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Sample records for ex-vivo regional gene

  1. Ex vivo culture of patient tissue & examination of gene delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    This video describes the use of patient tissue as an ex vivo model for the study of gene delivery. Fresh patient tissue obtained at the time of surgery is sliced and maintained in culture. The ex vivo model system allows for the physical delivery of genes into intact patient tissue and gene expression is analysed by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS detection system. The bioluminescent detection system demonstrates rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression within individual slices without the need for tissue sacrifice. This slice tissue culture system may be used in a variety of tissue types including normal and malignant tissue and allows us to study the effects of the heterogeneous nature of intact tissue and the high degree of variability between individual patients. This model system could be used in certain situations as an alternative to animal models and as a complementary preclinical mode prior to entering clinical trial.

  2. Ex vivo gene therapy for HIV-1 treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Lisa J; Rossi, John J

    2011-04-15

    Until recently, progress in ex vivo gene therapy (GT) for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) treatment has been incremental. Long-term HIV-1 remission in a patient who received a heterologous stem cell transplant for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma from a CCR5(-/-) donor, even after discontinuation of conventional therapy, has energized the field. We review the status of current approaches as well as future directions in the areas of therapeutic targets, combinatorial strategies, vector design, introduction of therapeutics into stem cells and enrichment/expansion of gene-modified cells. Finally, we discuss recent advances towards clinical application of HIV-1 GT.

  3. Spt5 accumulation at variable genes distinguishes somatic hypermutation in germinal center B cells from ex vivo-activated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maul, Robert W; Cao, Zheng; Venkataraman, Lakshmi; Giorgetti, Carol A; Press, Joan L; Denizot, Yves; Du, Hansen; Sen, Ranjan; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2014-10-20

    Variable (V) genes of immunoglobulins undergo somatic hypermutation by activation-induced deaminase (AID) to generate amino acid substitutions that encode antibodies with increased affinity for antigen. Hypermutation is restricted to germinal center B cells and cannot be recapitulated in ex vivo-activated splenic cells, even though the latter express high levels of AID. This suggests that there is a specific feature of antigen activation in germinal centers that recruits AID to V genes which is absent in mitogen-activated cultured cells. Using two Igh knock-in mouse models, we found that RNA polymerase II accumulates in V regions in B cells after both types of stimulation for an extended distance of 1.2 kb from the TATA box. The paused polymerases generate abundant single-strand DNA targets for AID. However, there is a distinct accumulation of the initiating form of polymerase, along with the transcription cofactor Spt5 and AID, in the V region from germinal center cells, which is totally absent in cultured cells. These data support a model where mutations are prevalent in germinal center cells, but not in ex vivo cells, because the initiating form of polymerase is retained, which affects Spt5 and AID recruitment.

  4. Optimal Temperature of Graft Preservation after ex Vivo Gene Transfer in Lung Isografts

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    Sano,Yoshifumi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the optimal temperature of graft preservation after ex vivo gene transfer to rat lung isografts. Left lungs were harvested and infused with cationic lipid/LacZ-DNA complex via the pulmonary artery, and the grafts were stored for 4h. The grafts (n=7 were allocated into groups IンIV according to the storage temperature:4℃, 10℃, 16℃, and 23℃, respectively. Forty-eight h after orthotopic transplantation, the arterial blood gas was analyzed and the peak airway pressure (PAP and the level of LacZ protein production in the grafts were measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. After reperfusion, the grafts were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The grafts in groups III and IV showed more deterioration as evidenced by decreased arterial oxygen tension, increased PAP, and predominant infiltration of inflammatory cells compared with groups I and II. The level of LacZ production was significantly lower in group I than in groups IIンIV. The optimal temperature of lung graft preservation after ex vivo gene transfer was determined to be 10℃, balancing considerations of lung injury and efficiency of transgene expression.

  5. Optimized isolation enables Ex vivo analysis of microglia from various central nervous system regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haas, Alexander H.; Boddeke, Hendricus W. G. M.; Brouwer, Nieske; Biber, Knut

    2007-01-01

    Ex vivo analysis is an accurate and convenient way to study in vivo microglia phenotype and function. However, current microglia isolation protocols for ex vivo analysis show many differences in isolation steps (perfusion, removal of meninges and blood vessels, mechanical dissociation, enzymatic dis

  6. P-gp activity and inhibition in the different regions of human intestine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; de Jager, Marina H; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2017-03-01

    Although intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been extensively studied in vitro and in animals, its activity and the consequences of P-gp inhibition for drug disposition and toxicity in humans are still difficult to accurately extrapolate from these studies. Moreover, existing in vitro models do not take into consideration that the intestine is heterogeneous with respect to P-gp expression. Recently, we reported rat precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) as a physiological ex vivo model to study the regional gradient of P-gp activity and inhibition. Here we extended the application of PCIS to the human intestine. For this purpose rhodamine 123 (R123) accumulation in the presence or absence of the P-gp inhibitors verapamil, cyclosporine A, quinidine, ketoconazole, PSC833 and CP100356 was measured in PCIS of human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon. R123 accumulation in the presence of the P-gp inhibitors appeared to be most enhanced in the ileum compared to the other regions. Moreover, the regional differences in accumulation are in line with published differences in abundance of P-gp. The rank order of the potency of the P-gp inhibitors, reflected by their IC50 , was comparable to that in rat PCIS. However, the increase in accumulation of the P-gp substrate R123 by the inhibitors was larger in human ileum PCIS than in rat PCIS, indicating species difference in P-gp abundance. These data show that human PCIS are an appropriate ex vivo model to study the activity of intestinal P-gp and predict the inhibitory effect of drugs and of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions in the human intestine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Gene transfer of integration defective anti-HSV-1 meganuclease to human corneas ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawy, H M; Gailledrat, M; Desseaux, C; Salvalaio, G; Di Iorio, E; Ferrari, B; Bertolin, M; Barbaro, V; Parekh, M; Gayon, R; Munegato, D; Franchin, E; Calistri, A; Palù, G; Parolin, C; Ponzin, D; Ferrari, S

    2014-03-01

    Corneal graft rejection is a major problem in chronic herpetic keratitis (HK) patients with latent infection. A new class of antiviral agents targeting latent and active forms of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is importantly required. Meganucleases are sequence-specific homing endonucleases capable of inducing DNA double-strand breaks. A proof-of-concept experiment has shown that tailor-made meganucleases are efficient against HSV-1 in vitro. To take this work a step forward, we hypothesized that the pre-treatment of human corneas in eye banks using meganuclease-encoding vectors will allow HK patients to receive a medicated cornea to resist the recurrence of the infection and the common graft rejection problem. However, this strategy requires efficient gene delivery to human corneal endothelium. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus, serotype 2/1 (rAAV2/1), efficient gene delivery of a reporter gene was demonstrated in human corneas ex vivo. The optimum viral dose was 3.7 × 10(11) VG with an exposure time of 1 day, followed by 6 days incubation in de-swelling medium. In addition, 12 days incubation can result in transgene expression in excess of 70%. Using similar transduction conditions, meganuclease transgene expression was detected in 39.4% of the endothelial cells after 2 weeks in culture. Reduction of the total viral load in the media and the endothelial cells of corneas infected with HSV-1 was shown. Collectively, this work provides information about the optimum conditions to deliver genetic material to the cornea, and demonstrates for the first time the expression of meganuclease in human corneas ex vivo and its antiviral activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the treatment of human corneas in eye banks before transplantation is a new approach to address the unmet clinical needs in corneal diseases.

  8. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Koert FD Kuhlmann; Conny T Bakker; Fibo JW ten Kate; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions.METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices.Tissue slices were cultured ex vivo for 1-6 d in an incubator using 95% O2. Slices were subsequently analyzed for viability and morphology. In addition the slices were incubated with different viral vectors expressing the repor ter genes GFP or DsRed.Expression of these reporter genes was measured at 72 h after infection.RESULTS: With the Krumdieck tissue slicer, uniform slices could be generated from pancreatic tissue but only upon embedding the tissue in 3% low melting agarose. Immunohistological examination showed the presence of all pancreatic cell types. Pancreatic normal and cancer tissue slices could be cultured for up to 6 d, while retaining viability and a moderate to good morphology. Reporter gene expression indicated that the slices could be infected and transduced efficiently by adenoviral vectors and by adeno associated viral vectors, whereas transduction with lentiviral vectors was limited. For the adenoviral vector, the transduction seemed limited to the peripheral layers of the explants.CONCLUSION: The presented sys tem al lows reproducible processing of minimal amounts of pancreatic tissue into slices uniform in size, suitable for pre-clinical evaluation of gene therapy vectors.

  9. Biosafety in Ex Vivo Gene Therapy and Conditional Ablation of Lentivirally Transduced Hepatocytes in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Olivier; Birraux, Jacques; Wildhaber, Barbara E; Jond, Caty; Lasne, Françoise; Habre, Walid; Trono, Didier; Nguyen, Tuan H; Chardot, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy is an interesting alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for treating metabolic liver diseases. In this study, we investigated its efficacy and biosafety in nonhuman primates. Hepatocytes isolated from liver lobectomy were transduced in suspension with a bicistronic liver-specific lentiviral vector and immediately autotransplanted (SLIT) into three cynomolgus monkeys. The vector encoded cynomolgus erythropoietin (EPO) and the conditional suicide gene herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK). Survival of transduced hepatocytes and vector dissemination were evaluated by detecting transgene expression and vector DNA. SLIT was safely performed within a day in all three subjects. Serum EPO and hematocrit rapidly increased post-SLIT and their values returned to baseline within about 1 month. Isoforms of EPO detected in monkeys' sera differed from the physiological renal EPO. In liver biopsies at months 8 and 15, we detected EPO protein, vector mRNA and DNA, demonstrating long-term survival and functionality of transplanted lentivirally transduced hepatocytes. Valganciclovir administration resulted in complete ablation of the transduced hepatocytes. We demonstrated the feasibility and biosafety of SLIT, and the long term (>1 year) functionality of lentivirally transduced hepatocytes in nonhuman primates. The HSV-TK/valganciclovir suicide strategy can increase the biosafety of liver gene therapy protocols by safely and completely ablating transduced hepatocytes on demand. PMID:19568222

  10. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, D.; Spanholtz, J.; Osl, M.; Tordoir, M.; Lipnik, K.; Bilban, M.; Schlechta, B.; Dolstra, H.; Hofer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT

  11. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, D.; Spanholtz, J.; Osl, M.; Tordoir, M.; Lipnik, K.; Bilban, M.; Schlechta, B.; Dolstra, H.; Hofer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time

  12. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases Toll-like receptor 3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki-Yoshida, A; Saito, S; Fukiya, S; Aoki, R; Takayama, Y; Suzuki, C; Sonoyama, K

    2016-06-01

    Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been reported to be therapeutically effective against acute secretory diarrhoea resulting from the structural and functional intestinal mucosal lesions induced by rotavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. Because Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in the innate immune responses following the recognition of rotavirus, the present study examined whether LGG influences TLR3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo. We employed cultured intestinal organoids derived from small intestinal crypts as an ex vivo tissue model. LGG supplementation increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the intestinal organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Likewise, single and 7-day consecutive daily administrations of LGG increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the small intestine of C57BL/6N mice. The mRNA levels of other TLRs were not substantially altered both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, LGG supplementation increased the mRNA levels of an antiviral type 1 interferon, interferon-α (IFN-α), and a neutrophil chemokine, CXCL1, upon stimulation with a synthetic TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C) in the intestinal organoids. LGG administration did not alter IFN-α and CXCL1 mRNA levels in the small intestine in vivo. Supplementation of other bacterial strains, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus paracasei, failed to increase TLR3 and poly(I:C)-stimulated CXCL1 mRNA levels ex vivo. We propose that upregulation of TLR3 gene expression may play a pivotal role in the therapeutic efficacy of LGG against rotavirus-associated diarrhoea. In addition, we demonstrated that intestinal organoids may be a promising ex vivo tissue model for investigating host-pathogen interactions and the antiviral action of probiotics in the intestinal epithelium.

  13. Ex-Vivo Gene Therapy Using Lentiviral Mediated Gene Transfer Into Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Stem Cells

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    Hanieh Jalali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Introduction of therapeutic genes into the injured site of nervous system can be achieved using transplantation of cellular vehicles containing desired gene. To transfer exogenous genes into the cellular vehicles, lentiviral vectors are one of interested vectors because of advantages such high transduction efficiency of dividing and non-dividing cells. Unrestricted somatic stem cells are subclasses of umbilical cord blood derived stem cells which are appreciate candidates to use as cellular vehicles for ex vivo gene therapy of nervous system. Objectives In current study we investigated the effect of lentiviral vector transduction on the neuronal related features of unrestricted somatic stem cells to indicate the probable and unwanted changes related to transduction procedure. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, lentiviral vector containing green fluorescent protein (GFP were transduced into unrestricted somatic stem cells and its effect was investigated with using MTT assay, qPCR and immunohistochemistry techniques. For statistical comparison of real time PCR results, REST software (2009, Qiagen was used. Results Obtained results showed lentiviral vector transduction did not have cytotoxic effects on unrestricted somatic stem cells and did not change neuronal differentiation capacity of them as well the expression of some neuronal related genes and preserved them in multilineage situation. Conclusions In conclusion, we suggested that lentiviral vectors could be proper vectors to transfer therapeutic gene into unrestricted somatic stem cells to provide a cellular vehicle for ex vivo gene therapy of nervous system disorders.

  14. A single epidermal stem cell strategy for safe ex vivo gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz-Georget Lathion, Stéphanie; Rochat, Ariane; Knott, Graham; Recchia, Alessandra; Martinet, Danielle; Benmohammed, Sara; Grasset, Nicolas; Zaffalon, Andrea; Besuchet Schmutz, Nathalie; Savioz-Dayer, Emmanuelle; Beckmann, Jacques Samuel; Rougemont, Jacques; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barrandon, Yann

    2015-02-27

    There is a widespread agreement from patient and professional organisations alike that the safety of stem cell therapeutics is of paramount importance, particularly for ex vivo autologous gene therapy. Yet current technology makes it difficult to thoroughly evaluate the behaviour of genetically corrected stem cells before they are transplanted. To address this, we have developed a strategy that permits transplantation of a clonal population of genetically corrected autologous stem cells that meet stringent selection criteria and the principle of precaution. As a proof of concept, we have stably transduced epidermal stem cells (holoclones) obtained from a patient suffering from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Holoclones were infected with self-inactivating retroviruses bearing a COL7A1 cDNA and cloned before the progeny of individual stem cells were characterised using a number of criteria. Clonal analysis revealed a great deal of heterogeneity among transduced stem cells in their capacity to produce functional type VII collagen (COLVII). Selected transduced stem cells transplanted onto immunodeficient mice regenerated a non-blistering epidermis for months and produced a functional COLVII. Safety was assessed by determining the sites of proviral integration, rearrangements and hit genes and by whole-genome sequencing. The progeny of the selected stem cells also had a diploid karyotype, was not tumorigenic and did not disseminate after long-term transplantation onto immunodeficient mice. In conclusion, a clonal strategy is a powerful and efficient means of by-passing the heterogeneity of a transduced stem cell population. It guarantees a safe and homogenous medicinal product, fulfilling the principle of precaution and the requirements of regulatory affairs. Furthermore, a clonal strategy makes it possible to envision exciting gene-editing technologies like zinc finger nucleases, TALENs and homologous recombination for next-generation gene therapy.

  15. Trichostatin A stabilizes the expression of pluripotent genes in human mesenchymal stem cells during ex vivo expansion.

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    Bing Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been considered as ideal cells for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, aging and spontaneous differentiation of MSCs during culture expansion dampen their effectiveness. Previous studies suggest that ex vivo aging of MSCs is largely caused by epigenetic changes particularly a decline of histone H3 acetylation levels in promoter regions of pluripotent genes due to inappropriate growth environment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we examined whether histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA could suppress the histone H3 deacetylation thus maintaining the primitive property of MSCs. We found that in regular adherent culture, human MSCs became flatter and larger upon successive passaging, while the expression of pluripotent genes such as Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, Rex-1, CD133 and TERT decreased markedly. Administration of low concentrations of TSA in culture significantly suppressed the morphological changes in MSCs otherwise occurred during culture expansion, increased their proliferation while retaining their cell contact growth inhibition property and multipotent differentiation ability. Moreover, TSA stabilized the expression of the above pluripotent genes and histone H3 acetylation levels in K9 and K14 in promoter regions of Oct4, Sox2 and TERT. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that TSA may serve as an effective culture additive to maintain the primitive feature of MSCs during culture expansion.

  16. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells.

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    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Osl, Markus; Tordoir, Marleen; Lipnik, Karoline; Bilban, Martin; Schlechta, Bernhard; Dolstra, Harry; Hofer, Erhard

    2012-11-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional analysis. Additionally, we compared the identified characteristics to peripheral blood (PB) CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells. The data show sequential expression of CD56 and the CD94 and NKG2 receptor chains during ex vivo NK cell development, resulting finally in the expression of a range of genes with partial characteristics of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from PB. Expression of characteristic NK cell receptors and cytotoxic genes was mainly found within the predominant ex vivo generated population of NKG2A+ NK cells, indicating the importance of NKG2A expression during NK cell differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, despite distinct phenotypic characteristics, the detailed analysis of cytolytic genes expressed within the ex vivo differentiated NK cells revealed a pattern close to CD56(dim) NK cells. In line with this finding, ex vivo generated NK cells displayed potent cytotoxicity. This supports that the ex vivo differentiation system faithfully reproduces major steps of the differentiation of NK cells from their progenitors, constitutes an excellent model to study NK cell differentiation, and is valuable to generate large-scale NK cells appropriate for immunotherapy.

  17. Effective in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer to intestinal mucosa by VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

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    Kasahara Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer to the gastrointestinal (GI mucosa is a therapeutic strategy which could prove particularly advantageous for treatment of various hereditary and acquired intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, GI infections, and cancer. Methods We evaluated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein envelope (VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV for efficacy of gene transfer to both murine rectosigmoid colon in vivo and human colon explants ex vivo. LV encoding beta-galactosidase (LV-β-Gal or firefly-luciferase (LV-fLuc reporter genes were administered by intrarectal instillation in mice, or applied topically for ex vivo transduction of human colorectal explant tissues from normal individuals. Macroscopic and histological evaluations were performed to assess any tissue damage or inflammation. Transduction efficiency and systemic biodistribution were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR. LV-fLuc expression was evaluated by ex vivo bioluminescence imaging. LV-β-Gal expression and identity of transduced cell types were examined by histochemical and immunofluorescence staining. Results Imaging studies showed positive fLuc signals in murine distal colon; β-Gal-positive cells were found in both murine and human intestinal tissue. In the murine model, β-Gal-positive epithelial and lamina propria cells were found to express cytokeratin, CD45, and CD4. LV-transduced β-Gal-positive cells were also seen in human colorectal explants, consisting mainly of CD45, CD4, and CD11c-positive cells confined to the LP. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of LV-mediated gene transfer into colonic mucosa. We also identified differential patterns of mucosal gene transfer dependent on whether murine or human tissue was used. Within the limitations of the study, the LV did not appear to induce mucosal damage and were not distributed beyond the distal colon.

  18. Gene expression patterns related to osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during ex vivo expansion.

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    Granchi, Donatella; Ochoa, Gorka; Leonardi, Elisa; Devescovi, Valentina; Baglìo, Serena Rubina; Osaba, Lourdes; Baldini, Nicola; Ciapetti, Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    Bone marrow is commonly used as a source of adult multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), defined for their ability to differentiate in vitro into multiple lineages. The ex vivo-expanded MSCs are currently being evaluated as a strategy for the restoration of function in damaged skeletal tissue, both in cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. The aim of this study was to define gene expression patterns underlying the differentiation of MSCs into mature osteoblasts during the expansion in vitro, and to explore a variety of cell functions that cannot be easily evaluated using morphological, cytochemical, and biochemical assays. Cell cultures were obtained from bone marrow samples of six individuals undergoing total hip replacement, and a large-scale transcriptome analysis, using Affymetrix HG-U133A Plus 2.0 array (Affymetrix((R)), Santa Clara, CA), was performed at the occurrence of specific events, including the appearance of MSC surface markers, formation of colonies, and deposition of mineral nodules. We focused our attention on 213 differentially upregulated genes, some belonging to well-known pathways and some having one or more Gene Ontology annotations related to bone cell biology, including angiogenesis, bone-related genes, cell communication, development and morphogenesis, transforming growth factor-beta signaling, and Wnt signaling. Twenty-nine genes, whose role in bone cell pathophysiology has not been described yet, were found. In conclusion, gene expression patterns that characterize the early, intermediate, and late phases of the osteogenic differentiation process of ex vivo-expanded MSCs were defined. These signatures represent a useful tool to monitor the osteogenic process, and to analyze a broad spectrum of functions of MSCs cultured on scaffolds, especially when the constructs are conceived for releasing growth factors or other signals to promote bone regeneration.

  19. Experimental study on ex vivo retrovirus-mediated aFGF gene transfer therapy in traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-hua; LI Bang-yin; XU Ru-xiang; LIU Chuan; ZOU Yu-xi; WANG Hui-xin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of ex vivo retrovirus-mediated gene transfer therapy with acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) in the management of traumatic brain injury. Methods: PLXSN-SPaFGF, a recombinant retroviral vector expressing biologically active aFGF was constructed and transfected into cultured embryonic astroglial cells which were injected into the surrounding areas of the contusion in the rat left parietal cortex. From 3 d to 1 month after the implantation, the survival of and aFGF gene expression in the implanted astroglial cells were examined, and neuronal apoptosis and rat motor function impairment evaluated. Results: The implanted aFGF-transduced astroglial cells survived and expressed aFGF mRNA and protein evidently at 3 d after grafting. The number of and aFGF gene expression in the astroglial cells increased remarkebly 7 d and decreased to some extent 1 month after the implantation. There were significant aFGF mRNA and protein expression in the neurons surrounding the contusion at 7 d that decreased to relatively low levels 1 month after the implantation of aFGF-transdued astrocytes. Diminished neuronal apoptosis (P<0.05) and significantly improved in the previously impaired motor function (P<0.05) of the rats were observed from 7 d to 1 month after the implantation. Conclusion: This experiment successfully conducted ex vivo aFGF gene transfer therapy in traumatic brain injury which proved to be effective in rescuing injured nerve cell from death and enhancing recovery of neurological deficiency.

  20. Ex Vivo Gene Therapy Using Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Deliver Growth Factors in the Skeletal Muscle of a Familial ALS Rat Model.

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    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic protein and molecule delivery to target sites by transplanted human stem cells holds great promise for ex vivo gene therapy. Our group has demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of ex vivo gene therapy targeting the skeletal muscles in a transgenic rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We used human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and genetically modified them to release neuroprotective growth factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Intramuscular growth factor delivery via hMSCs can enhance neuromuscular innervation and motor neuron survival in a rat model of ALS (SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats). Here, we describe the protocol of ex vivo delivery of growth factors via lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of hMSCs and hMSC transplantation into the skeletal muscle of a familial ALS rat model.

  1. Ex vivo intracoronary gene transfer of adeno-associated virus 2 leads to superior transduction over serotypes 8 and 9 in rat heart transplants.

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    Raissadati, Alireza; Jokinen, Janne J; Syrjälä, Simo O; Keränen, Mikko A I; Krebs, Rainer; Tuuminen, Raimo; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Anisimov, Andrey; Soronen, Jarkko; Pajusola, Katri; Alitalo, Kari; Nykänen, Antti I; Lemström, Karl

    2013-11-01

    Heart transplant gene therapy requires vectors with long-lasting gene expression, high cardiotropism, and minimal pathological effects. Here, we examined transduction properties of ex vivo intracoronary delivery of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 2, 8, and 9 in rat syngenic and allogenic heart transplants. Adult Dark Agouti (DA) rat hearts were intracoronarily perfused ex vivo with AAV2, AAV8, or AAV9 encoding firefly luciferase and transplanted heterotopically into the abdomen of syngenic DA or allogenic Wistar-Furth (WF) recipients. Serial in vivo bioluminescent imaging of syngraft and allograft recipients was performed for 6 months and 4 weeks, respectively. Grafts were removed for PCR-, RT-PCR, and luminometer analysis. In vivo bioluminescent imaging of recipients showed that AAV9 induced a prominent and stable luciferase activity in the abdomen, when compared with AAV2 and AAV8. However, ex vivo analyses revealed that intracoronary perfusion with AAV2 resulted in the highest heart transplant transduction levels in syngrafts and allografts. Ex vivo intracoronary delivery of AAV2 resulted in efficient transgene expression in heart transplants, whereas intracoronary AAV9 escapes into adjacent tissues. In terms of cardiac transduction, these results suggest AAV2 as a potential vector for gene therapy in preclinical heart transplants studies, and highlight the importance of delivery route in gene transfer studies.

  2. Dissection of tumour and host cells from target organs of metastasis for testing gene expression directly ex vivo.

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    Rocha, M.; Hexel, K.; Bucur, M.; Schirrmacher, V.; Umansky, V.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a new methodology which allows the direct analysis ex vivo of tumour cells and host cells (lymphocytes, macrophages, endothelial cells) from a metastasised organ (liver or spleen) at any time point during the metastatic process and without any further in vitro culture. First, we used a tumour cell line transduced with the bacterial gene lacZ, which permits the detection of the procaryotic enzyme beta-galactosidase in eukaryotic cells at the single cell level thus allowing flow adhesion cell sorting (FACS) analysis of tumour cells from metastasised target organs. Second, we established a method for the separation and enrichment of tumour and host cells from target organs of metastasis with a high viability and reproducibility. As exemplified with the murine lymphoma ESb, this new methodology permits the study of molecules of importance for metastasis or anti-tumour immunity (adhesion, costimulatory and cytotoxic molecules, cytokines, etc.) at the RNA or protein level in tumour and host cells during the whole process of metastasis. This novel approach may open new possibilities of developing strategies for intervention in tumour progression, since it allows the determination of the optimal window in time for successful treatments. The possibility of direct analysis of tumour and host cell properties also provides a new method for the evaluation of the effects of immunisation with tumour vaccines or of gene therapy. Images Figure 3 PMID:8883407

  3. Ciliary beating recovery in deficient human airway epithelial cells after lentivirus ex vivo gene therapy.

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    Brigitte Chhin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia is a heterogeneous genetic disease that is characterized by cilia dysfunction of the epithelial cells lining the respiratory tracts, resulting in recurrent respiratory tract infections. Despite lifelong physiological therapy and antibiotics, the lungs of affected patients are progressively destroyed, leading to respiratory insufficiency. Recessive mutations in Dynein Axonemal Intermediate chain type 1 (DNAI1 gene have been described in 10% of cases of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Our goal was to restore normal ciliary beating in DNAI1-deficient human airway epithelial cells. A lentiviral vector based on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus pseudotyped with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein was used to transduce cultured human airway epithelial cells with a cDNA of DNAI1 driven by the Elongation Factor 1 promoter. Transcription and translation of the transduced gene were tested by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Human airway epithelial cells that were DNAI1-deficient due to compound heterozygous mutations, and consequently had immotile cilia and no outer dynein arm, were transduced by the lentivirus. Cilia beating was recorded and electron microscopy of the cilia was performed. Transcription and translation of the transduced DNAI1 gene were detected in human cells treated with the lentivirus. In addition, immotile cilia recovered a normal beat and outer dynein arms reappeared. We demonstrated that it is possible to obtain a normalization of ciliary beat frequency of deficient human airway epithelial cells by using a lentivirus to transduce cells with the therapeutic gene. This preliminary step constitutes a conceptual proof that is indispensable in the perspective of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia's in vivo gene therapy. This is the first time that recovery of cilia beating is demonstrated in this disease.

  4. Reducing amyloid plaque burden via ex vivo gene delivery of an Abeta-degrading protease: a novel therapeutic approach to Alzheimer disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Hemming

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of amyloid-beta protein (Abeta production and clearance in the brain has been essential to elucidating the etiology of Alzheimer disease (AD. Chronically decreasing brain Abeta levels is an emerging therapeutic approach for AD, but no such disease-modifying agents have achieved clinical validation. Certain proteases are responsible for the catabolism of brain Abeta in vivo, and some experimental evidence suggests they could be used as therapeutic tools to reduce Abeta levels in AD. The objective of this study was to determine if enhancing the clearance of Abeta in the brain by ex vivo gene delivery of an Abeta-degrading protease can reduce amyloid plaque burden.We generated a secreted form of the Abeta-degrading protease neprilysin, which significantly lowers the levels of naturally secreted Abeta in cell culture. We then used an ex vivo gene delivery approach utilizing primary fibroblasts to introduce this soluble protease into the brains of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP transgenic mice with advanced plaque deposition. Brain examination after cell implantation revealed robust clearance of plaques at the site of engraftment (72% reduction, p = 0.0269, as well as significant reductions in plaque burden in both the medial and lateral hippocampus distal to the implantation site (34% reduction, p = 0.0020; and 55% reduction, p = 0.0081, respectively.Ex vivo gene delivery of an Abeta-degrading protease reduces amyloid plaque burden in transgenic mice expressing human APP. These results support the use of Abeta-degrading proteases as a means to therapeutically lower Abeta levels and encourage further exploration of ex vivo gene delivery for the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  5. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters expression of neurogenesis-related genes in an ex vivo cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Christina R; Allan, Andrea M

    2014-08-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can lead to long-lasting changes in functional and genetic programs of the brain, which may underlie behavioral alterations seen in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Aberrant fetal programming during gestational alcohol exposure is a possible mechanism by which alcohol imparts teratogenic effects on the brain; however, current methods used to investigate the effects of alcohol on development often rely on either direct application of alcohol in vitro or acute high doses in vivo. In this study, we used our established moderate prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) model, resulting in maternal blood alcohol content of approximately 20 mM, and subsequent ex vivo cell culture to assess expression of genes related to neurogenesis. Proliferating and differentiating neural progenitor cell culture conditions were established from telencephalic tissue derived from embryonic day (E) 15-17 tissue exposed to alcohol via maternal drinking throughout pregnancy. Gene expression analysis on mRNA derived in vitro was performed using a microarray, and quantitative PCR was conducted for genes to validate the microarray. Student's t tests were performed for statistical comparison of each exposure under each culture condition using a 95% confidence interval. Eleven percent of genes on the array had significantly altered mRNA expression in the prenatal alcohol-exposed neural progenitor culture under proliferating conditions. These include reduced expression of Adora2a, Cxcl1, Dlg4, Hes1, Nptx1, and Vegfa and increased expression of Fgf13, Ndn, and Sox3; bioinformatics analysis indicated that these genes are involved in cell growth and proliferation. Decreased levels of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a were also found under proliferating conditions. Under differentiating conditions, 7.3% of genes had decreased mRNA expression; these include Cdk5rap3, Gdnf, Hey2, Heyl, Pard6b, and Ptn, which are associated with survival and differentiation as indicated by bioinformatics analysis

  6. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  7. Ex Vivo γ-Retroviral Gene Therapy of Dogs with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and the Development of a Thymic T Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Douglas R.; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Vernau, William; Moore, Peter F.; O’Malley, Thomas; Burkly, Linda C.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results in sustained T cell reconstitution and sustained marking in myeloid and B cells for up to 4 years with no evidence of any serious adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ex vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of XSCID dogs results in a similar outcome. Eight of 12 XSCID dogs treated with an average of dose of 5.8 × 106 transduced CD34+ cells/kg successfully engrafted producing normal numbers of gene-corrected CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells. However, this was followed by a steady decrease in CD45RA+ T cells, T cell diversity, and thymic output as measured by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) resulting in a T cell lymphopenia. None of the dogs survived past 11 months post treatment. At necropsy, few gene-corrected thymocytes were observed correlating with the TREC levels and one of the dogs was diagnosed with a thymic T cell lymphoma that was attributed to the gene therapy. This study highlights the outcome differences between the ex vivo and in vivo approach to γ-retroviral gene therapy and is the first to document a serious adverse event following gene therapy in a canine model of a human genetic disease. PMID:21536334

  8. Osteogenic differentiation of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2-transduced murine mesenchymal stem cells and development of an immunocompetent mouse model for ex vivo osteoporosis gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Mahendra, Gandham; Nagy, Tim R; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2004-12-01

    Gene therapy for osteopenic conditions including osteoporosis is a potential alternative to pharmacotherapy for cost effectiveness, long-term viability, and the ability to enhance bone mass by anabolic approaches. Increased understanding of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) lineage differentiation during osteogenesis, and of the molecular pathways involved in bone cell production, provides an opportunity for the advancement of gene therapy approaches for osteopenic conditions. The potential of MSCs in osteoblast differentiation and the relative ease of MSC isolation and culturing offer a promising resource for the development of ex vivo gene therapy for bone defects. In an effort to develop ex vivo gene therapy for osteoporosis, we used gene-modified MSCs in a preclinical mouse model to determine the efficiency of transduction of murine MSCs by recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV) vectors carrying reporter genes and determined their osteogenic potential after recombinant AAV-mediated expression of bone morphogenic protein 2, known to induce osteoblast differentiation. Although surgical ovariectomy is believed to induce progressive bone loss in mouse models, similar to an osteoporosis-like phenotype in humans, several factors, including hormonal alteration and dietary habits, significantly affect both the onset and progression of the disease. Thus, in the present study, we determined the influence of these factors and developed an immunocompetent mouse model of osteoporosis with degenerative bone loss as in the human pathology.

  9. Combined Raman and autofluorescence ex vivo diagnostics of skin cancer in near-infrared and visible regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Myakinin, Oleg O.; Khristoforova, Yulia A.; Moryatov, Alexander A.; Kozlov, Sergey V.; Zakharov, Valery P.

    2017-02-01

    The differentiation of skin melanomas and basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) was demonstrated based on combined analysis of Raman and autofluorescence spectra stimulated by visible and NIR lasers. It was ex vivo tested on 39 melanomas and 40 BCCs. Six spectroscopic criteria utilizing information about alteration of melanin, porphyrins, flavins, lipids, and collagen content in tumor with a comparison to healthy skin were proposed. The measured correlation between the proposed criteria makes it possible to define weakly correlated criteria groups for discriminant analysis and principal components analysis application. It was shown that the accuracy of cancerous tissues classification reaches 97.3% for a combined 6-criteria multimodal algorithm, while the accuracy determined separately for each modality does not exceed 79%. The combined 6-D method is a rapid and reliable tool for malignant skin detection and classification.

  10. SIN retroviral vectors expressing COL7A1 under human promoters for ex vivo gene therapy of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titeux, Matthias; Pendaries, Valérie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Décha, Audrey; Pironon, Nathalie; Tonasso, Laure; Mejia, José E; Brice, Agnes; Danos, Olivier; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-08-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 encoding type VII collagen which forms key structures (anchoring fibrils) for dermal-epidermal adherence. Patients suffer since birth from skin blistering, and develop severe local and systemic complications resulting in poor prognosis. We lack a specific treatment for RDEB, but ex vivo gene transfer to epidermal stem cells shows a therapeutic potential. To minimize the risk of oncogenic events, we have developed new minimal self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors in which the COL7A1 complementary DNA (cDNA) is under the control of the human elongation factor 1alpha (EF1alpha) or COL7A1 promoters. We show efficient ex vivo genetic correction of primary RDEB keratinocytes and fibroblasts without antibiotic selection, and use either of these genetically corrected cells to generate human skin equivalents (SEs) which were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We achieved long-term expression of recombinant type VII collagen with restored dermal-epidermal adherence and anchoring fibril formation, demonstrating in vivo functional correction. In few cases, rearranged proviruses were detected, which were probably generated during the retrotranscription process. Despite this observation which should be taken under consideration for clinical application, this preclinical study paves the way for a therapy based on grafting the most severely affected skin areas of patients with fully autologous SEs genetically corrected using a SIN COL7A1 retroviral vector.

  11. Feline immunodeficiency virus and retrovirus-mediated adventitial ex vivo gene transfer to rabbit carotid artery using autologous vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankkonen, Hanna M; Turunen, Mikko P; Hiltunen, Mikko O; Lehtolainen, Pauliina; Koponen, Jonna; Leppänen, Pia; Turunen, Anna-Mari; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2004-03-01

    We have developed an ex vivo gene transfer technique to rabbit arterial wall using autologous smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs were harvested from rabbit ear artery, transduced in vitro with vesicular stomatitis virus G-glycoprotein pseudotyped retrovirus or feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and returned to the adventitial surface of the carotid artery using a periadventitial silicone collar or collagen sheet placed around the artery. Beta-galactosidase (lacZ) and human apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3) cDNAs were used as transgenes. After retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of lacZ the selected cells implanted with high efficiency and expressed lacZ marker gene at a very high level 7 and 14 days after the operation. The level of lacZ expression decreased thereafter but was still detectable 12 weeks after the gene transfer, and was exclusively localized to the site of cell implantation inside the collar. Utilizing FIV vector expressing apoE3, low levels of apoE were measured from serum collected from a low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits 1 month after the gene transfer. The physiological effect of apoE expression was detected as transiently elevated serum cholesterol levels. The results indicate that the model can be used for high efficiency local gene transfer in arteries, e.g. during vascular surgery. The model is also valuable for studying expression, stability and safety of new gene transfer vectors and their expression products in vivo.

  12. IL-3 or IL-7 increases ex vivo gene transfer efficiency in ADA-SCID BM CD34+ cells while maintaining in vivo lymphoid potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficara, Francesca; Superchi, Daniela B; Hernández, Raisa Jofra; Mocchetti, Cristina; Carballido-Perrig, Nicole; Andolfi, Grazia; Deola, Sara; Colombo, Augusto; Bordignon, Claudio; Carballido, José M; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2004-12-01

    To improve maintenance and gene transfer of human lymphoid progenitors for clinical use in gene therapy of adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID we investigated several gene transfer protocols using various stem cell-enriched sources. The lymphoid differentiation potential was measured by an in vitro clonal assay for B/NK cells and in the in vivo SCID-hu mouse model. Ex vivo culture with the cytokines TPO, FLT3-ligand, and SCF (T/F/S) plus IL-3 or IL-7 substantially increased the yield of transduced bone marrow (BM) CD34(+) cells purified from ADA-SCID patients or healthy donors, compared to T/F/S alone. Moreover, the use of IL-3 or IL-7 significantly improved the maintenance of in vitro B cell progenitors from ADA-SCID BM cells and allowed the efficient transduction of B and NK cell progenitors. Under these optimized conditions transduced CD34(+) cells were efficiently engrafted into SCID-hu mice and gave rise to B and T cell progeny, demonstrating the maintenance of in vivo lymphoid reconstitution capacity. The protocol based on the T/F/S + IL-3 combination was included in a gene therapy clinical trial for ADA-SCID, resulting in long-term engraftment of stem/progenitor cells. Remarkably, gene-corrected BM CD34(+) cells obtained from one patient 4 and 11 months after gene therapy were capable of repopulating the lymphoid compartment of SCID-hu hosts.

  13. Part I: Minicircle vector technology limits DNA size restrictions on ex vivo gene delivery using nanoparticle vectors: Overcoming a translational barrier in neural stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alinda R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-09-28

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplant populations offer key benefits in regenerative neurology, for release of therapeutic biomolecules in ex vivo gene therapy. NSCs are 'hard-to-transfect' but amenable to 'magnetofection'. Despite the high clinical potential of this approach, the low and transient transfection associated with the large size of therapeutic DNA constructs is a critical barrier to translation. We demonstrate for the first time that DNA minicircles (small DNA vectors encoding essential gene expression components but devoid of a bacterial backbone, thereby reducing construct size versus conventional plasmids) deployed with magnetofection achieve the highest, safe non-viral DNA transfection levels (up to 54%) reported so far for primary NSCs. Minicircle-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-mediated gene delivery also resulted in sustained gene expression for up to four weeks. All daughter cell types of engineered NSCs (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) were transfected (in contrast to conventional plasmids which usually yield transfected astrocytes only), offering advantages for targeted cell engineering. In addition to enhancing MNP functionality as gene delivery vectors, minicircle technology provides key benefits from safety/scale up perspectives. Therefore, we consider the proof-of-concept of fusion of technologies used here offers high potential as a clinically translatable genetic modification strategy for cell therapy.

  14. An ex vivo human model system to evaluate specificity of replicating and non-replicating gene therapy agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, MG; Elferink, MGL; Gommans, WM; Oosterhuis, D; Schalk, JAC; Curiel, DT; Olinga, P; Haisma, HJ; Groothuis, GMM

    2006-01-01

    Background Inefficiency, aspecificity and toxicity of gene transfer vectors hamper gene therapy from showing its full potential. On this basis significant research currently focuses on developing vectors with improved infection and/or expression profiles. Screening assays with validity to the clinic

  15. Ex-vivo lung perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Pablo G; D'Ovidio, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Lung transplant continues to be hampered by the number of available donors. Ex-vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as an essential tool for the reassessment, under a controlled scenario, of lungs that initially did not meet transplantation criteria. The purpose of the current study is to review the most recent clinical and research reports and summarize their findings. Several centers have presented positive data when using ex-vivo perfusion to identify better grafts from the higher risk donor pool. The posttransplant results, when using these organs, are not significantly different from those obtained when using standard criteria donors. In addition, a great amount of research reports have emphasized the potential of ex-vivo perfusion as a platform in reducing the injurious effects of ischemia-reperfusion. EVLP has already proved its value as a tool to identify 'good' lungs from the previously rejected pool. But as new therapeutics arise , EVLP will also prove its value as a reproducible platform for their evaluation.

  16. A simplified approach to improve the efficiency and safety of ex vivo hematopoietic gene therapy in fanconi anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacome, A; Navarro, S; Casado, J A; Rio, P; Madero, L; Estella, J; Sevilla, J; Badell, I; Ortega, J J; Olivé, T; Hanenberg, H; Segovia, J C; Bueren, J A

    2006-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited DNA repair disorder characterized by genetic instability of cells lacking a functional FA/BRCA pathway. Previous studies have shown that in vitro stimulation of bone marrow cells (BMCs) from FA mice promotes apoptosis, reduces the reconstitution ability of the stem cells, and induces myelodysplasia and myeloid leukemia upon reinfusion of the cells. This suggests the convenience of adapting standard protocols of gene therapy to FA. Here we show that the reserve of BM progenitors in FA patients is generally below 20% of normal values. Because this reduced reserve could activate the cycling of BM progenitors, we developed a simplified protocol to transduce BMCs from FA patients with gammaretroviral vectors. We demonstrate that a short in vitro manipulation (12-24 hr) of fresh mononuclear BMCs is sufficient to transduce 42% of hematopoietic progenitors from FA-A patients, in the absence of in vitro prestimulation. When FANCA-expressing vectors were used, this simple procedure reversed the phenotype of the BM progenitors from these patients. We propose that our approach will be more efficient and safer compared with standard gene therapy protocols for FA.

  17. Hydrodynamic IL10 Gene Transfer in Human Colon: Results from an "EX VIVO" Study with Potential Clinical Application in Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, Matteo; Sendra, Luis; Miguel, Antonio; Herrero, Maria José; Montalvá, Eva; López-Andújar, Rafael; Martínez-Pastor, Juan; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Granero, Eduardo García; Aliño, Salvador

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the efficacy of hydrodynamic venous IL10 gene delivery to "ex vivo" human colon segments and to determine its potential interest in Crohn's disease treatment. Twenty human colon segments were obtained from surgical resections. Hydrodynamic transfection through the main vein of the pedicle with 50 mL of hIL10 plasmid (20 μg/mL) solution was performed on 13 of them. Tissue sections were cultured and DNA, RNA, and protein copies were determined after 1, 2, and 4 days. Data obtained were compared with 6 nontransfected specimens. Finally, 1 specimen was injected with gold nanoparticles, and their distribution was examined under electron microscope. IL10 DNA levels were higher in treated tissues than in controls (P < 0.001), decreasing along time. The amount of hIL10 RNA was significantly increased in treated tissues when compared with controls (P = 0.001). The indexes of protein IL10 translation in treated groups were much higher (P < 0.001) than the basal production. The protein expression was higher in transfected tissue (10-50-fold, with respect to control tissue); this difference being established during the first hours and maintained during, at least, 4 days. With electron microscopy, we hardly observed large (15 nm) gold nanoparticles within the tissue, always in the submucosa. However, multiple small (4 nm) nanoparticles were observed within the cytoplasm of enterocytes in mucosa. Hydrodynamic procedure efficiently delivers the IL10 gene to the human colon, achieving levels of tissue protein expression high enough to mediate pharmacological effects with interest in controlling immune response in patients with Crohn's disease.

  18. In and ex vivo breast disease study by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raniero, L.; Canevari, R. A.; Ramalho, L. N. Z.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, Raman spectra in the 900-1,800 cm(-1) wavenumber region of in vivo and ex vivo breast tissues of both healthy mice (normal) and mice with induced mammary gland tumors (abnormal) were measured. In the case of the in vivo tissues, the Raman spectra were collected for both transcutaneous...... ex vivo measurements gave the highest specificity and sensitivity: 96 and 97%, respectively, as well as a largest percentage for correct discrimination: 94%. Now that the important bands have been experimentally determined in this and other works, what remains is for first principles molecular...

  19. Comparison of ex vivo harvested and in vitro cultured materials from Echinococcus granulosus by measuring expression levels of five genes putatively involved in the development and maturation of adult worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezaki, Ebrahim Saedi; Yaghoubi, Mohammad Mehdi; Spiliotis, Markus; Boubaker, Ghalia; Taheri, Elham; Almani, Pooya Ghaseminejad; Tohidi, Farideh; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Gottstein, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Parts of the natural life cycle of Echinococcus granulosus can be retraced in vitro such as the development of protoscoleces into semiadult worms with three or more proglottids, or the redifferentiation of in vitro cultured protoscoleces into metacestode-like cystic structures. Most in vitro generated samples share-at the microscopical level-high similarities with those naturally grown, but developmental differences have also been documented, such as missing egg production in in vitro grown adults or unusual bladder/vesicle formation in protoscoleces cultured into the metacestode direction. The aim of the present study was to explore how far different in vitro generated stage-specific materials/structures match the natural situation on the transcriptome level, based on testing five exemplarily chosen different genes: the frizzled receptor eg-fz4 (posterior marker), the FGF receptor-like factor eg-fgfrl (anterior association), the cell differentiation protein eg-rcd1 (part of the CCR4-NOT complex, a key regulator of eukaryotic gene expression), the rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma serin/threonin kinase eg-braf (part of the MAPK pathway involved, e.g., in EGF signaling) and the co-smad eg-smadD (downstream factor of TGFβ/BMP2/activin signaling). These genes-tested via qPCR-were selected such as to allow a discussion on their potential role in the development of E. granulosus into the adult stage. Thus, testing took place with three ex vivo isolated samples, namely (i) egg-containing adult worms, (ii) invaginated protoscoleces, and (iii) protoscolex-free germinal layer tissue. Respective data were compared (a) with in vitro generated metacestode-like microcysts developed from protoscolices, and (b) different development stages of protoscoleces in vitro cultured toward adult maturation. As a finding, only eg-smadD and partially eg-fz4 showed high expression similarities between ex vivo harvested and in vitro cultured E. granulosus, thus suggesting a putative role in

  20. Arrhenius analysis of the relationship between hyperthermia and Hsp70 promoter activation: a comparison between ex vivo and in vivo data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Roel; Debeissat, Christelle; Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Moonen, Chrit T W; Couillaud, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Tight regulation of gene expression in the region where therapy is necessary and for the duration required to achieve a therapeutic effect and to minimise systemic toxicity is very important for clinical applications of gene therapy. Hyperthermia in combination with a temperature sensitive heat shock protein (Hsp70) promoter presents a unique approach allowing non-invasive spatio-temporal control of transgene expression. In this study we investigated the in vivo and ex vivo relationship between temperature and duration of thermal stress with respect to the resulting gene expression using an Arrhenius analysis. A transgenic mouse expressing the luciferase reporter gene under the transcriptional control of a thermosensitive promoter was used to assure identical genotype for in vivo (mouse leg) and ex vivo (bone marrow mononuclear and embryonic fibroblast cells) studies. The mouse leg and cells were heated at different temperatures and different exposure times. Bioluminescence imaging and in vitro enzymatic assay were used to measure the resulting transgene expression. We showed that temperature-induced Hsp70 promoter activation was modulated by both temperature as well as duration of hyperthermia. The relationship between temperature and duration of hyperthermia and the resulting reporter gene expression can be modelled by an Arrhenius analysis for both in vivo as well as ex vivo. However, the increase in reporter gene expression after elevating the temperature of the thermal stress with 1°C is not comparable for in vivo and ex vivo situations. This information may be valuable for optimising clinical gene therapy protocols.

  1. Clock Genes Regulate the Circadian Expression of Piezo1, TRPV4, Connexin26, and VNUT in an Ex Vivo Mouse Bladder Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Tatsuya; Mitsui, Takahiko; Nakamura, Yuki; Kira, Satoru; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Norifumi; Hirayama, Yuri; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Yoichi; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Nakao, Atsuhito; Takeda, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Objectives ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice is an experimental model mouse for nocturia (NOC). Using the bladder mucosa obtained from ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice, we investigated the gene expression rhythms of mechanosensory cation channels such as transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) and Piezo1, and main ATP release pathways including vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) and Connexin26(Cx26), in addition to clock genes. Materials and methods Eight- to twelve-week-old male C57BL/6 mice (WT) and age- and sex-matched C57BL/6 ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice, which were bred under 12-h light/dark conditions for 2 weeks, were used. Gene expression rhythms and transcriptional regulation mechanisms in clock genes, mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT were measured in the mouse bladder mucosa, collected every 4 hours from WT and ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice using quantitative RT-PCR, a Western blot analysis, and ChIP assays. Results WT mice showed circadian rhythms in clock genes as well as mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT. Their expression was low during the sleep phase. The results of ChIP assays showed Clock protein binding to the promotor regions and the transcriptional regulation of mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT. In contrast, all of these circadian expressions were disrupted in ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice. The gene expression of mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT was maintained at a higher level in spite of the sleep phase. Conclusions Mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT expressed with circadian rhythm in the mouse bladder mucosa. The disruption of circadian rhythms in these genes, induced by the abnormalities in clock genes, may be factors contributing to NOC because of hypersensitivity to bladder wall extension. PMID:28060940

  2. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert J; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-02-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions.

