid urothelial cancer with osseous metaplasia and sarcomatoid change of bladder with area of amyloid deposition.

  13. Characteristics and Long-Term Outcome of Patients with Systemic Immunoglobulin Light-Chain Amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Lærke Marie; Gustafsson, Finn; Gimsing, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is a systemic disorder that causes progressive organ dysfunction. The optimal treatment strategy requires accurate patient stratification with an emphasis on the extent of cardiac involvement. Reports on its prognosis are sparse...... and predominantly originate from highly selected centers. We aimed to evaluate patient characteristics and outcomes in a cohort treated at a single center. Methods: This is a single-center retrospective study of 63 consecutive patients diagnosed with AL amyloidosis between January 2000 and December 2012. Patients...

  14. Nonsecretory Multiple Myeloma and AL Amyloidosis Presenting with Nephrotic Range Proteinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Beyler Kilic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsecretory multiple myeloma (NSMM is the absence of a detectable monoclonal protein in serum and urine of a multiple myeloma (MM patient and immunoglobulin light chain (AL amyloidosis is a significantly rare complication. A case of NSMM with AL amyloidosis and nephrotic range proteinuria is presented. Sharing clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic characteristics with MM, real challenge may be during initial diagnosis of NSMM and assessment of treatment response. In elderly patients with unexplained renal dysfunction, MM should be in the differential diagnosis and the absence of a monoclonal protein should not rule out MM but should remind us of the possibility of NSMM.

  15. Nonsecretory Multiple Myeloma and AL Amyloidosis Presenting with Nephrotic Range Proteinuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyler Kilic, Ozlem; Oguz, Ali Kemal; Ergun, Ihsan; Baydar, Dilek Ertoy; Ayli, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Nonsecretory multiple myeloma (NSMM) is the absence of a detectable monoclonal protein in serum and urine of a multiple myeloma (MM) patient and immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a significantly rare complication. A case of NSMM with AL amyloidosis and nephrotic range proteinuria is presented. Sharing clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic characteristics with MM, real challenge may be during initial diagnosis of NSMM and assessment of treatment response. In elderly patients with unexplained renal dysfunction, MM should be in the differential diagnosis and the absence of a monoclonal protein should not rule out MM but should remind us of the possibility of NSMM. PMID:26090243

  16. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  17. Amyloidosis involving the respiratory system: 5-year′s experience of a multi-disciplinary group′s activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Scala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis may involve the respiratory system with different clinical-radiological-functional patterns which are not always easy to be recognized. A good level of knowledge of the disease, an active integration of the pulmonologist within a multidisciplinary setting and a high level of clinical suspicion are necessary for an early diagnosis of respiratory amyloidosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the number and the patterns of amyloidosis involving the respiratory system. We searched the cases of amyloidosis among patients attending the multidisciplinary rare and diffuse lung disease outpatients′ clinic of Pulmonology Unit of the Hospital of Arezzo from 2007 to 2012. Among the 298 patients evaluated during the study period, we identified three cases of amyloidosis with involvement of the respiratory system, associated or not with other extra-thoracic localizations, whose diagnosis was histo-pathologically confirmed after the pulmonologist, the radiologist, and the pathologist evaluation. Our experience of a multidisciplinary team confirms that intra-thoracic amyloidosis is an uncommon disorder, representing 1.0% of the cases of rare and diffuse lung diseases referred to our center. The diagnosis of the disease is not always easy and quick as the amyloidosis may involve different parts of the respiratory system (airways, pleura, parenchyma. It is therefore recommended to remind this orphan disease in the differential diagnosis of the wide clinical scenarios the pulmonologist may intercept in clinical practice.

  18. Exacerbation of Brain Injury by Post-Stroke Exercise Is Contingent Upon Exercise Initiation Timing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fengwu; Geng, Xiaokun; Khan, Hajra; Pendy Jr., John T.; Peng, Changya; Li, Xiaorong; Rafols, Jose A.; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that post-stroke physical rehabilitation may reduce morbidity. The effectiveness of post-stroke exercise, however, appears to be contingent upon exercise initiation. This study assessed the hypothesis that very early exercise exacerbates brain injury, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and promotes energy failure. A total of 230 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion for 2 h, and randomized ...

  19. Bilateral post-arterial puncture pseudoaneurysm in a patient with amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Sabrina Araújo Milhomem

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis consists of deposition of insoluble fibrillar proteins in tissues and, causing dysfunction. In association with other factors, the condition can contribute to emergence of complications, such as pseudoaneurysms at arterial puncture sites. Pseudoaneurysms are becoming an ever-more common complication, which underscores the importance of identifying risk factors, so that their incidence can be minimized.

  20. Amyloidosis: A story of how inframammary erosions eclipsed inconspicuous periorbital ecchymoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Kelsey, MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Systemic amyloidosis is a rare disease that can be rapidly progressive due to widespread organ involvement. There are well-described renal, cardiac, pulmonary, neurological, and dermatologic findings. Here, we outline one patient’s experience with the condition from presentation to making the diagnosis. She presented with pathognomonic dermatologic findings including pinch purpura and ecchymoses found in the skin folds.

  1. Intratubular amyloid in light chain cast nephropathy is a risk factor for systemic light chain amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibier, Jean-Baptiste; Gnemmi, Viviane; Glowacki, François; Boyle, Eileen M; Lopez, Benjamin; MacNamara, Evelyne; Hoffmann, Maxime; Azar, Raymond; Guincestre, Thomas; Bourdon, Franck; Copin, Marie-Christine; Buob, David

    2017-10-20

    Light chain cast nephropathy is the most common form of kidney disease in patients with multiple myeloma. Light chain casts may occasionally show amyloid staining properties, that is, green birefringence after Congo red staining. The frequency and clinical significance of this intratubular amyloid are poorly understood. Here, we retrospectively assessed the clinicopathological features of 60 patients with histologically proven light chain cast nephropathy with a specific emphasis on intratubular amyloid, especially, its association with extrarenal systemic light chain amyloidosis. We found intratubular amyloid in 17 cases (17/60, 28%) and it was more frequent in patients with λ light chain gammopathy (13/17 in the 'intratubular amyloid' group vs 19/43 in the 'no intratubular amyloid' group, P=0.02). Pathological examination of extrarenal specimens showed that intratubular amyloid was significantly associated with the occurrence of systemic light chain amyloidosis (5/13 in the 'intratubular amyloid' group vs 0/30 in the 'no intratubular amyloid' group, P=0.001). Our results indicate that first, intratubular amyloid is not a rare finding in kidney biopsies of patients with light chain cast nephropathy, and, second, it reflects an amyloidogenic capacity of light chains that can manifest as systemic light chain amyloidosis. Thus, intratubular amyloid should be systematically screened for in kidney biopsies from patients with light chain cast nephropathy and, if detected, should prompt a work-up for associated systemic light chain amyloidosis.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 20 October 2017; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2017.124.

  2. Breast cancer and amyloid bodies: is there a role for amyloidosis in cancer-cell dormancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizejewski GJ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gerald J Mizejewski Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA Abstract: Breast cancer and Alzheimer’s disease (AD are major causes of death in older women. Interestingly, breast cancer occurs less frequently in AD patients than in the general population. Amyloidosis, the aggregation of amyloid proteins to form amyloid bodies, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of AD and other human neuropathies by forming intracellular fibrillary proteins. Contrary to popular belief, amyloidosis is a common occurrence in mammalian cells, and has recently been reported to be a natural physiological process in response to environmental stress stimulations (such as pH and temperature extremes, hypoxia, and oxidative stress. Many proteins contain an intrinsic “amyloid-converting motif”, which acts in conjunction with a specific noncoding RNA to induce formation of proteinaceous amyloid bodies that are stored in intracellular bundles. In cancer cells such as breast and prostate, the process of amyloidosis induces cells to enter a dormant or resting stage devoid of cell division and proliferation. Therefore, cancer cells undergo growth cessation and enter a dormant stage following amyloidosis in the cell; this is akin to giving the cell AD to cease growth. Keywords: α-fetoprotein, noncoding RNA, amyloid bodies, dormancy, breast cancer, Alzheimer’s disease

  3. Novel dermatophilosis and concurrent amyloidosis in Sanderlings (Calidris alba) from Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Schulz, Jessica L.; Dobbs, Robert C.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Grear, Daniel A.

    2018-01-01

    We observed Sanderlings (Calidris alba) with facial growths in coastal Louisiana, US during summer of 2016. Severe lesions were associated with lethargy and lack of a flight response. We determined that the skin growth etiology was a bacterium of the genus Dermatophilus, rarely reported infecting birds. Sanderlings also exhibited severe amyloidosis.

  4. Oral involvement in a case of AA amyloidosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldız Levent

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from circulating acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A protein causes systemic amyloidosis, a serious inflammatory disorder. We document a male patient who developed reactive amyloidosis (AA type, most likely secondary to his long standing periodontitis. Case presentation A 67-year-old Turkish man complained of pain in his oral cavity (burning mouth especially on the tongue, and had difficulty chewing and swallowing foods. A careful dental/periodontal examination was performed, including assessment of plaque, gingival condition and periodontal probing depths on all his remaining teeth. Prosthetic rehabilitation was provided three months after the completion of his periodontal and surgical therapy. The concentration of serum inflammatory markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, white blood cell count, fibrinogen and high sensitive C-reactive protein were measured at baseline, at the second and sixth weeks, and at three and six months after the periodontal and surgical therapy. Conclusions Oral examination revealed a few papules on the dorsum of the tongue with two slightly painful, small ulcers, localized on the vestibule of the mouth. The mean probing depth was 9.10 ± 0.84 mm. Biopsies of the tongue, buccal mucosa and retromolar trigone were performed and amyloid deposits were found. The serum inflammatory markers improved more dramatically at the second week of periodontal therapy than any other time intervals. Amyloidosis may manifest as periodontal destruction that leads to severe chronic periodontitis. Proper periodontal treatment may alleviate systemic inflammatory mediators caused by the amyloidosis.

  5. Cardiac Amyloidosis and its New Clinical Phenotype: Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    Full Text Available Abstract Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF is now an emerging cardiovascular epidemic, being identified as the main phenotype observed in clinical practice. It is more associated with female gender, advanced age and comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity and chronic kidney disease. Amyloidosis is a clinical disorder characterized by the deposition of aggregates of insoluble fibrils originating from proteins that exhibit anomalous folding. Recently, pictures of senile amyloidosis have been described in patients with HFpEF, demonstrating the need for clinical cardiologists to investigate this etiology in suspect cases. The clinical suspicion of amyloidosis should be increased in cases of HFPS where the cardio imaging methods are compatible with infiltrative cardiomyopathy. Advances in cardio imaging methods combined with the possibility of performing genetic tests and identification of the type of amyloid material allow the diagnosis to be made. The management of the diagnosed patients can be done in partnership with centers specialized in the study of amyloidosis, which, together with the new technologies, investigate the possibility of organ or bone marrow transplantation and also the involvement of patients in clinical studies that evaluate the action of the new emerging drugs.

  6. Infective Exacerbation of Pasteurella multocida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Hamada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An 89-year-old lady presented with a one-day history of shortness of breath as well as a cough productive of brown sputum. Her medical history was significant for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. She was in severe type one respiratory failure and blood tests revealed markedly raised inflammatory markers; however her chest X-ray was clear. On examination there was bronchial breathing with widespread crepitations and wheeze. She was treated as per an infective exacerbation of COPD. Subsequent blood cultures grew Pasteurella multocida, a common commensal in the oropharynx of domesticated animals. The patient was then asked about any contact with animals, after which she revealed she had a dog and was bitten on her left hand the day before admission. We should not forget to enquire about recent history of injuries or animal bites when patients present acutely unwell. She made a complete recovery after treatment with penicillin.

  7. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized nasopharyngeal amyloidosis. Case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Ming [Hubei University of Medicine, Department of Clinical Oncology, Taihe Hospital, Shiyan, Hubei (China); Peng, Gang; Shi, Liangliang; Li, Zhenyu; Fei, Shijiang; Ding, Qian; Cheng, Jing [HuaZhong University of Science and Technology, Cancer Center, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Wuhan (China); Ming, Xing [Hubei University of Medicine, Department of infection control and prevention, Taihe Hospital, Shiyan, Hubei (China)

    2016-12-15

    Primary localized amyloidosis is characterized by the deposition of amyloid proteins restricted to one organ, without systemic involvement. Primary nasopharyngeal amyloidosis is an exceedingly rare condition, for which the standard treatment remains unknown. Because of its challenging anatomical position, surgery alone hardly results in complete resection of the localized amyloidosis. Therefore, an interdisciplinary planning board to design optimal treatment is of particular importance. A 39-year-old man presented with a several-week history of nasal obstruction and epistaxis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a retro-odontoid nonenhancing soft tissue mass. The endoscopic biopsy demonstrated that the mass was amyloid in nature. An extensive systemic workup revealed an absence of inflammatory process, systemic amyloidosis, or plasma cell dyscrasia. The patient was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy, showing no evidence of recurrence or progression at his 1-year follow-up. Primary solitary amyloidosis is a rare form of amyloidosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a nasopharyngeal amyloidosis case treated with excision and radiation leading to complete remission. Because of the difficulty for surgeons to achieve radical resection with such lesions, radiotherapy proved to be an excellent adjuvant treatment in this case. (orig.) [German] Die primaere lokalisierte Amyloidose ist durch die Ablagerung von Amyloidproteinen gekennzeichnet, die sich auf ein Organ beschraenkt, also nicht systemisch ist. Eine primaere Amyloidose im Nasen-Rachen-Raum ist ausserordentlich selten, bisher gibt es keine Standardtherapie. Ihre anatomische Position bedeutet eine Herausforderung, nur selten resultiert eine chirurgische Intervention in einer vollstaendigen Resektion der lokalisierten Amyloidose. Daher ist die Beteiligung mehrerer Disziplinen fuer eine optimale Behandlung von besonderer

  8. Asthma exacerbation prediction: recent insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Louise

    2018-04-01

    Asthma attacks are frequent in children with asthma and can lead to significant adverse outcomes including time off school, hospital admission and death. Identifying children at risk of an asthma attack affords the opportunity to prevent attacks and improve outcomes. Clinical features, patient behaviours and characteristics, physiological factors, environmental data and biomarkers are all associated with asthma attacks and can be used in asthma exacerbation prediction models. Recent studies have better characterized children at risk of an attack: history of a severe exacerbation in the previous 12 months, poor adherence and current poor control are important features which should alert healthcare professionals to the need for remedial action. There is increasing interest in the use of biomarkers. A number of novel biomarkers, including patterns of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath, show promise. Biomarkers are likely to be of greatest utility if measured frequently and combined with other measures. To date, most prediction models are based on epidemiological data and population-based risk. The use of digital technology affords the opportunity to collect large amounts of real-time data, including clinical and physiological measurements and combine these with environmental data to develop personal risk scores. These developments need to be matched by changes in clinical guidelines away from a focus on current asthma control and stepwise escalation in drug therapy towards inclusion of personal risk scores and tailored management strategies including nonpharmacological approaches. There have been significant steps towards personalized prediction models of asthma attacks. The utility of such models needs to be tested in the ability not only to predict attacks but also to reduce them.

  9. Increased Prognostic Value of Query Amyloid Late Enhancement Score in Light-Chain Cardiac Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ke; Sun, Jiayu; Han, Yuchi; Liu, Hong; Yang, Dan; Li, Weihao; Wang, Jie; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Zeng, Zhi; Chen, Yucheng

    2017-11-02

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) pattern is a powerful imaging biomarker for prognosis of cardiac amyloidosis. It is unknown if the query amyloid late enhancement (QALE) score in light-chain (AL) amyloidosis could provide increased prognostic value compared with LGE pattern.Methods and Results:Seventy-eight consecutive patients with AL amyloidosis underwent contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with cardiac involvement were grouped by LGE pattern and analyzed using QALE score. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to identify the optimal cut-off for QALE score in predicting all-cause mortality. Survival of these patients was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox regression. During a median follow-up of 34 months, 53 of 78 patients died. The optimal cut-off for QALE score to predict mortality at 12-month follow-up was 9.0. On multivariate Cox analysis, QALE score ≥9 (HR, 5.997; 95% CI: 2.665-13.497; P<0.001) and log N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (HR, 1.525; 95% CI: 1.112-2.092; P=0.009) were the only 2 independent predictors of all-cause mortality. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients with subendocardial LGE can be further risk stratified using QALE score ≥9. The QALE scoring system provides powerful independent prognostic value in AL cardiac amyloidosis. QALE score ≥9 has added value to differentiate prognosis in AL amyloidosis patients with a subendocardial LGE pattern.

  10. Atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis: implications for Alzheimer prevention trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Abigail Andrews

    % absolute slowing of hippocampal atrophy rate in an 18-month treatment trial. We conclude that hippocampal atrophy may be a feasible outcome measure for secondary prevention studies in asymptomatic amyloidosis.

  11. Multicenter Study of Planar Technetium 99m Pyrophosphate Cardiac Imaging: Predicting Survival for Patients With ATTR Cardiac Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Adam; Haq, Muhammad; Narotsky, David L; Goldsmith, Jeff; Weinberg, Richard L; Morgenstern, Rachelle; Pozniakoff, Ted; Ruberg, Frederick L; Miller, Edward J; Berk, John L; Dispenzieri, Angela; Grogan, Martha; Johnson, Geoffrey; Bokhari, Sabahat; Maurer, Mathew S

    2016-11-01

    Transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis (also known as ATTR cardiac amyloidosis) is an increasingly recognized cause of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. In single-center studies, technetium 99m pyrophosphate (Tc 99m PYP) cardiac imaging noninvasively detects ATTR cardiac amyloidosis, but the accuracy of this technique in a multicenter study and the association of Tc 99m PYP myocardial uptake with survival are unknown. To assess Tc 99m PYP cardiac imaging as a diagnostic tool for ATTR cardiac amyloidosis and its association with survival in a multicenter study. Retrospective cohort study performed at 3 academic specialty centers for cardiac amyloidosis in the United States in which 229 participants were evaluated for cardiac amyloidosis and also underwent Tc 99m PYP cardiac imaging. The date of analysis and final confirmation from the statistician was May 4, 2016. Tc 99m PYP cardiac imaging for detection of ATTR cardiac amyloidosis. Retention of Tc 99m PYP in the heart was assessed using both a semiquantitative visual score (range, 0 [no uptake] to 3 [uptake greater than bone]) and a quantitative heart to contralateral (H/CL) ratio. The H/CL ratio was calculated as total counts in a region of interest over the heart divided by background counts in an identical size region of interest over the contralateral chest. The outcome measured was time to death after Tc 99m PYP imaging. Tc 99m PYP imaging of 171 participants (121 with ATTR cardiac amyloidosis and 50 with non-ATTR cardiac amyloidosis [34 with AL amyloidosis and 16 with nonamyloid heart failure with preserved ejection fraction]; 86% male; median [IQR] age, 73 years [65-79 years]) demonstrated 91% sensitivity and 92% specificity for detecting ATTR cardiac amyloidosis with an area under the curve of 0.960 (95% CI, 0.930-0.981). Univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses among participants with ATTR cardiac amyloidosis showed that an H/CL ratio of 1.6 or greater predicted

  12. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in Primary AL Hepatic Amyloidosis Associated with Multiple Myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Youn Mi; Bak, Cheol Hee [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Young; Cheon, Mi Ju; Kim, Young Eun; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    We report here on a rare case of primary AL hepatic amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma in a 64-year-old woman. The patient was referred for evaluating her progressive jaundice and right upper quadrant pain. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) showed diffusely and markedly increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the liver. Although there have been several case studies showing positive {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in pulmonary amyloidosis, to the best of our knowledge, the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT findings of hepatic amyloidosis or primary hepatic amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma have not been reported previously.

  13. Blood Coagulation and Asthma Exacerbation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Mairiang, Dara; Sirachainan, Nongnuch; Kadegasem, Praguywan; Kamchaisatian, Wasu; Benjaponpitak, Suwat; Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the activation of coagulation pathways in asthmatic airways. This study aimed to determine systemic blood coagulation during asthma exacerbation compared with the stable state in children. Pediatric patients (aged between 5 and 15 years) suffering from asthma exacerbation were enrolled. von Willebrand factor (vWF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), protein C, D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured during asthma exacerbation and stable state. A total of 22 patients were enrolled. The median vWF, PAI-1, and CRP during asthma exacerbation were significantly higher than those of the stable state: 147.5% (interquartile range, IQR: 111.05-196.57) versus 94% (IQR: 69.72-109.62, p coagulation in asthma exacerbation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. [Treatment and prevention of COPD exacerbation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Mutsuo; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Motoki; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Nakayama, Katsutoshi

    2007-04-01

    Airway inflammation, mucosal edema, epithelial hyperpermeability, mucus secretion and airway smooth muscle contraction induced by airway bacterial, virus infection and exposure to air pollution may be associated with COPD exacerbation. Severity of COPD exacerbation is estimated by blood gas analysis, serum CRP values and the chest radiograph. Patients with COPD exacerbations are recommended to be treated with additional inhalations of beta-2 agonists and anti -cholinergic agents, systemic administered glucocorticosteroids, oxygen inhalation, and, in cases with purulent sputum, antibiotics. Glucocorticosteroids, beta-2 agonists and anti-cholinergic agents reduce the frequency of COPD exacerbation. We reported the inhibitory effects of glucocorticosteroids on rhinovirus infection, the major cause of common colds, and the inhibitory effects of L-carbocisteine and erythromycin on COPD exacerbations and rhinovirus infection.

  15. Effects of secondary amyloidosis on arteriovenous hemodialysis fistula outcomes and intradialytic hypotension: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Yalcin; Caymaz, Memduh; Tonbul, Halil Zeki; Ozbek, Orhan; Turkmen, Kultigin; Gormus, Niyazi

    2012-07-01

    Amyloid fibrils can affect vascular structure through deposition and by causing nitric oxide depletion and increase of asymmetric dimethyl arginine. Patients with amyloidosis are prone to development of hypotension. Hypotension may also affect the maturation of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and may set the stage for formation of thrombosis and fistula failure. Thus, we aimed to evaluate effects of secondary amyloidosis on AVF outcomes and intradialytic hypotension. This is a case-control study which included 20 hemodialysis patients with amyloidosis and 20 hemodialysis patients without amyloidosis as control group. All patients underwent Doppler ultrasound of AVF. A thorough fistula history and baseline laboratory values along with episodes of intradialytic hypotension and blood pressure measurements were recorded. There was no difference between the groups regarding age, gender, body mass index, presence of comorbidities, hypertension, and drug use. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were similar (119 ± 28/75 ± 17 and 120 ± 14/75 ± 10 mmHg for patients with and without amyloidosis, respectively). Intradialytic hypotension episodes were also similar. Patients with amyloidosis had significantly lower serum albumin and higher C-reactive protein values compared to control hemodialysis patients. AVF sites and total number of created fistulas were similar in both groups. Flow rates of current functional AVFs were not different between the groups (1084 ± 875 and 845 ± 466 mL/minute for patients with and without amyloidosis, respectively, p:0.67). Patency duration of first AVF was not different between the groups. Clinical fistula outcomes and rate of intradialytic hypotension episodes were not significantly different between patients with and without secondary systemic amyloidosis. © 2012 The Authors. Hemodialysis International © 2012 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  16. Optimizing antibiotic selection in treating COPD exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attiya Siddiqi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Attiya Siddiqi, Sanjay SethiDivision of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Western New York Health Care System and University of Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USAAbstract: Our understanding of the etiology, pathogenesis and consequences of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has increased substantially in the last decade. Several new lines of evidence demonstrate that bacterial isolation from sputum during acute exacerbation in many instances reflects a cause-effect relationship. Placebo-controlled antibiotic trials in exacerbations of COPD demonstrate significant clinical benefits of antibiotic treatment in moderate and severe episodes. However, in the multitude of antibiotic comparison trials, the choice of antibiotics does not appear to affect the clinical outcome, which can be explained by several methodological limitations of these trials. Recently, comparison trials with nontraditional end-points have shown differences among antibiotics in the treatment of exacerbations of COPD. Observational studies that have examined clinical outcome of exacerbations have repeatedly demonstrated certain clinical characteristics to be associated with treatment failure or early relapse. Optimal antibiotic selection for exacerbations has therefore incorporated quantifying the risk for a poor outcome of the exacerbation and choosing antibiotics differently for low risk and high risk patients, reserving the broader spectrum drugs for the high risk patients. Though improved outcomes in exacerbations with antibiotic choice based on such risk stratification has not yet been demonstrated in prospective controlled trials, this approach takes into account concerns of disease heterogeneity, antibiotic resistance and judicious antibiotic use in exacerbations.Keywords: COPD, exacerbation, bronchitis, antibiotics

  17. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Experimental Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Alan L; Liu, Bo; Rogers, Troy D; Sartor, R Balfour; Miao, Edward A

    2017-08-01

    The Western diet is characterized by high protein, sugar, fat, and low fiber intake, and is widely believed to contribute to the incidence and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, high sodium chloride salt content, a defining feature of processed foods, has not been considered as a possible environmental factor that might drive IBD. We set out to bridge this gap. We examined murine models of colitis on either a high salt diet (HSD) or a low salt diet. We demonstrate that an HSD exacerbates inflammatory pathology in the IL-10-deficient murine model of colitis relative to mice fed a low salt diet. This was correlated with enhanced expression of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. Surprisingly, sodium accumulated in the colons of mice on an HSD, suggesting a direct effect of salt within the colon. Similar to the IL-10-deficient model, an HSD also enhanced cytokine expression during infection by Salmonella typhimurium This occurred in the first 3 d of infection, suggesting that an HSD potentiates an innate immune response. Indeed, in cultured dendritic cells we found that high salt media potentiates cytokine expression downstream of TLR4 activation via p38 MAPK and SGK1. A third common colitis model, administration of dextran sodium sulfate, was hopelessly confounded by the high sodium content of the dextran sodium sulfate. Our results raise the possibility that high dietary salt is an environmental factor that drives increased inflammation in IBD. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Longitudinal study of experimental induction of AA amyloidosis in mice seeded with homologous and heterologous AA fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Naeem; Murakami, Tomoaki; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2016-09-01

    To investigate pathogenesis and kinetics of experimentally induced murine AA amyloidosis seeded with homologous (murine) and heterologous (bovine) AA fibrils. Experimental AA amyloidosis was induced by administration of inflammatory stimulus and preformed AA fibrils to a total of 111 female C57/Black mice. In this longitudinal study, heterologous (bovine) as well as homologous (murine) AA fibrils were injected intraperitoneally to mice in various combinations. Re-stimulation was done at 120 or 300 days post first inoculation. To analyze the intensity of amyloid depositions in mice organs, immunohistochemical techniques and image J software were used. Assessment of cytokines level in sera was done using a Mouse Th1/Th2/Th17 Cytokine CBA Kit. Incidence and severity of AA amyloidosis were quite low in mice inoculated with heterologous bovine AA fibrils than homologous murine one. Homologous AA fibrils administration at first and second inoculation caused maximum amount of amyloid depositions and severe systemic form of amyloidosis. Increase in the level of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was observed after first inoculation, while second inoculation caused a further increase in the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. AA amyloidosis can be induced by heterologous as well as homologous AA fibrils. Severity of AA amyloidosis induced with homologous AA fibrils is higher compared to heterologous AA fibrils.

  19. Positron emission tomography (PET) utilizing Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) for detection of amyloid heart deposits in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilebro, Björn; Arvidsson, Sandra; Lindqvist, Per; Sundström, Torbjörn; Westermark, Per; Antoni, Gunnar; Suhr, Ole; Sörensen, Jens

    2018-02-01

    DPD scintigraphy has been advocated for imaging cardiac amyloid in ATTR amyloidosis. PET utilizing 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) is the gold standard for imaging brain amyloid in Alzheimer's disease. PIB was recently shown to identify cardiac amyloidosis in both AL and ATTR amyloidosis. In the ATTR population, two types of amyloid fibrils exist, one containing fragmented and full-length TTR (type A) and the other only full-length TTR (type B). The aim of this study was to further evaluate PIB-PET in patients with hereditary ATTR amyloidosis. Ten patients with biopsy-proven V30M ATTR amyloidosis and discrete or no signs of cardiac involvement were included. Patients were grouped according to TTR-fragmentation. All underwent DPD scintigraphy, echocardiography, and PIB-PET. A left ventricular PIB-retention index (PIB-RI) was established and compared to five normal volunteers. PIB-RI was increased in all patients (P < 0.001), but was significantly higher in type B than in type A (0.129 ± 0.041 vs 0.040 ± 0.006 min -1 , P = 0.009). Cardiac DPD uptake was elevated in group A and absent in group B. PIB-PET, in contrast to DPD scintigraphy, has the potential to specifically identify cardiac amyloid depositions irrespective of amyloid fibril composition. The heart appears to be a target organ for amyloid deposition in ATTR amyloidosis.

  20. Increasing fatal AA amyloidosis in hunting falcons and how to identify the risk: a report from the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Mirjam Ricarda; Kinne, Joerg; Wernery, Ulrich; Pospischil, Andreas; Kellermann, Josef; Linke, Reinhold Paul

    2009-01-01

    In hunting falcons, a fatal syndrome of wasting, weight loss, green mutes and, finally, sudden death of emaciated birds has been observed in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Histological examination using Congo red has revealed amyloid in most organs, in particular in the liver, spleen, kidney, and adrenal glands. Moreover, a retrospective study revealed amyloidosis in 100 cases among a total of 623 necropsied falcons between August 1995 and March 2004 in Dubai/UAE (16%; varying from 8 to 30% in different raptor bird species). The amyloid was immunohistochemically classified as amyloid A (AA), which was confirmed by Western blot analysis and N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, suggesting it to be secondary to a chronic inflammatory process. Retrospective analysis has indicated a significantly increased prevalence of bumble foot and visceral gout among falcons with amyloidosis. In addition, a significant increase of amyloidosis from 5.6% of necropsied falcons with amyloidosis in 1995 to 40.0% in 2004 has been noticed. Finally, a semi-quantitative serum test for falcon serum amyloid A (f-SAA) has been developed. Among 38 falcons with fatal AA amyloidosis, f-SAA was increased pathologically in 36, whereas f-SAA was elevated in only one of 15 apparently disease-free falcons (p f-SAA will indicate a minimal or even absent risk of succumbing to AA amyloidosis.

  1. Can we predict fall asthma exacerbations? Validation of the seasonal asthma exacerbation index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Heather E; Calatroni, Agustin; West, Joseph B; Liu, Andrew H; Gergen, Peter J; Gruchalla, Rebecca S; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Kercsmar, Carolyn M; Kim, Haejin; Lamm, Carin I; Makhija, Melanie M; Mitchell, Herman E; Teach, Stephen J; Wildfire, Jeremy J; Busse, William W; Szefler, Stanley J

    2017-10-01

    A Seasonal Asthma Exacerbation Predictive Index (saEPI) was previously reported based on 2 prior National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Inner City Asthma Consortium trials. This study sought to validate the saEPI in a separate trial designed to prevent fall exacerbations with omalizumab therapy. The saEPI and its components were analyzed to characterize those who had an asthma exacerbation during the Preventative Omalizumab or Step-Up Therapy for Fall Exacerbations (PROSE) study. We characterized those inner-city children with and without asthma exacerbations in the fall period treated with guidelines-based therapy (GBT) in the absence and presence of omalizumab. A higher saEPI was associated with an exacerbation in both the GBT alone (P asthma exacerbation in both groups. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic and clinical characteristics of hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis in endemic and non-endemic areas: experience from a single-referral center in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Taro; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Misumi, Yohei; Masuda, Teruaki; Nomura, Toshiya; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Takamatsu, Kotaro; Sasada, Keiko; Obayashi, Konen; Matsui, Hirotaka; Ando, Yukio

    2018-01-01

    Hereditary transthyretin (ATTR) amyloidosis is a life-threatening, autosomal dominant, systemic amyloidosis caused by mutant transthyretin. In addition to ATTRV30M in endemic and non-endemic areas, more than 140 non-V30M mutations occur worldwide. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical characteristics and genetic frequencies of hereditary ATTR amyloidosis. Diagnostic results and clinical manifestations of hereditary ATTR amyloidosis from April 1, 2012, to March 31, 2017, at Amyloidosis Medical Practice Center, Kumamoto University Hospital were analyzed. One hundred and four patients received a diagnosis of symptomatic hereditary ATTR amyloidosis. The following mutations of the TTR gene and their percentages were found: V30M in endemic areas, 10.6%; V30M in non-endemic areas, 51.0%; and non-V30M, 38.5%. The ages at onset of patients with ATTRV30M amyloidosis in non-endemic areas (66.6 ± 8.7 years) and those with non-V30M ATTR amyloidosis (55.8 ± 13.6 years) were significantly higher than those with ATTRV30M amyloidosis in endemic areas (37.0 ± 12.6 years). Of patients with ATTRV30M amyloidosis in endemic and non-endemic areas, and non-V30M ATTR amyloidosis, 63.6, 66.0, and 27.5% initially presented with polyneuropathy, respectively. Of patients with ATTRV30M amyloidosis in endemic areas, 81.8% had a family history of this disease. However, a significantly smaller percentage of patients with ATTRV30M amyloidosis (30.0%) in non-endemic areas and non-V30M ATTR amyloidosis (34.0%) had a family history. Patients with ATTRV30M amyloidosis in non-endemic areas and patients with non-V30M ATTR amyloidosis occurred more frequently than previously believed, and their clinical manifestations were diverse.

  3. Asthma Exacerbation in Children: A Practical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Shien Fu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory tract disease in childhood throughout the world. Despite advances in asthma management, acute exacerbations continue to be a major problem in patients and they result in a considerable burden on direct/indirect health care providers. A severe exacerbation occurring within 1 year is an independent risk factor. Respiratory tract viruses have emerged as the most frequent triggers of exacerbations in children. It is becoming increasingly clear that interactions may exist between viruses and other triggers, increasing the likelihood of an exacerbation. In this study, we provide an overview of current knowledge about asthma exacerbations, including its definition, impact on health care providers, and associated factors. Prevention management in intermittent asthma as well as intermittent wheeze in pre-school children and those with persistent asthma are discussed. Our review findings support the importance of controlling persistent asthma, as indicated in current guidelines. In addition, we found that early episodic intervention appeared to be crucial in preventing severe attacks and future exacerbations. Besides the use of medication, timely education after an exacerbation along with a comprehensive plan in follow up is also vitally important.

  4. Prevention of exacerbations of COPD with pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravitlles, M

    2010-06-01

    Exacerbations are a frequent event in the evolution of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Individuals with COPD have a mean of 1-3 episodes per year, some of which lead to hospital admission and may even be a cause of death. The importance of COPD exacerbations has become increasingly apparent due to the impact these episodes have on the natural history of disease. It is now known that frequent exacerbations can adversely affect health-related quality of life and short- and long-term pulmonary function. Optimising treatment for stable COPD will help to reduce exacerbations. Long-acting bronchodilators, alone or combined with inhaled corticosteroids, have demonstrated efficacy in reducing the rate of exacerbations in patients with COPD. Other innovative approaches are being investigated, such as the long-term use of macrolides or the use of antibiotics in an effort to suppress bronchial colonisation and consequent exacerbations. Other drugs, such as mucolytics and immunomodulators, have recently provided positive results. Non-pharmacological interventions such as rehabilitation, self-management plans and the maintenance of high levels of physical activity in daily life are also useful strategies to prevent exacerbations in patients with COPD and should be implemented in regular clinical practice.

  5. Prevention of exacerbations of COPD with pharmacotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miravitlles

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Exacerbations are a frequent event in the evolution of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. Individuals with COPD have a mean of 1–3 episodes per year, some of which lead to hospital admission and may even be a cause of death. The importance of COPD exacerbations has become increasingly apparent due to the impact these episodes have on the natural history of disease. It is now known that frequent exacerbations can adversely affect health-related quality of life and short- and long-term pulmonary function. Optimising treatment for stable COPD will help to reduce exacerbations. Long-acting bronchodilators, alone or combined with inhaled corticosteroids, have demonstrated efficacy in reducing the rate of exacerbations in patients with COPD. Other innovative approaches are being investigated, such as the long-term use of macrolides or the use of antibiotics in an effort to suppress bronchial colonisation and consequent exacerbations. Other drugs, such as mucolytics and immunomodulators, have recently provided positive results. Non-pharmacological interventions such as rehabilitation, self-management plans and the maintenance of high levels of physical activity in daily life are also useful strategies to prevent exacerbations in patients with COPD and should be implemented in regular clinical practice.

  6. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  7. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  8. Prevention of exacerbations of COPD with pharmacotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    M. Miravitlles

    2010-01-01

    Exacerbations are a frequent event in the evolution of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Individuals with COPD have a mean of 1–3 episodes per year, some of which lead to hospital admission and may even be a cause of death. The importance of COPD exacerbations has become increasingly apparent due to the impact these episodes have on the natural history of disease. It is now known that frequent exacerbations can adversely affect health-related quality of life and short- an...