  3. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ex vivo culture of human fetal gonads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Nielsen, J.E.; Perlman, S

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What are the effects of experimentally manipulating meiosis signalling by addition of retinoic acid (RA) in cultured human fetal gonads? SUMMARY ANSWER: RA-treatment accelerated meiotic entry in cultured fetal ovary samples, while addition of RA resulted in a dysgenetic gonadal...... phenotype in fetal testis cultures. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: One of the first manifestations of sex differentiation is the initiation of meiosis in fetal ovaries. In contrast, meiotic entry is actively prevented in the fetal testis at this developmental time-point. It has previously been shown that RA......-treatment mediates initiation of meiosis in human fetal ovary ex vivo. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This was a controlled ex vivo study of human fetal gonads treated with RA in 'hanging-drop' tissue cultures. The applied experimental set-up preserves germ cell-somatic niche interactions and the investigated...

  5. Effect of human patient plasma ex vivo treatment on gene expression and progenitor cell activation of primary human liver cells in multi-compartment 3D perfusion bioreactors for extra-corporeal liver support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Mutig, Kerim; Schrade, Petra; Bachmann, Sebastian; Gerlach, Jörg C; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2009-07-01

    Cultivation of primary human liver cells in innovative 3D perfusion multi-compartment capillary membrane bioreactors using decentralized mass exchange and integral oxygenation provides in vitro conditions close to the physiologic environment in vivo. While a few scale-up bioreactors were used clinically, inoculated liver progenitors in these bioreactors were not investigated. Therefore, we characterized regenerative processes and expression patterns of auto- and paracrine mediators involved in liver regeneration in bioreactors after patient treatment. Primary human liver cells containing parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells co-cultivated in bioreactors were used for clinical extra-corporeal liver support to bridge to liver transplantation. 3D tissue re-structuring in bioreactors was studied; expression of proteins and genes related to regenerative processes and hepatic progenitors was analyzed. Formation of multiple bile ductular networks and colonies of putative progenitors were observed within parenchymal cell aggregates. HGF was detected in scattered cells located close to vascular-like structures, expression of HGFA and c-Met was assigned to biliary cells and hepatocytes. Increased expression of genes associated to hepatic progenitors was detected following clinical application. The results confirm auto- and paracrine interactions between co-cultured cells in the bioreactor. The 3D bioreactor provides a valuable tool to study mechanisms of progenitor activation and hepatic regeneration ex vivo under patient plasma treatment. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Human ex vivo wound healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a spatially and temporally regulated process that progresses through sequential, yet overlapping phases and aims to restore barrier breach. To study this complex process scientists use various in vivo and in vitro models. Here we provide step-by-step instructions on how to perform and employ an ex vivo wound healing model to assess epithelization during wound healing in human skin.

  7. An In-Depth Comparison of Latency-Reversing Agent Combinations in Various In Vitro and Ex Vivo HIV-1 Latency Models Identified Bryostatin-1+JQ1 and Ingenol-B+JQ1 to Potently Reactivate Viral Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcis, Gilles; Kula, Anna; Bouchat, Sophie; Fujinaga, Koh; Corazza, Francis; Ait-Ammar, Amina; Delacourt, Nadège; Melard, Adeline; Kabeya, Kabamba; Vanhulle, Caroline; Van Driessche, Benoit; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Cherrier, Thomas; Pianowski, Luiz F; Gama, Lucio; Schwartz, Christian; Vila, Jorge; Burny, Arsène; Clumeck, Nathan; Moutschen, Michel; De Wit, Stéphane; Peterlin, B Matija; Rouzioux, Christine; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2015-07-01

    The persistence of latently infected cells in patients under combinatory antiretroviral therapy (cART) is a major hurdle to HIV-1 eradication. Strategies to purge these reservoirs are needed and activation of viral gene expression in latently infected cells is one promising strategy. Bromodomain and Extraterminal (BET) bromodomain inhibitors (BETi) are compounds able to reactivate latent proviruses in a positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb)-dependent manner. In this study, we tested the reactivation potential of protein kinase C (PKC) agonists (prostratin, bryostatin-1 and ingenol-B), which are known to activate NF-κB signaling pathway as well as P-TEFb, used alone or in combination with P-TEFb-releasing agents (HMBA and BETi (JQ1, I-BET, I-BET151)). Using in vitro HIV-1 post-integration latency model cell lines of T-lymphoid and myeloid lineages, we demonstrated that PKC agonists and P-TEFb-releasing agents alone acted as potent latency-reversing agents (LRAs) and that their combinations led to synergistic activation of HIV-1 expression at the viral mRNA and protein levels. Mechanistically, combined treatments led to higher activations of P-TEFb and NF-κB than the corresponding individual drug treatments. Importantly, we observed in ex vivo cultures of CD8+-depleted PBMCs from 35 cART-treated HIV-1+ aviremic patients that the percentage of reactivated cultures following combinatory bryostatin-1+JQ1 treatment was identical to the percentage observed with anti-CD3+anti-CD28 antibodies positive control stimulation. Remarkably, in ex vivo cultures of resting CD4+ T cells isolated from 15 HIV-1+ cART-treated aviremic patients, the combinations bryostatin-1+JQ1 and ingenol-B+JQ1 released infectious viruses to levels similar to that obtained with the positive control stimulation. The potent effects of these two combination treatments were already detected 24 hours post-stimulation. These results constitute the first demonstration of LRA combinations

  8. An In-Depth Comparison of Latency-Reversing Agent Combinations in Various In Vitro and Ex Vivo HIV-1 Latency Models Identified Bryostatin-1+JQ1 and Ingenol-B+JQ1 to Potently Reactivate Viral Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Darcis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of latently infected cells in patients under combinatory antiretroviral therapy (cART is a major hurdle to HIV-1 eradication. Strategies to purge these reservoirs are needed and activation of viral gene expression in latently infected cells is one promising strategy. Bromodomain and Extraterminal (BET bromodomain inhibitors (BETi are compounds able to reactivate latent proviruses in a positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb-dependent manner. In this study, we tested the reactivation potential of protein kinase C (PKC agonists (prostratin, bryostatin-1 and ingenol-B, which are known to activate NF-κB signaling pathway as well as P-TEFb, used alone or in combination with P-TEFb-releasing agents (HMBA and BETi (JQ1, I-BET, I-BET151. Using in vitro HIV-1 post-integration latency model cell lines of T-lymphoid and myeloid lineages, we demonstrated that PKC agonists and P-TEFb-releasing agents alone acted as potent latency-reversing agents (LRAs and that their combinations led to synergistic activation of HIV-1 expression at the viral mRNA and protein levels. Mechanistically, combined treatments led to higher activations of P-TEFb and NF-κB than the corresponding individual drug treatments. Importantly, we observed in ex vivo cultures of CD8+-depleted PBMCs from 35 cART-treated HIV-1+ aviremic patients that the percentage of reactivated cultures following combinatory bryostatin-1+JQ1 treatment was identical to the percentage observed with anti-CD3+anti-CD28 antibodies positive control stimulation. Remarkably, in ex vivo cultures of resting CD4+ T cells isolated from 15 HIV-1+ cART-treated aviremic patients, the combinations bryostatin-1+JQ1 and ingenol-B+JQ1 released infectious viruses to levels similar to that obtained with the positive control stimulation. The potent effects of these two combination treatments were already detected 24 hours post-stimulation. These results constitute the first demonstration of LRA

  9. Ex Vivo Optogenetic Dissection of Fear Circuits in Brain Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Daniel; Asede, Douglas; Ehrlich, Ingrid

    2016-04-05

    Optogenetic approaches are now widely used to study the function of neural populations and circuits by combining targeted expression of light-activated proteins and subsequent manipulation of neural activity by light. Channelrhodopsins (ChRs) are light-gated cation-channels and when fused to a fluorescent protein their expression allows for visualization and concurrent activation of specific cell types and their axonal projections in defined areas of the brain. Via stereotactic injection of viral vectors, ChR fusion proteins can be constitutively or conditionally expressed in specific cells of a defined brain region, and their axonal projections can subsequently be studied anatomically and functionally via ex vivo optogenetic activation in brain slices. This is of particular importance when aiming to understand synaptic properties of connections that could not be addressed with conventional electrical stimulation approaches, or in identifying novel afferent and efferent connectivity that was previously poorly understood. Here, a few examples illustrate how this technique can be applied to investigate these questions to elucidating fear-related circuits in the amygdala. The amygdala is a key region for acquisition and expression of fear, and storage of fear and emotional memories. Many lines of evidence suggest that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) participates in different aspects of fear acquisition and extinction, but its precise connectivity with the amygdala is just starting to be understood. First, it is shown how ex vivo optogenetic activation can be used to study aspects of synaptic communication between mPFC afferents and target cells in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Furthermore, it is illustrated how this ex vivo optogenetic approach can be applied to assess novel connectivity patterns using a group of GABAergic neurons in the amygdala, the paracapsular intercalated cell cluster (mpITC), as an example.

  10. Behavior of tip-steerable needles in ex vivo and in vivo tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewicz, Ann; Marra, Steven P; van Vledder, Mark G; Lin, MingDe; Choti, Michael A; Song, Danny Y; Okamura, Allison M

    2012-10-01

    Robotic needle steering is a promising technique to improve the effectiveness of needle-based clinical procedures, such as biopsies and ablation, by computer-controlled, curved insertions of needles within solid organs. In this paper, we explore the capabilities, challenges, and clinical relevance of asymmetric-tip needle steering through experiments in ex vivo and in vivo tissue. We evaluate the repeatability of needle insertion in inhomogeneous biological tissue and compare ex vivo and in vivo needle curvature and insertion forces. Steerable needles curved more in kidney than in liver and prostate, likely due to differences in tissue properties. Pre-bent needles produced higher insertion forces in liver and more curvature in vivo than ex vivo. When compared to straight stainless steel needles, steerable needles did not cause a measurable increase in tissue damage and did not exert more force during insertion. The minimum radius of curvature achieved by prebent needles was 5.23 cm in ex vivo tissue, and 10.4 cm in in vivo tissue. The curvatures achieved by bevel tip needles were negligible for in vivo tissue. The minimum radius of curvature for bevel tip needles in ex vivo tissue was 16.4 cm; however, about half of the bevel tip needles had negligible curvatures. We also demonstrate a potential clinical application of needle steering by targeting and ablating overlapping regions of cadaveric canine liver.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms in catalase and CYP1B1 determine DNA adduct formation by benzo(a)pyrene ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schults, Marten A; Chiu, Roland K; Nagle, Peter W; Wilms, Lonneke C; Kleinjans, Jos C; van Schooten, Frederik J; Godschalk, Roger W

    2013-03-01

    Genetic polymorphisms can partially explain the large inter-individual variation in DNA adduct levels following exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Effects of genetic polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation are difficult to assess in human studies because exposure misclassification attenuates underlying relationships. Conversely, ex vivo studies offer the advantage of controlled exposure settings, allowing the possibility to better elucidate genotype-phenotype relationships and gene-gene interactions. Therefore, we exposed lymphocytes of 168 non-smoking volunteers ex vivo to the environmental pollutant benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and BaP-related DNA adducts were quantified. Thirty-four genetic polymorphisms were assessed in genes involved in carcinogen metabolism, oxidative stress and DNA repair. Polymorphisms in catalase (CAT, rs1001179) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1, rs1800440) were significantly associated with DNA adduct levels, especially when combined. Moreover, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis in a subset of 30 subjects revealed that expression of catalase correlated strongly with expression of CYP1B1 (R = 0.92, P CYP1B1 and how they simultaneously affect BaP-related DNA adduct levels, catalase expression was transiently knocked down in the human lung epithelial cell line A549. Although catalase knockdown did not immediately change CYP1B1 gene expression, recovery of catalase expression 8 h after the knockdown coincided with a 2.2-fold increased expression of CYP1B1 (P polymorphism in the promoter region of CAT may determine the amount and activity of catalase, which may subsequently regulate the expression of CYP1B1. As a result, both genetic polymorphisms modulate DNA adduct levels in lymphocytes by BaP ex vivo.

  12. Avaliação e recondicionamento pulmonar ex vivo Ex vivo lung evaluation and reconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Manuel Pêgo-Fernandes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apenas 15% dos pulmões doados são aproveitados para transplante. Um novo método de Perfusão Pulmonar Ex Vivo (PPEV foi desenvolvido e pode ser usado para avaliação e recondicionamento de pulmões "marginais" e rejeitados para o transplante. Esse trabalho relata nossa experiência com a avaliação funcional da PPEV. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados pulmões de 12 doadores considerados inapropriados para transplante pulmonar. Após a captação, os pulmões são perfundidos ex vivo com Steen Solution, uma solução de composição eletrolítica extracelular com alta pressão coloidosmótica. Um oxigenador de membrana ligado ao circuito recebe uma mistura gasosa (nitrogênio e dióxido de carbono e "desoxigena" o perfusato, mantendo uma concentração de gases semelhante a do sangue venoso. Os pulmões são gradualmente aquecidos, perfundidos e ventilados. A avaliação dos órgãos é feita por gasometrias e medidas como a resistência vascular pulmonar (RVP e complacência pulmonar (CP. RESULTADOS: A PaO2 (FiO2 100% passou de um valor médio de 193,3 mmHg no doador para 495,3 mmHg durante a PPEV. Após uma hora de PPEV, a RVP média era de 737,3 dinas/seg/ cm5 e a CP era de 42,2 ml/cmH2O. CONCLUSÕES: O modelo de avaliação pulmonar ex vivo pode melhorar a capacidade de oxigenação de pulmões "marginais" inicialmente rejeitados para transplante. Isso denota um grande potencial do método para aumentar a disponibilidade de pulmões para transplante e, possivelmente, reduzir o tempo de espera nas filas.OBJECTIVE: Only about 15% of the potential candidates for lung donation are considered suitable for transplantation. A new method for ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP has been developed and can be used for evaluation and reconditioning of "marginal" and unacceptable lungs. This is a report of functional evaluation experience with ex vivo perfusion of twelve donor lungs deemed unacceptable in São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: After harvesting, the

  13. Ex vivo lung perfusion in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gustavo Abdalla

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the use of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP clinically to prepare donor lungs for transplantation. Methods: A prospective study involving EVLP for the reconditioning of extended-criteria donor lungs, the criteria for which include aspects such as a PaO2/FiO2 ratio < 300 mmHg. Between February of 2013 and February of 2014, the lungs of five donors were submitted to EVLP for up to 4 h each. During EVLP, respiratory mechanics were continuously evaluated. Once every hour during the procedure, samples of the perfusate were collected and the function of the lungs was evaluated. Results: The mean PaO2 of the recovered lungs was 262.9 ± 119.7 mmHg at baseline, compared with 357.0 ± 108.5 mmHg after 3 h of EVLP. The mean oxygenation capacity of the lungs improved slightly over the first 3 h of EVLP-246.1 ± 35.1, 257.9 ± 48.9, and 288.8 ± 120.5 mmHg after 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively-without significant differences among the time points (p = 0.508. The mean static compliance was 63.0 ± 18.7 mmHg, 75.6 ± 25.4 mmHg, and 70.4 ± 28.0 mmHg after 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively, with a significant improvement from hour 1 to hour 2 (p = 0.029 but not from hour 2 to hour 3 (p = 0.059. Pulmonary vascular resistance remained stable during EVLP, with no differences among time points (p = 0.284. Conclusions: Although the lungs evaluated remained under physiological conditions, the EVLP protocol did not effectively improve lung function, thus precluding transplantation.

  14. Ex vivo and in vitro production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in Blau syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Galozzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to study both ex vivo and in vitro secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients affected by Blau syndrome (BS and carrying p.E383K mutation in the CARD15/NOD2 gene associated with the disease. For ex vivo studies, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, serum from three patients and healthy controls have been collected. PBMCs have been cultured in the presence or absence of inflammatory enhancers, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS and muramyl dipeptide (MDP. The levels of interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interferon (IFN-γ were assayed by either immunoassay or array-based system. For in vitro studies, different constructs were created cloning human wild-type and p.E383K-mutated NOD2 cDNA into the expression vector pCMV-Tag2c. HEK293 cell lines were stably transfected, cultured with or without MDP and IL-8 level was assayed in their surnatants. Statistical analysis in both studies was performed using non-parametric tests. Both ex vivo and in vitro studies have not identified a significant increase in secretion of the analyzed proinflammatory cytokines. p.E383K-mutated NOD2 transfected cells express low level of IL-8. The ex vivo basal level results from both serum and PBMCs surnatants present similar levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ in patients and controls. The presence of the stimulant agents (LPS and MDP, either individual or paired, does not lead to significant increases in all cytokines concentrations in patients compared to controls. Taken together, the ex vivo and in vitro data suggest that there is not a primary mediation of IL-1β and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in BS patients carrying p.E383K.

  15. Comparison of In Vivo and Ex Vivo MRI for the Detection of Structural Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Holly E; Powell, Nick M; Ma, Da; Ismail, Ozama; Harrison, Ian F; Wells, Jack A; Colgan, Niall; O'Callaghan, James M; Johnson, Ross A; Murray, Tracey K; Ahmed, Zeshan; Heggenes, Morten; Fisher, Alice; Cardoso, M Jorge; Modat, Marc; O'Neill, Michael J; Collins, Emily C; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Ourselin, Sébastien; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2017-01-01

    With increasingly large numbers of mouse models of human disease dedicated to MRI studies, compromises between in vivo and ex vivo MRI must be fully understood in order to inform the choice of imaging methodology. We investigate the application of high resolution in vivo and ex vivo MRI, in combination with tensor-based morphometry (TBM), to uncover morphological differences in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy. The rTg4510 mouse also offers a novel paradigm by which the overexpression of mutant tau can be regulated by the administration of doxycycline, providing us with a platform on which to investigate more subtle alterations in morphology with morphometry. Both in vivo and ex vivo MRI allowed the detection of widespread bilateral patterns of atrophy in the rTg4510 mouse brain relative to wild-type controls. Regions of volume loss aligned with neuronal loss and pathological tau accumulation demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. When we sought to investigate more subtle structural alterations in the rTg4510 mice relative to a subset of doxycycline-treated rTg4510 mice, ex vivo imaging enabled the detection of more regions of morphological brain changes. The disadvantages of ex vivo MRI may however mitigate this increase in sensitivity: we observed a 10% global shrinkage in brain volume of the post-mortem tissues due to formalin fixation, which was most notable in the cerebellum and olfactory bulbs. However, many central brain regions were not adversely affected by the fixation protocol, perhaps due to our "in-skull" preparation. The disparity between our TBM findings from in vivo and ex vivo MRI underlines the importance of appropriate study design, given the trade-off between these two imaging approaches. We support the utility of in vivo MRI for morphological phenotyping of mouse models of disease; however, for subtler phenotypes, ex vivo offers enhanced sensitivity to discrete morphological changes.

  16. Ex vivo expansion of human peripheral blood progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabannon, C; Herrera-Rodriguez, D; Bardin, F; Mouren, M; Novakovitch, G; Blaise, D; Maraninchi, D; Mannoni, P

    1995-01-01

    Culture of human hematopoietic progenitors on a large scale could lead to several clinical applications within the near future, including the production of differentiated and functional cells, the increase in the number of early progenitors, especially stem cells, with such use as gene transfer, or the improvement of grafts used to limit the hematological toxicity associated with high-dose chemotherapy. In this case, one can still distinguish different objectives: improvement of grafts that contain low numbers of progenitors because of prior chemotherapies or because of marrow involvement for example, and qualitative changes in the graft content that would allow to envision the disappearance, or the further reduction, in the duration of absolute neutropenia that follows delivery of high dose chemotherapy ("nadir rescue"), despite substitution of mobilized blood cells to marrow cells and the in vivo use of hematopoietic growth factors. Additional advantages may be related to tumor purging in autologous expanded cells, and to the change in the ratio between hematopoietic progenitors and immunocompetent cells in allogeneic expanded populations. Therefore it appears that in vitro expansion currently raises two types of questions: the first ones are related to the definition of clinical or biological endpoints to be achieved, the second ones are related to "bioengineering", and deal with the efficiency and safety of progenitor cell cultures to be used for clinical applications. We here present preliminary results preparing future pilot clinical studies with ex vivo cultured human hematopoietic cells.

  17. Photoacoustic tomography of ex vivo mouse hearts with myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holotta, Markus; Grossauer, Harald; Kremser, Christian; Torbica, Pavle; Völkl, Jakob; Degenhart, Gerald; Esterhammer, Regina; Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Günther; Jaschke, Werner

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the applicability of ex vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) on small animal organs. We used photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to visualize infarcted areas within murine hearts and compared these data to other imaging techniques [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography] and histological slices. In order to induce ischemia, an in vivo ligation of the left anterior descending artery was performed on nine wild-type mice. After varying survival periods, the hearts were excised and fixed in formaldehyde. Samples were illuminated with nanosecond laser pulses delivered by a Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator. Ultrasound detection was achieved using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) working as an integrating line detector. The voxel data were computed using a Fourier-domain based reconstruction algorithm, followed by inverse Radon transforms. The results clearly showed the capability of PAI to visualize myocardial infarction and to produce three-dimensional images with a spatial resolution of approximately 120 μm. Regions of affected muscle tissue in PAI corresponded well with the results of MRI and histology. Photoacoustic tomography utilizing a MZI for ultrasound detection allows for imaging of small tissue samples. Due to its high spatial resolution, good soft tissue contrast and comparatively low cost, PAT offers great potentials for imaging.

  18. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion: Establishment and Operationalization in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaghi, Shadi; Abbasi Dezfuli, Azizollah; Ansari Aval, Zahra; Sheikhy, Kambiz; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Emami, Habib; Aigner, Clemens; Hosseini-Baharanchi, Fatemeh Sadat; Najafizadeh, Katayoun

    2017-02-01

    Although the number of lung transplants is limited because of general shortage of organ donors, ex vivo lung perfusion is a novel method with 2 main benefits, including better evaluation of lung potential and recovery of injured lungs. The main aim of this study was to establish and operationalize ex vivo lung perfusion as the first experience in Iran. This was a prospective operational research study on 5 cases, including 1 pig from Vienna Medical University and 4 patients from Masih Daneshvari Hospital. All organ donations from brain dead donors were evaluated according to lung transplant or ex vivo lung perfusion criteria from May 2013 to July 2015 in Tehran, Iran. If a donor did not have any sign of severe chest trauma or pneumonia but had poor oxygenation due to possible atelectasis or neurogenic pulmonary edema, their lungs were included for ex vivo lung perfusion. A successful trend in the difference between the pulmonary arterial Po2 and the left atrial Po2 was observed, as well as an increasing pattern in other functional parameters, including dynamic lung compliance and a decreasing trend in pulmonary vascular resistance. These initial trials indicate that ex vivo lung perfusion can lead to remarkable progress in lung transplant in Iran. They also provide several important pieces of guidance for successful ex vivo lung perfusion, including the necessity of following standard lung retrieval procedures and monitoring temperature and pressure precisely. The development of novel methods can provide opportunities for further research studies on lungs of deceased donors and lead to undiscovered findings. By keeping this science up to date in Iran and developing such new and creative methods, we can reveal effective strategies to promote the quality of donor lungs to support patients on transplant wait lists.

  19. Ex vivo expanded autologous polyclonal regulatory T cells suppress inhibitor formation in hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debalina Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cell therapy utilizing ex vivo expanded polyclonal CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg is in use in clinical trials for the treatment of type 1 diabetes and prevention of graft versus host disease in bone marrow transplantation. Here, we seek to evaluate this approach in the treatment of inherited protein deficiencies, i.e., hemophilia, which is often complicated by antibody formation against the therapeutic protein. Treg from mice that express green fluorescent protein–marked FoxP3 were highly purified by two-step magnetic/flow sorting and ex vivo expanded 50- to 100-fold over a 2-week culture period upon stimulation with antibody-coated microbeads. FoxP3 expression was maintained in >80% of expanded Treg, which also expressed high levels of CD62L and CTLA-4. Transplanted Treg suppressed inhibitory antibody formation against coagulation factors VIII and IX in protein and gene therapies in strain-matched hemophilia A and B mice, including in mice with pre-existing antibodies. Although transplanted Treg became undetectable within 2 weeks, suppression persisted for >2 months. Additional studies suggested that antigen-specific suppression emerged due to induction of endogenous Treg. The outcomes of these studies support the concept that cell therapy with ex vivo expanded autologous Treg can be used successfully to minimize immune responses in gene and protein replacement therapies.

  20. In vitro and ex vivo strategies for intracellular delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Martin P.; Sharei, Armon; Ding, Xiaoyun; Sahay, Gaurav; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2016-10-01

    Intracellular delivery of materials has become a critical component of genome-editing approaches, ex vivo cell-based therapies, and a diversity of fundamental research applications. Limitations of current technologies motivate development of next-generation systems that can deliver a broad variety of cargo to diverse cell types. Here we review in vitro and ex vivo intracellular delivery approaches with a focus on mechanisms, challenges and opportunities. In particular, we emphasize membrane-disruption-based delivery methods and the transformative role of nanotechnology, microfluidics and laboratory-on-chip technology in advancing the field.

  1. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic cells in the treatment of accidental irradiation-induced aplasia. Feasibility Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierry, D.; Bertho, J.M.; Chapel, A.; Gourmelon, P. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fountenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2000-05-01

    The lessons learnt from the treatment of previous radiation accidents using either bone marrow transplantation or growth factor therapy suggest that it is of importance to investigate new therapeutic regiments. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic stem cells, precursors and differentiated cells is a new approach of growth factor therapy which may be of interest for the treatment of patients with irradiation-induced bone marrow aplasia. Ex vivo expanded maturing cells could be used to limit the early risks bound to aplasia (infections related to granulocytopaenia, bleedings associated with thrombocytopaenia), whereas expanded immature cells could hasten haematopoietic recovery. Indeed, it is possible to culture from the blood or bone marrow the cells able to proliferate and differentiate. A sufficient quantity of cells to cover the transfusion needs of a radiation victim through an aplasia episode can be produced, in presence of a specific growth factor combination. Qualitative studies shows that the expanded cells exhibit a close to normal functionality. Long-term culture techniques demonstrate the expansion of immature cells. We have set up a high dose total body irradiation non-human primate model in order to study the therapeutic potential of ex vivo expansion of autologous progenitors and differentiating cells. All the steps of the process (sampling, positive selection of the immature cells, ex vivo expansion, irradiation of the animals, reinjection of the cultured cells and study of the outcome) are established. In order to allow the long term follow up of the ex vivo expanded haematopoietic cells (homing to the bone marrow or localization to specific organs for example), a retroviral gene transfer technique for transduction of green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene toward the selected immature blood or bone marrow cells is under development in this model. Taken together these elements will allow establishing the feasibility of ex vivo expansion of

  2. Development of an ex vivo human-porcine respiratory model for preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinel, Sophie; Pourchez, Jérémie; Leclerc, Lara; Avet, John; Durand, Marc; Prévôt, Nathalie; Cottier, Michèle; Vergnon, Jean M

    2017-02-24

    Anatomical models to study aerosol delivery impose huge limitations and extrapolation to humans remains controversial. This study aimed to develop and validate an ex vivo human-like respiratory tract model easy to use and relevant to compare to in vivo human data. A human plastinated head is connected to an ex vivo porcine pulmonary tract ventilated artificially by passive expansion. A physiological study measures "pleural" depressions, tidal volumes, and minute ventilation for the respiratory rates chosen (10, 15, and 20 per minute) with three inspiratory/expiratory ratios (1/1, 1/2, and 1/3). Scintigraphy with (81m)Krypton assesses the homogeneity of the ventilation. Forty different experiments were set for validation, with 36 (90%) ventilating successfully. At a respiratory rate of 15/minute with inspiratory/expiratory ratio of 1/2, the tidal volume average was 824 mL (standard deviation, 207 mL). The scintigraphy performed on 16 ex vivo models (44.4%), showed homogenous ventilation with great similarity to human physiological studies. Ratio of the peripheral to central count rates were equally correlated with human data published in the literature. This new model, combining research feasibility and human physiology likeness, provides a realistic approach to human inhalation and therefore can be an interesting tool in aerosol regional deposition studies.

  3. Development of an ex vivo human-porcine respiratory model for preclinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinel, Sophie; Pourchez, Jérémie; Leclerc, Lara; Avet, John; Durand, Marc; Prévôt, Nathalie; Cottier, Michèle; Vergnon, Jean M.

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical models to study aerosol delivery impose huge limitations and extrapolation to humans remains controversial. This study aimed to develop and validate an ex vivo human-like respiratory tract model easy to use and relevant to compare to in vivo human data. A human plastinated head is connected to an ex vivo porcine pulmonary tract ventilated artificially by passive expansion. A physiological study measures “pleural” depressions, tidal volumes, and minute ventilation for the respiratory rates chosen (10, 15, and 20 per minute) with three inspiratory/expiratory ratios (1/1, 1/2, and 1/3). Scintigraphy with 81mKrypton assesses the homogeneity of the ventilation. Forty different experiments were set for validation, with 36 (90%) ventilating successfully. At a respiratory rate of 15/minute with inspiratory/expiratory ratio of 1/2, the tidal volume average was 824 mL (standard deviation, 207 mL). The scintigraphy performed on 16 ex vivo models (44.4%), showed homogenous ventilation with great similarity to human physiological studies. Ratio of the peripheral to central count rates were equally correlated with human data published in the literature. This new model, combining research feasibility and human physiology likeness, provides a realistic approach to human inhalation and therefore can be an interesting tool in aerosol regional deposition studies. PMID:28233793

  4. Rat precision-cut intestinal slices to study P-gp activity and the potency of its inhibitors ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; de Jager, Marina H; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2015-01-01

    Rat Precision-Cut Intestinal Slices (PCIS) were evaluated as ex vivo model to study the regional gradient of P-gp activity, and to investigate whether the rank order of inhibitory potency of P-gp inhibitors can be correctly reproduced in this model with more accurate IC50 values than with current in

  5. 粒细胞-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子基因修饰的树突状细胞疫苗增强体外抗肿瘤免疫效应%Enhanced anti-tumor immunity ex vivo induced by GM-CSF gene transducted dendritic cell vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songbing He; Liang Wang; Kang Sun; Yanyun Zhang; Dechun Li

    2011-01-01

    Objective:The aim of the study was to investigate whether dendritic cell (DC) precursors,recruited by injection of chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3),induce enhanced anti-tumor immunity after granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) transfection in mice ex vivo.Methods:The 615 mice were injected with CCL3 via the tail vein.Freshly isolated B220–CD11c+ cells were cultured with cytokines.For adenoviral (Ad)-mediated gene transduction,DCs were transferred AdGM-CSF gene at different ratios of multiplicity of infection (MOI) to determine the optimal gene transfection conditions,and detecting the expression of GM-CSF after transfection.The variation of GM-CSF gene-modified DCs were analyzed by morphological observation,phenotype analysis,and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR).DCs were loaded with gastric cancer antigen obtained by frozen and thawed method.The stimulated DCs vaccination induced T lymphocytes,and the killing effect of T cells to gastric cancer cells was assayed by MTT.INF-γ production was determined with the INF-γ ELISA kit.Results:B220–CD11c+ cells numbers increased after CCL3 injection.ELISA results showed that after GM-CSF gene modification,DC could produce high level of GM-CSF.When DCs were transferred AdGM-CSF gene at MOI equal to 1:100,GM-CSF level in culture supernatants reached saturation [(130.00 ± 12.61) pg/mL].After GM-CSF gene-modification,DCs tended to more maturated through morphological observation and were phenotypically identical to typical DC and gained the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells.T lymphocytes stimulated with DC transduced with GM-CSF gene showed the specific killing effect on gastric carcinoma cells and produced high level of INF-γ [(1245.00 ± 13.75) pg/mL].Conclusion:CCL3-recruited DCs modified by adenovirus-transducted GM-CSF could produce high level of GM-CSF,which tended to more maturated,and the capacity of activating allogeneic T lymphocytes proliferation was enhanced greatly.Moreover,they could

  6. Ex Vivo Metrics, a preclinical tool in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, C Gerald; Bilyard, Kevin; Stephenson, Hugo

    2008-01-23

    Among the challenges facing translational medicine today is the need for greater productivity and safety during the drug development process. To meet this need, practitioners of translational medicine are developing new technologies that can facilitate decision making during the early stages of drug discovery and clinical development. Ex Vivo Metrics is an emerging technology that addresses this need by using intact human organs ethically donated for research. After hypothermic storage, the organs are reanimated by blood perfusion, providing physiologically and biochemically stable preparations. In terms of emulating human exposure to drugs, Ex Vivo Metrics is the closest biological system available for clinical trials. Early application of this tool for evaluating drug targeting, efficacy, and toxicity could result in better selection among promising drug candidates, greater drug productivity, and increased safety.

  7. Ex Vivo Metrics™, a preclinical tool in new drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilyard Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among the challenges facing translational medicine today is the need for greater productivity and safety during the drug development process. To meet this need, practitioners of translational medicine are developing new technologies that can facilitate decision making during the early stages of drug discovery and clinical development. Ex Vivo Metrics™ is an emerging technology that addresses this need by using intact human organs ethically donated for research. After hypothermic storage, the organs are reanimated by blood perfusion, providing physiologically and biochemically stable preparations. In terms of emulating human exposure to drugs, Ex Vivo Metrics is the closest biological system available for clinical trials. Early application of this tool for evaluating drug targeting, efficacy, and toxicity could result in better selection among promising drug candidates, greater drug productivity, and increased safety.

  8. Susceptibility of anthocyanins to ex vivo degradation in human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonpatana, Kom; Giusti, M. Mónica; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; MorenoCruz, Maria; Riedl, Ken M.; Kumar, Purnima; Failla, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Some fruits and their anthocyanin-rich extracts have been reported to exhibit chemopreventive activity in the oral cavity. Insights regarding oral metabolism of anthocyanins remain limited. Anthocyanin-rich extracts from blueberry, chokeberry, black raspberry, red grape, and strawberry were incubated ex vivo with human saliva from 14 healthy subjects. All anthocyanins were partially degraded in saliva. Degradation of chokeberry anthocyanins in saliva was temperature dependent and decreased by heating saliva to 80 °C and after removal of cells. Glycosides of delphinidin and petunidin were more susceptible to degradation than those of cyanidin, pelargonidin, peonidin and malvidin in both intact and artificial saliva. Stability of di- and tri-saccharide conjugates of anthocyanidins slightly, but significantly, exceeded that of monosaccharide compounds. Ex vivo degradation of anthocyanins in saliva was significantly decreased after oral rinsing with antibacterial chlorhexidine. These results suggest that anthocyanin degradation in the mouth is structure-dependent and largely mediated by oral microbiota. PMID:22868153

  9. Ex vivo gene editing of the dystrophin gene in muscle stem cells mediated by peptide nucleic acid single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides induces stable expression of dystrophin in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik-Ahd, Farnoosh; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which result in the complete absence of dystrophin protein throughout the body. Gene correction strategies hold promise to treating DMD. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the ability of peptide nucleic acid single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (PNA-ssODNs) to permanently correct single-point mutations at the genomic level. In this study, we show that PNA-ssODNs can target and correct muscle satellite cells (SCs), a population of stem cells capable of self-renewing and differentiating into muscle fibers. When transplanted into skeletal muscles, SCs transfected with correcting PNA-ssODNs were able to engraft and to restore dystrophin expression. The number of dystrophin-positive fibers was shown to significantly increase over time. Expression was confirmed to be the result of the activation of a subpopulation of SCs that had undergone repair as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analyses of engrafted muscles using antibodies specific to full-length dystrophin transcripts and by genomic DNA analysis of dystrophin-positive fibers. Furthermore, the increase in dystrophin expression detected over time resulted in a significant improvement in muscle morphology. The ability of transplanted cells to return into quiescence and to activate upon demand was confirmed in all engrafted muscles following injury. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using gene editing strategies to target and correct SCs and further establish the therapeutic potential of this approach to permanently restore dystrophin expression into muscle of DMD patients.

  10. An organotypic slice model for ex vivo study of neural, immune, and microbial interactions of mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Luke A; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Tobet, Stuart A

    2016-02-15

    Organotypic tissue slices provide seminatural, three-dimensional microenvironments for use in ex vivo study of specific organs and have advanced investigative capabilities compared with isolated cell cultures. Several characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract have made in vitro models for studying the intestine challenging, such as maintaining the intricate structure of microvilli, the intrinsic enteric nervous system, Peyer's patches, the microbiome, and the active contraction of gut muscles. In the present study, an organotypic intestinal slice model was developed that allows for functional investigation across regions of the intestine. Intestinal tissue slices were maintained ex vivo for several days in a physiologically relevant environment that preserved normal enterocyte structure, intact and proliferating crypt cells, submucosal organization, and muscle wall composure. Cell death was measured by a membrane-impermeable DNA binding indicator, ethidium homodimer, and less than 5% of cells were labeled in all regions of the villi and crypt epithelia at 24 h ex vivo. This tissue slice model demonstrated intact myenteric and submucosal neuronal plexuses and functional interstitial cells of Cajal to the extent that nonstimulated, segmental contractions occurred for up to 48 h ex vivo. To detect changes in physiological responses, slices were also assessed for segmental contractions in the presence and absence of antibiotic treatment, which resulted in slices with lesser or greater amounts of commensal bacteria, respectively. Segmental contractions were significantly greater in slices without antibiotics and increased native microbiota. This model renders mechanisms of neuroimmune-microbiome interactions in a complex gut environment available to direct observation and controlled perturbation.

  11. Evaluation of ex vivo effectiveness of commercial desensitizing dentifrices

    OpenAIRE

    Mockdeci, Hanny; Polonini, Hudson; Martins, Isadora; Granato, Ana-Paula; Raposo, Nádia; Chaves, Maria das Graças Afonso Miranda

    2017-01-01

    Background Dentin hypersensitivity is a short, severe pain with fast onset. Therapy aims to either prevent or decrease neural transmission or physically occlude the dentinal tubules. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of commercial desensitizing dentifrice by means of an ex vivo method. Material and Methods Samples (n=8 lower human premolars for each group) were randomly allocated into: G1- brushing with Colgate?Sensitive Pro-Relief; G2- brushing with Sensodyne?Rapid Relief; G3- b...

  12. Ex vivo laser confocal microscopy findings of cultured Acanthamoeba trophozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamazaki N

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Natsuko Yamazaki,1 Akira Kobayashi,1 Hideaki Yokogawa,1 Yasuhisa Ishibashi,2 Yosaburo Oikawa,3 Masaharu Tokoro,4 Kazuhisa Sugiyama11Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, East Washinomiya Hospital, Kuki, Japan; 3Department of Medical Zoology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku, Japan; 4Department of Parasitology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, JapanPurpose: The purpose of the current study was to investigate ex vivo laser confocal microscopic findings of cultured Acanthamoeba trophozoites obtained from Acanthamoeba keratitis patients.Methods: Eight cultured samples of Acanthamoeba trophozoites from eight eyes of seven patients (mean age, 26.9 years; age range, 18–52 years were used. Seven samples were from corneal scrapings of Acanthamoeba keratitis patients and one sample was from the solution in a soft contact lens case. Ex vivo laser confocal microscopy was performed to qualitatively evaluate the shape and degree of light reflection of the living Acanthamoeba trophozoites.Results: Ex vivo laser confocal microscopy demonstrated highly reflective, high-contrast Acanthamoeba trophozoites with no walls (mean size, 25.4 µm; range, 17.1–58.5 µm. The shapes of the trophozoites were highly pleomorphic, and some showed characteristic acanthopodia by laser confocal microscopy.Conclusion: Ex vivo laser confocal microscopy was effective in demonstrating cultured Acanthamoeba trophozoites of various shapes and sizes. The observations of the current study may be helpful when similar structures are identified under in vivo conditions.Keywords: Acanthamoeba, trophozoite, laser confocal microscopy

  13. Ex vivo ultrasound control of resection margins during partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Arnaud; Cerantola, Yannick; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Lhermitte, Benoît; Bensadoun, Henri; Jichlinski, Patrice

    2011-12-01

    Surgery remains the treatment of choice for localized renal neoplasms. While radical nephrectomy was long considered the gold standard, partial nephrectomy has equivalent oncological results for small tumors. The role of negative surgical margins continues to be debated. Intraoperative frozen section analysis is expensive and time-consuming. We assessed the feasibility of intraoperative ex vivo ultrasound of resection margins in patients undergoing partial nephrectomy and its correlation with margin status on definitive pathological evaluation. A study was done at 2 institutions from February 2008 to March 2011. Patients undergoing partial nephrectomy for T1-T2 renal tumors were included in analysis. Partial nephrectomy was done by a standardized minimal healthy tissue margin technique. After resection the specimen was kept in saline and tumor margin status was immediately determined by ex vivo ultrasound. Sequential images were obtained to evaluate the whole tumor pseudocapsule. Results were compared with margin status on definitive pathological evaluation. A total of 19 men and 14 women with a mean ± SD age of 62 ± 11 years were included in analysis. Intraoperative ex vivo ultrasound revealed negative surgical margins in 30 cases and positive margins in 2 while it could not be done in 1. Final pathological results revealed negative margins in all except 1 case. Ultrasound sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 97%, respectively. Median ultrasound duration was 1 minute. Mean tumor and margin size was 3.6 ± 2.2 cm and 1.5 ± 0.7 mm, respectively. Intraoperative ex vivo ultrasound of resection margins in patients undergoing partial nephrectomy is feasible and efficient. Large sample studies are needed to confirm its promising accuracy to determine margin status. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bioluminescence-mediated longitudinal monitoring of adipose-derived stem cells in a large mammal ex vivo organ culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Mirte; van Rijn, Sjoerd; Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A; Paul, Cornelis P L; Noske, David P; Vandertop, W Peter; Wurdinger, Thomas; Helder, Marco N

    2015-09-09

    Recently, ex vivo three-dimensional organ culture systems have emerged to study the physiology and pathophysiology of human organs. These systems also have potential as a translational tool in tissue engineering; however, this potential is limited by our ability to longitudinally monitor the fate and action of cells used in regenerative therapies. Therefore, we investigated luciferase-mediated bioluminescence imaging (BLI) as a non-invasive technique to continuously monitor cellular behavior in ex vivo whole organ culture. Goat adipose-derived stem cells (gADSCs) were transduced with either Firefly luciferase (Fluc) or Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) reporter genes and injected in isolated goat intervertebral discs (IVD). Luciferase activity was monitored by BLI for at least seven days of culture. Additionally, possible confounders specific to avascular organ culture were investigated. Gluc imaging proved to be more suitable compared to Fluc in monitoring gADSCs in goat IVDs. We conclude that BLI is a promising tool to monitor spatial and temporal cellular behavior in ex vivo organ culture. Hence, ex vivo organ culture systems allow pre-screening and pre-validation of novel therapeutic concepts prior to in vivo large animal experimentation. Thereby, organ culture systems can reduce animal use, and improve the speed of innovation by overcoming technological, ethical and financial challenges.

  15. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  16. Functional genetic targeting of embryonic kidney progenitor cells ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junttila, Sanna; Saarela, Ulla; Halt, Kimmo; Manninen, Aki; Pärssinen, Heikki; Lecca, M Rita; Brändli, André W; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Skovorodkin, Ilya; Vainio, Seppo J

    2015-05-01

    The embryonic mammalian metanephric mesenchyme (MM) is a unique tissue because it is competent to generate the nephrons in response to Wnt signaling. An ex vivo culture in which the MM is separated from the ureteric bud (UB), the natural inducer, can be used as a classic tubule induction model for studying nephrogenesis. However, technological restrictions currently prevent using this model to study the molecular genetic details before or during tubule induction. Using nephron segment-specific markers, we now show that tubule induction in the MM ex vivo also leads to the assembly of highly segmented nephrons. This induction capacity was reconstituted when MM tissue was dissociated into a cell suspension and then reaggregated (drMM) in the presence of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 7/human recombinant fibroblast growth factor 2 for 24 hours before induction. Growth factor-treated drMM also recovered the capacity for organogenesis when recombined with the UB. Cell tracking and time-lapse imaging of chimeric drMM cultures indicated that the nephron is not derived from a single progenitor cell. Furthermore, viral vector-mediated transduction of green fluorescent protein was much more efficient in dissociated MM cells than in intact mesenchyme, and the nephrogenic competence of transduced drMM progenitor cells was preserved. Moreover, drMM cells transduced with viral vectors mediating Lhx1 knockdown were excluded from the nephric tubules, whereas cells transduced with control vectors were incorporated. In summary, these techniques allow reproducible cellular and molecular examinations of the mechanisms behind nephrogenesis and kidney organogenesis in an ex vivo organ culture/organoid setting.

  17. Ex vivo MRI of axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luciani, Alain [Department of Radiology, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France)], E-mail: luciani@hmn.ap-hop-paris.fr; Pigneur, Frederic [Department of Radiology, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); Ghozali, Faridah [Department of Pathology, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); Dao, Thu-Ha [Department of Radiology, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); Cunin, Patrick [Unite de Recherche Clinique, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); Meyblum, Evelyne [Department of Radiology, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); De Baecque-Fontaine, Cecile [Department of Pathology, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); Alamdari, Ali [Department of Plastic Surgery, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); Maison, Patrick [Unite de Recherche Clinique, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); Deux, Jean Francois [Department of Radiology, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); Lagrange, Jean Leon [Department of Radiotherapy, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); Lantieri, Laurent [Department of Plastic Surgery, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France); Rahmouni, Alain [Department of Radiology, AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, 94010 Creteil (France)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To provide a strategy for precise co-localization of lymph nodes on axillary lymph-node dissection (ALND) specimens both on pathology and MR. To identify nodal features suggestive of metastatic involvement on a node-to-node basis. Materials and methods: National Institutional review-board approved this prospective study of 18 patients with breast cancer referred for ALND. Ex vivo T1 and inversion recovery (IR) T2 WI of ALND specimens tightly positioned within scaled plastic cranes was performed immediately after surgery. The correspondence of MR-based or pathologically based nodes location was assessed. The MR size and morphological presentation of metastatic and normal nodes were compared (Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney test). Quantitative variables were compared using Pearson coefficient. Results: 207 nodes were retrieved on pathology and 165 on MR. MR-pathological correlation of nodes location was high regarding MR-identified nodes (r = 0.755). An MR short axis threshold of 4 mm yielded the best predictive value for metastatic nodal involvement (Se = 78.6%; Sp = 62.3%). Irregular contours (Se = 35.7%; Sp = 96.7%), central nodal hyper-intensity on IR T2 WI (Se = 57.1%; Sp = 91.4%), and a cortical thickness above 3 mm (Se = 63.6%; Sp = 83.2%) were significantly associated with metastatic involvement. Conclusion: Ex vivo MR allows node-to-node correlation with pathology. Morphological MR criteria can suggest metastatic involvement.

  18. The consequence of regional gradients of P-gp and CYP3A4 for drug-drug interactions by P-gp inhibitors and the P-gp/CYP3A4 interplay in the human intestine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; van de Steeg, Evita; de Jager, Marina H; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2017-04-01

    Intestinal P-gp and CYP3A4 work coordinately to reduce the intracellular concentration of drugs, and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) based on this interplay are of clinical importance and require pre-clinical investigation. Using precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) of human jejunum, ileum and colon, we investigated the P-gp/CYP3A4 interplay and related DDIs with P-gp inhibitors at the different regions of the human intestine with quinidine (Qi), dual substrate of P-gp and CYP3A4, as probe. All the P-gp inhibitors increased the intracellular concentrations of Qi by 2.1-2.6 fold in jejunum, 2.6-3.8 fold in ileum but only 1.2-1.3 fold in colon, in line with the different P-gp expression in these intestinal regions. The selective P-gp inhibitors (CP100356 and PSC833) enhanced 3-hydroxy-quinidine (3OH-Qi) in jejunum and ileum, while dual inhibitors of P-gp and CYP3A4 (verapamil and ketoconazole) decreased the 3OH-Qi production, despite of the increased intracellular Qi concentration, due to inhibition of CYP3A4. The outcome of DDIs based on P-gp/CYP3A4 interplay, shown as remarkable changes in the intracellular concentration of both the parent drug and the metabolite, varied among the intestinal regions, probably due to the different expression of P-gp and CYP3A4, and were different from those found in rat PCIS, which may have important implications for the disposition and toxicity of drugs and their metabolites.

  19. Consequences of Mrp2 deficiency for diclofenac toxicity in the rat intestine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van de Vegte, Dennis; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Sekine, Shuichi; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2015-02-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DCF) has a high prevalence of intestinal side effects in humans and rats. It has been reported that Mrp2 transporter deficient rats (Mrp2) are more resistant to DCF induced intestinal toxicity. This was explained in vivo by impaired Mrp2-dependent biliary transport of DCF-acylglucuronide (DAG), leading to decreased intestinal exposure to DAG and DCF. However, it is not known to what extent adaptive changes in the Mrp2 intestine itself influence its sensitivity to DCF toxicity without the influence of liver metabolites. To investigate this, DCF toxicity and disposition were studied ex vivo by precision-cut intestinal slices and Ussing chamber using intestines from wild type(WT) and Mrp2 rats. The results show that adaptive changes due to Mrp2 deficiency concerning Mrp2, Mrp3 and BCRP gene expression, GSH content and DAG formation were different between liver and intestine. Furthermore, Mrp2 intestine was intrinsically more resistant to DCF toxicity than its WT counterpart ex vivo. This can at least partly be explained by a reduced DCF uptake by the Mrp2 intestine, but isnot related to the other adaptive changes in the intestine. The extrapolation of this data to humans with MRP2 deficiency is uncertain due to species differences in activity and regulation of transporters.