  9. {sup 123}I-Labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine for the evaluation of cardiac sympathetic denervation in early stage amyloidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordzij, Walter; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Rheenen, Ronald W.J. van; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Hazenberg, Bouke P.C. [University of Groningen, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Tio, Rene A. [University of Groningen, Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    Cardiac amyloidosis is a rare disorder, but it may lead to potentially life-threatening restrictive cardiomyopathy. Cardiac manifestations frequently occur in primary amyloidosis (AL) and familial amyloidosis (ATTR), but are uncommon in secondary amyloidosis (AA). Echocardiography is the method of choice for assessing cardiac amyloidosis. Amyloid deposits impair the function of sympathetic nerve endings. Disturbance of myocardial sympathetic innervations may play an important role in the remodelling process. {sup 123}I-MIBG can detect these innervation changes. Patients with biopsy-proven amyloidosis underwent general work-up, echocardiography and {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy. Left ventricular internal dimensions and wall thickness were measured, and highly refractile cardiac echoes (sparkling) were analysed. Early (15 min) and late (4 h) heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR) and wash-out rate were determined after administration of MIBG. Included in the study were 61 patients (30 women and 31 men; mean age 62 years; 39 AL, 11 AA, 11 ATTR). Echocardiographic parameters were not significantly different between the groups. Sparkling was present in 72 % of ATTR patients, in 54 % of AL patients and in 45 % of AA patients. Mean late HMR in all patients was 2.3 {+-} 0.75, and the mean wash-out rate was 8.6 {+-} 14 % (the latter not significantly different between the patient groups). Late HMR was significantly lower in patients with echocardiographic signs of amyloidosis than in patients without (2.0 {+-} 0.70 versus 2.8 {+-} 0.58, p < 0.001). Wash-out rates were significantly higher in these patients (-3.3 {+-} 9.9 % vs. 17 {+-} 10 %, p < 0.001). In ATTR patients without echocardiographic signs of amyloidosis, HMR was lower than in patients with the other types (2.0 {+-} 0.59 vs. 2.9 {+-} 0.50, p = 0.007). MIBG HMR is lower and wash-out rate is higher in patients with echocardiographic signs of amyloidosis. Also, {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy can detect cardiac denervation in

  10. Outcome in Patients Treated with Isolated Liver Transplantation for Familial Transthyretin Amyloidosis to Prevent Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Laerke Marie; Penninga, Luit; Villadsen, Gerda Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is caused by different TTR mutations resulting in different clinical phenotypes of the disease. The Leu111Met mutation causes severe restrictive cardiomyopathy. Liver transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for patients with TTR...... with echocardiographic manifestations of early cardiac amyloid involvement and in five endomyocardial biopsy was positive for TTR amyloid. RESULTS: Median age at LTx was 45.5 yr (range 39-54), and four were male (67%). All patients were alive at a median follow-up of 56.6 months (range 18-104). No surgical complications...... for patients with familial TTR amyloidosis due to Leu111Met mutation. Appropriate timing of LTx is of utmost importance to avoid development of severe amyloid cardiomyopathy and the need for combined heart and liver transplantation....

  11. Nasal mucosa: a new site for tissue biopsy to diagnose hereditary TTR amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munar-Qués, Miguel; Solé, Manel; Martínez-Nadal, Jacinto; Murcia-Sáiz, Antonio; Mas-Degano, José Manuel

    2014-11-07

    We report 2 carriers of the TTRV30M mutation and its plasmatic biochemical marker with clinical symptoms compatible with hereditary TTR amyloidosis. Based on our previously reported casual finding of amyloid TTR in nasal mucosa (2008), we requested biopsy of this tissue to search for amyloid with Congo red staining and TTR immunohistochemical analysis. The histological diagnosis was achieved by retrospective analysis of surgical sinonasal biopsy in the first patient and prospective biopsy of inferior nasal concha in the second. Large interstitial deposits of ATTR were observed in both cases. We suggest nasal mucosa as a suitable site for tissue biopsy in patients with suspected hereditary TTR amyloidosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Myeloma-associated systemic amyloidosis masquerading as NASH-associated cirrhosis and diabetic microvascular complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Partha; Ray, Sayantan; Patra, Sisir Kumar; Das, Anjan Kumar; Dey, Subhasis; George, Rintu

    2015-01-01

    Authors describe the case of a 60-year-old diabetic man who presented with jaundice, ascites and significant weight loss over a period of 2 months. Physical examination revealed firm hepatomegaly with ascites. On evaluation, nephropathy, axonal neuropathy, carpal tunnel syndrome and decompensated cryptogenic liver disease with portal hypertension were found fitting with the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy and neuropathy and nonalcoholic steato-hepatitis-associated cirrhosis, respectively. It was only after tissue diagnosis and serum protein electrophoresis that a definitive diagnosis of myeloma-related amyloidosis was made. This case emphasizes the fact that due to nonspecific initial presentation and multisystem involvement, a high index of suspicion and prompt use of appropriate tests including tissue diagnosis may be required to diagnose amyloid light-chain amyloidosis, which may be a rare presenting feature of myeloma. It should be differentiated from a commoner multisystem disease like diabetes and its complications. PMID:26634140

  13. Secondary renal amyloidosis in a patient of pulmonary tuberculosis and common variable immunodeficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Balwani Manish R; Kute Vivek B.; Shah Pankaj R; Wakhare Pawan; Trivedi Hargovind L

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) usually manifests in the second or third decade of life with recurrent bacterial infections and hypoglobulinemia. Secondary renal amyloidosis with history of pulmonary tuberculosis is rare in CVID, although T cell dysfunction has been reported in few CVID patients. A 40-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with a 3-month history of recurrent respiratory infections and persistent pitting pedal edema. His past history revealed 3 to 5 episodes of rec...

  14. A case of localized amyloidosis of the eyelid misdiagnosed as recurrent chalazion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Manaa Alkatan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Localized amyloidosis of the eyelid is uncommon and is classically associated with systemic manifestations. We present an interesting case of a localized eyelid mass misdiagnosed as a recurrent chalazion presenting in an 85-year-old Saudi gentleman with no definite associate findings suggestive of an underlying systemic amyloid disease. Debulking surgery was subsequently performed. Proper diagnosis was reached based on the histopathologic examination of the excised tissue, which demonstrated the typical Congo red staining of the amyloid deposits.

  15. A case of localized amyloidosis of the eyelid misdiagnosed as recurrent chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaa Alkatan, Hind; Al-Mohizea, Asma; Alsuhaibani, Adel

    2017-01-01

    Localized amyloidosis of the eyelid is uncommon and is classically associated with systemic manifestations. We present an interesting case of a localized eyelid mass misdiagnosed as a recurrent chalazion presenting in an 85-year-old Saudi gentleman with no definite associate findings suggestive of an underlying systemic amyloid disease. Debulking surgery was subsequently performed. Proper diagnosis was reached based on the histopathologic examination of the excised tissue, which demonstrated the typical Congo red staining of the amyloid deposits.

  16. Primary amyloidosis with spontaneous splenic rupture, cholestasis, and liver failure treated with emergency liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg-Gertzén, H; Ericzon, B G; Blomberg, B

    1998-11-01

    A 61-yr-old man with cholestatic jaundice soon after presentation had an emergency operation because of spontaneous rupture of the spleen. This was found to be caused by primary systemic amyloidosis. After the splenectomy, the patient deteriorated with liver failure and was successfully treated with liver transplantation. Osteopenic fractures of the thoracic columna developed after transplantation. Except for this, the patient is well 18 months after transplantation.

  17. Impact of regional left ventricular function on outcome for patients with AL amyloidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore the left ventricular (LV deformation changes and the potential impact of deformation on outcome in patients with proven light-chain (AL amyloidosis and LV hypertrophy. BACKGROUND: Cardiac involvement in AL amyloidosis patients is associated with poor outcome. Detecting regional cardiac function by advanced non-invasive techniques might be favorable for predicting outcome. METHODS: LV longitudinal, circumferential and radial peak systolic strains (Ssys were assessed by speckle tracking imaging (STI in 44 biopsy-proven systemic AL amyloidosis patients with LV hypertrophy (CA and in 30 normal controls. Patients were divided into compensated (n = 18 and decompensated (n = 26 group based on clinical assessment and followed-up for a median period of 345 days. RESULTS: Ejection fraction (EF was preserved while longitudinal Ssys (LSsys was significantly reduced in both compensated and decompensated groups. Survival was significantly reduced in decompensated group (35% vs. compensated 78%, P = 0.001. LSsys were similar in apical segments and significantly reduced in basal segments between two patient groups. LSsys at mid-segments were significantly reduced in all LV walls of decompensated group. Patients were further divided into 4 subgroups according to the presence or absence of reduced LSsys in no (normal, only basal (mild, basal and mid (intermediate and all segments of the septum (severe. This staging revealed continuously worse prognosis in proportion to increasing number of segments with reduced LSsys (mortality: normal 14%, mild 27%, intermediate 67%, and severe 64%. Mid-septum LSsys<11% suggested a 4.8-fold mortality risk than mid-septum LSsys≥11%. Multivariate regression analysis showed NYHA class and mid-septum LSsys were independent predictors for survival. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced deformation at mid-septum is associated with worse prognosis in systemic amyloidosis patients with LV

  18. Secondary renal amyloidosis in a patient of pulmonary tuberculosis and common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balwani Manish R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID usually manifests in the second or third decade of life with recurrent bacterial infections and hypoglobulinemia. Secondary renal amyloidosis with history of pulmonary tuberculosis is rare in CVID, although T cell dysfunction has been reported in few CVID patients. A 40-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with a 3-month history of recurrent respiratory infections and persistent pitting pedal edema. His past history revealed 3 to 5 episodes of recurrent respiratory tract infections and diarrhoea each year since last 20 years. He had been successfully treated for sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis 8 years back. Laboratory studies disclosed high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, hypoalbuminemia and nephrotic range proteinuria. Serum immunoglobulin levels were low. CD4/CD8 ratio and CD3 level was normal. C3 and C4 complement levels were normal. Biopsy revealed amyloid A (AA positive secondary renal amyloidosis. Glomeruli showed variable widening of mesangial regions with deposition of periodic schiff stain (PAS pale positive of pink matrix showing apple green birefringence on Congo-red staining. Immunohistochemistry was AA stain positive. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed no staining with anti-human IgG, IgM, IgA, C3, C1q, kappa and lambda light chains antisera. Patient was treated symptomatically for respiratory tract infection and was discharged with low dose angiotensin receptor blocker. An old treated tuberculosis and chronic inflammation due to recurrent respiratory tract infections were thought to be responsible for AA amyloidosis. Thus pulmonary tuberculosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of secondary causes of AA renal amyloidosis in patients of CVID especially in endemic settings.

  19. Mutational Spectrum of the MEFV Gene in AA Amyloidosis Associated With Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursal, Ayse Feyda; Tekcan, Akin; Kaya, Suheyla Uzun; Turkmen, Ercan; Yigit, Serbulent

    2016-05-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a recessively inherited disease which is characterized by recurrent episodic fever, abdominal pain, and polyserositis. It is caused by mutations in the MEFV gene, encoding the pyrin protein. The most important complication of FMF is secondary (AA) amyloidosis that leads to kidney failure. This study aimed to identify the frequency and distribution of MEFV mutations in Turkish patients with FMF-associated AA amyloidosis. A total of 57 patients with FMF-associated AA amyloidosis and 60 healthy controls were included in this study. We analyzed the MEFV gene for E148Q, M694V, M680I, and V726A mutations and R202Q variant by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods.  Results. The male-female ratio was 0.72. The mean age of the patients was 29.8 ± 12.8 years. Among the patients, the rate of the MEFV mutations was found to be 77.2%. The most frequently observed genotype was homozygous M694V mutation, which was present in 17 patients (29.8%, P < .001), followed by compound heterozygous M680I/M694V (14.3%, P = .01). The R202Q allele frequencies were significantly different between patients and control group (P = .02; odds ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.30 to 0.94). In this study, mutation analysis of MEFV gene confirmed that the most frequent mutation was homozygous M694V genotype. R202Q may be important in patients with FMF-associated AA amyloidosis. Thus, it is suggested that investigation of R202Q should be considered as a genetic test for Turkish FMF patients.

  20. Three cases of systemic amyloidosis successfully diagnosed by subcutaneous fat tissue biopsy of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arahata M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Masahisa Arahata,1 Shigeru Shimadoi,1 Satosi Yamatani,1 Shin-ichi Hayashi,2 Shigeharu Miwa,2 Hidesaku Asakura,3 Shinji Nakao4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Nanto Municipal Hospital, Nanto, 2Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, 3Department of Internal Medicine (III, 4Department of Cellular Transplantation Biology, Division of Cancer Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan Abstract: Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the abdominal fat pad is considered to be a minimally invasive procedure for diagnosing systemic amyloidosis. However, this procedure is sometimes difficult and can be dangerous for elderly patients whose abdominal fat layer is thin because of malnutrition. In such cases, alternative diagnostic methods are required. We report three elderly patients with heart failure complicated by malnutrition. In all cases, electrocardiogram showed low voltage in the limb leads and a pseudoinfarct pattern in the chest leads, and echocardiography showed left ventricular wall thickening with granular sparkling appearance. These patients were suspected of having amyloid cardiomyopathy but could not undergo myocardial biopsies because of their poor conditions. After failed attempts at biopsy of the abdominal fat pad or the other organs, subcutaneous fat tissue biopsy over the hip led to the diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis with cardiomyopathy. The resultant diagnosis guided us to choose the appropriate treatment for the patients. This article illustrates that subcutaneous fat tissue biopsy of the hip could be a useful procedure for diagnosing systemic amyloidosis in elderly patients, particularly when a fat tissue biopsy of the abdomen is associated with a high risk of complications because of malnutrition. Keywords: systemic amyloidosis, amyloid cardiomyopathy, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, subcutaneous fat tissue, hip

  1. Risk of transmission of systemic transthyretin amyloidosis after domino liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Laura; Baliellas, Carme; Casasnovas, Carlos; Ferrer, Isidre; Fabregat, Joan; Ramos, Emilio; Castellote, Jose; Torras, Jaume; Xiol, Xavier; Rafecas, Antoni

    2010-12-01

    Recent reports of the transmission of systemic transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis after domino liver transplantation (DLT) using grafts from patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) have raised concerns about the procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the transmission incidence of systemic TTR amyloidosis after DLT with a complete clinical, neurological, and pathological assessment. At our institution, DLT has been performed 31 times with livers from patients with FAP. Seventeen of the 19 patients still alive in 2008 agreed to enter the study. This cross-sectional study of this cohort of patients included clinical assessments, rectal biopsy, and electroneuromyography (as well as sural nerve biopsy when it was indicated). The mean follow-up at the time of the study was 62.6 ± 2.9 months. Clinically, 3 patients complained of weak dysesthesia. When a focused study was performed, 8 patients reported some kind of neurological and/or gastrointestinal disturbance. Six of the rectal biopsy samples showed amyloid deposits (TTR-positive). Electromyography (EMG) showed signs of mild sensorimotor neuropathy in 3 cases and moderate to severe sensorimotor neuropathy in 1 case. Only 2 of the 4 patients with EMG signs of polyneuropathy showed amyloid deposits in their rectal biopsy samples. Sural nerve biopsy revealed amyloid deposits (TTR-positive) in all 4 patients with EMG signs of polyneuropathy. Two patients with normal EMG findings had TTR-positive amyloid deposits in their sural nerve biopsy samples. In conclusion, de novo systemic amyloidosis after DLT may be more frequent and appear earlier than was initially thought. In our opinion, however, the graft shortage still justifies DLT in selected patients, despite the risk of de novo systemic amyloidosis. Sural nerve biopsy with EMG and clinical correlation is mandatory for confirming the disease. Indeed, other causes of neuropathy should be excluded. Copyright © 2010 American Association for the Study of

  2. Diaphragmatic Amyloidosis Causing Respiratory Failure: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Novikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular respiratory failure is a rare complication of systemic immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis. We describe a case of a 70-year-old Caucasian man with multiple myeloma who presented with worsening dyspnea. The patient was diagnosed with and treated for congestive heart failure but continued to suffer from hypercapnic respiratory insufficiency. He had restrictive physiology on pulmonary function tests and abnormal phrenic nerve conduction studies, consistent with neuromuscular respiratory failure. The diagnosis of systemic immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis was made based on the clinical context and a cardiac biopsy. Despite treatment attempts, the patient passed away in the intensive care unit from hypercapnic respiratory failure. Autopsy revealed dense diaphragmatic amyloid deposits without phrenic nerve infiltration or demyelination or lung parenchymal involvement. Only 5 cases of neuromuscular respiratory failure due to amyloid infiltration of the diaphragm have been described. All cases, including this, were characterized by rapid progression and high mortality. Therefore, diaphragmatic amyloidosis should be on the differential for progressive neuromuscular respiratory failure in patients with multiple myeloma or any other monoclonal gammopathy. Given its poor prognosis, early recognition of this condition is essential in order to address goals of care and encourage pursuit of palliative measures.

  3. Bilateral optic neuropathy and intraretinal deposits after pars plana vitrectomy in amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossetti Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological examination of material from a nonextensive pars plana vitrectomy (PPV in the right eye provided a diagnosis of nonfamilial amyloidosis in a 68-year-old woman, who presented with bilateral glass wool-like vitreous opacities. Genetic testing revealed a Tyr114Cys mutation in the transthyretin gene. Six months after PPV, perimetry showed intense constriction with a temporal island and central scotoma in the right eye. An extensive PPV was performed in the left eye. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography evidenced bilateral epimacular amyloid deposits and unreported reflective spots within the inner retina. One year later, visual acuity had decreased to 20/400 in the left eye, with mild vitreous opacity, pale cupped optic disc and inferior altitudinal field defect. Bilateral diurnal intraocular pressure, transiently increased after PPV, never exceeded 16 mmHg with medication. Our patient presented optic nerve blood supply impairment, due to amyloidosis, which caused optic atrophy. Epiretinal and intraretinal deposit detection could aid in diagnosing patients with suspected amyloidosis.

  4. Tubulointerstitial nephritis is a dominant feature of hereditary apolipoprotein A-I amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorini, Gina; Izzi, Claudia; Ravani, Pietro; Obici, Laura; Dallera, Nadia; Del Barba, Andrea; Negrinelli, Alessandro; Tardanico, Regina; Nardi, Matilde; Biasi, Luciano; Scalvini, Tiziano; Merlini, Giampaolo; Scolari, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I is the main protein of high-density lipoprotein particles, and is encoded by the APOA1 gene. Several APOA1 mutations have been found, either affecting the lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity, determining familial HDL deficiency, or resulting in amyloid formation with prevalent deposits in the kidney and liver. Evaluation of familial tubulointerstitial nephritis in patients with the Leu75Pro APOA-I amyloidosis mutation resulted in the identification of 253 carriers belonging to 50 families from Brescia, Italy. A total of 219 mutation carriers underwent clinical, laboratory, and instrumental tests. Of these, 62% had renal, hepatic, and testicular disease; 38% were asymptomatic. The disease showed an age-dependent penetrance. Tubulointerstitial nephritis was diagnosed in 49% of the carriers, 13% of whom progressed to kidney failure requiring dialysis. Hepatic involvement with elevation of cholestasis indices was diagnosed in 30% of the carriers, 38% of whom developed portal hypertension. Impaired spermatogenesis and hypogonadism was found in 68% of male carriers. The cholesterol levels were lower than normal in 80% of the mutation carriers. Thus, tubulointerstitial nephritis was highly prevalent in this large series of patients with Leu75Pro apoA-I amyloidosis. Persistent elevation of alkaline phosphatase, reduced HDL cholesterol plasma levels, and hypogonadism in men are key diagnostic features of this form of amyloidosis.

  5. Concurrent systemic AA amyloidosis can discriminate primary sclerosing cholangitis from IgG4-associated cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takehiro; Komori, Atsumasa; Bae, Sung-Kwan; Migita, Kiyoshi; Ito, Masahiro; Motoyoshi, Yasuhide; Abiru, Seigo; Ishibashi, Hiromi

    2012-01-14

    Chronic hepatobiliary inflammatory diseases are not widely acknowledged as underlying disorders of systemic AA amyloidosis, except epidemic schistosomiasis. Among them, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) might initiate amyloid A protein deposition in diverse tissues, giving rise to systemic amyloidosis, due to a progressive and unresolved inflammatory process, and its possible association with inflammatory bowel diseases. Nevertheless, only one such case has been reported in the literature to date. We report a 69-year-old Japanese woman with cirrhosis who was diagnosed with PSC complicated with systemic AA amyloidosis, without any evidence of other inflammatory disorders. As a result of cholestasis in conjunction with biliary strictures and increased serum IgG4, the presence of IgG4(+) plasma cells was examined systemically, resulting in unexpected documentation of Congo-red-positive amyloid deposits, but not IgG4(+) plasma cells, in the liver, stomach and salivary glands. Elevated serum IgG4 is the hallmark of IgG4-related disease, including IgG4-associated cholangitis, but it has also been demonstrated in certain patients with PSC. Amyloid A deposits in multiple organs associated with an indolent clinical course that progresses over many years might have a diagnostic value in discriminating PSC from IgG4-associated cholangitis.

  6. Amiloidosis secundaria en la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal Secondary amyloidosis in Chrohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Seijo Ríos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La amiloidosis es una entidad clínica que se produce a consecuencia del depósito a nivel extracelular de un material proteico amorfo, causando una desorganización de la arquitectura normal de múltiples órganos y tejidos y, por tanto, una alteración funcional de los mismos. La amiloidosis secundaria es una complicación infrecuente pero muy grave que aparece en el contexto de neoplasias, enfermedades infecciosas e inflamatorias de curso crónico, como es el caso de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, principalmente enfermedad de Crohn, ensombreciendo el pronóstico de estos pacientes. A continuación presentamos dos casos clínicos correspondientes a dos pacientes con enfermedad de Crohn que desarrollaron amiloidosis secundaria.Amyloidosis is a clinical entity that results from the deposition of an extracellular protein material that causes disruption in the normal architecture of multiple organs and tissues, and impairs their function. Secondary amyloidosis is a rare but serious complication that may worsen the prognosis of patients with cancer, infection or chronic inflammatory disease, including inflammatory bowel disease, particularly Crohn's disease. We report two cases of Crohn's disease associated with secondary amyloidosis.

  7. Primary systemic amyloidosis initially presenting with digestive symptoms: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiu; Mao, Yueping; Qi, Qing; Zhang, Chuyi; Tian, Yongzhen; Chen, Yanyang

    2015-09-21

    Primary systemic amyloidosis (PSA) is one of systemic amyloidosis, characterized by clonal plasma cell disorder. The disease is rare and with high fatality. Signs and symptoms of PSA are various and complex, which depend on the organs involved. Here we report a case in which the patient initially suffered from gastrointestinal symptoms. Gradually periorbital purpura, skin fragility, and subsequent petechiae, ecchymoses and sclerosis of the distal limbs, appeared. Biopsy of his palmar skin showed scleroderma-like changes. However, histopathology of the petechiae lesion on forehead with Crystal Violet Staining prompted deposition of amyloid; gastric mucosal biopsy with Congo Red staining was also positive, which made clear the diagnosis of PSA. Bone marrow biopsy and serum immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) revealed plasmacytosis and M proteinemia. Other examinations were performed to assess the function of organs. PSA was challenging due to the initial atypical clinical presentation and absence of biopsy with special staining. The case demonstrates that PSA should be considered in patients with multisystemic symptoms and biopsy with Congo Red staining should be performed to exclusively diagnose amyloidosis.

  8. Reactive eccrine syringofibroadenomatosis secondary to primary cutaneous amyloidosis: a novel association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggini, Andrea; Mully, Thaddeus

    2014-04-01

    We report the unprecedented case of reactive eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA) secondary to primary cutaneous amyloidosis. A 62-year-old woman of Asian ethnicity presented with a pruritic rash on the back of long-standing duration. Physical examination revealed diffuse hyperpigmentation localized to the interscapular region; there were a multitude of hyperpigmented macules merged in a rippled pattern intermixed with scattered papules and cobblestone-like areas. A punch biopsy from a papule was taken. Histopathological examination revealed a network of epithelial strands and cords hanging from the epidermis and harboring foci of ductal differentiation. Eosinophilic collections of amorphous material were found between the epithelial strands, obscuring the superficial dermis. The microscopic picture was consistent with primary cutaneous amyloidosis associated with reactive ESFA. Results of histochemical and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis. We speculate that pathogenetic mechanisms intrinsic to primary cutaneous amyloidosis, in addition to unknown genetic factors, resulted in clinical changes of lichen amyloidosus associated with an abnormal hyperplastic epithelial response with histopathological features of ESFA rather than the common epidermal change of acanthosis and hyperkeratosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Living kidney transplantation between brothers with unrecognized renal amyloidosis as the first manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Afonso, Sara; Peces, Carlos; Nevado, Julián; Selgas, Rafael

    2017-08-31

    Familial Mediterranean fever is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and polyserositis and by the onset of reactive amyloid-associated amyloidosis. Amyloidosis due to familial Mediterranean fever can lead to end-stage renal disease, culminating in kidney transplantation for some patients. In this study, we report the clinical outcome of two brothers with familial Mediterranean fever who were the inadvertent donor and recipient, respectively, of a kidney. Subsequently, they were diagnosed with renal amyloidosis secondary to familial Mediterranean fever and were successfully treated with anakinra and colchicine. Two brothers with familial Mediterranean fever and renal amyloidosis were the inadvertent donor and recipient, respectively, of a kidney. The recipient had presented recurrent acute febrile episodes of familial Mediterranean fever, developed nephrotic syndrome secondary to amyloidosis and needed bilateral nephrectomy and chronic dialysis. His elder brother, in apparent good health, donated his left kidney to his brother. Immediately after the kidney transplantation, both the donor and recipient presented massive proteinuria, impaired renal function and elevated serum amyloid A levels. Biopsies of the brothers' kidneys showed amyloidosis. Genetic studies thereafter revealed a homozygous variant for the MEFV gene (NM_000243.2.c.2082G > A; p.M694I) in both brothers. At this point, both the donor and recipient were treated with colchicine and anakinra, resulting in improved renal function, decreased proteinuria, undetectable serum amyloid A levels and stable renal function at 62 months of follow-up and no major adverse effects. In familial Mediterranean fever, analyses of the MEFV gene should be performed in potential live kidney donors from a direct family member (either between siblings or between parents and children). In addition, genetic studies are required when consanguinity is suspected between members involved in

  10. Acute exacerbations of fibrotic interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2011-03-01

    An acute exacerbation is the development of acute lung injury, usually resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, in a patient with a pre-existing fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. By definition, acute exacerbations are not caused by infection, heart failure, aspiration or drug reaction. Most patients with acute exacerbations have underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, either idiopathic or in association with a connective tissue disease, but the same process has been reported in patients with fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia, fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis. Occasionally an acute exacerbation is the initial manifestation of underlying interstitial lung disease. On biopsy, acute exacerbations appear as diffuse alveolar damage or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) superimposed upon the fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Biopsies may be extremely confusing, because the acute injury pattern can completely obscure the underlying disease; a useful clue is that diffuse alveolar damage and organizing pneumonia should not be associated with old dense fibrosis and peripheral honeycomb change. Consultation with radiology can also be extremely helpful, because the fibrosing disease may be evident on old or concurrent computed tomography scans. The aetiology of acute exacerbations is unknown, and the prognosis is poor; however, some patients survive with high-dose steroid therapy. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  11. Vitamin D deficiency and adult asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Natalie Mariam; Luo, Li; Harkins, Michelle S

    2014-11-01

    There is growing evidence indicating a connection between vitamin D deficiency and the severity of asthma exacerbations. This study seeks to assess the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the number and severity of asthma exacerbation in adults. A retrospective analysis was conducted in 92 patients being treated for asthma at the University of New Mexico Adult Asthma Clinic. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels were analyzed in adults with mild to severe persistent asthma. Using multi-variant modeling, the relationship was examined between serum vitamin D levels and the odds of asthma exacerbations ranging in severity from moderate to severe over the span of five years. This study demonstrates that vitamin D sufficiency was significantly associated with a decreased total number of asthma exacerbations (incidence rate ratio [IRR]: 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44-0.84, p = 0.002), decreased total severe asthma exacerbations (IRR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.24-0.72, p = 0.002) and decreased emergency room visits (IRR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.20-0.88, p = 0.023). Vitamin D deficiency may be linked to the risk of severe asthma exacerbations in adults.

  12. Spontaneous abdominal hemorrhage with AA-amyloidosis and vasculitis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardene, S A; Sheerin, N; Pattison, J M; Hartley, B; Goldsmith, D J

    2001-04-01

    Both rheumatoid vasculitis and amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are uncommon. We describe a patient in whom they occurred together and were associated with fatal intra-abdominal hemorrhage. A 56-year-old Caucasian woman was referred because of increasing lethargy, edema, and proteinuria. She had suffered from seropositive, erosive, nodular RA for 14 years. Previously, she had undergone numerous joint replacements, a thyroidectomy for amyloid-associated (AA) amyloidosis of the thyroid that caused a large goiter and a renal biopsy that showed renal AA-amyloidosis in the context of nephrotic syndrome. As her condition deteriorated, this patient became increasingly reluctant to go to the hospital and to take drugs beyond analgesics. Thus, her RA was chronically under treated. While in the hospital for evaluation, this patient suddenly developed hypotension, tachycardia, and a severe colicky left-sided abdominal pain radiating from the left upper quadrant/epigastric region to the left iliac fossa. Computed tomography (CT) showed a large amount of echogenic free fluid within the abdomen and marked thickening of the omentum. At laparotomy, 2 liters of free blood was found adjacent to a hematoma of the greater omentum, and it was evacuated without identification of a discrete bleeding point. All solid and hollow organs were normal. The omentum was noted to be very friable. She developed a more disseminated bleeding diathesis and persistent peritoneal hemorrhage via her abdominal drains. She succumbed shortly afterward. Histology revealed extensive omental hemorrhage and one large vessel within the area of hemorrhage showed a severe necrotizing vasculitis. Extensive amyloid deposition was also found within the walls of the smaller omental arterioles. Vasculitis in the context of RA is relatively rare and is associated with under treated, seropositive disease. Skin and nerve involvement are most common, but bowel involvement has been reported, with a highly

  13. Cardiac Transplantation Followed by Dose-Intensive Melphalan and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for AL Amyloidosis and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Bimalangshu R; Chung, Stephen S; Spitzer, Thomas R; Zheng, Hui; MacGillivray, Thomas E.; Seldin, David C; McAfee, Steven; Ballen, Karen; Attar, Eyal; Wang, Thomas; Shin, Jordan; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Moore, Stephanie; Sanchorawala, Vaishali; Skinner, Martha; Madsen, Joren C.; Semigran, Marc J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with AL amyloidosis who present with severe heart failure due to cardiac involvement rarely survive more than six months. Survival after cardiac transplantation is markedly reduced due to the progression of amyloidosis. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has become a common therapy for AL amyloidosis, but there is an exceedingly high treatment-related mortality in patients with heart failure. Methods We developed a treatment strategy of cardiac transplant followed by ASCT. 26 patients were evaluated, and of 18 eligible patients, nine patients underwent cardiac transplantation. Eight of these patients subsequently received an ASCT. Results Six of seven evaluable patients achieved a complete hematologic remission, and one achieved a partial remission. At a median follow-up of 56 months from cardiac transplant, five of seven patients are alive without recurrent amyloidosis. Their survival is comparable to 17,389 patients who received heart transplants for non-amyloid heart disease: 64% in non-amyloid vs. 60% in amyloid patients at seven years (p= 0.83). Seven of eight transplanted patients have had no evidence of amyloid in their cardiac allograft. Conclusions This demonstrates that cardiac transplantation followed by ASCT is feasible in selected patients with AL amyloidosis and heart failure, and that such a strategy may lead to improved overall survival. (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00456040) PMID:20733534

  14. Atypical rapid progression of osteoarticular amyloidosis involving the hip in a patient on hemodialysis using polyacrylonitrile membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kenneth S. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Holsbeeck, Marnix T. van [Wayne State School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Abbud, Alexander [Wayne State School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Amyloidosis related to dialysis is a well-known complication affecting many organ systems, in particular the musculoskeletal system. In 1985 Shirahama et al. (Biochem Biophys Res Commun 53:705-709, 1985) identified beta-2 microglobulin (MG) as the offending constituent by using protein purification techniques. Amyloidosis has been increasing in prevalence because of longer life spans and increased chronic medical conditions such as end-stage renal disease. When dialysis-related amyloidosis involves the musculoskeletal system, it affects the shoulder girdle, the so called shoulder pad sign, the wrist, hip, knee, and spine (Resnick, Diagnosis of bone and joint disorders, 4th edn., pp. 2054-2058 and 2176-2183, 2002). Other osteoarticular manifestations of amyloidosis include osteoporosis, lytic lesions, and pathologic fractures. It has been well documented that the prevalence of amyloid is dependent on duration of dialysis - over 90% in patients on dialysis for over 7 years (Jadoul, Nephrol Dial Transplant 13:61-64, 1998). However, a recent changeover to high-flux membranes used in hemofiltration has been reported to delay its onset (Campistol et al., Contrib Nephrol 125:76-85, 1999). We report on the radiographic, nuclear medicine, and computed tomography (CT) findings of osteoarticular amyloidosis involving the hip, and sequence its atypical rapid onset. The imaging, histopathological findings, and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  15. An ancillary tool for the diagnosis of amyloid A amyloidosis in a variety of domestic and wild animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtrasburg, S; Gal, R; Gruys, E; Perl, S; Martin, B M; Kaplan, B; Koren, R; Nyska, A; Pras, M; Livneh, A

    2005-03-01

    Immunohistochemistry, the standard method for diagnosing amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, is limited in animals because it requires a large array of animal-specific anti-AA antibodies, not commercially available. The Shtrasburg method (SH method) is a highly specific and sensitive technique, helping in the diagnosis and determination of AA amyloidosis in humans. The aim of this study is to determine whether the SH method is applicable in the diagnosis of AA amyloidosis in a variety of animals. Tissue samples were obtained from animals suffering from spontaneous or experimentally induced AA amyloidosis (mice, hamsters, guinea pigs, cheetahs, cats, cows, ducks, a dog, a goose, a chicken, and a turaco). Detection of the amyloid and quantitative evaluation were performed using Congo red staining, and specific AA typing was performed by the potassium permanganate technique. The studied tissues were subjected to the SH method, which confirmed the AA nature of the amyloid deposit, by displaying in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein bands consistent with the molecular weight of the species-specific AA, in all the animals examined, except mice, hamsters, and guinea pigs. N-terminal analysis of these bands corroborated their AA origin. We conclude that the SH method may be used as an ancillary simple tool for the diagnosis of AA amyloidosis in a large number of domestic and wild animals. Moreover, our findings further increase the feasibility of applying this method in humans.

  16. Acute bacterial exacerbations in bronchitis and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodosh, S

    1987-04-27

    Symptomatic exacerbations are frequent problems in the management of chronic bronchitis and bronchial asthma. Identification of a bacterial etiology as the cause of specific exacerbations should be based on changes in clinical symptoms and documentation of significant bronchial bacterial flora and a neutrophilic inflammatory response. Most acute bacterial exacerbations in patients with bronchitis or asthma are caused by Hemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Branhamella catarrhalis. Treatment with ampicillins, synthetic tetracyclines, or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is successful in 80 to 90 percent of bacterial exacerbations. Emergence of resistant Hemophilus species and pneumococci motivates development of new orally administered antimicrobial drugs. Appropriate treatment depends on the prompt recognition that bacterial infection is present. Once instituted, antimicrobial therapy should be continued for a minimum of 10 to 14 days, which should increase the duration of the infection-free period until the next bacterial exacerbation. Adequate response should be evaluated by the return of symptoms to pre-infectious levels and by decreased sputum bacterial flora and neutrophilic inflammation.

  17. Widespread cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in primary amyloidosis: does spontaneous hyperventilation have a compensatory role against postural hypotension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, L; Passino, C; Porta, C; Anesi, E; Palladini, G; Merlini, G

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possible causes of abnormal blood pressure control in light chain related (primary, AL) amyloidosis. Design: Cardiovascular, autonomic, and respiratory response to passive tilting were investigated in 51 patients with primary amyloidosis (mean (SEM) age 56 (2) years) and in 20 age matched controls. Spontaneous fluctuations in RR interval, respiration, end tidal carbon dioxide, blood pressure, and skin microcirculation were recorded during supine rest and with tilting. The values were subjected to spectral analysis to assess baroreflex sensitivity and the autonomic modulation of cardiac and vascular responses. Setting: Tertiary referral centre. Results: Autonomic modulation of the heart and blood pressure was nearly absent in the patients with amyloidosis: thus baroreflex sensitivity and the low frequency (0.1 Hz) fluctuations in all cardiovascular signals were severely reduced (p hyperventilation; the breathing rate correlated inversely with the fall in blood pressure on tilting (p hyperventilation at a slow breathing rate. PMID:12433892

  18. Accumulation of Tc99m-DMSA-3 in the spleen in a case of multiple myeloma with associated amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barai Sukanta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a 58-year-old male with longstanding hypertension and Type 2 diabetes mellitus who developed sudden onset renal impairment. The first clue to the possible presence of amyloidosis in this case was provided by the radionuclide renal cortical scan performed with trivalent dimercapto succinic acid (Tc99m-DMSA-3, which revealed intense tracer uptake in the spleen suggesting amyloid deposit. Further workup to ascertain the cause of amyloidosis led to the diagnosis of multiple myeloma. We conclude that in cases of extra-renal or splenic accumulation of Tc99m-DMSA-3, a diagnosis of amyloidosis should be considered, in an appropriate clinical setting.

  19. Acute exacerbation of asthma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lorenzo Urso

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways with a worldwide prevalence ranging from 1% to 18%. We report the case of a 43-year-old man with acute asthma exacerbation admitted to Emergency Department. All patients with asthma are at risk of having exacerbations characterised by worsening symptoms, airflow obstruction, and an increased requirement for rescue bronchodilators. Patients should be evaluated and triaged quickly to assess the presence of exacerbations and the need for urgent intervention. The goals of treatment may be summarised as maintenance of adequate oxygen saturation with supplemental oxygen, relief of airway obstruction with repetitive administration of rapid-acting inhaled bronchodilators, and treatment of airway inflammation with systemic corticosteroids.

  20. [Asthmatic exacerbations: specific features in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsin, A; Pham-Thi, N

    2011-12-01

    Asthma concerns more than 10% of 10-year-old children. Despite the similarities between adult and childhood asthma, the pediatric population presents some specific characteristics, notably in relation to exacerbations. Asthma in the newborn infant is a specific entity, the definition of which has recently been officially recognized. In exacerbations, the most important trigger factors are respiratory virus infections, the strain having prognostic importance. The indoor and outdoor environments are risk factors, particularly high levels of atmospheric pollution. Nutrients seem to play a prognostic role through vitamin D or food allergy. Measurement of exhaled nitric oxide and examination of induced sputum may help in diagnosis and adjustment of treatment but these tools are not yet effective as predictive factors in asthma exacerbations. Prevention, early management and continued education of children and their families remain the best methods to improve asthma control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Depression and anxiety in patients with AL amyloidosis as assessed by the SF-36 questionnaire: experience in 1226 patients().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Janet; Lo, Stephen; Phillips, Margot; Sun, Fangui; Seldin, David C; Berenbaum, Isidore; Berk, John L; Sanchorawala, Vaishali

    2016-09-01

    Our study examines depression and anxiety in patients with immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis, and determines the associations between the mental health problems and patient characteristics (age, gender, race, marital status, alcohol consumption, smoking status and cardiac involvement). Patients with AL amyloidosis who completed the 36-item Short Form General Health Survey (SF-36) during initial evaluation at a single center were studied. The SF-36 included assessments of depression, anxiety, role limitation due to emotional problems and the mental health subscale score. From 1226 patients with AL amyloidosis, 37.0% reported depression and 46.7% reported anxiety. Patients with cardiac amyloidosis reported more anxiety (odds ratio (OR) = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.61) and role limitation due to emotional problems (OR = 1.32, 95%CI 1.05-1.65). No significant association between cardiac involvement and depression was found (OR = 1.22, 95%CI 0.97-1.54). Men reported less anxiety (OR = 0.72, 95%CI 0.57-0.91). Patients  ≥65 years experienced greater role limitation (OR = 1.36, 95%CI 1.08-1.71). Smokers (p = 0.019) and women (p = 0.006) scored lower on mental health subscales. Many patients with AL amyloidosis suffer from depression, anxiety and functional limitations. Psychiatric assessment and treatment is important, and further research is needed to clarify the long-term effects of depression and anxiety in AL amyloidosis. This current study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00898235.