  20. Expression of Plasmodium vivax crt-o Is Related to Parasite Stage but Not Ex Vivo Chloroquine Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pava, Zuleima; Handayuni, Irene; Wirjanata, Grennady; To, Sheren; Trianty, Leily; Noviyanti, Rintis; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Auburn, Sarah; Price, Ric N; Marfurt, Jutta

    2015-11-02

    Chloroquine (CQ)-resistant Plasmodium vivax is present in most countries where P. vivax infection is endemic, but the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Increased expression of P. vivax crt-o (pvcrt-o) has been correlated with in vivo CQ resistance in an area with low-grade resistance. We assessed pvcrt-o expression in isolates from Papua (Indonesia), where P. vivax is highly CQ resistant. Ex vivo drug susceptibilities to CQ, amodiaquine, piperaquine, mefloquine, and artesunate were determined using a modified schizont maturation assay. Expression levels of pvcrt-o were measured using a novel real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method. Large variations in pvcrt-o expression were observed across the 51 isolates evaluated, with the fold change in expression level ranging from 0.01 to 59 relative to that seen with the P. vivax β-tubulin gene and from 0.01 to 24 relative to that seen with the P. vivax aldolase gene. Expression was significantly higher in isolates with the majority of parasites at the ring stage of development (median fold change, 1.7) compared to those at the trophozoite stage (median fold change, 0.5; P < 0.001). Twenty-nine isolates fulfilled the criteria for ex vivo drug susceptibility testing and showed high variability in CQ responses (median, 107.9 [range, 6.5 to 345.7] nM). After controlling for the parasite stage, we found that pvcrt-o expression levels did not correlate with the ex vivo response to CQ or with that to any of the other antimalarials tested. Our results highlight the importance of development-stage composition for measuring pvcrt-o expression and suggest that pvcrt-o transcription is not a primary determinant of ex vivo drug susceptibility. A comprehensive transcriptomic approach is warranted for an in-depth investigation of the role of gene expression levels and P. vivax drug resistance.

  1. Ex Vivo and In Silico Feasibility Study of Monitoring Electric Field Distribution in Tissue during Electroporation Based Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjc, Matej; Bajd, Franci; Sersa, Igor; Woo, Eung Je; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) was recently proposed for determining electric field distribution during electroporation in which cell membrane permeability is temporary increased by application of an external high electric field. The method was already successfully applied for reconstruction of electric field distribution in agar phantoms. Before the next step towards in vivo experiments is taken, monitoring of electric field distribution during electroporation of ex vivo tissue ex vivo and feasibility for its use in electroporation based treatments needed to be evaluated. Sequences of high voltage pulses were applied to chicken liver tissue in order to expose it to electric field which was measured by means of MREIT. MREIT was also evaluated for its use in electroporation based treatments by calculating electric field distribution for two regions, the tumor and the tumor-liver region, in a numerical model based on data obtained from clinical study on electrochemotherapy treatment of deep-seated tumors. Electric field distribution inside tissue was successfully measured ex vivo using MREIT and significant changes of tissue electrical conductivity were observed in the region of the highest electric field. A good agreement was obtained between the electric field distribution obtained by MREIT and the actual electric field distribution in evaluated regions of a numerical model, suggesting that implementation of MREIT could thus enable efficient detection of areas with insufficient electric field coverage during electroporation based treatments, thus assuring the effectiveness of the treatment. PMID:23029212

  2. Ex vivo and in silico feasibility study of monitoring electric field distribution in tissue during electroporation based treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Kranjc

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT was recently proposed for determining electric field distribution during electroporation in which cell membrane permeability is temporary increased by application of an external high electric field. The method was already successfully applied for reconstruction of electric field distribution in agar phantoms. Before the next step towards in vivo experiments is taken, monitoring of electric field distribution during electroporation of ex vivo tissue ex vivo and feasibility for its use in electroporation based treatments needed to be evaluated. Sequences of high voltage pulses were applied to chicken liver tissue in order to expose it to electric field which was measured by means of MREIT. MREIT was also evaluated for its use in electroporation based treatments by calculating electric field distribution for two regions, the tumor and the tumor-liver region, in a numerical model based on data obtained from clinical study on electrochemotherapy treatment of deep-seated tumors. Electric field distribution inside tissue was successfully measured ex vivo using MREIT and significant changes of tissue electrical conductivity were observed in the region of the highest electric field. A good agreement was obtained between the electric field distribution obtained by MREIT and the actual electric field distribution in evaluated regions of a numerical model, suggesting that implementation of MREIT could thus enable efficient detection of areas with insufficient electric field coverage during electroporation based treatments, thus assuring the effectiveness of the treatment.

  3. Assessment of donor heart viability during ex vivo heart perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher W; Ambrose, Emma; Müller, Alison; Li, Yun; Le, Hoa; Hiebert, Brett; Arora, Rakesh; Lee, Trevor W; Dixon, Ian; Tian, Ganghong; Nagendran, Jayan; Hryshko, Larry; Freed, Darren

    2015-10-01

    Ex vivo heart perfusion (EVHP) may facilitate resuscitation of discarded donor hearts and expand the donor pool; however, a reliable means of demonstrating organ viability prior to transplantation is required. Therefore, we sought to identify metabolic and functional parameters that predict myocardial performance during EVHP. To evaluate the parameters over a broad spectrum of organ function, we obtained hearts from 9 normal pigs and 37 donation after circulatory death pigs and perfused them ex vivo. Functional parameters obtained from a left ventricular conductance catheter, oxygen consumption, coronary vascular resistance, and lactate concentration were measured, and linear regression analyses were performed to identify which parameters best correlated with myocardial performance (cardiac index: mL·min(-1)·g(-1)). Functional parameters exhibited excellent correlation with myocardial performance and demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for identifying hearts at risk of poor post-transplant function (ejection fraction: R(2) = 0.80, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.85; stroke work: R(2) = 0.76, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.77; minimum dP/dt: R(2) = 0.74, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.54; tau: R(2) = 0.51, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.92), whereas metabolic parameters were limited in their ability to predict myocardial performance (oxygen consumption: R(2) = 0.28; coronary vascular resistance: R(2) = 0.20; lactate concentration: R(2) = 0.02). We concluded that evaluation of functional parameters provides the best assessment of myocardial performance during EVHP, which highlights the need for an EVHP device capable of assessing the donor heart in a physiologic working mode.

  4. Late Effects of Heavy Ion Irradiation on Ex Vivo Osteoblastogenesis and Cancellous Bone Microarchitecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Luan Hoang; Alwood, Joshua; Kumar, Akhilesh; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged spaceflight causes degeneration of skeletal tissue with incomplete recovery even after return to Earth. We hypothesize that heavy ion irradiation, a component of Galactic Cosmic Radiation, damages osteoblast progenitors and may contribute to bone loss during long duration space travel beyond the protection of the Earth's magnetosphere. Male, 16 week old C57BL6/J mice were exposed to high LET (56 Fe, 600MeV) radiation using either low (5 or 10cGy) or high (50 or 200cGy) doses at the NASA Space Radiation Lab and were euthanized 3 - 4, 7, or 35 days later. Bone structure was quantified by microcomputed tomography (6.8 micron pixel size) and marrow cell redox assessed using membrane permeable, free radical sensitive fluorogenic dyes. To assess osteoblastogenesis, adherent marrow cells were cultured ex vivo, then mineralized nodule formation quantified by imaging and gene expression analyzed by RT PCR. Interestingly, 3 - 4 days post exposure, fluorogenic dyes that reflect cytoplasmic generation of reactive nitrogen/oxygen species (DAF FM Diacetate or CM H2DCFDA) revealed irradiation (50cGy) reduced free radical generation (20-45%) compared to sham irradiated controls. Alternatively, use of a dye showing relative specificity for mitochondrial superoxide generation (MitoSOX) revealed an 88% increase compared to controls. One week after exposure, reactive oxygen/nitrogen levels remained lower(24%) relative to sham irradiated controls. After one month, high dose irradiation (200 cGy) caused an 86% decrement in ex vivo nodule formation and a 16-31% decrement in bone volume to total volume and trabecular number (50, 200cGy) compared to controls. High dose irradiation (200cGy) up regulated expression of a late osteoblast marker (BGLAP) and select genes related to oxidative metabolism (Catalase) and DNA damage repair (Gadd45). In contrast, lower doses (5, 10cGy) did not affect bone structure or ex vivo nodule formation, but did down regulate iNOS by 0.54 - 0.58 fold

  5. Influence of water dilution on percutaneous absorption of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone in vivo and ex vivo in rats and ex vivo in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Fabrice; Payan, Jean-Paul; Beydon, Dominique; Wathier, Ludivine; Ferrari, Elisabeth; Grandclaude, Marie-Christine

    2015-11-01

    N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) is mainly used as a monomer in the production of polyvinylpyrrolidone or copolymers. Percutaneous absorption is an important source of exposure in the work environment. However, few studies have investigated this route of absorption. In this study, percutaneous absorption of neat or aqueous NVP solutions was measured in vivo and ex vivo in rats, and ex vivo in humans. Penetration and absorption fluxes were very similar following in vivo exposure to neat NVP (0.54 and 0.43 mg/cm(2)/h, respectively). Exposing rats to a 50% aqueous solution of NVP increased both fluxes threefold (to 1.48 and 1.55 mg/cm(2)/h, respectively). Ex vivo, the absorption flux increased with solutions from 10 to 25% of NVP, reached a plateau (between 25 and 50% in rat, 25 and 75% in human) and then decreased with neat NVP. In vivo and ex vivo absorption fluxes measured using rat skin were similar, supporting the hypothesis that the ex vivo measurements were a good representation of what was observed in vivo. Thus, for humans, the ex vivo measurements are likely the same as would be determined in vivo.

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity of Punica granatum L. (Pomegranate) rind extracts applied topically to ex vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, David M J; Bugert, Joachim; Denyer, Stephen P; Heard, Charles M

    2017-03-01

    Coadministered pomegranate rind extract (PRE) and zinc (II) produces a potent virucidal activity against Herpes simplex virus (HSV); however, HSV infections are also associated with localised inflammation and pain. Here, the objective was to determine the anti-inflammatory activity and relative depth penetration of PRE, total pomegranate tannins (TPT) and zinc (II) in skin, ex vivo. PRE, TPT and ZnSO4 were dosed onto freshly excised ex vivo porcine skin mounted in Franz diffusion cells and analysed for COX-2, as a marker for modulation of the arachidonic acid inflammation pathway, by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Tape stripping was carried out to construct relative depth profiles. Topical application of PRE to ex vivo skin downregulated expression of COX-2, which was significant after just 6h, and maintained for up to 24h. This was achieved with intact stratum corneum, proving that punicalagin penetrated skin, further supported by the depth profiling data. When PRE and ZnSO4 were applied together, statistically equal downregulation of COX-2 was observed when compared to the application of PRE alone; no effect followed the application of ZnSO4 alone. TPT downregulated COX-2 less than PRE, indicating that tannins alone may not be entirely responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of PRE. Punicalagin was found throughout the skin, in particular the lower regions, indicating appendageal delivery as a significant route to the viable epidermis. Topical application of TPT and PRE had significant anti-inflammatory effects in ex vivo skin, confirming that PRE penetrates the skin and modulates COX-2 regulation in the viable epidermis. Pomegranates have potential as a novel approach in ameliorating the inflammation and pain associated with a range of skin conditions, including cold sores and herpetic stromal keratitis.

  7. Stratum corneum damage and ex vivo porcine skin water absorption - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch Lynggaard, C; Bang Knudsen, D; Jemec, G B E

    2009-01-01

    A simple ex vivo screening technique would be of interest for mass screening of substances for potential barrier disruptive qualities. Ex vivo water absorption as a marker of skin barrier integrity was studied on pig ear skin. Skin water absorption was quantified by weighing and weight changes we...

  8. Surveying the Delivery Methods of CRISPR/Cas9 for ex vivo Mammalian Cell Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, William J; Pesch, Theresa; Matile, Stefan; Reddy, Sai T

    2016-01-01

    The simplicity of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology has been transformative in making targeted genome editing accessible for laboratories around the world. However, due to the sheer volume of literature generated in the past five years, determining the best format and delivery method of CRISPR/Cas9 components can be challenging. Here, we provide a brief overview of the progress that has been made in the ex vivo genome editing of mammalian cells and summarize the key advances made for improving efficiency and delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 in DNA, RNA, and protein form. In particular, we highlight the delivery of Cas9 components to human cells for advanced genome editing applications such as large gene insertion.

  9. An "ex vivo model" contributing to the diagnosis and evaluation of new drugs in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lullo, A M; Scorza, M; Amato, F; Comegna, M; Raia, V; Maiuri, L; Ilardi, G; Cantone, E; Castaldo, G; Iengo, M

    2016-11-29

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. About 2000 mutations have been described so far. We setup an ex vivo model of human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) to study CF patients testing the effect of novel mutations and molecular therapies. We performed the sampling (by brushing), followed by culture and analysis of HNECs using a series of molecular techniques. We performed 50 brushings from CF patients and controls. Using cultured cells, we: i) demonstrated the widely heterogeneous CFTR expression in patients and in controls; ii) defined the splicing effect of a CFTR mutation; iii) assessed the CFTR gating activity in patients bearing different mutations; iv) demonstrated that butyrate significantly enhances CFTR expression. Based on our data, we can conclude: 1) HNEC brushing is performed without anaesthesia and is well tolerated in all CF patients (children and adults); 2) HNECs can be preserved for up to 48 hours before culture allowings multicenter studies; 3) HNECs culture can be considered a suitable model to study the molecular effects of new CFTR gene mutations and/or uncertain meaning specific mutations of carriers; 4) an ex vivo model of HNECs may be used to evaluate, before human use, the effect of new drugs on patients' cells bearing specific CFTR mutations; 5) the methodology is adequate for a quantitative measurement, by fluorescence, of the CFTR gating activity of the HNECs from patients with different genotypes identifying: a) CF patients bearing two severe mutations with an activity < 10% (compared to controls - 100%); b) CF patients bearing at least a mild mutation with an activity of 10-20%; c) CF carriers (heterozygous subjects) with an activity between 40-70%.

  10. Random walks with shape prior for cochlea segmentation in ex vivo μCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz Pujadas, Esmeralda; Kjer, Hans Martin; Piella, Gemma;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cochlear implantation is a safe and effective surgical procedure to restore hearing in deaf patients. However, the level of restoration achieved may vary due to differences in anatomy, implant type and surgical access. In order to reduce the variability of the surgical outcomes, we...... previously proposed the use of a high-resolution model built from μCT images and then adapted to patient-specific clinical CT scans. As the accuracy of the model is dependent on the precision of the original segmentation, it is extremely important to have accurate μCT segmentation algorithms. Methods We...... propose a new framework for cochlea segmentation in ex vivo μCT images using random walks where a distance-based shape prior is combined with a region term estimated by a Gaussian mixture model. The prior is also weighted by a confidence map to adjust its influence according to the strength of the image...

  11. Ex vivo evaluation of the percutaneous penetration of proanthocyanidin extracts from Guazuma ulmifolia using photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, J C B; Pedrochi, F; Hernandes, L; de Mello, J C P; Baesso, M L

    2007-03-21

    In this work photoacoustic spectroscopy has been applied to determine ex vivo the percutaneous penetration of proanthocyanidins present in extracts obtained from Guazuma ulmifolia, in rats. Lotion formulations containing 0.0663 mg of procyanidin B2 day(-1)animal(-1) were topically applied during 7, 10 and 13 days in each group of the animals. After the end of treatment the animals were killed, the skin dissected to remove the basal content, and the measurements were carried out as a function of the period of time of treatment. The results showed that despite the very low concentration of the active principle (procyanidin B2) in the lotion, the photoacoustic method was able to show the presence of optical absorption bands from this substance in the dermis region, evidencing once again that this method may be useful for studies of topically applied formulations of interest in the pharmacokinetic area.

  12. Ex vivo 3D diffusion tensor imaging and quantification of cardiac laminar structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Patrick A; Tseng, Hsiang-Jer; Younes, Laurent; McVeigh, Elliot R; Winslow, Raimond L

    2005-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) method for measuring cardiac fiber structure at high spatial resolution is presented. The method was applied to the ex vivo reconstruction of the fiber architecture of seven canine hearts. A novel hypothesis-testing method was developed and used to show that distinct populations of secondary and tertiary eigenvalues may be distinguished at reasonable confidence levels (P < or = 0.01) within the canine ventricle. Fiber inclination and sheet angles are reported as a function of transmural depth through the anterior, lateral, and posterior left ventricle (LV) free wall. Within anisotropic regions, two consistent and dominant orientations were identified, supporting published results from histological studies and providing strong evidence that the tertiary eigenvector of the diffusion tensor (DT) defines the sheet normal.

  13. Ex Vivo Drug Susceptibility Testing and Molecular Profiling of Clinical Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia from 2008 to 2013 Suggest Emerging Piperaquine Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Saunders, David L; Sea, Darapiseth; Chanarat, Nitima; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Se, Youry; Yom, You; Heng, Thay Kheng; Kong, Nareth; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Tangthongchaiwiriya, Kuntida; Jacob, Christopher; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher; Lin, Jessica T; Chuor, Char Meng; Prom, Satharath; Tyner, Stuart D; Gosi, Panita; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Lon, Chanthap; Lanteri, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Cambodia's first-line artemisinin combination therapy, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), is no longer sufficiently curative against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria at some Thai-Cambodian border regions. We report recent (2008 to 2013) drug resistance trends in 753 isolates from northern, western, and southern Cambodia by surveying for ex vivo drug susceptibility and molecular drug resistance markers to guide the selection of an effective alternative to DHA-PPQ. Over the last 3 study years, PPQ susceptibility declined dramatically (geomean 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] increased from 12.8 to 29.6 nM), while mefloquine (MQ) sensitivity doubled (67.1 to 26 nM) in northern Cambodia. These changes in drug susceptibility were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (Pfmdr1) multiple copy isolates and coincided with the timing of replacing artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ) with DHA-PPQ as the first-line therapy. Widespread chloroquine resistance was suggested by all isolates being of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVIET haplotype. Nearly all isolates collected from the most recent years had P. falciparum kelch13 mutations, indicative of artemisinin resistance. Ex vivo bioassay measurements of antimalarial activity in plasma indicated 20% of patients recently took antimalarials, and their plasma had activity (median of 49.8 nM DHA equivalents) suggestive of substantial in vivo drug pressure. Overall, our findings suggest DHA-PPQ failures are associated with emerging PPQ resistance in a background of artemisinin resistance. The observed connection between drug policy changes and significant reduction in PPQ susceptibility with mitigation of MQ resistance supports reintroduction of AS-MQ, in conjunction with monitoring of the P. falciparum mdr1 copy number, as a stop-gap measure in areas of DHA-PPQ failure.

  14. A New Hemodynamic Ex Vivo Model for Medical Devices Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Blandine; Sarraf, Christophe; Bakir, Farid; Chai, Feng; Maton, Mickael; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Hertault, Adrien; Blanchemain, Nicolas; Haulon, Stephan; Lermusiaux, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    In-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a major public health concern associated with an increased morbidity, mortality, and health-related costs. Drug-eluting stents (DES) have reduced ISR, but generate healing-related issues or hypersensitivity reactions, leading to an increased risk of late acute stent thrombosis. Assessments of new DES are based on animal models or in vitro release systems, which have several limitations. The role of flow and shear stress on endothelial cell and ISR has also been emphasized. The aim of this work was to design and first evaluate an original bioreactor, replicating ex vivo hemodynamic and biological conditions similar to human conditions, to further evaluate new DES. This bioreactor was designed to study up to 6 stented arteries connected in bypass, immersed in a culture box, in which circulated a physiological systolo-diastolic resistive flow. Two centrifugal pumps drove the flow. The main pump generated pulsating flows by modulation of rotation velocity, and the second pump worked at constant rotation velocity, ensuring the counter pressure levels and backflows. The flow rate, the velocity profile, the arterial pressure, and the resistance of the flow were adjustable. The bioreactor was placed in an incubator to reproduce a biological environment. A first feasibility experience was performed over a 24-day period. Three rat aortic thoracic arteries were placed into the bioreactor, immersed in cell culture medium changed every 3 days, and with a circulating systolic and diastolic flux during the entire experimentation. There was no infection and no leak. At the end of the experimentation, a morphometric analysis was performed confirming the viability of the arteries. We designed and patented an original hemodynamic ex vivo model to further study new DES, as well as a wide range of vascular diseases and medical devices. This bioreactor will allow characterization of the velocity field and drug transfers within a stented artery with new

  15. Ex vivo T2 relaxation: associations with age-related neuropathology and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawe, Robert J; Bennett, David A; Schneider, Julie A; Leurgans, Sue E; Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Boyle, Patricia A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos

    2014-07-01

    The transverse relaxation time constant, T(2), is sensitive to brain tissue's free water content and the presence of paramagnetic materials such as iron. In this study, ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate alterations in T(2) related to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology and other types of neuropathology common in old age, as well as the relationship between T(2) alterations and cognition. Cerebral hemispheres were obtained from 371 deceased older adults. Using fast spin-echo imaging with multiple echo times, T(2) maps were produced and warped to a study-specific template. Hemispheres underwent neuropathologic examination for identification of AD pathology and other common age-related neuropathologies. Voxelwise linear regression was carried out to detect regions of pathology-related T(2) alterations and, in separate analyses, regions in which T(2) alterations were linked to antemortem cognitive performance. AD pathology was associated with T(2) prolongation in white matter of all lobes and T(2) shortening in the basal ganglia and insula. Gross infarcts were associated with T(2) prolongation in white matter of all lobes, and in the thalamus and basal ganglia. Hippocampal sclerosis was associated with T(2) prolongation in the hippocampus and white matter of the temporal lobe. After controlling for neuropathology, T(2) prolongation in the frontal lobe white matter was associated with lower performance in the episodic, semantic, and working memory domains. In addition, voxelwise analysis of in vivo and ex vivo T(2) values indicated a positive relationship between the two, though further investigation is necessary to accurately translate findings of the present study to the in vivo case.

  16. Infrared fluorescent imaging as a potent tool for in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models of visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Calvo-Álvarez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is hypoendemic in the Mediterranean region, where it is caused by the protozoan Leishmania infantum. An effective vaccine for humans is not yet available and the severe side-effects of the drugs in clinical use, linked to the parenteral administration route of most of them, are significant concerns of the current leishmanicidal medicines. New drugs are desperately needed to treat VL and phenotype-based High Throughput Screenings (HTS appear to be suitable to achieve this goal in the coming years.We generated two infrared fluorescent L. infantum strains, which stably overexpress the IFP 1.4 and iRFP reporter genes and performed comparative studies of their biophotonic properties at both promastigote and amastigote stages. To improve the fluorescence emission of the selected reporter in intracellular amastigotes, we engineered distinct constructs by introducing regulatory sequences of differentially-expressed genes (A2, AMASTIN and HSP70 II. The final strain that carries the iRFP gene under the control of the L. infantum HSP70 II downstream region (DSR, was employed to perform a phenotypic screening of a collection of small molecules by using ex vivo splenocytes from infrared-infected BALB/c mice. In order to further investigate the usefulness of this infrared strain, we monitored an in vivo infection by imaging BALB/c mice in a time-course study of 20 weeks.The near-infrared fluorescent L. infantum strain represents an important step forward in bioimaging research of VL, providing a robust model of phenotypic screening suitable for HTS of small molecule collections in the mammalian parasite stage. Additionally, HSP70 II+L. infantum strain permitted for the first time to monitor an in vivo infection of VL. This finding accelerates the possibility of testing new drugs in preclinical in vivo studies, thus supporting the urgent and challenging drug discovery program against this parasitic disease.

  17. Cytokine combinations on the potential for ex vivo expansion of murine hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Wing Chi; Chan, Yuen Fan; Chan, Li Chong; Ng, Ray Kit

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is a rare cell population, which is capable of self-renewal and differentiation to all blood lineages. The clinical potential of HSCs for treating hematological disorders has led to the use of cytokine stimulation for ex vivo expansion. However, little is known about the molecular features of the HSC populations expanded under different cytokine combinations. We studied the expansion of murine HSCs cultured with six different cytokine combinations under serum-containing or serum-free conditions for 14days. We found that all the cytokine combinations promoted expansion of murine HSCs. Although SCF/IL-3/IL-6 induced the highest expansion of the immunophenotypic Lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells at day 14, over 90% of them were FcεRIα(+) mast cells. In contrast, the serum-free medium with SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 effectively promoted the expansion of LSK/FcεRIα(-) HSCs by over 50-fold. HSCs expanded by SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 combination formed compact hematopoietic colonies and demonstrated a higher degree of multipotency compared to the HSCs cultured with other cytokine combinations. Surprisingly, despite the same LSK/FcεRIα(-) immunophenotype, HSCs cultured with different cytokine combinations demonstrated differential patterns of hematopoietic gene expression. HSCs cultured with SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 maintained a transcription profile resembling that of freshly isolated HSCs. We propose that serum-free medium supplemented with SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 is the optimal culture condition to maintain the stemness of ex vivo expanded HSCs. This study used molecular characterization of cytokine-expanded murine HSCs to facilitate the selection of cytokine combinations that could induce fully competent HSC for clinical applications.

  18. Evaluation of ex vivo effectiveness of commercial desensitizing dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockdeci, Hanny; Polonini, Hudson; Martins, Isadora; Granato, Ana-Paula; Raposo, Nádia; Chaves, Maria-das Graças

    2017-04-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is a short, severe pain with fast onset. Therapy aims to either prevent or decrease neural transmission or physically occlude the dentinal tubules. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of commercial desensitizing dentifrice by means of an ex vivo method. Samples (n=8 lower human premolars for each group) were randomly allocated into: G1- brushing with Colgate®Sensitive Pro-Relief; G2- brushing with Sensodyne®Rapid Relief; G3- brushing with Sensodyne®Repair & Protect; and G4- brushing with Colgate®Maximum Cavity Protection. The test bodies were submitted to simulated toothbrushing and dentifrices were analyzed regarding their hydrodynamic size, polydispersity index (PI) and zeta potential. Specimens were evaluated using: scanning electron microscopy (SEM); spectroscopy energy dispersive X-ray (EDS); and profilometry. A qualitative analysis of the photomicrographs and topographies was performed. The dentifrices showed statistical similar physical and chemical characteristics. They also demonstrated obliteration of dentinal tubules when micrographs were observed. Regarding the chemical elements present in the dentin samples, there was a statistically significant difference between the control and experimental surfaces in the four groups. Joint data analysis shows that the desensitizing dentifrice showed better results with regards to the obliteration of dentinal tubules compared to positive and negative controls. Key words:Dentin hypersensitivity, dentin desensitizing agents, toothpastes.

  19. In vitro and ex vivo antiangiogenic activity of Salvia officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Maryam; Mostafaie, Ali; Mansouri, Kamran; Bidmeshkipour, Ali; Motlagh, Hamid Reza Mohammadi; Parvaneh, Shahram

    2010-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer and its metastasis. Herein, the antiangiogenic activity of Salvia officinalis extract and its fractions was investigated. S. officinalis aerial parts were extracted with ethanol and its successive hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous fractions were evaluated for their antiangiogenic activities using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) capillary tube formation and rat aorta models in a three-dimensional collagen matrix. Furthermore, antimigrative effects of the fractions were assessed using a wound healing model. The ethanol extract of S. officinalis (ESO) potently inhibited capillary tube formation in HUVEC and rat aorta models of angiogenesis, and its hexane fraction (HSO) exerted the highest inhibitory effect. In addition, the ethanol extract of S. officinalis and its hexane fraction showed a dose-dependent inhibitory activity on the migration of the endothelial cells in the wound healing model. Furthermore, ESO inhibited endothelial cell proliferation at 50-200 μg/mL in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicated some new pharmacological activities of S. officinalis such as antiangiogenic in vitro and ex vivo, and antimigrative activity in vitro. Therefore, S. officinalis could be a candidate as a useful herb with therapeutic or preventive activity against angiogenesis related disorders.

  20. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: "Ex vivo" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Meleti, Marco; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Rocca, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-30

    Stabilization of implant abutments through electric impulses at high voltage for a very short time (electrowelding) was developed in the Eighties. In 2009, the same procedure was performed through the use of laser (laser welding) The aim of this study is to compare electrowelding and laser welding for intra-oral implant abutments stabilization on "ex vivo models" (pig jaws). Six bars were welded with two different devices (Nd:YAG laser and Electrowelder) to eighteen titanium implant abutment inserted in three pig jaws. During the welding process, thermal increase was recorded, through the use of k-thermocouples, in the bone close to the implants. The strength of the welded joints was evaluated by a traction test after the removal of the implants. For temperature measurements a descriptive analysis and for traction test "values unpaired t test with Welch's correction" were performed: the significance level was set at PLaser welding gives a lower thermal increase than Electrowelding at the bone close to implants (Mean: 1.97 and 5.27); the strength of laser welded joints was higher than that of Electrowelding even if nor statistically significant. (Mean: 184.75 and 168.29) CONCLUSION: Electrowelding seems to have no advantages, in term of thermal elevation and strength, while laser welding may be employed to connect titanium implants for immediate load without risks of thermal damage at surrounding tissues.

  1. Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer in ex vivo urine cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, C. Y.; Ng, B. K.; Razul, S. Gulam; Olivo, Malini C.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Tan, P. H.; Chin, William

    2006-02-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth common malignant disease worldwide, accounting for 4% of all cancer cases. In Singapore, it is the ninth most common form of cancer. The high mortality rate can be reduced by early treatment following precancerous screening. Currently, the gold standard for screening bladder tumors is histological examination of biopsy specimen, which is both invasive and time-consuming. In this study ex vivo urine fluorescence cytology is investigated to offer a timely and biopsy-free means for detecting bladder cancers. Sediments in patients' urine samples were extracted and incubated with a novel photosensitizer, hypericin. Laser confocal microscopy was used to capture the fluorescence images at an excitation wavelength of 488 nm. Images were subsequently processed to single out the exfoliated bladder cells from the other cells based on the cellular size. Intensity histogram of each targeted cell was plotted and feature vectors, derived from the histogram moments, were used to represent each sample. A difference in the distribution of the feature vectors of normal and low-grade cancerous bladder cells was observed. Diagnostic algorithm for discriminating between normal and low-grade cancerous cells is elucidated in this paper. This study suggests that the fluorescence intensity profiles of hypericin in bladder cells can potentially provide an automated quantitative means of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  2. Evaluation of ex vivo effectiveness of commercial desensitizing dentifrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockdeci, Hanny; Polonini, Hudson; Granato, Ana-Paula; Raposo, Nádia; Chaves, Maria-das Graças

    2017-01-01

    Background Dentin hypersensitivity is a short, severe pain with fast onset. Therapy aims to either prevent or decrease neural transmission or physically occlude the dentinal tubules. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of commercial desensitizing dentifrice by means of an ex vivo method. Material and Methods Samples (n=8 lower human premolars for each group) were randomly allocated into: G1- brushing with Colgate®Sensitive Pro-Relief; G2- brushing with Sensodyne®Rapid Relief; G3- brushing with Sensodyne®Repair & Protect; and G4- brushing with Colgate®Maximum Cavity Protection. The test bodies were submitted to simulated toothbrushing and dentifrices were analyzed regarding their hydrodynamic size, polydispersity index (PI) and zeta potential. Specimens were evaluated using: scanning electron microscopy (SEM); spectroscopy energy dispersive X-ray (EDS); and profilometry. A qualitative analysis of the photomicrographs and topographies was performed. Results The dentifrices showed statistical similar physical and chemical characteristics. They also demonstrated obliteration of dentinal tubules when micrographs were observed. Regarding the chemical elements present in the dentin samples, there was a statistically significant difference between the control and experimental surfaces in the four groups. Conclusions Joint data analysis shows that the desensitizing dentifrice showed better results with regards to the obliteration of dentinal tubules compared to positive and negative controls. Key words:Dentin hypersensitivity, dentin desensitizing agents, toothpastes. PMID:28469813

  3. Ex vivo laser lipolysis assisted with radially diffusing optical applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jieun; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Park, Sung Yeon; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    Laser-assisted lipolysis has been implemented to reduce body fat in light of thermal interactions with adipose tissue. However, using a flat fiber with high irradiance often needs rapid cannula movements and even undesirable thermal injury due to direct tissue contact. The aim of the current study was to explore the feasibility of a radially diffusing optical applicator to liquefy the adipose tissue for effective laser lipolysis. The proposed diffuser was evaluated with a flat fiber in terms of temperature elevation and tissue liquefaction after laser lipolysis with a 980-nm wavelength. Given the same power (20 W), the diffusing applicator generated a 30% slower temperature increase with a 25% lower maximum temperature (84±3.2°C in 1 min ptissue, compared with the flat fiber. Under the equivalent temperature development, the diffuser induced up to fivefold larger area of the adipose liquefaction due to radial light emission than the flat fiber. Ex vivo tissue tests for 5-min irradiation demonstrated that the diffuser (1.24±0.15 g) liquefied 66% more adipose tissue than the flat fiber (0.75±0.05 g). The proposed diffusing applicator can be a feasible therapeutic device for laser lipolysis due to low temperature development and wide coverage of thermal treatment.

  4. Ex vivo bioluminescence detection of alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 infection during malignant catarrhal fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewals, Benjamin; Myster, Françoise; Palmeira, Leonor; Gillet, Laurent; Ackermann, Mathias; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2011-07-01

    Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried by wildebeest asymptomatically, causes malignant catarrhal fever (WD-MCF) when cross-species transmitted to a variety of susceptible species of the Artiodactyla order. Experimentally, WD-MCF can be reproduced in rabbits. WD-MCF is described as a combination of lymphoproliferation and degenerative lesions in virtually all organs and is caused by unknown mechanisms. Recently, we demonstrated that WD-MCF is associated with the proliferation of CD8(+) cells supporting a latent type of infection in lymphoid tissues. Here, we investigated the macroscopic distribution of AlHV-1 infection using ex vivo bioluminescence imaging in rabbit to determine whether it correlates with the distribution of lesions in lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. To reach that goal, a recombinant AlHV-1 strain was produced by insertion of a luciferase expression cassette (luc) in an intergenic region. In vitro, the reconstituted AlHV-1 luc(+) strain replicated comparably to the parental strain, and luciferase activity was detected by bioluminescence imaging. In vivo, rabbits infected with the AlHV-1 luc(+) strain developed WD-MCF comparably to rabbits infected with the parental wild-type strain, with hyperthermia and increases of both CD8(+) T cell frequencies and viral genomic charge over time in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in lymph nodes at time of euthanasia. Bioluminescent imaging revealed that AlHV-1 infection could be detected ex vivo in lymphoid organs but also in lung, liver, and kidney during WD-MCF, demonstrating that AlHV-1 infection is prevalent in tissue lesions. Finally, we show that the infiltrating mononuclear leukocytes in nonlymphoid organs are mainly CD8(+) T cells and that latency is predominant during WD-MCF.

  5. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  6. Cell population kinetics of collagen scaffolds in ex vivo oral wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agis, Hermann; Collins, Amy; Taut, Andrei D; Jin, Qiming; Kruger, Laura; Görlach, Christoph; Giannobile, William V

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable collagen scaffolds are used clinically for oral soft tissue augmentation to support wound healing. This study sought to provide a novel ex vivo model for analyzing healing kinetics and gene expression of primary human gingival fibroblasts (hGF) within collagen scaffolds. Sponge type and gel type scaffolds with and without platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF) were assessed in an hGF containing matrix. Morphology was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, and hGF metabolic activity using MTT. We quantitated the population kinetics within the scaffolds based on cell density and distance from the scaffold border of DiI-labled hGFs over a two-week observation period. Gene expression was evaluated with gene array and qPCR. The sponge type scaffolds showed a porous morphology. Absolute cell number and distance was higher in sponge type scaffolds when compared to gel type scaffolds, in particular during the first week of observation. PDGF incorporated scaffolds increased cell numbers, distance, and formazan formation in the MTT assay. Gene expression dynamics revealed the induction of key genes associated with the generation of oral tissue. DKK1, CYR61, CTGF, TGFBR1 levels were increased and integrin ITGA2 levels were decreased in the sponge type scaffolds compared to the gel type scaffold. The results suggest that this novel model of oral wound healing provides insights into population kinetics and gene expression dynamics of biodegradable scaffolds.

  7. Cell population kinetics of collagen scaffolds in ex vivo oral wound repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Agis

    Full Text Available Biodegradable collagen scaffolds are used clinically for oral soft tissue augmentation to support wound healing. This study sought to provide a novel ex vivo model for analyzing healing kinetics and gene expression of primary human gingival fibroblasts (hGF within collagen scaffolds. Sponge type and gel type scaffolds with and without platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF were assessed in an hGF containing matrix. Morphology was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, and hGF metabolic activity using MTT. We quantitated the population kinetics within the scaffolds based on cell density and distance from the scaffold border of DiI-labled hGFs over a two-week observation period. Gene expression was evaluated with gene array and qPCR. The sponge type scaffolds showed a porous morphology. Absolute cell number and distance was higher in sponge type scaffolds when compared to gel type scaffolds, in particular during the first week of observation. PDGF incorporated scaffolds increased cell numbers, distance, and formazan formation in the MTT assay. Gene expression dynamics revealed the induction of key genes associated with the generation of oral tissue. DKK1, CYR61, CTGF, TGFBR1 levels were increased and integrin ITGA2 levels were decreased in the sponge type scaffolds compared to the gel type scaffold. The results suggest that this novel model of oral wound healing provides insights into population kinetics and gene expression dynamics of biodegradable scaffolds.

  8. An elegant technique for ex vivo imaging in experimental research—Optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tschernig, T.; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an elegant technology for imaging of tissues and organs and has been established for clinical use for around a decade. Thus, it is used in vivo but can also serve as a valuable ex vivo imaging tool in experimental research. Here, a brief overview is given...... with a focus on an ex vivo application of OCT. Image and video examples of freshly obtained murine lungs are included. The main advantage of OCT for ex vivo analysis is the non-contact, non-invasive, and non-destructive fast acquisition of a three-dimensional data set with micrometer-resolution....

  9. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebelung, Sven; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Aachen (Germany); Pufe, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration. (orig.)

  10. Human corneal epithelial subpopulations: oxygen dependent ex vivo expansion and transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Chris

    2013-06-01

    differentiation pathway in human corneal epithelium according to an optimized protocol for maintenance of expression profiles. Isolated total RNA from basal limbal crypts (BLCs), superficial limbal crypts (SLCs), paracentral/central cornea and limbal stroma was amplified and converted to fragmented cDNA libraries for use in deep paired-end next-generation sequencing. Global transcriptional profiling was carried out using bioinformatics. The location of primitive cells in BLCs, migratory and activated cells in SLCs and differentiated cells in paracentral/central cornea was evident from mapping of significantly upregulated genes in each compartment to the gene ontology (GO). Interestingly, many GO terms in BLCs were also involved in neurogenic processes, whereas many GO terms in SLCs were related to vasculature. Mapping upregulated genes in BLCs to pathway annotations in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes described many active pathways as signalling and cancer-associated pathways. We supply extensive information on possible novel biomarkers, reveal insight into both active pathways and novel regulators of LESCs such as Lrig1 and SOX9 and provide an immense amount of data for future exploration (Bath et al. 2013b). Selective ex vivo expansion of LESCs in hypoxia and the comprehensive molecular characterization of corneal epithelial subpopulations in situ are expected to be beneficial for the future treatment of LSCD by cultured limbal epithelial transplantation. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  11. Tumor associated antigen specific T-cell populations identified in ex vivo expanded TIL cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Kvistborg, Pia; Køllgaard, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from malignant melanoma (MM) and head & neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) share a similar oligoclonal composition of T effector memory cells, with HLA class I restricted lysis of tumor cell lines. In this study we show that ex vivo expanded...... the heterogeneous tumors upon adoptive transfer; increasing the probability of tumor control by minimizing immune evasion by tumor cell escape variants....

  12. Preclinical evaluation of gene delivery methods for the treatment of loco-regional disease in breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    Preclinical results with various gene therapy strategies indicate significant potential for new cancer treatments. However, many therapeutics fail at clinical trial, often due to differences in tissue physiology between animal models and humans, and tumor phenotype variation. Clinical data relevant to treatment strategies may be generated prior to clinical trial through experimentation using intact patient tissue ex vivo. We developed a novel tumor slice model culture system that is universally applicable to gene delivery methods, using a realtime luminescence detection method to assess gene delivery. Methods investigated include viruses (adenovirus [Ad] and adeno-associated virus), lipofection, ultrasound (US), electroporation and naked DNA. Viability and tumor populations within the slices were well maintained for seven days, and gene delivery was qualitatively and quantitatively examinable for all vectors. Ad was the most efficient gene delivery vector with transduction efficiency >50%. US proved the optimal non-viral gene delivery method in human tumor slices. The nature of the ex vivo culture system permitted examination of specific elements. Parameters shown to diminish Ad gene delivery included blood, regions of low viability and secondary disease. US gene delivery was significantly reduced by blood and skin, while tissue hyperthermia improved gene delivery. US achieved improved efficacy for secondary disease. The ex vivo model was also suitable for examination of tissue-specific effects on vector expression, with Ad expression mediated by the CXCR4 promoter shown to provide a tumor selective advantage over the ubiquitously active cytomegalovirus promoter. In conclusion, this is the first study incorporating patient tissue models in comparing gene delivery from various vectors, providing knowledge on cell-type specificity and examining the crucial biological factors determining successful gene delivery. The results highlight the importance of in

  13. Preclinical evaluation of gene delivery methods for the treatment of loco-regional disease in breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2011-04-01

    Preclinical results with various gene therapy strategies indicate significant potential for new cancer treatments. However, many therapeutics fail at clinical trial, often due to differences in tissue physiology between animal models and humans, and tumor phenotype variation. Clinical data relevant to treatment strategies may be generated prior to clinical trial through experimentation using intact patient tissue ex vivo. We developed a novel tumor slice model culture system that is universally applicable to gene delivery methods, using a realtime luminescence detection method to assess gene delivery. Methods investigated include viruses (adenovirus [Ad] and adeno-associated virus), lipofection, ultrasound (US), electroporation and naked DNA. Viability and tumor populations within the slices were well maintained for seven days, and gene delivery was qualitatively and quantitatively examinable for all vectors. Ad was the most efficient gene delivery vector with transduction efficiency >50%. US proved the optimal non-viral gene delivery method in human tumor slices. The nature of the ex vivo culture system permitted examination of specific elements. Parameters shown to diminish Ad gene delivery included blood, regions of low viability and secondary disease. US gene delivery was significantly reduced by blood and skin, while tissue hyperthermia improved gene delivery. US achieved improved efficacy for secondary disease. The ex vivo model was also suitable for examination of tissue-specific effects on vector expression, with Ad expression mediated by the CXCR4 promoter shown to provide a tumor selective advantage over the ubiquitously active cytomegalovirus promoter. In conclusion, this is the first study incorporating patient tissue models in comparing gene delivery from various vectors, providing knowledge on cell-type specificity and examining the crucial biological factors determining successful gene delivery. The results highlight the importance of in

  14. The effect of radiofrequency ablation on different organs: Ex vivo and in vivo comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Na [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyunchul, E-mail: rhimhc@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dongil; Kim, Young-sun; Lee, Min Woo; Chang, Ilsoo; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo K. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purposes of this study are to evaluate the ex vivo and in vivo efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on different porcine tissues by the ablation of three different sites simultaneously. Materials and methods: A multichannel RFA system, enables three separate tumors to be ablated simultaneously, was used. RFA procedures were applied to normal porcine liver, kidney, and muscle together ex vivo (n = 12) and in vivo (n = 17). Pre-impedances, defined as baseline systemic impedances of tissues before beginning RFA, and the areas of ablation zones were measured and compared. Results: The areas of ablation zones among three organs had a significant difference in decreasing order as follows: liver, muscle, and kidney in the ex vivo study (p = 0.001); muscle, liver, and kidney in the in vivo study (p < 0.0001). The areas of ablation zones between ex vivo and in vivo had a significant difference in the liver and muscle (each p < 0.05). There was no significant correlation between the areas of ablation zones and pre-impedances in both studies. Conclusions: Renal RFA produced the smallest ablation zone in both in vivo and ex vivo studies. Muscular RFA demonstrated the largest ablation zone in the in vivo study, and hepatic RFA showed the largest ablation zone in the ex vivo study. This variability in the tissues should be considered for performing an optimized RFA for each organ site.

  15. Ex vivo innate immune cytokine signature of enhanced risk of relapsing brucellosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristyn E Feldman

    Full Text Available Brucellosis, a zoonotic infection caused by one of the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria of the Brucella genus, is an ongoing public health problem in Perú. While most patients who receive standard antibiotic treatment recover, 5-40% suffer a brucellosis relapse. In this study, we examined the ex vivo immune cytokine profiles of recovered patients with a history of acute and relapsing brucellosis.Blood was taken from healthy control donors, patients with a history of acute brucellosis, or patients with a history of relapsing brucellosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and remained in culture without stimulation or were stimulated with a panel of toll-like receptor agonists or heat-killed Brucella melitensis (HKBM isolates. Innate immune cytokine gene expression and protein secretion were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and a multiplex bead-based immunoassay, respectively. Acute and relapse patients demonstrated consistently elevated cytokine gene expression and secretion levels compared to controls. Notably, these include: basal and stimulus-induced expression of GM-CSF, TNF-α, and IFN-γ in response to LPS and HKBM; basal secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α; and HKBM or Rev1-induced secretion of IL-1β, IL-2, GM-CSF, IFN-Υ, and TNF-α. Although acute and relapse patients were largely indistinguishable by their cytokine gene expression profiles, we identified a robust cytokine secretion signature that accurately discriminates acute from relapse patients. This signature consists of basal IL-6 secretion, IL-1β, IL-2, and TNF-α secretion in response to LPS and HKBM, and IFN-γ secretion in response to HKBM.This work demonstrates that informative cytokine variations in brucellosis patients can be detected using an ex vivo assay system and used to identify patients with differing infection histories. Targeted diagnosis of this signature may allow for better follow-up care of brucellosis patients

  16. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p skin, negating the requirement for animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment.

  17. Gelam honey potentiates ex vivo corneal keratocytes proliferation with desirable phenotype expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Alia Md; Abd Ghafar, Norzana; Kamarudin, Taty Anna; Hui, Chua Kien; Yusof, Yasmin Anum Mohd

    2016-02-24

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Gelam honey on corneal keratocytes proliferative capacity and phenotypic characterization via MTT assay, gene expression and immunocytochemistry. Corneal keratocytes from New Zealand white rabbits were cultured in basal medium (BM) and serum enriched medium (BMS). Serial dilutions of Gelam honey (GH) were added to both media and cells were cultured until passage 1. MTT assay was performed on corneal keratocytes in both media to ascertain the optimal dose of GH that produced maximum proliferation. Gelam honey at the concentration of 0.0015% in both media showed the highest proliferative capacity with no morphological changes compared to their respective controls. The gene expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), a marker for quiescent keratocytes and vimentin, a marker for fibroblast, were higher in the GH enriched groups. The alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, marker for myofibroblast, was lower in GH treated groups compared to the controls. Immunocytochemistry results were in accordance to the gene expression analyses. Gelam honey at a concentration of 0.0015% promotes ex vivo corneal keratocytes proliferation while retaining desirable phenotype expression. The results serve as a basis for the development of Gelam honey as a potential natural product in promoting corneal wound healing.

  18. Generation of islet-like cells from mouse gall bladder by direct ex vivo reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Raymond D; Galivo, Feorillo; Schug, Jonathan; Brehm, Michael A; Haft, Annelise; Wang, Yuhan; Benedetti, Eric; Gu, Guoqiang; Magnuson, Mark A; Shultz, Leonard D; Lagasse, Eric; Greiner, Dale L; Kaestner, Klaus H; Grompe, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Cell replacement is an emerging therapy for type 1 diabetes. Pluripotent stem cells have received a lot of attention as a potential source of transplantable β-cells, but their ability to form teratomas poses significant risks. Here, we evaluated the potential of primary mouse gall bladder epithelial cells (GBCs) as targets for ex vivo genetic reprogramming to the β-cell fate. Conditions for robust expansion and genetic transduction of primary GBCs by adenoviral vectors were developed. Using a GFP reporter for insulin, conditions for reprogramming were then optimized. Global expression analysis by RNA-sequencing was used to quantitatively compare reprogrammed GBCs (rGBCs) to true β-cells, revealing both similarities and differences. Adenoviral-mediated expression of NEUROG3, Pdx1, and MafA in GBCs resulted in robust induction of pancreatic endocrine genes, including Ins1, Ins2, Neurod1, Nkx2-2 and Isl1. Furthermore, expression of GBC-specific genes was repressed, including Sox17 and Hes1. Reprogramming was also enhanced by addition of retinoic acid and inhibition of Notch signaling. Importantly, rGBCs were able to engraft long term in vivo and remained insulin-positive for 15weeks. We conclude that GBCs are a viable source for autologous cell replacement in diabetes, but that complete reprogramming will require further manipulations.

  19. Ex vivo imaging of early dental caries within the interproximal space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Hewko, Mark D.; Dufour, Marc L.; Fulton, Crystal; Qiu, Pingli; Gauthier, Bruno; Padioleau, Christian; Bisaillon, Charles-Etienne; Dong, Cecilia; Cleghorn, Blaine M.; Lamouche, Guy; Sowa, Michael G.