  2. Immunoglobulin light and heavy chain amyloidosis AL/AH: renal pathology and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picken, Maria M

    2007-01-01

    Among the varied and biochemically diverse group of protein folding disorders that are collectively known as the amyloidoses, AL-amyloidosis where deposits are derived from the immunoglobulin light chain fragments, is the most prevalent systemic form of the disease found in the western world. In contrast, AH-amyloidosis, resulting from the deposition of immunoglobulin heavy chains, is a rare disease with very few cases thus far reported. Both diseases primarily affect older individuals and are always associated with some form of plasma cell/B cell lymphoproliferative process. The overwhelming majority of monoclonal light chains are nephrotoxic leading to frequent renal involvement, although a wide variety of other organ systems may be involved. The most common clinical presentation is proteinuria and the disease is often diagnosed by renal biopsy. The kidneys are the most frequent site of amyloid fibril deposition in AL and light microscopic examination of Congo red stained sections is the prime means of detection. Electron microscopy may be helpful in the detection of small deposits and in the differentiation of amyloid from other types of renal fibrillar deposits. Current treatment of systemic amyloidoses depends upon the type of amyloid deposits; thus, accurate typing, using a panel of antibodies, is of paramount importance. While the differential diagnosis of amyloidoses continues to expand with increased awareness of hereditary types, currently, the main challenge is diagnosis of AL/AH with confidence. Future goals include the development of more precise and sensitive diagnostic tools. This chapter presents the pathology of AL/AH, current standards of diagnosis and the differential diagnosis. Whenever possible, the most recent references, considered as being particularly useful to clinicians and pathologists serving patients with renal amyloidosis, have been selected.

  3. Serial scanning with technetium pyrophosphate ((99m)Tc-PYP) in advanced ATTR cardiac amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, Adam; DeLuca, Albert; Weinberg, Richard; Pozniakoff, Ted; Blaner, William S; Pirmohamed, Altaf; Bettencourt, Brian; Gollob, Jared; Karsten, Verena; Vest, John A; Chiuzan, Codruta; Maurer, Mathew S; Bokhari, Sabahat

    2016-12-01

    Development of noninvasive imaging modalities to quantify amyloid burden over time is an unmet clinical need. Technetium pyrophosphate ((99m)Tc-PYP) scintigraphy is a simple and widely available radiotracer useful to differentiate transthyretin from light-chain amyloidosis in patients with advanced cardiac amyloidosis. We examined the utility of serial (99m)Tc-PYP scanning to quantify amyloid burden over time in TTR cardiac amyloidosis (ATTR-CA). Twenty subjects with ATTR-CA (10 wild type, 10 mutant) underwent serial (99m)Tc-PYP planar cardiac imaging. Cardiac retention was assessed both semiquantitatively (visual score 0, no uptake to 3, uptake greater than bone) and quantitatively (region of interest drawn over the heart, copied, and mirrored over the contralateral chest) to calculate a heart-to-contralateral (H/CL) ratio. Index scan mean visual score and H/CL were 3.0 ± 0.2 and 1.79 ± 0.2, respectively, and after an average 1.5 ± 0.5 years follow-up, did not differ, 3.0 ± 0.2, P = .33 and 1.76 ± 0.2, P = .44. H/CL change was minimal, 0.03 ± 0.17, did not correlate with time between scans, r = 0.19, P = .43, and was observed despite obvious clinical progression (increase in troponin ≥ 0.1 ng/mL, BNP ≥ 400 pg/mL, NYHA class, and/or death). Serial (99m)Tc-PYP scanning in subjects with advanced ATTR-CA does not show significant changes over an average 1.5 years of follow-up despite obvious clinical progression.

  4. Cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy affects movement and posture causing activity limitation; it is a lifelong condition, with foreseeable complications. There are evidence-based interventions that will prevent participation restriction. Childhood interventions are generally delivered within multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs. Sadly young adults are often not transferred to an appropriate multidisciplinary adult neurodisability service. An unexplained neurological deterioration should warrant further investigation. Pain is an important underreported symptom and musculoskeletal complaints are prevalent. Disabled adults have less participation socially, in employment, marriage, and independent living related to health problems, discrimination, or lack of access to information, support, and equipment. Evidence-based interventions include a variety of modalities at all International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health levels to include support and adaptations. Rehabilitation interventions that have been shown to be effective include surgery in childhood, ankle-foot orthoses, strength training, and electrical stimulation. Management of spasticity is beneficial and has an evidence base. Orthotics and casting are also used. Systematic reviews of upper limb therapies also show the benefit of physical therapy exercise, strengthening, fitness training, and constraint therapy. Occupational therapy has a weaker evidence base than in other disabling conditions but many modalities are transferable. Speech therapy is effective although no specific intervention is better. Psychological wellbeing interventions, including improving self-efficacy, health knowledge, and coping skills, are beneficial. Management of continence, nutrition, and fatigue promote wellbeing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Gold nephropathy and renal amyloidosis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallard, M; Carrabba, M; Venegoni, C; Imbasciati, E; Banfi, G; Mihatsch, M J

    1985-01-01

    A 71-year-old Caucasian woman with rheumatoid arthritis, who had been treated with gold salts for 19 months, developed a significant proteinuria associated with nephrotic syndrome and renal impairment. Her renal biopsy revealed the unusual simultaneous occurrence of gold nephropathy and renal amyloidosis and she was treated by gold withdrawal, methylprednisolone pulses and azathioprine, with a good remission of symptoms. We describe the case and discuss the possible cause(s) of similar renal involvement and the results obtained with the combined therapy of steroids and cytotoxic drugs.

  6. Comparison of Different Stem Cell Mobilization Regimens in AL Amyloidosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenko, Katharina; Wuchter, Patrick; Hansberg, Marion; Mangatter, Anja; Benner, Axel; Ho, Anthony D; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hegenbart, Ute; Schönland, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    High-dose melphalan (HDM) and autologous blood stem cell transplantation (ABSCT) is an effective treatment for transplantation-eligible patients with systemic light chain (AL) amyloidosis. Whereas most centers use granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) alone for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC), the application of mobilization chemotherapy might offer specific advantages. We retrospectively analyzed 110 patients with AL amyloidosis who underwent PBSC collection. Major eligibility criteria included age mobilization, 67 patients (61%) had been pretreated with induction therapy, including 17 (15%) patients who had received melphalan. Chemo-mobilization was performed with either cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, dexamethasone (CAD)/G-CSF (n = 78, 71%); ifosfamide/G-CSF (n = 14, 13%); or other regimens (n = 8, 7%). AL amyloidosis patients with predominant heart involvement and/or status post heart transplantation were mobilized with G-CSF only (n = 10, 9%). PBSC collection was successful in 101 patients (92%) at first attempt. The median number of CD34 + cells was 8.7 (range, 2.1 to 45.5) × 10 6 CD34 + /kg collected in a median of 1 leukapheresis (LP) session. Compared with G-CSF-only mobilization, a chemo-mobilization with CAD/G-CSF or ifosfamide/G-CSF had a positive impact on the number of collected CD34 + cell number/kg per LP (P mobilization (median CTC: grade 3; range, 1 to 4). Toxicity in patients undergoing ifosfamide/G-CSF mobilization was higher than in with those who received G-CSF-only mobilization. HDM and ABSCT were performed in 100 patients. Compared with >6.5 × 10 6 transplanted CD34 + cells/kg, an ABSCT with 1 × 10 9 /L and a reduced platelet count mobilization and has a tolerable toxicity profile in AL amyloidosis patients. A further toxicity reduction by omission of doxorubicin might be considered. Because of advanced nonhematologic toxicity, ifosfamide administration cannot be recommended. However, G

  7. Acute exacerbation of airspace enlargement with fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Kakugawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, Kawabata et al. described a lesion which they termed “airspace enlargement with fibrosis” that could be included on the spectrum of smoking-related interstitial lung diseases. This group also reported that patients with airspace enlargement with fibrosis but without coexisting interstitial pneumonia of another type had no acute exacerbations and favorable prognoses on clinical follow-up. Here we describe the first case, to our knowledge, of acute exacerbation of airspace enlargement with fibrosis without coexisting interstitial pneumonia of another type. An 82-year-old man was referred to our department for worsening dyspnea and new alveolar opacities on chest radiograph following left pulmonary segmentectomy (S6 for cancer. A diagnosis of acute exacerbation of airspace enlargement with fibrosis without coexisting interstitial pneumonia of other types was made, based on pathological evidence of airspace enlargement with fibrosis and organizing diffuse alveolar damage. Treatment with high-dose methylprednisolone followed by tapered oral prednisolone resulted in gradual improvement of the clinical condition and chest radiographic findings. Clinicians should be aware that patients with airspace enlargement with fibrosis may experience acute exacerbation.

  8. Prevention of Acute Exacerbations of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbeau, Jean; Diekemper, Rebecca L.; Ouellette, Daniel R.; Goodridge, Donna; Hernandez, Paul; Curren, Kristen; Balter, Meyer S.; Bhutani, Mohit; Camp, Pat G.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Dechman, Gail; Dransfield, Mark T.; Fiel, Stanley B.; Foreman, Marilyn G.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Ireland, Belinda K.; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Marciniuk, Darcy D.; Mularski, Richard A.; Ornelas, Joseph; Stickland, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States as well as throughout the rest of the world. An exacerbation of COPD (periodic escalations of symptoms of cough, dyspnea, and sputum production) is a major contributor to worsening lung function, impairment in quality of life, need for urgent care or hospitalization, and cost of care in COPD. Research conducted over the past decade has contributed much to our current understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of COPD. Additionally, an evolving literature has accumulated about the prevention of acute exacerbations. METHODS: In recognition of the importance of preventing exacerbations in patients with COPD, the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) joint evidence-based guideline (AECOPD Guideline) was developed to provide a practical, clinically useful document to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the prevention of acute exacerbations according to major categories of prevention therapies. Three key clinical questions developed using the PICO (population, intervention, comparator, and outcome) format addressed the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD: nonpharmacologic therapies, inhaled therapies, and oral therapies. We used recognized document evaluation tools to assess and choose the most appropriate studies and to extract meaningful data and grade the level of evidence to support the recommendations in each PICO question in a balanced and unbiased fashion. RESULTS: The AECOPD Guideline is unique not only for its topic, the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD, but also for the first-in-kind partnership between two of the largest thoracic societies in North America. The CHEST Guidelines Oversight Committee in partnership with the CTS COPD Clinical Assembly launched this project with the objective that a systematic review and critical evaluation of the published literature by clinical experts and researchers in

  9. 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency, exacerbation frequency and human rhinovirus exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quint Jennifer K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency is associated with COPD and increased susceptibility to infection in the general population. Methods We investigated whether COPD patients deficient in 25-hydroxyvitamin D were more likely to be frequent exacerbators, had reduced outdoor activity and were more susceptible to human rhinovirus (HRV exacerbations than those with insufficient and normal levels. We also investigated whether the frequency of FokI, BsmI and TaqIα 25-hydroxyvitamin D receptor (VDR polymorphisms differed between frequent and infrequent exacerbators. Results There was no difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels between frequent and infrequent exacerbators in the summer; medians 44.1nmol/L (29.1 – 68.0 and 39.4nmol/L (22.3 – 59.2 or winter; medians 24.9nmol/L (14.3 – 43.1 and 27.1nmol/L (19.9 – 37.6. Patients who spent less time outdoors in the 14 days prior to sampling had lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (p = 0.02. Day length was independently associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (p = 0.02. There was no difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels between baseline and exacerbation; medians 36.2nmol/L (IQR 22.4-59.4 and 33.3nmol/L (23.0-49.7; p = 0.43. HRV positive exacerbations were not associated with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at exacerbation than exacerbations that did not test positive for HRV; medians 30.0nmol/L (20.4 – 57.8 and 30.6nmol/L (19.4 – 48.7. There was no relationship between exacerbation frequency and any VDR polymorphisms (all p > 0.05. Conclusions Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in COPD are not associated with frequent exacerbations and do not increase susceptibility to HRV exacerbations. Independent of day length, patients who spend less time outdoors have lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration.

  10. Life-threatening hematuria in a hemodialysis patient with systemic light-chain amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Po-Jen; Chiang, Wen-Fang; Chao, Tai-Kuang; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2015-12-07

    Direct amyloid invasion of prostate tissue resulting in massive bleeding may be fatal, and rapid diagnosis is difficult. A 71-y-old male undergoing regular hemodialysis with primary light-chain (AL) amyloidosis was admitted due to gross hematuria for 2 days. Cystoscopy revealed oozing from the prostatic urethra. Therefore, electrocauterization was performed, and his symptoms resolved. Unfortunately, he experienced recurrent massive hematuria 3 months later. Tests for serum D-dimer and fibrin degradation products were both positive. Followed serum factor X level was low at 5.4%. Gross hematuria persisted despite of blood transfusions, desmopressin, and vitamin K therapy. Emergent cystoscopy revealed oozing from the prostatic urethra, as was found previously. Therefore, electrocauterization and transurethral resection of the prostate were performed. Analysis of a biopsy specimen of prostate demonstrated strong amyloid deposition in the vascular and perivascular regions. Electron microscopy showed relatively straight fibrils with diameters of 7-10nm in the perivascular region. Gross hematuria subsided then, and no recurrence was noted at a 6-month follow-up. Systemic AL amyloidosis can cause potentially life-threatening hemorrhage. Hemostatic defects and direct invasion with amyloid angiopathy are main pathogenic factors. Timely surgical intervention may be imperative. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Systemic Amyloidosis and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Associated with Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasems Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old male with long-standing Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia complicated with systemic amyloidosis presented with a witnessed syncopal episode. He had complaints of orthostatic dizziness and palpitations for few months. Orthostatic hypotension and peripheral neuropathy were demonstrated on physical examination. EKG, 24-hour Holter monitoring, and 2D echocardiogram were unremarkable. MRI of the brain ruled out stroke. Patients with amyloidosis can develop cardiovascular disease through amyloid cardiomyopathy, small vessel disease, conduction defects, pericardial effusion, or autonomic denervation. After ruling out other life-threatening causes, Ewing’s battery of tests was done to rule out cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Two heart rate tests and one blood pressure test were abnormal which indicated severe cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy can mask symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and hence early diagnosis using the simple bedside maneuver is beneficial. The test is also important for prognostication. Absence of augmentation of cardiac output from inadequate autonomic stimulation will lead to postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, and tachycardia. There may be no change in heart rate with Valsalva or deep breathing both of which increase parasympathetic tone. As the condition progresses, it may result in cardiac denervation which can result in silent myocardial infarction, syncope, and sudden death.

  12. Frequencies and geographic distributions of genetic mutations in transthyretin- and non-transthyretin-related familial amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, D B; Swiecicki, P L; Zeldenrust, S R; Dispenzieri, A; Mauermann, M L; Gertz, M A

    2015-10-01

    Inherited forms of amyloidosis are rare; of these, transthyretin-related (ATTR) is the most common, but non-ATTR has been described as well. We studied a large case series of ATTR and a small series of non-ATTR to better determine the mutation frequencies and geographic distributions of these inherited forms of amyloidosis in the United States. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of 284 ATTR and non-ATTR patients seen at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, from 1 January 1970 through 29 January 2013. Mutations were identified by DNA sequencing, restriction fragment length polymorphism, or mass spectroscopy. The genetic testing method was unknown for several patients, but a small proportion were identified by family history or by classical clinical presentation associated with a specific mutation. The most common ATTR mutations were Thr60Ala (24%), Val30Met (15%), Val122Ile (10%), and Ser77Tyr (5%). Non-ATTR mutations included gelsolin (n = 3), apolipoprotein A-I (n = 6), apolipoprotein A-II (n = 1), fibrinogen A-α (n = 9), and lysozyme (n = 1). Although rare, ATTR and, to a lesser extent, non-ATTR are prevalent in the United States and should be considered for patients presenting in the appropriate clinical context. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Amyloidosis, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress in the Heart of an Alkaptonuric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Millucci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alkaptonuria, a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by deficiency in homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase activity, leads to accumulation of oxidised homogentisic acid in cartilage and collagenous structures present in all organs and tissues, especially joints and heart, causing a pigmentation called ochronosis. A secondary amyloidosis is associated with AKU. Here we report a study of an aortic valve from an AKU patient. Results. Congo Red birefringence, Th-T fluorescence, and biochemical assays demonstrated the presence of SAA-amyloid deposits in AKU stenotic aortic valve. Light and electron microscopy assessed the colocalization of ochronotic pigment and SAA-amyloid, the presence of calcified areas in the valve. Immunofluorescence detected lipid peroxidation of the tissue and lymphocyte/macrophage infiltration causing inflammation. High SAA plasma levels and proinflammatory cytokines levels comparable to those from rheumatoid arthritis patients were found in AKU patient. Conclusions. SAA-amyloidosis was present in the aortic valve from an AKU patient and colocalized with ochronotic pigment as well as with tissue calcification, lipid oxidation, macrophages infiltration, cell death, and tissue degeneration. A local HGD expression in human cardiac tissue has also been ascertained suggesting a consequent local production of ochronotic pigment in AKU heart.

  14. Non-invasive evaluation of the myocardial substrate of cardiac amyloidosis by gadolinium cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugini, E; Rapezzi, C; Piva, T; Leone, O; Bacchi-Reggiani, L; Riva, L; Salvi, F; Lovato, L; Branzi, A; Fattori, R

    2006-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence and distribution of gadolinium (Gd) enhancement at cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in patients with cardiac amyloidosis (CA) and to look for associations with clinical, morphological, and functional features. 21 patients with definitely diagnosed CA (nine with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis and 12 transthyretin related) underwent Gd-CMR. Gd enhancement was detected in 16 of 21 (76%) patients. Sixty six of 357 (18%) segments were enhanced, more often at the mid ventricular level. Transmural extension of enhancement within each patient significantly correlated with left ventricular (LV) end systolic volume (r = 0.58). The number of enhanced segments correlated with LV end diastolic volume (r = 0.76), end systolic volume (r = 0.6), and left atrial size (r = 0.56). Segments with > 50% extensive transmural enhancement more often were severely hypokinetic or akinetic (p = 0.001). Patients with > 2 enhanced segments had significantly lower 12 lead QRS voltage and Sokolow-Lyon index. No relation was apparent with any other clinical, morphological, functional, or histological characteristics. Gd enhancement is common but not universally present in CA, probably due to expansion of infiltrated interstitium. The segmental and transmural distribution of the enhancement is highly variable, and mid-ventricular regions are more often involved. Enhancement appears to be associated with impaired segmental and global contractility and a larger atrium.

  15. Nonfluent/Agrammatic PPA with In-Vivo Cortical Amyloidosis and Pick’s Disease Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Caso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of biomarkers in predicting pathological findings in the frontotemporal dementia (FTD clinical spectrum disorders is still being explored. We present comprehensive, prospective longitudinal data for a 66 year old, right-handed female who met current criteria for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA. She first presented with a 3-year history of progressive speech and language impairment mainly characterized by severe apraxia of speech. Neuropsychological and general motor functions remained relatively spared throughout the clinical course. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM showed selective cortical atrophy of the left posterior inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and underlying insula that worsened over time, extending along the left premotor strip. Five years after her first evaluation, she developed mild memory impairment and underwent PET-FDG and PiB scans that showed left frontal hypometabolism and cortical amyloidosis. Three years later (11 years from first symptom, post-mortem histopathological evaluation revealed Pick's disease, with severe degeneration of left IFG, mid-insula, and precentral gyrus. Alzheimer’s disease (AD (CERAD frequent/Braak Stage V was also detected. This patient demonstrates that biomarkers indicating brain amyloidosis should not be considered conclusive evidence that AD pathology accounts for a typical FTD clinical/anatomical syndrome.

  16. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dieting OK for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A A What's in this article? ... the first word you spoke? For kids with cerebral palsy, called CP for short, taking a first step ...

  17. [Coexistence of intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis with amyloidosis in patient with polyneuropathy in the course of multiple myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziarska, D; Grzelec, H; Flont, M; Millo, B; Nowacki, P

    2000-01-01

    A coexistence of high level of intrathecal monoclonal immunoglobulin (intrathecal synthesis?) and amyloidosis as a possible cause of peripheral neuropathy in multiple myeloma patient was presented. In the reported case neurological symptoms and intrathecal monoclonal protein existence had been manifested several months before the appearance of plasmocytoma.

  18. Prevalence of amyloid deposition in mature healthy chickens in the flock that previously had outbreaks of vaccine-associated amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    IBI, Kanata; MURAKAMI, Tomoaki; GODA, Wael Mohamed; KOBAYASHI, Naoki; ISHIGURO, Naotaka; YANAI, Tokuma

    2015-01-01

    Avian amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is commonly observed in adult birds with chronic inflammation, such as that caused by bacterial infection. We previously described vaccine-associated AA amyloidosis in juvenile chickens. In this study, the prevalence of amyloid deposition was measured in mature healthy chickens that survived a previous outbreak of avian AA amyloidosis while they were juveniles. Herein, we analyzed the amyloid deposition in mature chickens and compared the prevalence of amyloid deposition with juvenile chickens obtained in our previous study (Murakami et al., 2013). We found that: 1) amyloid deposition in the liver was absent in mature chickens, while juvenile chickens had a rate of 24%; 2) amyloid deposition in the spleen was observed in 36% of juvenile chickens and in 40% of mature chickens; 3) amyloid deposition in the pectoral muscle of mature chickens (43.75%) was approximately half that of juvenile chickens (88%). These results suggest that additional amyloid deposition in chickens previously exposed to AA amyloidosis may not worsen with age. Further, amyloid deposition in chickens may tend to regress when causative factors, such as vaccinations and/or chronic inflammation, are absent. PMID:25985816

  19. Autonomic Neuropathy and Albuminocytologic Dissociation in Cerebrospinal Fluid As the Presenting Features of Primary Amyloidosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePrimary amyloidosis is a disease with a poor prognosis and multi-organ involvement. Here, we report the clinical and pathological features of a patient with primary amyloidosis featuring autonomic neuropathy as the initial symptom and albuminocytologic dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF.MethodsThe patient was a 60-year-old Chinese male with numbness, orthostatic hypotension, and gastrointestinal symptoms. For diagnosis, we performed an electromyogram (EMG, lumbar puncture, Bence Jones protein urine test, serum electrophoresis blood test, sural nerve and rectal membrane biopsies, transthyretin (TTR gene sequencing, and bone marrow puncture.ResultsCongo red staining of sural nerve and rectal membrane biopsies showed amyloid deposition and apple-green birefringence was visualized under polarized light microscopy. TTR gene sequencing showed no causative mutation. Following lumbar puncture, normal CSF cell counts and elevated CSF protein concentration (1,680 mg/L were detected. Bone marrow puncture showed that out of the total number of whole blood cells, 0.56% were abnormal plasma cells and that 87.4% of the total number of plasma cells were abnormal. EMG results showed mixed peripheral nerve damage predominately in the sensory nerve fibers.ConclusionObvious symptoms of neuropathy, particularly autonomic neuropathy, albuminocytologic dissociation, and organ function damage suggested a diagnosis of amyloidosis. In such patients, neurologists should use caution to differentiate between chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, primary amyloidosis, and familial amyloid neuropathy.

  20. MR imaging in cardiac amyloidosis - morphology, function and late enhancement; Magnetresonanztomografie bei kardialer Amyloidose - Morphologie, Funktion und late enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosch, W.; Heye, T.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Kauczor, H.U. [Abt. Diagnostische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Libicher, M. [Abt. Diagnostische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany); Ley, S. [Abt. Paediatrische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Abt. Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (dkfz) (Germany); Schnabel, P. [Pathologisches Inst., Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Dengler, T.J.; Katus, H.A.; Kristen, A.V. [Abt. Innere Medizin III, Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: since limited data is available using MR imaging in cardiac amyloidosis, the purpose of our study was to evaluate morphological and functional differences of the heart using cardiac MRI. Materials and methods: 19 consecutive patients (14 males, 5 females, mean age 59 {+-} 6 years) with histologically proven cardiac amyloidosis were evaluated with MRI at 1.5 T. Results were compared with data of 10 healthy, age-matched control subjects (5 males, 5 females, mean age 60 {+-} 6 years). Functional and morphological data including late enhancement (LE) was acquired. Results: compared to the control group, patients with cardiac amyloidosis had thickened atrial walls and dilated atriums. Both ventricles and the interventricular septum were thickened. The LV hypertrophy was focal in 11/19 (58%) and global in 4/19 (21%) of patients. A myocardial edema occurred in 2/19 patients with cardiac amyloidosis (11%). An edema of the myocardium was visible in 2/19 (11%) of patients. The LV ejection fraction was statistically significantly decreased. The prevalence of LE was 74% (14/19 of patients). LE was detected predominantly in the LV anterior wall and in the interventricular septum. Within the segments LE was located predominantly in a subendocardial location. Between patients with and without LE no statistically significant differences of functional and morphological results were able to be established. (orig.)

  1. Tocilizumab in the treatment of twelve cases with aa amyloidosis secondary to familial mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurlu, Serdal; Hacioglu, Aysa; Adibnia, Yasaman; Hamuryudan, Vedat; Ozdogan, Huri

    2017-05-30

    There is no established treatment of AA amyloidosis, a long-term complication of various chronic inflammatory diseases associated with increased mortality, such as familial Mediterranian fever (FMF). Recently there are few reports pointing out that tocilizumab(TCZ), an anti IL-6 agent may be effective in AA amyloidosis resistant to conventional treatments. We report our data on the effect of TCZ in patients with FMF complicated with AA amyloidosis. FMF patients with histologically proven AA amyloidosis, treated with TCZ (8 mg/kg per month) were followed monthly and the changes in creatinine, creatinine clearance, the amount of 24-hour urinary protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were noted throughout the treatment period. Adverse effects of the treatment were closely monitored. TCZ was given to 12 patients (6 F, 6 M) who also continued to receive colchicine (1.9 ± 0.4 mg/day). Coexisting diseases were ankylosing spondylitis(4) and Crohn's disease(1). The mean age was 35.2 ± 10.0 years and the mean follow-up on TCZ was 17.5 ± 14.7 months. The renal functions remained stable (mean creatinine from 1.1 ± 0.9 mg/dl to 1.0 ± 0.6 mg/dl), while a significant decrease in acute phase response (the mean CRP from 18.1 ± 19.5 mg/L to 5.8 ± 7.1 mg/L and ESR from 48.7 ± 31.0 mm/h to 28.7 ± 28.3 mm/h) was observed and the mean 24-hour urinary protein excretion reduced from 6537.6 ± 6526.0 mg/dl to 4745.5 ± 5462.7 mg/dl. Two patients whose renal functions were impaired prior to TCZ therapy improved significantly on this regimen. No infusion reaction was observed. None of the patients experienced any FMF attack under TCZ treatment with the exception of 2, one of whom had less frequent attacks while the other had episodes of erysipelas-like erythema. CONCLUSıON: Tocilizumab improved the acute phase response and the renal function in this group of patients and was generally well

  2. Imaging findings and literature review of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in primary systemic AL amyloidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Hee; Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jeon, Eun Seok; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae; Choi, Joon Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Although several case reports and case series have described {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in amyloidosis, the value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for diagnosing amyloidosis has not been clarified. We investigated the imaging findings of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with primary systemic AL amyloidosis. Subjects were 15 patients (M:F = 12:3; age, 61.5 ± 7.4 years) with histologically confirmed primary systemic AL amyloidosis who underwent pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT to rule out the possibility of malignancy or for initial workup of alleged cancer. For involved organs, visual and semiquantitative analyses were performed on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images. In total, 22 organs (10 hearts, 5 kidneys, 2 stomachs, 2 colons, 1 ileum, 1 pancreas, and 1 liver) were histologically confirmed to have primary systemic AL amyloidosis. F-FDG uptake was significantly increased in 15 of the 22 organs (68.2 %; 10 hearts, 2 kidneys, 1 colon, 1 ileum, and 1 liver; SUV{sub max} = 7.0 ± 3.2, range 2.1–14.1). However, in 11 of 15 PET-positive organs (78.6 %; 10 hearts and the ileum), it was difficult to differentiate pathological uptake from physiological uptake. Definitely abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was found in only 4 of the 22 organs (18.2 %; 2 kidneys, 1 colon, and the liver). {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was negative for pancreas and gastric lesions. Although {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT showed high uptake in two-thirds of the organs involving primary systemic AL amyloidosis, its sensitivity appeared to be low to make differentiation of pathological uptake from physiological uptake. However, due to the small number of cases, further study for the role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in amyloidosis will be warranted.

  3. Cerebral microangiopathies; Zerebrale Mikroangiopathien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Jennifer [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2011-03-15

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  4. Pneumonic vs nonpneumonic acute exacerbations of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, David; Lieberman, Devora; Gelfer, Yevgenia; Varshavsky, Raiesa; Dvoskin, Bella; Leinonen, Maija; Friedman, Maureen G

    2002-10-01

    To describe and compare the background, clinical manifestations, disease course, and infectious etiologies of pneumonic acute exacerbations (PNAE) vs nonpneumonic acute exacerbations (NPAE) of COPD. A prospective, observational study. A tertiary university medical center in southern Israel. Twenty-three hospitalizations for PNAE and 217 hospitalizations for NPAE were included in the study. Paired sera were obtained for each of the hospitalizations and were tested serologically for 12 pathogens. Only a significant change in antibody titers or levels was considered diagnostic. No significant differences were found between the two groups for any of the parameters related to COPD or comorbidity. The clinical type of the exacerbation was not significantly different between the groups. Compared to NPAE, patients with PNAE had lower PO(2) values at hospital admission (p = 0.004) but higher rates of abrupt onset (p = 0.005), ICU admissions (p = 0.006), invasive mechanical ventilation (p = 0.01), mortality (p = 0.007), and longer hospital stay (p = 0.001). In 22 PNAE hospitalizations (96%) and in 153 NPAE hospitalizations (71%), at least one infectious etiology was identified (p = 0.001). Mixed infection was found in 13 patients with PNAE (59%) and in 59 patients with NPAE (39%; not significant [NS]). Viral etiology was identified in 18 patients with PNAE (78%) compared with 99 patients with NPAE (46%; p = 0.003). Pneumococcal etiology was found in 10 patients with PNAE (43%) and in 38 patients with NPAE (18%; p = 0.006). An atypical etiology was identified in 8 patients with PNAE (35%) and 64 patients with NPAE (30%; NS). Community-acquired pneumonia is common among patients hospitalized for an acute exacerbation of COPD and is generally manifested by more severe clinical and laboratory parameters. In PNAE, compared to NPAE, viral and pneumococcal etiologies are more common, but the rate of atypical pathogens is similar. The therapeutic significance of these findings

  5. Adverse Prognostic Factors for Morbidity and Mortality During Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients with Light Chain Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jason C; Shank, Brandon R; Milton, Denái R; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H

    2017-12-06

    Patients with immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis undergoing peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (PBSC) mobilization for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT) can experience significant morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to characterize the adverse events and identify prognostic factors associated with the development of morbidity and mortality in patients with AL amyloidosis who had begun PBSC mobilization for auto-HCT. A retrospective study was performed in 101 consecutive patients with AL amyloidosis who underwent PBSC mobilization for auto-HCT between January 2006 and December 2013. A composite primary endpoint of morbidity and mortality during PBSC mobilization was used. Forty-one patients (41%) experienced at least 1 adverse event, including 4 deaths during PBSC mobilization. Adverse events included in this composite endpoint were cardiac events, thromboembolic events, bleeding events, unplanned hospitalization, weight gain >2% necessitating diuretic intervention, and death. Low serum albumin levels, elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, and increased interventricular septal thickness were significantly associated with the composite primary endpoint (P = .024, .001, and .006, respectively). The median progression-free survival from the start of PBSC mobilization was 4.7 years, and the median overall survival was 6.5 years. In general, PBSC mobilization is associated with minimal complications, but patients with AL amyloidosis can experience more frequent and severe complications, such as volume overload and weight gain. Careful patient selection is warranted in patients with AL amyloidosis before proceeding to PBSC mobilization and auto-HCT. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Current insight in the localized insulin-derived amyloidosis (LIDA): clinico-pathological characteristics and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Amir Mehdi; Osmani, Lais; Matsangos, Aerielle E; Li, Qing K

    2017-10-01

    In diabetic patients, subcutaneous insulin injection may cause several types of injection site-related lesions, such as lipoatrophy, insulin-induced cutaneous lipohypertrophy (IICL), allergic reaction, and iatrogenic localized insulin-derived amyloidosis (LIDA). Among these complications, both IICL and LIDA present as tumor-like and slow growing lesions; and they may be confused with one another. The clinical implication and management of IICL and LIDA are different. LIDA causes poor blood glycemic controls due to inadequate absorption of the insulin. Thus, accurate diagnosis of the lesion is critical in diabetic patients. LIDA is an extremely rare complication and often overlooked, it is managed by a surgical intervention. Whereas, IICL is a common side effect and can be managed by a non-surgical approach. Furthermore, in long-standing diabetics, patients may develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, proteinuria, peripheral, and autonomic neuropathy; these symptoms can be mistaken for a systemic amyloidosis. It is also necessary to distinguish LIDA from the systemic amyloidosis, which requires a more aggressive systemic therapy. LIDA should also be distinguished from primary cutaneous amyloidosis, with high risk of progression to a systemic amyloidosis. In this effort we reviewed 25 published manuscripts, including case reports and case series studies. We also summarized the literature and discussed differential diagnosis, including the approach to diagnose LIDA. The identification of amyloid material and immunoreactivity with anti-insulin antibodies are key diagnostic features of LIDA. Although several clinical and animal studies were made in recent years, the lesion is still under-diagnosed and underreported. The clinical suspicion and knowledge of the lesion play a crucial role for the accurate diagnosis of LIDA. Surgical excision of the lesion can dramatically decrease insulin requirement and improve glycemic control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights

  7. Three-dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Light Chain Cardiac Amyloidosis: Examination of Left and Right Ventricular Myocardial Mechanics Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano-Moral, Jose Angel; Gangadharamurthy, Dakshin; Comenzo, Raymond L; Pandian, Natesa G; Patel, Ayan R

    2015-08-01

    The study of myocardial mechanics has a potential role in the detection of cardiac involvement in patients with amyloidosis. This study aimed to characterize 3-dimensional-speckle tracking echocardiography-derived left and right ventricular myocardial mechanics in light chain amyloidosis and examine their relationship with brain natriuretic peptide. In patients with light chain amyloidosis, left ventricular longitudinal and circumferential strain (n=40), and right ventricular longitudinal strain and radial displacement (n=26) were obtained by 3-dimensional-speckle tracking echocardiography. Brain natriuretic peptide levels were determined. All myocardial mechanics measurements showed differences when compared by brain natriuretic peptide level tertiles. Left and right ventricular longitudinal strain were highly correlated (r=0.95, P<.001). Left ventricular longitudinal and circumferential strain were reduced in patients with cardiac involvement (-9±4 vs -16±2; P<.001, and -24±6 vs -29±4; P=.01, respectively), with the most prominent impairment at the basal segments. Right ventricular longitudinal strain and radial displacement were diminished in patients with cardiac involvement (-9±3 vs -17±3; P<.001, and 2.7±0.8 vs 3.8±0.3; P=.002). On multivariate analysis, left ventricular longitudinal strain was associated with the presence of cardiac involvement (odds ratio = 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 2.37; P=.03) independent of the presence of brain natriuretic peptide and troponin I criteria for cardiac amyloidosis. Three-dimensional-speckle tracking echocardiography-derived left and right ventricular myocardial mechanics are increasingly altered as brain natriuretic peptide increases in light chain amyloidosis. There appears to be a strong association between left ventricular longitudinal strain and cardiac involvement, beyond biomarkers such as brain natriuretic peptide and troponin I. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by

  8. Biomarkers Predictive of Exacerbations in the SPIROMICS and COPDGene Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Jason D; Jacobson, Sean; Kechris, Katerina; Kinney, Gregory L; Foreman, Marilyn G; Doerschuk, Claire M; Make, Barry J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Rennard, Stephen I; Barr, R Graham; Bleecker, Eugene R; Kanner, Richard E; Kleerup, Eric C; Hansel, Nadia N; Woodruff, Prescott G; Han, MeiLan K; Paine, Robert; Martinez, Fernando J; Bowler, Russell P; O'Neal, Wanda K

    2017-02-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations are associated with disease progression, higher healthcare cost, and increased mortality. Published predictors of future exacerbations include previous exacerbation, airflow obstruction, poor overall health, home oxygen use, and gastroesophageal reflux. To determine the value of adding blood biomarkers to clinical variables to predict exacerbations. Subjects from the SPIROMICS (Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcomes Measures in COPD Study) (n = 1,544) and COPDGene (Genetic Epidemiology of COPD) (n = 602) cohorts had 90 plasma or serum candidate proteins measured on study entry using Myriad-RBM multiplex panels. We defined total exacerbations as subject-reported worsening in respiratory health requiring therapy with corticosteroids and/or antibiotics, and severe exacerbations as those leading to hospitalizations or emergency room visits. We assessed retrospective exacerbations during the 12 months before enrollment and then documented prospective exacerbations in each cohort. Exacerbations were modeled for biomarker associations with negative binomial regression including clinical covariates (age, sex, percent predicted FEV1, self-reported gastroesophageal reflux, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire score, smoking status). We used the Stouffer-Liptak test to combine P values for metaanalysis. Between the two cohorts, 3,471 total exacerbations (1,044 severe) were reported. We identified biomarkers within each cohort that were significantly associated with a history of exacerbation and with a future exacerbation, but there was minimal replication between the cohorts. Although established clinical features were predictive of exacerbations, of the blood biomarkers only decorin and α2-macroglobulin increased predictive value for future severe exacerbations. Blood biomarkers were significantly associated with the occurrence of exacerbations but were not robust between cohorts and added little to the

  9. Fine particulate pollution and asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouazza, Naïm; Foissac, Frantz; Urien, Saik; Guedj, Romain; Carbajal, Ricardo; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Chappuy, Hélène

    2017-12-19

    As the results from epidemiological studies about the impact of outdoor air pollution on asthma in children are heterogeneous, our objective was to investigate the association between asthma exacerbation in children and exposure to air pollutants. A database of 1 264 585 paediatric visits during the 2010-2015 period to the emergency rooms from 20 emergency departments (EDs) of 'Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP)', the largest hospital group in Europe, was used. A total of 47 107 visits were classified as asthma exacerbations. Concentration of air pollutants (nitrogen dioxide, ozone, fine particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10  µm (PM10) and 2.5 µm (PM2.5)), as well as meteorological data, evolution of respiratory syncytial virus infection and pollen exposition, were collected on an hourly or daily basis for the same period using institutional databases. To assess the association between air pollution and asthma, mixed-effects quasi-Poisson regression modelling was performed. The only compound independently associated with ED visits for asthma was PM2.5 (Peffect, was estimated at 13.5 µg/m3. We found an association between daily asthma exacerbation in paediatric visits to the ED and fine particulate air pollutants. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. [Prevention of COPD exacerbation: a fundamental challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, N; Aguilaniu, B; Burgel, P-R; Durand-Zaleski, I; Dusser, D; Escamilla, R; Perez, T; Raherison, C; Similowski, T

    2012-06-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are a cause of suffering for patients and a burden for healthcare systems and society. Their prevention represents individual and collective challenge. The present article is based on the work of a group of experts who met on 5th and 6th May 2011 and seeks to highlight the importance of AECOPD. In the absence of easily quantifiable criteria, the definition of AECOPD varies in the literature, making identification difficult and affecting interpretation of study results. Exacerbations increase mortality and risk of cardiovascular disease. They also increase the risk of developing further exacerbations, accelerate the decline in lung function and contribute to reduction in muscle mass. By limiting physical activity and affecting mental state (anxiety, depression), AECOPD are disabling and impair quality of life. They increase work absenteeism and are responsible for about 60% of the global cost of COPD. Earlier identification with simple criteria, possibly associated to patient phenotyping, could be helpful in preventing hospitalization. Given their immediate and delayed impact, AECOPD should not be trivialized or neglected. Their prevention is a fundamental issue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Myasthenia gravis exacerbation and diarrhea associated with erythromycin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sora Yasr

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in management of the case with myasthenia gravis (MG is the control of exacerbation. There are several possible causes of exacerbation of MG including the use of drug. Here, the authors report a case of MG exacerbation and diarrhea associated with erythromycin treatment.