    2009-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is emerging as a technology that can potentially be used for the detection and monitoring of early dental enamel caries since it can provide high-resolution depth imaging of early lesions. To date, most caries detection optical technologies are well suited for examining caries at facial, lingual, incisal and occlusal surfaces. The approximal surfaces between adjacent teeth are difficult to examine due to lack of visual access and limited space for these new caries detection tools. Using a catheter-style probe developed at the NRC-Industrial Materials Institute, the probe was inserted into the interproximal space to examine the approximal surfaces with OCT imaging at 1310 nm. The probe was rotated continuously and translated axially to generate depth images in a spiral fashion. The probe was used in a mock tooth arch model consisting of extracted human teeth mounted with dental rope wax in their anatomically correct positions. With this ex vivo model, the probe provided images of the approximal surfaces revealing morphological structural details, regions of calculus, and especially regions of early dental caries (white spot lesions). Results were compared with those obtained from OCT imaging of individual samples where the approximal surfaces of extracted teeth are accessible on a lab-bench. Issues regarding access, regions of interest, and factors to be considered in an in vivo setting will be discussed. Future studies are aimed at using the probe in vivo with patient volunteers.

  20. Effects of ex-vivo and in-vivo treatment with probiotics on the inflammasome in dogs with chronic enteropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Schmitz

    Full Text Available Inflammasomes coordinate the maturation of IL-1β and IL-18 in response to danger signals. They are vital for maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and have been linked to chronic intestinal inflammation in humans. Probiotics have been advocated as treatment in intestinal inflammation. So far, no study has investigated the role of the inflammasome in canine chronic enteropathy (CE. In this study the intestinal expression of inflammasome components was assessed in CE dogs compared to controls, when treated with probiotic Enterococcus faecium (EF ex-vivo and in-vivo. RNA extraction from endoscopic biopsies and reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR was performed for NLRP3, casp-1, IL-1β and IL-18. Immunohistochemistry was performed to investigate protein expression in tissues. Gene expression of casp-1 and NLRP3 was lower in CE samples than controls. Ex-vivo treatment with EF reduced NLRP3 expression in control samples. Treatment of CE dogs with EF alongside dietary intervention had no effect on gene expression. In contrast, IL-1β protein expression in CE decreased with dietary treatment (but not with probiotics. The results of this study suggest that the inflammasome or its components may be partially involved in the inflammatory process seen in CE, but distinct from intestinal inflammation in humans.

  1. Ex vivo piperaquine resistance developed rapidly in Plasmodium falciparum isolates in northern Cambodia compared to Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwanna Chaorattanakawee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent dramatic decline in dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ efficacy in northwestern Cambodia has raised concerns about the rapid spread of piperaquine resistance just as DHA-PPQ is being introduced as first-line therapy in neighbouring countries. Methods Ex vivo parasite susceptibilities were tracked to determine the rate of progression of DHA, PPQ and mefloquine (MQ resistance from sentinel sites on the Thai–Cambodian and Thai–Myanmar borders from 2010 to 2015. Immediate ex vivo (IEV histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP-2 assays were used on fresh patient Plasmodium falciparum isolates to determine drug susceptibility profiles. Results IEV HRP-2 assays detected the precipitous emergence of PPQ resistance in Cambodia beginning in 2013 when 40 % of isolates had an IC90 greater than the upper limit of prior years, and this rate doubled to 80 % by 2015. In contrast, Thai–Myanmar isolates from 2013 to 14 remained PPQ-sensitive, while northeastern Thai isolates appeared to have an intermediate resistance profile. The opposite trend was observed for MQ where Cambodian isolates appeared to have a modest increase in overall sensitivity during the same period, with IC50 declining to median levels comparable to those found in Thailand. A significant association between increased PPQ IC50 and IC90 among Cambodian isolates with DHA-PPQ treatment failure was observed. Nearly all Cambodian and Thai isolates were deemed artemisinin resistant with a >1 % survival rate for DHA in the ring-stage assay (RSA, though there was no correlation among isolates to indicate cross-resistance between PPQ and artemisinins. Conclusions Clinical DHA-PPQ failures appear to be associated with declines in the long-acting partner drug PPQ, though sensitivity appears to remain largely intact for now in western Thailand. Rapid progression of PPQ resistance associated with DHA-PPQ treatment failures in northern Cambodia limits drugs of choice in

  2. Interphase chromosome positioning in in vitro porcine cells and ex vivo porcine tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Helen A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In interphase nuclei of a wide range of species chromosomes are organised into their own specific locations termed territories. These chromosome territories are non-randomly positioned in nuclei which is believed to be related to a spatial aspect of regulatory control over gene expression. In this study we have adopted the pig as a model in which to study interphase chromosome positioning and follows on from other studies from our group of using pig cells and tissues to study interphase genome re-positioning during differentiation. The pig is an important model organism both economically and as a closely related species to study human disease models. This is why great efforts have been made to accomplish the full genome sequence in the last decade. Results This study has positioned most of the porcine chromosomes in in vitro cultured adult and embryonic fibroblasts, early passage stromal derived mesenchymal stem cells and lymphocytes. The study is further expanded to position four chromosomes in ex vivo tissue derived from pig kidney, lung and brain. Conclusions It was concluded that porcine chromosomes are also non-randomly positioned within interphase nuclei with few major differences in chromosome position in interphase nuclei between different cell and tissue types. There were also no differences between preferred nuclear location of chromosomes in in vitro cultured cells as compared to cells in tissue sections. Using a number of analyses to ascertain by what criteria porcine chromosomes were positioned in interphase nuclei; we found a correlation with DNA content.

  3. Virulence diversity among bacteremic Aeromonas isolates: ex vivo, animal, and clinical evidences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Lin Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to compare virulence among different Aeromonas species causing bloodstream infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nine of four species of Aeromonas blood isolates, including A. dhakensis, A. hydrophila, A. veronii and A. caviae were randomly selected for analysis. The species was identified by the DNA sequence matching of rpoD. Clinically, the patients with A. dhakensis bacteremia had a higher sepsis-related mortality rate than those with other species (37.5% vs. 0%, P = 0.028. Virulence of different Aeromonas species were tested in C. elegans, mouse fibroblast C2C12 cell line and BALB/c mice models. C. elegans fed with A. dhakensis and A. caviae had the lowest and highest survival rates compared with other species, respectively (all P values <0.0001. A. dhakensis isolates also exhibited more cytotoxicity in C2C12 cell line (all P values <0.0001. Fourteen-day survival rate of mice intramuscularly inoculated with A. dhakensis was lower than that of other species (all P values <0.0001. Hemolytic activity and several virulence factor genes were rarely detected in the A. caviae isolates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Clinical data, ex vivo experiments, and animal studies suggest there is virulence variation among clinically important Aeromonas species.

  4. Live-cell imaging of the early stages of colony development in Fusarium oxysporum in vitro and ex vivo during infection of a human corneal model

    OpenAIRE

    Kurian, Smija Mariam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe University of ManchesterName: Smija Mariam KurianDegree title: Doctor of PhilosophyResearch title: Live-cell imaging of the early stages of colony development in Fusarium oxysporum in vitro and ex vivo during infection of a human corneal modelDate: May 2016Abstract: Fusarium oxysporum is a major fungal plant pathogen and emerging human pathogen. It has been hypothesised that conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) fusion may facilitate horizontal gene/chromosome transfer that could result...

  5. Ex vivo stimulation of whole blood as a means to determine glucocorticoid sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnsides C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Burnsides,1,* Jacqueline Corry,1,* Jacob Alexander,1 Catherine Balint,1 David Cosmar,1 Gary Phillips,2 Jeanette I Webster Marketon1,31Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Center for Biostatistics, 3Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA*JC and CB have equally contributed to this workPurpose: Glucocorticoids are commonly prescribed to treat a number of diseases including the majority of inflammatory diseases. Despite considerable interpersonal variability in response to glucocorticoids, an insensitivity rate of about 30%, and the risk of adverse side effects of glucocorticoid therapy, currently no assay is performed to determine sensitivity.Patients and methods: Here we propose a whole blood ex vivo stimulation assay to interrogate known glucocorticoid receptor (GR up- and downregulated genes to indicate glucocorticoid sensitivity. We have chosen to employ real-time PCR in order to provide a relatively fast and inexpensive assay.Results: We show that the GR-regulated genes, GILZ and FKBP51, are upregulated in whole blood by treatment with dexamethasone and that LPS-induction of cytokines (IL-6 and TNFα are repressed by dexamethasone in a dose responsive manner. There is considerable interpersonal variability in the maximum induction of these genes but little variation in the EC50 and IC50 concentrations. The regulation of the GR-induced genes differs throughout the day whereas the suppression of LPS-induced cytokines is not as sensitive to time of day.Conclusion: In all, this assay would provide a method to determine glucocorticoid receptor responsiveness in whole blood.Keywords: glucocorticoid responsiveness, gene regulation, nuclear receptor, GILZ, FKBP51, cytokines

  6. Visualizing Oxazine 4 nerve-specific fluorescence ex vivo in frozen tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Connor W.; Gibbs, Summer L.

    2016-03-01

    Nerve damage plagues surgical outcomes and remains a major burden for patients, surgeons, and the healthcare system. Fluorescence image-guided surgery using nerve specific small molecule fluorophores offers a solution to diminish surgical nerve damage through improved intraoperative nerve identification and visualization. Oxazine 4 has shown superior nerve specificity in initial testing in vivo, while exhibiting a red shifted excitation and emission spectra compared to other nerve-specific fluorophores. However, Oxazine 4 does not exhibit near-infrared (NIR) excitation and emission, which would be ideal to improve penetration depth and nerve signal to background ratios for in vivo imaging. Successful development of a NIR nerve-specific fluorophore will require understanding of the molecular target of fluorophore nerve specificity. While previous small molecule nerve-specific fluorophores have demonstrated excellent ex vivo nerve specificity, Oxazine 4 ex vivo nerve specific fluorescence has been difficult to visualize. In the present study, we examined each step of the ex vivo fluorescence microscopy sample preparation procedure to discover how in vivo nerve-specific fluorescence is changed during ex vivo tissue sample preparation. Through step-by-step examination we found that Oxazine 4 fluorescence was significantly diminished by washing and mounting tissue sections for microscopy. A method to preserve Oxazine 4 nerve specific fluorescence ex vivo was determined, which can be utilized for visualization by fluorescence microscopy.

  7. High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance angiography: a feasibility study on biological and medical tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boel Lene WT

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In biomedical sciences, ex vivo angiography is a practical mean to elucidate vascular structures three-dimensionally with simultaneous estimation of intravascular volume. The objectives of this study were to develop a magnetic resonance (MR method for ex vivo angiography and to compare the findings with computed tomography (CT. To demonstrate the usefulness of this method, examples are provided from four different tissues and species: the human placenta, a rice field eel, a porcine heart and a turtle. Results The optimal solution for ex vivo MR angiography (MRA was a compound containing gelatine (0.05 g/mL, the CT contrast agent barium sulphate (0.43 mol/L and the MR contrast agent gadoteric acid (2.5 mmol/L. It was possible to perform angiography on all specimens. We found that ex vivo MRA could only be performed on fresh tissue because formalin fixation makes the blood vessels permeable to the MR contrast agent. Conclusions Ex vivo MRA provides high-resolution images of fresh tissue and delineates fine structures that we were unable to visualise by CT. We found that MRA provided detailed information similar to or better than conventional CTA in its ability to visualize vessel configuration while avoiding interfering signals from adjacent bones. Interestingly, we found that vascular tissue becomes leaky when formalin-fixed, leading to increased permeability and extravascular leakage of MR contrast agent.

  8. Discovery of novel drug sensitivities in T-PLL by high-throughput ex vivo drug testing and mutation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E I; Pützer, S; Yadav, B; Dufva, O; Khan, S; He, L; Sellner, L; Schrader, A; Crispatzu, G; Oleś, M; Zhang, H; Adnan-Awad, S; Lagström, S; Bellanger, D; Mpindi, J P; Eldfors, S; Pemovska, T; Pietarinen, P; Lauhio, A; Tomska, K; Cuesta-Mateos, C; Faber, E; Koschmieder, S; Brümmendorf, T H; Kytölä, S; Savolainen, E-R; Siitonen, T; Ellonen, P; Kallioniemi, O; Wennerberg, K; Ding, W; Stern, M-H; Huber, W; Anders, S; Tang, J; Aittokallio, T; Zenz, T; Herling, M; Mustjoki, S

    2017-08-14

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare and aggressive neoplasm of mature T-cells with an urgent need for rationally designed therapies to address its notoriously chemo-refractory behavior. The median survival of T-PLL patients is PLL patient samples using an ex vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing platform and correlated the findings with somatic mutations and gene expression profiles. Intriguingly, all T-PLL samples were sensitive to the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor SNS-032, which overcame stromal-cell-mediated protection and elicited robust p53-activation and apoptosis. Across all patients, the most effective classes of compounds were histone deacetylase, phosphoinositide-3 kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin, heat-shock protein 90 and BH3-family protein inhibitors as well as p53 activators, indicating previously unexplored, novel targeted approaches for treating T-PLL. Although Janus-activated kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription factor (JAK-STAT) pathway mutations were common in T-PLL (71% of patients), JAK-STAT inhibitor responses were not directly linked to those or other T-PLL-specific lesions. Overall, we found that genetic markers do not readily translate into novel effective therapeutic vulnerabilities. In conclusion, novel classes of compounds with high efficacy in T-PLL were discovered with the comprehensive ex vivo drug screening platform warranting further studies of synergisms and clinical testing.Leukemia advance online publication, 1 September 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.252.

  9. Ex-vivo assessment and non-invasive in vivo imaging of internal hemorrhages in Aga2/+ mutant mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolayev, Vladimir [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Building 56, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Cohrs, Christian M. [Institute for Experimental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Mohajerani, Pouyan; Ale, Angelique [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Building 56, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Hrabé de Angelis, Martin [Institute for Experimental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Ntziachristos, Vasilis, E-mail: v.ntziachristos@tum.de [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Building 56, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Aga2/+ mice, model for Osteogenesis imperfecta, have type I collagen mutation. ► Aga2/+ mice display both moderate and severe phenotypes lethal 6–11th postnatal. ► Internal hemorrhages studied in Aga2/+ vs. control mice at 6 and 9 days postnatal. ► Anatomical and functional findings in-vivo contrasted to the ex-vivo appearance. -- Abstract: Mutations in type I collagen genes (COL1A1/2) typically lead to Osteogenesis imperfecta, the most common heritable cause of skeletal fractures and bone deformation in humans. Heterozygous Col1a1{sup Aga2/+}, animals with a dominant mutation in the terminal C-propeptide domain of type I collagen develop typical skeletal hallmarks and internal hemorrhages starting from 6 day after birth. The disease progression for Aga2/+ mice, however, is not uniform differing between severe phenotype lethal at the 6–11th day of life, and moderate-to-severe one with survival to adulthood. Herein we investigated whether a new modality that combines X-ray computer tomography with fluorescence tomography in one hybrid system can be employed to study internal bleedings in relation to bone fractures and obtain insights into disease progression. The disease phenotype was characterized on Aga2/+ vs. wild type mice between 6 and 9 days postnatal. Anatomical and functional findings obtained in-vivo were contrasted to the ex-vivo appearance of the same tissues under cryo-slicing.

  10. Microemulsion system for topical delivery of thai mango seed kernel extract: development, physicochemical characterisation and ex vivo skin permeation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanpolchareanchai, Jiraporn; Padois, Karine; Falson, Françoise; Bavovada, Rapepol; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan

    2014-10-24

    A microemulsion system containing Thai mango seed kernel extract (MSKE, cultivar "Fahlun") was developed and characterised for the purpose of topical skin delivery. The MSKE-loaded microemulsions were prepared by using the spontaneous emulsification method. Isopropyl myristate (IPM) was selected as the oil phase. A polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate and sorbitan monododecanoate (1:1, w/w) system was used as the surfactant phase; an aqueous mixture of different cosurfactants (absolute ethanol, 96.3% v/v ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol or 1,2-propanediol) at a weight ratio of 1:1 was used as the aqueous phase. Among the cosurfactants studied, the 1-propanol aqueous mixture had the largest microemulsion region (48.93%) in the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Microemulsions containing 1% MSKE demonstrated good physicochemical stability during a six-month study period at 25 ± 2 °C/60% ± 5% RH. The ex vivo skin permeation study demonstrated that the microemulsions exhibited a potent skin enhancement effect allowing MSKE to penetrate skin layers up to 60-fold higher compared with the control. Neither skin irritation nor skin corrosion was observed in ex vivo studies. The present study revealed that IPM-based microemulsion systems may be promising carriers to enhance skin penetration and delivering MSKE for topical treatment.

  11. Microemulsion System for Topical Delivery of Thai Mango Seed Kernel Extract: Development, Physicochemical Characterisation and Ex Vivo Skin Permeation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiraporn Leanpolchareanchai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A microemulsion system containing Thai mango seed kernel extract (MSKE, cultivar “Fahlun” was developed and characterised for the purpose of topical skin delivery. The MSKE-loaded microemulsions were prepared by using the spontaneous emulsification method. Isopropyl myristate (IPM was selected as the oil phase. A polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate and sorbitan monododecanoate (1:1, w/w system was used as the surfactant phase; an aqueous mixture of different cosurfactants (absolute ethanol, 96.3% v/v ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol or 1,2-propanediol at a weight ratio of 1:1 was used as the aqueous phase. Among the cosurfactants studied, the 1-propanol aqueous mixture had the largest microemulsion region (48.93% in the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Microemulsions containing 1% MSKE demonstrated good physicochemical stability during a six-month study period at 25 ± 2 °C/60% ± 5% RH. The ex vivo skin permeation study demonstrated that the microemulsions exhibited a potent skin enhancement effect allowing MSKE to penetrate skin layers up to 60-fold higher compared with the control. Neither skin irritation nor skin corrosion was observed in ex vivo studies. The present study revealed that IPM-based microemulsion systems may be promising carriers to enhance skin penetration and delivering MSKE for topical treatment.

  12. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion and Transplant: State of the Art and View to the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamed S A

    2015-12-01

    After the first clinical application of ex vivo lung perfusion in 2001, the technique has been used in many lung transplant centers worldwide. In addition, many modifications have been tested, leading to the development of various ex vivo lung perfusion systems and application protocols. Currently, the Lund protocol, the Toronto protocol, and Organ Care System Lung protocol are the clinically applied ex vivo lung perfusion protocols, based on the favorable results of the safety studies. Accordingly, the comparison among these EVLP systems and protocols should be an important research target, in order to provide the evidence based medical data that would recommend one protocol over the others. In this manuscript, the current experience with EVLP is reviewed and some molecular and clinical targets, that could be used to compare the various protocols of the technique, are introduced.

  13. Quantification of fibronectin as a method to assess ex vivo extracellular matrix remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Cecilie Liv; Gudmann, N.; Willumsen, N.

    2016-01-01

    of the ECM is fibronectin. Fibronectin serves as an adhesion molecule anchoring cells to the underlying basement membrane through direct interaction with integrin receptors. Fibronectin hereby modulates the properties of the ECM and affects cellular processes. Quantification of fibronectin remodeling could...... therefore be used to assess the changes in the ECM that occur during progression of fibro-proliferative pathologies. Ex vivo models are becoming state-of-the-art tools to study ECM remodeling as the cellular composition and the organization of the ECM are preserved. Ex vivo models may therefore...... be a valuable tool to study the ECM remodeling that occurs during progression of fibro-proliferative pathologies. The aim of this study was to quantify fibronectin remodeling in ex vivo models of cartilage and cancer. A competitive The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against the C...

  14. A new veno-venous bypass type for ex-vivo liver resection in dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Lei; Shi-Qi Liu; Xiao-Hai Cui; Yi Lv; Ge Zhao; Jian-Hui Li

    2013-01-01

    Ex-vivo liver resection is a procedure in which the liver is completely removed, perfused and after bench surgery, the liver is autotransplanted to the original site. Ex-vivo liver resection is an important treatment for unresectable liver tumors. This surgical procedure requires long operation time, during which blood flow must be carefully maintained to avoid venous congestion. An effective veno-venous bypass (VVB) may meet this requirement. The present study was to test our new designed VVB device which comprised one heparinized polyvinylchloride tube and three magnetic rings. The efficacy of this device was tested in five dogs. A VVB was established in 6-10 minutes. There was no leakage during the procedure. Hemodynamics was stable at anhepatic phase, which indicated that the bypass was successful. This newly-developed VVB device maintained circulation stability during ex-vivo liver resection in our dog model and thus, this VVB device significantly shortened the operation time.

  15. Ex-vivo-Expansion perikardialer Patchstrukturen : zur Frage des Einflusses von zyklischem Stress und laminaren Strömungsbedingungen auf das Ex-vivo-Remodelling perikardialer Patchstrukturen

    OpenAIRE

    Hesse, Björn

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pericardium is widely used as a patch structure in paediatric cardiovascular heart surgery. However, the major problem still is the restricted availability and level of quality of autologous pericardium. Based on those limiting factors, a new concept has already been tested in a pilot study combining the mesh graft technique of burn surgery with the principles of tissue engineering to expand pericardial tissue ex vivo. The aims of this dissertation were to verify the preliminary r...

  16. Effect of flunixin meglumine and firocoxib on ex vivo cyclooxygenase activity in horses undergoing elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duz, Marco; Parkin, Tim D; Cullander, Rose M; Marshall, John F

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate ex vivo cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and compare in vitro and ex vivo COX-1 inhibition by flunixin meglumine and firocoxib in horses. 4 healthy horses for in vitro experiments and 12 healthy horses (6 males and 6 females; 5 Thoroughbreds, 5 Warmbloods, and 2 ponies) undergoing elective surgery for ex vivo experiments. 12 horses received flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg, IV, q 12 h) or firocoxib (0.09 mg/kg, IV, q 24 h). Blood samples were collected before (baseline) and 2 and 24 hours after NSAID administration. Prostanoids (thromboxane B2, prostaglandin E2, and prostaglandin E metabolites) served as indicators of COX activity, and serum drug concentrations were measured by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. An in vitro coagulation-induced thromboxane B2 assay was used to calculate drug concentration-COX-1 inhibition curves. Effect of time and treatment on COX activity was determined. Agreement between in vitro and ex vivo measurement of COX activity was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. At 2 and 24 hours after NSAID administration, COX-1 activity was reduced, compared with baseline activity, for the flunixin meglumine group only and relative COX-1 activity was significantly greater for the firocoxib group, compared with that for the flunixin meglumine group. There was no significant change in COX-2 activity after surgery for either group. Bland-Altman analysis revealed poor agreement between in vitro and ex vivo measurement of COX-1 activity. Compared with flunixin meglumine, firocoxib had COX-1-sparing effects ex vivo in equine patients that underwent elective surgery.

  17. Biomonitoring and hormone-disrupting effect biomarkers of persistent organic pollutants in vitro and ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C; Ghisari, Mandana; Wielsøe, Maria; Bjerregaard-Olesen, Christian; Kjeldsen, Lisbeth S; Long, Manhai

    2014-07-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) include lipophilic legacy POPs and the amphiphilic perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). They have long half-lives and bioaccumulate in the environment, animals and human beings. POPs possess toxic, carcinogenic and endocrine-disrupting potentials. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are compounds that either mimic or block endogenous hormones and thus disrupt the normal hormone homeostasis. Biomonitoring assesses the internal doses of a person to provide information about chemical exposures. Effect biomarkers assess chemicals potential to affect cellular functions in vivo/ex vivo. Human beings are exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals, having individually very different biological potentials and effects. Therefore, the assessment of the combined, integrated biological effect of the actual chemical mixture in human blood is important. In vitro and ex vivo cell systems have been introduced for the assessment of the integrated level of xenobiotic cellular effects in human beings. Ex vivo studies have shown geographical differences in bioaccumulated POP serum levels, being reflected by the combined biomarker effects of the complex mixture extracted from human serum. Xenohormone receptor transactivities can be used as an ex vivo integrated biomarker of POP exposure and effects. Epidemiological and in vitro/ex vivo studies have supported the potential impact of the combined effect of serum POPs on the activity of hormone and/or dioxin receptors as a risk factor for human health. With focus on hormone disruption, this MiniReview will give an update on recent POP-related endocrine-disrupting effects in vitro/ex vivo/in vivo and some related genetic data.

  18. In vitro and ex vivo microbial leakage assessment in endodontics: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Savadkouhi, Sohrab Tour; Bakhtiar, Hengameh; Ardestani, Safoura Emami

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a literature review of published in-vitro and ex-vivo studies, which evaluated microbial leakage in endodontics in the past 10 years. A comprehensive electronic literature search was carried out in PubMed database for English articles published from 2005 to 2016 using the keywords “endodontics,” “in vitro,” “ex vivo,” “microbial leakage,” “microbial penetration,” “saliva,” “Enterococcus faecalis,” “E. faecalis,” “endodontic sealers,” “temporary filling mat...

  19. Effect of Static Load on the Nucleus Pulposus of Rabbit Intervertebral Disc Motion Segment in Ex vivo Organ Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Guo Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Methods: IVD motion segments were harvested from rabbit lumbar spines and cultured in no-loading 6-well plates (control conditions or custom-made apparatuses under a constant, compressive load (3 kg, 0.5 MPa for up to 14 days. Tissue integrity, matrix synthesis, and the matrix gene expression profile were assessed after 3, 7, and 14 days of culturing and compared with those of fresh tissues. Results: The results showed that ex vivo culturing of motion segments preserved tissue integrity under no-loading conditions for 14 days whereas the static load gradually destroyed the morphology after 3 days. Proteoglycan contents were decreased under both conditions, with a more obvious decrease under static load, and proteoglycan gene expression was also downregulated. However, under static load, immunohistochemical staining intensity and collagen Type II alpha 1 (COL2A1 gene expression were significantly enhanced (61.54 ± 5.91, P = 0.035 and upregulated (1.195 ± 0.040, P = 0.000, respectively, compared with those in the controls (P < 0.05. In contrast, under constant compression, these trends were reversed. Our initial results indicated that short-term static load stimulated the synthesis of collagen Type II alpha 1; however, sustained constant compression led to progressive degeneration and specifically to a decreased proteoglycan content. Conclusions: A loading and organ culture system for ex vivo rabbit IVD motion segments was developed. Using this system, we were able to study the effects of mechanical stimulation on the biology of IVDs, as well as the pathomechanics of IVD degeneration.

  20. Ex vivo model for pre-clinical evaluation of dialyzers containing new membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiout, A; Meinhold, H; Jörres, A; Krieg, R; Kessel, M; Tretzel, J; Baurmeister, U

    1985-01-01

    The ex vivo model which reflects hemodialysis modulating factors during the first twenty minutes of blood membrane interaction, is applicable as a pre-clinical test for new membranes. The biocompatibility of a new cellulosic membrane (MC) proved to be superior to regenerated cellulose and comparable to synthetic membranes such as PAN regarding complement activation.

  1. The Impact of Food Bioactives on Health: In Vitro and Ex Vivo Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeckx, Kitty; Cotter, Paul; López-Expósito, Iván; Kleiveland, Charlotte; Lea, Tor; Mackie, Alan; Requena, Teresa; Swiatecka, Dominika; Wichers, Harry

    2015-01-01

    This book describes in vitro and ex vivo models that can be employed to investigate effects of digested food products on the GIT, or specific components thereof. Many such models exist and include, for example, those used to study digestion and fermentation in the small and large intestine, to inves

  2. Optimization of SCF feeding regimen for ex vivo expansion of cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zheng; Cai, Haibo; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-Song

    2012-12-15

    Stem cell factor (SCF) plays important roles in ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In this study, the effects of dose and feeding time of SCF on ex vivo expansion of CD34(+) cells were investigated in serum-free medium supplemented with a cytokine cocktail composed of SCF, thrombopoietin (TPO) and flt3-ligand (FL). Among the four tested doses (0, 5, 50 and 500ng/mL), a SCF dose of 50ng/mL was demonstrated to be most favorable for ex vivo expansion of CD34(+) cells, which resulted in 34.22±10.80 and 8.89±1.25 folds of expansion regarding total cells and CD34(+) cells, respectively. Meanwhile, the specific growth rate of cells, the consumption rate of SCF and the percentage of CD34(+)c-kit(+) cells during the 21-day culture process were analyzed. The results indicated that initial 4-day period was a critical stage for SCF functioning on CD34(+) cells during ex vivo expansion. Based on this, a modified SCF feeding regimen was proposed, in which SCF (50ng/mL) was only supplemented on day 0 in the cytokine cocktail and cells were then fed with TPO and FL till the end of culture. It was found that this SCF feeding regimen could expand CD34(+) cells efficiently, thus providing a cost-effect expansion protocol for HSCs.

  3. Transplantation of human neonatal foreskin stromal cells in ex vivo organotypic cultures of embryonic chick femurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    NSSCs in ex vivo organotypic cultures of embryonic chick femurs. Isolated embryonic chick femurs (E10 and E11) were cultured for 10 days together with micro-mass cell pellets of hNSSCs, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or a combination of the two cell types. Changes in femurs gross morphology...

  4. Assessment of thermal sensitivity of CT during heating of liver : an ex vivo study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandeya, G. D.; Greuter, M. J. W.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.; Oudkerk, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the thermal sensitivity of CT during heating of ex-vivo animal liver. Methods: Pig liver was indirectly heated from 20 to 90 degrees C by passage of hot air through a plastic tube. The temperature in the heated liver was measured using calibrated t

  5. Surgical sealant in the prevention of early vein graft injury in an ex vivo model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stooker, W; Niessen, HWM; Jansen, EK; Fritz, J; Wildevuur, WR; Van Hinsbergh, VWM; Wildevuur, CRH; Eijsman, L

    2003-01-01

    Background: The amelioration of the adaptation process (arterialisation) of the vein graft wall to the arterial circulation in coronary artery bypass surgery by using extravascular support is clearly established in animal models and in in vitro and ex vivo set-ups. This support consists of some form

  6. Polydimethylsiloxane embedded mouse aorta ex vivo perfusion model: proof-of-concept study focusing on atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueya; Wolf, Marc P; Keel, Rahel Bänziger; Lehner, Roman; Hunziker, Patrick R

    2012-07-01

    Existing mouse artery ex vivo perfusion models have utilized arteries such as carotid, uterine, and mesenteric arteries, but not the aorta. However, the aorta is the principal vessel analyzed for atherosclerosis studies in vivo. We have devised a mouse aorta ex vivo perfusion model that can bridge this gap. Aortas from apoE((-/-)) mice are embedded in a transparent, gas-permeable, and elastic polymer matrix [polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)] and artificially perfused with cell culture medium under cell culture conditions. After 24 h of artificial ex vivo perfusion, no evidence of cellular apoptosis is detected. Utilizing a standard confocal microscope, it is possible to image specific receptor targeting of cells in atherosclerotic plaques during 24 h. Imaging motion artifacts are minimal due to the polymer matrix embedding. Re-embedding of the aorta enables tissue sectioning and immuno-histochemical analysis. The ex vivo data are validated by comparison with in vivo experiments. This model can save animal lives via production of multiple endpoints in a single experiment, is easy to apply, and enables straightforward comparability with pre-existing atherosclerosis in vivo data. It is suited to investigate atherosclerotic disease in particular and vascular biology in general.

  7. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory pa

  8. Bacterial transmission from contact lenses to porcine corneas : An ex vivo study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeltfoort, PBJ; van Kooten, TG; Bruinsma, GM; Hooymans, AMM; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE. To quantify the transmission to ex vivo porcine eyes of Staphylococcus aureus 835 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3 from three types of contact lenses - one daily wear and two extended wear - differing in hydrophobicity and roughness. METHODS. One daily wear lens (etafilcon) and two extended-wea

  9. Particle Bombardment of Ex Vivo Skin to Deliver DNA and Express Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokol, Ena; Nijenhuis, Miranda; Sjollema, Klaas A; Jonkman, Marcel F; Pas, Hendri H; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2017-01-01

    Particle bombardment of gold microparticles coated with plasmids, which are accelerated to high velocity, is used for transfection of cells within tissue. Using this method, cDNA encoding proteins of interest introduced into ex vivo living human skin enables studying of proteins of interest in real

  10. Ex-vivo response to blood products and haemostatic agents after paediatric cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Andreasen, Jo B; Christiansen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    of fibrinogen concentrate, FFP or tranexamic acid improved clot stability significantly. Whole blood coagulation was significantly impaired after cardiac surgery in children. Ex-vivo studies showed a total reversal of the coagulopathy after addition of pooled platelets and significantly improved clot stability...

  11. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Bansal

    Full Text Available Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5, which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus and mucus degradation, respectively were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  12. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Devendra; Ave, Patrick; Kerneis, Sophie; Frileux, Pascal; Boché, Olivier; Baglin, Anne Catherine; Dubost, Geneviève; Leguern, Anne-Sophie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Bracha, Rivka; Mirelman, David; Guillén, Nancy; Labruyère, Elisabeth

    2009-11-17

    Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year) is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase) and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor) were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon) was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5), which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus) and mucus degradation, respectively) were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  13. Biomimetic aggrecan reduces cartilage extracellular matrix from degradation and lowers catabolic activity in ex vivo and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shaili; Lee, Aeju; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Youn, Inchan; Trippel, Stephen B; Panitch, Alyssa

    2013-09-01

    Aggrecan, a major macromolecule in cartilage, protects the extracellular matrix (ECM) from degradation during the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However, aggrecan itself is also susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. Here, the use of a biomimetic proteoglycan (mAGC) is presented, which functionally mimics aggrecan but lacks the known cleavage sites, protecting the molecule from proteolytic degradation. The objective of this study is to test the efficacy of this molecule in ex vivo (human OA synovial fluid) and in vivo (Sprague-Dawley rats) osteoarthritic models. These results indicate that mAGC's may protect articular cartilage against the loss of key ECM components, and lower catabolic protein and gene expression in both models. This suppression of matrix degradation has the potential to provide a healthy environment for tissue repair.

  14. Mass transfer trends occurring in engineered ex vivo tissue scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Marc; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; McFetridge, Peter

    2012-08-01

    In vivo the vasculature provides an effective delivery system for cellular nutrients; however, artificial scaffolds have no such mechanism, and the ensuing limitations in mass transfer result in limited regeneration. In these investigations, the regional mass transfer properties that occur through a model scaffold derived from the human umbilical vein (HUV) were assessed. Our aim was to define the heterogeneous behavior associated with these regional variations, and to establish if different decellularization technologies can modulate transport conditions to improve microenvironmental conditions that enhance cell integration. The effect of three decellularization methods [Triton X-100 (TX100), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and acetone/ethanol (ACE/EtOH)] on mass transfer, cellular migration, proliferation, and metabolic activity were assessed. Results show that regional variation in tissue structure and composition significantly affects both mass transfer and cell function. ACE/EtOH decellularization was shown to increase albumin mass flux through the intima and proximate-medial region (0-250 μm) when compared with sections decellularized with TX100 or SDS; although, mass flux remained constant over all regions of the full tissue thickness when using TX100. Scaffolds decellularized with TX100 were shown to promote cell migration up to 146% further relative to SDS decellularized samples. These results show that depending on scaffold derivation and expectations for cellular integration, specificities of the decellularization chemistry affect the scaffold molecular architecture resulting in variable effects on mass transfer and cellular response.

  15. Calcium Dynamics of Ex Vivo Long-Term Cultured CD8+ T Cells Are Regulated by Changes in Redox Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, Margaret A.; Potnis, Anish; Hill, Abby; Lu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    T cells reach a state of replicative senescence characterized by a decreased ability to proliferate and respond to foreign antigens. Calcium release associated with TCR engagement is widely used as a surrogate measure of T cell response. Using an ex vivo culture model that partially replicates features of organismal aging, we observe that while the amplitude of Ca2+ signaling does not change with time in culture, older T cells exhibit faster Ca2+ rise and a faster decay. Gene expression analysis of Ca2+ channels and pumps expressed in T cells by RT-qPCR identified overexpression of the plasma membrane CRAC channel subunit ORAI1 and PMCA in older T cells. To test whether overexpression of the plasma membrane Ca2+ channel is sufficient to explain the kinetic information, we adapted a previously published computational model by Maurya and Subramaniam to include additional details on the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) process to recapitulate Ca2+ dynamics after T cell receptor stimulation. Simulations demonstrated that upregulation of ORAI1 and PMCA channels is not sufficient to explain the observed alterations in Ca2+ signaling. Instead, modeling analysis identified kinetic parameters associated with the IP3R and STIM1 channels as potential causes for alterations in Ca2+ dynamics associated with the long term ex vivo culturing protocol. Due to these proteins having known cysteine residues susceptible to oxidation, we subsequently investigated and observed transcriptional remodeling of metabolic enzymes, a shift to more oxidized redox couples, and post-translational thiol oxidation of STIM1. The model-directed findings from this study highlight changes in the cellular redox environment that may ultimately lead to altered T cell calcium dynamics during immunosenescence or organismal aging. PMID:27526200

  16. An ex vivo model to induce early fibrosis-like changes in human precision-cut lung slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsafadi, Hani N; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A; Lehmann, Mareike; Lindner, Michael; Peschel, Britta; Königshoff, Melanie; Wagner, Darcy E

    2017-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating chronic interstitial lung disease (ILD) characterized by lung tissue scarring and high morbidity. Lung epithelial injury, myofibroblast activation, and deranged repair are believed to be key processes involved in disease onset and progression, but the exact molecular mechanisms behind IPF remain unclear. Several drugs have been shown to slow disease progression, but treatments that halt or reverse IPF progression have not been identified. Ex vivo models of human lung have been proposed for drug discovery, one of which is precision-cut lung slices (PCLS). Although PCLS production from IPF explants is possible, IPF explants are rare and typically represent end-stage disease. Here we present a novel model of early fibrosis-like changes in human PCLS derived from patients without ILD/IPF using a combination of profibrotic growth factors and signaling molecules (transforming growth factor-β, tumor necrosis factor-α, platelet-derived growth factor-AB, and lysophosphatidic acid). Fibrotic-like changes of PCLS were qualitatively analyzed by histology and immunofluorescence and quantitatively by water-soluble tetrazolium-1, RT-qPCR, Western blot analysis, and ELISA. PCLS remained viable after 5 days of treatment, and fibrotic gene expression (FN1, SERPINE1, COL1A1, CTGF, MMP7, and ACTA2) increased as early as 24 h of treatment, with increases in protein levels at 48 h and increased deposition of extracellular matrix. Alveolar epithelium reprogramming was evident by decreases in surfactant protein C and loss of HOPX In summary, using human-derived PCLS, we established a novel ex vivo model that displays characteristics of early fibrosis and could be used to evaluate novel therapies and study early-stage IPF pathomechanisms. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Genomic definition of multiple ex vivo regulatory T cell subphenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerer, Markus; Hill, Jonathan A; Kretschmer, Karsten; von Boehmer, Harald; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2010-03-30

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells that express the Foxp3 transcription factor are essential for lymphoid homeostasis and immune tolerance to self. Other nonimmunological functions of Treg cells, such as controlling metabolic function in adipose tissue, are also emerging. Treg cells originate primarily in the thymus, but can also be elicited from conventional T cells by in vivo exposure to low-dose antigen or homeostatic expansion or by activation in the presence of TGFbeta in vitro. Treg cells are characterized by a distinct transcriptional signature controlled in part, but not solely, by Foxp3. For a better perspective on transcriptional control in Treg cells, we compared gene expression profiles of a broad panel of Treg cells from various origins or anatomical locations. Treg cells generated by different means form different subphenotypes and were identifiable by particular combinations of transcripts, none of which fully encompassed the entire Treg signature. Molecules involved in Treg cell effector function, chemokine receptors, and the transcription factors that control them were differentially represented in these subphenotypes. Treg cells from the gut proved dissimilar to cells elicited by exposure to TGFbeta in vitro, but instead they resembled a CD103(+)Klrg1(+) subphenotype preferentially generated in response to lymphopenia.

  18. Plasmodium falciparum Polymorphisms associated with ex vivo drug susceptibility and clinical effectiveness of artemisinin-based combination therapies in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlström, Sabina; Aubouy, Agnès; Maïga-Ascofaré, Oumou; Faucher, Jean-François; Wakpo, Abel; Ezinmègnon, Sèm; Massougbodji, Achille; Houzé, Pascal; Kendjo, Eric; Deloron, Philippe; Le Bras, Jacques; Houzé, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are the main option to treat malaria, and their efficacy and susceptibility must be closely monitored to avoid resistance. We assessed the association of Plasmodium falciparum polymorphisms and ex vivo drug susceptibility with clinical effectiveness. Patients enrolled in an effectiveness trial comparing artemether-lumefantrine (n = 96), fixed-dose artesunate-amodiaquine (n = 96), and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (n = 48) for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria 2007 in Benin were assessed. pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfmrp1, pfdhfr, and pfdhps polymorphisms were analyzed pretreatment and in recurrent infections. Drug susceptibility was determined in fresh baseline isolates by Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A majority had 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) estimates (the concentration required for 50% growth inhibition) lower than those of the 3D7 reference clone for desethylamodiaquine, lumefantrine, mefloquine, and quinine and was considered to be susceptible, while dihydroartemisinin and pyrimethamine IC50s were higher. No association was found between susceptibility to the ACT compounds and treatment outcome. Selection was observed for the pfmdr1 N86 allele in artemether-lumefantrine recrudescences (recurring infections) (4/7 [57.1%] versus 36/195 [18.5%]), and of the opposite allele, 86Y, in artesunate-amodiaquine reinfections (new infections) (20/22 [90.9%] versus 137/195 [70.3%]) compared to baseline infections. The importance of pfmdr1 N86 in lumefantrine tolerance was emphasized by its association with elevated lumefantrine IC50s. Genetic linkage between N86 and Y184 was observed, which together with the low frequency of 1246Y may explain regional differences in selection of pfmdr1 loci. Selection of opposite alleles in artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine recurrent infections supports the strategy of multiple first-line treatment. Surveillance based on clinical, ex

  19. Soft tissue discrimination ex vivo by dual energy computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachrisson, H., E-mail: helene.zachrisson@lio.s [Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping University Hospital, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Clinical Physiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Linkoeping University, Linkoeping University Hospital, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Engstroem, E. [Clinical Physiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Linkoeping University, Linkoeping University Hospital, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Engvall, J.; Wigstroem, L. [Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping University Hospital, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Clinical Physiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Linkoeping University, Linkoeping University Hospital, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Smedby, O.; Persson, A. [Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping University Hospital, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Radiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Linkoeping University, Linkoeping University Hospital, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Dual Energy Computed Tomography (DECT) may provide additional information about the chemical composition of tissues compared to examination with a single X-ray energy. The aim of this in vitro study was to test whether combining two energies may significantly improve the detection of soft tissue components commonly present in arterial plaques. Methods: Tissue samples of myocardial and psoas muscle, venous and arterial thrombus as well as fat from different locations were scanned using a SOMATOM Definition Dual Source CT system (Siemens AG, Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) with simultaneous tube voltages of 140 and 80 kV. The attenuation (Hounsfield units, HU) at 80 and 140 kV was measured in representative regions of interest, and the association between measured HU values and tissue types was tested with logistic regression. Results: The combination of two energy levels (80 and 140 kV) significantly improved (p < 0.001) the ability to correctly classify venous thrombus vs arterial thrombus, myocardium or psoas; arterial thrombus vs myocardium or psoas; myocardium vs psoas; as well as the differentiation between fat tissue from various locations. Single energy alone was sufficient for distinguishing fat from other tissues. Conclusion: DECT offers significantly improved in vitro differentiation between soft tissues occurring in plaques. If this corresponds to better tissue discrimination in vivo needs to be clarified in future studies.

  20. Differences in the molecular structure of the blood-brain barrier in the cerebral cortex and white matter: an in silico, in vitro, and ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyúl-Tóth, Ádám; Suciu, Maria; Molnár, Judit; Fazakas, Csilla; Haskó, János; Herman, Hildegard; Farkas, Attila E; Kaszaki, József; Hermenean, Anca; Wilhelm, Imola; Krizbai, István A

    2016-06-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main interface controlling molecular and cellular traffic between the central nervous system (CNS) and the periphery. It consists of cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) interconnected by continuous tight junctions, and closely associated pericytes and astrocytes. Different parts of the CNS have diverse functions and structures and may be subject of different pathologies, in which the BBB is actively involved. It is largely unknown, however, what are the cellular and molecular differences of the BBB in different regions of the brain. Using in silico, in vitro, and ex vivo techniques we compared the expression of BBB-associated genes and proteins (i.e., markers of CECs, brain pericytes, and astrocytes) in the cortical grey matter and white matter. In silico human database analysis (obtained from recalculated data of the Allen Brain Atlas), qPCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence studies on porcine and mouse brain tissue indicated an increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes in the white matter compared with the grey matter. We have also found increased expression of genes of the junctional complex of CECs (occludin, claudin-5, and α-catenin) in the white matter compared with the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, occludin, claudin-5, and α-catenin proteins showed increased expression in CECs of the white matter compared with endothelial cells of the cortical grey matter. In parallel, barrier properties of white matter CECs were superior as well. These differences might be important in the pathogenesis of diseases differently affecting distinct regions of the brain.

  1. Identification of small molecules that support human leukemia stem cell activity ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Caroline; Krosl, Jana; Fares, Iman; Boucher, Geneviève; Ruel, Réjean; Marinier, Anne; Lemieux, Sébastien; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2014-04-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) are considered a major cause of relapse in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Defining pathways that control LSC self-renewal is crucial for a better understanding of underlying mechanisms and for the development of targeted therapies. However, currently available culture conditions do not prevent spontaneous differentiation of LSCs, which greatly limits the feasibility of cell-based assays. To overcome these constraints we conducted a high-throughput chemical screen and identified small molecules that inhibit differentiation and support LSC activity in vitro. Similar to reports with cord blood stem cells, several of these compounds suppressed the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway, which we show to be inactive in vivo and rapidly activated ex vivo in AML cells. We also identified a compound, UM729, that collaborates with AhR suppressors in preventing AML cell differentiation. Together, these findings provide newly defined culture conditions for improved ex vivo culture of primary human AML cells.

  2. New technologies and possibilities of breast cancer staging by the criterion N ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Kh. Gantsev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to improve breast cancer (BC staging by the criterion N ex vivo, by applying the up-to-date ultrasound and microsurgical technologies. A LySonix 3000® with PulseSelectTM system was used to expose lymph nodes and vessels. Axillary adipose tissue classically exposed was examined in 70 patients with Stages II-III BC. Lymph vessels and nodes were separated by the sonolipodestruction technique. The findings permit sonolipodestruction to be used for ex vivo total lymph dissection for BC as a method that improves its N-staging. Sonolymphodissection opens up fresh opportunities for studying the anatomic structure of the lymphatic apparatus.

  3. Ex Vivo Aneurysm models mimicking real cases for the preoperative training of the clipping technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin D.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Training in a specialty like cerebrovascular neurosurgery becomes more and more difficult as the access to training is limited by the increasing number of neurosurgical departments and the lack of expert centers for specific pathology. This is why an increased investment in experimental training is encountered in many centers worldwide. The best models for training the clipping technique are ex Vivo on cadaveric heads aneurysm models, animal models or augmented reality models. We present a few ex Vivo models of aneurysms mimicking ACOA, ACM bifurcation and basil are tip aneurysms using a pulsed continuous perfusion system. Clipping training on aneurysm models is an invaluable tool both for the residents and for the specialists with a special interest in cerebrovascular surgery.

  4. An ex vivo original test using radiotracers for evaluating haemocompatibility of tubular biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janvier, G.; Caix, J.; Bordenave, L.; Revel, P.; Baquey, C.; Ducassou, D. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), 33 - Bordeaux (France))

    1994-02-01

    The haemocompatibility of a vascular prosthesis can be estimated as the result of its interaction with blood components. The authors describe an ex vivo canine shunt for evaluating isotopic haemocompatibility in blood-wall interactions. Methods employing radioisotopic tracers can be used to dynamically monitor the adsorption of labelled blood cells and proteins on different biomaterial surfaces. This ex vivo test should enable materials to be assessed for quality according to two thrombogenic criteria: (i) number of adhered platelets mm[sup -2] s[sup -1], (ii) quantity of adsorbed fibrinogen expressed as [mu]g mm[sup -2] s[sup -1], which would provide the basis for a scale of haemocompatibility. (author).

  5. RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION USING HYPERTONIC SALINE SOLUTION INSTILLATION: AN EX VIVO STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine whether radiofrequency ablation using hypertonic saline solution instillation can increase the extent of thermally mediated coagulation in ex vivo pig liver tissue. Methods Fifty-six radiofrequency ablation lesions were produced in fresh ex vivo pig's liver. According to different saline solutions, the lesions were divided into six groups: 25% acetic acid, 18% NaCl, 10% NaCl, 5% NaCl, 0.9% NaCl, and distilled water. After radiofrequency ablation, the lesions size and morphology were measured and compared.Results Using different instillation, the volume of coagulation necrosis was different: 25% acetic acid >18% NaCl >10% NaCl >5% NaCl >0.9% NaCl>distilled water. Conclusion Radiofrequency ablation using hypertonic saline solution instillation can increase the volume of radiofrequency ablation induced necrosis.