  12. Effects of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine on cerebral blood flow in obsessive-compulsive disorder and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pian, KLH; Westenberg, HGM; den Boer, JA; de Bruin, WI; van Rijk, PP

    1998-01-01

    Background: A number of studies have shown that the serotonin receptor agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) can exacerbate symptoms in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), The aim of the present study was to study the effect of this compound on regional cerebral bloodflow (rCBF)

  13. Medically treated exacerbations in COPD by GOLD 1-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S.; Marott, Jacob L.; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    -up. Construct validity of this definition of medically treated exacerbations was assessed by studying baseline determinants as well as by studying the association between GOLD 1 through 4 grades and time to first exacerbation during follow-up. RESULTS: Among individuals with COPD, 964 individuals (7.1%) had...... definition of exacerbations was robust and without major biases. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to individuals with GOLD 1, the risk of exacerbations was 17-fold for GOLD 4, 5-fold for GOLD 3, and 2-fold for GOLD 2. Medically treated exacerbations defined by register linkage seem a valid, robust, and low...

  14. Stability of the frequent COPD exacerbator in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilev, Mette; Lykkegaard, Jesper; Halling, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Exacerbation frequency is central in treatment strategies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, whether chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients from the general population with frequent exacerbations continue to have frequent exacerbations over an extended period of time...... is currently unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the stability of the frequent exacerbator in a population-based setting. To this end, we conducted a nationwide register-based descriptive study with a 10-year follow-up period of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with at least one...... medically treated exacerbation in 2003. Each subsequent year, we divided the population into frequent, infrequent and non-exacerbators and quantified the flow between categories. Further, we estimated the percentage of frequent exacerbators at baseline who stayed in this category each year during a 5-year...

  15. Rhinovirus-Induced Exacerbations of Asthma and COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershenson, Marc B.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, increasing evidence has shown that, in patients with chronic airways disease, viral infection is the most common cause of exacerbation. This review will examine the evidence for viral-induced exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease and the potential mechanisms by which viruses cause exacerbations. Attention will be focused on rhinovirus, the most common cause of respiratory exacerbations. Exacerbations due to rhinovirus, which infects relatively few cells in the airway and does not cause the cytotoxicity of other viruses such as influenza or respiratory syncytial virus, are particularly poorly understood. While the innate immune response likely plays a role in rhinovirus-induced exacerbations, its precise role, either adaptive or maladaptive, is debated. Because current treatment strategies are only partially effective, further research examining the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying viral-induced exacerbations of chronic airways diseases is warranted. PMID:24278777

  16. Cardiac Amyloidosis and its New Clinical Phenotype: Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Jorge, Antonio José Lagoeiro; Souza, Celso Vale; Andrade, Thais Ribeiro de

    2017-07-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is now an emerging cardiovascular epidemic, being identified as the main phenotype observed in clinical practice. It is more associated with female gender, advanced age and comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity and chronic kidney disease. Amyloidosis is a clinical disorder characterized by the deposition of aggregates of insoluble fibrils originating from proteins that exhibit anomalous folding. Recently, pictures of senile amyloidosis have been described in patients with HFpEF, demonstrating the need for clinical cardiologists to investigate this etiology in suspect cases. The clinical suspicion of amyloidosis should be increased in cases of HFPS where the cardio imaging methods are compatible with infiltrative cardiomyopathy. Advances in cardio imaging methods combined with the possibility of performing genetic tests and identification of the type of amyloid material allow the diagnosis to be made. The management of the diagnosed patients can be done in partnership with centers specialized in the study of amyloidosis, which, together with the new technologies, investigate the possibility of organ or bone marrow transplantation and also the involvement of patients in clinical studies that evaluate the action of the new emerging drugs. Resumo A insuficiência cardíaca com fração de ejeção preservada (ICFEP) é hoje uma epidemia cardiovascular emergente, sendo identificada como o principal fenótipo observado na prática clínica. Está mais associado ao sexo feminino, idade avançada e a comorbidades como hipertensão arterial, diabetes, obesidade e doença renal crônica. A amiloidose é uma desordem clínica caracterizada pelo depósito de agregados de fibrilas insolúveis originadas de proteínas que apresentam dobramento anômalo. Recentemente, têm sido descritos quadros de amiloidose senil em pacientes com ICFEP, demonstrando a necessidade de os cardiologistas clínicos investigarem

  17. Role of the single disulphide bond of beta(2)-microglobulin in amyloidosis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D P; Radford, S E

    2001-09-01

    The aggregation of beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) into amyloid fibrils occurs in the condition known as dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA). The protein has a beta-sandwich fold typical of the immunoglobulin family, which is stabilized by a highly conserved disulphide bond linking Cys25 and Cys80. Oxidized beta(2)m forms amyloid fibrils rapidly in vitro at acidic pH and high ionic strength. Here we investigate the role of the single disulphide bond of beta(2)m in amyloidosis in vitro. We show that reduction of the disulphide bond destabilizes the native protein such that non-native molecules are populated at neutral pH. These species are prone to oligomerization but do not form amyloid fibrils when incubated for up to 8 mo at pH 7.0 in 0.4 M NaCl. Over the pH range 4.0-1.5 in the presence of 0.4 M NaCl, however, amyloid fibrils of reduced beta(2)m are formed. These fibrils are approximately 10 nm wide, but are shorter and assemble more rapidly than those produced from the oxidized protein. These data show that population of non-native conformers of beta(2)m at neutral pH by reduction of its single disulphide bond is not sufficient for amyloid formation. Instead, association of one or more specific partially unfolded molecules formed at acid pH are necessary for the formation of beta(2)m amyloid in vitro. Further experiments will now be needed to determine the role of different oligomeric species of beta(2)m in the toxicity of the protein in vivo.

  18. T1 mapping and survival in systemic light-chain amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banypersad, Sanjay M; Fontana, Marianna; Maestrini, Viviana; Sado, Daniel M; Captur, Gabriella; Petrie, Aviva; Piechnik, Stefan K; Whelan, Carol J; Herrey, Anna S; Gillmore, Julian D; Lachmann, Helen J; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D; Hawkins, Philip N; Moon, James C

    2015-01-21

    To assess the prognostic value of myocardial pre-contrast T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) in systemic amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) T1 mapping. One hundred patients underwent CMR and T1 mapping pre- and post-contrast. Myocardial ECV was calculated at contrast equilibrium (ECV(i)) and 15 min post-bolus (ECVb). Fifty-four healthy volunteers served as controls. Patients were followed up for a median duration of 23 months and survival analyses were performed. Mean ECV(i) was raised in amyloid (0.44 ± 0.12) as was ECV(b) (mean 0.44 ± 0.12) compared with healthy volunteers (0.25 ± 0.02), P ECV(i) of >0.45 carried a hazard ratio (HR) for death of 3.84 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.53-9.61], P = 0.004 and pre-contrast T1 of >1044 ms = HR 5.39 (95% CI: 1.24-23.4), P = 0.02. Extracellular volume after primed infusion and ECVb performed similarly. Isolated post-contrast T1 was non-predictive. In Cox regression models, ECV(i) was independently predictive of mortality (HR = 4.41, 95% CI: 1.35-14.4) after adjusting for E:E', ejection fraction, diastolic dysfunction grade, and NT-proBNP. Myocardial ECV (bolus or infusion technique) and pre-contrast T1 are biomarkers for cardiac AL amyloid and they predict mortality in systemic amyloidosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  19. Amyloid Cardiomyopathy in Hereditary Transthyretin V30M Amyloidosis - Impact of Sex and Amyloid Fibril Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Arvidsson

    Full Text Available Transthyretin V30M (ATTR V30M amyloidosis is a phenotypically diverse disease with symptoms ranging from predominant neuropathy to exclusive cardiac manifestations. The aims of this study were to determine the dispersion of the two types of fibrils found in Swedish ATTR V30M patients -Type A consisting of a mixture of truncated and full length ATTR fibrils and type B fibrils consisting of full length fibrils, and to estimate the severity of cardiac dysfunction in relation to fibril composition and sex.Echocardiographic data were analysed in 107 Swedish ATTR V30M patients with their fibril composition determined as either type A or type B. Measurements of left ventricular (LV dimensions and evaluation of systolic and diastolic function including speckle tracking derived strain were performed. Patients were grouped according to fibril type and sex. Multivariate linear regression was utilised to determine factors of significant impact on LV thickness.There was no significant difference in proportions of the two types of fibrils between men and women. In patients with type A fibrils, women had significantly lower median septal (p = 0.007 and posterior wall thicknesses (p = 0.010, lower median LV mass indexed to height (p = 0.008, and higher septal strain (p = 0.037, as compared to males. These differences were not apparent in patients with type B fibrils. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that fibril type, sex and age all had significant impact on LV septal thickness.This study demonstrates a clear difference between sexes in the severity of amyloid heart disease in ATTR V30M amyloidosis patients. Even though type A fibrils were associated with more advanced amyloid heart disease compared to type B, women with type A fibrils generally developed less cardiac infiltration than men. The differences may explain the better outcome for liver transplanted late-onset female patients compared to males.

  20. Predictors of early treatment failure following initial therapy for systemic immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Nidhi; Sidana, Surbhi; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Dispenzieri, Angela; Gertz, Morie A; Lacy, Martha Q; Kyle, Robert A; Buadi, Francis K; Dingli, David; Hayman, Suzanne R; Fonder, Amie L; Hobbs, Miriam A; Gonsalves, Wilson I; Kapoor, Prashant; Hwa, Yi Lisa; Leung, Nelson; Go, Ronald S; Lust, John A; Russell, Stephen J; Zeldenrust, Steven R; Kumar, Shaji K

    2017-09-01

    We analysed factors predicting early treatment failure (ETF), after first-line therapy for light-chain amyloidosis (AL). AL amyloidosis patients seen at Mayo Clinic within 90 days of diagnosis, from 2006 to 2015, excluding those who died within 3 months of initial therapy, were analysed retrospectively. ETF was defined as progression requiring treatment change or death within 12 (ETF12) or 24 (ETF24) months of first-line treatment. Non-ETF included those with a follow-up of more than 12 or 24 months who had progression beyond 12 or 24 months. A total of 724 patients met the study criteria; 244 (33.7%) had ETF12 and 388 (53.6%) had ETF24. Patients with ETF12 were older (64.1 vs. 62.2 years) with higher prevalence of cardiac (81 vs. 64.1%) and multi-organ involvement (67.2 vs. 45.4%) and higher proportion of patients with t(11; 14) (58.5 vs. 44.3%) or in higher Mayo 2012 stage (58.5 vs. 41.1%).The median follow-up was 5.4 years from start of initial therapy. In multivariate analysis, presence of t(11; 14) and non-incorporation of autologous transplant in initial therapy are significant predictors of ETF12 (p = .01and p = .003) and ETF24 (p = .0001 and p = .005) while Mayo stage is predictive of ETF24 (p = .002), but not ETF12.

  1. Prognostic impact of T2-weighted CMR imaging for cardiac amyloidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassmuth, Ralf; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette [HELIOS Klinikum Berlin Buch, Charite Campus Buch, Berlin (Germany); Abdel-Aty, Hassan [HELIOS Klinikum Berlin Buch, Charite Campus Buch, Berlin (Germany); Cardio Imaging Center Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Bohl, Steffen [HELIOS Klinikum Berlin Buch, Charite Campus Buch, Berlin (Germany); Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) we tested the diagnostic value of various markers for amyloid infiltration. We performed MRI at 1.5 T in 36 consecutive patients with cardiac amyloidosis and 48 healthy volunteers. The protocol included cine imaging, T2-weighted spin echo, T1-weighted spin echo before and early after contrast and late gadolinium enhancement. We compared the frequency of abnormalities and their relation to mortality. Median follow-up was 31 months. Twenty-three patients died. Mean left ventricular (LV) mass was 205 {+-} 70 g. LV ejection fraction (EF) was 55 {+-} 12%. T2 ratio was 1.5 {+-} 0.4. 33/36 patients had pericardial and 22/36 had pleural effusions. All but two had heterogeneous late enhancement. Surviving patients did not differ from those who had died with regard to gender, LV mass or volume. Surviving patients had a significantly higher LVEF (60.4 {+-} 9.9% vs. 51.6 {+-} 11.5%; p = 0.03). The deceased patients had a lower T2 ratio than those who survived (1.38 {+-} 0.42 vs. 1.76 {+-} 0.17; p = 0.005). Low T2 was associated with shorter survival (Chi-squared 11.3; p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed T2 ratio < 1.5 as the only independent predictors for survival. Cardiac amyloidosis is associated with hypointense signal on T2-weighted images. A lower T2 ratio was independently associated with shortened survival. (orig.)

  2. Induction of murine AA amyloidosis by various homogeneous amyloid fibrils and amyloid-like synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Cui, D; Hoshii, Y; Kawano, H; Une, Y; Gondo, T; Ishihara, T

    2007-11-01

    We investigated amyloid-enhancing factor (AEF) activity of amyloid fibrils extracted from amyloid-laden livers of mice, cow, cheetah, cat and swan. All amyloid fibrils were confirmed to be amyloid protein A (AA) by an immunohistochemical analysis. We found that these fibrils accelerated the deposition of amyloid in an experimental mouse model of AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, the degree of deposition was dependent on the concentration of fibrils. When we compared the minimal concentration of amyloid fibrils needed to induce deposition, we found that these fibrils showed different efficiencies. Murine amyloid fibril induced amyloid deposition more efficiently than cow, cat, cheetah or swan amyloid fibrils. These data suggest that amyloid deposition is preferentially induced by amyloid fibrils with the same primary sequence as the endogenous amyloid protein. We then analysed the AEF activity of synthetic peptides, synthesized corresponding to amino acids 1-15 of mouse SAA (mSAA), 2-15 of cow SAA (bSAA), 1-15 of cat SAA (cSAA), which was the same as cheetah, and the common amino acids 33-45 of these four SAA (aSAA). We found that mSAA, bSAA and cSAA formed amyloid-like fibrils in morphology and showed similar AEF properties to those of native amyloid fibrils. Although aSAA also formed highly ordered amyloid-like fibrils, it showed weaker AEF activity than the other synthetic fibrils. Our results indicate that amyloidosis is transmissible between species under certain conditions; however, the efficiency of amyloid deposition is species-specific and appears to be related to the primary amino acid sequence, especially the N-terminal segment of the amyloid protein.

  3. UVRAG Deficiency Exacerbates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Lin; Hu, Xiao-wen; Zhang, Shasha; Hu, Xiaowen; Song, Zongpei; Naz, Amber; Zi, Zhenguo; Wu, Jian; Li, Can; Zou, Yunzeng; He, Lin; Zhu, Hongxin

    2017-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of various types of cancers. However, its clinical application has been largely limited by potential development of cardiotoxicity. Previously we have shown that ultra-violet radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG), an autophagy-related protein, is essential for the maintenance of autophagic flux in the heart under physiological conditions. Here, we sought to determine the role of UVRAG-mediated autophagy in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Mouse models of acute or chronic DOX-induced cardiotoxicity were established. UVRAG deficiency exacerbated DOX-induced mortality and cardiotoxicity manifested by increased cytoplasmic vacuolization, enhanced collagen accumulation, elevated serum activities of lactate dehydrogenase and myocardial muscle creatine kinase, higher ROS levels, aggravated apoptosis and more depressed cardiac function. Autophagic flux was impaired in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. UVRAG deficiency aggravated impaired autophagic flux in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Intermittent fasting restored autophagy and ameliorated pathological alterations of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our data suggest that UVRAG deficiency exacerbates DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, at least in part, through aggravation of DOX-induced impaired autophagic flux. Intermittent fasting, which restores blunted autophagic flux and ameliorates pathology in the mouse models of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, may be used as a potential preventive or therapeutic approach for DOX cardiotoxicity. PMID:28225086

  4. Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    Full Text Available A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. Após realização de biópsia e exame histopatológico, o diagnóstico foi de amiloidose oral, o que foi confirmado com a coloração do espécime com o reagente vermelho congo. Depósitos de amilóide foram encontrados no tecido conjuntivo, na avaliação através da luz polarizada, que apresentou birrefringência. Tal achado foi preocupante, já que a amiloidose geralmente acomete diversos tecidos levando a comprometimentos sistêmicos. Por essa razão a paciente foi encaminhada a procurar atendimento médico. No entanto, houve abandono do tratamento e a mesma veio a óbito 6 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. Lesões orais aparentemente simples podem revelar doenças raras e de difícil tratamento. O diagnóstico preciso e acompanhamentos médicos são fundamentais na sobrevida do paciente.

  5. Cardiac Amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Circulation My alerts Sign In Join Sign out Facebook Twitter Home About this Journal Editorial Board General Statistics Circulation Doodle Information for Advertisers Author Reprints Commercial Reprints Customer Service and Ordering ...

  6. Primary amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tongue, intestines, skeletal and smooth muscles, nerves, skin, ligaments, heart, liver, spleen, and kidneys. Symptoms may include ... have: Decreased urine Difficulty breathing Swelling of the ankles or other body parts that does not go ...

  7. Cerebral vasospasm in acute porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, P; Van Melkebeke, D; Honoré, P-J; Defreyne, L; Hemelsoet, D

    2017-09-01

    Porphyrias are a group of inherited metabolic disorders resulting from a specific deficiency along the pathway of haem biosynthesis. A clinical classification distinguishes acute from non-acute porphyrias considering the occurrence of life-threatening neurovisceral attacks, presenting with abdominal pain, neuropsychiatric disturbance and neuropathy. Vasospasm is a very rare complication that can occur in all major types of acute porphyria. We describe a porphyric crisis with vasospasm in a woman with previously undiagnosed acute porphyria. Furthermore we performed a systematic review by searching the electronic database Pubmed/MEDLINE for additional data in published studies of vasospasm in acute porphyria. Overall, 9 case reports reporting on 11 patients who suffered vasospasm during an exacerbation of acute porphyria were identified. All of the reported patients were women and the mean age was 29.4 years. When brain MRI was performed, T2-hyperintense lesions, consistent with ischaemic changes, were observed in most patients (10/11, 91%). Although the genetic pathogenesis of the disease is well understood, the precise mechanisms to explain neurologic involvement in acute porphyria remain unclear. Acute porphyria is an unusual and rare cause of vasospasm. However, considering porphyria in patients with unexplained cerebral vasospasm, especially in women of childbearing age, is crucial given the severity of possible complications and the available treatment options. © 2017 EAN.

  8. Seasonal Risk Factors for Asthma Exacerbations among Inner City Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teach, Stephen J.; Gergen, Peter J.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Mitchell, Herman E.; Calatroni, Agustin; Wildfire, Jeremy; Bloomberg, Gordon; Kercsmar, Carolyn; Liu, Andrew H.; Makhija, Melanie; Matsui, Elizabeth; Morgan, Wayne; O'Connor, George; Busse, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma remain common even in children and adolescents despite optimal medical management. Identification of host risk factors for exacerbations is incomplete, particularly for seasonal episodes. Objective Define host risk factors for asthma exacerbations unique to their season of occurrence. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients aged 6-20 years who comprised the control groups of the Asthma Control Evaluation trial and the Inner City Anti-IgE Therapy for Asthma trial. Univariate and multivariate models were constructed to determine if patient demographic and historical factors, allergic sensitization, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, spirometric measurements, asthma control, and treatment requirements were associated with seasonal exacerbations. Results The analysis included 400 patients (54.5% male; 59.0% African American; median age 13 years). Exacerbations occurred in 37.5% of participants over the periods of observation and were most common in the fall (28.8% of participants). In univariate analysis, impaired pulmonary function was significantly associated with greater odds of exacerbations for all seasons, as was an exacerbation in the previous season for all seasons except spring. In multivariate analysis, exacerbation in the previous season was the strongest predictor in fall and winter while a higher requirement for inhaled corticosteroids was the strongest predictor in spring and summer. The multivariate models had the best predictive power for fall exacerbations (30.5% variance attributed). Conclusions Among a large cohort of inner city children with asthma, patient risk factors for exacerbations vary by season. Thus, individual patient information may be beneficial in strategies to prevent these seasonal events. Clinical Implications Inner city children remain at risk for asthma exacerbations despite appropriate therapy. Because their risk factors vary by season, strategies to prevent them may need to differ as

  9. Case reports Juvenile idiopathic arthritis complicated by amyloidosis with secondary nephrotic syndrome – effective treatment with tocilizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kwiatkowska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A case report of a boy with juvenile idiopathic arthritis since the age of 2 years, generalized onset, complicated by nephrotic syndrome due to secondary type A amyloidosis is presented. In the patient the disease had an especially severe course, complicated by frequent infections, making routine treatment difficult. Amyloidosis was diagnosed in the 5th year of the disease based on a rectal biopsy. Since the disease onset the boy has been taking prednisolone and sequentially cyclosporine A, methotrexate, chlorambucil, etanercept, and cyclophosphamide. Clinical and laboratory remission was observed after treatment with tocilizumab. After 42 months of treatment with tocilizumab the boy’s condition is good. There is no pain or joint edema, and no signs of nephrotic syndrome.

  10. Response to anti-TNF-α treatment for secondary renal amyloidosis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gallo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Renal amyloidosis is a complication of ankylosing spondylitis. A possible pathogenetic role is due to TNF-α, with a direct action on glomerular receptors TNFR2 and renal injury, secondary to deposition of amyloid fibrils. The most frequent clinical manifestation is proteinuria or nephrotic syndrome. Etanercept, a soluble receptor of TNF-α, binds this circulant cytokine with a progressive improvement of renal function and reduction of deposits of amyloid. Transient leukopenia, observed during ankylosing spondylitis, should not be considered a controindication to the use of Etanercept, but it requires a constant monitoring. The benefit observed in our patient can represent an indication to the use of Etanercept for the management of amyloidosis.

  11. Automated Description of Regional Left Ventricular Motion in Patients With Cardiac Amyloidosis: A Quantitative Study Using Heart Deformation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Leng; Lin, Kai; Collins, Jeremy; Markl, Michael; Carr, James C

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to test the hypothesis that heart deformation analysis can automatically quantify regional myocardial motion patterns in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. Eleven patients with cardiac amyloidosis and 11 healthy control subjects were recruited to undergo cardiac MRI. Cine images were analyzed using heart deformation analysis and feature tracking. Heart deformation analysis-derived myocardial motion indexes in radial and circumferential directions, including radial and circumferential displacement, radial and circumferential velocity, radial and circumferential strain, and radial and circumferential strain rate, were compared between the two groups. The heart deformation analysis tool required a shorter mean (± SD) processing time than did the feature-tracking tool (1.5 ± 0.3 vs 5.1 ± 1.2 minutes). Patients with cardiac amyloidosis had lower peak radial displacement (4.32 ± 1.37 vs 5.62 ± 1.19 mm), radial velocity (25.50 ± 7.70 vs 33.41 ± 5.43 mm/s), radial strain (23.32% ± 10.24% vs 31.21% ± 8.71%), circumferential strain (-13.44% ± 4.21% vs -17.84% ± 2.84%), radial strain rate (1.14 ± 0.46 vs 1.58 ± 0.41 s-1), and circumferential strain rate (-0.78 ± 0.22 vs -1.08 ± 0.20 s-1) than did healthy control subjects. Heart deformation analysis-derived indexes correlated with feature tracking-derived indexes (r = 0.411 and 0.552). Heart deformation analysis is able to automatically quantify regional myocardial motion in patients with cardiac amyloidosis without the need for operator interaction.

  12. Detection of AA76, a Common Form of Amyloid A Protein, as a Way of Diagnosing AA Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junji; Okuda, Yasuaki; Kuroda, Takeshi; Yamada, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Reactive amyloid deposits consist of amyloid A (AA) proteins, the degradation products of serum amyloid A (SAA). Since the most common species of AA is the amino terminal portion produced by cleavage between residues 76 and 77 of SAA (AA76), the presence of AA76 in tissues could be a consequence of AA amyloid deposition. This study assessed the diagnostic significance of the detection of AA76 for AA amyloidosis using two different approaches. Biopsy specimens (n=130 from 54 subjects) from gastroduodenal mucosa or abdominal fat (n=9 from 9 subjects) of patients who had already been diagnosed with or were suspected of having AA amyloidosis were used. Fixed mucosal sections were subjected to immunohistochemistry using a newly developed antibody recognizing the carboxyl terminal end of AA76 (anti-AA76). The non-fixed materials from gastroduodenal mucosa or abdominal fat were subjected to immunoblotting for detection of the size of AA76. Among the gastroduodenal specimens (n=115) from already diagnosed patients, the positive rates of Congo red staining, immunohistochemistry using anti-AA76, and immunoblotting were 68.4%, 73.0%, and 92.2%, respectively. The anti-AA76 did not stain the supposed SAA in the blood or leakage, which was stained by anti-SAA antibody. AA76 was not detected either by immunohistochemistry or by immunoblot in the materials from patients in whom AA amyloidosis had been ruled out. In the abdominal fat, the immunoblot detected AA76 in 8 materials from 8 already diagnosed patients and did not in 1 patient whose gastroduodenal mucosa was negative. In conclusion, the detection of AA76 may alter the ability to diagnose AA amyloidosis. In immunohistochemistry for fixed specimens, the new anti-AA76 antibody can improve the specificity. Immunoblot for non-fixed materials, which can considerably improve the sensitivity, should be beneficial for small materials like abdominal fat. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  13. Utility of abdominal skin plus subcutaneous fat and rectal mucosal biopsy in the diagnosis of AL amyloidosis with renal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Huang, Xianghua; Cheng, Shuiqin; Zhao, Liang; Ren, Guisheng; Chen, Wencui; Wang, Qingwen; Zeng, Caihong; Liu, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    Skin fat biopsy of the abdominal wall is a simple and safe method for detecting amyloidosis, and rectal mucosal biopsy is also frequently used for screening for the disease; however, the sensitivity of these approaches has not been fully studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of skin fat biopsy combined with rectal mucosal biopsy as a screening procedure for the diagnosis of systemic immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) amyloidosis. We retrospectively analyzed 224 AL amyloidosis patients confirmed by renal biopsy, including a test group of 165 patients and validation group of 59 patients. Surgical skin fat biopsy from the abdominal wall and rectal mucosal biopsy under endoscopy was performed to obtain specimens. Congo red staining and immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against light chains were performed to type the disease. Pathology reports were reviewed to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of skin fat biopsy and rectal mucosal biopsy. Diagnostic specificity was not examined in the present study, because no healthy volunteers and only few patients with other diseases had performed immunofluorescence staining on skin fat and rectal specimens. Of the 165 patients in the test group, Congo red staining of skin fat and rectal mucosal specimens was associated with a sensitivity of 89.3% and 94.8%, respectively. The sensitivity increased to 98.9% by combining both biopsy methods. Immunofluorescence stains were positive in 81.1% of patients undergoing skin fat biopsy and 84.7% of patients undergoing rectal mucosal biopsy. Immunofluorescence stains yielded positive results in 86.7% of cases combining skin fat biopsy with rectal mucosal biopsy. The diagnostic results also performed well in the validation group. Surgical skin biopsy including the subcutaneous fat pad can be performed safely at the bedside and is useful for diagnosing AL amyloidosis. Combining skin fat biopsy with rectal mucosal biopsy may identify amyloid deposits in almost all

  14. Utility of abdominal skin plus subcutaneous fat and rectal mucosal biopsy in the diagnosis of AL amyloidosis with renal involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Li

    Full Text Available Skin fat biopsy of the abdominal wall is a simple and safe method for detecting amyloidosis, and rectal mucosal biopsy is also frequently used for screening for the disease; however, the sensitivity of these approaches has not been fully studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of skin fat biopsy combined with rectal mucosal biopsy as a screening procedure for the diagnosis of systemic immunoglobulin light-chain (AL amyloidosis.We retrospectively analyzed 224 AL amyloidosis patients confirmed by renal biopsy, including a test group of 165 patients and validation group of 59 patients. Surgical skin fat biopsy from the abdominal wall and rectal mucosal biopsy under endoscopy was performed to obtain specimens. Congo red staining and immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against light chains were performed to type the disease. Pathology reports were reviewed to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of skin fat biopsy and rectal mucosal biopsy. Diagnostic specificity was not examined in the present study, because no healthy volunteers and only few patients with other diseases had performed immunofluorescence staining on skin fat and rectal specimens.Of the 165 patients in the test group, Congo red staining of skin fat and rectal mucosal specimens was associated with a sensitivity of 89.3% and 94.8%, respectively. The sensitivity increased to 98.9% by combining both biopsy methods. Immunofluorescence stains were positive in 81.1% of patients undergoing skin fat biopsy and 84.7% of patients undergoing rectal mucosal biopsy. Immunofluorescence stains yielded positive results in 86.7% of cases combining skin fat biopsy with rectal mucosal biopsy. The diagnostic results also performed well in the validation group.Surgical skin biopsy including the subcutaneous fat pad can be performed safely at the bedside and is useful for diagnosing AL amyloidosis. Combining skin fat biopsy with rectal mucosal biopsy may identify amyloid deposits in

  15. Measurement of liver and spleen interstitial volume in patients with systemic amyloid light-chain amyloidosis using equilibrium contrast CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Jason; Sivarajan, S; Treibel, T A; Rosmini, S; Fontana, M; Gillmore, J D; Hawkins, P N; Punwani, S; Moon, J C; Taylor, S A; Bandula, S

    2017-11-01

    To investigate equilibrium contrast-enhanced CT (EQ-CT) measurement of extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in patients with systemic amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis, testing the hypothesis that ECV becomes elevated in the liver and spleen and ECV correlates with other estimates of organ amyloid burden. 26 patients with AL amyloidosis underwent EQ-CT, and ECV was measured in the liver and spleen. Patients also underwent serum amyloid P (SAP) component scintigraphy with grading of liver and spleen involvement. Mann-Whitney U test was used to test for a difference between patients with amyloid deposition (SAP grade 1-3) and those without (SAP grade 0). Variation in ECV across SAP grades was assessed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and association between ECV and SAP grades with Spearman correlation. Mean ECV in the spleen and liver was significantly greater (p ECV increased with increasing amyloid burden, showing positive correlation with SAP grade in both the liver (r = 0.758) and spleen (r = 0.867). In patients with systemic AL amyloidosis, EQ-CT can demonstrate increased spleen and liver ECV, which is associated with amyloid disease burden.

  16. Mice with alopecia, osteoporosis, and systemic amyloidosis due to mutation in Zdhhc13, a gene coding for palmitoyl acyltransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir N Saleem

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein palmitoylation has emerged as an important mechanism for regulating protein trafficking, stability, and protein-protein interactions; however, its relevance to disease processes is not clear. Using a genome-wide, phenotype driven N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-mediated mutagenesis screen, we identified mice with failure to thrive, shortened life span, skin and hair abnormalities including alopecia, severe osteoporosis, and systemic amyloidosis (both AA and AL amyloids depositions. Whole-genome homozygosity mapping with 295 SNP markers and fine mapping with an additional 50 SNPs localized the disease gene to chromosome 7 between 53.9 and 56.3 Mb. A nonsense mutation (c.1273A>T was located in exon 12 of the Zdhhc13 gene (Zinc finger, DHHC domain containing 13, a gene coding for palmitoyl transferase. The mutation predicted a truncated protein (R425X, and real-time PCR showed markedly reduced Zdhhc13 mRNA. A second gene trap allele of Zdhhc13 has the same phenotypes, suggesting that this is a loss of function allele. This is the first report that palmitoyl transferase deficiency causes a severe phenotype, and it establishes a direct link between protein palmitoylation and regulation of diverse physiologic functions where its absence can result in profound disease pathology. This mouse model can be used to investigate mechanisms where improper palmitoylation leads to disease processes and to understand molecular mechanisms underlying human alopecia, osteoporosis, and amyloidosis and many other neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding and amyloidosis.

  17. Fibrils from designed non-amyloid-related synthetic peptides induce AA-amyloidosis during inflammation in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Westermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse AA-amyloidosis is a transmissible disease by a prion-like mechanism where amyloid fibrils act by seeding. Synthetic peptides with no amyloid relationship can assemble into amyloid-like fibrils and these may have seeding capacity for amyloid proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Several synthetic peptides, designed for nanotechnology, have been examined for their ability to produce fibrils with Congo red affinity and concomitant green birefringence, affinity for thioflavin S and to accelerate AA-amyloidosis in mice. It is shown that some amphiphilic fibril-forming peptides not only produced Congo red birefringence and showed affinity for thioflavin S, but they also shortened the lag phase for systemic AA-amyloidosis in mice when they were given intravenously at the time of inflammatory induction with silver nitride. Peptides, not forming amyloid-like fibrils, did not have such properties. CONCLUSIONS: These observations should caution researchers and those who work with synthetic peptides and their derivatives to be aware of the potential health concerns.

  18. Auto-SCT improves survival in systemic light chain amyloidosis: a retrospective analysis with 14-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, S; Kongtim, P; Champlin, R; Dinh, Y; Elgharably, Y; Wang, M; Bashir, Q; Shah, J J; Shah, N; Popat, U; Giralt, S A; Orlowski, R Z; Qazilbash, M H

    2014-08-01

    Optimal treatment approach continues to remain a challenge for systemic light chain amyloidosis (AL). So far, Auto-SCT is the only modality associated with long-term survival. However, failure to show survival benefit in randomized study raises questions regarding its efficacy. We present a comparative outcome analysis of Auto-SCT to conventional therapies (CTR) in AL patients treated over a 14-year period at our institution. Out of the 145 AL amyloidosis patients, Auto-SCT was performed in 80 patients with 1-year non-relapse mortality rate of 12.5%. Novel agents were used as part of induction therapy in 56% of transplant recipients vs 46% of CTR patients. Hematological and organ responses were seen in 74.6% and 39% in the Auto-SCT arm vs 53% and 12% in the CTR arm, respectively. The projected 5-year survival for Auto-SCT vs CTR was 63% vs 38%, respectively. Landmark analysis of patients alive at 1-year after diagnosis showed improved 5-year OS of 72% with Auto-SCT vs 65% in the CTR arm. In the multivariate analysis, age Auto-SCT were associated with improved survival. In conclusion, Auto-SCT is associated with long-term survival for patients with AL amyloidosis.

  19. Bacteraemia in cerebral malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enwere, G.; van Hensbroek, M. B.; Adegbola, R.; Palmer, A.; Onyiora, E.; Weber, M.; Greenwood, B.

    1998-01-01

    As part of a treatment trial of cerebral malaria, blood cultures were done in 276 Gambian children, aged between 1 and 9 years, with cerebral malaria. Fourteen (5%) of these were positive. The organisms isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (6), coliforms (4), Pseudomonas spp. (2), Salmonella spp. (1)

  20. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  1. Pidotimod activity against chronic bronchitis exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccia, A

    1994-12-01

    The efficacy of pidotimod ((R)-3-[(S)-(5-oxo-2-pyrrolidinyl) carbonyl]-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, PGT/1A, CAS 121808-62-6) in the management of infectious exacerbations of chronic bronchitis was evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in parallel groups over 5 months (60 days of treatment and 90 days of follow-up). The study enrolled 580 patients, of whom 514 could be evaluated. The pidotimod group had fewer and shorter infectious episodes, fewer days of antibiotic therapy and fewer days unable to undertake normal activities. The difference vs. placebo was significant during the follow-up period and, in those subjects with a less severe history, during the treatment period also. Pidotimod was well tolerated.

  2. Role of antileukotrienes in acute asthma exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lorenzo Urso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute asthma exacerbations are one of the most frequent reasons to visit the emergency department or general practitioner. Although current standard treatments for acute asthma – including supplemental oxygen, short-acting β2-agonists, systemic corticosteroids and anticholinergics – are quite effective in most patients, they are inadequate for rapid and sustained improvement in a significant proportion. The antileukotrienes, a relatively new class of drugs, have a role in the treatment of chronic asthma. Their relatively rapid onset of action after endovenous or oral administration and their additive effect to β2-agonists led to the hypothesis that they might be of benefit in acute asthma. This review examines the efficacy of antileukotrienes in the treatment of acute asthma.