  6. Ex-vivo expansion of red blood cells: how real for transfusion in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Masselli, Elena; Varricchio, Lilian; Whitsett, Carolyn

    2012-03-01

    Blood transfusion is indispensable for modern medicine. In developed countries, the blood supply is adequate and safe but blood for alloimmunized patients is often unavailable. Concerns are increasing that donations may become inadequate in the future as the population ages prompting a search for alternative transfusion products. Improvements in culture conditions and proof-of-principle studies in animal models have suggested that ex-vivo expanded red cells may represent such a product. Compared to other cell therapies transfusion poses the unique challenge of requiring great cell doses (2.5×10(12) cells vs 10(7) cells). Although production of such cell numbers is theoretically possible, current technologies generate red cells in numbers sufficient only for safety studies. It is conceived that by the time these studies will be completed, technical barriers to mass cell production will have been eliminated making transfusion with ex-vivo generated red cells a reality.

  7. In Vitro and Ex Vivo Selection Procedures for Identifying Potentially Therapeutic DNA and RNA Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Marton

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It was only relatively recently discovered that nucleic acids participate in a variety of biological functions, besides the storage and transmission of genetic information. Quite apart from the nucleotide sequence, it is now clear that the structure of a nucleic acid plays an essential role in its functionality, enabling catalysis and specific binding reactions. In vitro selection and evolution strategies have been extremely useful in the analysis of functional RNA and DNA molecules, helping to expand our knowledge of their functional repertoire and to identify and optimize DNA and RNA molecules with potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The great progress made in this field has prompted the development of ex vivo methods for selecting functional nucleic acids in the cellular environment. This review summarizes the most important and most recent applications of in vitro and ex vivo selection strategies aimed at exploring the therapeutic potential of nucleic acids.

  8. Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in ex vivo perfused placental tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, Caroline; Mathiesen, Line; Heno, Kristine K;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Placental malaria occurs when Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta. Placental parasite isolates bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) by expression of VAR2CSA on the surface of infected erythrocytes, but may sequester by other VAR2CSA mediated mechanisms...... placental tissue. RESULTS: The ex vivo placental perfusion model was modified to study adhesion of infected erythrocytes binding to CSA, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) or a transgenic parasite where P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 expression had been shut down. Infected erythrocytes...... expressing VAR2CSA accumulated in perfused placental tissue whereas the EPCR binding and the transgenic parasite did not. Soluble CSA and antibodies specific against VAR2CSA inhibited binding of infected erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: The ex vivo model provides a novel way of studying receptor-ligand interactions...

  9. Biomimetic molecules lower catabolic expression and prevent chondroitin sulfate degradation in an osteoarthritic ex vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shaili; Vazquez-Portalatin, Nelda; Calve, Sarah; Panitch, Alyssa

    2016-02-08

    Aggrecan, the major proteoglycan in cartilage, serves to protect cartilage tissue from damage and degradation during the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). In cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) aggrecan exists in an aggregate composed of several aggrecan molecules that bind to a single filament of hyaluronan. Each molecule of aggrecan is composed of a protein core and glycosaminoglycan sides chains, the latter of which provides cartilage with the ability to retain water and resist compressive loads. During the progression of OA, loss of aggrecan is considered to occur first, after which other cartilage matrix components become extremely susceptible to degradation. Proteolytic cleavage of the protein core of aggrecan by enzymes such as aggrecanases, prevent its binding to HA and lower cartilage mechanical strength. Here we present the use of HA-binding or collagen type II-binding molecules that functionally mimic aggrecan but lack known cleavage sites, protecting the molecule from proteolytic degradation. These molecules synthesized with chondroitin sulfate backbones conjugated to hyaluronan- or collagen type II- binding peptides, are capable of diffusing through a cartilage explant and adhering to the ECM of this tissue. The objective of this study was to test the functional efficacy of these molecules in an ex vivo osteoarthritic model to discern the optimal molecule for further studies. Different variations of chondroitin sulfate conjugated to the binding peptides were diffused through aggrecan depleted explants and assessed for their ability to enhance compressive stiffness, prevent CS degradation, and modulate catabolic (MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5) and anabolic (aggrecan and collagen type II) gene expression. A pilot in vivo study assessed the ability to retain the molecule within the joint space of an osteoarthritic guinea pig model. The results indicate chondroitin sulfate conjugated to hyaluronan-binding peptides is able to significantly restore equilibrium

  10. Utilization of the organ care system as ex-vivo lung perfusion after cold storage transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, P N; Maunz, O; Popov, A-F; Zych, B; Patil, N P; Simon, A R

    2015-11-01

    The Organ Care System (OCS) allows perfusion and ventilation of the donor lungs under physiological conditions. Ongoing trials to compare preservation with OCS Lung with standard cold storage do not include donor lungs with suboptimal gas exchange and donor lungs treated with OCS following cold storage transportation. We present a case of a 48-yr-old man who received such lungs after cold storage transportation treated with ex-vivo lung perfusion utilizing OCS.

  11. Ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus macaque regulatory T cells are resistant to alemtuzumab-mediated cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (Ab) directed against CD52 that depletes lymphocytes and other leukocytes, mainly by complement-dependent mechanisms. We investigated the influence of alemtuzumab (i) on ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus monkeys regulatory T cells (Treg) generated for prospective use in adoptive cell therapy and (ii) on naturally-occurring Treg following alemtuzumab infusion. Treg were isolated from PBMC and lymph nodes and expanded for two rounds. CD52 ex...

  12. Training gastroenterology fellows to perform gastric polypectomy using a novel ex vivo model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jen Chen; Ching-Chung Lin; Chia-Yuan Liu; Chih-Jen Chen; Chen-Wang Chang; Ching-Wei Chang; Chien-Wei Lee; Shou-Chuan Shih; Horng-Yuan Wang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of hands-on training of gastroenterology fellows in gastric polypectomy using an ex vivo simulator.METHODS: Eight gastroenterology fellows at Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei were evaluated in gastric polypectomy techniques using a pig stomach with artificial polyps created by a rubber band ligation device. The performance of four second year (year-2) fellows who had undergone one year of clinical training was compared with that of four first year (year-1) fellows both before and after a 4-h workshop using the ex vivo simulator. The workshop allowed for hands-on training in the removal of multiple artificial polyps and the placement of hemoclips at the excision site. Evaluation included observation of technical skills, procedure time, and the fellows' confidence scale.RESULTS: One week after the workshop, the year-1 fellows were re-evaluated and had significantly improved mean performance scores (from 17.9 ± 1.8 to 22.5 ± 0.7), confidence scale (from 4.5 ± 1.0 to 7.8 ± 0.5) and procedure time (from 615.0 ± 57.4 s to 357.5 ± 85.0 s) compared with their baseline performance. After 4 h of training using the ex vivo simulator, the skills of the year-1 fellows were statistically similar to those of the year-2 fellows.CONCLUSION: Use of this ex vivo simulator significantly improved the endoscopic gastric polypectomy skills of gastroenterology fellows who had not had previous clinical training in gastric polypectomy.

  13. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa [TNO Triskelion BV, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE, Zeist (Netherlands); Krul, Cyrille A.M., E-mail: cyrille.krul@tno.nl [TNO, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE Zeist (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  14. Shaping of Natural Killer Cell Antitumor Activity by Ex Vivo Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Granzin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are a promising tool for the use in adoptive immunotherapy, since they efficiently recognize and kill tumor cells. In this context, ex vivo cultivation is an attractive option to increase NK cells in numbers and to improve their antitumor potential prior to clinical applications. Consequently, various strategies to generate NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy have been developed. Here, we give an overview of different NK cell cultivation approaches and their impact on shaping the NK cell antitumor activity. So far, the cytokines interleukin (IL-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, and IL-21 are used to culture and expand NK cells. The selection of the respective cytokine combination is an important factor that directly affects NK cell maturation, proliferation, survival, distribution of NK cell subpopulations, activation, and function in terms of cytokine production and cytotoxic potential. Importantly, cytokines can upregulate the expression of certain activating receptors on NK cells, thereby increasing their responsiveness against tumor cells that express the corresponding ligands. Apart from using cytokines, cocultivation with autologous accessory non-NK cells or addition of growth-inactivated feeder cells are approaches for NK cell cultivation with pronounced effects on NK cell activation and expansion. Furthermore, ex vivo cultivation was reported to prime NK cells for the killing of tumor cells that were previously resistant to NK cell attack. In general, NK cells become frequently dysfunctional in cancer patients, for instance, by downregulation of NK cell activating receptors, disabling them in their antitumor response. In such scenario, ex vivo cultivation can be helpful to arm NK cells with enhanced antitumor properties to overcome immunosuppression. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on NK cell modulation by different ex vivo cultivation strategies focused on increasing NK cytotoxicity for clinical

  15. IL-12 directs further maturation of ex vivo differentiated NK cells with improved therapeutic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Lehmann

    Full Text Available The possibility to modulate ex vivo human NK cell differentiation towards specific phenotypes will contribute to a better understanding of NK cell differentiation and facilitate tailored production of NK cells for immunotherapy. In this study, we show that addition of a specific low dose of IL-12 to an ex vivo NK cell differentiation system from cord blood CD34(+ stem cells will result in significantly increased proportions of cells with expression of CD62L as well as KIRs and CD16 which are preferentially expressed on mature CD56(dim peripheral blood NK cells. In addition, the cells displayed decreased expression of receptors such as CCR6 and CXCR3, which are typically expressed to a lower extent by CD56(dim than CD56(bright peripheral blood NK cells. The increased number of CD62L and KIR positive cells prevailed in a population of CD33(+NKG2A(+ NK cells, supporting that maturation occurs via this subtype. Among a series of transcription factors tested we found Gata3 and TOX to be significantly downregulated, whereas ID3 was upregulated in the IL-12-modulated ex vivo NK cells, implicating these factors in the observed changes. Importantly, the cells differentiated in the presence of IL-12 showed enhanced cytokine production and cytolytic activity against MHC class I negative and positive targets. Moreover, in line with the enhanced CD16 expression, these cells exhibited improved antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity for B-cell leukemia target cells in the presence of the clinically applied antibody rituximab. Altogether, these data provide evidence that IL-12 directs human ex vivo NK cell differentiation towards more mature NK cells with improved properties for potential cancer therapies.

  16. Criteria for viability assessment of discarded human donor livers during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Sutton

    Full Text Available Although normothermic machine perfusion of donor livers may allow assessment of graft viability prior to transplantation, there are currently no data on what would be a good parameter of graft viability. To determine whether bile production is a suitable biomarker that can be used to discriminate viable from non-viable livers we have studied functional performance as well as biochemical and histological evidence of hepatobiliary injury during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion of human donor livers. After a median duration of cold storage of 6.5 h, twelve extended criteria human donor livers that were declined for transplantation were ex vivo perfused for 6 h at 37 °C with an oxygenated solution based on red blood cells and plasma, using pressure controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous portal perfusion. During perfusion, two patterns of bile flow were identified: (1 steadily increasing bile production, resulting in a cumulative output of ≥ 30 g after 6 h (high bile output group, and (2 a cumulative bile production <20 g in 6 h (low bile output group. Concentrations of transaminases and potassium in the perfusion fluid were significantly higher in the low bile output group, compared to the high bile output group. Biliary concentrations of bilirubin and bicarbonate were respectively 4 times and 2 times higher in the high bile output group. Livers in the low bile output group displayed more signs of hepatic necrosis and venous congestion, compared to the high bile output group. In conclusion, bile production could be an easily assessable biomarker of hepatic viability during ex vivo machine perfusion of human donor livers. It could potentially be used to identify extended criteria livers that are suitable for transplantation. These ex vivo findings need to be confirmed in a transplant experiment or a clinical trial.

  17. Ex-vivo expansion of red blood cells: How real for transfusion in humans?

    OpenAIRE

    Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Masselli, Elena; Varricchio, Lilian; Whitsett, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Blood transfusion is indispensable for modern medicine. In developed countries, the blood supply is adequate and safe but blood for alloimmunized patients is often unavailable. Concerns are increasing that donations may become inadequate in the future as the population ages prompting a search for alternative transfusion products. Improvements in culture conditions and proof-of-principle studies in animal models have suggested that ex-vivo expanded red cells may represent such a product. Compa...

  18. Shaping of Natural Killer Cell Antitumor Activity by Ex Vivo Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzin, Markus; Wagner, Juliane; Köhl, Ulrike; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Huppert, Volker; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a promising tool for the use in adoptive immunotherapy, since they efficiently recognize and kill tumor cells. In this context, ex vivo cultivation is an attractive option to increase NK cells in numbers and to improve their antitumor potential prior to clinical applications. Consequently, various strategies to generate NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy have been developed. Here, we give an overview of different NK cell cultivation approaches and their impact on shaping the NK cell antitumor activity. So far, the cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, and IL-21 are used to culture and expand NK cells. The selection of the respective cytokine combination is an important factor that directly affects NK cell maturation, proliferation, survival, distribution of NK cell subpopulations, activation, and function in terms of cytokine production and cytotoxic potential. Importantly, cytokines can upregulate the expression of certain activating receptors on NK cells, thereby increasing their responsiveness against tumor cells that express the corresponding ligands. Apart from using cytokines, cocultivation with autologous accessory non-NK cells or addition of growth-inactivated feeder cells are approaches for NK cell cultivation with pronounced effects on NK cell activation and expansion. Furthermore, ex vivo cultivation was reported to prime NK cells for the killing of tumor cells that were previously resistant to NK cell attack. In general, NK cells become frequently dysfunctional in cancer patients, for instance, by downregulation of NK cell activating receptors, disabling them in their antitumor response. In such scenario, ex vivo cultivation can be helpful to arm NK cells with enhanced antitumor properties to overcome immunosuppression. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on NK cell modulation by different ex vivo cultivation strategies focused on increasing NK cytotoxicity for clinical application in malignant

  19. Modelo de conductancia hidráulica de la dentina humana ex vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Hevia, Javier; Fresno, Consuelo; Martin, Javier; Moncada,G; Letelier, Claudia; Oliveira Júnior, Osmir Batista de [UNESP; Fernández, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to mount and test an experimental model to measure the hydraulic conductance of ex vivo dentin. Seventeen healthy third molars, with indication of extraction of healthy donors aged between 15 and 30 years were obtained by informed consent. After cleaning them, disinfecting them, including them in resin epoxy and cutting them, there were 17 samples of dentin, corresponding to a disk of resin with a coronal section of tooth showing the dentin exposed on both ...

  20. Ex vivo generation of a functional and regenerative wound epithelium from axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Donald R; Satoh, Akira; Mandefro, Berhan; Cummings, Gillian M; Gardiner, David M; Rugg, Elizabeth L

    2010-10-01

    Urodele amphibians (salamanders) are unique among adult vertebrates in their ability to regenerate structurally complete and fully functional limbs. Regeneration is a stepwise process that requires interactions between keratinocytes, nerves and fibroblasts. The formation of a wound epithelium covering the amputation site is an early and necessary event in the process but the molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of the wound epithelium in regeneration remain unclear. We have developed an ex vivo model that recapitulates many features of in vivo wound healing. The model comprises a circular explant of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) limb skin with a central circular, full thickness wound. Re-epithelialization of the wound area is rapid (typically <11 h) and is dependent on metalloproteinase activity. The ex vivo wound epithelium is viable, responds to neuronal signals and is able to participate in ectopic blastema formation and limb regeneration. This ex vivo model provides a reproducible and tractable system in which to study the cellular and molecular events that underlie wound healing and regeneration.

  1. In vitro and ex vivo angiogenic effects of roxarsone on rat endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiaqiao; Cui, Weibo; Liu, Xue; Ying, Jun; Hu, Chengyun; Zhang, Yumei

    2013-11-25

    Roxarsone, a feed additive, is being used worldwide to promote animal growth. However, the potential effect of roxarsone on angiogenesis has not been extensively characterized. We examined the ability of roxarsone to promote angiogenesis of rat endothelial cells in vitro and from rat aorta rings ex vivo. Endothelial cells from rats were exposed to 0.01-10.00μM roxarsone, 5ng/mL vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as a positive control or phosphate buffer saline (PBS) as a negative control. Cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, and the content of VEGF in supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. A Matrigel-induced tube formation assay was used to evaluate the effects of roxarsone on endothelial cells. Additionally, the total number and length of microvessels sprouted from rat aortic rings were measured for ex vivo investigation of angiogenesis. Results showed that the cell viability and total number and length of capillary-like tube formations after roxarsone treatment was significantly higher than that of negative (Proxarsone was significantly higher than that of PBS treatment, with a peak value of 1.0μM. These results further demonstrate the potential of roxarsone to promote angiogenesis in vitro and ex vivo.

  2. STUDY OF INTRA TESTICULAR REGULATIONS OF SPERMATOGENESIS DIFFERENTIATION BY EX-VIVO APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Adaika

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the regulation of intratesticular during spermatogenesis ex vivo. To highlight the progress of spermatogenesis ex vivo, we developed two cell culture systems of seminiferous tubules to study the role of local factors that control the proliferation and differentiation of male germ cells. Our studies are based on two main techniques: RT-PCR and RNA extraction to examine changes in the expression of some growth factors in the culture of seminiferous tubules as the SCF, c- Kit and TGFß. The results show, using RT-PCR, that expression of SCF, c-Kit and TGFb is probably not involved in the alterations of spermatogenesis ex vivo. Indeed, their expressions are not modified during three weeks of culture, and their expressions depend on the proportion of cells where they are expressed. Our results also show that clusterin is a marker of Sertoli cells in the culture of seminiferous tubules and its expression is not altered by the presence of germ cells.

  3. Pre vivo, ex vivo and in vivo evaluations of [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitterhauser, Markus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria) and Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria) and Hospital Pharmacy, General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.mitterhauser@meduniwien.ac.at; Toegel, Stefan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Wadsak, Wolfgang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Lanzenberger, Rupert R. [Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Mien, Leonhard-Key [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Kuntner, Claudia [Department of Radiopharmaceuticals, Austrian Research Centers, Seibersdorf 2443 (Austria); Wanek, Thomas [Department of Radiopharmaceuticals, Austrian Research Centers, Seibersdorf 2443 (Austria); Eidherr, Harald [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Ettlinger, Dagmar E. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Viernstein, Helmut [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Kluger, Rainer [Department of Orthopedics, Donauspital, Vienna 1220 (Austria); Dudczak, Robert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Kletter, Kurt [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2007-05-15

    Introduction: The objectives of this study were to develop a simple preparation method for [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP and to evaluate the applicability of [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP as a potential positron emission tomography (PET) bone imaging agent using pre vivo, ex vivo and in vivo models. Methods: [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP was prepared using [{sup 68}Ga]-gallium chloride eluted from the {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga generator and commercially available Multibone kits. Binding affinity to bone compartments was evaluated using a recently established pre vivo model. In vivo (microPET) and ex vivo experiments were performed in mice, and the results of which were compared with those obtained with [{sup 18}F]-fluoride. Results: [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP was accessible via simple kit preparation and predominantly accumulated in bone tissue in vivo, ex vivo and pre vivo. Binding to mineral bone was irreversible, and low binding was observed in organic bone. In vivo microPET evaluation revealed predominant uptake in bone with renal excretion. Compared with [{sup 18}F]-fluoride, the uptake was lower and the PET image quality was reduced. Conclusions: From the present evaluation, apart from the autonomy for PET centers without an onsite cyclotron, the advantage of [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP over [{sup 18}F]-fluoride is not apparent and the future clinical prospect of [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP remains speculative.

  4. Endoluminal Nd:YAG laser application in ex vivo biliary porcine tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Roberta; Di Matteo, Francesco Maria; Martino, Margareth; Pandolfi, Monica; Saccomandi, Paola; Rabitti, Carla; Crescenzi, Anna; Costamagna, Guido

    2017-08-01

    Adequate biliary drainage with endoscopic or percutaneous placement of self-expandable metal stents represents the goal of palliation in patients with inoperable malignant obstruction of the biliary tree. As an adjunct to stenting, various tissue ablation treatments have been proposed with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to test the effect on biliary tissue of a new ablation technique based on Nd:YAG laser light delivery. The study was conducted on ex vivo specimens of 18 healthy farm pigs, using cystic ducts that are the simplest biliary structures to isolate and cannulate ex vivo. A 22G cannula was positioned into the cystic duct and a quartz optical fibre, with a prototypal cooling system, was inserted into the cannula. Nd:YAG laser output powers of 10, 12, and 15 W were tested, with a total delivered energy of 1000 J in continuous mode in each case. After laser treatment, histological analysis was performed. At macroscopical examination, no lesions of the external wall of the cystic ducts were detected. At histopathological examination, a coagulative necrosis involving the entire mucosa up to the muscolaris propria without significant changes of periductal tissues was observed in all specimens. This study shows the possibility of using Nd:YAG laser on ex vivo porcine biliary ducts with the effect of obtaining a coagulative necrosis involving the whole mucosa.

  5. X-ray cell tracking: from ex-vivo to in-vivo experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfo, A.; Schültke, E.; Menk, R.-H.; Hall, C.; Juurlink, B.; Arfelli, F.

    2013-06-01

    The capacity to track cells (cell tracking) using x-rays on ex-vivo specimens of both malignant and non-malignant cell lines on small animals has been demonstrated recently. Gold nanoparticles have been used as a cellular contrast agent to render cells visible in x-ray microCT acquisitions. The limits of the technique proposed are basically driven by the imaging system used. Single cell resolution can be achieved using synchrotron radiation in-vitro or ex-vivo samples. Micro-focus x-ray tubes can be used to obtain high resolution cell tracking but with some limitations. However, the translation from ex-vivo to in-vivo experiments is not straightforward. The dose restrictions required for in-vivo longitudinal experiments set severe limitations on the technique. Here we present a detailed investigation showing a significant reduction of x-ray dose for the tracking of brain tumour cells. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed considering different spatial resolutions, photon fluence, number of projections, lesion dimension and cell contrast dilution. The findings are compared with real samples imaged using the same parameters. A pioneering in-vivo experiment conducted at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra, Basovizza, Italy) is presented here as proof of principle of in-vivo longitudinal x-ray cell tracking experiments on small animals at low x-ray doses.

  6. Hematopoietic stem cells: ex-vivo expansion and therapeutic potential for myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Lu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jingwei Lu, Vincent J Pompili, Hiranmoy DasCardiovascular Stem Cell Research Laboratory, The Dorothy M Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USAAbstract: Despite recent advances in cardiovascular medicine, ischemic heart disease remains the major cause of death in the United States and abroad. Cell-based therapy for degenerative diseases like myocardial ischemia using stem cells is currently under serious investigation. Various types of stem cells are being considered to be candidates for cell transplantation in cell-based therapy. Hematopoietic stem cells are one of the most promising cell types as several studies demonstrated their ability to improve ischemic cardiac functions by enhancing neovascularization and by reducing the total size of scar tissue. However, in order to procure sufficient numbers of functional stem cells, ex-vivo expansion technology became critically important. In this review, we focus on the state-of-the-art ex-vivo technology for the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells, and the underlying mechanisms regulating stem cell self-renewal as well as differentiation.Keywords: ischemic heart disease, ex-vivo expansion, hematopoietic stem cells, cytokines, nanofibers

  7. Parsley extract inhibits in vitro and ex vivo platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadi, Dounia; Bnouham, Mohamed; Aziz, Mohammed; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Legrand, Chantal; Lafeve, Françoise Fauvel; Mekhfi, Hassane

    2009-08-17

    Many cardiovascular diseases are associated with an increase in blood platelet activity. In Morocco, parsley (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) is one of the medicinal herbs used to treat cardiovascular diseases such as arterial hypertension. In this study, crude aqueous extract (CAE) of parsley was evaluated for its anti-platelet activity in experimental animals on platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo; and on bleeding time in vivo. The in vitro aggregation was monitored after pre-incubation of platelets with CAE. The bleeding time and ex vivo aggregation were performed after oral treatment. CAE inhibited dose dependently platelet aggregation in vitro induced by thrombin, ADP, collagen and epinephrine. The oral administration of CAE (3g/kg) inhibited significantly (p<0.001) platelet aggregation ex vivo and prolonged bleeding time (p<0.001) without changes in the platelet amount. The prolongation of bleeding time by CAE may be attributed to the observed inhibition of platelet aggregation. These effects could be related in part to the polyphenolic compounds present in the extract. These results support the hypothesis that the dietary intake of parsley may be benefit in the normalization of platelet hyperactivation, in the nutritional prevention of cardiovascular diseases and are potentially interesting in the development of new prevention strategies.

  8. Light Emission Requires Exposure to the Atmosphere in Ex Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Inoue

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of organs bearing luciferase activity by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is often difficult, and ex vivo imaging of excised organs plays a complementary role. This study investigated the importance of exposure to the atmosphere in ex vivo BLI. Mice were inoculated with murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 transduced with firefly luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL. They were killed following in vivo BLI, and whole-body imaging was done after death and then after intraperitoneal air injection. In addition, the right knee was exposed and imaged before and after the adjacent bones were cut. Extensive light signals were seen on in vivo imaging. The luminescence disappeared after the animal was killed, and air injection restored the light emission from the abdomen only, suggesting a critical role of atmospheric oxygen in luminescence after death. Although no substantial light signal at the right knee was seen before bone cutting, light emission was evident after cutting. In conclusion, in ex vivo BLI, light emission requires exposure to the atmosphere. Bone destruction is required to demonstrate luciferase activity in the bone marrow after death.

  9. Digital Radiography for Determination of Primary Tooth Length: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Basso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Methods for determining the root canal length of the primary tooth should yield accurate and reproducible results. In vitro studies show some limitations, which do not allow their findings to be directly transferred to a clinical situation. Aim. To compare the accuracy of radiographic tooth length obtained from in vivo digital radiograph with that obtained from ex vivo digital radiograph. Method. Direct digital radiographs of 20 upper primary incisors were performed in teeth (2/3 radicular resorption that were radiographed by an intraoral sensor, according to the long-cone technique. Teeth were extracted, measured, and mounted in a resin block, and then radiographic template was used to standardise the sensor-target distance (30 cm. The apparent tooth length (APTL was obtained from the computer screen by means of an electronic ruler accompanying the digital radiography software (CDR 2.0, whereas the actual tooth length (ACTL was obtained by means of a digital calliper following extraction. Data were compared to the ACTL by variance analysis and Pearson’s correlation test. Results. The values for APTL obtained from in vivo radiography were slightly underestimated, whereas those values obtained from ex vivo were slightly overestimated. No significance was observed (P≤0.48 between APTL and ACTL. Conclusion. The length of primary teeth estimated by in vivo and ex vivo comparisons using digital radiography was found to be similar to the actual tooth length.

  10. Apoptotic cell death, detected ex vivo in peripheral blood lymphocytes of HIV-1 infected persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. te Velde

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In HIV-1 infection the ongoing depletion of CD4+ T-lymphocytes is believed, to a large extent, to be due to apoptosis. Until now quantitative information about in vivo apoptosis of lymphocytes in HIV-patients is scarce because of the very nature of the apoptotic process. Successful detection of apoptosis ex vivo requires the recognition of the initial phase of this process, because at a later stage the cells may not remain any longer in the circulation. We measured quantitatively the amount of early apoptotic peripheral blood lymphocytes directly ex vivo in HIV-1 infected patients using a recently described flow cytometric assay. With this method we observed in an unselected heterogenous group of twelve HIV-infected individuals a median percentage of apoptotic lymphocytes to be significantly higher than in ten healthy controls. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of ex vivo observed increased apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in HIV-infected persons.

  11. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks.

  12. Regulable vascular endothelial growth factor165 overexpression by ex vivo expanded keratinocyte cultures promotes matrix formation, angiogenesis, and healing in porcine full-thickness wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Stijn; Vermeulen, Pieter; Hendrickx, Benoit; Van den Berge, Stefaan; Vranckx, Jan J

    2008-01-01

    The intricate wound repair process involves the interplay of numerous cells and proteins. Using a porcine full-thickness wound (FTW) healing model, we hypothesized that the ex vivo gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-transfected basal keratinocyte (KC) cell suspensions may generate cross-talk and induce matrix formation, angiogenesis, and accelerated healing. Moreover, to regulate overexpression of isoform 165 of VEGF and its effect on healing, we introduced a tetracycline (TC)-inducible gene switch in the expression plasmid. Autologous basal KCs were cultivated from the porcine donor and transfected using cationic liposomes. A dose-response curve was established to determine optimal activation of the gene switch by TC. In vivo, FTWs were treated with VEGF-transfected KCs and controls. Wound fluids were collected daily and examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Biopsies were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin and immunostaining for fibronectin, CD144, and lectin BS-1. In vitro, highest regulable VEGF165-expression was obtained with 1 microg/mL of TCs. In vivo, after induction of the gene switch by adding 1 microg/mL of TCs to the FTW, we obtained upregulated VEGF165 levels and enhanced fibronectin deposition and found more endothelial cell tubular formations and higher rates of reepithelialization than in controls. This ex vivo gene transfer model may serve as a platform for vascular induction in full-thickness tissue repair.

  13. Ex Vivo Drug Sensitivity Profiles of Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates from Cambodia and Thailand, 2005 to 2010, Determined by a Histidine-Rich Protein-2 Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    01 JUN 2012 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ex vivo drug sensitivity profiles of Plasmodium falciparum field...PCR (RT-PCR) targeting the 18 s rRNA gene. Specimens with a microscopically or RT-PCR confirmed malaria co- infection at time zero, Plasmodium vivax...one week. Drug solutions were stored at 2 – 8°C and used within 1 week of preparation. Plasmodium falciparum W2 reference clone and quality control W2

  14. Vaginal Lactobacillus Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Tissues Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ñahui Palomino, Rogers A; Zicari, Sonia; Vanpouille, Christophe; Vitali, Beatrice; Margolis, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus species, which dominate vaginal microbiota of healthy reproductive-age women, lower the risks of sexually transmitted infections, including the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. The exact mechanisms of this protection remain to be understood. Here, we investigated these mechanisms in the context of human cervico-vaginal and lymphoid tissues ex vivo. We found that all six Lactobacillus strains tested in these systems significantly suppressed HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection. We identified at least three factors that mediated this suppression: (i) Acidification of the medium. The pH of the undiluted medium conditioned by lactobacilli was between 3.8 and 4.6. Acidification of the culture medium with hydrochloric acid (HCl) to this pH in control experiments was sufficient to abrogate HIV-1 replication. However, the pH of the Lactobacillus-conditioned medium (CM) diluted fivefold, which reached ∼6.9, was also suppressive for HIV-1 infection, while in control experiments HIV-1 infection was not abrogated when the pH of the medium was brought to 6.9 through the use of HCl. This suggested the existence of other factors responsible for HIV-1 inhibition by lactobacilli. (ii) Lactic acid. There was a correlation between the concentration of lactic acid in the Lactobacillus-CM and its ability to suppress HIV-1 infection in human tissues ex vivo. Addition of lactic acid isomers D and L to tissue culture medium at the concentration that corresponded to their amount released by lactobacilli resulted in HIV-1 inhibition. Isomer L was produced in higher quantities than isomer D and was mostly responsible for HIV-1 inhibition. These results indicate that lactic acid, in particular its L-isomer, inhibits HIV-1 independently of lowering of the pH. (iii) Virucidal effect. Incubation of HIV-1 in Lactobacillus-CM significantly suppressed viral infectivity for human tissues ex vivo. Finally, lactobacilli adsorb HIV-1, serving as a sink decreasing the

  15. Evaluacion ex vivo de la retencion de estructuras en zirconia--ytria de procera[R] con diferentes cementos

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mejia Bravo, Richard Milton; Catarroso Perez, Carlos Bernardo; Ruiz Restrepo, Xiomara Cristina; Espitia Mesa, Jose Fernando; Moreno Castillo, Jenny Alexandra; Montoya Sepulveda, Andres Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Introduccion: en tanto no se encuentra en la literatura un protocolo fundamentado de cementacion para restauraciones elaboradas en zirconia-ytria, el proposito de este estudio fue evaluar ex vivo la retencion...

  16. Encapsulated feeder cells within alginate beads for ex vivo expansion of cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pan, Xiuwei; Sun, Qiong; Cai, Haibo; Gao, Yun; Tan, Wensong; Zhang, Weian

    2016-01-01

    A co-culture system based on encapsulated feeder cells within alginate beads was developed through optimizing the detailed aspects of the cell culture system to expand CD34-positive (CD34(+)) cells ex vivo...

  17. Ascorbic acid has superior ex vivo antiproliferative, cell death-inducing and immunomodulatory effects over IFN-α in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Moens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clear therapeutic guidelines for HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP are missing due to the lack of randomized double-blind controlled clinical trials. Moderate yet similar clinical benefit has been demonstrated for IFN-α and high-dose ascorbic acid (AA monotherapy in a large open clinical trial. However, there is a lack of in vivo and in vitro studies exploring and comparing the effects of high-dose AA and IFN-α treatment in the context of HAM/TSP. Therefore, we performed the first comparative analysis of the ex vivo and in vitro molecular and cellular mechanisms of action of IFN-α and high-dose AA in HAM/TSP. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Through thymidine incorporation and quantification of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines, we demonstrate that high-dose AA displays differential and superior antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects over IFN-α in HAM/TSP PBMCs ex vivo. In addition, high-dose AA, but not IFN-α, induced cell death in both HAM/TSP PBMCs and HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines MT-2 and MT-4. Microarray data combined with pathway analysis of MT-2 cells revealed AA-induced regulation of genes associated with cell death, including miR-155. Since miR-155 has recently been demonstrated to up-regulate IFN-γ, this microRNA might represent a novel therapeutic target in HAM/TSP, as recently demonstrated in multiple sclerosis, another neuroinflammatory disease. On the other hand, IFN-α selectively up-regulated antiviral and immune-related genes. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison to IFN-α, high-dose AA treatment has superior ex vivo and in vitro cell death-inducing, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory anti-HTLV-1 effects. Differential pathway activation by both drugs opens up avenues for targeted treatment in specific patient subsets.

  18. Evaluation of the diagnostic potential of ex vivo Raman spectroscopy in gastric cancers: fingerprint versus high wavenumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xueqian; Dai, Jianhua; Chen, Yao; Duan, Guangjie; Liu, Yulong; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Hongbo; Peng, Guiyong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to apply Raman spectroscopy in the high wavenumber (HW) region (2800 to 3000 cm-1) for ex vivo detection of gastric cancer and compare its diagnostic potential with that of the fingerprint (FP) region (800 to 1800 cm-1). Raman spectra were collected in the FP and HW regions to differentiate between normal mucosa (n=38) and gastric cancer (n=37). The distinctive Raman spectral differences between normal and cancer tissues are observed at 853, 879, 1157, 1319, 1338, 1448, and 2932 cm-1 and are primarily related to proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, collagen, and carotenoids in the tissue. In FP and HW Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of gastric cancer, multivariate diagnostic algorithms based on partial-least-squares discriminant analysis, together with leave-one-sample-out cross validation, yielded diagnostic sensitivities of 94.59% and 81.08%, and specificities of 86.84% and 71.05%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic analysis further confirmed that the FP region model performance is superior to that of the HW region model. Better differentiation between normal and gastric cancer tissues can be achieved using FP Raman spectroscopy and PLS-DA techniques, but the complementary natures of the FP and HW regions make both of them useful in diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  19. Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy for ex-vivo diagnosis of melanocytic and non-melanocytic skin tumors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Daniela; Krammer, Sebastian; Vural, Secil; Bachmann, Mario Raphael; Ruini, Cristel; Sárdy, Miklós; Ruzicka, Thomas; Berking, Carola; von Braunmühl, Tanja

    2017-09-26

    Ex-vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy (ex-vivo CLSM) offers rapid examination of freshly excised tissue. During the conventional examination immunohistochemistry enables to distinguish various cell types. The possibility of immunofluorescent techniques could enhance the accuracy of the diagnosis performed by ex-vivo CLSM. The tissue probes from various skin tumors were stained with FITC labelled S-100A10, Melan-A and anti-Ber-EP4 antibodies before examination with ex-vivo CLSM in the fluorescence (FM) and reflectance modes (RM). Results were compared to negative controls and conventional histopathology. The staining protocols were evaluated by establishing a scoring system according to the signal intensity found in ex-vivo CLSM. S100 immunostaining was successful in 55.6%. Dilution of 1:200 resulted in the best possible evaluation of the tumor. The best suitable protocol was protocol B (phosphate buffered saline /PBS/, without blocking agent). Melan A immunostaining was positive in 66.7%; 1:500 was the best dilution and protocol B (PBS, without blocking agent) the most suitable. Ber-EP4 immunostaining presented a signal in 85.7%, the best dilutions were 1:200 and 1:500 and protocol A (PBS, with blocking agent) showed most optimal results. The use of fluorescent-labeled antibodies in ex-vivo CLSM is possible and could improve intraoperative diagnostics of skin tumors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel Sensor-Enabled Ex Vivo Bioreactor: A New Approach towards Physiological Parameters and Porcine Artery Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundargi, Raghavendra; Venkataraman, Divya; Kumar, Saranya; Mogal, Vishal; Ortiz, Raphael; Loo, Joachim; Venkatraman, Subbu; Steele, Terry

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to design and construct an ex vivo bioreactor system to assess the real time viability of vascular tissue. Porcine carotid artery as a model tissue was used in the ex vivo bioreactor setup to monitor its viability under physiological conditions such as oxygen, pressure, temperature, and flow. The real time tissue viability was evaluated by monitoring tissue metabolism through a fluorescent indicator "resorufin." Our ex vivo bioreactor allows real time monitoring of tissue responses along with physiological conditions. These ex vivo parameters were vital in determining the tissue viability in sensor-enabled bioreactor and our initial investigations suggest that, porcine tissue viability is considerably affected by high shear forces and low oxygen levels. Histological evaluations with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining show intact endothelium with fresh porcine tissue whereas tissues after incubation in ex vivo bioreactor studies indicate denuded endothelium supporting the viability results from real time measurements. Hence, this novel viability sensor-enabled ex vivo bioreactor acts as model to mimic in vivo system and record vascular responses to biopharmaceutical molecules and biomedical devices.

  1. Effect of Static Load on the Nucleus Pulposus of Rabbit Intervertebral Disc Motion Segment in Ex vivo Organ Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Guo Zhu; Min-Shan Feng; Jia-Wen Zhan; Ping Zhang; Jie Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background:The development of mechanically active culture systems helps increase the understanding of the role of mechanical stress in intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration.Motion segment cultures allow for preservation of the native IVD structure,and adjacent vertebral bodies facilitate the application and control of mechanical loads.The purpose of this study was to establish loading and organ culture methods for rabbit IVD motion segments to study the effect of static load on the whole disc organ.Methods:IVD motion segments were harvested from rabbit lumbar spines and cultured in no-loading 6-well plates (control conditions) or custom-made apparatuses under a constant,compressive load (3 kg,0.5 MPa) for up to 14 days.Tissue integrity,matrix synthesis,and the matrix gene expression profile were assessed after 3,7,and 14 days of culturing and compared with those of fresh tissues.Results:The results showed that ex vivo culturing of motion segments preserved tissue integrity under no-loading conditions for 14 days whereas the static load gradually destroyed the morphology after 3 days.Proteoglycan contents were decreased under both conditions,with a more obvious decrease under static load,and proteoglycan gene expression was also downregulated.However,under static load,immunohistochemical staining intensity and collagen Type Ⅱ alpha 1 (COL2A 1) gene expression were significantly enhanced (61.54 ± 5.91,P =0.035) and upregulated (1.195 ± 0.040,P =0.000),respectively,compared with those in the controls (P < 0.05).In contrast,under constant compression,these trends were reversed.Our initial results indicated that short-term static load stimulated the synthesis of collagen Type Ⅱ alpha l;however,sustained constant compression led to progressive degeneration and specifically to a decreased proteoglycan content.Conclusions:A loading and organ culture system for ex vivo rabbit IVD motion segments was developed.Using this system,we were able to study the effects of

  2. Efficient generation of transgenic chickens using the spermatogonial stem cells in vivo and ex vivo transfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The highly efficient novel methods to produce transgenic chickens were established by directly in-jecting the recombinant plasmid containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into the cock’s testis termed as testis-medianted gene transfer (TMGT), and transplanting transfected spermatogonial stem cells (TTSSCs). For the TMGT approach,four dosages of pEGFP-N1 DNA/cationic polymer complex were injected intratesticularly. The results showed: (1) 48 h after the injection,the percentages of testis cells expressing GFP were 4.0%, 8.7%, 10.2% and 13.6% in the 50, 100, 150 and 200 μg/mL group, re-spectively. The difference from the four dosage groups was significant (P<0.05). On day 25 after the injection, a dosage-dependent and time-dependent increase in the number of transgenic sperm was observed. The percentages of gene expression reached the summit and became stable from day 70 to 160, being 12.7%, 12.8%, 15.9% and 19.1%, respectively. The difference from the four dosage groups was also significant (P<0.05). (2) 70 d after the injection, strong green fluorescent could be observed in the seminiferous tubules by whole-mount in-situ hybridization. (3) 70 d after the injection, the semen was collected and used to artificially inseminate wild-type females. The blastoderms of F1 and F2 transgenic chicken expressed GFP were 56.2% (254/452) and 53.2% (275/517), respectively. The detec-tion of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of F1 and F2 transgenic chicken blood genomic DNA showed that 56.5% (3/23) of F1 and 52.9% (9/17) of F2 were positive. Southern blot showed GFP DNA was in-serted in their genomic DNAs. (4) Frozen whole mount tissue sections of F1 and F2 transgenic chicken liver, heart, kidney and muscle showed that the rates of green fluorescent positive were between 50.0% and 66.7%. (5) With the TTSSCs method, SSCs ex vivo transfected with GFP were transplanted into recipient roosters whose endogenic SSCs had been resoluted. The donor SSCs settled and GFP ex

  3. Efficient generation of transgenic chickens using the spermatogonial stem cells in vivo and ex vivo transfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BiChun; YU Fei; WANG KeHua; CHEN GuoHong; SUN GuoBo; SUN HuaiChang; XU Qi; GAO Bo; ZHOU GuanYue; ZHAO WenMing; WU XinSheng; BAO WenBin

    2008-01-01

    The highly efficient novel methods to produce transgenic chickens were established by directly in-jecting the recombinant plasmid containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into the cock's testis termed as testis-medianted gene transfer (TMGT), and transplanting transfected spermatogonial stem cells (ITSSCs). For the TMGT approach, four dosages of pEGFP-N1 DNA/cationic polymer complex were injected intratesticularly. The results showed: (1) 48 h after the injection, the percentages of testis cells expressing GFP were 4.0%, 8.7%, 10.2% and 13.6% in the 50, 100, 150 and 200 μg/mL group, re-spectively. The difference from the four dosage groups was significant (P<0.05). On day 25 after the injection, a dosage-dependent and time-dependent increase in the number of transgenic sperm was observed. The percentages of gene expression reached the summit and became stable from day 70 to 160, being 12.7%, 12.8%, 15.9% and 19.1%, respectively. The difference from the four dosage groups was also significant (P<0.05). (2) 70 d after the injection, strong green fluorescent could be observed in the seminiferous tubules by whole-mount in-situ hybridization. (3) 70 d after the injection, the semen was collected and used to artificially inseminate wild-type females. The blastoderms of F1 and F2 transgenic chicken expressed GFP were 56.2% (254/452) and 53.2% (275/517), respectively. The detec-tion of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of F1 and F2 transgenic chicken blood genomic DNA showed that 56.5% (3/23) of F1 and 52.9% (9/17) of F2 were positive. Southern blot showed GFP DNA was in-serted in their genomic DNAs. (4) Frozen whole mount tissue sections of F1 and F2 transgenic chicken liver, head, kidney and muscle showed that the rates of green fluorescent positive were between 50.0% and 66.7%. (5) With the TTSSCs method, SSCs ex vivo transfected with GFP were transplanted into recipient roosters whose endogenic SSCs had been resoluted. The donor SSCs settled and GFP ex

  4. The application of anti-ESAT-6 monoclonal antibody fluorescent probe in ex vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging in mice with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Zhang, Haoling; Zhu, Zhaoqin; Li, Cong; Shi, Yuxin; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-09-01

    Here, we aimed to assess the feasibility of anti-ESAT-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) coupling with IR783 and rhodamine fluorescent probe in the detection of ESAT-6 expression in tuberculosis tissue of mice using near-infrared fluorescence imaging. IR783 and rhodamine were conjugated to the anti-ESAT-6 mAb or IgG. Mice in the experimental group were injected with fluorescence-labeled mAb probe, and mice in the control group were injected with fluorescence-labeled non-specific IgG antibody. Twenty-four hours later, the lung tissue of mice was examined using ex vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging. In addition, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated by measuring the signal intensities of the pulmonary lesions, normal lung tissue and background noise. The frozen lung tissue section was examined under fluorescence microscopy and compared with hemoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The ex vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging showed that the fluorescence signal in the lung tuberculosis lesions in the experimental group was significantly enhanced, whereas there was only a weak fluorescence signal or even no fluorescence signal in the control group. CNR values were 64.40 ± 7.02 (n = 6) and 8.75 ± 3.87 (n = 6), respectively (t = 17.01, p fluorescence accumulation distribution detected under fluorescence microscopy was consistent with HE staining of the tuberculosis region. In conclusion, anti-ESAT-6 mAb fluorescent probe could target and be applied in specific ex vivo imaging of mice tuberculosis, and may be of further use in tuberculosis in living mice. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Using computed tomography scans to develop an ex-vivo gastric model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jerome A Henry; Gerard O'Sullivan; Abhay S Pandit

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research was to use abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans to non-invasively quantify anthropometrical data of the human stomach and to concomitantly create an anatomically correct and distensible ex-vivo gastric model. Thirty-three abdominal CT scans of human subjects were obtained and were imported into reconstruction software to generate 3D models of the stomachs. Anthropometrical data such as gastric wall thickness, gastric surface area and gastric volume were subsequently quantified. A representative 3D computer model was exported into a selective laser sintering (SLS) rapid prototyping machine to create an anatomically correct solid gastric model. Subsequently,a replica wax template of the SLS model was created. A negative mould was offset around the wax template such that the offset distance was equivalent to that of the gastric wall thickness. A silicone with similar mechanical properties to the human stomach was poured into the offset. The lost wax manufacturing technique was employed to create a hollow distensible stomach model.3D computer gastric models were generated from the CT scans. A hollow distensible silicone ex-vivo gastric model with similar compliance to that of the human stomach was created. The anthropometrical data indicated that there is no significant relationship between BMI and gastric surface area or gastric volume. There were interand intra-group differences between groups with respect to gastric wall thickness. This study demonstrates that abdominal CT scans can be used to both non-invasively determine gastric anthropometrical data as well as create realistic ex-vivo stomach models.

  6. Application of Gold Nanorods for Photothermal Therapy in Ex Vivo Human Oesophagogastric Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohan; Harris-Birtill, David C C; Zhou, Yu; Gallina, Maria E; Cass, Anthony E G; Hanna, George B; Elson, Daniel S

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles are chemically fabricated and tuned to strongly absorb near infrared (NIR) light, enabling deep optical penetration and therapy within human tissues, where sufficient heating induces tumour necrosis. In our studies we aim to establish the optimal gold nanorod (GNR) concentration and laser power for inducing hyperthermic effects in tissues and test this photothermal effect on ex vivo human oesophagogastric adenocarcinoma. The ideal GNR concentration and NIR laser power that would elicit sufficient hyperthermia for tumour necrosis was pre-determined on porcine oesophageal tissues. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma tissues were incubated with GNR solutions and a GNR-free control solution with corresponding healthy tissues for comparison, then irradiated with NIR light for 10 minutes. Temperature rise was found to vary linearly with both the concentration of GNRs and the laser power. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric tissues consistently demonstrated a significant temperature rise when incubated in an optimally concentrated GNR solution (3 x 10(10) GNRs/ml) prior to NIR irradiation delivered at an optimal power (2 W/cm2). A mean temperature rise of 27 degrees C was observed in tissues incubated with GNRs, whereas only a modest 2 degrees C rise in tissues not exposed to any GNRs. This study evaluates the photothermal effects of GNRs on oesophagogastric tissue examines their application in the minimally invasive therapeutics of oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas. This could potentially be an effective method of clinically inducing irreversible oesophagogastric tumour photodestruction, with minimal collateral damage expected in (healthy) tissues free from GNRs.

  7. In vitro and ex vivo toxicological testing of sildenafil-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, M; Neuhaus, V; Finke, J H; Richter, C; Gothsch, T; Kwade, A; Büttgenbach, S; Braun, A; Müller-Goymann, C C

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential cytotoxicity of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) loaded with sildenafil. The SLNs were tested as a new drug delivery system (DDS) for the inhalable treatment of pulmonary hypertension in human lungs. Solubility of sildenafil in SLN lipid matrix (30:70 phospholipid:triglyceride) was determined to 1% sildenafil base and 0.1% sildenafil citrate, respectively. Sildenafil-loaded SLN with particle size of approximately 180 nm and monomodal particle size distribution were successfully manufactured using a novel microchannel homogenization method and were stable up to three months. Sildenafil-loaded SLN were then used in in vitro and ex vivo models representing lung and heart tissue. For in vitro models, human alveolar epithelial cell line (A459) and mouse heart endothelium cell line (MHEC5-T) were used. For ex vivo models, rat precision cut lung slices (PCLS) and rat heart slices (PCHS) were used. All the models were treated with plain SLN and sildenafil-loaded SLN in a concentration range of 0-5000 µg/ml of lipid matrix. The toxicity was evaluated in vitro and ex vivo by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Median lethal dose 50% (LD50) values for A549 cells and PCLS were found to be in the range of 1200-1900 µg/ml while for MHEC5-T cells and precision cut heart slices values were found between 1500 and 2800 µg/ml. PCHS showed slightly higher LD50 values in comparison to PCLS. Considering the toxicological aspects, sildenafil-loaded SLN could have potential in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension via inhalation route.