  3. [Treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms and exacerbations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto González, José María

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, there has been an explosion of new drugs acting on the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) but less attention has been paid to better knowledge of the symptoms of this disease and their pathogenesis and treatment, which is essential to improve patients' quality of life. Because many patients have numerous concurrent symptoms during their clinical course, their management is complex and consequently it is important to know which symptoms are a direct result of the degenerative lesions of MS. The present article describes all the therapeutic options available for spasticity and its associated pain, paroxystic symptoms, fatigue, genitourinary disorders and sexual dysfunction, tremor, ataxia, gait disorder and cognitive impairment, with special emphasis on novel treatments. The article also defines exacerbations, how to recognize them and the available treatments, mainly oral administration of high-dose methylprednisolone and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Exacerbating factors of itch in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Murota

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD displays different clinical symptoms, progress, and response to treatment during early infancy and after childhood. After the childhood period, itch appears first, followed by formation of well-circumscribed plaque or polymorphous dermatoses at the same site. When accompanied with dermatitis and dry skin, treatment of skin lesions should be prioritized. When itch appears first, disease history, such as causes and time of appearance of itch should be obtained by history taking. In many cases, itch increases in the evening when the sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Treatment is provided considering that hypersensitivity to various external stimulations can cause itch. Heat and sweating are thought to especially exacerbate itch. Factors causing itch, such as cytokines and chemical messengers, also induce itch mainly by stimulating the nerve. Scratching further aggravates dermatitis. Skin hypersensibility, where other non-itch senses, such as pain and heat, are felt as itch, sometimes occurs in AD. Abnormal elongation of the sensory nerve into the epidermis, as well as sensitizing of the peripheral/central nerve, are possible causes of hypersensitivity, leading to itch. To control itch induced by environmental factors such as heat, treatment for dermatitis is given priority. In the background of itch exacerbated by sweating, attention should be given to the negative impact of sweat on skin homeostasis due to 1 leaving excess sweat on the skin, and 2 heat retention due to insufficient sweating. Excess sweat on the skin should be properly wiped off, and dermatitis should be controlled so that appropriate amount of sweat can be produced. Not only stimulation from the skin surface, but also visual and auditory stimulation can induce new itch. This “contagious itch” can be notably observed in patients with AD. This article reviews and introduces causes of aggravation of itch and information regarding how to cope with such

  5. Exacerbating factors of itch in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) displays different clinical symptoms, progress, and response to treatment during early infancy and after childhood. After the childhood period, itch appears first, followed by formation of well-circumscribed plaque or polymorphous dermatoses at the same site. When accompanied with dermatitis and dry skin, treatment of skin lesions should be prioritized. When itch appears first, disease history, such as causes and time of appearance of itch should be obtained by history taking. In many cases, itch increases in the evening when the sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Treatment is provided considering that hypersensitivity to various external stimulations can cause itch. Heat and sweating are thought to especially exacerbate itch. Factors causing itch, such as cytokines and chemical messengers, also induce itch mainly by stimulating the nerve. Scratching further aggravates dermatitis. Skin hypersensibility, where other non-itch senses, such as pain and heat, are felt as itch, sometimes occurs in AD. Abnormal elongation of the sensory nerve into the epidermis, as well as sensitizing of the peripheral/central nerve, are possible causes of hypersensitivity, leading to itch. To control itch induced by environmental factors such as heat, treatment for dermatitis is given priority. In the background of itch exacerbated by sweating, attention should be given to the negative impact of sweat on skin homeostasis due to 1) leaving excess sweat on the skin, and 2) heat retention due to insufficient sweating. Excess sweat on the skin should be properly wiped off, and dermatitis should be controlled so that appropriate amount of sweat can be produced. Not only stimulation from the skin surface, but also visual and auditory stimulation can induce new itch. This "contagious itch" can be notably observed in patients with AD. This article reviews and introduces causes of aggravation of itch and information regarding how to cope with such causes. Copyright

  6. Incidence and risk factors for exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Z

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Zarqa Ali, Charlotte Suppli UlrikDepartment of Pulmonary Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkBackground: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases among pregnant women. Acute exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy have an unfavorable impact on pregnancy outcome. This review provides an overview of current knowledge of incidence, mechanisms, and risk factors for acute exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy.Methods: A narrative literature review was carried out using the PubMed database.Results: During pregnancy, up to 6% of women with asthma are hospitalized for an acute exacerbation. The maternal immune system is characterized by a very high T-helper-2:T-helper-1 cytokine ratio during pregnancy and thereby provides an environment essential for fetal survival but one that may aggravate asthma. Cells of the innate immune system such as monocytes and neutrophils are also increased during pregnancy, and this too can exacerbate maternal asthma. Severe or difficult-to-control asthma appears to be the major risk factor for exacerbations during pregnancy, but studies also suggest that nonadherence with controller medication and viral infections are important triggers of exacerbations during pregnancy. So far, inconsistent findings have been reported regarding the effect of fetal sex on exacerbations during pregnancy. Other risk factors for exacerbation during pregnancy include obesity, ethnicity, and reflux, whereas atopy does not appear to be a risk factor.Discussion: The incidence of asthma exacerbations during pregnancy is disturbingly high. Severe asthma – better described as difficult-to-control asthma – nonadherence with controller therapy, viral infections, obesity, and ethnicity are likely to be important risk factors for exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy, whereas inconsistent findings have been reported with regard to the importance of sex of the fetus.Keywords: acute exacerbations

  7. Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: current and emerging treatment options for transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hund E

    2012-06-01

    removing the main source of mutant TTR. Recently, orally administered tafamidis meglumine has been approved by European authorities for treatment of FAP. The substance has been shown to stabilize the TTR tetramer, thereby improving the outcome of patients with TTR-FAP. Various other strategies have been studied in vitro to prevent TTR amyloidosis, including gene therapy, immunization, dissolution of TTR aggregates, and free radical scavengers, but none of them is ready for clinical use so far.Keywords: FAP, transthyretin, amyloidosis, treatment, therapy

  8. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, 1-2 Higashi-Takada-cho, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, 604-8845 Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko [Department of Pediatric Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, 603-8323 Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  9. Trends in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, E

    2001-05-01

    The terms trend and cerebral palsy are defined emphazing the non-diagnostic nature of the cerebral palsy label. Criteria necessary for valid estimation of trends include constant methods of estimating population based numerators and denominators over a number of years, which render them hard to obtain, particularly in developing countries. Trends in cerebral palsy are an important source of aetiological hypotheses for congenital cerebral palsy, provide corroborative evidence for existing hypotheses and may direct strategies to prevent post neonatally acquired cerebral palsy. In developed countries the overall frequency of congenital cerebral palsy has changed little during the last decades. However this masks a dramatic increase in the frequency in the infants born most preterm, a decline in those born moderately preterm and little change in those born at term, but the severity of impairments of those born very preterm is decreasing while for those born at term severity in increasing. These changes may be the result of the increasing ability of perinatal care to rescue very vulnerable infants. There is less agreement in trends of post neonatally acquired cerebral palsy which are more sensitive to social well being.

  10. Amiloidose na cavidade bucal: aspectos clínicos, histopatológicos e ultra-estruturais Amyloidosis in the oral cavity: clinical, histopathological and ultrastructural features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rogério de Faria

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Amiloidose refere-se à deposição extracelular e progressiva de proteínas fibrilares patogênicas com características microscópicas e ultra-estruturais similares. A amiloidose pode ser sistêmica ou localizada. Descrevemos três pacientes que desenvolveram amiloidose intra-oral, sendo que dois casos manifestaram amiloidose localizada e o outro caso apresentou amiloidose sistêmica com acometimento de língua. Nos três casos, o exame histopatológico evidenciou depósitos de amilóide, os quais foram confirmados pela coloração de vermelho-congo. A ultra-estrutura mostrou material fibrilar compatível com amilóide. Apesar de infreqüente, a cavidade bucal pode ser um importante local de acometimento de amiloidose.Amyloidosis refers to extracellular and progressive deposition of the fibrilar protein with similar microscopic and ultrastructural features. Amyloid deposits can occur in the localized (one organ or systemic form (several organs. We report three patients which developed intraoral amyloidosis. Two of them were clinical cases which showed localized amyloidosis and another, an autopsied patient with systemic amyloidosis involving the tongue. In these three cases, the histopathologic study displayed amyloid deposits, which were confirmed with stain Congo red and apple-green birefringence under polarized light. Ultrastructural features presented fibrilar material compatible with amyloid. Although uncommon, oral cavity can be involved by amyloidosis.

  11. Acquired cerebral dyschromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G J; Lessell, S

    1977-01-01

    Color blindness developed in five patients apparently because of lesions in the posterior portions of both cerebral hemispheres. Three of them also had symptoms of prosopagnosia. The lesions were neoplastic in two and vascular in three of the patients. It would appear that bilateral, inferior, occipital lobe lesions may be responsible both for acquired cerebral dyschromatopsia and prosopagnosia. Evidence from experimental investigations in primates suggests that the areas of the cerebral hemispheres analogous to those involved in these patients, may be specialized for the processing of colored stimuli.

  12. Determinants of low risk of asthma exacerbation during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of asthma control every 4-6 weeks during pregnancy is recommended to reduce risk of exacerbation, and by that improve outcome. OBJECTIVE: To identify determinants of pregnancies with low risk of asthma exacerbation. METHODS: All pregnant women enrolled into the Management o...... is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  13. Inflammatory biomarkers and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette; Ingebrigtsen, Truls Sylvan; Marott, Jacob Louis

    2013-01-01

    Exacerbations of respiratory symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have profound and long-lasting adverse effects on patients.......Exacerbations of respiratory symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have profound and long-lasting adverse effects on patients....

  14. Blood Eosinophils and Exacerbations in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Krogh, Signe; Nielsen, Sune F; Lange, Peter

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Whether high blood eosinophils are associated with COPD exacerbations among individuals with COPD in the general population is largely unknown. OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that high blood eosinophils predict COPD exacerbations. METHODS: Among 81,668 individuals from the Copenhag...

  15. Detection of rhinovirus-associated asthma exacerbations using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    INTRODUCTION. Acute asthma exacerbation is a cause of strong concern among children and parents and represents a challenge for pediatric healthcare providers1. Studies reported the issue of “virus-induced exacerbation in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease” and evidence of viral infection is found in ...

  16. Factors associated with change in exacerbation frequency in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donaldson, Gavin C; Müllerova, Hanna; Locantore, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be categorized as having frequent (FE) or infrequent (IE) exacerbations depending on whether they respectively experience two or more, or one or zero exacerbations per year. Although most patients do not change category from year...

  17. Prevalence and pattern of asthma exacerbation in children seen at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute exacerbation is a major cause of morbidity in asthmatic children. It can occur even in well controlled asthma. Aim: To determine the prevalence and pattern of acute exacerbation of asthma in children seen at the emergency room of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu. Materials ...

  18. Incidence and risk factors for exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases among pregnant women. Acute exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy have an unfavorable impact on pregnancy outcome. This review provides an overview of current knowledge of incidence, mechanisms, and risk factors for acute exacerbations of asthma...

  19. Increased neutrophil expression of pattern recognition receptors during COPD exacerbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Simon D.; Van Geffen, Wouter H.; Jonker, Marnix R.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Heijink, Irene H.

    Previously, we observed increased serum levels of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) during COPD exacerbations. Here, gene expression of DAMP receptors was measured in peripheral blood neutrophils of COPD patients during stable disease and severe acute exacerbation. The expression of

  20. Acute exacerbations and pulmonary hypertension in advanced idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Judge, Eoin P

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for and outcomes of acute exacerbations in patients with advanced idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and to examine the relationship between disease severity and neovascularisation in explanted IPF lung tissue. 55 IPF patients assessed for lung transplantation were divided into acute (n=27) and non-acute exacerbation (n=28) groups. Haemodynamic data was collected at baseline, at the time of acute exacerbation and at lung transplantation. Histological analysis and CD31 immunostaining to quantify microvessel density (MVD) was performed on the explanted lung tissue of 13 transplanted patients. Acute exacerbations were associated with increased mortality (p=0.0015). Pulmonary hypertension (PH) at baseline and acute exacerbations were associated with poor survival (p<0.01). PH at baseline was associated with a significant risk of acute exacerbations (HR 2.217, p=0.041). Neovascularisation (MVD) was significantly increased in areas of cellular fibrosis and significantly decreased in areas of honeycombing. There was a significant inverse correlation between mean pulmonary artery pressure and MVD in areas of honeycombing. Acute exacerbations were associated with significantly increased mortality in patients with advanced IPF. PH was associated with the subsequent development of an acute exacerbation and with poor survival. Neovascularisation was significantly decreased in areas of honeycombing, and was significantly inversely correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure in areas of honeycombing.

  1. Exacerbation of Brain Injury by Post-Stroke Exercise Is Contingent Upon Exercise Initiation Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengwu Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that post-stroke physical rehabilitation may reduce morbidity. The effectiveness of post-stroke exercise, however, appears to be contingent upon exercise initiation. This study assessed the hypothesis that very early exercise exacerbates brain injury, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and promotes energy failure. A total of 230 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery (MCA occlusion for 2 h, and randomized into eight groups, including two sham injury control groups, three non-exercise and three exercise groups. Exercise was initiated after 6 h, 24 h and 3 days of reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after completion of exercise (and at corresponding time points in non-exercise controls, infarct volumes and apoptotic cell death were examined. Early brain oxidative metabolism was quantified by examining ROS, ATP and NADH levels 0.5 h after completion of exercise. Furthermore, protein expressions of angiogenic growth factors were measured in order to determine whether post-stroke angiogenesis played a role in rehabilitation. As expected, ischemic stroke resulted in brain infarction, apoptotic cell death and ROS generation, and diminished NADH and ATP production. Infarct volumes and apoptotic cell death were enhanced (p < 0.05 by exercise that was initiated after 6 h of reperfusion, but decreased by late exercise (24 h, 3 days. This exacerbated brain injury at 6 h was associated with increased ROS levels (p < 0.05, and decreased (p < 0.05 NADH and ATP levels. In conclusion, very early exercise aggravated brain damage, and early exercise-induced energy failure with ROS generation may underlie the exacerbation of brain injury. These results shed light on the manner in which exercise initiation timing may affect post-stroke rehabilitation.

  2. Exacerbation of Brain Injury by Post-Stroke Exercise Is Contingent Upon Exercise Initiation Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengwu; Geng, Xiaokun; Khan, Hajra; Pendy Jr., John T.; Peng, Changya; Li, Xiaorong; Rafols, Jose A.; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that post-stroke physical rehabilitation may reduce morbidity. The effectiveness of post-stroke exercise, however, appears to be contingent upon exercise initiation. This study assessed the hypothesis that very early exercise exacerbates brain injury, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and promotes energy failure. A total of 230 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion for 2 h, and randomized into eight groups, including two sham injury control groups, three non-exercise and three exercise groups. Exercise was initiated after 6 h, 24 h and 3 days of reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after completion of exercise (and at corresponding time points in non-exercise controls), infarct volumes and apoptotic cell death were examined. Early brain oxidative metabolism was quantified by examining ROS, ATP and NADH levels 0.5 h after completion of exercise. Furthermore, protein expressions of angiogenic growth factors were measured in order to determine whether post-stroke angiogenesis played a role in rehabilitation. As expected, ischemic stroke resulted in brain infarction, apoptotic cell death and ROS generation, and diminished NADH and ATP production. Infarct volumes and apoptotic cell death were enhanced (p exercise that was initiated after 6 h of reperfusion, but decreased by late exercise (24 h, 3 days). This exacerbated brain injury at 6 h was associated with increased ROS levels (p exercise aggravated brain damage, and early exercise-induced energy failure with ROS generation may underlie the exacerbation of brain injury. These results shed light on the manner in which exercise initiation timing may affect post-stroke rehabilitation. PMID:29051728

  3. Immune Responses in Rhinovirus-Induced Asthma Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, John W; Borish, Larry

    2016-11-01

    Acute asthma exacerbations are responsible for urgent care visits and hospitalizations; they interfere with school and work productivity, thereby driving much of the morbidity and mortality associated with asthma. Approximately 80 to 85 % of asthma exacerbations in children, adolescents, and less frequently adults are associated with viral upper respiratory tract viral infections, and rhinovirus (RV) accounts for ∼60-70 % of these virus-associated exacerbations. Evidence suggests that it is not the virus itself but the nature of the immune response to RV that drives this untoward response. In particular, evidence supports the concept that RV acts to exacerbate an ongoing allergic inflammatory response to environmental allergens present at the time of the infection. The interaction of the ongoing IgE- and T cell-mediated response to allergen superimposed on the innate and adaptive immune responses to the virus and how this leads to triggering of an asthma exacerbation is discussed.

  4. A Novel Missense Mutation in Oncostatin M Receptor Beta Causing Primary Localized Cutaneous Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Saeedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis (PLCA is a chronic skin disorder, caused by amyloid material deposition in the upper dermis. Autosomal dominant PLCA has been mapped earlier to pathogenic missense mutations in the OSMR gene, which encodes the oncostatin M receptor ß subunit (OSMRß. OSMRß is interleukin-6 family cytokine receptors and possesses two ligands, oncostatin M and interleukin-31, which both have biologic roles in inflammation and keratinocyte cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we identified a new OSMR mutation in a Kurdish family for the first time. Blood samples were taken from all the affected individuals in the family. DNA extraction was performed using salting out technique. Primers were designed for intron flanking individual exons of OSMR gene which were subjected to direct sequencing after PCR amplification for each sample. Sequencing showed a C/T substitution at position 613 in the proband. This mutation results in an L613S (leucine 613 to serine amino acid change. The identified mutation was observed in all affected family members but not in 100 ethnically matched healthy controls. Elucidating the molecular basis of familial PLCA provides new insight into mechanisms of itch in human skin and may lead to new therapeutic targets for pruritus.

  5. Germinal centre protein HGAL promotes lymphoid hyperplasia and amyloidosis via BCR-mediated Syk activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Natkunam, Yasodha; Lu, Xiaoqing; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Gonzalez-Herrero, Ines; Flores, Teresa; Garcia, Juan Luis; McNamara, George; Kunder, Christian; Zhao, Shuchun; Segura, Victor; Fontan, Lorena; Martínez-Climent, Jose A; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Theis, Jason D; Dogan, Ahmet; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Green, Michael R; Alizadeh, Ash A; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Lossos, Izidore S

    2013-01-01

    The human germinal centre-associated lymphoma gene is specifically expressed in germinal centre B-lymphocytes and germinal centre-derived B-cell lymphomas, but its function is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that human germinal centre-associated lymphoma directly binds to Syk in B cells, increases its kinase activity on B-cell receptor stimulation and leads to enhanced activation of Syk downstream effectors. To further investigate these findings in vivo, human germinal centre-associated lymphoma transgenic mice were generated. Starting from 12 months of age these mice developed polyclonal B-cell lymphoid hyperplasia, hypergammaglobulinemia and systemic reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, leading to shortened survival. The lymphoid hyperplasia in the human germinal centre-associated lymphoma transgenic mice are likely attributable to enhanced B-cell receptor signalling as shown by increased Syk phosphorylation, ex vivo B-cell proliferation and increased RhoA activation. Overall, our study shows for the first time that the germinal centre protein human germinal centre-associated lymphoma regulates B-cell receptor signalling in B-lymphocytes which, without appropriate control, may lead to B-cell lymphoproliferation.

  6. Progressive cranial nerve involvement and grading of facial paralysis in gelsolin amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlamaa, Tiia; Salmi, Tapani; Suominen, Sinikka; Kiuru-Enari, Sari

    2016-05-01

    Hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (GA) is a rare condition caused by the gelsolin gene mutation. The diagnostic triad includes corneal lattice dystrophy (type 2), progressive bilateral facial paralysis, and cutis laxa. Detailed information on facial paralysis in GA and the extent of cranial nerve injury is lacking. 29 GA patients undergoing facial corrective surgery were interviewed, examined, and studied electroneurophysiologically. All showed dysfunction of facial (VII) and trigeminal (V) nerves, two-thirds of oculomotor (III) and hypoglossal (XII) nerves, and half of vestibulocochlear (acoustic) (VIII) nerve. Clinical involvement of frontal, zygomatic, and buccal facial nerve branches was seen in 97%, 83%, and 52% of patients, respectively. Electromyography showed marked motor unit potential loss in facial musculature. Cranial nerve involvement in GA is more widespread than previously described, and correlates with age, severity of facial paralysis, and electromyographic findings. We describe a grading method for bilateral facial paralysis in GA, which is essential for evaluation of disease progression and the need for treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Diagnosis of primary tracheobronchial amyloidosis by multiplanar reconstruction of the computed tomography combined with bronchoscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Wang, Lei; Asmit, Thakur; Wang, Chunbao; Wang, Yuan

    2015-10-01

    To summarize the specific CT characteristics and the endoscopic findings of primary tracheobronchial amyloidosis (PTBA) for improvement of the diagnostic accuracy.
 The imaging features of 6 patients with PTBA were analyzed by multiplanar reconstructed CT and the fiberoptic bronchoscope, and the pathology were summarized retrospectively.
 All PTBA patients received bronchoscopic examination and the definite diagnosis were confirmed by positive staining with Congo red. PTBA presented diffuse thickening of major airway and lumen stenosis in various degrees with scattered hemorrhage of the mucous membrane under CT and bronchoscope, which was more obvious in low part of trachea, main bronchus and lobar bronchus. The mucosa of trachea and bilateral main bronchi were irregular and bumpy with jutting nodes in 5 patients, which was called "wavy path" pattern. Widely nodular or stripy calcifications of airway were found in 4 patients, which was considered as specific imaging features in PTBA and was involved bilateral main bronchi largely. There were obstructive atelectasis in 2 patients, and calcifications of hilus of lung with longitudinal diaphragm lymph nodes in 3 patients, but they were not specific. Ignoring the extensive circumferential thickening of large airway, "wavy path sign" and rail-like calcification was mainly responsible for misdiagnosis of PTBA as endobronchial tuberculosis or other diseases.
 Attentions to the specific imaging features on multiplanar CT and the endoscopic findings are the fundamentals to avoid the misdiagnosis of PTBA.

  8. Neonatal Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The presentation, treatment, and outcome of neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (SVT were studied in 42 children, using neurology clinic records (1986-2005 at Indiana University School of Medicine.

  9. Cerebral Manifestations of Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Brussé (Ingrid)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis intends to describe and explain the course of clinical neurophysiological and neuropsychological parameters in patients with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. We aimed to improve knowledge on cerebral pathophysiological mechanisms of preeclampsia related to signs and

  10. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Division of Neuroscience Director, NIH BRAIN Initiative® Health Scientist Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research Featured Director's Message menu search Enter Search Term Submit Search Cerebral Cavernous Malformation ...

  11. Dysphagia in cerebral palsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Annamaria Salghetti; Andrea Martinuzzi

    2012-01-01

      Feeding problems are often present in children with neuromotor impairment: dysphagia is usually seen in the most severe form of cerebral palsy and it's defined as the difficulty with any of the four phases of swallowing...

  12. Exacerbation of colon carcinogenesis by Blastocystis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide and the number is increasing every year. Despite advances in screening programs, CRC remains as the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer (CRC) and has been shown to be associated with Blastocystis sp., a common intestinal microorganism. In the present study, we aimed to identify a role for Blastocystis sp. in exacerbating carcinogenesis using in vivo rat model. Methylene blue staining was used to identify colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and adenomas formation in infected rats whilst elevation of oxidative stress biomarker levels in the urine and serum samples were evaluated using biochemical assays. Histological changes of the intestinal mucosa were observed and a significant number of ACF was found in Blastocystis sp. infected AOM-rats compared to the AOM-controls. High levels of urinary oxidative indices including advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP) and hydrogen peroxide were observed in Blastocystis sp. infected AOM-rats compared to the uninfected AOM-rats. Our study provides evidence that Blastocystis sp. has a significant role in enhancing AOM-induced carcinogenesis by resulting damage to the intestinal epithelium and promoting oxidative damage in Blastocystis sp. infected rats. PMID:28859095

  13. Cerebral Palsy in Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lucila Merino Marcos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty-five years, a number of important films have been made in which the protagonist or supporting actor has had, or simulated having, cerebral palsy.  On occasion, these characters have been played by people with disabilities.  In the course of this field’s history, films have portrayed many diverse aspects of cerebral palsy such as healthcare and social and familial obligations.

  14. Cerebral venous angiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author).

  15. Acute ischemic cerebral attack

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-Garcia Samir; Barreiro-Pinto Belis

    2010-01-01

    The decrease of the cerebral blood flow below the threshold of autoregulation led to changes of cerebral ischemia and necrosis that traduce in signs and symtoms of focal neurologic dysfunction called acute cerebrovascular symdrome (ACS) or stroke. Two big groups according to its etiology are included in this category the hemorragic that constitue a 20% and the ischemic a 80% of cases. Great interest has wom the ischemic ACS because of its high social burden, being the third cause of no violen...

  16. Experimental transmission of AA amyloidosis by injecting the AA amyloid protein into interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Uchida, K; Chambers, J K; Tei, M; Shoji, A; Ushio, N; Nakayama, H

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of AA amyloidosis is high in humans with rheumatoid arthritis and several animal species, including cats and cattle with prolonged inflammation. AA amyloidosis can be experimentally induced in mice using severe inflammatory stimuli and a coinjection of AA amyloid; however, difficulties have been associated with transmitting AA amyloidosis to a different animal species, and this has been attributed to the "species barrier." The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mouse, a rodent model of human rheumatoid arthritis, has been used in the transmission of AA amyloid. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with mouse AA amyloid together with a subcutaneous pretreatment of 2% AgNO3, all mice from both strains that were injected with crude or purified murine AA amyloid developed AA amyloidosis. However, the amyloid index, which was determined by the intensity of AA amyloid deposition, was significantly higher in IL-1raKO mice than in BALB/c mice. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified bovine AA amyloid together with the pretreatment, 83% (5/6 cases) and 38% (3/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 17% (1/6 cases) and 0% (0/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. Similarly, when IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified feline AA amyloid, 33% (2/6 cases) and 88% (7/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 0% (0/6 cases) and 29% (2/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. These results indicated that IL-1raKO mice are a useful animal model for investigating AA amyloidogenesis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  18. Virus-induced exacerbations in asthma and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke eKurai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and/or airflow limitation due to pulmonary emphysema. Chronic bronchitis, pulmonary emphysema, and bronchial asthma may all be associated with airflow limitation; therefore, exacerbation of asthma may be associated with the pathophysiology of COPD. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that the exacerbation of asthma, namely virus-induced asthma, may be associated with a wide variety of respiratory viruses.COPD and asthma have different underlying pathophysiological processes and thus require individual therapies. Exacerbation of both COPD and asthma, which are basically defined and diagnosed by clinical symptoms, is associated with a rapid decline in lung function and increased mortality. Similar pathogens, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and coronavirus, are also frequently detected during exacerbation of asthma and/or COPD. Immune response to respiratory viral infections, which may be related to the severity of exacerbation in each disease, varies in patients with both COPD and asthma. In this regard, it is crucial to recognize and understand both the similarities and differences of clinical features in patients with COPD and/or asthma associated with respiratory viral infections, especially in the exacerbative stage.In relation to definition, epidemiology, and pathophysiology, this review aims to summarize current knowledge concerning exacerbation of both COPD and asthma by focusing on the clinical significance of associated respiratory virus infections.

  19. Can meteorological factors forecast asthma exacerbation in a paediatric population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervás, D; Utrera, J F; Hervás-Masip, J; Hervás, J A; García-Marcos, L

    2015-01-01

    Asthma exacerbations attended in emergency departments show a marked seasonality in the paediatric age. This seasonal pattern can change from one population to another and the factors involved are poorly understood. To evaluate the association between meteorological factors and schooling with asthma exacerbations in children attended in the paediatric emergency department of a district hospital. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of children 5-14 years of age attended for asthma exacerbations during a 4-year period (2007-2011). Climatic data were obtained from a weather station located very close to the population studied. The number of asthma exacerbations was correlated to temperature, barometric pressure, relative humidity, rainfall, wind speed, wind distance, solar radiation, water vapour pressure and schooling, using regression analyses. During the study period, 371 children were attended for asthma exacerbations; median age was eight years (IQR: 6-11), and 59% were males. Asthma exacerbations showed a bimodal pattern with peaks in spring and summer. Maximum annual peak occurred in week 39, within 15 days from school beginning after the summer holidays. A regression model with mean temperature, water vapour pressure, relative humidity, maximum wind speed and schooling could explain 98.4% (pschooling could predict asthma exacerbations in children attended in a paediatric emergency department. Copyright © 2013 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Liver Transplantation Is a Potential Treatment Option for Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis Patients with Dominant Hepatic Involvement: A Case Report and Analytical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Akihiro; Katoh, Nagaaki; Aramaki, Osamu; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Systemic light chain (AL) amyloidosis is caused by abnormal plasma cell clones producing amyloidogenic light chains. The standard treatment is therefore chemotherapy targeting these clones, however, some patients are ineligible due to liver dysfunction. For these patients, preceding liver transplantation (LT) and following chemotherapy is a possible treatment option. We herein report a 58-year-old man with advanced hepatic AL amyloidosis who was successfully treated using this strategy. Previously reported cases treated with LT for this condition were reviewed, however, the outcomes were not favorable. We additionally investigated potential prognostic factors of this treatment approach to improve the outcome of these patients.

  1. Amyloidosis of the Breast with Multicentric DCIS and Pleomorphic Invasive Lobular Carcinoma in a Patient with Underlying Extranodal Castleman’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an interesting case of focal amyloidosis of the left breast which was intermixed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS. On subsequent staging bilateral breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, the patient was found to have an additional suspicious enhancing mass with spiculated borders within the left breast. This mass was biopsy proven to represent pleomorphic invasive lobular carcinoma. A pulmonary nodule within the lingula was also noted on the staging bilateral breast MRI and was biopsy proven to represent extranodal Castleman’s disease. Therefore, it is believed that our patient had secondary amyloidosis due to Castleman’s disease.

  2. Acute kidney injury in stable COPD and at exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakat MF

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available MF Barakat,1 HI McDonald,1 TJ Collier,1 L Smeeth,1 D Nitsch,1 JK Quint1,2 1Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK Background: While acute kidney injury (AKI alone is associated with increased mortality, the incidence of hospital admission with AKI among stable and exacerbating COPD patients and the effect of concurrent AKI at COPD exacerbation on mortality is not known.Methods: A total of 189,561 individuals with COPD were identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Using Poisson and logistic regressions, we explored which factors predicted admission for AKI (identified in Hospital Episode Statistics in this COPD cohort and concomitant AKI at a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. Using survival analysis, we investigated the effect of concurrent AKI at exacerbation on mortality (n=36,107 and identified confounding factors.Results: The incidence of AKI in the total COPD cohort was 128/100,000 person-years. The prevalence of concomitant AKI at exacerbation was 1.9%, and the mortality rate in patients with AKI at exacerbation was 521/1,000 person-years. Male sex, older age, and lower glomerular filtration rate predicted higher risk of AKI or death. There was a 1.80 fold (95% confidence interval: 1.61, 2.03 increase in adjusted mortality within the first 6 months post COPD exacerbation in patients suffering from AKI and COPD exacerbation compared to those who were AKI free.Conclusion: In comparison to previous studies on general populations and hospitalizations, the incidence and prevalence of AKI is relatively high in COPD patients. Coexisting AKI at exacerbation is prognostic of poor outcome. Keywords: acute renal failure, mortality, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, prognosis

  3. Monitoring of cerebral haemodynamics in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liem, K Djien; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The most important cerebrovascular injuries in newborn infants, particularly in preterm infants, are cerebral haemorrhage and ischemic injury. The typical cerebral vascular anatomy and the disturbance of cerebral haemodynamics play important roles in the pathophysiology. The term 'cerebral...

  4. Crohn's Disease Exacerbation Induced by Edwardsiella tarda Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Aman V; Rostom, Alaa; Dong, Wei-Feng; Flynn, Andrew N

    2011-09-01

    Exacerbations of Crohn's disease are not infrequently associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The recognition of synchronous infections in such patients is vital for the initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, the detection of active bacterial infections may lead the clinician to delay starting biological therapy. We report here a man presenting with an exacerbation of his Crohn's disease during a trip to Thailand. Stool cultures were positive for the unusual gut pathogen Edwardsiella tarda. The patient's symptoms resolved with concurrent antibiotic and steroid therapy. This finding demonstrates the value of performing stool culture in all patients presenting with exacerbations of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  5. Crohn’s Disease Exacerbation Induced by Edwardsiella tarda Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman V. Arya

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Exacerbations of Crohn’s disease are not infrequently associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The recognition of synchronous infections in such patients is vital for the initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, the detection of active bacterial infections may lead the clinician to delay starting biological therapy. We report here a man presenting with an exacerbation of his Crohn’s disease during a trip to Thailand. Stool cultures were positive for the unusual gut pathogen Edwardsiella tarda. The patient’s symptoms resolved with concurrent antibiotic and steroid therapy. This finding demonstrates the value of performing stool culture in all patients presenting with exacerbations of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  6. Structural Changes in Synapses in the Hippocampus of a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Aß amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderman, Andreas; Jensen, George Bach; West, Mark

     This project examines the extent to which synaptic morphology is altered by the gradual in vivo build up of beta amyloid (Aß) protein in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) Aß amyloidosis. It constitutes a test of the amyloid cascade hypothesis for the development of Alzheimer's......'s Disease (AD), which, in its extended form, predicts that alterations in synapses during the early stages of the disease ultimately lead to the development of plaques, tangles and neuron death.              ...

  7. Fractional 1,550 nm Ytterbium/Erbium fiber laser in the treatment of lichen amyloidosis: clinical and histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchaprateep, Ratchathorn; Tusgate, Sai; Munavalli, Girish S; Noppakun, Nopadon

    2015-03-01

    Lichen amyloidosis is characterized by amyloid deposition in the papillary dermis, presenting clinically with intensely pruritic hyperkeratotic papules. Various treatment modalities have been used but the results are generally unsatisfactory. Several studies show that non-ablative fractional lasers can be used to treat depositional diseases due to their capability of inducing transepidermal elimination of the dermal content. To investigate the efficacy and safety of a non-ablative fractional 1,550 nm Yttrium/Erbium fiber laser for the treatment of lichen amyloidosis. Ten subjects with a clinical and histological diagnosis of lichen amyloidosis were treated with fractional non-ablative laser using a 7-cm tip, with the parameter of 30 mJ/cm2 and 1,000 microscopic treatment zones (MTZ)/cm2 for three sessions at 4-week intervals. Clinical improvement (in terms of global improvement score, brownish/hyperpigmentation, thickness, and number of papules) was evaluated using a quartile grading scale at baseline, and 4, 12, and 24 weeks after the last treatment. Itch score and subjective satisfaction rates were also assessed. Adverse events were recorded, and pain was scored using a visual analog scale (VAS). Histologic changes were observed using standard staining with hematoxylin and eosin, as well as special stains of alkaline congo red and crystal violet at baseline and 4 weeks after treatment. At 4 and 24 weeks after treatment, the lichen amyloid lesions had statistically significantly improved in all aspects compared to baseline (P = 0.01 and P = 0.016, respectively; Wilcoxon signed-rank test). However, partial recurrence was reported in 2 out of 10 subjects. All subjects rated itching symptom significantly improved after only the first treatment (P material deposition in the papillary dermis. There was no amyloid material deposition noted in two out of eight histopathology studies. The non-ablative fractional 1,550 nm Ytterbium/Erbium fiber laser is

  8. Isolated primary amyloidosis of the inferior rectus muscle mimicking Graves' orbitopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Mário Luiz Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Allan Christian Pieroni; Bezerra, Alanna Mara Pinheiro Sobreira

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of Graves' orbitopathy is usually straightforward. However, orbital diseases that mimick some clinical signs of Graves' orbitopathy may cause diagnostic confusion, particularly when associated to some form of thyroid dysfunction. This report describes the rare occurrence of localized inferior rectus muscle amyloidosis in a patient with autoimmune hypothyroidism, who was misdiagnosed as Graves' orbitopathy. A 48-year-old man complained of painless progressive proptosis on the left side and intermittent vertical diplopia for 6 months. The diagnosis of Graves' orbitopathy was entertained after magnetic resonance imaging revealing a markedly enlarged, tendon-sparing inferior rectus enlargement on the left side, and an autoimmune hypothyroidism was disclosed on systemic medical workup. After no clinical improvement with treatment, the patient was referred to an ophthalmologist and further investigation was performed. The presence of calcification in the inferior rectus muscle on computed tomography, associated with the clinical findings led to a diagnostic biopsy, which revealed amyloid deposition. This report emphasizes that a careful evaluation of atypical forms of Graves' orbitopathy may be crucial and should include, yet with rare occurrence, amyloidosis in its differential diagnosis. RESUMO O diagnóstico de orbitopatia de Graves usualmente é fácil de ser estabelecido. No entanto, doenças da órbita que simulam alguns sinais clínicos da orbitopatia de Graves podem levar à confusão diagnóstica, particularmente quando associada à alguma forma de disfunção tireoidiana. Relatamos a ocorrência rara de amiloidose localizada no músculo reto inferior em paciente com hipotireoidismo autoimune, que recebeu inicialmente o diagnóstico errôneo de orbitopatia de Graves. Paciente masculino, 48 anos, com queixa de proptose progressiva e indolor do lado esquerdo e diplopia vertical intermitente há 6 meses. O diagnóstico de orbitopatia de Graves foi

  9. Resting state FMRI reveals diminished functional connectivity in a mouse model of amyloidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disha Shah

    Full Text Available Functional connectivity (FC studies have gained immense popularity in the evaluation of several neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. AD is a complex disorder, characterised by several pathological features. The problem with FC studies in patients is that it is not straightforward to focus on a specific aspect of pathology. In the current study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI is applied in a mouse model of amyloidosis to assess the effects of amyloid pathology on FC in the mouse brain.Nine APP/PS1 transgenic and nine wild-type mice (average age 18.9 months were imaged on a 7T MRI system. The mice were anesthetized with medetomidine and rsfMRI data were acquired using a gradient echo EPI sequence. The data were analysed using a whole brain seed correlation analysis and interhemispheric FC was evaluated using a pairwise seed analysis. Qualitative histological analyses were performed to assess amyloid pathology, inflammation and synaptic deficits.The whole brain seed analysis revealed an overall decrease in FC in the brains of transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice. The results showed that interhemispheric FC was relatively preserved in the motor cortex of the transgenic mice, but decreased in the somatosensory cortex and the hippocampus when compared to the wild-type mice. The pairwise seed analysis confirmed these results. Histological analyses confirmed the presence of amyloid pathology, inflammation and synaptic deficits in the transgenic mice.In the current study, rsfMRI demonstrated decreased FC in APP/PS1 transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice in several brain regions. The APP/PS1 transgenic mice had advanced amyloid pathology across the brain, as well as inflammation and synaptic deficits surrounding the amyloid plaques. Future studies should longitudinally evaluate APP/PS1 transgenic mice and correlate the rsfMRI findings to specific stages of amyloid pathology.

  10. Technetium pyrophosphate uptake in transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis: Associations with echocardiographic disease severity and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranian, Michael N; Sperry, Brett W; Hanna, Mazen; Hachamovitch, Rory; Ikram, Asad; Brunken, Richard C; Jaber, Wael A

    2017-01-03

    Quantitative uptake of Technetium 99 m-pyrophosphate (TcPYP) is sensitive and specific for diagnosing transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis (ATTR). We sought to examine the association between TcPYP uptake intensity and echocardiographic measures of disease severity and clinical outcomes. A retrospective analysis was performed of 75 patients who underwent TcPYP scintigraphy. Planar images were evaluated semiquantitatively and using heart-to-contralateral lung (H/CL) ratio. The associations between H/CL ratio and echocardiographic parameters and outcomes were evaluated using linear regression and Cox models, respectively. There were 48 patients diagnosed with ATTR with mean H/CL ratio 1.58 ± 0.22 (vs 1.08 ± 0.09 if semiquantitative score = 0). The H/CL ratio was not associated with any measured echocardiographic parameter. Both semiquantitative uptake grade and H/CL ratio were associated with all-cause mortality (P = 0.009 and 0.007, respectively) and all-cause mortality or heart failure hospitalization (P = 0.001 and 0.020, respectively); however, neither were associated with outcomes when limited to patients with confirmed ATTR (P = 0.18 and 0.465, respectively). In patients with suspected ATTR, quantitative and semiquantitative uptake intensity of TcPYP is associated with all-cause mortality as well as all-cause mortality or heart failure hospitalization. However, in those with confirmed ATTR, there is no association with echocardiographic disease severity or outcomes.

  11. Noninvasive detection of cardiac amyloidosis using delayed enhanced MDCT: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deux, Jean-Francois [University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Cardiac MR Unit, Radiology Department, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, CNRS EAC 4396, Centre de Recherches Chirurgicales, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Reseau Amylose Mondorien, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Mihalache, Cristian-Ionut; Legou, Francois; Luciani, Alain; Kobeiter, Hicham; Rahmouni, Alain [University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Cardiac MR Unit, Radiology Department, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Damy, Thibaud [Reseau Amylose Mondorien, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Cardiology Department, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Mayer, Julie [University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Cardiac MR Unit, Radiology Department, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Reseau Amylose Mondorien, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Rappeneau, Stephane [Reseau Amylose Mondorien, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Plante-Bordeneuve, Violaine [Reseau Amylose Mondorien, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Neurophysiology of Neurology, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate myocardial enhancement of patients with cardiac amyloidosis (CA) using computed tomography (CT). Thirteen patients with CA and 11 control patients were examined with first-pass and delayed CT acquisition. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of images was performed. Myocardial attenuation, myocardial signal-to-noise ratio (SNR{sub myoc}), blood pool SNR (SNR{sub blood}), contrast-to-noise ratio between blood pool and myocardium (CNR{sub blood-myoc}) and relative attenuation index (RAI) defined as variation of myocardial attenuation between delayed and first-pass acquisitions were calculated. Two false negative cases (15 %) and three false positive cases (27 %) were detected on qualitative analysis. SNR{sub myoc} of patients with CA was significantly (p < 0.05) lower on first-pass (4.08 ± 1.9) and higher on delayed acquisition (7.10 ± 2.7) than control patients (6.1 ± 2.2 and 5.03 ± 1.8, respectively). Myocardial attenuation was higher in CA (121 ± 39 HU) than control patients (81 ± 17 HU) on delayed acquisition. CNR{sub blood-myoc} was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in CA (1.51 ± 0.7) than control patients (2.85 ± 1.2) on delayed acquisition. The RAI was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in CA (0.12 ± 0.25) than in control patients (-0.56 ± 0.21). Dual phase MDCT can detect abnormal myocardial enhancement in patients with CA. (orig.)

  12. Neuropathy and efficacy of once weekly subcutaneous bortezomib in multiple myeloma and light chain (AL amyloidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Sidana

    Full Text Available Randomized studies have shown that bortezomib (BTZ can be given weekly via intravenous (IV route or twice weekly via subcutaneous (SC route with lower neuropathy risk and no loss of anti-myeloma efficacy compared to original standard IV twice weekly schedule. Weekly SC should therefore yield the best therapeutic index and is widely used but has not been compared to established administration schedules in the context of a clinical trial.Comprehensive electronic medical record review was done for disease control and neuropathy symptoms of 344 consecutive patients who received their first BTZ-containing regimen for myeloma or AL amyloidosis before or after we changed to SC weekly in December 2010. Univariate and multivariable analyses were carried out that adjusted for age, underlying disease, concurrently used anticancer agents, underlying conditions predisposing to neuropathy, and number of prior regimens compared SC weekly to other schedules.Fifty-three patients received BTZ SC weekly, 17 SC twice weekly, 127 IV weekly and 147 IV twice weekly. Risk for neuropathy of any grade was higher with other schedules compared to SC weekly (44.3% vs. 26.9%, p = 0.001 while response rate was similar (72.1% vs. 76.6%, respectively, p = 0.15. Multivariable analyses upheld higher neuropathy risk (Odds ratio 2.45, 95% CI 1.26-4.76, p = 0.008 while the likelihood of not achieving a response (= partial response or better was comparable (Odds ratio 1.25, 95% CI 0.58-2.71, p = 0.56 for other schedules compared to SC weekly, respectively. Lower neuropathy risk translated into longer treatment duration when BTZ was started SC weekly (p = 0.001.Weekly SC BTZ has activity comparable to other schedules and causes low rates of neuropathy.

  13. Diagnosis and typing of systemic amyloidosis: The role of abdominal fat pad fine needle aspiration biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halloush Ruba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Systemic amyloidosis (SA has a broad nonspecific clinical presentation. Its diagnosis depends on identifying amyloid in tissues. Abdominal fat pad fine needle aspiration (FPFNA has been suggested as a sensitive and specific test for diagnosing SA. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine FPFNA from 38 patients (16 women and 20 men, age range 40-88 years during a 15-year period were reviewed. Smears and cell blocks were stained with Congo red (CR. A panel of antibodies (serum amyloid protein, serum amyloid A, albumin, transthyretin, kappa light chain and lambda light chain was used on six cell blocks from five patients. The FNA findings were correlated with clinical and histological follow-up. Results: FPFNAs were positive, confirmed by CR in 5/39 (13%, suspicious in 1/39 (3%, negative in 28/39 (72%, and insufficient for diagnosis in 5/39 (13% of cases. In all the positive cases, SA was confirmed within 2-16 weeks. Among the 28 negative cases, SA was diagnosed in 21, the rest were lost to follow-up. Among the insufficient cases, SA was diagnosed in four and one was lost to follow-up. Specificity was 100%, whereas sensitivity was 19%. SA typing using cell block sections was successful in three, un-interpretable in one, and negative in two cases. Conclusion: FPFNA for SA is not as good as previously reported. This may be due to different practice setting, level of experience, diagnostic technique, or absence of abdominal soft tissue involvement. A negative result of FPFNA does not exclude SA. Immune phenotyping of amyloid is possible on cell block.

  14. Deposition of collagen IV and aggrecan in leptomeningeal arteries of hereditary brain haemorrhage with amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snorradottir, Asbjorg Osk; Isaksson, Helgi J; Kaeser, Stephan A; Skodras, Angelos A; Olafsson, Elias; Palsdottir, Astridur; Bragason, Birkir Thor

    2013-10-16

    Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy (HCCAA) is a rare genetic disease in Icelandic families caused by a mutation in the cystatin C gene, CST3. HCCAA is classified as a cerebral amyloid angiopathy and mutant cystatin C forms amyloid deposits in cerebral arteries resulting in fatal haemorrhagic strokes in young adults. The aetiology of HCCAA pathology is not clear and there is, at present, no animal model of the disease. The aim of this study was to increase understanding of the cerebral vascular pathology of HCCAA patients with an emphasis on structural changes within the arterial wall of affected leptomeningeal arteries. Examination of post-mortem samples revealed extensive changes in the walls of affected arteries characterised by deposition of extracellular matrix constituents, notably collagen IV and the proteoglycan aggrecan. Other structural abnormalities were thickening of the laminin distribution, intimal thickening concomitant with a frayed elastic layer, and variable reduction in the integrity of endothelia. Our results show that excess deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in cerebral arteries of HCCAA is a prominent feature of the disease and may play an important role in its pathogenesis. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prion protein amyloidosis with divergent phenotype associated with two novel nonsense mutations in PRNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Casper; Parchi, Piero; Capellari, Sabina; Vermeij, Ad J.; Corrado, Patrizia; Baas, Frank; Strammiello, Rosaria; van Gool, Willem A.; van Swieten, John C.; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Stop codon mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PRNP) are very rare and have thus far only been described in two patients with prion protein cerebral amyloid angiopathy (PrP-CAA). In this report, we describe the clinical, histopathological and pathological prion protein (PrPSc)

  16. Prion protein amyloidosis with divergent phenotype associated with two novel nonsense mutations in PRNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, C.; Parchi, P.; Capellari, S.; Vermeij, A.J.; Corrado, P.; Baas, F.; Strammiello, R.; van Gool, W.A.; van Swieten, J.C.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Stop codon mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PRNP) are very rare and have thus far only been described in two patients with prion protein cerebral amyloid angiopathy (PrP-CAA). In this report, we describe the clinical, histopathological and pathological prion protein (PrP

  17. Prion protein amyloidosis with divergent phenotype associated with two novel nonsense mutations in PRNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Jansen (Casper); P. Parchi (Piero); S. Capellari (Sabina); A.J. Vermeij (Ad); P. Corrado (Patrizia); F. Baas (Frank); R. Strammiello (Rosario); W.A. van Gool (Willem); J.C. van Swieten (John); A.J.M. Rozemuller (Annemieke)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractStop codon mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PRNP) are very rare and have thus far only been described in two patients with prion protein cerebral amyloid angiopathy (PrP-CAA). In this report, we describe the clinical, histopathological and pathological prion protein

  18. Phenytoin induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome exacerbated by cefepime

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhu, Varsha A.; Doddapaneni, Sahiti; Thunga, Girish; Thiyagu, Rajakannan; Prabhu, M. Mukyaprana; Naha, Kushal

    2013-01-01

    Steven Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a rare drug induced mucocutaneous reaction. Here, we present an elaborate report of a 28-year-old female patient who developed Phenytoin induced SJS, which was exacerbated by cefepime.

  19. Phenytoin induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome exacerbated by cefepime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Varsha A; Doddapaneni, Sahiti; Thunga, Girish; Thiyagu, Rajakannan; Prabhu, M Mukyaprana; Naha, Kushal

    2013-10-01

    Steven Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a rare drug induced mucocutaneous reaction. Here, we present an elaborate report of a 28-year-old female patient who developed Phenytoin induced SJS, which was exacerbated by cefepime.

  20. Susceptibility to exacerbation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, John R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Anzueto, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although we know that exacerbations are key events in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), our understanding of their frequency, determinants, and effects is incomplete. In a large observational cohort, we tested the hypothesis that there is a frequent-exacerbation phenotype...... of follow-up were 0.85 per person for patients with stage 2 COPD (with stage defined in accordance with Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] stages), 1.34 for patients with stage 3, and 2.00 for patients with stage 4. Overall, 22% of patients with stage 2 disease, 33% with stage 3...... of COPD that is independent of disease severity. METHODS: We analyzed the frequency and associations of exacerbation in 2138 patients enrolled in the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE) study. Exacerbations were defined as events that led a care provider...

  1. Childhood obesity in relation to poor asthma control and exacerbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadizar, Fariba; Vijverberg, Susanne; Arets, Hubertus; De Boer, Anthonius; Lang, Jason; Kattan, Meyer; Palmer, Colin; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath; Turner, Steve; Van Der Zee, Anke-Hilse Maitland

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between obesity and asthma severity in children is inconsistent across studies. Objectives: To estimate the association between obesity and poor asthma control/ risk of exacerbations in asthmatic children and adolescents, and to assess whether these associations are

  2. Age-Specific Characteristics of Inpatients with Severe Asthma Exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Sekiya

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The characteristics of inpatients with severe asthma vary depending on age. We need to establish countermeasures for asthma exacerbation according to the characteristics of patients depending on age.

  3. Correlating interleukin-10 promoter gene polymorphisms with human cerebral infarction onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-hong Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that interleukin-10 (IL-10 deficiency exacerbates inflammation and worsens the outcome of brain ischemia. In view of the critical role of the single nucleotide polymorphic sites -1082 (A/G and -819 (C/T in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene, we hypothesized that they are associated with cerebral infarction morbidity in the Chinese Han population. We genotyped these allelic gene polymorphisms by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction methods in 181 patients with cerebral infarction (cerebral infarction group and 115 healthy subjects (control group. We identified significant differences in genotype distribution and allele frequency of the IL-10-1082 A/G allele between cerebral infarction and control groups (χ2 = 6.643, P = 0.010. The IL-10-1082 A allele frequency was significantly higher in the cerebral infarction group (92.3% than in the control group (86.1% (P = 0.015. Moreover, cerebral infarction risk of the AA genotype was 2-fold higher than with the AG genotype (OR = 2.031, 95%CI: 1.134-3.637. In addition, AA genotype together with hypertension was the independent risk factor of cerebral infarction (OR = 2.073, 95%CI: 1.278-3.364. No statistical difference in genotype distribution or allele frequency of IL-10-819 C/T was found between cerebral infarction and control groups (P > 0.05. These findings suggest that the IL-10-1082 A/G gene polymorphism is involved in cerebral infarction, and increased A allele frequency is closely associated with occurrence of cerebral infarction.

  4. Fibrinogen and α1-antitrypsin in COPD exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S; Marott, Jacob L; Rode, Line

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypotheses that fibrinogen and α1-antitrypsin are observationally and genetically associated with exacerbations in COPD. METHODS: We studied 13,591 individuals with COPD from the Copenhagen General Population Study (2003-2013), of whom 6857 were genotyped for FGB -455 (rs...... in instrumental variable analyses. RESULTS: Elevated fibrinogen and α1-antitrypsin levels were associated with increased risk of exacerbations in COPD, HR=1.14 (1.07 to 1.22, p

  5. Oxygen therapy in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, T.; Lange, P.; Mogensen, T.

    2008-01-01

    Acute exacerbation of COPD is a major cause of hospitalisation in Denmark. Most of the patients require supplemental oxygen in the acute phase and some patients continue oxygen therapy at home after discharge. In this paper we discuss the physiological mechanisms of respiratory failure seen...... in acute exacerbations of COPD. The principles for oxygen therapy in the acute phase are described and recommendations for oxygen therapy are suggested Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5/5...

  6. Beta Blockers for the Prevention of Acute Exacerbations of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    40%.21 22 ▸ Current therapy with ocular β-blocker medications. ▸ Critical ischaemia related to peripheral arterial disease . ▸ Other diseases that are...exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (βLOCK COPD): a randomised controlled study protocol. Bhatt, SP; Connett, JE; Voelker, H...acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (βLOCK COPD): a randomised controlled study protocol Surya P Bhatt,1 John E Connett,2 Helen

  7. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  8. [Risk factors for acute exacerbation in patients with bronchiectasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Rui; Liu, Shuang

    2015-01-27

    To evaluate the risk factors for patients with an acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis. Retrospective analyses were conducted for 228 patients diagnosed with acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis at Affiliated Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University from January 2008 to December 2012. Depending on whether there were recurrences with exacerbation within one year after discharge, they were divided into two groups. Their basic profiles, clinical symptoms and signs, blood tests, sputum culture, dyspnea score (mMRC) and imaging data were analyzed. There were 110 males and 118 females with an average age of (64.5+14.5) years. The incidence of the recurrence of acute exacerbation was 55.7% (127/228) within one year after discharge. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥ 60 years (OR = 2.583, 95%CI: 1.188-5.613), body mass index (BMI)resolution computed tomography (CT) displayed bronchiectasis involving ≥ 3 lobes (OR = 3.179, 95%CI: 1.449-6.976) and staying in intensive care unit (ICU) (OR = 2.499, 95%CI: 1.301-4.801) were associated with the acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis (all P < 0.05). There are multiple risk factors of acute exacerbation in patients with bronchiectasis. And their proper identification and management shall improve the prognosis of bronchiectasis patients.

  9. The causes and consequences of seasonal variation in COPD exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson GC

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gavin C Donaldson, Jadwiga A Wedzicha Airways Disease Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: The time of year when patients experience exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a much-overlooked feature of the disease. The higher incidence of exacerbations in winter has important consequences for patients in terms of increased morbidity and mortality. The seasonality also imposes a considerable burden on already-overloaded health care services, with both primary care consultations and hospital admissions increasing in number. The seasonality of exacerbations varies with latitude, and is greater in more temperate climates, where there may be less protection from outdoor and indoor cold exposure. The precise causes of the seasonality are unknown, but thought to be partly due to the increased prevalence of respiratory viral infections circulating in cold, damp conditions. Increased susceptibility to viral infection may also be a mechanism mediated through increased airway inflammation or possibly reduced vitamin D levels. The seasonality of exacerbations informs us about the triggers of exacerbations and suggests possible strategies to reduce their number. Keywords: exacerbations of COPD, seasonality, winter mortality, winter morbidity

  10. Antibiotics usefulness and choice in BPCO acute exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Tartaglino

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the debate on the role of bacterial infections and antibiotic treatment in AE-COPD remains open, there is evidence that the persistence of bacteria after acute exacerbation (residual bacterial colony influences the frequency and severity of subsequent acute exacerbation and that antibiotic treatment that induces faster and more complete eradication produces better clinical outcomes. New aspects must now be considered, given that COPD is a chronic illness subject to acute exacerbations of varying frequencies and that acute exacerbations correspond to functional respiratory deterioration. One of the parameters that is currently acquiring clinical relevance is the interval free of infection (IFI, the period that elapses between one acute exacerbation and the next, caused by bacterial infection. Another guiding concept in the choice of antibiotic treatment is that not all patients benefit in the same way; those requiring more aggressive treatment are most likely to be those with FEV1 < 50%, frequent exacerbations (> 3/year treated with antibiotics, relevant co-morbidity, under chronic steroid treatment, etc., for these patients it is recommended to administer antibiotics active on the three most common pathogens (in particular H. influenzae, considering the resistance acquired in recent years, and on Pseudomomias aeruginosa.

  11. Cerebral palsy-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Pratibha D

    2004-07-01

    Cerebral Palsy encompasses a heterogeneous group of non-progressive motor disorders caused by injury to the developing brain. Management is best done in a multidisciplinary set up under one roof. Comprehensive assessment of the child to evaluate functional ability and associated problems is followed by an individualized plan of management with long term goals and short term objectives. Participation of the family is pivotal to ensure proper habilitation of the child. A home-based management plan is advocated. Considerable experience, sensitivity and understanding are needed both for breaking the news and counselling the parents of a child with cerebral palsy.

  12. Is cerebral hemorrhage approaching?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Yukiko; Yoneyama, Takumi; Hamasuna, Ryouichi; Fujime, Kenichi; Goya, Tomokazu [Junwakai Memorial Hospital, Miyazaki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    In Junwakai Memorial Hospital, from May, 2000 to April, 2001, 1042 patients underwent MRI examination to detect intracerebral microbleed (MB). This series included 481 hypertensive cases and 109 intra-cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage patients. MB was identified by MRI GRASS image that detects hemosiderin with high sensitivity. The occurrence of MB is high in men and increased with the age. The hypertensive patients showed increased frequency of MB in proportion to the duration of hypertension. Almost all of the symptomatic cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage cases showed multiple MBs except for massive hemorrhagic lesions. Therefore, MB can be an antecedant feature of the inpending symptomatic intracerebral and cerebellar hemorrhages. (author)

  13. Hereditary amyloidosis caused by R554L fibrinogen Aα-chain mutation in a Spanish family and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidinger, Michael; Werzowa, Johannes; Kain, Renate; Antlanger, Marlies; Hecking, Manfred; Pfaffenberger, Stefan; Mascherbauer, Julia; Gremmel, Thomas; Gilbertson, Janet A; Rowczenio, Dorota; Weichhart, Thomas; Kopecky, Chantal; Hörl, Walter H; Hawkins, Philip N; Säemann, Marcus D

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary amyloidosis with predominant renal disease can be caused by mutations in the gene encoding the fibrinogen Aα-chain (AFib). Here, we describe the clinical course of AFib amyloidosis associated with the rare R554L mutation, and the significance of extrarenal amyloid deposits and their possible influence on cardiovascular morbidity. We report on 101 members of a family after having conducted patient interviews, chart review, genetic testing, renal biopsies and assessment for extrarenal amyloid deposition. Ten family members had chronic kidney disease with late-onset gross proteinuria and a variable course of declining renal function, starting in the fourth decade of life. In two affected living members, we identified the AFib R554L mutation. Renal biopsies from two affected members revealed almost complete obliteration of the mesangial glomerular architecture, although kidney function was only moderately impaired. There was neither evidence of extrarenal amyloidosis nor accelerated atherosclerosis. Renal amyloidosis associated with the R554L AFib variant dominated the clinical picture in this family, which was similar to that associated with the much more prevalent E526V mutation. Although it has been hypothesized that vascular deposits of fibrinogen amyloid may be associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, there was no suggestion of this in this particular kindred.

  14. Bone scintigraphy with (99m)technetium-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate allows early diagnosis of cardiac involvement in patients with transthyretin-derived systemic amyloidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; van Rheenen, Ronald W. J.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Noordzij, Walter; Koole, Michel; Blokzijl, Hans; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Hazenberg, Bouke P. C.

    Objective: To assess the usefulness of bone scintigraphy with (99m)Technetium-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m-HDP) for the detection of cardiac involvement in a group of patients with ATTR amyloidosis in different phases of disease, to relate the findings to echocardiography, ECG and cardiac

  15. The specific case: cardiac amyloidosis as differential diagnosis in case of restricted cardiac pump function; Der besondere Fall. Amyloidose des Herzens als Differenzialdiagnose bei eingeschraenkter kardialer Pumpfunktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, L. [Universitaetsspital Basel (Switzerland). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Zellweger, M.; Niemann, T.

    2014-03-15

    The NMR imaging data in combination with clinical characterization and echocardiography are consistent with the diagnosis of a cardiac amyloidosis. The article describes disease pattern and diagnosis based on contrast agent accumulation and diastolic functional disturbances. CT was performed to exclude pulmonary embolism.

  16. Exercise-Stress Echocardiography Reveals Systolic Anterior Motion of the Mitral Valve as a Cause of Syncopes in a Cardiac Amyloidosis Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Tor Skibsted; Mølgaard, Henning; Andersen, Niels Frost

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cardiac amyloidosis are at increased AV-block and syncope risk. Therefore, a prophylactic pacemaker is often implanted. However, this case illustrates that other mechanisms should be ruled out prior to pacemaker implantation. The patient studied had mitral valve thickening without...

  17. Post-traumatic stress symptoms and exacerbations in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Paulo Josè Zimermann; Porto, Lucia; Kristensen, Christian Haag; Santos, Alvaro Huber; Menna-Barreto, Sergio Saldanha; Do Prado-Lima, Pedro AntÙnio Schmidt

    2015-02-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a common psychological consequence of exposure to traumatic stressful life events. During COPD exacerbations dyspnea can be considered a near-death experience that may induce post-traumatic stress symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between COPD exacerbations and PTSD- related symptoms. Thirty-three in-patients with COPD exacerbations were screened for the following: PTSS (Screen for Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory). Patients had a median age of 72 years and 72.7% were female. Mean FEV1 and FVC were 0.8 ± 0.3 (37.7 ± 14.9% of predicted) and 1.7 ± 0.6 (60 ± 18.8% of predicted), respectively with a mean exacerbation of 2.9 episodes over the past year. Post-traumatic stress symptoms related to PTSD were found in 11 (33.3%) patients (SPTSS mean score 4.13 ± 2.54); moderate to severe depression in 16 (48.5%) (BDI mean score 21.2 ± 12.1) and moderate to severe anxiety in 23 (69.7%) (BAI mean score 23.5 ± 12.4). In a linear regression model, exacerbations significantly predicted post-traumatic stress symptoms scores: SPTSS scores increased 0.9 points with each exacerbation (p = 0.001). Significant correlations were detected between PTSD-related symptoms and anxiety (rs = 0.57; p = 0.001) and PTSD symptoms and depression (rs = 0.62; p = 0.0001). In a multivariable analysis model, two or more exacerbation episodes led to a near twofold increase in the prevalence ratio of post-traumatic stress symptoms related to PTSD(PR1.71; p = 0.015) specially those requiring hospitalization (PR 1.13; p = 0.030) CONCLUSION: PTSD symptoms increase as the patient's exacerbations increase. Two or more exacerbation episodes lead to a near twofold increase in the prevalence ratio of post-traumatic symptomatology. Overall, these findings suggest that psychological domains should be addressed along with respiratory function and exacerbations in

  18. Determinants of exacerbation risk in patients with COPD in the TIOSPIR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calverley, Peter MA; Tetzlaff, Kay; Dusser, Daniel; Wise, Robert A; Mueller, Achim; Metzdorf, Norbert; Anzueto, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Exacerbation history is used to grade the risk of COPD exacerbation, but its reliability and relationship to other risk factors and prior therapy is unclear. To examine these interrelationships, we conducted a post hoc analysis of patients in the TIOSPIR trial with ≥2 years’ follow-up or who died on treatment. Patients and methods Patients were grouped by their annual exacerbation rate on treatment into nonexacerbators, infrequent, and frequent exacerbators (annual exacerbation rates 0, ≤1, and >1, respectively), and baseline characteristics discriminating among the groups were determined. We used univariate and multivariate analyses to explore the effect of baseline characteristics on risk of exacerbation, hospitalization (severe exacerbation), and death (all causes). Results Of 13,591 patients, 6,559 (48.3%) were nonexacerbators, 4,568 (33.6%) were infrequent exacerbators, and 2,464 (18.1%) were frequent exacerbators; 45% of patients without exacerbations in the previous year exacerbated on treatment. Multivariate analysis identified baseline pulmonary maintenance medication as a predictive factor of increased exacerbation risk, with inhaled corticosteroid treatment associated with increased exacerbation risk irrespective of exacerbation history. Conclusion Our data confirm established risk factors for exacerbation, but highlight the limitations of exacerbation history when categorizing patients and the importance of prior treatment when identifying exacerbation risk. PMID:29238184

  19. [Multiple cerebral tuberculomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, L; Villarreal, F

    The tuberculosis is a disease that continues being important cause of morbidity and mortality at worldwide level. Its presentation as tuberculomas cerebral manifold at level of the central nervous system is little frequent in immunocompetent patients and can be confused with other etiology. An indigenous young man, immunocompetent consulted for history of headache, nausea, vomits, convulsions, double vision and hemiparesia left side, which in the cerebral tomography of revenue was showing injuries compatible with cerebral abscesses; for which he received treatment with antibiotics without improvement for what there takes biopsy of the injuries that reported tuberculomas, specific treatment being initiated later and the primary area being investigated without the same one be detecting. After the first procedural step with evident clinical and radiographic improvement. The tuberculosis in anyone of their forms of presentation must be included within the diagnosis differential of the patients in our endemic countries for this disease. The clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral injuries is difficult and single usually it obtains to the diagnosis during a pathology study that shows tuberculomas with caseosa necrosis, epiteliodes cell and the acid alcohol bacilli resistant.

  20. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  1. CASE REPORT Cerebral schistosomiasis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0b013e3182704d1e]. 5. Sanelli PC, Lev MH, Gonzalez RG, Schaefer PW. Unique linear and nodular MR enhancement pattern in schistosomiasis of the central nervous system: Report of three patients. AJR 2001;177(6):1471-1474. Cerebral schistosomiasis.

  2. Regional Variation in Technetium Pyrophosphate Uptake in Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis and Impact on Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Brett W; Vranian, Michael N; Tower-Rader, Albree; Hachamovitch, Rory; Hanna, Mazen; Brunken, Richard; Phelan, Dermot; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Jaber, Wael A

    2017-09-09

    This study sought to investigate the regional uptake of technetium 99m-pyrophosphate (TcPYP) in transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis (ATTR) and its association with mortality. TcPYP nuclear scintigraphy is a diagnostic and prognostic tool in ATTR. Echocardiography has identified a pattern of regional variation in longitudinal strain (LS) with a gradient of improved strain from base to apex in ATTR. Consecutive patients with ATTR were evaluated who underwent TcPYP nuclear scintigraphy with planar and attenuation corrected single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Heart-to-contralateral lung (H/CL) ratio was calculated on planar images, and left ventricular (LV) uptake was determined in each of the 17 segments using SPECT. A measure of apical-sparing of myocardial TcPYP uptake, termed the apical-sparing ratio (ASR), was calculated as basal + mid / apical counts. Overall, 54 patients with ATTR (age 78 ± 9 years, 76% male, 31% hereditary ATTR) were analyzed. There was increased TcPYP uptake in basal and mid relative to apical LV segments, and an apical-sparing LS pattern on echocardiography. The right ventricle similarly showed greater uptake in basal segments. There were 26 deaths over 1.8 years median follow-up. The ASR of TcPYP uptake was associated with age-adjusted all-cause mortality (p = 0.013) with worse prognosis seen at levels <2.75. Global LS was also prognostic (p = 0.01), whereas H/CL ratio and total LV uptake indexed to blood pool were not (p = 0.772 and p = 0.850, respectively). The prognostic utility of the ASR persisted in multivariable modeling (p = 0.003), whereas global LS did not. There is decreased TcPYP uptake in apical as compared to mid and basal segments in the LV, mimicking apical-sparing LS seen on echocardiography. Regional distribution of LV TcPYP uptake is associated with mortality, whereas overall amount of uptake as measured by H/CL ratio and indexed LV SPECT uptake is not. Copyright © 2017 American College of

  3. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    El término parálisis cerebral (PC) engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia me...

  4. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El término parálisis cerebral (PC engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia mental, trastornos del lenguaje, audición, visión, déficit de la atención que mejoran el pronóstico de manera significativa. El pronóstico también depende de la gravedad del padecimiento y de las manifestaciones asociadas.The term cerebral palsy (CP, is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the nonevolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations.

  5. TLR4 mutation reduces microglial activation, increases Aβ deposits and exacerbates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Min

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid plaques, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD, are accompanied by activated microglia. The role of activated microglia in the pathogenesis of AD remains controversial: either clearing Aβ deposits by phagocytosis or releasing proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic substances. Microglia can be activated via toll-like receptors (TLRs, a class of pattern-recognition receptors in the innate immune system. We previously demonstrated that an AD mouse model homozygous for a loss-of-function mutation of TLR4 had increases in Aβ deposits and buffer-soluble Aβ in the brain as compared with a TLR4 wild-type AD mouse model at 14-16 months of age. However, it is unknown if TLR4 signaling is involved in initiation of Aβ deposition as well as activation and recruitment of microglia at the early stage of AD. Here, we investigated the role of TLR4 signaling and microglial activation in early stages using 5-month-old AD mouse models when Aβ deposits start. Methods Microglial activation and amyloid deposition in the brain were determined by immunohistochemistry in the AD models. Levels of cerebral soluble Aβ were determined by ELISA. mRNA levels of cytokines and chemokines in the brain and Aβ-stimulated monocytes were quantified by real-time PCR. Cognitive functions were assessed by the Morris water maze. Results While no difference was found in cerebral Aβ load between AD mouse models at 5 months with and without TLR4 mutation, microglial activation in a TLR4 mutant AD model (TLR4M Tg was less than that in a TLR4 wild-type AD model (TLR4W Tg. At 9 months, TLR4M Tg mice had increased Aβ deposition and soluble Aβ42 in the brain, which were associated with decrements in cognitive functions and expression levels of IL-1β, CCL3, and CCL4 in the hippocampus compared to TLR4W Tg mice. TLR4 mutation diminished Aβ-induced IL-1β, CCL3, and CCL4 expression in monocytes. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of TLR4

  6. Severe exacerbations and decline in lung function in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Byrne, Paul M; Pedersen, Søren; Lamm, Carl Johan

    2009-01-01

    are associated with a persistent decline in lung function. METHODS: The START (inhaled steroid treatment as regular therapy in early asthma) study was a 3-year, randomized, double-blind study of 7,165 patients (5-66 yr) with persistent asthma for less than 2 years, to determine whether early intervention...... with low-dose inhaled budesonide prevents severe asthma-related events (exacerbations requiring hospitalization or emergency treatment) and decline in lung function. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: There were 315 patients who experienced at least one severe asthma exacerbation, of which 305 were analyzable...... difference was seen in both children and in adults, but not in adolescents. In the budesonide group, the change in the post-bronchodilator FEV(1) % predicted in patients who did or did not experience a severe exacerbation was -2.48% and -1.72%, respectively (P = 0.57). The difference in magnitude...

  7. Postpartum airway responsiveness and exacerbation of asthma during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    . MATERIALS AND METHODS: In women with asthma who were prescribed controller medication and monitored closely during pregnancy, the risk of exacerbations was analyzed in relation to postpartum measures of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), skin prick test reactivity, static and dynamic lung volumes......BACKGROUND: Airway responsiveness and inflammation are associated with the clinical manifestations of asthma and the response to pharmacological therapy. OBJECTIVE: To investigate if airway responsiveness and inflammatory characteristics are related to asthma exacerbations during pregnancy......, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, bronchial responsiveness to inhaled mannitol, and inflammatory characteristics in induced sputum. Obtained data were analyzed in relation to exacerbation status during pregnancy. The PD15 is defined as the cumulative administered dose causing a 15% decline in forced...

  8. Modulation of airway inflammation to prevent exacerbations of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Solèr

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are periods in the chronic course of this disease with symptoms of intensified inflammation, induced in part by infections but also by noninfectious irritating mechanisms. Although these exacerbations seem to be linked to accelerated long-term disease progression and impaired quality of life, there are only limited preventive measures available, apart from smoking cessation. This article compares the effectiveness of different pharmacological treatments for the prevention of COPD exacerbations, including the oral bacterial lysate OM-85. Given the differences in the mechanism of action of the treatments discussed, this opens some hope for additive or potentiating effects with combined treatments, which will have to be studied in future controlled trials.

  9. COPD exacerbations in general practice: variability in oral prednisolone courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of oral corticosteroids as treatment of COPD exacerbations in primary care is well established and evidence-based. However, the most appropriate dosage regimen has not been determined and remains controversial. Corticosteroid therapy is associated with a number of undesirable side effects, including hyperglycaemias, so differences in prescribing might be relevant. This study examines the differences between GPs in dosage and duration of prednisolone treatment in patients with a COPD exacerbation. It also investigates the number of general practitioners (GPs who adjust their treatment according to the presence of diabetic co-morbidity. Methods Cross-sectional study among 219 GPs and 25 GPs in training, located in the Northern part of the Netherlands. Results The response rate was 69%. Nearly every GP prescribed a continuous dose of prednisolone 30 mg per day. Among GPs there were substantial differences in treatment duration. GPs prescribed courses of five, seven, ten, or fourteen days. A course of seven days was most common. The duration of treatment depended on exacerbation and disease severity. A course of five days was especially prescribed in case of a less severe exacerbation. In a more severe exacerbation duration of seven to fourteen days was more common. Hardly any GP adjusted treatment to the presence of diabetic co-morbidity. Conclusion Under normal conditions GPs prescribe prednisolone quite uniformly, within the range of the current Dutch guidelines. There is insufficient guidance regarding how to adjust corticosteroid treatment to exacerbation severity, disease severity and the presence of diabetic co-morbidity. Under these circumstances, there is a substantial variation in treatment duration.

  10. Can exhaled volatile organic compounds predict asthma exacerbations in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Dillys; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Jöbsis, Quirijn; Rosias, Philippe; Muris, Jean; Dallinga, Jan; Dompeling, Edward; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan

    2017-03-01

    Asthma control does not yet meet the goals of asthma management guidelines. Non-invasive monitoring of airway inflammation may help to improve the level of asthma control in children. (1) To identify a set of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that is most predictive for an asthma exacerbation in children. (2) To elucidate the chemical identity of predictive biomarkers. In a one-year prospective observational study, 96 asthmatic children participated . During clinical visits at 2 month intervals, asthma control, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, lung function (FEV1, FEV1/VC) and VOCs in exhaled breath were determined by means of gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Random Forrest classification modeling was used to select predictive VOCs, followed by plotting of receiver operating characteristic-curves (ROC-curves). An inverse relationship was found between the predictive power of a set of VOCs and the time between sampling of exhaled breath and the onset of exacerbation. The sensitivity and specificity of the model predicting exacerbations 14 days after sampling were 88% and 75%, respectively. The area under the ROC-curve was 90%. The sensitivity for prediction of asthma exacerbations within 21 days after sampling was 63%. In total, 7 VOCs were selected for the classification model: 3 aldehydes, 1 hydrocarbon, 1 ketone, 1 aromatic compound, and 1 unidentified VOC. VOCs in exhaled breath showed potential for predicting asthma exacerbations in children within 14 days after sampling. Before using this in clinical practice, the validity of predicting asthma exacerbations should be studied in a larger cohort.