  8. Characterization of micro-invasive trabecular bypass stents by ex vivo perfusion and computational flow modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter KS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kendall S Hunter,1 Todd Fjield,2 Hal Heitzmann,2 Robin Shandas,1 Malik Y Kahook3 1Department of Bioengineering, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; 2Glaukos Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA, USA; 3University of Colorado Hospital Eye Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Micro-invasive glaucoma surgery with the Glaukos iStent® or iStent inject® (Glaukos Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA, USA is intended to create a bypass through the trabecular meshwork to Schlemm's canal to improve aqueous outflow through the natural physiologic pathway. While the iStent devices have been evaluated in ex vivo anterior segment models, they have not previously been evaluated in whole eye perfusion models nor characterized by computational fluid dynamics. Intraocular pressure (IOP reduction with the iStent was evaluated in an ex vivo whole human eye perfusion model. Numerical modeling, including computational fluid dynamics, was used to evaluate the flow through the stents over physiologically relevant boundary conditions. In the ex vivo model, a single iStent reduced IOP by 6.0 mmHg from baseline, and addition of a second iStent further lowered IOP by 2.9 mmHg, for a total IOP reduction of 8.9 mmHg. Computational modeling showed that simulated flow through the iStent or iStent inject is smooth and laminar at physiological flow rates. Each stent was computed to have a negligible flow resistance consistent with an expected significant decrease in IOP. The present perfusion results agree with prior clinical and laboratory studies to show that both iStent and iStent inject therapies are potentially titratable, providing clinicians with the opportunity to achieve lower target IOPs by implanting additional stents. Keywords: glaucoma, iStent, trabecular bypass, intraocular pressure, ab-interno, CFD

  9. Evaluation of the In Vivo and Ex Vivo Binding of Novel BC1 Cannabinoid Receptor Radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.; Gatley, J.; Gifford, A.

    2002-01-01

    The primary active ingredient of marijuana, 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, exerts its psychoactive effects by binding to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. These receptors are found throughout the brain with high concentrations in the hippocampus and cerebellum. The current study was conducted to evaluate the binding of a newly developed putative cannabinoid antagonist, AM630, and a classical cannabinoid 8-tetrahydrocannabinol as potential PET and/or SPECT imaging agents for brain CB1 receptors. For both of these ligands in vivo and ex vivo studies in mice were conducted. AM630 showed good overall brain uptake (as measure by %IA/g) and a moderately rapid clearance from the brain with a half-clearance time of approximately 30 minutes. However, AM630 did not show selective binding to CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Ex vivo autoradiography supported the lack of selective binding seen in the in vivo study. Similar to AM630, 8-tetrahydrocanibol also failed to show selective binding to CB1 receptor rich brain areas. The 8-tetrahydrocanibol showed moderate overall brain uptake and relatively slow brain clearance as compared to AM630. Further studies were done with AM2233, a cannabinoid ligand with a similar structure as AM630. These studies were done to develop an ex vivo binding assay to quantify the displacement of [131I]AM2233 binding by other ligands in Swiss-Webster and CB1 receptor knockout mice. By developing this assay we hoped to determine the identity of an unknown binding site for AM2233 present in the hippocampus of CB1 knockout mice. Using an approach based on incubation of brain slices prepared from mice given intravenous [131I]AM2233 in either the presence or absence of AM2233 (unlabelled) it was possible to demonstrate a significant AM2233-displacable binding in the Swiss-Webster mice. Future studies will determine if this assay is appropriate for identifying the unknown binding site for AM2233 in the CB1 knockout mice.

  10. A reliable indirect cell-labelling protocol for optical imaging allows ex vivo visualisation of mesenchymal stem cells after transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Valentina; Libani, Ilaria Vittoria; Armentero, Marie-Therese; Blandini, Fabio; Lucignani, Giovanni; Silani, Vincenzo; Cova, Lidia; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2013-09-01

    We set out to assess the feasibility of exploiting expression of the mCherry gene, after lentiviral infection, in order visualise bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by optical imaging, and to provide proof of principle of this approach as a method for cell tracking and quantification in pre-clinical models. Commercial hMSCs were infected with a lentiviral vector carrying the mCherry gene under the control of the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. After extensive in vitro culture, infected hMSCs were analysed for viability, morphology, differentiation capability, and maintenance of fluorescence. Thereafter, mCherry-positive cells were transplanted into unilaterally 6-hydroxy-dopamine lesioned rats (an experimental model of Parkinson's disease). Our analysis showed that hMSCs can be efficiently transduced with the lentiviral vector, retaining their biological features even in the long term. Intrastriatally transplanted mCherry-positive hMSCs can be detected ex vivo by a sensitive cooled CCD camera, both in the whole brain and in serial slices, and relatively quantified. Our protocol was found to be a reliable means of studying the viability of implanted hMSCs. mCherry labelling appears to be readily applicable in the post-transplantation tracking of stem cells and could favour the rapid development of new therapeutic targets for clinical treatments.

  11. Ex vivo multiscale quantitation of skin biomechanics in wild-type and genetically-modified mice using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Lynch, Barbara; Bonod-Bidaud, Christelle; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Dokládal, Petr; Allain, Jean-Marc; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Ruggiero, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Soft connective tissues such as skin, tendon or cornea are made of about 90% of extracellular matrix proteins, fibrillar collagens being the major components. Decreased or aberrant collagen synthesis generally results in defective tissue mechanical properties as the classic form of Elhers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS). This connective tissue disorder is caused by mutations in collagen V genes and is mainly characterized by skin hyperextensibility. To investigate the relationship between the microstructure of normal and diseased skins and their macroscopic mechanical properties, we imaged and quantified the microstructure of dermis of ex vivo murine skin biopsies during uniaxial mechanical assay using multiphoton microscopy. We used two genetically-modified mouse lines for collagen V: a mouse model for cEDS harboring a Col5a2 deletion (a.k.a. pN allele) and the transgenic K14-COL5A1 mice which overexpress the human COL5A1 gene in skin. We showed that in normal skin, the collagen fibers continuously align with stretch, generating the observed increase in mechanical stress. Moreover, dermis from both transgenic lines exhibited altered collagen reorganization upon traction, which could be linked to microstructural modifications. These findings show that our multiscale approach provides new crucial information on the biomechanics of dermis that can be extended to all collagen-rich soft tissues.

  12. Ex vivo Time Evolution of Thrombus Growth through Optical and Electrical Impedance data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affanni, A.; Specogna, R.; Trevisan, F.

    2013-09-01

    We designed a novel sensor specifically aimed at ex vivo measurements of white thrombus volume growth; a white thrombus is induced within an artificial micro-channel where hemostasis takes place starting from whole blood under flow conditions. The advantage of the proposed methodology is to identify the time evolution of the thrombus volume by means of an original data fusion methodology based on 2D optical and electrical impedance data simultaneously processed. On the contrary, the present state of the art optical imaging methodologies allow the thrombus volume estimation only at the end of the hemostatic process.

  13. An ex vivo approach to botanical-drug interactions: A proof of concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinwen; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Munoz, Juliana; Gurley, Bill J.; Markowitz, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Botanical medicines are frequently used in combination with therapeutic drugs, imposing a risk for harmful botanical-drug interactions (BDIs). Among the existing BDI evaluation methods, clinical studies are the most desirable, but due to their expense and protracted time-line for completion, conventional in vitro methodologies remain the most frequently used BDI assessment tools. However, many predictions generated from in vitro studies are inconsistent with clinical findings. Accordingly, the present study aimed to develop a novel ex vivo approach for BDI assessment and expand the safety evaluation methodoloy in applied ethnopharmacological research. Materials and Methods This approach differs from conventional in vitro methods in that rather than botanical extracts or individual phytochemicals being prepared in artificial buffers, human plasma/serum collected from a limited number of subjects administered botanical supplements was utilized to assess BDIs. To validate the methodology, human plasma/serum samples collected from healthy subjects administered either milk thistle or goldenseal extracts were utilized in incubation studies to determine their potential inhibitory effects on CYP2C9 and CYP3A4/5, respectively. Silybin A and B, two principal milk thistle phytochemicals, and hydrastine and berberine, the purported active constituents in goldenseal, were evaluated in both phosphate buffer and human plasma based in vitro incubation systems. Results Ex vivo study results were consistent with formal clinical study findings for the effect of milk thistle on the disposition of tolbutamide, a CYP2C9 substrate, and for goldenseal’s influence on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a widely accepted CYP3A4/5 substrate. Compared to conventional in vitro BDI methodologies of assessment, the introduction of human plasma into the in vitro study model changed the observed inhibitory effect of silybinA, silybin B and hydrastine and berberine

  14. Rapid multiplexed molecular phenotyping of ex vivo and in vivo tissues with targeted SERS NPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Khan, Altaz; Som, Madhura; Leigh, Steven Y.; Wang, Danni; Chen, Ye; McVeigh, Patrick; Wilson, Brian C.; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing a miniature fiber-optic spectral-detection device and topical-staining protocol to rapidly detect multiplexed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles (NPs) targeted to cell-surface biomarkers in fresh tissues. Ex vivo and in vivo experiments were performed to optimize our strategy for the rapid detection of multiple cell-surface biomarkers following a brief (5 min) topical application of SERS NPs on tissues. The simultaneous detection and ratiometric quantification of targeted and nontargeted NPs allows for an unambiguous assessment of molecular expression that is insensitive to nonspecific variations in NP concentrations, potentially enabling point-of-care surgical guidance or early disease detection.

  15. Ex vivo culture of human fetal gonads: manipulation of meiosis signalling by retinoic acid treatment disrupts testis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, A; Nielsen, J E; Perlman, S; Lundvall, L; Mitchell, R T; Juul, A; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2015-10-01

    What are the effects of experimentally manipulating meiosis signalling by addition of retinoic acid (RA) in cultured human fetal gonads? RA-treatment accelerated meiotic entry in cultured fetal ovary samples, while addition of RA resulted in a dysgenetic gonadal phenotype in fetal testis cultures. One of the first manifestations of sex differentiation is the initiation of meiosis in fetal ovaries. In contrast, meiotic entry is actively prevented in the fetal testis at this developmental time-point. It has previously been shown that RA-treatment mediates initiation of meiosis in human fetal ovary ex vivo. This was a controlled ex vivo study of human fetal gonads treated with RA in 'hanging-drop' tissue cultures. The applied experimental set-up preserves germ cell-somatic niche interactions and the investigated outcomes included tissue integrity and morphology, cell proliferation and survival and the expression of markers of meiosis and sex differentiation. Tissue from 24 first trimester human fetuses was included in this study, all from elective terminations at gestational week (GW) 7-12. Gonads were cultured for 2 weeks with and without addition of 1 µM RA. Samples were subsequently formalin-fixed and investigated by immunohistochemistry and cell counting. Proteins investigated and quantified included; octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), transcription factor AP-2 gamma (AP2γ) (embryonic germ cell markers), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9), anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) (immature Sertoli cell markers), COUP transcription factor 2 (COUP-TFII) (marker of interstitial cells), forkhead box L2 (FOXL2) (granulosa cell marker), H2A histone family, member X (γH2AX) (meiosis marker), doublesex and mab-3 related transcription factor 1 (DMRT1) (meiosis regulator), cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), cleaved Caspase 3 (apoptosis markers) and Ki-67 antigen (Ki-67) (proliferation marker). Also, proliferation was determined using a 5'-bromo-2

  16. Optical properties of normal and thermally coagulated chicken liver tissue measured ex-vivo with diffuse reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez-Ullah; Atif, M.; Firdous, S.; Mehmood, M. S.; Hamza, M. Y.; Imran, M.; Hussain, G.; Ikram, M.

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the optical properties of normal and thermally coagulated chicken liver at 720, 740, 770, 810, 825 and 840 nm wavelengths of laser irradiation. So, we were able to evaluate these optical properties (absorption and scattering coefficients) with ex-vivo study using Kubelka Munk Model (KMM) from the radial dependence of the diffuse reflectance with femtosecond pulsed laser in near IR region. These coefficients were significantly increased with coagulation. The penetration depths of the diffused light have been reported to a maximum value of 8.12 ± 0.36 mm in normal liver and 2.49 ± 0.17 mm in coagulated liver at 840 nm showing increasing behavior towards IR region. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to check the theoretical validation of measured optical properties of the tissue that showed a good match with our experimental results. We believe that these differences in optical properties will be helpful for the understanding arid optimal use of laser applications in medicine and differential diagnosis of tissues by using different optical methods. Especially for the investigation of biological tissue for photodynamic therapy (PDT), the knowledge of the specific optical properties and their thermo-induced changes is important.

  17. Ex-vivo evaluation of an early caries detector based on integrated OCT and polarized Raman spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamouche, Guy; Padioleau, Christian; Hewko, Mark; Smith, Michael S. D.; Schattka, Bernie J.; Fulton, Crystal; Gauthier, Bruno; Beauchesne, André; Ko, Alex C.; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Sowa, Michael G.

    2017-02-01

    Early detection of incipient caries would allow dentists to provide more effective measures to delay or to reverse caries' progression at earlier stage. Such earlier intervention could lead to improved oral health for the patients and reduced burden to the health system. Previously, we have demonstrated that the combination of morphological and biochemical information furnished by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS), respectively, provided a unique tool for dental caries management. In this study we will report the first pre-clinical caries detection system that includes a hand-held probe with a size slightly larger than a tooth brush. This probe presents a novel platform combining both OCT and PRS optics in a very tight space ideal for clinical practice. OCT cross-sectional images of near-surface enamel morphology are obtained with miniaturized MEMS scanning device and are processed in real-time to identify culprit regions. These regions are sequentially analyzed with polarized Raman spectroscopy for further confirmation. PRS is performed using 830nm laser line and four detection channels in order to obtain polarized Raman spectroscopic data, i.e. depolarization ratio of the hydroxyapatite Raman band at 960 cm-1. A detailed description of this hand-held caries detector and ex-vivo/in-vivo test results will be presented.

  18. Use of Ex Vivo Normothermic Perfusion for Quality Assessment of Discarded Human Donor Pancreases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, A D; Hamed, M O; Mallon, D H; Brais, R J; Gribble, F M; Scott, M A; Howat, W J; Bradley, J A; Bolton, E M; Pettigrew, G J; Hosgood, S A; Nicholson, M L; Saeb-Parsy, K

    2015-09-01

    A significant number of pancreases procured for transplantation are deemed unsuitable due to concerns about graft quality and the associated risk of complications. However, this decision is subjective and some declined grafts may be suitable for transplantation. Ex vivo normothermic perfusion (EVNP) prior to transplantation may allow a more objective assessment of graft quality and reduce discard rates. We report ex vivo normothermic perfusion of human pancreases procured but declined for transplantation, with ABO-compatible warm oxygenated packed red blood cells for 1-2 h. Five declined human pancreases were assessed using this technique after a median cold ischemia time of 13 h 19 min. One pancreas, with cold ischemia over 30 h, did not appear viable and was excluded. In the remaining pancreases, blood flow and pH were maintained throughout perfusion. Insulin secretion was observed in all four pancreases, but was lowest in an older donation after cardiac death pancreas. Amylase levels were highest in a gland with significant fat infiltration. This is the first study to assess the perfusion, injury, as measured by amylase, and exocrine function of human pancreases using EVNP and demonstrates the feasibility of the approach, although further refinements are required.

  19. Ex vivo complement protein adsorption on positively and negatively charged cellulose dialyser membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiout, A; Matata, B M; Vienken, J; Courtney, J M

    1997-05-01

    An ex vivo test system was used to measure complement protein C3 and factor B adsorption onto small dialyser modules made from regenerated and modified cellulosic hollow fibre membranes in which positive diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or negative carboxymethyl (CM) groups were introduced into the cellulose matrix. The extracorporeal system, which included test-dialysers and the dialysis environment, allowed the use of labelled proteins without contaminating the blood donors which were connected in an open-loop fashion to the extracorporeal test system. The modules were removed at selected time points from the extracorporeal system for radioactivity counting. The results were used to evaluate the mechanisms involved in complement reactions to foreign surfaces. The system therefore allowed the analysis of complement protein adsorption occurring in the dialyser modules and its relationship to the complement generation rate in the extracorporeal system to be evaluated. It was possible to demonstrate that significant complement C3 and factor B adsorption occurred in the test modules made of cellulosic membranes. Complement adsorption as a function of the pH and the release reaction of the adsorbed C3 and factor B after membrane blood perfusion were therefore found to be variable according to the cellulosic membrane type and the presence of positive or negative charged groups within the cellulose matrix. The data obtained from the ex vivo model therefore provided additional evidence on the discussion of the mechanisms involved in the increased complement activation by regenerated cellulose and in its attenuation by DEAE- or CM-modified cellulose.

  20. Ex vivo evaluation of a microneedle array device for transdermal application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermun, Sunaina; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; van Vuuren, Sandy; Luttge, Regina; Pillay, Viness

    2015-12-30

    A new approach of transdermal drug delivery is the use of microneedles. This promising technique offers the potential to be broadly used for drug administration as it enables the dramatic increase in permeation of medicaments across the stratum corneum. The potential of microneedles has evolved to spawn a plethora of potential transdermal applications. In order to advance the microneedle capabilities and possibly revolutionize advanced drug delivery, this study introduces a novel transdermal electro-modulated hydrogel-microneedle array (EMH-MNA) device composed of a nano-porous, embeddable ceramic microneedle array as well as an optimized EMH for the electro-responsive delivery of indomethacin through the skin. The ex vivo permeation as well as drug release experiments were performed on porcine skin tissue to ascertain the electro-responsive capabilities of the device. In addition, the microbial permeation ability of the microneedles across the viable epidermis in both microneedle-punctured skin as well as hypodermic needle-punctured skin was determined. Ex vivo evaluation of the EMH-MNA device across porcine skin demonstrated that without electro-stimulation, significantly less drug release was obtained (±0.4540mg) as compared to electro-stimulation (±2.93mg).

  1. In vitro and ex vivo microbial leakage assessment in endodontics: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savadkouhi, Sohrab Tour; Bakhtiar, Hengameh; Ardestani, Safoura Emami

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a literature review of published in-vitro and ex-vivo studies, which evaluated microbial leakage in endodontics in the past 10 years. A comprehensive electronic literature search was carried out in PubMed database for English articles published from 2005 to 2016 using the keywords “endodontics,” “in vitro,” “ex vivo,” “microbial leakage,” “microbial penetration,” “saliva,” “Enterococcus faecalis,” “E. faecalis,” “endodontic sealers,” “temporary filling material,” “apical plug,” “mineral trioxide aggregate,” and “MTA.” The keywords were combined using Boolean operators AND/OR. Based on our search strategy, 33 relevant articles were included in the study. There are three main methods for assessment of bacterial microleakage, namely, (A) the dual-chamber leakage model, (B) detection of bacteria using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and (C) polymerase chain reaction. All bacterial leakage models have some limitations and may yield different results compared to other microleakage evaluation techniques (i.e., dye penetration, fluid filtration, or electrochemical tests). The results of SEM correlated with those of microbial leakage test in most studies. Microbial leakage test using saliva better simulates the clinical setting for assessment of the leakage of single or mixed bacterial species. PMID:28032041

  2. Ex Vivo Maintenance of Primary Human Multiple Myeloma Cells through the Optimization of the Osteoblastic Niche.

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    Wenting Zhang

    Full Text Available We previously reported a new approach for culturing difficult-to-preserve primary patient-derived multiple myeloma cells (MMC using an osteoblast (OSB-derived 3D tissue scaffold constructed in a perfused microfluidic environment and a culture medium supplemented with patient plasma. In the current study, we used this biomimetic model to show, for the first time, that the long-term survival of OSB is the most critical factor in maintaining the ex vivo viability and proliferative capacity of MMC. We found that the adhesion and retention of MMC to the tissue scaffold was meditated by osteoblastic N-cadherin, as one of potential mechanisms that regulate MMC-OSB interactions. However, in the presence of MMC and patient plasma, the viability and osteogenic activity of OSB became gradually compromised, and consequently MMC could not remain viable over 3 weeks. We demonstrated that the long-term survival of both OSB and MMC could be enhanced by: (1 optimizing perfusion flow rate and patient-derived plasma composition in the culture medium and (2 replenishing OSB during culture as a practical means of prolonging MMC's viability beyond several weeks. These findings were obtained using a high-throughput well plate-based perfusion device from the perspective of optimizing the ex vivo preservation of patient-derived MM biospecimens for downstream use in biological studies and chemosensitivity analyses.

  3. Ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus macaque regulatory T cells are resistant to alemtuzumab-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dons, E M; Raimondi, G; Zhang, H; Zahorchak, A F; Bhama, J K; Lu, L; Ezzelarab, M; Ijzermans, J N M; Cooper, D K C; Thomson, A W

    2013-08-01

    Alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (Ab) directed against CD52 that depletes lymphocytes and other leukocytes, mainly by complement-dependent mechanisms. We investigated the influence of alemtuzumab (i) on ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus monkey regulatory T cells (Treg) generated for prospective use in adoptive cell therapy and (ii) on naturally occurring Treg following alemtuzumab infusion. Treg were isolated from PBMC and lymph nodes and expanded for two rounds. CD52 expression, binding of alemtuzumab and both complement-mediated killing and Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) were compared between freshly isolated and expanded Treg and effector T cells. Monkeys undergoing allogeneic heart transplantation given alemtuzumab were monitored for Treg and serum alemtuzumab activity. Ex vivo-expanded Treg showed progressive downregulation of CD52 expression, absence of alemtuzumab binding, minimal change in complement inhibitory protein (CD46) expression and no complement-dependent killing or ADCC. Infusion of alemtuzumab caused potent depletion of all lymphocytes, but a transient increase in the incidence of circulating Treg. After infusion of alemtuzumab, monkey serum killed fresh PBMC, but not expanded Treg. Thus, expanded cynomolgus monkey Treg are resistant to alemtuzumab-mediated, complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, our data suggest that these expanded monkey Treg can be infused into graft recipients given alemtuzumab without risk of complement-mediated killing.

  4. Clinical study of ex vivo photoacoustic imaging in endoscopic mucosal resection tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Liang; Streutker, Catherine J.; Marcon, Norman; Cirocco, Maria; Lakovlev, Vladimir V.; DaCosta, Ralph; Foster, F. S.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate endoscopic detection and dysplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) remains a major unmet clinical need. Current diagnosis use multiple biopsies under endoscopic image guidance, where up to 99% of the tissue remains unsampled, leading to significant risk of missing dysplasia. We conducted an ex vivo clinical trial using photoacoustic imaging (PAI) in patients undergoing endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) with known high-grade dysplasia for the purpose of characterizing the esophageal microvascular pattern, with the long-term goal of performing in vivo endoscopic PAI for dysplasia detection and therapeutic guidance. EMR tissues were mounted immediately on an agar layer and covered with ultrasound gel. Digital photography guided the placement of the PAI transducer (40 MHz center frequency). The luminal side of the specimen was scanned over a field of view of 14 mm (width) by 15 mm (depth) at 680, 750, 824, 850 and 970 nm. Acoustic images were simultaneously acquired. Tissues were then sliced and fixed in formalin for histopathology with H and E staining. Analysis consisted of co-registration and correlation between the intrinsic PAI features and the histological images. The initial PAI + ultrasound images from 8 BE patients have demonstrated the technical feasibility of this approach and point to the potential of PAI to reveal the microvascular pattern within EMR specimens. There are several technical factors to be considered in rigorous interpretation of the PAI characteristics, including the loss of blood from the ex vivo specimens and the limited depth penetration of the photoacoustic signal.

  5. White blood cell-based detection of asymptomatic scrapie infection by ex vivo assays.

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    Sophie Halliez

    Full Text Available Prion transmission can occur by blood transfusion in human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in experimental animal models, including sheep. Screening of blood and its derivatives for the presence of prions became therefore a major public health issue. As infectious titer in blood is reportedly low, highly sensitive and robust methods are required to detect prions in blood and blood derived products. The objectives of this study were to compare different methods--in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays--to detect prion infectivity in cells prepared from blood samples obtained from scrapie infected sheep at different time points of the disease. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA and bioassays in transgenic mice expressing the ovine prion protein were the most efficient methods to identify infected animals at any time of the disease (asymptomatic to terminally-ill stages. However scrapie cell and cerebellar organotypic slice culture assays designed to replicate ovine prions in culture also allowed detection of prion infectivity in blood cells from asymptomatic sheep. These findings confirm that white blood cells are appropriate targets for preclinical detection and introduce ex vivo tools to detect blood infectivity during the asymptomatic stage of the disease.

  6. In vitro and ex vivo effect of hyaluronic acid on erythrocyte flow properties

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    Palatnik S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyaluronic acid (HA is present in many tissues; its presence in serum may be related to certain inflammatory conditions, tissue damage, sepsis, liver malfunction and some malignancies. In the present work, our goal was to investigate the significance of hyaluronic acid effect on erythrocyte flow properties. Therefore we performed in vitro experiments incubating red blood cells (RBCs with several HA concentrations. Afterwards, in order to corroborate the pathophysiological significance of the results obtained, we replicated the in vitro experiment with ex vivo RBCs from diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, a serum HA-increasing pathology. Methods Erythrocyte deformability (by filtration through nucleopore membranes and erythrocyte aggregability (EA were tested on blood from healthy donors additioned with purified HA. EA was measured by transmitted light and analyzed with a mathematical model yielding two parameters, the aggregation rate and the size of the aggregates. Conformational changes of cytoskeleton proteins were estimated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR. Results In vitro, erythrocytes treated with HA showed increased rigidity index (RI and reduced aggregability, situation strongly related to the rigidization of the membrane cytoskeleton triggered by HA, as shown by EPR results. Also, a significant correlation (r: 0.77, p Conclusions Our results lead us to postulate the hypothesis that HA interacts with the erythrocyte surface leading to modifications in erythrocyte rheological and flow properties, both ex vivo and in vitro.

  7. An ex vivo porcine nasal mucosa explants model to study MRSA colonization.

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    Pawel Tulinski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the upper respiratory tract and skin surfaces in mammals. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. However, the mechanism of successful pig colonization by MRSA ST398 is poorly understood. To study MRSA colonization in pigs, an ex vivo model consisting of porcine nasal mucosa explants cultured at an air-liquid interface was evaluated. In cultured mucosa explants from the surfaces of the ventral turbinates and septum of the pig nose no changes in cell morphology and viability were observed up to 72 h. MRSA colonization on the explants was evaluated followed for three MRSA ST398 isolates for 180 minutes. The explants were incubated with 3×10(8 CFU/ml in PBS for 2 h to allow bacteria to adhere to the explants surface. Next the explants were washed and in the first 30 minutes post adhering time, a decline in the number of CFU was observed for all MRSA. Subsequently, the isolates showed either: bacterial growth, no growth, or a further reduction in bacterial numbers. The MRSA were either localized as clusters between the cilia or as single bacteria on the cilia surface. No morphological changes in the epithelium layer were observed during the incubation with MRSA. We conclude that porcine nasal mucosa explants are a valuable ex vivo model to unravel the interaction of MRSA with nasal tissue.

  8. Ex vivo expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients for adoptive immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia He; Xiao-Feng Tang; Qiu-Yan Chen; Hai-Qiang Mai; Zhou-Feng Huang; Jiang Li; Yi-Xin Zeng

    2012-01-01

    Establishing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytolytic T lymphocytes (EBV-CTLs) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) for adoptive immunotherapy has been reported in EBV-associated malignancies including Hodgkin's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).In the current study,we performed ex vivo expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) obtained from NPC biopsy specimens with a rapid expansion protocol using anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (OKT3),recombinanthuman interleukin (IL)-2,and irradiated PBMCs from healthy donors to initiate the growth of TILs.Young TIL cultures comprised of more than 90% of CD3+ T cells,a variable percentage of CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells,and less than 10% of CD3-CD16+ natural killer cells,a similar phenotype of EBV-CTL cultures from PBMCs.Interestingly,TIL cultures secreted high levels of the Th1 cytokines,interferon gamma (IFNγ) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α),and low levels of the Th2 cytokines,IL-4 and IL10.Moreover,young TILs could recognize autologous EBV-transformed B lymphoblast cell lines,but not autologous EBV-negative blast cells or allogeneic EBV-negative tumor cells.Taken together,these data suggest that ex vivo expansion of TILs from NPC biopsy tissue is an appealing alternative method to establish T cell-based immunotherapy for NPC.

  9. Assessment of thermal coagulation in ex-vivo tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Matthew; Weersink, Robert A.; Whelan, William M.

    2010-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the effects of heating on specific molecular bonds present in albumen-based coagulation phantoms and ex-vivo tissues. Thermal coagulation is induced by submerging albumen-based phantoms in a 75°C water bath to achieve target temperatures of 45, 55, 65, and 75°C. Laser photocoagulation is performed on ex-vivo bovine muscle samples, yielding induced temperatures between 46 and 90°C, as reported by implanted microthermocouples. All phantoms and tissue samples are cooled to room temperature, and Raman spectra are acquired at the microthermocouple locations. Shifts in major Raman bands are observed with laser heating in bovine muscle, specifically from the amide-1 α-helix group (~1655 cm-1), the CH2/CH3 group (~1446 cm-1), the Cα-H stretch group (~1312 cm-1), and the CN stretch group (~1121cm-1). Raman bands at 1334 cm-1 (tryptophan), 1317 cm-1 [ν(Cα-H)], and 1655 cm-1 (amide-1 α-helix) also show a decrease in intensity following heating. The results suggest that Raman band locations and relative intensities are affected by thermal denaturation of proteins, and hence, may be a useful tool for monitoring the onset and progression of coagulation during thermal therapies.

  10. A novel ovine ex vivo arteriovenous shunt model to test vascular implantability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haofan; Schlaich, Evan M; Row, Sindhu; Andreadis, Stelios T; Swartz, Daniel D

    2012-01-01

    The major objective of successful development of tissue-engineered vascular grafts is long-term in vivo patency. Optimization of matrix, cell source, surface modifications, and physical preconditioning are all elements of attaining a compatible, durable, and functional vascular construct. In vitro model systems are inadequate to test elements of thrombogenicity and vascular dynamic functional properties while in vivo implantation is complicated, labor-intensive, and cost-ineffective. We proposed an ex vivo ovine arteriovenous shunt model in which we can test the patency and physical properties of vascular grafts under physiologic conditions. The pressure, flow rate, and vascular diameter were monitored in real-time in order to evaluate the pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, and dynamic elastic modulus, all indicators of graft stiffness. Carotid arteries, jugular veins, and small intestinal submucosa-based grafts were tested. SIS grafts demonstrated physical properties between those of carotid arteries and jugular veins. Anticoagulation properties of grafts were assessed via scanning electron microscopy imaging, en face immunostaining, and histology. Luminal seeding with endothelial cells greatly decreased the attachment of thrombotic components. This model is also suture free, allowing for multiple samples to be stably processed within one animal. This tunable (pressure, flow, shear) ex vivo shunt model can be used to optimize the implantability and long-term patency of tissue-engineered vascular constructs. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Ex Vivo Produced Oral Mucosa Equivalent by Using the Direct Explant Cell Culture Technique

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    Kamile Öztürk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation of ex vivo produced oral mucosal equivalents using keratinocytes cultured by direct explant technique.Material and Methods: Oral mucosa tissue samples were obtained from the keratinized gingival tissues of 14 healthy human subjects. Human oral mucosa keratinocytes from an oral mucosa biopsy specimen were dissociated by the explant technique. Once a sufficient population of keratinocytes was reached, they were seeded onto the type IV collagen coated “AlloDerm” and taken for histological and immunohistochemical examinations at 11 days postseeding of the keratinocytes on the cadaveric human dermal matrix.Results: Histopathologically and immunohistochemically, 12 out of 14 successful ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalents (EVPOME that consisted of a stratified epidermis on a dermal matrix have been developed with keratinocytes cultured by the explant technique.Conclusion: The technical handling involved in the direct explant method at the beginning of the process has fewer steps than the enzymatic method and use of the direct explant technique protocol for culturing of human oral mucosa keratinocyte may be more adequate for EVPOME production.

  12. An Ex Vivo Platform for the Prediction of Clinical Response in Multiple Myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ariosto; Silva, Maria C; Sudalagunta, Praneeth; Distler, Allison; Jacobson, Timothy; Collins, Aunshka; Nguyen, Tuan; Song, Jinming; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, Lu; Cubitt, Christopher; Baz, Rachid; Perez, Lia; Rebatchouk, Dmitri; Dalton, William; Greene, James; Gatenby, Robert; Gillies, Robert; Sontag, Eduardo; Meads, Mark B; Shain, Kenneth H

    2017-06-15

    Multiple myeloma remains treatable but incurable. Despite a growing armamentarium of effective agents, choice of therapy, especially in relapse, still relies almost exclusively on clinical acumen. We have developed a system, Ex vivo Mathematical Myeloma Advisor (EMMA), consisting of patient-specific mathematical models parameterized by an ex vivo assay that reverse engineers the intensity and heterogeneity of chemosensitivity of primary cells from multiple myeloma patients, allowing us to predict clinical response to up to 31 drugs within 5 days after bone marrow biopsy. From a cohort of 52 multiple myeloma patients, EMMA correctly classified 96% as responders/nonresponders and correctly classified 79% according to International Myeloma Working Group stratification of level of response. We also observed a significant correlation between predicted and actual tumor burden measurements (Pearson r = 0.5658, P multiple myeloma patient samples, yielded consistent results with recent phase I/II trials, suggesting that EMMA is a feasible platform for estimating clinical efficacy of drugs and inclusion criteria screening. This unique platform, specifically designed to predict therapeutic response in multiple myeloma patients within a clinically actionable time frame, has shown high predictive accuracy in patients treated with combinations of different classes of drugs. The accuracy, reproducibility, short turnaround time, and high-throughput potential of this platform demonstrate EMMA's promise as a decision support system for therapeutic management of multiple myeloma. Cancer Res; 77(12); 3336-51. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Ex Vivo Expanded CD34-Positive Haematopoetic Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood

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    Heiner Falkenberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ex vivo expansion of haematopoetic cells by application of specific cytokines is one approach to overcome boundaries in cord blood transplantation due to limited numbers of haematopoetic stem cells. While many protocols describe an effective increase of total cell numbers and the amount of CD34-positive cells, it still remains unclear if and how the procedure actually affects the cells’ properties. In the presented publications, CD34-positive cells were isolated from cord blood and expanded for up to 7 days in media supplemented with stem cell factor (SCF, thrombopoietin (THPO, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FLT3lg. At days 3 and 7, expanded cells were harvested and analyzed by flow cytometry and quantitative proteomics. 2970 proteins were identified, whereof proteomic analysis showed 440 proteins significantly changed in abundance during ex vivo expansion. Despite the fact that haematopoetic cells still expressed CD34 on the surface after 3 days, major changes in regard to the protein profile were observed, while further expansion showed less effect on the proteome level. Enrichment analysis of biological processes clearly showed a proteomic change toward a protein biosynthesis phenotype already within the first three days of expression.

  14. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  15. Ex-Vivo percutaneous absorption of enrofloxacin: Comparison of LMOG organogel vs. pentravan cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilov, Plamen; Tran, Van Hung; Ducrotté-Tassel, Alban; Salvi, Jean-Paul; Perrot, Sébastien; Haftek, Marek; Boulieu, Roselyne; Pirot, Fabrice

    2016-02-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the percutaneous absorption of enrofloxacin from two base formulations, Pentravan cream and LMOG organogel. Ex-vivo experiments were carried out on pig ear skin. The percutaneous permeation through pig skin of two formulations containing 5 wt% of enrofloxacin was measured and compared using Franz diffusion cells. At appropriate intervals up to 120 h, diffusion samples were taken and analyzed using HPLC assays. Permeation profiles were established and the parameters Tlag and flux values were calculated. In this ex-vivo study, the flux values were 0.35 μgcm(-2)h(-1) for Pentravan and 1.22 μgcm(-2)h(-1) for LMOG organogel, corresponding respectively to 7.9 % and 29.3 % of enrofloxacin absorbed after 120 h by these formulations. The lag time (T lag) of Pentravan and organogel were 6.32 and 0.015 h respectively. The absorption time to reach the antibiotic concentration of enrofloxacin (2 μgmL(-1)) in the receptor was 60 h with Pentravan and 30 h with the organogel, suggesting more effective treatment by the latter. Enrofloxacin contained in organogel could be absorbed through pig ear skin 3.7 times greater than that in Pentravan (commercial formulation). This study demonstrates the perspective of organogel formulations as potential drug delivery systems.

  16. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsang JJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jovian J Tsang,1,2 Harold L Atkins2,3 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Ottawa, 2Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 3Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation (HSCT to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT. Keywords: hematopoietic stem cells, oncolytic virus, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, stem cell graft purging, hematopoietic malignancy, graft vs host disease

  17. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Jovian J; Atkins, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT.

  18. Characterising the tumour morphological response to therapeutic intervention: an ex vivo model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Savage

    2013-01-01

    In cancer, morphological assessment of histological tissue samples is a fundamental part of both diagnosis and prognosis. Image analysis offers opportunities to support that assessment through quantitative metrics of morphology. Generally, morphometric analysis is carried out on two-dimensional tissue section data and so only represents a small fraction of any tumour. We present a novel application of three-dimensional (3D morphometrics for 3D imaging data obtained from tumours grown in a culture model. Minkowski functionals, a set of measures that characterise geometry and topology in n-dimensional space, are used to quantify tumour topology in the absence of and in response to therapeutic intervention. These measures are used to stratify the morphological response of tumours to therapeutic intervention. Breast tumours are characterised by estrogen receptor (ER status, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2 status and tumour grade. Previously, we have shown that ER status is associated with tumour volume in response to tamoxifen treatment ex vivo. Here, HER2 status is found to predict the changes in morphology other than volume as a result of tamoxifen treatment ex vivo. Finally, we show the extent to which Minkowski functionals might be used to predict tumour grade. Minkowski functionals are generalisable to any 3D data set, including in vivo and cellular systems. This quantitative topological analysis can provide a valuable link among biomarkers, drug intervention and tumour morphology that is complementary to existing, non-morphological measures of tumour response to intervention and could ultimately inform patient treatment.

  19. In vitro and ex vivo activity of Melaleuca alternifolia against protoscoleces of Echinococcus ortleppi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Danieli Urach; Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Weiblen, Carla; DE Avila Botton, Sônia; Funk, Nadine Lysyk; DE Bona DA Silva, Cristiane; Zanette, Régis Adriel; Schwanz, Thiago Guilherme; DE LA Rue, Mário Luiz

    2017-02-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease of difficult diagnosis and treatment. The use of protoscolicidal agents in procedures is of utmost importance for treatment success. This study was aimed at analysing the in vitro and ex vivo activity of Melaleuca alternifolia oil (tea tree oil - TTO), its nanoemulsion formulation (NE-TTO) and its major component (terpinen-4-ol) against Echinococcus ortleppi protoscoleces obtained from cattle. Concentrations of 2·5, 5 and 10 mg mL-1 of TTO, 10 mg mL-1 of NE-TTO and 1, 1·5 and 2 mg mL-1 of terpinen-4-ol were evaluated in vitro against protoscoleces at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min. TTO was also injected directly into hydatid cysts (ex vivo analysis, n = 20) and the viability of protoscoleces was evaluated at 5, 15 and 30 min. The results indicated protoscolicidal effect at all tested formulations and concentrations. Terpinen-4-ol (2 mg mL-1) activity was superior when compared with the highest concentration of TTO. NE-TTO reached a gradual protoscolicidal effect. TTO at 20 mg mL-1 showed 90% protoscolicidal action in hydatid cysts at 5 min. The results showed that TTO affects the viability of E. ortleppi protoscoleces, suggesting a new protoscolicidal option to the treatment of cystic equinococcosis.

  20. Linarin Inhibits the Acetylcholinesterase Activity In-vitro and Ex-vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xinchi; Wang, Xin; Liu, Youping; Di, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Linarin is a flavone glycoside in the plants Flos chrysanthemi indici, Buddleja officinalis, Cirsium setosum, Mentha arvensis and Buddleja davidii, and has been reported to possess analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this paper, linarin was investigated for its AChE inhibitory potential both in-vitro and ex-vivo. Ellman's colorimetric method was used for the determination of AChE inhibitory activity in mouse brain. In-vitro assays revealed that linarin inhibited AChE activity with an IC50 of 3.801 ± 1.149 μM. Ex-vivo study showed that the AChE activity was significantly reduced in both the cortex and hippocampus of mice treated intraperitoneally with various doses of linarin (35, 70 and 140 mg/Kg). The inhibition effects produced by high dose of linarin were the same as that obtained after huperzine A treatment (0.5 mg/Kg). Molecular docking study revealed that both 4'-methoxyl group and 7-O-sugar moiety of linarin played important roles in ligand-receptor binding and thus they are mainly responsible for AChE inhibitory activity. In view of its potent AChE inhibitory activity, linarin may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of some diseases associated with AChE, such as glaucoma, myasthenia gravis, gastric motility and Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Instrumented urethral catheter and its ex vivo validation in a sheep urethra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, Serdar

    2017-03-01

    This paper designs and fabricates an instrumented catheter for instantaneous measurement of distributed urethral pressure profiles. Since the catheter enables a new type of urological measurement, a process for accurate ex vivo validation of the catheter is developed. A flexible sensor strip is first fabricated with nine pressure sensors and integrated electronic pads for an associated sensor IC chip. The flexible sensor strip and associated IC chip are assembled on a 7 Fr Foley catheter. A sheep bladder and urethra are extracted and used in an ex vivo set up for verification of the developed instrumented catheter. The bladder-urethra are suspended in a test rig and pressure cuffs placed to apply known static and dynamic pressures around the urethra. A significant challenge in the performance of the sensor system is the presence of parasitics that introduce large bias and drift errors in the capacitive sensor signals. An algorithm based on use of reference parasitic transducers is used to compensate for the parasitics. Extensive experimental results verify that the developed compensation method works effectively. Results on pressure variation profiles circumferentially around the urethra and longitudinally along the urethra are presented. The developed instrumented catheter will be useful in improved urodynamics to more accurately diagnose the source of urinary incontinence in patients.

  2. A Predictive Model of Vertebral Trabecular Anisotropy From Ex Vivo Micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekadir, Karim; Hoogendoorn, Corné; Hazrati-Marangalou, Javad; Taylor, Zeike; Noble, Christopher; van Rietbergen, Bert; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2015-08-01

    Spine-related disorders are amongst the most frequently encountered problems in clinical medicine. For several applications such as 1) to improve the assessment of the strength of the spine, as well as 2) to optimize the personalization of spinal interventions, image-based biomechanical modeling of the vertebrae is expected to play an important predictive role. However, this requires the construction of computational models that are subject-specific and comprehensive. In particular, they need to incorporate information about the vertebral anisotropic micro-architecture, which plays a central role in the biomechanical function of the vertebrae. In practice, however, accurate personalization of the vertebral trabeculae has proven to be difficult as its imaging in vivo is currently infeasible. Consequently, this paper presents a statistical approach for accurate prediction of the vertebral fabric tensors based on a training sample of ex vivo micro-CT images. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first predictive model proposed and validated for vertebral datasets. The method combines features selection and partial least squares regression in order to derive optimal latent variables for the prediction of the fabric tensors based on the more easily extracted shape and density information. Detailed validation with 20 ex vivo T12 vertebrae demonstrates the accuracy and consistency of the approach for the personalization of trabecular anisotropy.

  3. Automated Segmentation of in Vivo and Ex Vivo Mouse Brain Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alize E.H. Scheenstra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data is required for many applications, such as the comparison of different structures or time points, and for annotation purposes. Currently, the gold standard for automated image segmentation is nonlinear atlas-based segmentation. However, these methods are either not sufficient or highly time consuming for mouse brains, owing to the low signal to noise ratio and low contrast between structures compared with other applications. We present a novel generic approach to reduce processing time for segmentation of various structures of mouse brains, in vivo and ex vivo. The segmentation consists of a rough affine registration to a template followed by a clustering approach to refine the rough segmentation near the edges. Compared with manual segmentations, the presented segmentation method has an average kappa index of 0.7 for 7 of 12 structures in in vivo MRI and 11 of 12 structures in ex vivo MRI. Furthermore, we found that these results were equal to the performance of a nonlinear segmentation method, but with the advantage of being 8 times faster. The presented automatic segmentation method is quick and intuitive and can be used for image registration, volume quantification of structures, and annotation.

  4. Survival of cord blood haematopoietic stem cells in a hyaluronan hydrogel for ex vivo biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Elise; Kassim, Yusra; Petit, Cyrille; Buquet, Catherine; Dulong, Virginie; Cerf, Didier Le; Buchonnet, Gérard; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) grow in a specified niche in close association with the microenvironment, the so-called 'haematopoietic niche'. Scaffolds have been introduced to overcome the liquid culture limitations, mimicking the presence of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study the hyaluronic acid scaffold, already developed in the laboratory, has been used for the first time to maintain long-term cultures of CD34⁺ haematopoietic cells obtained from human cord blood. One parameter investigated was the impact on ex vivo survival of CD34⁺ cord blood cells (CBCs) on the hyaluronic acid surface, immobilized with peptides containing the RGD motif. This peptide was conjugated by coating the hyaluronan hydrogel and cultured in serum-free liquid phase complemented with stem cell factor (SCF), a commonly indispensable cytokine for haematopoiesis. Our work demonstrated that these hyaluronan hydrogels were superior to traditional liquid cultures by maintaining and expanding the HPCs without the need for additional cytokines, and a colonization of 280-fold increment in the hydrogel compared with liquid culture after 28 days of ex vivo expansion. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. High efficiency ex vivo cloning of antigen-specific human effector T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Neller

    Full Text Available While cloned T cells are valuable tools for the exploration of immune responses against viruses and tumours, current cloning methods do not allow inferences to be made about the function and phenotype of a clone's in vivo precursor, nor can precise cloning efficiencies be calculated. Additionally, there is currently no general method for cloning antigen-specific effector T cells directly from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, without the need for prior expansion in vitro. Here we describe an efficient method for cloning effector T cells ex vivo. Functional T cells are detected using optimised interferon gamma capture following stimulation with viral or tumour cell-derived antigen. In combination with multiple phenotypic markers, single effector T cells are sorted using a flow cytometer directly into multi-well plates, and cloned using standard, non antigen-specific expansion methods. We provide examples of this novel technology to generate antigen-reactive clones from healthy donors using Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus as representative viral antigen sources, and from two melanoma patients using autologous melanoma cells. Cloning efficiency, clonality, and retention/loss of function are described. Ex vivo effector cell cloning provides a rapid and effective method of deriving antigen-specific T cells clones with traceable in vivo precursor function and phenotype.

  6. Optimization of an ex vivo wound healing model in the adult human skin: Functional evaluation using photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Garcia, Jenifer; Sebastian, Anil; Alonso-Rasgado, Teresa; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-09-01

    Limited utility of in vitro tests and animal models of human repair, create a demand for alternative models of cutaneous healing capable of functional testing. The adult human skin Wound Healing Organ Culture (WHOC) provides a useful model, to study repair and enable evaluation of therapies such as the photodynamic therapy (PDT). Thus, the aim here was to identify the optimal WHOC model and to evaluate the role of PDT in repair. Wound geometry, system of support, and growth media, cellular and matrix biomarkers were investigated in WHOC models. Subsequently, cellular activity, extracellular matrix remodeling, and oxidative stress plus gene and protein levels of makers of wound repair measured the effect of PDT on the optimized WHOC. WHOCs embedded in collagen and supplemented DMEM were better organized showing stratified epidermis and compact dermis with developing neo-epidermis. Post-PDT, the advancing reepithelialization tongue was 3.5 folds longer, and was highly proliferative with CK-14 plus p16 increased (p < 0.05) compared to controls. The neo-epidermis was fully differentiated forming neo-collagen. Proliferating nuclear antigen, p16, COLI, COLIII, MMP3, MMP19, and α-SMA were significantly more expressed (p < 0.05) in dermis surrounding the healing wound. In conclusion, an optimal model of WHOC treated with PDT shows increased reepithelialization and extracellular matrix reconstruction and remodeling, supporting evidence toward development of an optimal ex vivo wound healing model.

  7. The use of rats and mice as animal models in ex vivo bone growth and development studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, A. A.; Noordin, M. M.; Azmi, T. I.; Kaka, U.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo animal experimentation has been one of the cornerstones of biological and biomedical research, particularly in the field of clinical medicine and pharmaceuticals. The conventional in vivo model system is invariably associated with high production costs and strict ethical considerations. These limitations led to the evolution of an ex vivo model system which partially or completely surmounted some of the constraints faced in an in vivo model system. The ex vivo rodent bone culture system has been used to elucidate the understanding of skeletal physiology and pathophysiology for more than 90 years. This review attempts to provide a brief summary of the historical evolution of the rodent bone culture system with emphasis on the strengths and limitations of the model. It encompasses the frequency of use of rats and mice for ex vivo bone studies, nutritional requirements in ex vivo bone growth and emerging developments and technologies. This compilation of information could assist researchers in the field of regenerative medicine and bone tissue engineering towards a better understanding of skeletal growth and development for application in general clinical medicine. Cite this article: A. A. Abubakar, M. M. Noordin, T. I. Azmi, U. Kaka, M. Y. Loqman. The use of rats and mice as animal models in ex vivo bone growth and development studies. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:610–618. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.512.BJR-2016-0102.R2. PMID:27965220

  8. A Vivens Ex Vivo Study on the Synergistic Effect of Electrolysis and Freezing on the Cell Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugnani, Franco; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Marcuzzo, Thomas; Bottin, Cristina; Mikus, Paul; Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Rubinsky, Liel; Stehling, Michael K.; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Freezing—cryosurgery, and electrolysis—electrochemical therapy (EChT), are two important minimally invasive surgery tissue ablation technologies. Despite major advantages they also have some disadvantages. Cryosurgery cannot induce cell death at high subzero freezing temperatures and requires multiple freeze thaw cycles, while EChT requires high concentrations of electrolytic products—which makes it a lengthy procedure. Based on the observation that freezing increases the concentration of solutes (including products of electrolysis) in the frozen region and permeabilizes the cell membrane to these products, this study examines the hypothesis that there could be a synergistic effect between freezing and electrolysis in their use together for tissue ablation. Using an animal model we refer to as vivens ex vivo, which may be of value in reducing the use of animals for experiments, combined with a Hematoxylin stain of the nucleus, we show that there are clinically relevant protocols in which the cell nucleus appears intact when electrolysis and freezing are used separately but is affected by certain combinations of electrolysis and freezing. PMID:26695185

  9. A Vivens Ex Vivo Study on the Synergistic Effect of Electrolysis and Freezing on the Cell Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugnani, Franco; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Marcuzzo, Thomas; Bottin, Cristina; Mikus, Paul; Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Rubinsky, Liel; Stehling, Michael K; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Freezing-cryosurgery, and electrolysis-electrochemical therapy (EChT), are two important minimally invasive surgery tissue ablation technologies. Despite major advantages they also have some disadvantages. Cryosurgery cannot induce cell death at high subzero freezing temperatures and requires multiple freeze thaw cycles, while EChT requires high concentrations of electrolytic products-which makes it a lengthy procedure. Based on the observation that freezing increases the concentration of solutes (including products of electrolysis) in the frozen region and permeabilizes the cell membrane to these products, this study examines the hypothesis that there could be a synergistic effect between freezing and electrolysis in their use together for tissue ablation. Using an animal model we refer to as vivens ex vivo, which may be of value in reducing the use of animals for experiments, combined with a Hematoxylin stain of the nucleus, we show that there are clinically relevant protocols in which the cell nucleus appears intact when electrolysis and freezing are used separately but is affected by certain combinations of electrolysis and freezing.

  10. Protease-mediated release of chemotherapeutics from mesoporous silica nanoparticles to ex vivo human and mouse lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijt, Sabine H; Bölükbas, Deniz A; Argyo, Christian; Datz, Stefan; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie; Bein, Thomas; Meiners, Silke

    2015-03-24

    Nanoparticles allow for controlled and targeted drug delivery to diseased tissues and therefore bypass systemic side effects. Spatiotemporal control of drug release can be achieved by nanocarriers that respond to elevated levels of disease-specific enzymes. For example, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is overexpressed in tumors, is known to enhance the metastatic potency of malignant cells, and has been associated with poor prognosis of lung cancer. Here, we report the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) tightly capped by avidin molecules via MMP9 sequence-specific linkers to allow for site-selective drug delivery in high-expressing MMP9 tumor areas. We provide proof-of-concept evidence for successful MMP9-triggered drug release from MSNs in human tumor cells and in mouse and human lung tumors using the novel technology of ex vivo 3D lung tissue cultures. This technique allows for translational testing of drug delivery strategies in diseased mouse and human tissue. Using this method we show MMP9-mediated release of cisplatin, which induced apoptotic cell death only in lung tumor regions of Kras mutant mice, without causing toxicity in tumor-free areas or in healthy mice. The MMP9-responsive nanoparticles also allowed for effective combinatorial drug delivery of cisplatin and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which had a synergistic effect on the (therapeutic) efficiency. Importantly, we demonstrate the feasibility of MMP9-controlled drug release in human lung tumors.

  11. Electrochemical fecal pellet sensor for simultaneous real-time ex vivo detection of colonic serotonin signalling and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rachel; Fagan-Murphy, Aidan; MacEachern, Sarah J.; Covill, Derek; Patel, Bhavik Anil

    2016-03-01

    Various investigations have focused on understanding the relationship between mucosal serotonin (5-HT) and colonic motility, however contradictory studies have questioned the importance of this intestinal transmitter. Here we described the fabrication and use of a fecal pellet electrochemical sensor that can be used to simultaneously detect the release of luminal 5-HT and colonic motility. Fecal pellet sensor devices were fabricated using carbon nanotube composite electrodes that were housed in 3D printed components in order to generate a device that had shape and size that mimicked a natural fecal pellet. Devices were fabricated where varying regions of the pellet contained the electrode. Devices showed that they were stable and sensitive for ex vivo detection of 5-HT, and no differences in the fecal pellet velocity was observed when compared to natural fecal pellets. The onset of mucosal 5-HT was observed prior to the movement of the fecal pellet. The release of mucosal 5-HT occurred oral to the fecal pellet and was linked to the contraction of the bowel wall that drove pellet propulsion. Taken, together these findings provide new insights into the role of mucosal 5-HT and suggest that the transmitter acts as a key initiator of fecal pellet propulsion.

  12. Computer-aided diagnosis in phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography for quantitative characterization of ex vivo human patellar cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Glaser, Christian; Wismuller, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Visualization of ex vivo human patellar cartilage matrix through the phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has been previously demonstrated. Such studies revealed osteoarthritis-induced changes to chondrocyte organization in the radial zone. This study investigates the application of texture analysis to characterizing such chondrocyte patterns in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. Texture features derived from Minkowski functionals (MF) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These texture features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with the MF features perimeter (AUC: 0.94 ±0.08 ) and "Euler characteristic" (AUC: 0.94 ±0.07 ), and GLCM-derived feature "Correlation" (AUC: 0.93 ±0.07). These results suggest that such texture features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix, enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy.

  13. In Vivo/Ex Vivo MRI-Based 3D Non-Newtonian FSI Models for Human Atherosclerotic Plaques Compared with Fluid/Wall-Only Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Yuan, Chun; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K

    2007-01-01

    It has been recognized that fluid-structure interactions (FSI) play an important role in cardiovascular disease initiation and development. However, in vivo MRI multi-component FSI models for human carotid atherosclerotic plaques with bifurcation and quantitative comparisons of FSI models with fluid-only or structure-only models are currently lacking in the literature. A 3D non-Newtonian multi-component FSI model based on in vivo/ex vivo MRI images for human atherosclerotic plaques was introduced to investigate flow and plaque stress/strain behaviors which may be related to plaque progression and rupture. Both artery wall and plaque components were assumed to be hyperelastic, isotropic, incompressible and homogeneous. Blood flow was assumed to be laminar, non-Newtonian, viscous and incompressible. In vivo/ex vivo MRI images were acquired using histologically-validated multi-spectral MRI protocols. The 3D FSI models were solved and results were compared with those from a Newtonian FSI model and wall-only/fluid-only models. A 145% difference in maximum principal stresses (Stress-P(1)) between the FSI and wall-only models and 40% difference in flow maximum shear stress (MSS) between the FSI and fluid-only models were found at the throat of the plaque using a severe plaque sample (70% severity by diameter). Flow maximum shear stress (MSS) from the rigid wall model is much higher (20-40% in maximum MSS values, 100-150% in stagnation region) than those from FSI models.

  14. [Net power and energy of cooled antenna microwave ablation:ex vivo versus in vivo results in porcine liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Fan, Wei-jun; Zhang, Liang; Li, Xin; Zhang, Jian-lei

    2012-09-18

    To explore the net power and net energy of a cooled antenna radiator in ex vivo and in vivo porcine livers. All animal experiments complied with the guidelines of our animal use committee. Microwave ablation (MWA) was performed in ex vivo and in vivo porcine livers with a cooled-shaft antenna in different microwave ablation parameter groups (50, 80 and 110 W for 10 min). The energy losses from the microwave antenna or cables were calculated. And the net power, net energy and the relationship between net power and power readout were determined. When the power displayed by the machine indicated 50 W, 80 W and 110 W, the net power during MWA was 31.3 ± 0.6, 47.3 ± 0.8 and 62.1 ± 0.9 W ex vivo and 31.8 ± 0.8, 47.4 ± 0.3 and 61.7 ± 1.5 W in vivo. For the same power readout, the ex vivo or in vivo effective power was the same (P = 0.841, P = 0.133, P = 0.551). For both ex vivo and in vivo experiments, the ratio of microwave antenna energy loss to microwave antenna input energy was relatively constant (P = 0.613, 0.326). For the same treatment time and net power, the difference was significant between ex vivo and in vivo ablation volumes (P = 0.001, 0.006, 0.001). Using net power as a reference during MWA is more accurate compared to the traditional power readout. And net energy offers a more realistic reflection of MWA energy in tissues.

  15. Association of Parathyroid Gland Biopsy Excision Technique With Ex Vivo Radiation Counts During Radioguided Parathyroid Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Andrew M; Lawson, Bradley R; Franco, Aime T; Stack, Brendan C

    2017-06-01

    Parathyroid biopsy represents a means for normal and hyperfunctional glands to be distinguished intraoperatively. However, no data exist to guide surgeons regarding how much of a parathyroid gland must be biopsied to satisfy the 20% rule. To quantify the relative proportion of a hyperfunctional parathyroid gland that must be evaluated with the gamma probe to satisfy the 20% rule. A retrospective review of surgical data for 24 consecutive patients (16 women, 18 men; mean [SD] age, 66.6 [10] years; range, 51-83 years) who underwent surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism between May and October, 2015, in a tertieary academic medical center. Extirpated parathyroid glands were sectioned into parallel or pie-shaped biopsies and evaluated ex vivo with a gamma probe to determine what percentage of a hyperfunctional gland must be sampled to meet the Norman 20% rule. The hypothesis was formulated during data collection. In total, 253 ex vivo biopsy specimens were obtained from 33 surgically removed parathyroid glands. Parathyroid biopsies satisfied the 20% rule with an accuracy that depended on the relative proportion of the parent gland represented: half or more (96.6%; 95% CI, 91.7%-100.0%), a quarter to one-half (87.0%; 95% CI, 79.3%-94.7%), less than a quarter (63.6%; 95% CI, 54.5%-72.8%). When less than a quarter of the gland was removed, pie-shaped biopsies were more likely to satisfy the 20% rule compared with parallel biopsies of the same weight (78.4% vs 56.2%; absolute difference, 22.2%; 95% CI, 4.7%-39.7%). Unless half of a parathyroid gland is biopsied during radioguided parathyroidectomy, the 20% rule cannot reliably rule out the presence of a hyperfunctional parathyroid lesion. Pie-shaped biopsies originating from the center of the gland are associated with a lower rate of false-negative results compared with peripheral biopsies of similar size. Pie-shaped biopsies and biopsy of half or more of each nonexcised parathyroid gland for ex vivo counts may increase

  16. Effect of laser generated shockwaves 1 on ex-vivo pigskin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprasad, Vidyunmala; Navarro, Artemio; Patel, Shahzad; Patel, Vikash; Nowroozi, Bryan N; Taylor, Zach D; Yong, William; Gupta, Vijay; Grundfest, Warren S

    2014-10-01

    Persistent bacterial infection prolongs hospitalizations, leading to increased healthcare costs. Treatment of these infections costs several billion dollars annually. Biofilm production is one mechanism by which bacteria become resistant. With the help of biofilms, bacteria withstand the host immune response and are much less susceptible to antibiotics. Currently, there is interest in the use of laser-generated shockwaves (LGS) to delaminate biofilm from infected wound surfaces; however, the safety of such an approach has not yet been established. Of particular concern are the thermal and mechanical effects of the shockwave treatment on the epidermis and the underlying collagen structure of the dermis. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the effect of LGS on freshly harvested ex vivo porcine skin tissue samples. Tissue samples for investigation were harvested immediately post-mortem and treated with LGS within 30 minutes. Previous studies have shown that laser fluences between 100 and 500 mJ/pulse are capable of delaminating biofilms off a variety of surfaces, thus our preliminary investigation focused on this range of laser energy. For each sample, LGS were produced via laser irradiation of a thin layer (0.5 µm) of titanium sandwiched between a 50 and 100 µm thick layer of water glass and a 0.1 mm thick sheet of Mylar. The rapid thermal expansion of the irradiated titanium film generates a transient compressive wave that is coupled through a liquid layer to the surface of the ex vivo pigskin sample. Shocked samples were immediately fixed in formalin and prepared for histological analysis. A blinded pathologist evaluated and scored each section on the basis of its overall appearance (O) and presence of linear/slit-like spaces roughly parallel to the surface of the skin (S). The scores were given on a scale of 0-3. The present investigation revealed no visible difference between the tissue sections of the control sample and those that

  17. In vitro and ex vivo evaluations on transdermal delivery of the HIV inhibitor IQP-0410.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony S Ham

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the physicochemical and in vitro/ex vivo characteristics of the pyrmidinedione IQP-0410 formulated into transdermal films. IQP-0410 is a potent therapeutic anti-HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that would be subjected to extensive first pass metabolism, through conventional oral administration. Therefore, IQP-0410 was formulated into ethyl cellulose/HPMC-based transdermal films via solvent casting. In mano evaluations were performed to evaluate gross physical characteristics. In vitro release studies were performed in both Franz cells and USP-4 dissolution vessels. Ex vivo release and permeability assays were performed on human epidermal tissue models, and the permeated IQP-0410 was collected for in vitro HIV-1 efficacy assays in CEM-SS cells and PBMCs. Film formulation D3 resulted in pliable, strong transdermal films that were loaded with 2% (w/w IQP-0410. Composed of 60% (w/w ethyl cellulose and 20% (w/w HPMC, the films contained < 1.2% (w/w of water and were hygroscopic resulting in significant swelling under humid conditions. The water permeable nature of the film resulted in complete in vitro dissolution and drug release in 26 hours. When applied to ex vivo epidermal tissues, the films were non-toxic to the tissue and also were non-toxic to HIV target cells used in the in vitro efficacy assays. Over a 3 day application, the films delivered IQP-0410 through the skin tissue at a zero-order rate of 0.94 ± 0.06 µg/cm(2/hr with 134 ± 14.7 µM collected in the basal media. The delivered IQP-0410 resulted in in vitro EC50 values against HIV-1 of 2.56 ± 0.40 nM (CEM-SS and 0.58 ± 0.03 nM (PBMC. The film formulation demonstrated no significant deviation from target values when packaged in foil pouches under standard and accelerated environmental conditions. It was concluded that the transdermal film formulation was a potentially viable method of administering IQP-0410 that warrants

  18. A novel monoclonal antibody of human stem cell factor inhibits umbilical cord blood stem cell ex vivo expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell factor (SCF activates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC self-renewal and is being used to stimulate the ex vivo expansion of HSCs. The mechanism by which SCF supports expansion of HSCs remains poorly understood. In cord blood ex vivo expansion assays, a newly produced anti-SCF monoclonal antibody (clone 23C8 was found to significantly inhibit the expansion of CD34+ cells. This antibody appears to bind directly to a part of SCF that is critical for biological activity toward expansion of CD34+ cells, which is located in the first 104 amino acids from the NH2-terminus.

  19. In Vivo Consumption of Cranberry Exerts ex Vivo Antiadhesive Activity against FimH-Dominated Uropathogenic Escherichia coli: A Combined in Vivo, ex Vivo, and in Vitro Study of an Extract from Vaccinium macrocarpon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafsanjany, Nasli; Senker, Jandirk; Brandt, Simone; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-10-14

    For investigation of the molecular interaction of cranberry extract with adhesins of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), urine from four volunteers consuming standardized cranberry extract (proanthocyanidin content = 1.24%) was analyzed within ex vivo experiments, indicating time-dependent significant inhibition of 40-50% of bacterial adhesion of UPEC strain NU14 to human T24 bladder cells. Under in vitro conditions a dose-dependent increase in bacterial adhesion was observed with proanthocyanidin-enriched cranberry Vaccinium macrocarpon extract (proanthocyanidin content = 21%). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy proved that V.m. extract led to the formation of bacterial clusters on the outer plasma membrane of the host cells without subsequent internalization. This agglomerating activity was not observed when a PAC-depleted extract (V.m. extract(≠PAC)) was used, which showed significant inhibition of bacterial adhesion in cases where type 1 fimbriae dominated and mannose-sensitive UPEC strain NU14 was used. V.m. extract(≠PAC) had no inhibitory activity against P- and F1C-fimbriae dominated strain 2980. Quantitative gene expression analysis indicated that PAC-containing as well as PAC-depleted cranberry extracts increased the fimH expression in NU14 as part of a feedback mechanism after blocking FimH. For strain 2980 the PAC-containing extract led to up-regulation of P- and F1C-fimbriae, whereas the PAC-depleted extract had no influence on gene expression. V.m. and V.m. extract(≠PAC) did not influence biofilm and curli formation in UPEC strains NU14 and 2980. These data lead to the conclusion that also proanthocyanidin-free cranberry extracts exert antiadhesive activity by interaction with mannose-sensitive type 1 fimbriae of UPEC.

  20. First Danish experience with ex vivo lung perfusion of donor lungs before transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ian Sune Iversen; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Christian Holdfold;

    2014-01-01

    otherwise considered transplantable, but failed to meet the usual criteria due to possible contusions or because they were from donors with sepsis or unable to pass the oxygenation test. RESULTS: In the study period, seven of 33 Danish lung transplantations were made possible due to EVLP. One patient died......INTRODUCTION: The number of lung transplantations is limited by a general lack of donor organs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to optimise and evaluate marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. We describe our experiences with EVLP in Denmark during the first year after its...... introduction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted by prospective registration of donor offers and lung transplantations in Denmark from 1 May 2012 to 30 April 2013. Donor lungs without any contraindications were transplanted in the traditional manner. Taken for EVLP were donor lungs that were...

  1. Increasing time interval and decreasing allergen dose interval improves ex vivo desensitization of human blood basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting Christensen, Sara K; Krohn, Inge Kortekaas; Thuraiaiyah, Jani;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Desensitization is a method for inducing temporary tolerance to allergen. The mechanism underlying desensitization is yet to be established. METHODS: Basophil granulocytes in whole blood from grass pollen allergic subjects were desensitized ex vivo by sequential addition of increasing...... allergen concentrations. At each step basophil activation (CD193(+) CD63(+) ) was monitored with and without (background activation) allergen challenge at optimal concentration. The sequential desensitization protocol was compared to a single-dose desensitization protocols with threshold and subthreshold...... allergen concentrations. Incubation intervals and allergen concentrations were varied in order to optimise the protocol. RESULTS: Sequential desensitization effectively reduced basophil response. The single-dose subthreshold protocol and single-dose threshold protocols did not reduce basophil activation...

  2. Ex-vivo partial nephrectomy after living donor nephrectomy: Surgical technique for expanding kidney donor pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw A Nyame

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation has profound improvements in mortality, morbidity, and overall quality of life compared to renal replacement therapy. This report aims to illustrate the use of ex-vivo partial nephrectomy in a patient with a renal angiomyolipoma prior to living donor transplantation. The surgical outcomes of the donor nephrectomy and recipient transplantation are reported with 2 years of follow-up. Both the donor and recipient are healthy and without any significant comorbidities. In conclusion, urologic techniques such as partial nephrectomy can be used to expand the living donor pool in carefully selected and well informed transplant recipients. Our experience demonstrated a safe and positive outcome for both the recipient and donor, and is consistent with other reported outcomes in the literature.

  3. Ex Vivo Expansion or Manipulation of Stem Cells to Improve Outcome of Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Mitchell E

    2016-02-01

    The outcome of umbilical cord blood transplantation for adult patients with hematologic malignancies now rivals that of matched unrelated donor transplantation. However, delayed hematopoietic and immunologic recovery remains a source of significant morbidity and mortality. Multiple strategies are now being studied to overcome these limitations. One strategy involves ex vivo expansion of the umbilical cord blood unit prior to transplantation. A second strategy involves exposure of the umbilical cord blood graft to compounds aimed at improving homing and engraftment following transplantation. Such a strategy may also address the problem of slow hematopoietic recovery as well as the increased risk of graft failure. Many of these strategies are now being tested in late phase multi-center clinical trials. If proven cost-effective and efficacious, they may alter the landscape of donor options for allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  4. Ex vivo imaging of human thyroid pathology using integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. 34 thyroid gland specimens are imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology ranging from normal thyroid to benign disease/neoplasms (multinodular colloid goiter, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and follicular adenoma) and malignant thyroid tumors (papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma). Imaging is performed using an integrated OCT and OCM system, with sections. Characteristic features that suggest malignant lesions, such as complex papillary architecture, microfollicules, psammomatous calcifications, or replacement of normal follicular architecture with sheets/nests of tumor cells, can be identified from OCT and OCM images and are clearly differentiable from normal or benign thyroid tissues. With further development of needle-based imaging probes, OCT and OCM could be promising techniques to use for the screening of thyroid nodules and to improve the diagnostic specificity of fine needle aspiration evaluation.

  5. Fusing in vivo and ex vivo NMR sources of information for brain tumor classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitor-Sava, A. R.; Martinez-Bisbal, M. C.; Laudadio, T.; Piquer, J.; Celda, B.; Heerschap, A.; Sima, D. M.; Van Huffel, S.

    2011-11-01

    In this study we classify short echo-time brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data by applying a model-based canonical correlation analyses algorithm and by using, as prior knowledge, multimodal sources of information coming from high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS), MRSI and magnetic resonance imaging. The potential and limitations of fusing in vivo and ex vivo nuclear magnetic resonance sources to detect brain tumors is investigated. We present various modalities for multimodal data fusion, study the effect and the impact of using multimodal information for classifying MRSI brain glial tumors data and analyze which parameters influence the classification results by means of extensive simulation and in vivo studies. Special attention is drawn to the possibility of considering HR-MAS data as a complementary dataset when dealing with a lack of MRSI data needed to build a classifier. Results show that HR-MAS information can have added value in the process of classifying MRSI data.

  6. Enhanced ex vivo intestinal absorption of olmesartan medoxomil nanosuspension: Preparation by combinative technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari, Zenab; Bhandari, Amita; Jagadish, P C; Lewis, Shaila

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop nanosuspension based on combinative technology to enhance the intestinal absorption of Olmesartan medoxomil (OLM), a potent antihypertensive agent with limited oral bioavailability. Two combinative approaches were employed and then characterized. In vitro intestinal absorption of OLM nanosuspension and plain OLM was studied using non-everted rat intestinal sac model. Optimal OLM nanosuspension was prepared by a combination of ball milling and probe sonication using stabilizer, Poloxamer 407. The formula exhibited particle size of 469.9 nm and zeta potential of -19.1 mV, which was subjected to ex vivo studies. The flux and apparent permeability coefficient in intestine from OLM nanosuspension was higher than the plain drug, thereby suggesting better drug delivery.

  7. Ex-vivo detection of neural events using THz BioMEMS

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Abdennour; Croix, Dominique; Salzet, Michel; Bocquet, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    Background: Electromagnetic frequencies up to a few terahertz (THz) can yield real-time and noninvasive measurements on biological matter. Unfortunately, strong absorption in aqueous solutions and low spatial resolution return difficult free-space investigations. A new approach based on integrated THz circuits was used. The authors designed and fabricated a BioMEMS (Biological MicroElectro-Mechanical System) compatible with microfluidic circulation and electromagnetic propagation. It is dedicated to the ex vivo detection of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, which is involved in neurodegenerative phenomena. Material/Methods: The biological model was a leech's central nervous system. After its injury, the production of NO was observed and measured in the far-THz spectral domain. The nerve cord was put inside a BioMEMS realized in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sealed on a glass wafer. Glass is a good material for supporting high-frequency integrated waveguides such as coplanar waveguides (CPWs). Measurements w...

  8. Real-time imaging of inflation-induced ATP release in the ex vivo rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Kishio; Tan, Ju Jing; Boudreault, Francis; Sokabe, Masahiro; Berthiaume, Yves; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular ATP and other nucleotides are important autocrine/paracrine mediators that regulate diverse processes critical for lung function, including mucociliary clearance, surfactant secretion, and local blood flow. Cellular ATP release is mechanosensitive; however, the impact of physical stimuli on ATP release during breathing has never been tested in intact lungs in real time and remains elusive. In this pilot study, we investigated inflation-induced ATP release in rat lungs ex vivo by real-time luciferin-luciferase (LL) bioluminescence imaging coupled with simultaneous infrared tissue imaging to identify ATP-releasing sites. With LL solution introduced into air spaces, brief inflation of such edematous lung (1 s, ∼20 cmH2O) induced transient (lungs and provides the first direct evidence of inflation-induced ATP release in lung air spaces and in pulmonary blood capillaries, highlighting the importance of purinergic signaling in lung function. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. CD64-directed microtubule associated protein tau kills leukemic blasts ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenov, Radoslav; Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Cremer, Christian; Gresch, Gerrit; Grieger, Elena; Schenke, Lea; Klose, Diana; Amoury, Manal; Woitok, Mira; Jost, Edgar; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Fendel, Rolf; Fischer, Rainer; Stein, Christoph; Thepen, Theo; Barth, Stefan

    2016-10-11

    Fc gamma receptor I (FcγRI, CD64) is a well-known target antigen for passive immunotherapy against acute myeloid leukemia and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. We recently reported the preclinical immunotherapeutic potential of microtubule associated protein tau (MAP) against a variety of cancer types including breast carcinoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Here we demonstrate that the CD64-directed human cytolytic fusion protein H22(scFv)-MAP kills ex vivo 15-50% of CD64+ leukemic blasts derived from seven myeloid leukemia patients. Furthermore, in contrast to the nonspecific cytostatic agent paclitaxel, H22(scFv)-MAP showed no cytotoxicity towards healthy CD64+ PBMC-derived cells and macrophages. The targeted delivery of this microtubule stabilizing agent therefore offers a promising new strategy for specific treatment of CD64+ leukemia.

  10. Matrix type transdermal therapeutic system containing captopril: formulation optimization, in vitro and ex vivo characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimoğlu, Oya; Keskin, Ebru; Dortunç, Betül; Anah, Sela

    2013-01-01

    Transdermal therapeutic systems (TTS) containing captopril were developed by using synthetic and pH independent polymers, Eudragit RL 100 and RS 100. The formulations were characterized in terms of their appearance, thickness, captopril content, in vitro release rate and diffusion profiles. In vitro release studies demonstrated controlled release for each formulation developed. In viro and ex vivo diffusion rate studies were performed through various synthetic membranes with different thickness, pore size and type (hydrophilic and hydrophobic) and through human skin by using Franz diffusion cells. Type of membrane and composition of the formulation affected the diffusion profiles of captopril from the transdermal therapeutic systems. Transdermal therapeutic systems containing captopril were successfully prepared and especially two of the formulations (F15 and F16) are considered to be suitable to administer captopril via skin.

  11. Corneal morphology after ex-vivo UV and mid-infrared laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyratou, E.; Voloudakis, G. E.; Moutsouris, K.; Asproudis, I.; Baltatzis, S.; Makropoulou, M.; Bacharis, C.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    In this work, ablation experiments of ex vivo porcine cornea tissue were conducted with two solid state lasers (an Er:YAG laser and the 4th harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser, both in the ns pulse width range) emitting in mid infrared and ultraviolet part of the spectrum respectively, at moderate laser fluences. The cornea epithelium of each porcine eye was manually removed before the ablation. Histology analysis of the specimens was performed, in order to examine the microscopic appearance of the ablated craters and the existence of any thermal or mechanical damage caused by the midinfrared and the UV laser irradiation. For a detailed and complete examination of the morphology of the laser ablated corneal tissue, the surface roughness was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  12. Optical spectroscopy for differentiation of liver tissue under distinct stages of fibrosis: an ex vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabila, D. A.; Hernández, L. F.; de la Rosa, J.; Stolik, S.; Arroyo-Camarena, U. D.; López-Vancell, M. D.; Escobedo, G.

    2013-11-01

    Liver fibrosis is the decisive step towards the development of cirrhosis; its early detection affects crucially the diagnosis of liver disease, its prognosis and therapeutic decision making. Nowadays, several techniques are employed to this task. However, they have the limitation in estimating different stages of the pathology. In this paper we present a preliminary study to evaluate if optical spectroscopy can be employed as an auxiliary tool of diagnosis of biopsies of human liver tissue to differentiate the fibrosis stages. Ex vivo fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired from biopsies using a portable fiber-optic system. Empirical discrimination algorithms based on fluorescence intensity ratio at 500 nm and 680 nm as well as diffuse reflectance intensity at 650 nm were developed. Sensitivity and specificity of around 80% and 85% were respectively achieved. The obtained results show that combined use of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy could represent a novel and useful tool in the early evaluation of liver fibrosis.

  13. First Danish experience with ex vivo lung perfusion of donor lungs before transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ian Sune Iversen; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Christian Holdfold

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The number of lung transplantations is limited by a general lack of donor organs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to optimise and evaluate marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. We describe our experiences with EVLP in Denmark during the first year after its...... introduction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted by prospective registration of donor offers and lung transplantations in Denmark from 1 May 2012 to 30 April 2013. Donor lungs without any contraindications were transplanted in the traditional manner. Taken for EVLP were donor lungs that were...... otherwise considered transplantable, but failed to meet the usual criteria due to possible contusions or because they were from donors with sepsis or unable to pass the oxygenation test. RESULTS: In the study period, seven of 33 Danish lung transplantations were made possible due to EVLP. One patient died...

  14. Release of rosmarinic acid from semisolid formulations and its penetration through human skin ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelmakienė Ada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of rosmarinic acid (RA from the experimental topical formulations with the Melissa officinalis L. extract and to evaluate its penetration through undamaged human skin ex vivo. The results of the in vitro release study showed that higher amounts of RA were released from the emulsion vehicle when lemon balm extract was added in its dry form. An inverse correlation was detected between the released amount of RA and the consistency index of the formulation. Different penetration of RA into the skin may be influenced by the characteristics of the vehicle as well as by the form of the extract. The results of penetration assessment showed that the intensity of RA penetration was influenced by its lipophilic properties: RA was accumulating in the epidermis, while the dermis served as a barrier, impeding its deeper penetration.

  15. Temperature profile of ex-vivo organs during radio frequency thermal ablation by fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Giovanna; Iadicicco, Agostino; Tosi, Daniele; Verze, Paolo; Carlomagno, Nicola; Tammaro, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Juliet; Campopiano, Stefania

    2016-11-01

    We report on the integration of fiber optic sensors with commercial medical instrumentation for temperature monitoring during radio frequency ablation for tumor treatment. A suitable configuration with five fiber Bragg grating sensors bonded to a bipolar radio frequency (RF) probe has been developed to monitor the area under treatment. A series of experiments were conducted on ex-vivo animal kidney and liver and the results confirm that we were able to make a multipoint measurement and to develop a real-time temperature profile of the area, with a temperature resolution of 0.1°C and a spatial resolution of 5 mm during a series of different and consecutive RF discharges.

  16. Human Ex-Vivo Liver Model for Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Thomas; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Schlattjan, Martin; Treckmann, Jürgen; Paul, Andreas; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Baba, Hideo A.; Odenthal, Margarete; Gieseler, Robert K.; Gerken, Guido; Arteel, Gavin E.; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Reliable test systems to identify hepatotoxicity are essential to predict unexpected drug-related liver injury. Here we present a human ex-vivo liver model to investigate acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Human liver tissue was perfused over a 30 hour period with hourly sampling from the perfusate for measurement of general metabolism and clinical parameters. Liver function was assessed by clearance of indocyanine green (ICG) at 4, 20 and 28 hours. Six pieces of untreated human liver specimen maintained stable liver function over the entire perfusion period. Three liver sections incubated with low-dose acetaminophen revealed strong damage, with ICG half-lives significantly higher than in non-treated livers. In addition, the release of microRNA-122 was significantly higher in acetaminophen-treated than in non-treated livers. Thus, this model allows for investigation of hepatotoxicity in human liver tissue upon applying drug concentrations relevant in patients. PMID:27550092

  17. Steerable intravitreal inserts for drug delivery: in vitro and ex vivo mobility experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeles, Christos; Kummer, Michael P; Kratochvil, Bradley E; Framme, Carsten; Nelson, Bradley J

    2011-01-01

    The progress of wet age-related macular degeneration can now be controlled by intravitreal drug injection. This approach requires repeated injections, which could be avoided by delivering the drug to the retina. Intraocular implants are a promising solution for drug delivery near the retina. Currently, their accurate placement is challenging, and they can only be removed after a vitrectomy. In this paper, we introduce an approach for minimally invasive retinal drug delivery using magnetic intraocular inserts. We briefly discuss the electromagnetic-control system for magnetic implants and then focus on evaluating their ability to move in the vitreous humor. The mobility of magnetic intraocular implants is estimated in vitro with synthesized vitreous humors, and ex vivo with experiments on cadaver porcine eyes. Preliminary results show that with such magnetic implants a vitrectomy can be avoided.

  18. Measurement of histamine release from human lung tissue ex vivo by microdialysis technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Dan; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Nolte, H;

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Currently no method is available for measurement of mediator release from intact human lung. In this study, a microdialysis technique was used to measure histamine release from mast cells in human lung tissue ex vivo. MATERIAL: Microdialysis fibers of 216 microm were inserted...... into lung tissue and perfused with Krebs Ringer buffer at a rate of 3 microl/min. After a 15 min period of steady-state perfusion, anti-IgE and vehicle were injected into the lung tissue above individual fibers. Samples from each fibre were collected for 20 min at 2 min intervals. Histamine was assayed...... fluorometrically. RESULTS: Anti-IgE concentrations of 40-40,000 U/ml dose-dependently released histamine, significant histamine release being demonstrated with anti-IgE concentrations of 400 U/ml and greater. The kinetics of histamine release showed peak values 2-8 min after the injection. Great individual...

  19. Safety and efficient ex vivo expansion of stem cells using platelet-rich plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Prado, Roberto; Orive, Gorka

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the cell culture media supplements used in the ex vivo expansion of stem cells intended for cell therapy. Currently, the gold standard is the culture supplemented with fetal bovine serum, however, their use in cell therapy raises many concerns. The alternatives to its use are presented, ranging from the use of human serum to platelet-rich plasma (PRP), to serum-free media or extracellular matrix components. Finally, various growth factors present in PRP are described, which make it a safe and effective stem cell expansion supplement. These growth factors could be responsible for their efficiency, as they increase both stem cell proliferation and survival. The different PRP formulations are also discussed, as well as the need for protocol standardization.

  20. Dataset on force measurements of needle insertions into two ex-vivo human livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Tonke L; Dankelman, Jenny; van den Dobbelsteen, John J

    2017-04-01

    A needle-tissue interaction experiment has been carried out, by inserting the inner needle of a trocar needle into two ex-vivo human livers. The dataset contains the forces that act on the needle during insertion and retraction into the livers. In addition, a MATLAB code file is included that provides base-level analysis of the data and generates force-position diagrams of the needle insertions. The dataset is available on Mendeley Data (do1i:10.17632/94s7xd9mzt.2), and is made publicly available to enable other researchers to use it for their own research purposes. For further interpretation and discussion of the data, one is referred to the associated research article entitled "PVA matches human liver in needle-tissue interaction" de Jong et al., 2017.

  1. Angiopoietin-like proteins stimulate ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kaba, Megan; Ge, Guangtao; Xie, Kathleen; Tong, Wei; Hug, Christopher; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-02-01

    Successful ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) would greatly benefit the treatment of disease and the understanding of crucial questions of stem cell biology. Here we show, using microarray studies, that the HSC-supportive mouse fetal liver CD3(+) cells specifically express the proteins angiopoietin-like 2 (Angptl2) and angiopoietin-like 3 (Angptl3). We observed a 24- or 30-fold net expansion of long-term HSCs by reconstitution analysis when we cultured highly enriched HSCs for 10 days in the presence of Angptl2 or Angptl3 together with saturating levels of other growth factors. The coiled-coil domain of Angptl2 was capable of stimulating expansion of HSCs. Furthermore, angiopoietin-like 5, angiopoietin-like 7 and microfibril-associated glycoprotein 4 also supported expansion of HSCs in culture.

  2. Comparison of lung preservation solutions in human lungs using an ex vivo lung perfusion experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel L. Medeiros

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Experimental studies on lung preservation have always been performed using animal models. We present ex vivo lung perfusion as a new model for the study of lung preservation. Using human lungs instead of animal models may bring the results of experimental studies closer to what could be expected in clinical practice. METHOD: Brain-dead donors whose lungs had been declined by transplantation teams were used. The cases were randomized into two groups. In Group 1, Perfadex®was used for pulmonary preservation, and in Group 2, LPDnac, a solution manufactured in Brazil, was used. An ex vivo lung perfusion system was used, and the lungs were ventilated and perfused after 10 hours of cold ischemia. The extent of ischemic-reperfusion injury was measured using functional and histological parameters. RESULTS: After reperfusion, the mean oxygenation capacity was 405.3 mmHg in Group 1 and 406.0 mmHg in Group 2 (p = 0.98. The mean pulmonary vascular resistance values were 697.6 and 378.3 dyn·s·cm-5, respectively (p =0.035. The mean pulmonary compliance was 46.8 cm H20 in Group 1 and 49.3 ml/cm H20 in Group 2 (p =0.816. The mean wet/dry weight ratios were 2.06 and 2.02, respectively (p=0.87. The mean Lung Injury Scores for the biopsy performed after reperfusion were 4.37 and 4.37 in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (p = 1.0, and the apoptotic cell counts were 118.75/mm² and 137.50/mm², respectively (p=0.71. CONCLUSION: The locally produced preservation solution proved to be as good as Perfadex®. The clinical use of LPDnac may reduce costs in our centers. Therefore, it is important to develop new models to study lung preservation.

  3. Detection of thrombus size and protein content by ex vivo magnetization transfer and diffusion weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phinikaridou Alkystis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To utilize a rabbit model of plaque disruption to assess the accuracy of different magnetic resonance sequences [T1-weighted (T1W, T2-weighted (T2W, magnetization transfer (MT and diffusion weighting (DW] at 11.7 T for the ex vivo detection of size and composition of thrombus associated with disrupted plaques. Methods Atherosclerosis was induced in the aorta of male New Zealand White rabbits (n = 17 by endothelial denudation and high-cholesterol diet. Subsequently, plaque disruption was induced by pharmacological triggering. Segments of infra-renal aorta were excised fixed in formalin and examined by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 11.7 T and histology. Results MRI at 11.7 T showed that: (i magnetization transfer contrast (MTC and diffusion weighted images (DWI detected thrombus with higher sensitivity compared to T1W and T2W images [sensitivity: MTC = 88.2%, DWI = 76.5%, T1W = 66.6% and T2W = 43.7%, P P (ii MTC and DWI provided a more accurate detection of thrombus area with histology as the gold-standard [underestimation of 6% (MTC and 17.6% (DWI compared to an overestimation of thrombus area of 53.7% and 46.4% on T1W and T2W images, respectively]; (iii the percent magnetization transfer rate (MTR correlated with the fibrin (r = 0.73, P = 0.003 and collagen (r = 0.9, P = 0.004 content of the thrombus. Conclusions The conspicuity of the thrombus was increased on MTC and DW compared to T1W and T2W images. Changes in the %MTR and apparent diffusion coefficient can be used to identify the organization stage of the thrombus.

  4. A numerical analysis model for interpretation of flow cytometric studies of ex vivo phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted S Strom

    Full Text Available The study of ex vivo phagocytosis via flow cytometry requires that one distinguish experimentally between uptake and adsorption of fluorescently labeled targets by phagocytes. Removal of the latter quantity from the analysis is the most common means of analyzing such data. Because the probability of phagocytosis is a function of the probability of adsorption, and because partially quenched fluorescence after uptake often overlaps with that of negative controls, this approach is suboptimal at best. Here, we describe a numerical analysis model which overcomes these limitations. We posit that the random adsorption of targets to macrophages, and subsequent phagocytosis, is a function of three parameters: the ratio of targets to macrophages (m, the mean fluorescence intensity imparted to the phagocyte by the internalized target (alpha, and the probability of phagocytosis per adsorbed target (p. The potential values of these parameters define a parameter space and their values at any point in parameter space can be used to predict the fraction of adsorption(+ and [adsorption(-, phagocytosis(+] cells that might be observed experimentally. By systematically evaluating the points in parameter space for the latter two values and comparing them to experimental data, the model arrives at sets of parameter values that optimally predict such data. Using activated THP-1 cells as macrophages and platelets as targets, we validate the model by demonstrating that it can distinguish between the effects of experimental changes in m, alpha, and p. Finally, we use the model to demonstrate that platelets from a congenitally thrombocytopenic WAS patient show an increased probability of ex vivo phagocytosis. This finding correlates with other evidence that rapid in vivo platelet consumption contributes significantly to the thrombocytopenia of WAS. Our numerical analysis method represents a useful and innovative approach to multivariate analysis.

  5. Rapid evaluation of fresh ex vivo kidney tissue with full-field optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT is a real-time imaging technique that rapidly generates images reminiscent of histology without any tissue processing, warranting its exploration for evaluation of ex vivo kidney tissue. Methods: Fresh tissue sections from tumor and adjacent nonneoplastic kidney (n = 25 nephrectomy specimens; clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC = 12, papillary RCC (PRCC = 4, chromophobe RCC (ChRCC = 4, papillary urothelial carcinoma (PUC = 1, angiomyolipoma (AML = 2 and cystic nephroma = 2 were imaged with a commercial FFOCT device. Sections were submitted for routine histopathological diagnosis. Results: Glomeruli, tubules, interstitium, and blood vessels were identified in nonneoplastic tissue. In tumor sections, the normal architecture was completely replaced by either sheets of cells/trabeculae or papillary structures. The former pattern was seen predominantly in CCRCC/ChRCC and the latter in PRCC/PUC (as confirmed on H&E. Although the cellular details were not very prominent at this resolution, we could identify unique cytoplasmic signatures in some kidney tumors. For example, the hyper-intense punctate signal in the cytoplasm of CRCC represents glycogen/lipid, large cells with abundant hyper-intense cytoplasm representing histiocytes in PRCC, and signal-void large polygonal cell representing adipocytes in AML. According to a blinded analysis was performed by an uropathologist, all nonneoplastic tissues were differentiated from neoplastic tissues. Further, all benign tumors were called benign and malignant were called malignant. A diagnostic accuracy of 80% was obtained in subtyping the tumors. Conclusion: The ability of FFOCT to reliably differentiate nonneoplastic from neoplastic tissue and identify some tumor types makes it a valuable tool for rapid evaluation of ex vivo kidney tissue e.g. for intraoperative margin assessment and kidney biopsy adequacy. Recently, higher resolution images were

  6. Complete Human and Rat Ex Vivo Spermatogenesis from Fresh or Frozen Testicular Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrard, Marie-Hélène; Sereni, Nicolas; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Blondet, Antonine; D Estaing, Sandrine Giscard; Plotton, Ingrid; Morel-Journel, Nicolas; Lejeune, Hervé; David, Laurent; Durand, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Until now, complete ex vivo spermatogenesis has been reported only in the mouse. In this species, the duration of spermatogenesis is 35 days, whereas it is 54 days in the rat and 74 days in humans. We performed long-term (until 60 days) cultures of fresh or frozen rat or human seminiferous tubule segments in a bioreactor made of a hollow cylinder of chitosan hydrogel. Testicular tissues were obtained from 8- or 20-day-old male rats or from adult human subjects who had undergone hormone treatments leading to a nearly complete regression of their spermatogenesis before bilateral orchiectomy for gender reassignment. The progression of spermatogenesis was assessed by cytological analyses of the cultures; it was related to a dramatic increase in the levels of the mRNAs specifically expressed by round spermatids, Transition protein 1, Transition protein 2, and Protamine 3 in rat cultures. From 2% to 3.8% of cells were found to be haploid cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of human cultures. In this bioreactor, long-term cultures of seminiferous tubule segments from prepubertal rats or from adult men allowed completion of the spermatogenic process leading to morphologically mature spermatozoa. Further studies will need to address the way of optimizing the yield of every step of spermatogenesis by adjusting the composition of the culture medium, the geometry, and the material properties of the chitosan hydrogel bioreactors. Another essential requirement is to assess the quality of the gametes produced ex vivo by showing their ability to produce normal offspring (rat) or their biochemical normality (human).

  7. Fiber optic microneedles for transdermal light delivery: ex vivo porcine skin penetration experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoglu, Mehmet A; Hood, Robert L; Chen, Ye; Xu, Yong; Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G

    2010-09-01

    Shallow light penetration in tissue has been a technical barrier to the development of light-based methods for in vivo diagnosis and treatment of epithelial carcinomas. This problem can potentially be solved by utilizing minimally invasive probes to deliver light directly to target areas. To develop this solution, fiber optic microneedles capable of delivering light for either imaging or therapy were manufactured by tapering step-index silica-based optical fibers employing a melt-drawing process. Some of the microneedles were manufactured to have sharper tips by changing the heat source during the melt-drawing process. All of the microneedles were individually inserted into ex vivo pig skin samples to demonstrate the feasibility of their application in human tissues. The force on each microneedle was measured during insertion in order to determine the effects of sharper tips on the peak force and the steadiness of the increase in force. Skin penetration experiments showed that sharp fiber optic microneedles that are 3 mm long penetrate through 2 mm of ex vivo pig skin specimens. These sharp microneedles had a minimum average diameter of 73 mum and a maximum tip diameter of 8 mum. Flat microneedles, which had larger tip diameters, required a minimum average diameter of 125 mum in order to penetrate through pig skin samples. Force versus displacement plots showed that a sharp tip on a fiber optic microneedle decreased the skin's resistance during insertion. Also, the force acting on a sharp microneedle increased more steadily compared with a microneedle with a flat tip. However, many of the sharp microneedles sustained damage during skin penetration. Two designs that did not accrue damage were identified and will provide a basis of more robust microneedles. Developing resilient microneedles with smaller diameters will lead to transformative, novel modes of transdermal imaging and treatment that are less invasive and less painful for the patient.

  8. Development of domperidone bilayered matrix type transdermal patches: physicochemical, in vitro and ex vivo characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K Madishetti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Domperidone (DOM is a dopamine- receptor (D2 antagonist, which is widely used in the treatment of motion-sickness. The pharmacokinetic parameters make DOM a suitable candidate for transdermal delivery. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop transdermal delivery systems for DOM and to evaluate their physicochemical characteristics, in vitro release an ex vivo permeation through rat abdominal skin and their mechanical properties. "nMethods: Bilayered matrix type transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS of DOM were prepared by film casting technique using hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose as primary and Eudragit RL 100 as secondary layers. Brij-35 was incorporated as a solubilizer, d-limonene and propylene glycol were employed as permeation enhancer and plasticizer respectively. The prepared TDDS were extensively evaluated for in vitro release, moisture absorption, moisture content, water vapor transmission, ex vivo permeation through rat abdominal skin, mechanical properties and stability studies. The physicochemical interaction between DOM and polymers were investigated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. "nResults: All the formulations exhibited satisfactory physicochemical and mechanical characteristics. The optimized formulation F6 showed maximum cumulative percentage of drug release (90.7%, permeation (6806.64 μg in 24 hrs, flux (86.02 μg /hr/cm2 and permeation coefficient of 0.86x10-2 cm/hr. Values of tensile strength (4.34 kg/mm2 and elastic modulus (5.89 kg/cm2 revealed that formulation F6 was strong but not brittle. DSC and FTIR studies showed no evidence of interaction between the drug and polymers. A shelf life of 2 years is predicted for the TDDS. Conclusions: Domperidone bilayered matrix type transdermal therapeutic systems could be prepared with the required flux and suitable mechanical properties.

  9. Equivalent metabolic acidosis with four colloids and saline on ex vivo haemodilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T J; Vellaichamy, M; Cowley, D M; Weier, S L; Venkatesh, B; Jones, M A

    2009-05-01

    Colloid infusions can cause metabolic acidosis. Mechanisms and relative severity with different colloids are incompletely understood. We compared haemodilution acid-base effects of 4% albumin, 3.5% polygeline, 4% succinylated gelatin (all weak acid colloids, strong ion difference 12 mEq/l, 17.6 mEq/l and 34 mEq/l respectively), 6% hetastarch (non-weak acid colloid, strong ion difference zero) and 0.9% saline (crystalloid, strong ion difference zero). Gelatin weak acid properties were tracked via the strong ion gap. Four-step ex vivo dilutions of pre-oxygenated human venous blood were performed to a final [Hb] near 50% baseline. With each fluid, base excess fell to approximately -13 mEq/l. Base excess/[Hb] relationships across dilution were linear and direct (R2 > or = 0.96), slopes and intercepts closely resembling saline. Baseline strong ion gap was -0.3 (2.1) mEq/l. Post-dilution increases occurred in three groups: small with saline, hetastarch and albumin (to 3.5 (02) mEq/l, 4.3 (0.3) mEq/l, 3.3 (1.4) mEq/l respectively), intermediate with polygeline (to 12.2 (0.9) mEq/l) and greatest with succinylated gelatin (to 20.8 (1.4) mEq/l). We conclude that, despite colloid weak acid activity ranging from zero (hydroxyethyl starch) to greater than that of albumin with both gelatin preparations, ex vivo dilution causes a metabolic acidosis of identical severity to saline in each case. This uniformity reflects modifications to the albumin and gelatin saline vehicles, in part aimed at pH correction. By proportionally increasing the strong ion difference, these modifications counter deviations from pure saline effects caused by colloid weak acid activity. Extrapolation in vivo requires further investigation.