  11. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  12. Can resistive breathing injure the lung? Implications for COPD exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilakopoulos T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theodoros Vassilakopoulos, Dimitrios Toumpanakis Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece Abstract: In obstructive lung diseases, airway inflammation leads to bronchospasm and thus resistive breathing, especially during exacerbations. This commentary discusses experimental evidence that resistive breathing per se (the mechanical stimulus in the absence of underlying airway inflammation leads to lung injury and inflammation (mechanotransduction. The potential implications of resistive breathing-induced mechanotrasduction in COPD exacerbations are presented along with the available clinical evidence. Keywords: resistive breathing, COPD, mechanotransduction, bronchoconstriction, inflammation

  13. Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Cardiovascular Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laratta, Cheryl R.; van Eeden, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic, progressive lung disease resulting from exposure to cigarette smoke, noxious gases, particulate matter, and air pollutants. COPD is exacerbated by acute inflammatory insults such as lung infections (viral and bacterial) and air pollutants which further accelerate the steady decline in lung function. The chronic inflammatory process in the lung contributes to the extrapulmonary manifestations of COPD which are predominantly cardiovascular in nature. Here we review the significant burden of cardiovascular disease in COPD and discuss the clinical and pathological links between acute exacerbations of COPD and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24724085

  14. Susceptibility to exacerbation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, John R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Anzueto, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    of COPD that is independent of disease severity. METHODS: We analyzed the frequency and associations of exacerbation in 2138 patients enrolled in the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE) study. Exacerbations were defined as events that led a care provider...... of follow-up were 0.85 per person for patients with stage 2 COPD (with stage defined in accordance with Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] stages), 1.34 for patients with stage 3, and 2.00 for patients with stage 4. Overall, 22% of patients with stage 2 disease, 33% with stage 3...

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Emergency care in acute exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedd J. Welniak

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the current state of research and international guidelines surrounding the management of acute exacerbation of COPD in the emergency centre. Strict adherence to international guidelines for management of acute exacerbation of COPD may be difficult for many African providers given factors affecting diagnosis, treatment, and access to care for many Africans suffering from COPD. Research looking into the role of the African EM practitioner in providing more cost-effective means of diagnosis and treatment of COPD is limited.

  16. Plasticidad cerebral y lenguaje

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Torres Sánchez, Ignacio; Berthier Torres, Marcelo Luís

    2012-01-01

    Hace pocos años se daba por sentado que la recuperación del lenguaje tras una lesión cerebral era imposible, al igual que adquirir la lengua materna más allá de los tres primeros años de vida. Sin embargo, las últimas indagaciones muestran que nuestra capacidad de aprender es mucho mayor.

  17. Cerebral palsy and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through ad...

  18. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    reflected a cerebral form of high altitude illness. In 1964, Fitch described a similar form of mountain sickness with neurolkgical manifestations in the...71% in thaL of Hackett et al; this sex distribution undoubtedly reflects the larger numbers of males presently involved in trekking and 44...HACE with loss of consciousness, absence of pupillary reactions, flaccidity of all extremities and the presence of bilateral Babinski responses. The

  19. Cerebral oxygenation and hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Richard Bain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is associated with marked reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF. Increased distribution of cardiac output to the periphery, increases in alveolar ventilation and resultant hypocapnia each contribute to the fall in CBF during passive hyperthermia; however, their relative contribution remains a point of contention, and probably depends on the experimental condition (e.g. posture and degree of hyperthermia. The hyperthermia-induced hyperventilatory response reduces arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2 causing cerebral vasoconstriction and subsequent reductions in flow. During supine passive hyperthermia, the majority of recent data indicate that reductions in PaCO2 may be the primary, if not sole, culprit for reduced CBF. On the other hand, during more dynamic conditions (e.g. hemorrhage or orthostatic challenges, an inability to appropriately decrease peripheral vascular conductance presents a condition whereby adequate cerebral perfusion pressure may be compromised secondary to reductions in systemic blood pressure. Although studies have reported maintenance of pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy during exercise and severe heat stress, the influence of cutaneous blood flow is known to contaminate this measure. This review discusses the governing mechanisms associated with changes in CBF and oxygenation during moderate to severe (i.e. 1.0°C to 2.0°C increase in body core temperature levels of hyperthermia. Future research directions are provided.

  20. Disease: H01185 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01185 Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA); Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis...M, Magoni M, Padovani A, Tagliavini F Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis associated with the E6

  1. Echo Parameters for Differential Diagnosis in Cardiac Amyloidosis: A Head-to-Head Comparison of Deformation and Nondeformation Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagourelias, Efstathios D; Mirea, Oana; Duchenne, Jürgen; Van Cleemput, Johan; Delforge, Michel; Bogaert, Jan; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2017-03-01

    A plethora of echo parameters has been suggested for distinguishing cardiac amyloidosis (CA) from other causes of myocardial thickening with, however, scarce data on their head-to-head comparison. This study aimed at comparing the diagnostic accuracy of various deformation and conventional echo parameters in differentiating CA from other hypertrophic substrates, especially in the gray zone of mild hypertrophy (maximum wall thickness ≤16 mm) or normal ejection fraction (EF). We included 100 subjects, of which 40 were patients with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven CA (65.5±10.8 years, 65% male, 62.5% amyloidosis light chain [AL] type), 40 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy matched for demographics and maximum wall thickness (60.1±14.8 years, 85% male), and 20 hypertensives with prominent myocardial remodeling. Quantifiable conventional morphological and functional parameters along with multidimensional strain and strain-derived ratios indices, previously suggested to diagnose CA, were analyzed. EF global longitudinal strain ratio showed the best performance to discriminate CA (area under the curve, 0.95; 95% confidence intervals, 0.89-0.98; P echo indices showed overall low sensitivities and high specificities (among them myocardial contraction fraction ratio had the highest area under the curve, 0.80; 95% confidence intervals, 0.7-0.87; P 55%), EF global longitudinal strain ratio remained the best predicting parameter of CA diagnosis (multiple logistic regression models P <0.00005 and P =0.0002, respectively) independent of the CA type. Our study demonstrated that in patients with thickened hearts, EF global longitudinal strain ratio has the best accuracy in detecting CA, even among the most "challenging" patient subgroups as those with mild hypertrophy and normal EF. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Thorough investigation of a canine autoinflammatory disease (AID confirms one main risk locus and suggests a modifier locus for amyloidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Olsson

    Full Text Available Autoinflammatory disease (AID manifests from the dysregulation of the innate immune system and is characterised by systemic and persistent inflammation. Clinical heterogeneity leads to patients presenting with one or a spectrum of phenotypic signs, leading to difficult diagnoses in the absence of a clear genetic cause. We used separate genome-wide SNP analyses to investigate five signs of AID (recurrent fever, arthritis, breed specific secondary dermatitis, otitis and systemic reactive amyloidosis in a canine comparative model, the pure bred Chinese Shar-Pei. Analysis of 255 DNA samples revealed a shared locus on chromosome 13 spanning two peaks of association. A three-marker haplotype based on the most significant SNP (p<2.6×10(-8 from each analysis showed that one haplotypic pair (H13-11 was present in the majority of AID individuals, implicating this as a shared risk factor for all phenotypes. We also noted that a genetic signature (F ST distinguishing the phenotypic extremes of the breed specific Chinese Shar-Pei thick and wrinkled skin, flanked the chromosome 13 AID locus; suggesting that breed development and differentiation has played a parallel role in the genetics of breed fitness. Intriguingly, a potential modifier locus for amyloidosis was revealed on chromosome 14, and an investigation of candidate genes from both this and the chromosome 13 regions revealed significant (p<0.05 renal differential expression in four genes previously implicated in kidney or immune health (AOAH, ELMO1, HAS2 and IL6. These results illustrate that phenotypic heterogeneity need not be a reflection of genetic heterogeneity, and that genetic modifiers of disease could be masked if syndromes were not first considered as individual clinical signs and then as a sum of their component parts.

  3. Late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac amyloidosis: attributable both to interstitial amyloid deposition and subendocardial fibrosis caused by ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimura, Hiromi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Yonemoto, Yumiko; Ohta-Ogo, Keiko; Matsuyama, Taka-Aki; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Morita, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Naoaki; Yasui, Hiroki; Naito, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Gadolinium contrast agents used for late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) distribute in the extracellular space. Global diffuse myocardial LGE pronounced in the subendocardial layers is common in cardiac amyloidosis. However, the pathophysiological basis of these findings has not been sufficiently explained. A 64-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with leg edema and nocturnal dyspnea. Bence Jones protein was positive in the urine, and an endomyocardial and skin biopsy showed light-chain (AL) amyloidosis. He died of ventricular fibrillation 3 months later. 9 days before death, the patient was examined by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging on a 3-T system. We acquired LGE data at 2, 5, 10, and 20 min after the injection of gadolinium contrast agents, with a fixed inversion time of 350 ms. Myocardial LGE developed sequentially. The myocardium was diffusely enhanced at 2 min, except for the subendocardium, but LGE had extended to almost the entire left ventricle at 5 min and predominantly localized to the subendocardial region at 10 and 20 min. An autopsy revealed massive and diffused amyloid deposits in perimyocytes throughout the myocardium. Old and recent ischemic findings, such as replacement fibrosis and coagulative myocyte necrosis, were evident in the subendocardium. In the intramural coronary arteries, mild amyloid deposits were present within the subepicardial to the mid layer of the left ventricle, but no stenotic lesions were evident. However, capillaries were obstructed by amyloid deposits in the subendocardium. In conclusion, the late phase of dynamic LGE (at 10 and 20 min) visualized in the subendocardium corresponded to the interstitial amyloid deposition and subendocardial fibrosis caused by ischemia in our patient.

  4. Significant association between renal function and amyloid-positive area in renal biopsy specimens in AL amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The kidney is a major target organ for systemic amyloidosis that often affects the kidney including proteinura, and elevated serum creatinine (Cr). The correlation between amount of amyloid deposits and clinical parameters is not known. The aim of this study was to clarify correlation the amyloid area in all renal biopsy specimen and clinical parameters. Methods Fifty-eight patients with an established diagnosis of AL amyloidosis participated in the study. All patients showed amyloid deposits in renal biopsies. We retrospectively investigated the correlation between clinical data and amyloid occupied area in whole renal biopsy specimens. Results The area occupied by amyloid was less than 10% in 57 of the 58 patients, and was under 2% in 40. For statistical analyses, %amyloid-positive areas were transformed to common logarithmic values (Log10%amyloid). Cr showed significant correlation with Log10%amyloid and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) showed the significant negative correlation. Patient age, cleatinine clearance (Ccr), blood urea nitorogen, and urinary protein was not significantly correlated with Log10%amyloid. The correlation with other clinical factors such as sex, and serum concentrations of total protein, albumin, immunoglobulins, compliments was evaluated. None of these factors significantly correlated with Log10%amyloid. According to sex- and age- adjusted multiple linear regression analysis, Log10%amyloid had significant positive association with Cr and significant negative association with eGFR. Conclusion There is significant association between amyloid-positive area in renal tissue and renal function, especially Cr and eGFR. The level of Cr and eGFR may be a marker of amount of amyloid in renal tissue. PMID:23006903

  5. Significant association between renal function and amyloid-positive area in renal biopsy specimens in AL amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda Takeshi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kidney is a major target organ for systemic amyloidosis that often affects the kidney including proteinura, and elevated serum creatinine (Cr. The correlation between amount of amyloid deposits and clinical parameters is not known. The aim of this study was to clarify correlation the amyloid area in all renal biopsy specimen and clinical parameters. Methods Fifty-eight patients with an established diagnosis of AL amyloidosis participated in the study. All patients showed amyloid deposits in renal biopsies. We retrospectively investigated the correlation between clinical data and amyloid occupied area in whole renal biopsy specimens. Results The area occupied by amyloid was less than 10% in 57 of the 58 patients, and was under 2% in 40. For statistical analyses, %amyloid-positive areas were transformed to common logarithmic values (Log10%amyloid. Cr showed significant correlation with Log10%amyloid and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR showed the significant negative correlation. Patient age, cleatinine clearance (Ccr, blood urea nitorogen, and urinary protein was not significantly correlated with Log10%amyloid. The correlation with other clinical factors such as sex, and serum concentrations of total protein, albumin, immunoglobulins, compliments was evaluated. None of these factors significantly correlated with Log10%amyloid. According to sex- and age- adjusted multiple linear regression analysis, Log10%amyloid had significant positive association with Cr and significant negative association with eGFR. Conclusion There is significant association between amyloid-positive area in renal tissue and renal function, especially Cr and eGFR. The level of Cr and eGFR may be a marker of amount of amyloid in renal tissue.

  6. Cerebral malformations without antenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Nadine J. [Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Hopital Timone, Marseille (France)

    2010-06-15

    Cerebral malformations are usually described following the different steps in development. Disorders of neurulation (dysraphisms), or diverticulation (holoprosencephalies and posterior fossa cysts), and total commissural agenesis are usually diagnosed in utero. In contrast, disorders of histogenesis (proliferation-differentiation, migration, organization) are usually discovered in infants and children. The principal clinical symptoms that may be a clue to cerebral malformation include congenital hemiparesis, epilepsy and mental or psychomotor retardation. MRI is the imaging method of choice to assess cerebral malformations. (orig.)

  7. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H; van Lieshout, J J

    2014-04-01

    This review summarizes evidence in humans for an association between hyperventilation (HV)-induced hypocapnia and a reduction in cerebral perfusion leading to syncope defined as transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). The cerebral vasculature is sensitive to changes in both the arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2 the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established.

  8. Amiloidose manifestando-se com pseudo-hipertrofia muscular Amyloidosis presenting as muscle pseudohypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bortoli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Amiloidose tipo AL é uma doença rara causada pela deposição extracelular de fragmentos de cadeias leves monoclonais em órgãos e tecidos. Pode apresentar-se com uma ampla variedade de sinais e sintomas, e o acometimento cutâneo-muscular, simulando pseudo-hipertrofia muscular, é um achado muito raro. São descritos dois casos que apresentaram tal manifestação. CASO 1 - Mulher, 61 anos, há quatro meses com história de mialgia e aumento da massa muscular nas cinturas pélvica, escapular e região cervical. Não havia alterações significativas ao exame físico, exceto aparente hipertrofia muscular difusa e discreta macroglossia. CASO 2 - Homem, 51 anos, há dois anos com cansaço e espessamento cutâneo progressivo do dorso, pescoço e braços. Em outros serviços levantou suspeitas diagnósticas de esclerodermia ou de escleredema de Buschke; desde fevereiro de 2007 passou a ser acompanhado nesse serviço e referia, havia cerca de um ano, disfagia para sólidos, disartria e dificuldade para movimentar a língua. Chamava atenção em seu exame o porte físico atlético com musculatura torácica proeminente, porém referia não fazer exercícios físicos. Em ambos os casos, a biópsia cutânea foi realizada com identificação do depósito amilóide por meio da coloração de vermelho congo.AL amyloidosis is a rare disease secondary to extracellular deposition of light chains fragments in organs and tissues. It can cause a wide variety of signs and symptoms, being the muscular pseudohypertrophy form a very rare finding. CASE 1 - a 61-year-old female had a history of myalgia and increase of muscular mass on pelvic and scapular girdle and cervical region. Besides the generalized muscular hypertrophy and discrete macroglossia, the rest of physical examination was normal. CASE 2 - a 51-year-old male complained of tiredness and progressive cutaneous thickening on his thorax, neck and arms for the last two years. Initially, he was misdiagnosed

  9. Cerebral Autoregulation in Normal Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, Teelkien R.; Panerai, Ronney B.; Haeri, Sina; Griffioen, Annemiek C.; Zeeman, Gerda; Belfort, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that preeclampsia is associated with impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation. METHODS: In a prospective cohort analysis, cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (determined by transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (determined by noninvasive

  10. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Cerebral cavernous malformation Cerebral cavernous malformation Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Cerebral cavernous malformations are collections of small blood vessels ( capillaries ) ...

  11. Circulating IGF-1 deficiency exacerbates hypertension-induced microvascular rarefaction in the mouse hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex: implications for cerebromicrovascular and brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, Stefano; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Valcarcel-Ares, M Noa; Toth, Peter; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B; Ballabh, Praveen; Wei, Jeanne Y; Wren, Jonathan D; Ashpole, Nicole M; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Strong epidemiological and experimental evidence indicate that both age and hypertension lead to significant functional and structural impairment of the cerebral microcirculation, predisposing to the development of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and Alzheimer's disease. Preclinical studies establish a causal link between cognitive decline and microvascular rarefaction in the hippocampus, an area of brain important for learning and memory. Age-related decline in circulating IGF-1 levels results in functional impairment of the cerebral microvessels; however, the mechanistic role of IGF-1 deficiency in impaired hippocampal microvascularization remains elusive. The present study was designed to characterize the additive/synergistic effects of IGF-1 deficiency and hypertension on microvascular density and expression of genes involved in angiogenesis and microvascular regression in the hippocampus. To achieve that goal, we induced hypertension in control and IGF-1 deficient mice (Igf1 (f/f)  + TBG-Cre-AAV8) by chronic infusion of angiotensin II. We found that circulating IGF-1 deficiency is associated with decreased microvascular density and exacerbates hypertension-induced microvascular rarefaction both in the hippocampus and the neocortex. The anti-angiogenic hippocampal gene expression signature observed in hypertensive IGF-1 deficient mice in the present study provides important clues for subsequent studies to elucidate mechanisms by which hypertension may contribute to the pathogenesis and clinical manifestation of VCI. In conclusion, adult-onset, isolated endocrine IGF-1 deficiency exerts deleterious effects on the cerebral microcirculation, leading to a significant decline in cortical and hippocampal capillarity and exacerbating hypertension-induced cerebromicrovascular rarefaction. The morphological impairment of the cerebral microvasculature induced by IGF-1 deficiency and hypertension reported here, in combination with neurovascular uncoupling, increased

  12. Risk Factors Precipitating Exacerbations in Adult Asthma Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk Factors Precipitating Exacerbations in Adult Asthma Patients presenting at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria. ... South African Family Practice ... The total prevalence of asthma is estimated to lie at 7.2% of the world\\'s population (6% in adults, ...

  13. Accelerated extracellular matrix turnover during exacerbations of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Jannie M B; Knox, Alan J; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    progression. Extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover reflects activity in tissues and consequently assessment of ECM turnover may serve as biomarkers of disease activity. We hypothesized that the turnover of lung ECM proteins were altered during exacerbations of COPD. METHODS: 69 patients with COPD hospitalised...

  14. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation in patients presenting to an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Asthma exacerbations are caused by a variety of risk factors. Reducing exposure to these risk factors improves the control of asthma and reduces medication needs. Knowledge of the particular risk factors is essential in formulating controlling and treatment protocols. This study set out to determine the risk ...

  15. Diagnosis and management of acute exacerbations of chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for at least 2 consecutive days.2,3. However, the severity of exacerbations can be extremely heterogeneous, ranging from a mild increase in symptoms to more serious manifestations and severe respiratory failure. The magnitude of the problem is substantial for the patient, as well as economically. In the USA alone, in 2000, ...

  16. Oxygen therapy in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, T.; Lange, P.; Mogensen, T.

    2008-01-01

    Acute exacerbation of COPD is a major cause of hospitalisation in Denmark. Most of the patients require supplemental oxygen in the acute phase and some patients continue oxygen therapy at home after discharge. In this paper we discuss the physiological mechanisms of respiratory failure seen in ac...

  17. Prevalence and pattern of asthma exacerbation in children seen at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-01-15

    Jan 15, 2016 ... Exacerbations of asthma symptoms produce significant cost to health care systems and seriously diminish the .... used at home prior to presentation. This included twelve. (46.2%) of the 26 newly ... begin to reverse as the children get older with almost equal rate between 5 and 10 years and more girls be-.

  18. Detection of rhinovirus-associated asthma exacerbations using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute exacerbations of asthma are the leading cause of emergency department visits in pediatric patients. The development of sensitive diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based techniques permitted demonstration of an already clinically suspected association between common viral respiratory ...

  19. COPD exacerbations in general practice : variability in oral prednisolone courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Marianne; Berendsen, Annette J.; Bosveld, Henk E. P.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; van der Molen, Thys

    2012-01-01

    Background: The use of oral corticosteroids as treatment of COPD exacerbations in primary care is well established and evidence-based. However, the most appropriate dosage regimen has not been determined and remains controversial. Corticosteroid therapy is associated with a number of undesirable

  20. Effects of N-acetylcysteine on asthma exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyali, Masoud; Poorhasan Amiri, Ali; Sharifpoor, Ali; Zalli, Fatemeh

    2010-06-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion and increased oxidative stress are clinical and pathophysiological features of asthma exacerbation. We studied effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) as a mucolytic and antioxidant agent in asthma exacerbation. In this randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study 50 patients ( 17 male, 33 female, mean age 48.94+/-13.68) with asthma exacerbation were randomized to receive either oral 600 mg b.d. N-acetylcysteine or placebo in addition to standard treatment during 5 days hospitalization. Daily measurements of wheezing, dyspnea, cough, sputum, expectoration, night sleep scores and morning PEFR were performed. There was no significant difference in wheezing score between patients assigned NAC and those assigned placebo in day 5(0.84[SD 0.94] VS 0.87[SD 0.79]) and also in cough score (0.72[SD 0.84] VS 0.79[SD 0.97]), dyspnea score (0.84[SD 1.06] VS 0.91[SD 1.01]), sputum score(0.79[SD 0.83] VS 0.62[SD 0.71]), expectoration score(0.79[SD 0.97] VS 0.83[SD 1.09]), night sleep score(1[SD 1.17] VS 0.67[SD 0.98] and morning PEFR (256[SD 96.36] VS 282[SD 98.86]). We concluded that addition of N-acetylcysteine to usual asthma medication has no significant effect in treatment of asthma exacerbation.

  1. How Clinical Diagnosis Might Exacerbate the Stigma of Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Patrick W.

    2007-01-01

    Stigma can greatly exacerbate the experience of mental illness. Diagnostic classification frequently used by clinical social workers may intensify this stigma by enhancing the public's sense of "groupness" and "differentness" when perceiving people with mental illness. The homogeneity assumed by stereotypes may lead mental health professionals and…

  2. Assessment of Aerobic Exercise Adverse Effects during COPD Exacerbation Hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Knaut

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aerobic exercise performed after hospital discharge for exacerbated COPD patients is already recommended to improve respiratory and skeletal muscle strength, increase tolerance to activity, and reduce the sensation of dyspnea. Previous studies have shown that anaerobic activity can clinically benefit patients hospitalized with exacerbated COPD. However, there is little information on the feasibility and safety of aerobic physical activity performed by patients with exacerbated COPD during hospitalization. Objective. To evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise on vital signs in hospitalized patients with exacerbated COPD. Patients and Methods. Eleven COPD patients (63% female, FEV1: 34.2 ± 13.9% and age: 65 ± 11 years agreed to participate. Aerobic exercise was initiated 72 hours after admission on a treadmill; speed was obtained from the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test (6MWT. Vital signs were assessed before and after exercise. Results. During the activity systolic blood pressure increased from 125.2 ± 13.6 to 135.8 ± 15.0 mmHg (p=0.004 and respiratory rate from 20.9 ± 4.4 to 24.2 ± 4.5 rpm (p=0.008 and pulse oximetry (SpO2 decreased from 93.8 ± 2.3 to 88.5 ± 5.7% (p<0.001. Aerobic activity was considered intense, heart rate ranged from 99.2 ± 11.5 to 119.1 ± 11.1 bpm at the end of exercise (p=0.092, and patients reached on average 76% of maximum heart rate. Conclusion. Aerobic exercise conducted after 72 hours of hospitalization in patients with exacerbated COPD appears to be safe.

  3. One-year mortality after severe COPD exacerbation in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeni Mekov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One-year mortality in COPD patients is reported to be between 4% and 43%, depending on the group examined. Aim To examine the one-year mortality in COPD patients after severe exacerbation and the correlation between mortality and patients’ characteristics and comorbidities. Methods A total of 152 COPD patients hospitalized for severe exacerbation were assessed for vitamin D status, diabetes mellitus (DM, arterial hypertension (AH, and metabolic syndrome (MS. Data were gathered about smoking status and number of exacerbations in previous year. CAT and mMRC questionnaires were completed by all patients. Pre- and post-bronchodilatory spirometry was performed. One-year mortality was established from national death register. Results One-year mortality is 7.2%. DM, MS, and VD are not predictors for one-year mortality. However there is a trend for increased mortality in patients with AH (9.5% vs. 2.1%, p = 0.107. There is increased mortality in patients with mMRC > 2 (11.1 vs. 0%, p = 0.013. The presence of severe exacerbation in the previous year is a risk factor for mortality (12.5% vs. 1.4%, p = 0.009. There is a trend for increased mortality in the group with FEV1  80% may be factors for good prognosis. Risk factors for increased mortality are age, FEV1 value, severe exacerbation in previous year and reduced quality of life.

  4. The Burden of Illness Related to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations in Québec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Dang-Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD prevalence in Canada has risen over time. COPD-related exacerbations contribute to the increased health care utilization (HCU in this population. This study investigated the impact of exacerbations on COPD-related HCU. Methods. This retrospective observational cohort study used patient data from the Québec provincial health insurance databases. Eligible patients with a new HCU claim with a diagnostic billing for COPD during 2001–2010 were followed until March 31, 2011. Exacerbation rates and time to first exacerbation were assessed. Unadjusted analyses and multivariable models compared the rate of HCU by exacerbation classification (any [moderate/severe], moderate, or severe. Results. The exacerbation event rate in patients with an exacerbation was 34.3 events/100 patient-years (22.7 for moderate exacerbations and 11.6 for severe exacerbations. Median time to first exacerbation of any classification was 37 months. In unadjusted analyses, COPD-related HCU significantly increased with exacerbation severity. In the multivariable, HCU rates were significantly higher after exacerbation versus before exacerbation (p<0.01 for patients with an exacerbation or moderate exacerbations. For severe exacerbations, general practitioner, respiratory specialist, emergency room, and hospital visits were significantly higher after exacerbation versus before exacerbation (p<0.001. Conclusions. Exacerbations were associated with increased HCU, which was more pronounced for patients with severe exacerbations. Interventions to reduce the risk of exacerbations in patients with COPD may reduce disease burden.

  5. Vascular amyloidosis impairs the gliovascular unit in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough, Ian F.; Robel, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cerebral blood flow impairs cognitive function and ultimately causes irreparable damage to brain tissue. The gliovascular unit, composed of neural and vascular cells, assures sufficient blood supply to active brain regions. Astrocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, and pericytes are important players within the gliovascular unit modulating vessel diameters. While the importance of the gliovascular unit and the signals involved in regulating local blood flow to match neuronal activity is now well recognized, surprisingly little is known about this interface in disease. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with reduced cerebral blood flow. Here, we studied how the gliovascular unit is affected in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, using a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging approaches. We specifically labelled vascular amyloid in living mice using the dye methoxy-XO4. We elicited vessel responses ex vivo using either pharmacological stimuli or cell-specific calcium uncaging in vascular smooth muscle cells or astrocytes. Multi-photon in vivo imaging through a cranial window allowed us to complement our ex vivo data in the presence of blood flow after label-free optical activation of vascular smooth muscle cells in the intact brain. We found that vascular amyloid deposits separated astrocyte end-feet from the endothelial vessel wall. High-resolution 3D images demonstrated that vascular amyloid developed in ring-like structures around the vessel circumference, essentially forming a rigid cast. Where vascular amyloid was present, stimulation of astrocytes or vascular smooth muscle cells via ex vivo Ca2+ uncaging or in vivo optical activation produced only poor vascular responses. Strikingly, vessel segments that were unaffected by vascular amyloid responded to the same extent as vessels from age-matched control animals. We conclude that while astrocytes can still release vasoactive substances, vascular amyloid deposits render blood vessels rigid and

  6. A case of pulmonary dialysis-related amyloidosis with reticular opacity of the lung in a patient undergoing long-term dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiura, Hidekazu; Nakayama, Kayu; Takei, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2010-01-01

    Dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA) is one of the most important complications in long-term dialysis patients. Pulmonary involvement in patients with DRA has been rarely described, and lung radiographic findings have not yet been reported. The most common chronic lung disease process in chronic dialysis patients is interstitial fibrosis. This is the first case report of DRA presenting in the lung in a manner resembling interstitial pneumonia. This case study suggests that interstitial pneumoni...

  7. Complex interplay between brain function and structure during cerebral amyloidosis in APP transgenic mouse strains revealed by multi-parametric MRI comparison.

    OpenAIRE

    Grandjean J.; Derungs R.; Kulic L.; Welt T.; Henkerlmann M.; Nitsch R.M.; Rudin M.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the aging population. Neuroimaging methods in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have helped reveal alterations in the brain structure metabolism and function of patients and in groups at risk of developing AD yet the nature of these alterations is poorly understood. Neuroimaging in mice is attractive for investigating mechanisms underlying functional and structural changes associated with AD pathology. Several precl...

  8. Cerebral oxygenation after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessel, Trine W; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare absolute values of regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (cStO2 ) during haemodynamic transition after birth and repeatability during steady state for two commercial near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) devices. METHODS: In a prospective observational study, the INVOS 5100C and FORE......: The INVOS and FORE-SIGHT cStO2 estimates showed oxygenation-level-dependent difference during birth transition. The better repeatability of FORE-SIGHT could be due to the lower response to change in saturation....

  9. Oligodendrogenesis after Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruilan eZhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNeural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricle of adult rodent brain generate oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs that disperse throughout the corpus callosum and striatum where some of OPCs differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Studies in animal models of stroke demonstrate that cerebral ischemia induces oligodendrogenesis during brain repair processes. This article will review evidence of stroke-induced proliferation and differentiation of OPCs that are either resident in white matter or are derived from SVZ neural progenitor cells and of therapies that amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis in ischemic brain.

  10. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns.

  11. Cerebral aneurysms – an audit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Abstract. We performed an audit to determine the profile of cerebral aneurysms at the Universitas Hospital Bloem- fontein, the only government hospital with a vascular suite in the Free State and Northern Cape area. Two hun- dred and twenty-three government patients, diagnosed with cerebral aneurysms during the period.

  12. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes evidence in humans for an association between hyperventilation (HV)-induced hypocapnia and a reduction in cerebral perfusion leading to syncope defined as transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). The cerebral vasculature is sensitive to changes in both the arterial carbon...

  13. Combination of lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone therapy promotes the anticoagulant activity of warfarin in patients with immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Fumiaki; Fuchida, Shin-Ichi; Ise, Fumitaka; Kado, Yoko; Ueda, Kumi; Kokufu, Takatoshi; Okano, Akira; Hatsuse, Mayumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Nakayama, Yuko; Takara, Kohji; Shimazaki, Chihiro

    2017-07-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the drug interactions between warfarin and combination chemotherapy with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone in immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) amyloidosis patients with unstable international normalized ratios (INR). The changes to INR values over time in 3 AL amyloidosis patients treated with warfarin and a combination of lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone between March 2011 and February 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. The mean INR value was 1.52 prior to the combination chemotherapy, and the value increased 1.7-fold during treatment. The median time to reach maximum values was 17 days. Horn's drug Interaction Probability Scale indicated a possible interaction between lenalidomide and warfarin. These patients exhibited no marked alterations in hepatic function or serum albumin concentrations prior to and following combination chemotherapy and no additional administration of CYP2C9 inhibitors or vitamin K supplements was conducted. In addition, no patient experienced chemotherapy-induced nausea or appetite loss. These findings suggest that the total clearance or protein binding of warfarin remained unchanged. Therefore, the combination of warfarin and lenalidomide may cause a pharmacodynamic interaction, more likely by inhibiting the production of interleukin-6. In conclusion, clinically important interactions between warfarin and lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone therapy were observed in AL amyloidosis patients, where INR values signi ficantly increased. Therefore, close and regular monitoring of patients during the course of treatment is important, and the dose of warfarin should be reduced if required.

  14. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  15. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, I. [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  16. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. New cerebral protection strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, Serge C; Engelhard, Kristin; Werner, Christian

    2005-10-01

    This article presents an overview of the most recent and important strategies to reduce secondary brain damage. There is currently no magic bullet available to protect the brain after neuronal injury. This is related to the complex pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, which makes it unlikely that a single pharmacological intervention results in sustained neuroprotection. Analyses of clinical studies reveal that acute physiologic derangements (e.g. fever, hypertension and hypotension, hypoxemia, hypercapnia, hyperglycemia) are the most important predictors of unfavorable outcome after brain injury and have to be treated. The effectiveness of anesthetic agents to extend the ischemic tolerance of neurons has been demonstrated in experimental settings, but such benefits have not been demonstrated in humans. The effectiveness of osmodiuretics to decrease elevated intracranial pressure, a factor with relevance to outcome, has been demonstrated. Infusion of magnesium in patients with subarachnoidal hemorrhage can reduce the occurrence of delayed ischemia caused by cerebrovascular spasm. The prophylactic administration of glucocorticoids should be avoided. While the positive effects of chronic administration of statins to reduce the incidence of stroke has been demonstrated in several clinical studies, the protective effect of acute administration of statins after a cerebral insult has do be defined. Control of physiological variables, avoidance of hyperthermia, intensive control of plasma glucose concentrations, use of anesthetic agents and osmodiuretics to control intracranial hypertension and the possible prophylactic administration of magnesium in patients at risk of vasospasm and of statins in patients with cerebrovascular risk factors are currently the most important strategies to reduce neuronal injury.

  18. Modulation of cerebral RAGE expression following nitric oxide synthase inhibition in rats subjected to focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Rosaria; Demartini, Chiara; Zanaboni, Anna Maria; Blandini, Fabio; Amantea, Diana; Tassorelli, Cristina

    2017-04-05

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a key mediator of neuroinflammation following cerebral ischemia. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a dualistic role in cerebral ischemia, depending on whether it originates from neuronal, inducible or endothelial synthase. Although a dynamic interplay between RAGE and NO pathways exists, its relevance in ischemic stroke has not been investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibition on RAGE expression in rats subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). Full-length (fl-RAGE) gene expression was elevated in the striatum and, to a lesser extent, in the cortex of rats undergone tMCAo. The exacerbation of cortical damage caused by systemic administration of L-N-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine (L-NIO), a relatively selective inhibitor of endothelial NOS (eNOS), was associated with elevated mRNA levels of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and fl-RAGE in both the cortex and the striatum. Conversely, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a non-selective NOS inhibitor, decreased cortical damage, did not affect cerebral cytokine mRNA levels, while it increased fl-RAGE mRNA expression only in the striatum. Fl-RAGE striatal protein levels varied accordingly with observed mRNA changes in the striatum, while in the cortex, RAGE protein levels were reduced by tMCAo and further decreased following L-NIO treatment. Modulation of RAGE expression by different inhibitors of NOS may have opposite effects on transient cortical ischemia: the non selective inhibition of NOS activity is protective, while the selective inhibition of eNOS is harmful, probably via the activation of inflammatory pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Differences in systemic adaptive immunity contribute to the 'frequent exacerbator' COPD phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, J.X.; Simons, S.O.; Pike, R.; Stauss, H.J.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Hurst, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some COPD patients are more susceptible to exacerbations than others. Mechanisms underlying these differences in susceptibility are not well understood. We hypothesized that altered cell mediated immune responses may underlie a propensity to suffer from frequent exacerbations in COPD.

  20. Withdrawal of inhaled glucocorticoids and exacerbations of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Helgo; Disse, Bernd; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids in combination with long-acting bronchodilators is recommended in patients with frequent exacerbations of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the benefit of inhaled glucocorticoids in addition to two long......-acting bronchodilators has not been fully explored. METHODS: In this 12-month, double-blind, parallel-group study, 2485 patients with a history of exacerbation of COPD received triple therapy consisting of tiotropium (at a dose of 18 μg once daily), salmeterol (50 μg twice daily), and the inhaled glucocorticoid...... findings, health status, and dyspnea were also monitored. RESULTS: As compared with continued glucocorticoid use, glucocorticoid withdrawal met the prespecified noninferiority criterion of 1.20 for the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) with respect to the first moderate or severe COPD...

  1. Gene expression profiles of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Kazuhisa; Gibson, Kevin F; Lindell, Kathleen O; Richards, Thomas J; Zhang, Yingze; Dhir, Rajiv; Bisceglia, Michelle; Gilbert, Sebastien; Yousem, Samuel A; Song, Jin Woo; Kim, Dong Soon; Kaminski, Naftali

    2009-07-15

    The molecular mechanisms underlying acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are poorly understood. We studied the global gene expression signature of acute exacerbations of IPF. To understand the gene expression patterns of acute exacerbations of IPF. RNA was extracted from 23 stable IPF lungs, 8 IPF lungs with acute exacerbation (IPF-AEx), and 15 control lungs and used for hybridization on Agilent gene expression microarrays. Functional analysis of genes was performed with Spotfire and Genomica. Gene validations for MMP1, MMP7, AGER, DEFA1-3, COL1A2, and CCNA2 were performed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase dUTP nick end-labeling assays were performed on the same tissues used for the microarray. ELISA for alpha-defensins was performed on plasma from control subjects, patients with stable IPF, and patients with IPF-AEx. Gene expression patterns in IPF-AEx and IPF samples were similar for the genes that distinguish IPF from control lungs. Five hundred and seventy-nine genes were differentially expressed (false discovery rate < 5%) between stable IPF and IPF-AEx. Functional analysis of these genes did not indicate any evidence of an infectious or overwhelming inflammatory etiology. CCNA2 and alpha-defensins were among the most up-regulated genes. CCNA2 and alpha-defensin protein levels were also higher and localized to the epithelium of IPF-AEx, where widespread apoptosis was also detected. alpha-Defensin protein levels were increased in the peripheral blood of patients with IPF-AEx. Our results indicate that IPF-AEx is characterized by enhanced epithelial injury and proliferation, as reflected by increases in CCNA2 and alpha-defensins and apoptosis of epithelium. The concomitant increase in alpha-defensins in the peripheral blood and lungs may suggest their use as biomarkers for this disorder.

  2. Intranasal substituted cathinone "bath salts" psychosis potentially exacerbated by diphenhydramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Erik W; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Willing, Laura M; Holstege, Christopher P

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe a case of intranasal "bath salts"-associated psychosis. Symptoms developed during a 3-week binge and were potentially exacerbated by oral diphenhydramine taken for insomnia. The clinical case conference includes expert discussion from 3 disciplines: emergency medicine toxicology, behavioral pharmacology, and addiction medicine. It is hoped that the discussion will provide insight into the clinical aspects and challenges of addressing acute substituted cathinone toxicity, including acute psychosis, a major adverse effect of bath salts consumption.

  3. Genetic Mechanisms in Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha Palikhe, Nami; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jin, Hyun Jung; Hwang, Eui-Kyung; Nam, Young Hee; Park, Hae-Sim

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatics following the exposure to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The key pathogenic mechanisms associated with AERD are the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) and increased CysLTR1 expression in the airway mucosa and decreased lipoxin and PGE2 synthesis. Genetic studies have suggested a role for variability of genes in disease susceptibility and the resp...

  4. Exacerbation of asthma secondary to fentanyl transdermal patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Malvinder S

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways associated with hyperresponsiveness, reversible airflow limitation and respiratory symptoms.1 All patients with asthma are at risk for exacerbations that may range from mild to life threatening. Different triggers cause asthma exacerbation by inducing airway inflammation and/or provoking bronchospasm. Allergen-induced bronchospasm results from IgE-dependent release of mediators including histamine, prostaglandins and leukotrienes.2 Opiates are commonly used to treat chronic pain.3 Although hypersensitivity to opiates or accumulation of opiates can cause respiratory depression, opiates are also used in the management of cough and dyspnoea associated with advanced COPD and heart failure.4(,)5 Here, a report is presented on a patient who developed persistent exacerbation of underlying stable asthma after initiating fentanyl transdermal therapy for chronic low back pain. He underwent extensive investigations and a detailed reassessment of history, especially medication history, led to the possible causative factor; once recognised, removal of the offending agent (fenatnyl) resulted in complete improvement in his symptoms within 72 h.

  5. T cells exacerbate Lyme borreliosis in TLR2-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie E. Lasky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection of humans with the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes Lyme borreliosis and can lead to clinical manifestations such as, arthritis, carditis and neurological conditions. Experimental infection of mice recapitulates many of these symptoms and serves as a model system for the investigation of disease pathogenesis and immunity. Innate immunity is known to drive the development of Lyme arthritis and carditis, but the mechanisms driving this response remain unclear. Innate immune cells recognize B. burgdorferi surface lipoproteins primarily via Toll-like receptor (TLR2; however, previous work has demonstrated TLR2-/- mice had exacerbated disease and increased bacterial burden. We demonstrate increased CD4 and CD8 T cell infiltrates in B. burgdorferi-infected joints and hearts of C3H TLR2-/- mice. In vivo depletion of either CD4 or CD8 T cells reduced Borrelia-induced joint swelling and lowered tissue spirochete burden, while depletion of CD8 T cells alone reduced disease severity scores. Exacerbation of Lyme arthritis correlated with increased production of CXCL9 by synoviocytes and this was reduced with CD8 T cell depletion. These results demonstrate T cells can exacerbate Lyme disease pathogenesis and prolong disease resolution possibly through dysregulation of inflammatory responses and inhibition of bacterial clearance.

  6. Factors influencing exacerbation-related self-management in patients with COPD : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpershoek, Y. J G; Vervoort, S. C J M; Nijssen, L. I T; Trappenburg, J. C A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31144556X; Schuurmans, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with COPD, self-management skills are important to reduce the impact of exacerbations. However, both detection and adequate response to exacerbations appear to be difficult for some patients. Little is known about the underlying process of exacerbation-related

  7. Cerebral Palsy: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Sheffali; Sondhi, Vishal

    2017-11-20

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormalities of muscle tone, movement and motor skills, and is attributed to injury to the developing brain. The clinical features of this entity evolve over time and the specific CP syndrome may be recognizable only after 3-5 y of age; although suggestive signs and symptoms may be present at an earlier age. The management involves neurological rehabilitation (addressing muscle tonal abnormalities, and devising physical and occupational therapies) and diagnosis and management of co-morbidities (including epilepsy, impairment of cognition, vision, hearing, and disturbances of growth and gastrointestinal function). The management, therefore, is multidisciplinary involving the treating physician working with a team of rehabilitation-, orthopedic-, psychologic-, and social care- providers.

  8. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, F.; Steudel, H.; Klotz, D.

    1986-02-01

    Since 1982 (Hauser and co-workers), literature has reported focal cerebral tissue charges in AIDS patients whose diagnosis was unclear at first but which could be identified finally as florid toxoplasmosis encephalitis by biopsy and autopsy. It was found that the value of otherwise reliable serological tests (KBR, Sabin-Feldmann tests, etc.) is questionable in patients with severely impaired or incompetent immune systems, and, in particular, that a negative or uncharacteristic test result may not preclude any opportunistic infection process. Furthermore, isolation of Toxoplasma gondii or specific antibodies from the cerebrospinal fluid will be successful in exceptional cases only. In patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy syndrome, the differential diagnosis will have to include - first and foremost - reactivated toxoplasma infection (not newly acquired, as a rule) if central neurological symptoms occur.

  9. Cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, José Manuel; Canhão, Patrícia; Aguiar de Sousa, Diana

    2016-12-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has an incidence of 1.32/100,000/years in high-income countries, and higher in middle- and low-income countries. CVT is more frequent in infants and children young adults and females, especially during pregnancy/puerperium. CVT are now being diagnosed with increasing frequency because of the increased awareness and higher use of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) for investigating patients with acute and subacute headaches and new onset seizures. CVT rarely present as a stroke syndrome. Their most frequent presentations are isolated headache, intracranial hypertension syndrome, seizures, a lobar syndrome and encephalopathy. The confirmation of the diagnosis of CVT relies on the demonstration of thrombi in the cerebral veins and/or sinuses by MR/MR venography or veno CT. The more frequent risk factors/associated conditions for CVT are genetic prothrombotic conditions, antiphospholipid syndrome and other acquired prothrombotic diseases, including cancer, oral contraceptives, puerperium and pregnancy, infections and trauma. The prognosis of CVT is in general favorable, as acute death rate is below 5% and only 15% of the patients remain dependent or die. Treatment in the acute phase includes management of the associated condition, anticoagulation with either low molecular weight or unfractionated heparin, treatment of intracranial hypertension, prevention of recurrent seizures and headache relief. In patients in severe condition on admission or who deteriorate despite anticoagulation, local thrombolysis or thrombectomy is an option. Decompressive surgery is lifesaving in patients with large venous infarcts or hemorrhage with impending herniation. After the acute phase, patients should anticoagulated for a variable period of time, depending on their inherent thrombotic risk. CVT patients may experience recurrent seizures. Prophylaxis with anti-epileptic drugs is recommended after the first seizure, in those with hemispheric lesions. There

  10. Orally Administrated Ascorbic Acid Suppresses Neuronal Damage and Modifies Expression of SVCT2 and GLUT1 in the Brain of Diabetic Rats with Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiro Iwata

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is known to exacerbate cerebral ischemic injury. In the present study, we investigated antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of oral supplementation of ascorbic acid (AA on cerebral injury caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/Re in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. We also evaluated the effects of AA on expression of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2 and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 after MCAO/Re in the brain. The diabetic state markedly aggravated MCAO/Re-induced cerebral damage, as assessed by infarct volume and edema. Pretreatment with AA (100 mg/kg, p.o. for two weeks significantly suppressed the exacerbation of damage in the brain of diabetic rats. AA also suppressed the production of superoxide radical, activation of caspase-3, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β in the ischemic penumbra. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that expression of SVCT2 was upregulated primarily in neurons and capillary endothelial cells after MCAO/Re in the nondiabetic cortex, accompanied by an increase in total AA (AA + dehydroascorbic acid in the tissue, and that these responses were suppressed in the diabetic rats. AA supplementation to the diabetic rats restored these responses to the levels of the nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, AA markedly upregulated the basal expression of GLUT1 in endothelial cells of nondiabetic and diabetic cortex, which did not affect total AA levels in the cortex. These results suggest that daily intake of AA attenuates the exacerbation of cerebral ischemic injury in a diabetic state, which may be attributed to anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects via the improvement of augmented oxidative stress in the brain. AA supplementation may protect endothelial function against the exacerbated ischemic oxidative injury in the diabetic state and improve AA transport through SVCT2 in the cortex.

  11. Identification and management of adults with asthma prone to exacerbations: can we do better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Rekha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exacerbations are a major cause of morbidity in asthma and generate high health costs. Identification and management of adults with asthma who are prone to exacerbations is of considerable importance as by this means it should be possible to reduce the number of patients who currently experience inadequately controlled disease. Exacerbations occur most frequently in individuals with severe disease. Other risk factors include a history of a recent exacerbation, co-morbidities such as a raised body mass index and psychological problems as well as current smoking and lower socio-economic status. A low FEV1, particularly if combined with the additional information from questionnaires helps predict exacerbations. Despite the association between these risk factors and exacerbations it remains difficult to accurately predict in an individual patient with asthma whether they will go on to develop an exacerbation in the future. A major aim of international guidelines on the management of asthma is to prevent future risks of exacerbations, but some patients, particularly those with severe disease, respond poorly to current therapies and continue to experience recurrent exacerbations. There is an unmet need for improved management strategies and drugs targeted at preventing asthma exacerbations. Monitoring induced sputum eosinophil cell counts is helpful in preventing exacerbations in some patient with severe asthma. Future developments are likely to include the identification of better biomarkers to predict exacerbations or the cause of exacerbations, augmentation of the immunological response to viruses at the time of the exacerbation, the use of telemonitoring in patients with severe asthma and the development of improved therapies targeted at reducing exacerbations.

  12. Inositol trisphosphate 3-kinase B is increased in human Alzheimer brain and exacerbates mouse Alzheimer pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stygelbout, Virginie; Leroy, Karelle; Pouillon, Valérie; Ando, Kunie; D'Amico, Eva; Jia, Yonghui; Luo, H Robert; Duyckaerts, Charles; Erneux, Christophe; Schurmans, Stéphane; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2014-02-01

    ITPKB phosphorylates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate into inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate and controls signal transduction in various hematopoietic cells. Surprisingly, it has been reported that the ITPKB messenger RNA level is significantly increased in the cerebral cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease, compared with control subjects. As extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 activation is increased in the Alzheimer brain and as ITPKB is a regulator of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 activation in some hematopoietic cells, we tested whether this increased activation in Alzheimer's disease might be related to an increased activity of ITPKB. We show here that ITPKB protein level was increased 3-fold in the cerebral cortex of most patients with Alzheimer's disease compared with control subjects, and accumulated in dystrophic neurites associated to amyloid plaques. In mouse Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, Itpkb overexpression was associated with increased cell apoptosis and increased β-secretase 1 activity leading to overproduction of amyloid-β peptides. In this cellular model, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated kinase kinases 1/2 completely prevented overproduction of amyloid-β peptides. Transgenic overexpression of ITPKB in mouse forebrain neurons was not sufficient to induce amyloid plaque formation or tau hyperphosphorylation. However, in the 5X familial Alzheimer's disease mouse model, neuronal ITPKB overexpression significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 activation and β-secretase 1 activity, resulting in exacerbated Alzheimer's disease pathology as shown by increased astrogliosis, amyloid-β40 peptide production and tau hyperphosphorylation. No impact on pathology was observed in the 5X familial Alzheimer's disease mouse model when a catalytically inactive ITPKB protein was overexpressed. Together, our results point to the ITPKB/inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate/extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1

  13. Tacrolimus prevents murine cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lam Quoc; Nhi, Dang My; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hamano, Shinjiro; Hirayama, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil are immunosuppressants frequently used in human organ transplantation. Tacrolimus is also reported to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro. Here, we report that tacrolimus prevented the death from cerebral malaria of Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected C57BL/6J mice, but not their death from malaria due to the high parasitaemia and severe anaemia. The mycophenolate mofetil-treated mice showed higher mortality from cerebral malaria and succumbed to malaria earlier than tacrolimus-treated littermates. Tacrolimus attenuated the infiltration of mononuclear cells including pathogenic CD8+ T cells into the brain. It appears to prevent murine cerebral malaria through the inhibition of cerebral infiltration of CD8+ T cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Scoliosis in Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1998-01-01

    The natural history and risk factors for progressive severe scoliosis were evaluated in 37 institutionalized spastic cerebral palsy patients followed at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, and at Centers in Nagano, Japan.

  15. [Senile macula and cerebral functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offret, G; Dhermy, P

    1984-01-01

    Because of similarities in the physiology and histology of the intraocular and the cerebral circulations, a study of cerebral disorders in patients with senile macular choroidal degeneration (S.M.C.D.) was undertaken. Of 26 cases of S.M.C.D. with sufficient follow-up, 7 showed signs of cerebral disfunction. Types of problems most often found were inordinate disturbances of short-term memory, judgement, and social behavior. It appears that S.M.C.D. tends more to be associated with mental involution than with sensory-motor deficits. Various methods of investigating the cerebro-vascular circulation can be helpful in discussing causes of mental involution, including doppler ultrasound, echotomography Xemon 133 inhalation, positron emission tomography, C.T. scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance scanning. The physiopathology may involve relative cerebral ischemia, modification of neurotransmitters, and free radical formation, as well as immunologic factors. Specific treatment may one day become reality.

  16. Learn More About Cerebral Palsy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-30

    This podcast describes the causes, preventions, types, and signs and symptoms of cerebral palsy.  Created: 3/30/2008 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.   Date Released: 3/21/2008.

  17. Cerebral and Sinus Vein Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The typical target INR is 2.0 to 3.0. One of the newer oral blood thinners (rivaroxaban [ ... the Council on Epidemiology and Prevention . Diagnosis and management of cerebral venous thrombosis: a statement for healthcare ...

  18. [Systemic Buschke's scleredema with cardiomyopathy, monoclonal IgG kappa gammopathy and amyloidosis. Case report with autopsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, R A; Badra, R E; Martí, H M; Maxit, M J

    1998-01-01

    A 73 year old retired truck driver and blacksmith was studied in June 1996 for thoracic pain and was diagnosed as acute pericarditis which responded well to steroid treatment. In January 1997, he noted swelling of the abdominal skin, genitalia and limbs, sparing the feet. He was euthyroid, did not have evidence of diabetes or a Raynaud's phenomenon. His proteinogram showed an IgG-Kappa monoclonal paraprotein M component, 1.31 g/oo. TSH and tetraiodotironine were normal; ESR 16 mm in the first hour. As he did not respond to treatment he was referred to our hospital in March 1997. On physical examination the most relevant findings were a non-pitting edema of the abdomen and lower limbs, sparing the feet. An echocardiogram was consistent with an infiltrative cardiomyopathy. Soon after his hospitalization his condition worsened suddenly with severe bradicardia (28/minute) due to a junctional rhythm and righ bundle branch block. He suffered a cardiac arrest and died. The autopsy findings favoured the diagnosis of systemic scleredema adultorum of Buschke. Amyloid deposits were also found although not abundant, with a similar distribution except in the skin. In this article the clinical and autopsy findings are presented in a patient showing coexistence of systemic Buschke's scleredema with an infiltrative cardiomyopathy, IgG Kappa gammopathy and amyloidosis.

  19. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Idol controls brain LDL receptor expression, ApoE clearance, and Aβ amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinkuk; Gao, Jie; Kim, Jaekwang; Hong, Cynthia; Kim, Jungsu; Tontonoz, Peter

    2015-11-18

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is an important modifier of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, and its abundance has been linked to the clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain. The pathways that control the clearance of ApoE in the brain are incompletely understood. We report that Idol, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) for degradation, is a critical determinant of brain ApoE metabolism and Aβ plaque biogenesis. Previous work has shown that Idol contributes minimally to the regulation of hepatic LDLR expression in mice. By contrast, we demonstrate that Idol is a primary physiological regulator of LDLR protein in the brain, controlling the clearance of both ApoE-containing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles and Aβ. We studied the consequences of loss of Idol expression in a transgenic mouse model of Aβ amyloidosis. Idol deficiency increased brain LDLR, decreased ApoE, decreased soluble and insoluble Aβ, reduced amyloid plaque burden, and ameliorated neuroinflammation. These findings identify Idol as a gatekeeper of LDLR-dependent ApoE and Aβ clearance in the brain and a potential enzyme target for therapeutic intervention in AD. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Amyloidosis, synucleinopathy, and prion encephalopathy in a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease: the CNS-biomarker potential of peripheral blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartholomew J Naughton

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS IIIB is a devastating neuropathic lysosomal storage disease with complex pathology. This study identifies molecular signatures in peripheral blood that may be relevant to MPS IIIB pathogenesis using a mouse model. Genome-wide gene expression microarrays on pooled RNAs showed dysregulation of 2,802 transcripts in blood from MPS IIIB mice, reflecting pathological complexity of MPS IIIB, encompassing virtually all previously reported and as yet unexplored disease aspects. Importantly, many of the dysregulated genes are reported to be tissue-specific. Further analyses of multiple genes linked to major pathways of neurodegeneration demonstrated a strong brain-blood correlation in amyloidosis and synucleinopathy in MPS IIIB. We also detected prion protein (Prnp deposition in the CNS and Prnp dysregulation in the blood in MPS IIIB mice, suggesting the involvement of Prnp aggregation in neuropathology. Systemic delivery of trans-BBB-neurotropic rAAV9-hNAGLU vector mediated not only efficient restoration of functional α-N-acetylglucosaminidase and clearance of lysosomal storage pathology in the central nervous system (CNS and periphery, but also the correction of impaired neurodegenerative molecular pathways in the brain and blood. Our data suggest that molecular changes in blood may reflect pathological status in the CNS and provide a useful tool for identifying potential CNS-specific biomarkers for MPS IIIB and possibly other neurological diseases.

  1. CEREBRAL PALSY : ANTENATAL RISK FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasa Rao; Vidyullatha; Subbalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Cerebral palsy is caused by abnormal development or damage to the parts of the brain that control movement, balance, and posture. Most often the problems occur during pregnancy; however, they may also occur during childbirth, or shortly after birth. Often the cause is unknown. AIM: To study the different antenatal maternal risk factors associated with cere...

  2. Parálisis cerebral :

    OpenAIRE

    Aguado Navarro, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    Se aborda el tema de la parálisis cerebral definiendo qué es, clasificando los tipos de parálisis dependiendo de la afectación y las características principales. Se explican algunos de sus tratamientos, se dan sistemas alternativos y/o aumentativos de comunicación para un alumno con PC (parálisis cerebral).

  3. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  4. Predicting an asthma exacerbation in children 2 to 5 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swern, Arlene S; Tozzi, Carol A; Knorr, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    an exacerbation. Caregiver-reported information (daytime cough, breathing difficulties, limitation of activity, nighttime cough or awakening, daytime and nighttime beta2-agonist use) were analyzed using general estimating equations with an exchangeable within-subject log odds ratio regression structure...... to identify predictors of an exacerbation. RESULTS: Average symptom scores and beta2-agonist use increased significantly before exacerbation but at different rates. A combination of daytime cough and wheeze and nighttime beta2-agonist use 1 day before the exacerbation was identified as strongly predictive...... of an exacerbation. These methods predicted 149 (66.8%) of the exacerbations with a very low false-positive rate of 14.2%. CONCLUSIONS: No individual symptom was predictive of an imminent asthma exacerbation, but a combination of increased daytime cough, daytime wheeze, and nighttime beta2-agonist use 1 day before...

  5. Anxiety after cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation: exacerbated by stress and prevented by minocycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neigh, Gretchen N; Karelina, Kate; Glasper, Erica R; Bowers, Stephanie L K; Zhang, Ning; Popovich, Phillip G; DeVries, A Courtney

    2009-11-01

    Stress is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, most of the research on this topic has focused on incidence rather than outcome. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of prior exposure to chronic stress on ischemia-induced neuronal death, microglial activation, and anxiety-like behavior. In Experiment 1, mice were exposed to 3 weeks of daily restraint (3 hours) and then subjected to either 8 minutes of cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) or sham surgery. Anxiety-like behavior, microglial activation, and neuronal damage were assessed on postischemic Day 4. In Experiment 2, mice were infused intracerebroventricularly with minocycline (10 microg/day) to determine the effect of inhibiting post-CA/CPR microglial activation on the development of anxiety-like behavior and neuronal death. CA/CPR precipitated anxiety-like behavior and increased microglial activation and neuronal damage within the hippocampus relative to sham surgery. Prior exposure to stress exacerbated these measures among CA/CPR mice, but had no significant effect on sham-operated mice. Treatment with minocycline reduced both neuronal damage and anxiety-like behavior among CA/CPR animals. Anxiety-like behavior was significantly correlated with measures of microglial activation but not neuronal damage. A history of stress exposure increases the pathophysiological response to ischemia and anxiety-like behavior, whereas inhibiting microglial activation reduces neuronal damage and mitigates the development of anxiety-like behavior after CA/CPR. Thus, modulating inflammatory signaling after cerebral ischemia may be beneficial in protecting the brain and preventing the development of affective disorders.

  6. Predictors of Hospitalized Exacerbations and Mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Santibáñez

    Full Text Available Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD carry significant consequences for patients and are responsible for considerable health-care costs-particularly if hospitalization is required. Despite the importance of hospitalized exacerbations, relatively little is known about their determinants. This study aimed to analyze predictors of hospitalized exacerbations and mortality in COPD patients.This was a retrospective population-based cohort study. We selected 900 patients with confirmed COPD aged ≥35 years by simple random sampling among all COPD patients in Cantabria (northern Spain on December 31, 2011. We defined moderate exacerbations as events that led a care provider to prescribe antibiotics or corticosteroids and severe exacerbations as exacerbations requiring hospital admission. We observed exacerbation frequency over the previous year (2011 and following year (2012. We categorized patients according to COPD severity based on forced expiratory volume in 1 second (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] grades 1-4. We estimated the odds ratios (ORs by logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, COPD severity, and frequent exacerbator phenotype the previous year.Of the patients, 16.4% had ≥1 severe exacerbations, varying from 9.3% in mild GOLD grade 1 to 44% in very severe COPD patients. A history of at least two prior severe exacerbations was positively associated with new severe exacerbations (adjusted OR, 6.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.53-12.83 and mortality (adjusted OR, 7.63; 95%CI, 3.41-17.05. Older age and several comorbidities, such as heart failure and diabetes, were similarly associated.Hospitalized exacerbations occurred with all grades of airflow limitation. A history of severe exacerbations was associated with new hospitalized exacerbations and mortality.

  7. A role for interferon-gamma in focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Gregersen, Rikke; Meldgaard, Michael

    2004-01-01

    . Furthermore, the ischemic brain damage in IFN-gamma-transgenic mice was unaffected by recombinant soluble TNF receptor I. Taken together, the data argues against a role for IFNgamma in cerebral ischemia under normal conditions. However, when present, IFNgamma significantly exacerbates ischemia-induced brain...... damage by mechanisms that appear to be independent of TNF or synergistic neurotoxic interactions of IFNgamma and TNF Irrespective of the mechanism(s) involved, this enhancing effect of IFNgamma on ischemia-induced neurotoxicity may need to be considered in diseases where immune IFNgamma is involved...

  8. Incidence and outcomes of patients hospitalized with COPD exacerbation with and without pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søgaard M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mette Søgaard,1 Morten Madsen,1 Anders Løkke,2 Ole Hilberg,2 Henrik Toft Sørensen,1 Reimar W Thomsen1 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C, Denmark Background: Pneumonia may be a major contributor to hospitalizations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbation and influence their outcomes.Methods: We examined hospitalization rates, health resource utilization, 30-day mortality, and risk of subsequent hospitalizations for COPD exacerbations with and without pneumonia in Denmark during 2006–2012.Results: We identified 179,759 hospitalizations for COPD exacerbations, including 52,520 first-time hospitalizations (29.2%. Pneumonia was frequent in first-time exacerbations (36.1%, but declined in successive exacerbations to 25.6% by the seventh or greater exacerbation. Pneumonic COPD exacerbations increased 20% from 0.92 per 1,000 population in 2006 to 1.10 per 1,000 population in 2012. Nonpneumonic exacerbations decreased by 6% from 1.74 per 1,000 population to 1.63 per 1,000 population during the same period. A number of markers of health resource utilization were more prevalent in pneumonic exacerbations than in nonpneumonic exacerbations: length of stay (median 7 vs 4 days, intensive care unit admission (7.7% vs 12.5%, and several acute procedures. Thirty-day mortality was 12.1% in first-time pneumonic COPD exacerbations versus 8.3% in first-time nonpneumonic cases (adjusted HR [aHR] 1.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–1.24. Pneumonia also predicted increased mortality associated with a second exacerbation (aHR 1.14, 95% CI 1.11–1.18, and up to a seventh or greater exacerbation (aHR 1.10, 95% CI 1.07–1.13. In contrast, the aHR of a subsequent exacerbation was 8%–13% lower for patients with pneumonic exacerbations.Conclusions: Pneumonia is frequent among patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbations and is associated with increased health care

  9. A case of cerebral reversible vasoconstriction syndrome triggered by repetition transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mamiko; Yamate, Koji; Hayashi, Hiromi; Miura, Toyoaki; Kobayashi, Yasutaka

    2017-08-31

    A 75-year-old man was admitted for combined low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and intensive occupational therapy. Five days after the initiation of rTMS, he developed hypotension and temporary exacerbation of the right hemiplegia with thunderclap headache. MRA showed segmental stenosis of the left middle cerebral artery, which findings were improved at 9 days after the onset of the headache. He was diagnosed as having the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). The rTMS was recognized as safe rehabilitation treatment. However, it is necessary to recognize that RCVS can become one of the precipitants. This is the first report of RCVS triggered by rTMS.

  10. Differential Features of Cerebral Perfusion in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Compared to Alzheimer's Dementia using SPM Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Jae Woo [College of Medicine, Univ. of Donga, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Alzheimer's dementia (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are most common cause of dementia in elderly people. Clinical distinction in some cases of DLB from AD may be difficult as symptom profiles overlap. Some neuropathologic overlap is also seen as beta-amyloidosis and senile plaques can be found in both disease. Both disease also share severe acetylcholine depletion. We evaluated the differences of brain perfusion between DLB and AD using statistical parametric mapping analysis. Twelve DLB (mean age ; 68.8{+-}8.3 years, K-MMSE ; 17.3{+-}6.1) and 51 AD patients (mean age ; 71.4{+-}7.2 years, K-MMSE ; 16.7{+-}4.5), which were matched for age and severity of dementia, participated in this study. Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT was performed for measuring regional cerebral blood flow. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) software was used for automatic and objective approach to analyze SPECT image data. The SPECT data of the patients with DLB were compared to patients with AD. Comparison of the two dementia groups (uncorrected p<0.01) revealed significant hypoperfusion in both occipital (both middle occipital gyrus, Rt B no. 18 and Lt cuneus), both parietal (Lt parietal precuneus, Lt B no. 39, Lt inferior parietal lobule and Rt supramarginal gyrus) lobes in DLB compared with AD. Significant hyperperfusion was noted in Rt frontal (sup. frontal gyrus, B no.10, middle frontal gyrus, B no. 9, B no. 11, inf. frontal gyrus), Rt putamen, Lt ant. cingulate gyrus (B no. 24), both cerebellar post. lobe (Lt tuber, Lt declive, Lt tonsil, Rt declive) in DLB compared with AD. We found a significant differences in the cerebral perfusion pattern between DLB and AD. Differential feature of cerebral perfusion in DLB was both occipital hypoperfusion and preserved Rt frontal perfusion compared to AD. Therefore in difficult case of clinical an neuro pathologic diagnosis, brain perfusion SPECT with SPM analysis may be helpful to differentiate DLB from AD.

  11. Cerebral trypanosomiasis and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Apio Claudio Martins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36 year-old black female, complaining of headache of one month's duration presented with nausea, vomiting, somnolence, short memory problems, loss of weight, and no fever history. Smoker, intravenous drugs abuser, promiscuous lifestyle. Physical examination: left homonimous hemianopsia, left hemiparesis, no papilledema, diffuse hyperreflexia, slowness of movements. Brain CT scan: tumor-like lesion in the splenium of the corpus calosum, measuring 3.5 x 1.4 cm, with heterogeneous enhancing pattern, sugesting a primary CNS tumor. Due to the possibility of CNS infection, a lumbar puncture disclosed an opening pressure of 380 mmH(20; 11 white cells (lymphocytes; glucose 18 mg/dl (serum glucose 73 mg/dl; proteins 139 mg/dl; presence of Trypanosoma parasites. Serum Elisa-HIV tests turned out to be positive. Treatment with benznidazole dramatically improved clinical and radiographic picture, but the patient died 6 weeks later because of respiratory failure. T. cruzi infection of the CNS is a rare disease, but we have an increasing number of cases in HIV immunecompromised patients. Diagnosis by direct observation of CSF is uncommon, and most of the cases are diagnosed by pathological examination. It is a highly lethal disease, even when properly diagnosed and treated. This article intends to include cerebral trypanosomiasis in the differential diagnosis of intracranial space-occupying lesions, especially in immunecompromised patients from endemic regions.

  12. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C.; Lapresle, J. (Centre Hospitalier de Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France))

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. ..gamma..EG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed.

  13. Risk factors for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvanand, S; Kapoor, S K; Reddaiah, V P; Singh, U; Sundaram, K R

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a major cause of crippling in children, but it's etiology is poorly understood. This case control study was done to assess some of the identified risk factors for cerebral palsy, 125 cerebral palsy cases selected from hospital clinic and 125 age and sex matched neighbourhood controls, all aged less than 5 years and residing in Delhi (India) were studied. Information regarding antenatal, natal and postnatal period was collected by mother's interview, and wherever available, from hospital records with the study subjects. Most common type of cerebral palsy was spastic (88%). Quadriplegia was the commonest topographical subtype (86.4%). Birth asphyxia was found to be present in only 25.6% of cases. The commonest risk factor amongst cases was low birth weight (28.8%). The multivariate odds ratios (confidence limits) for the risk factors found to be significantly associated with cerebral palsy were 36.1 (7.76-160) for birth asphyxia, 13.8 (4.95-38.3) for low birth weight, 37.4 (4.47-313) for neonatal convulsion, 23 (4.7-112) for neonatal jaundice, 14.4 (3.69-56.4) for neonatal infection, 24.9 (2.78-223) for instrument assisted delivery and 15.4 (1.57-152) for antepartum hemorrhage. Precipitate labour, caesarean section, twins, toxemia, breech delivery and head injury were not found to be significantly associated with cerebral palsy. Thus birth asphyxia, low birth weight, neonatal convulsions, neonatal jaundice, neonatal infection, instrument assisted delivery and antepartum hemorrhage are significant risk factors for cerebral palsy.

  14. A longitudinal evaluation of health-related quality of life in patients with AL amyloidosis: associations with health outcomes over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchorawala, Vaishali; McCausland, Kristen L; White, Michelle K; Bayliss, Martha S; Guthrie, Spencer D; Lo, Stephen; Skinner, Martha

    2017-11-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a rare disease associated with significant, irreversible organ dysfunction and high case fatality. An observational study was conducted to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients treated for AL amyloidosis between 1994 and 2014 with both high dose melphalan and stem cell transplantation (HDM/SCT) or non-SCT chemotherapy regimens. The SF-36v1(®) Health Survey (SF-36) was administered to assess HRQoL during clinic visits. Analysis of variance was used to compare pre- and post-treatment HRQoL within each treatment group to an age- and gender-adjusted general population (GP) normative sample. Cox proportional hazard models were fit to examine associations between pre-treatment levels of HRQoL and mortality within 1 and 5 years after initiating specific treatment regimens (HDM/SCT: n = 402; non-SCT chemotherapy regimens: n = 172). Among patients who received HDM/SCT, there were significant improvements following treatment in vitality, social functioning, role-emotional and mental health. Worse pre-treatment SF-36 physical component scores were associated with a greater risk of mortality in both treatment groups and follow-up periods (P ≤ 0·005 for both). [Correction added on 20 October 2017, after first online publication: This P value has been corrected]. Using HRQoL assessments in every physician visit or treatment may provide valuable insights for treating rare conditions like AL amyloidosis. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. 5-Aminosalicylate intolerance causing exacerbation in pediatric ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka; Arai, Katsuhiro; Tang, Julian; Hosoi, Kenji; Funayama, Rie

    2017-05-01

    5-Aminosalicylate (5-ASA) is widely used as the first-line drug for ulcerative colitis (UC). 5-ASA is mostly a safe and effective drug, but it can bring about exacerbation due to 5-ASA intolerance. 5-ASA intolerance can be confusing and it can mislead physicians into considering unnecessary treatment escalation, including corticosteroid (CS), biologics, or even surgery. In spite of the clinical importance of 5-ASA intolerance, there have been few studies on its incidence, clinical features, and diagnosis. In order to evaluate the incidence, characteristic symptoms, disease course, and laboratory data of children with 5-ASA intolerance, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 80 children with UC. Eleven of 80 children (13.8%) with UC were diagnosed with 5-ASA intolerance. The median time between the initiation of 5-ASA and the onset of 5-ASA intolerance was 10 days (range, 4-20 days) in patients not receiving CS. Drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST) was performed in 10 patients, and was positive in eight. C-reactive protein (CRP) increased significantly when exacerbation of colitis symptoms occurred. The incidence of 5-ASA intolerance was relatively high. Besides the challenge test, elevation of CRP and positive DLST appeared to support the diagnosis of 5-ASA intolerance. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  16. Tic Exacerbation in Adults with Tourette Syndrome: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Schaefer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tourette syndrome (TS has been described as peaking in adolescence with subsequent regression. We report patients who were diagnosed with TS during childhood who experienced a latent period (significant reduction in or absence of tics followed by tic re-emergence in adulthood.Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of outpatients over age 21 seen at the Yale neurology clinic between January 2012 and July 2016 who were diagnosed with childhood-onset tics, and who experienced a latent period of greater than 1 year followed by an exacerbation.Results: Sixteen patients were identified. The mean latent period was 16 years. Ten patients (62.5% identified an exacerbation trigger, most commonly changes in substance use (five patients. Seven patients (43.8% reported worsening of tics since childhood. Six patients (37.5% had received pharmacological intervention for tics as children, and 15 patients (93.8% as adults. Six of 15 patients (40.0% had an effective response from those pharmacological intervention(s.Discussion: Our study demonstrates that the decline in symptoms as patients age may represent temporary improvement. The latent period lasted years in our patients, different from the more rapid waxing and waning in children. A change in substance use was an important trigger. Requests for pharmacological intervention were not necessarily correlated with worsening tic severity. 

  17. Sputum Bacterial and Fungal Dynamics during Exacerbations of Severe COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Su

    Full Text Available The changes in the microbial community structure during acute exacerbations of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in hospitalized patients remain largely uncharacterized. Therefore, further studies focused on the temporal dynamics and structure of sputum microbial communities during acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD would still be necessary. In our study, the use of molecular microbiological techniques provided insight into both fungal and bacterial diversities in AECOPD patients during hospitalization. In particular, we examined the structure and varieties of lung microbial community in 6 patients with severe AECOPD by amplifying 16S rRNA V4 hyper-variable and internal transcribed spacer (ITS DNA regions using barcoded primers and the Illumina sequencing platform. Sequence analysis showed 261 bacterial genera representing 20 distinct phyla, with an average number of genera per patient of >157, indicating high diversity. Acinetobacter, Prevotella, Neisseria, Rothia, Lactobacillus, Leptotrichia, Streptococcus, Veillonella, and Actinomyces were the most commonly identified genera, and the average total sequencing number per sputum sample was >10000 18S ITS sequences. The fungal population was typically dominated by Candia, Phialosimplex, Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium and Eutypella. Our findings highlight that COPD patients have personalized structures and varieties in sputum microbial community during hospitalization periods.

  18. Chronic Hepatitis B with Spontaneous Severe Acute Exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lun Tsai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a major global health problem with an estimated 400 million HBV carriers worldwide. In the natural history of chronic hepatitis B (CHB, spontaneous acute exacerbation (AE is not uncommon, with a cumulative incidence of 10%–30% every year. While exacerbations can be mild, some patients may develop hepatic decompensation and even die. The underlying pathogenesis is possibly related to the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immune response against HBV. An upsurge of serum HBV DNA usually precedes the rise of alanine aminotransferase (ALT and bilirubin. Whether antiviral treatment can benefit CHB with severe AE remains controversial, but early nucleos(tide analogues treatment seemed to be associated with an improved outcome. There has been no randomized study that compared the effects of different nucleos(tide analogues (NA in the setting of CHB with severe AE. However, potent NAs with good resistance profiles are recommended. In this review, we summarized current knowledge regarding the natural history, pathogenetic mechanisms, and therapeutic options of CHB with severe AE.

  19. Acute exacerbation in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Vieira Santos

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of an acute exacerbation of liver injury in a chronic HBV infected young male is reported. The correlation between the severe symptomatic hepatitis is done with the histopathologic findings of extense areas of bridging necrosis on the Iwer biopsy. The serological pattern for markers of HBV (HBsAg +, anti HBs g -, HBeAg -, anti HBe +, anti HBcIgG + and IgM - confirm a chronic infection, ana the authors propose that the episode of severe hepatitis relates to the recent spontaneous seroconvertion of HBe Ag to anti HBe. Other causes of hepatitis were excluded, and the control liver biopsy (6 months later showed normalization of hepatic architecture and absence of markers of viral replication in tissue and serum. A review of literature is done in an attempt to elucidate the diagnostic possibilities in this case, with emphasis on new immunoassays useful in differentiating between acute hepatitis B and acute exacerbation of a chronic hepatitis by the same virus.

  20. Do we know the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) for COPD exacerbations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kenneth R; Bergeron, Celine; Bhutani, Mohit; Bourbeau, Jean; Grossman, Ronald F; Hernandez, Paul; McIvor, R Andrew; Mayers, Irvin

    2013-04-01

    Frequent exacerbations of COPD are associated with accelerated loss of lung function, declining health status, increased mortality, and increased health care costs. Thus, a key objective in the management of COPD is preventing exacerbations or at least reducing their number and severity. When new interventions are examined, their value is sometimes assessed in reference to the minimal clinically important difference (MCID), a theoretical construct that may be defined and estimated numerically in several different ways. There have been limited attempts to calculate the MCID for COPD exacerbations but a figure of 20% reduction in exacerbation frequency is occasionally cited as the "established" MCID from a single manuscript reviewing six clinical trials. Our review suggests that defining and calculating the MCID for COPD exacerbations is problematic, not only because the methodology around developing endpoints for MCIDs is inconsistent, but because the impact of exacerbation reduction is likely to be influenced dramatically by the definitions of exacerbation severity used and the population's baseline status. Reference to current literature shows that at least one other estimate for exacerbation MCID as low as 4%. MCID is sometimes estimated by expert consensus; a review of articles used to shape COPD guidelines shows frequent reference to articles in which interventions yielded exacerbation differences as low as 11%. We find no evidence of an established MCID but suggest that interventions reducing exacerbations by as little as 11% appear to be regarded widely as clinically important.