  10. Transplantation of Ex Vivo Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood (NiCord) Decreases Early Infection and Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sarah; Thomas, Samantha; Hyslop, Terry; Adcock, Janet; Corbet, Kelly; Gasparetto, Cristina; Lopez, Richard; Long, Gwynn D; Morris, Ashley K; Rizzieri, David A; Sullivan, Keith M; Sung, Anthony D; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Chao, Nelson J; Horwitz, Mitchell E

    2017-07-01

    Delayed hematopoietic recovery contributes to increased infection risk following umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation. In a Phase 1 study, adult recipients of UCB stem cells cultured ex vivo for 3 weeks with nicotinamide (NiCord) had earlier median neutrophil recovery compared with historical controls. To evaluate the impact of faster neutrophil recovery on clinically relevant early outcomes, we reviewed infection episodes and hospitalization during the first 100 days in an enlarged cohort of 18 NiCord recipients compared with 86 standard UCB recipients at our institution. The median time to neutrophil engraftment was shorter in NiCord recipients compared with standard UCB recipients (12.5 days versus 26 days; P < .001). Compared with standard UCB recipients, NiCord recipients had a significantly reduced risk for total infection (RR, 0.69; P = .01), grade 2-3 (moderate to severe) infection (RR, 0.36; P < .001), bacterial infection (RR, 0.39; P = .003), and grade 2-3 bacterial infection (RR, 0.21; P = .003) by Poisson regression analysis; this effect persisted after adjustment for age, disease stage, and grade II-IV acute GVHD. NiCord recipients also had significantly more time out of the hospital in the first 100 days post-transplantation after adjustment for age and Karnofsky Performance Status (69.9 days versus 49.7 days; P = .005). Overall, transplantation of NiCord was associated with faster neutrophil engraftment, fewer total and bacterial infections, and shorter hospitalization in the first 100 days compared with standard UCB transplantation. In conclusion, rapid hematopoietic recovery from an ex vivo expanded UCB transplantation approach is associated with early clinical benefit. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatial distribution of niche and stem cells in ex vivo human limbal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Indumathi; Kacham, Santhosh; Purushotham, Jyothi; Maddileti, Savitri; Siamwala, Jamila; Sangwan, Virender Singh

    2014-11-01

    Stem cells at the limbus mediate corneal epithelial regeneration and regulate normal tissue homeostasis. Ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial transplantations are being widely practiced in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency. In this report, we examined whether the limbal niche cells that nurture and regulate epithelial stem cells coexist in ex vivo limbal cultures. We also compared the inherent differences between explant and suspension culture systems in terms of spatial distribution of niche cells and their effect on epithelial stem cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in vitro. We report that the stem cell content of both culture systems was similar, explaining the comparable clinical outcomes reported using these two methods. We also showed that the niche cells get expanded in culture and the nestin-positive cells migrate at the leading edges to direct epithelial cell migration in suspension cultures, whereas they are limited to the intact niche in explant cultures. We provide evidence that C/EBPδ-positive, p15-positive, and quiescent, label-retaining, early activated stem cells migrate at the leading edges to regulate epithelial cell proliferation in explant cultures, and this position effect is lost in early suspension cultures. However, in confluent suspension cultures, the stem cells and niche cells interact with each another, migrate in spiraling patterns, and self-organize to form three-dimensional niche-like compartments resembling the limbal crypts and thereby reestablish the position effect. These 3D-sphere clusters are enriched with nestin-, vimentin-, S100-, and p27-positive niche cells and p15-, p21-, p63α-, C/EBPδ-, ABCG2-, and Pax6-positive quiescent epithelial stem cells.

  12. Microultrasound characterisation of ex vivo porcine tissue for ultrasound capsule endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, H. S.; Cox, B. F.; Sunoqrot, M.; Démoré, C. E. M.; Näthke, I.; Gomez, T.; Cochran, S.

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease development and progression is often characterised by cellular and tissue architectural changes within the mucosa and sub-mucosa layers. Current clinical capsule endoscopy and other approaches are heavily reliant on optical techniques which cannot detect disease progression below the surface layer of the tissue. To enhance the ability of clinicians to detect cellular changes earlier and more confidently, both quantitative and qualitative microultrasound (μUS) techniques are investigated in healthy ex vivo porcine GI tissue. This work is based on the use of single-element, focussed μUS transducers made with micromoulded piezocomposite operating at around 48 MHz. To explore the possibility that μUS can detect Crohn’s disease and other inflammatory bowel diseases, ex vivo porcine small bowel tissue samples were cannulised and perfused with phosphate-buffered saline followed by various dilutions of polystyrene microspheres. Comparison with fluorescent imaging showed that the microspheres had infiltrated the microvasculature of the samples and that μUS was able to successfully detect this as a mimic of inflammation. Samples without microspheres were analysed using quantitative ultrasound to assess mechanical properties. Attenuation coefficients of 1.78 ± 0.66 dB/mm and 1.92 ± 0.77 dB/mm were obtained from reference samples which were surgically separated from the muscle layer. Six intact samples were segmented using a software algorithm and the acoustic impedance, Z, for varying tissue thicknesses, and backscattering coefficient, BSC, were calculated using the reference attenuation values and tabulated.

  13. Micro CT imaging assessment for spatial distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in an ex vivo thrombolysis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tu, Shu-Ju

    2012-03-01

    In recent nanotechnology development, iron-based magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used in several investigations on biomedical research for small animal experiments. Their important applications include targeted drug delivery for therapeutic purpose, contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperthermia treatment for tumors. These MNPs can be guided by an external magnetic field due to their physical characteristics of superparamagnetism. In a recent report, authors indicated that covalently bound recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) to MNP (MNPrtPA) with preserved enzyme activity may be guided by a bar magnet and induce target thrombolysis in an embolic model in rats. Delivery of rtPA by binding the thrombolytic drug to MNPs will improve the possibility of the drug to be delivered under magnetic guidance and retained in a local targeted area in the circulation system. In this work, an ex vivo intravascular thrombolysis model was developed to study the impact of external magnetic field on the penetration of MNP-rtPA in the blood clot samples. The samples were then scanned by a micro CT system for quantification. Images of MNPs show strong contrast with their surrounding blood clot materials. The optimum drug loading was found when 0.5 mg/ml rtPA is conjugated with 10 mg SiO2-MNP where 98% drug was attached to the carrier with full retention of its thrombolytic activity. Effective thrombolysis with tPA bound to SiO2-MNP under magnetic guidance was demonstrated in our ex vivo model where substantial reduction in time for blood clot lysis was observed compared with control groups without magnetic field application.

  14. Characterization and ex vivo Expansion of Human Placenta-Derived Natural Killer Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokui eZhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent clinical studies suggest that adoptive transfer of donor-derived natural killer (NK cells may improve clinical outcome in hematological malignancies and some solid tumors by direct antitumor effects as well as by reduction of graft versus host disease (GVHD. NK cells have also been shown to enhance transplant engraftment during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT for hematological malignancies. The limited ex vivo expansion potential of NK cells from peripheral blood (PB or umbilical cord blood (UCB has however restricted their therapeutic potential. Here we define methods to efficiently generate NK cells from donor matched, full-term human placenta perfusate (termed Human Placenta-Derived Stem Cell, HPDSC and UCB. Following isolation from cryopreserved donor-matched HPDSC and UCB units, CD56+CD3- placenta-derived NK cells, termed pNK cells, were expanded in culture for up to 3 weeks to yield an average of 1.2 billion cells per donor that were >80% CD56+CD3-, comparable to doses previously utilized in clinical applications. Ex vivo-expanded pNK cells exhibited a marked increase in anti-tumor cytolytic activity coinciding with the significantly increased expression of NKG2D, NKp46 and NKp44 (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.05, respectively. Strong cytolytic activity was observed against a wide range of tumor cell lines in vitro. pNK cells display a distinct microRNA (miRNA expression profile, immunophenotype and greater antitumor capacity in vitro compared to PB NK cells used in recent clinical trials. With further development, pNK may represent a novel and effective cellular immunotherapy for patients with high clinical needs and few other therapeutic options.

  15. Hepatic ablation with multiple interstitial ultrasound applicators: initial ex vivo and computational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has emerged as an effective method for treating liver tumors under 3 cm in diameter. Multiple applicator devices and techniques - using RF, microwave and other modalities - are under development for thermal ablation of large and irregularly-shaped liver tumors. Interstitial ultrasound (IUS) applicators, comprised of linear arrays of independently powered tubular transducers, enable 3D control of the spatial power deposition profile and simultaneous ablation with multiple applicators. We evaluated IUS applicator configurations (parallel, converging and diverging implants) suitable for percutaneous and laparascopic placement with experiments in ex vivo bovine tissue and computational models. Ex vivo ablation zones measured 4.6+/-0.5 x 4.2+/-0.5 × 3.3+/-0.5 cm3 and 5.6+/-0.5 × 4.9+/-0.5 x 2.8+/-0.3 cm3 using three parallel applicators spaced 2 and 3 cm apart, respectively, and 4.0+/-0.3 × 3.2+/-0.4 × 2.9+/-0.2 cm3 using two parallel applicators spaced 2 cm apart. Computational models indicate in vivo ablation zones up to 4.5 × 4.4 × 5.5 cm3 and 5.7 × 4.8 × 5.2 cm3, using three applicators spaced 2 and 3 cm apart, respectively. Converging and diverging implant patterns can also be employed for conformal ablation of irregularly-shaped tumor margins by tailoring power levels along each device. Simultaneously powered interstitial ultrasound devices can create tailored ablation zones comparable to currently available RF devices and similarly sized microwave antennas.

  16. The effect of different root canal medicaments on the elimination of Enterococcus faecalis ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammaschke, Till; Jung, Nina; Harks, Inga; Schafer, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine gel (CHX-G) 2%, chlorhexidine powder (CHX-P) 1%, povidone-iodine (PVP-I), polyhexanide and camphorated-and-mentholated chlorophenol (ChKM) ex vivo. For every medicament group 10 root segments (15 mm long) of extracted human teeth were prepared to ISO-size 45 and sterilized (n = 50). The root segments were then inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis and aerobically incubated at 37°C. After 1 week, ten root canals were filled with one of the medicaments, respectively and aerobically incubated at 37°C for another week. Ten teeth served as positive controls and were filled with sterile saline solution. After 7 days, the medicaments were inactivated and all root canals were instrumented to ISO-size 50. The obtained dentin samples were dispersed in Ringer solution followed by the preparation of serial dilutions. 10 μl per sample were applied to an agar plate and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The colony forming units were counted and the reduction factors (RFs) were calculated and statistically analyzed. Compared with the positive controls all medicaments exhibited an antibacterial effect against E. faecalis. The RFs for CHX-G, CHX-P and ChKM were significantly higher compared to PVP-I and polyhexanide (P polyhexanide, CHX-G, CHX-P and ChKM were able to eliminate E. faecalis from all dentin samples. Within the limitations of this ex vivo investigation, 2% CHX-G and CHX-P were as effective as ChKM against E. faecalis. Thus, when choosing a root canal medicament the better biocompatibility of CHX compared with ChKM should be taken in consideration.

  17. Intermediate outcomes with ex-vivo allograft perfusion for heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Joshua L; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Reich, Heidi J; Ramzy, Danny; Thottam, Maria M; Yu, Zhe; Aintablian, Tamar L; Liou, Frank; Patel, Jignesh K; Kittleson, Michelle M; Czer, Lawrence S; Trento, Alfredo; Esmailian, Fardad

    2017-03-01

    The Organ Care System, an ex-vivo heart perfusion platform, represents an alternative to the current standard of cold organ storage that sustains the donor heart in a near-physiologic state. It is unknown whether using the Organ Care System influences 2-year outcomes after heart transplantation. We reviewed our institutional experience to compare 2-year outcomes for patients randomized to the Organ Care System or standard cold storage. Between 2011 and 2013, heart transplant candidates from a single tertiary-care medical center enrolled within the PROCEED II trial were randomized to either standard cold storage or the Organ Care System. Outcomes assessed included 2-year survival, freedom from cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), non-fatal major cardiac events (NF-MACE), biopsy-proven cellular rejection (CMR) and biopsy-proven antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Thirty-eight patients were randomized to the Organ Care System (n = 19) or cold storage group (n = 19). There was no significant difference in 2-year patient survival (Organ Care System: 72.2%; cold storage: 81.6%; p = 0.38). Similarly, there were no differences in freedom from CAV, NF-MACE, CMR or AMR. The Organ Care System group had significantly longer total ischemia time (361 ± 96 minutes vs 207 ± 50 minutes; p < 0.001) and shorter cold ischemia time (134 ± 45 minutes vs 207 ± 50 minutes; p < 0.001) compared with the cold storage group. The Organ Care System did not appear to be associated with significant differences in intermediate results compared with conventional strategies. These results suggest that this ex-vivo allograft perfusion system is a promising and valid platform for donor heart transportation. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Rodent Model of Cardiac Donation After Circulatory Death and Novel Biomarkers of Cardiac Viability During Ex Vivo Heart Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Mark J; Miller, Sally D; Cheung, Anson; Bashir, Jamil; Wong, Stephanie; Seidman, Michael A; Boyd, John H

    2017-08-01

    Organ donation after circulatory death (DCD) is increasingly being used as a means of addressing the organ supply/demand mismatch in solid organ transplantation. There is reluctance to use DCD hearts, due to an inability to precisely identify hearts that have suffered irreversible injury. We investigated novel biomarkers and clinically relevant endpoints across a spectrum of warm ischemic times, before and during ex vivo heart perfusion (EVHP), to identify features associated with a nonviable cardiac phenotype. Donor rats sustained a hypoxic cardiac arrest, followed by variable acirculatory standoff periods (DCD groups). Left ventricular function, histochemical injury, and differences in left ventricular gene expression were studied before, and during, EVHP. As warm ischemic time exposure increased in DCD groups, fewer hearts were functional during EVHP, and ventricular function was increasingly impaired. Histochemical assessment identified severely injured hearts during EVHP. A novel gene expression signature identified severely injured hearts during EVHP (upregulation of c-Jun, 3.19 (2.84-3.60); P = 0.0014; HMOX-1, 3.87 (2.72-5.50); P = 0.0037; and Hsp90, 7.66 (6.32-9.27); P < 0.0001 in DCD20), and may be useful in identifying high-risk hearts at the point of harvest (Hsp90). We demonstrate that our preclinical model recapitulates the cardio-respiratory decompensation observed in humans, and that EVHP appears necessary to unmask distinguishing features of severely injured DCD hearts. Furthermore, we outline a clinically relevant multimodal approach to assessing candidate DCD hearts. Novel mRNA signatures correlated with elevations in cardiac Troponin-I in severely injured hearts during EVHP, and may also detect injury at the point of harvest.

  19. Ex Vivo Expansion of Functional Human UCB-HSCs/HPCs by Coculture with AFT024-hkirre Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muti ur Rehman Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kiaa1867 (human Kirre, hKirre has a critical role in brain development and/or maintenance of the glomerular slit diaphragm in kidneys. Murine homolog of this gene, mKirre expressed in OP9 and AFT024 cells could support hematopoietic stem cells/hematopoietic progenitor cells (HSC/HPC expansion in vitro. HKirre is also expressed in human FBMOB-hTERT cell line and fetal liver fibroblast-like cells but its function has remained unclear. In this paper, we cloned a hKirre gene from human fetal liver fibroblast-like cells and established a stably overexpressing hKirre-AFT024 cell line. Resultant cells could promote self-renewal and ex vivo expansion of HSCs/HPCs significantly higher than AFT024-control cells transformed with mock plasmid. The Expanded human umbilical cord blood (hUCB CD34+ cells retained the capacity of multipotent differentiation as long as 8 weeks and successfully repopulated the bone marrow of sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice, which demonstrated the expansion of long-term primitive transplantable HSCs/HPCs. Importantly, hkirre could upregulate the expressions of Wnt-5A, BMP4, and SDF-1 and downregulate TGF-β with other hematopoietic growth factors. By SDS-PAGE and Western Blot analysis, a ~89 kDa protein in total lysate of AFT024-hKirre was identified. Supernatants from AFT024-hkirre could also support CD34+CD38− cells expansion. These results demonstrated that the AFT024-hKirre cells have the ability to efficiently expand HSCs/HPCs.

  20. Cyclosporine, a P-glycoprotein modulator, increases [{sup 18}F]MPPF uptake in rat brain and peripheral tissues: microPET and ex vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacan, Goran; Way, Baldwin M. [UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Plenevaux, Alain; Defraiteur, Caroline; Lemaire, Christian; Aerts, Joel; Luxen, Andre [Liege University, Cyclotron Research Center, Liege (Belgium); Rubins, Daniel J. [Merck and Co., Inc, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA (United States); Cherry, Simon R. [Cyclotron Research Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Davis, CA (United States); Melega, William P. [UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA School of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Pretreatment with cyclosporine, a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulator increases brain uptake of 4-(2'-methoxyphenyl)-1-[2'-(N-2''-pyridinyl)-p-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzamido]ethylpiperazine ([{sup 18}F]MPPF) for binding to hydroxytryptamine{sub 1A} (5-HT{sub 1A}) receptors. Those increases were quantified in rat brain with in vivo microPET and ex vivo tissue studies. Each Sprague-Dawley rat (n=4) received a baseline [{sup 18}F]MPPF microPET scan followed by second scan 2-3 weeks later that included cyclosporine pretreatment (50 mg/kg, i.p.). Maximum a posteriori reconstructed images and volumetric ROIs were used to generate dynamic radioactivity concentration measurements for hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum, with simplified reference tissue method (SRTM) analysis. Western blots were used to semiquantify P-gp regional distribution in brain. MicroPET studies showed that hippocampus uptake of [{sup 18}F]MPPF was increased after cyclosporine; ex vivo studies showed similar increases in hippocampus and frontal cortex at 30 min, and for heart and kidney at 2.5 and 5 min, without concomitant increases in [{sup 18}F]MPPF plasma concentration. P-gp content in cerebellum was twofold higher than in hippocampus or frontal cortex. These studies confirm and extend prior ex vivo results (J. Passchier, et al., Eur J Pharmacol, 2000) that showed [{sup 18}F]MPPF as a substrate for P-gp. Our microPET results showed that P-gp modulation of [{sup 18}F]MPPF binding to 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors can be imaged in rat hippocampus. The heterogeneous brain distribution of P-gp appeared to invalidate the use of cerebellum as a nonspecific reference region for SRTM modeling. Regional quantitation of P-gp may be necessary for accurate PET assessment of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor density when based on tracer uptake sensitive to P-gp modulation. (orig.)

  1. Comparative ex vivo study on humidifying function of three speaking valves with integrated heat and moisture exchanger for tracheotomised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boer, C.; Lansaat, L.; Muller, S.H.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Assessment of humidifying function of tracheotomy speaking valves with integrated heat and moisture exchanger. Design Ex vivo measurement of water exchange and storage capacity of three tracheotomy speaking valves: Humidiphon Plus, Spiro and ProTrach DualCare (with two different heat and m

  2. A new method for real-time quantification of irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Psimma, Z.; Boutsioukis, C.; Vasiliadis, L.; Kastrinakis, E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim (i) To introduce a new method of quantifying extruded irrigant during root canal irrigation ex vivo. (ii) to evaluate the effect of periapical tissue simulation and pressure equalization and (iii) to determine the effect of needle type, apical preparation size and apical constriction diameter

  3. Ex vivo evaluation of the serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist [³H]CUMI-101 in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; Underwood, Mark D; Kumar, Dileep J S

    2011-01-01

    [³H]CUMI-101 is a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist, which has been evaluated for use as a positron emission tracer in baboon and humans. We sought to evaluate the properties of [³H]CUMI-101 ex vivo in awake rats and determine if [³H]CUMI-101 can measure changes in synaptic levels of serotonin after...

  4. Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in ex vivo perfused placental tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, Caroline; Mathiesen, Line; Heno, Kristine K;

    2016-01-01

    expressing VAR2CSA accumulated in perfused placental tissue whereas the EPCR binding and the transgenic parasite did not. Soluble CSA and antibodies specific against VAR2CSA inhibited binding of infected erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: The ex vivo model provides a novel way of studying receptor-ligand interactions...

  5. The development and characterization of a competitive ELISA for measuring active ADAMTS-4 in a bovine cartilage ex vivo model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yi; Zheng, Qinlong; Simonsen, Ole;

    2013-01-01

    )) in a bovine cartilage ex vivo model. We found that after stimulation with catabolic factors, the cartilage initially released high levels of aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments into supernatant but subsequently decreased to background levels. The level of active ADAMTS-4 released into the supernatant...

  6. Mechanical Properties of Healthy and ex vivo Onychomycosis Nails and the Influence of a Porphyrin-propylene Glycol Antifungal Formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hosseinzoi (Amu); F. Galli (Federica); L. Incrocci (Luca); T. Smijs (Threes)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAims: To investigate nail penetration enhancing effectiveness of a novel drug formulation and ingredients, 40% propylene glycol (PG) and 40 μM multifunctional photosensitizer (MFPS). Proposed formulation was proven effective in photodynamic treatment (PDT) of ex vivo fungal infections of

  7. Alterations in creatine metabolism observed in experimental autoimmune myocarditis using ex vivo proton magic angle spinning MRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muench, Frédéric; Retel, Joren; Jeuthe, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    of male young Lewis rats with EAM was quantified by performing left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) analysis in short-axis cine images throughout the whole heart. Inflammatory cellular infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Myocardial tissue was analyzed using ex vivo proton magic angle...

  8. Ex vivo fracture resistance of direct resin composite complete crowns with and without posts on maxillary premolars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Bell, A.M. Le; Kreulen, C.M.; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ex vivo the fracture resistance and failure mode of direct resin composite complete crowns with and without various root canal posts made on maxillary premolars. METHODOLOGY: The clinical crowns of 40 human extracted single-rooted maxillary premolars were sectioned at the cemento

  9. Mechanical Properties of Healthy and ex vivo Onychomycosis Nails and the Influence of a Porphyrin-propylene Glycol Antifungal Formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hosseinzoi (Amu); F. Galli (Federica); L. Incrocci (Luca); T. Smijs (Threes)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAims: To investigate nail penetration enhancing effectiveness of a novel drug formulation and ingredients, 40% propylene glycol (PG) and 40 μM multifunctional photosensitizer (MFPS). Proposed formulation was proven effective in photodynamic treatment (PDT) of ex vivo fungal infections of

  10. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; van der Bij, Hendrik A.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal to

  11. Temporal Profiling and Pulsed SILAC Labeling Identify Novel Secreted Proteins during ex vivo Osteoblast Differentiation of Human Stromal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars P; Chen, Li; Nielsen, Maria Overbeck;

    2012-01-01

    labeling to distinguish genuine secreted proteins from intracellular contaminants. We identified 466 potentially secreted proteins that were quantified at 5 time-points during 14-days ex vivo OB differentiation including 41 proteins known to be involved in OB functions. Among these, 315 proteins exhibited...

  12. Photonic Characteristics and Ex Vivo Imaging of Escherichia coli-Xen14 Within the Bovine Reproductive Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the photonic properties of Escherichia coli-Xen14 and (2) conduct photonic imaging of E. coli-Xen14 within bovine reproductive tract segments (RTS) ex vivo (Bos indicus). E. coli-Xen14 was grown for 24 h in Luria Bertani medium (LB), with or with...

  13. Polarimetry based partial least square classification of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma human skin tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ikram, Masroor

    2016-06-01

    Optical polarimetry was employed for assessment of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissue samples from human skin. Polarimetric analyses revealed that depolarization and retardance for healthy tissue group were significantly higher (ppolarimetry together with PLS statistics hold promise for automated pathology classification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel ex vivo rat infection model to study protective immunity against Fasciola hepatica at the gut level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milligen, van F.J.; Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Gaasenbeek, C.P.H.; Bokhout, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    We describe an ex vivo rat infection model to study protective immunity against Fasciola hepatica at the gut level. An exact number of newly excysted juveniles (NEJs) was injected into a gut segment with an intact blood supply and which was still attached to a live anaesthetized rat. NEJs that penet

  15. Comparative ex vivo study on humidifying function of three speaking valves with integrated heat and moisture exchanger for tracheotomised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boer, C.; Lansaat, L.; Muller, S.H.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Assessment of humidifying function of tracheotomy speaking valves with integrated heat and moisture exchanger. Design Ex vivo measurement of water exchange and storage capacity of three tracheotomy speaking valves: Humidiphon Plus, Spiro and ProTrach DualCare (with two different heat and

  16. Persistence of DNA studied in different ex vivo and in vivo rat models simulating the human gut situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; van Hoek, A.H.A.M.; Joosten, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of DNA sequences from genetically modified plants to persist in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. PCR analysis and transformation assays were used to study DNA persistence and integrity in various ex vivo and in vivo systems using gnotobiotic rats. DNA...

  17. High-wavenumber FT-Raman spectroscopy for in vivo and ex vivo measurements of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Flores, A. F.; Raniero, L.; Canevari, R. A.;

    2011-01-01

    The identification of normal and cancer breast tissue of rats was investigated using high-frequency (HF) FT-Raman spectroscopy with a near-infrared excitation source on in vivo and ex vivo measurements. Significant differences in the Raman intensities of prominent Raman bands of lipids and protei...

  18. Single-pixel hyperspectral imaging for real-time cancer detection: detecting damage in ex vivo porcine tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Joseph; Farahi, Faramarz; Trammell, Susan R.

    2016-03-01

    We are developing a single-pixel hyperspectral imaging system based on compressive sensing that acquires spatial and spectral information simultaneously. Our spectral imaging system uses autofluorescencent emission from collagen (400 nm) and NAD(P)H (475 nm), as well as, differences in the optical reflectance spectra as diagnostics for differentiating between healthy and diseased tissue. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of our imaging system to discriminate between healthy and damaged porcine epidermal tissue. Healthy porcine epidermal tissue samples (n=11) were imaged ex vivo using our hyperspectral system. The amount of NAD(P)H emission and the reflectance properties were approximately constant across the surface of healthy tissue samples. The tissue samples were then thermally damaged using an 1850 nm thulium fiber laser and re-imaged after laser irradiation. The damaged regions were clearly visible in the hyperspectral images as the thermal damage altered the fluorescent emission of NAD(P)H and changed the scattering properties of the tissue. The extent of the damaged regions was determined based on the hyperspectral images and these estimates were compared to damage extents measured in white light images acquired with a traditional camera. The extent of damage determined via hyperspectral imaging was in good agreement with estimates based on white light imaging indicating that our system is capable of differentiating between healthy and damaged tissue. Possible applications of our single pixel hyperspectral imaging system range from real-time determination of tumor margins during surgery to the use of this technique in the pathology lab to aid with cancer diagnosis and staging.

  19. An ex vivo RT-qPCR-based assay for human peripheral leukocyte responsiveness to glucocorticoids in surgically induced inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gråberg T

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Truls Gråberg,1 Lovisa Strömmer,1 Erik Hedman,2 Mehmet Uzunel,3 Ewa Ehrenborg,4 Ann-Charlotte Wikström5 1Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska University Hospital, 3Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, 4Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, 5Unit of Translational Immunology, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Introduction: An assay to determine glucocorticoid (GC responsiveness in humans could be used to monitor GC non-responsiveness in states of GC insufficiency and could provide a tool to adapt GC treatment to individual patients. We propose an ex vivo assay to test GC responsiveness in peripheral leukocytes. The assay was evaluated in a human experimental model of surgery-induced inflammation. Patients and methods: Changes in expression of the GC-regulated genes GILZ, IL1R2, FKBP5, and HLA-DR and glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GRα were determined by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR in peripheral leukocytes from surgical patients and healthy blood donors (total n=60 in response to low (1 nM and high (1 µM dexamethasone (DEX. The final selection of a suitable endogenous control gene was based on the studies of stability during DEX treatment and inflammation. Correlations between pre- and postoperative GC-induced gene expression, the postoperative systemic inflammatory and metabolic response (CRP, IL-6, white blood cell count, cytokines, resistin, free fatty acids, glucose, insulin, and adiponectin, and the clinical outcome were analyzed. The length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU-LOS, the length of stay in the hospital, and postoperative complications were used to measure clinical outcome. Results: When the blood donors were compared to the patients, there were no significant

  20. Comparison of iodinated contrast media for the assessment of atherosclerotic plaque attenuation values by CT coronary angiography: Observations in an ex vivo model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. la Grutta (Ludovico); M. Galia (Massimo); G. Gentile; G. Lo Re (G.); E. Grassedonio (Emanuele); F. Coppolino; E. Maffei (Erica); E. Maresi (E.); A. Lo Casto (A.); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); M. Midiri (Massimo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the influence of different iodinated contrast media with several dilutions on plaque attenuation in an ex vivo coronary model studied by multislice CT coronary angiography. Methods: In six ex vivo left anterior descending coronary arteries immersed in oil, CT (slice

  1. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Harper

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8 and weak (IFNα1 subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies.

  2. Drosophila pupal macrophages--a versatile tool for combined ex vivo and in vivo imaging of actin dynamics at high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Moritz; Squarr, Anna Julia; Risse, Benjamin; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Bogdan, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Molecular understanding of actin dynamics requires a genetically traceable model system that allows live cell imaging together with high-resolution microscopy techniques. Here, we used Drosophila pupal macrophages that combine many advantages of cultured cells with a genetic in vivo model system. Using structured illumination microscopy together with advanced spinning disk confocal microscopy we show that these cells provide a powerful system for single gene analysis. It allows forward genetic screens to characterize the regulatory network controlling cell shape and directed cell migration in a physiological context. We knocked down components regulating lamellipodia formation, including WAVE, single subunits of Arp2/3 complex and CPA, one of the two capping protein subunits and demonstrate the advantages of this model system by imaging mutant macrophages ex vivo as well as in vivo upon laser-induced wounding.

  3. Blockade of Toll-like receptor 2 prevents spontaneous cytokine release from rheumatoid arthritis ex vivo synovial explant cultures

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nic An Ultaigh, Sinead

    2011-02-23

    Abstract Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the effect of blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells. Methods RA synovial tissue biopsies, obtained under direct visualization at arthroscopy, were established as synovial explant cultures ex vivo or snap frozen for immunohistology. Mononuclear cell cultures were isolated from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of RA patients. Cultures were incubated with the TLR1\\/2 ligand, Pam3CSK4 (200 ng, 1 and 10 μg\\/ml), an anti-TLR2 antibody (OPN301, 1 μg\\/ml) or an immunoglobulin G (IgG) (1 μg\\/ml) matched control. The comparative effect of OPN301 and adalimumab (anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha) on spontaneous release of proinflammatory cytokines from RA synovial explants was determined using quantitative cytokine MSD multiplex assays or ELISA. OPN301 penetration into RA synovial tissue explants cultures was assessed by immunohistology. Results Pam3CSK4 significantly upregulated interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in RA peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and RA synovial explant cultures (P < 0.05). OPN301 significantly decreased Pam3CSK4-induced cytokine production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-8 compared to IgG control in RA PBMCs and SFMCs cultures (all P < 0.05). OPN301 penetration of RA synovial tissue cultures was detected in the lining layer and perivascular regions. OPN301 significantly decreased spontaneous cytokine production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-8 from RA synovial tissue explant cultures (all P < 0.05). Importantly, the inhibitory effect of OPN on spontaneous cytokine secretion was comparable to inhibition by anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody adalimumab. Conclusions These findings further support targeting TLR2 as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA.

  4. Control of circumferential wall stress and luminal shear stress within intact vascular segments perfused ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kurdi, Mohammed S; Vipperman, Jeffrey S; Vorp, David A

    2008-10-01

    Proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controllers have proven to be robust in controlling many applications, and remain the most widely used control system architecture. The purpose of this work was to use this architecture for designing and tuning two PID controllers. The first was used to control the physiologic arterial circumferential wall stress (CWS) and the second to control the physiologic arterial shear stress (SS) imposed on intact vascular segments that were implanted into an ex vivo vascular perfusion system (EVPS). In order to most accurately control the stresses imposed onto vascular segments perfused ex vivo, analytical models were derived to calculate the CWS and SS. The mid-vein-wall CWS was calculated using the classical Lame solution for thick-walled cylinders in combination with the intraluminal pressure and outer diameter measurements. Similarly, the SS was calculated using the Hagen-Poiseuille equation in combination with the flow rate and outer diameter measurements. Performance of each controller was assessed by calculating the root mean square of the error (RMSE) between the desired and measured process variables. The performance experiments were repeated ten times (N=10) and an average RMSE was reported for each controller. RMSE standard deviations were calculated to demonstrate the reproducibility of the results. Sterile methods were utilized for making blood gas and temperature measurements in order to maintain physiologic levels within the EVPS. Physiologic blood gases (pH, pO(2), and pCO(2)) and temperature within the EVPS were very stable and controlled manually. Blood gas and temperature levels were recorded hourly for several (N=9) 24 h perfusion experiments. RMSE values for CWS control (0.427+/-0.027 KPa) indicated that the system was able to generate a physiologic CWS wave form within 0.5% error of the peak desired CWS over each cardiac cycle. RMSE values for SS control (0.005+/-0.0007 dynescm(2)) indicated that the system

  5. Expression patterns of intestinal calcium transport factors and ex-vivo absorption of calcium in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprekeler Nele

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many species, the small intestine is the major site of calcium (Ca2+ absorption. The horse differs considerably from most other species with regard to the physiology of its Ca2+ metabolism and digestion. Thus, this study was performed to get more information about the transcellular Ca2+ absorption in the horse. Two mechanisms of intestinal Ca2+ absorption are described: the passive paracellular pathway and the active, vitamin D-dependent transcellular pathway. The latter involves the following elements: vitamin D receptors (VDR, transient receptor potential vanilloid channel members 5 and 6 (TRPV5/6, calbindin-D9k (CB, the Na/Ca exchanger (NCX1 and the plasma membrane Ca-ATPase (PMCA. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein and mRNA expression patterns of VDR, CB and TRPV6 and the ex-vivo Ca2+ absorption in horses, assessed by qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR, western blot, immunohistochemistry and the Ussing chamber technique. Results Highest CB and TRPV6 mRNA levels were detected in the duodenum as compared to the middle parts of the jejunum and ileum and several sites of the large intestine. VDR mRNA levels did not change significantly throughout the intestine. TRPV5 mRNA was not detectable in the horse intestine. The highest VDR and CB protein levels were measured in the duodenum. Ussing chamber studies revealed ex-vivo Ca2+ absorption only in the duodenum, but not in cecum and specific sites of the colon. Conclusion The present findings suggest that TRPV6, CB and VDR may be involved in active intestinal Ca2+ absorption in horses, as described for other mammals. TRPV5 may not play a major role in this process. Furthermore, the expression patterns of these Ca2+ transport elements and the results of the Ussing chamber procedure indicate that a significant part of active intestinal Ca2+ absorption occurs in the duodenum in this species.

  6. Ex-vivo assessment of chronic toxicity of low levels of cadmium on testicular meiotic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffroy-Siraudin, Cendrine [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Laboratoire de Biologie de la Reproduction, AP-HM, Hôpital de la Conception, 147, Boulevard Baille, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Perrard, Marie-Hélène [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, UMR 5242 CNRS INRA Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon 1, 46 allée d' Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Ghalamoun-Slaimi, Rahma [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Laboratoire de Biologie de la Reproduction, AP-HM, Hôpital de la Conception, 147, Boulevard Baille, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Ali, Sazan [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Chaspoul, Florence [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Unité de Chimie-Physique, Faculté de Pharmacie 13005, Marseille (France); Lanteaume, André [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Achard, Vincent [Laboratoire de Biologie de la Reproduction, AP-HM, Hôpital de la Conception, 147, Boulevard Baille, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Gallice, Philippe [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Unité de Chimie-Physique, Faculté de Pharmacie 13005, Marseille (France); Durand, Philippe [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, UMR 5242 CNRS INRA Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon 1, 46 allée d' Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); and others

    2012-08-01

    Using a validated model of culture of rat seminiferous tubules, we assessed the effects of 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/L cadmium (Cd) on spermatogenic cells over a 2‐week culture period. With concentrations of 1 and 10 μg/L in the culture medium, the Cd concentration in the cells, determined by ICP-MS, increased with concentration in the medium and the day of culture. Flow cytometric analysis enabled us to evaluate changes in the number of Sertoli cells and germ cells during the culture period. The number of Sertoli cells did not appear to be affected by Cd. By contrast, spermatogonia and meiotic cells were decreased by 1 and 10 μg/L Cd in a time and dose dependent manner. Stage distribution of the meiotic prophase I and qualitative study of the synaptonemal complexes (SC) at the pachytene stage were performed by immunocytochemistry with an anti SCP3 antibody. Cd caused a time-and-dose-dependent increase of total abnormalities, of fragmented SC and of asynapsis from concentration of 0.1 μg/L. Additionally, we observed a new SC abnormality, the “motheaten” SC. This abnormality is frequently associated with asynapsis and SC widening which increased with both the Cd concentration and the duration of exposure. This abnormality suggests that Cd disrupts the structure and function of proteins involved in pairing and/or meiotic recombination. These results show that Cd induces dose-and-time-dependent alterations of the meiotic process of spermatogenesis ex-vivo, and that the lowest metal concentration, which induces an adverse effect, may vary with the cell parameter studied. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium induces ex-vivo severe time- and dose-dependent germ cell abnormalities. ► Cadmium at very low concentration (0.1 µg/l) induces synaptonemal complex abnormalities. ► The lowest concentration inducing adverse effect varied with the cell parameter studied. ► Cadmium alters proteins involved in pairing and recombination. ► Cadmium leads to achiasmate univalents and

  7. MR elastography and diffusion-weighted imaging of ex vivo prostate cancer: quantitative comparison to histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebjavaher, Ramin S; Nir, Guy; Gagnon, Louis O; Ischia, Joseph; Jones, Edward C; Chang, Silvia D; Yung, Andrew; Honarvar, Mohammad; Fazli, Ladan; Goldenberg, S Larry; Rohling, Robert; Sinkus, Ralph; Kozlowski, Piotr; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was (1) to develop a magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) system for imaging of the ex vivo human prostate and (2) to assess the diagnostic power of mono-frequency and multi-frequency MRE and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) alone and combined as correlated with histopathology in a patient study. An electromagnetic driver was designed specifically for MRE studies in small-bore MR scanners. Ex vivo prostate specimens (post-fixation) of 14 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were imaged with MRE at 7 T (nine cases had DWI). In six patients, the MRE examination was performed at three frequencies (600, 800, 1000 Hz) to extract the power-law exponent Gamma. The images were registered to wholemount pathology slides marked with the Gleason score. The areas under the receiver-operator-characteristic curves (AUC) were calculated. The methods were validated in a phantom study and it was demonstrated that (i) the driver does not interfere with the acquisition process and (ii) the driver can generate amplitudes greater than 100 µm for frequencies less than 1 kHz. In the quantitative study, cancerous tissue with Gleason score at least 3 + 3 was distinguished from normal tissue in the peripheral zone (PZ) with an average AUC of 0.75 (Gd ), 0.75 (Gl ), 0.70 (Gamma-Gd ), 0.68 (apparent diffusion coefficient, ADC), and 0.82 (Gd  + Gl  + ADC). The differentiation between PZ and central gland was modest for Gd (p prostate specimen and the stiffness of the tissue, which could affect the diagnostic power results. DWI and MRE may provide complementary information; in fact MRE performed better than ADC in distinguishing normal from cancerous tissue in some cases. Multi-frequency (Gamma) analysis did not appear to improve the results. However, in light of the effect of tissue fixation, the clinical implication of our results may be inconclusive and more experiments are needed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to antimalarial drugs in western, northern, and eastern Cambodia, 2011-2012: association with molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pharath; Dek, Dalin; Try, Vorleak; Eastman, Richard T; Chy, Sophy; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Mao, Sivanna; Sopha, Chantha; Sam, Baramey; Ashley, Elizabeth A; Miotto, Olivo; Dondorp, Arjen M; White, Nicholas J; Su, Xin-zhuan; Char, Meng Chuor; Anderson, Jennifer M; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Menard, Didier; Fairhurst, Rick M

    2013-11-01

    In 2008, dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-piperaquine (PPQ) became the first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in western Cambodia. Recent reports of increased treatment failure rates after DHA-PPQ therapy in this region suggest that parasite resistance to DHA, PPQ, or both is now adversely affecting treatment. While artemisinin (ART) resistance is established in western Cambodia, there is no evidence of PPQ resistance. To monitor for resistance to PPQ and other antimalarials, we measured drug susceptibilities for parasites collected in 2011 and 2012 from Pursat, Preah Vihear, and Ratanakiri, in western, northern, and eastern Cambodia, respectively. Using a SYBR green I fluorescence assay, we calculated the ex vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 310 parasites to six antimalarials: chloroquine (CQ), mefloquine (MQ), quinine (QN), PPQ, artesunate (ATS), and DHA. Geometric mean IC50s (GMIC50s) for all drugs (except PPQ) were significantly higher in Pursat and Preah Vihear than in Ratanakiri (P ≤ 0.001). An increased copy number of P. falciparum mdr1 (pfmdr1), an MQ resistance marker, was more prevalent in Pursat and Preah Vihear than in Ratanakiri and was associated with higher GMIC50s for MQ, QN, ATS, and DHA. An increased copy number of a chromosome 5 region (X5r), a candidate PPQ resistance marker, was detected in Pursat but was not associated with reduced susceptibility to PPQ. The ex vivo IC50 and pfmdr1 copy number are important tools in the surveillance of multidrug-resistant (MDR) parasites in Cambodia. While MDR P. falciparum is prevalent in western and northern Cambodia, there is no evidence for PPQ resistance, suggesting that DHA-PPQ treatment failures result mainly from ART resistance.

  9. Certolizumab pegol does not bind the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn): Consequences for FcRn-mediated in vitro transcytosis and ex vivo human placental transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Charlene; Armstrong-Fisher, Sylvia; Kopotsha, Tim; Smith, Bryan; Baker, Terry; Kevorkian, Lara; Nesbitt, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) are used to treat inflammatory diseases, which often affect women of childbearing age. The active transfer of these antibodies across the placenta by binding of the Fc-region to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) may result in adverse fetal or neonatal effects. In contrast to other anti-TNFs, certolizumab pegol lacks an Fc-region. The objective of this study was to determine whether the structure of certolizumab pegol limits active placental transfer. Binding affinities of certolizumab pegol, infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept to human FcRn and FcRn-mediated transcytosis were determined using in vitro assays. Human placentas were perfused ex vivo to measure transfer of certolizumab pegol and positive control anti-D IgG from the maternal to fetal circulation. FcRn binding affinity (KD) was 132nM, 225nM and 1500nM for infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept, respectively. There was no measurable certolizumab pegol binding affinity, similar to that of the negative control. FcRn-mediated transcytosis across a cell layer (mean±SD; n=3) was 249.6±25.0 (infliximab), 159.0±20.2 (adalimumab) and 81.3±13.1ng/mL (etanercept). Certolizumab pegol transcytosis (3.2±3.4ng/mL) was less than the negative control antibody (5.9±4.6ng/mL). No measurable transfer of certolizumab pegol from the maternal to the fetal circulation was observed in 5 out of 6 placentas that demonstrated positive-control IgG transport in the ex vivo perfusion model. Together these results support the hypothesis that the unique structure of certolizumab pegol limits its transfer through the placenta to the fetus and may be responsible for previously reported differences in transfer of other anti-TNFs from mother to fetus.

  10. A small molecule modulator of prion protein increases human mesenchymal stem cell lifespan, ex vivo expansion, and engraftment to bone marrow in NOD/SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sindhu T; Cairney, Claire J; Chantry, Andrew D; Madan, Sanjeev; Fernandes, James A; Howe, Steven J; Moore, Harry D; Thompson, Mark J; Chen, Beining; Thrasher, Adrian; Keith, W Nicol; Bellantuono, Ilaria

    2012-06-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been shown to have potential in regenerative approaches in bone and blood. Most protocols rely on their in vitro expansion prior to clinical use. However, several groups including our own have shown that hMSCs lose proliferation and differentiation ability with serial passage in culture, limiting their clinical applications. Cellular prion protein (PrP) has been shown to enhance proliferation and promote self-renewal of hematopoietic, mammary gland, and neural stem cells. Here we show, for the first time, that expression of PrP decreased in hMSC following ex vivo expansion. When PrP expression was knocked down, hMSC showed significant reduction in proliferation and differentiation. In contrast, hMSC expanded in the presence of small molecule 3/689, a modulator of PrP expression, showed retention of PrP expression with ex vivo expansion and extended lifespan up to 10 population doublings. Moreover, cultures produced a 300-fold increase in the number of cells generated. These cells showed a 10-fold increase in engraftment levels in bone marrow 5 weeks post-transplant. hMSC treated with 3/689 showed enhanced protection from DNA damage and enhanced cell cycle progression, in line with data obtained by gene expression profiling. Moreover, upregulation of superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2) was also observed in hMSC expanded in the presence of 3/689. The increase in SOD2 was dependent on PrP expression and suggests increased scavenging of reactive oxygen species as mechanism of action. These data point to PrP as a good target for chemical intervention in stem cell regenerative medicine.

  11. First Ex-Vivo Validation of a Radioguided Surgery Technique with beta- Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Camillocci, E Solfaroli; Bocci, V; Carollo, A; Chiodi, G; Colandrea, M; Collamati, F; Cremonesi, M; Donnarumma, R; Ferrari, M E; Ferroli, P; Ghielmetti, F; Grana, C M; Marafini, M; Morganti, S; Terracciano, C Mancini; Patanè, M; Pedroli, G; Pollo, B; Recchia, L; Russomando, A; Toppi, M; Traini, G; Faccini, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A radio-guided surgery technique with beta- -emitting radio-tracers was suggested to overcome the effect of the large penetration of gamma radiation. The feasibility studies in the case of brain tumors and abdominal neuro-endocrine tumors were based on simulations starting from PET images with several underlying assumptions. This paper reports, as proof-of-principle of this technique, an ex-vivo test on a meningioma patient. This test allowed to validate the whole chain, from the evaluation of the SUV of the tumor, to the assumptions on the bio-distribution and the signal detection. Methods: A patient affected by meningioma was administered 300 MBq of 90Y-DOTATOC. Several samples extracted from the meningioma and the nearby Dura Mater were analyzed with a beta- probe designed specifically for this radio-guided surgery technique. The observed signals were compared both with the evaluation from the histology and with the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: we obtained a large signal on the bulk tumor (105...

  12. Repopulating Decellularized Kidney Scaffolds: An Avenue for Ex Vivo Organ Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. McKee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that fully developed organs can be decellularized, resulting in a complex scaffold and extracellular matrix (ECM network capable of being populated with other cells. This work has resulted in a growing field in bioengineering focused on the isolation, characterization, and modification of organ derived acellular scaffolds and their potential to sustain and interact with new cell populations, a process termed reseeding. In this review, we cover contemporary advancements in the bioengineering of kidney scaffolds including novel work showing that reseeded donor scaffolds can be transplanted and can function in recipients using animal models. Several major areas of the field are taken into consideration, including the decellularization process, characterization of acellular and reseeded scaffolds, culture conditions, and cell sources. Finally, we discuss future avenues based on the advent of 3D bioprinting and recent developments in kidney organoid cultures as well as animal models of renal genesis. The ongoing mergers and collaborations between these fields hold the potential to produce functional kidneys that can be generated ex vivo and utilized for kidney transplantations in patients suffering with renal disease.

  13. Comparison of routinely used intestinal biopsy forceps in dogs: an ex vivo histopathological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, J; Semin, M O; Monton, C; Amiriantz, S; Concordet, D; Raymond-Letron, I; Dossin, O

    2017-03-01

    To compare the quality of duodenal and ileal samples obtained with different biopsy forceps. Fifteen dogs were included in a prospective ex vivo study. After euthanasia, the duodenum and the ileum were sampled with four different forceps and evaluated according to a standardised scoring system. The biopsy forceps evaluated had alligator jaws or cups with smooth edge with or without a needle. The global quality of the biopsies was better in the ileum that in the duodenum regardless of the biopsy forceps. Biopsy forceps with smooth edge including a needle resulted in fewer artefacts than biopsy forceps with smooth edge but no needle in both sites and those with alligator jaws without a needle provided deeper biopsies than those with smooth edge without a needle only in the duodenum. There was no effect of the biopsy forceps type on the size of the biopsies. Our findings may aid in choosing the appropriate type of forceps for intestinal biopsy. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  14. A comparative ex vivo drug permeation study of beta-blockers through porcine buccal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, Sonia; Lauroba, Jacinto; Calpena, Ana; Colom, Helena; Gimeno, Alvaro; Domenech, José

    2014-07-01

    Apparent permeability coefficients (kp) of a series of beta-blockers: acebutolol, atenolol, labetalol, metoprolol, oxprenolol and propranolol, through porcine buccal mucosa were determined. The aim of the study was to determine the permeation parameters (apparent permeability coefficient, kp; flux, J; and lag time, TL) as a measure of the intrinsic permeability of porcine buccal mucosa to these drugs, in order to predict the efficacy of their possible administration through human buccal mucosa. A positive linear correlation was observed between the apparent permeability coefficient, kpand the partition coefficient, P. Oxprenolol and propranolol are the drugs that presented the highest values of kp: 0.3231×10(2) cm/h and 0.5666×10(2) cm/h, respectively. Multiple linear regression (MLR) using least square estimation was performed on the data set with logkpas dependent variable and the descriptors as predictor variables. The potential systemic capacity after a buccal administration was predicted by estimating the plasma concentrations at steady-stated (Css). Considering the entire process of permeation ex vivo, propranolol and oxprenolol would seem to be the best candidates for administration through the buccal mucosa.

  15. Effectiveness of hand washing on the removal of iron oxide nanoparticles from human skin ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Nastassja A; Berthet, Aurélie; Maurizi, Lionel; Eisenbeis, Antoine; Hopf, Nancy B

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of washing with soap and water in removing nanoparticles from exposed skin was investigated. Dry, nanoscale hematite (α-Fe2O3) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) powder, with primary particle diameters between 20-30 nm, were applied to two samples each of fresh and frozen ex vivo human skin in two independent experiments. The permeation of nanoparticles through skin, and the removal of nanoparticles after washing with soap and water were investigated. Bare iron oxide nanoparticles remained primarily on the surface of the skin, without penetrating beyond the stratum corneum. Skin exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles for 1 and 20 hr resulted in removal of 85% and 90%, respectively, of the original dose after washing. In the event of dermal exposure to chemicals, removal is essential to avoid potential local irritation or permeation across skin. Although manufactured at an industrial scale and used extensively in laboratory experiments, limited data are available on the removal of engineered nanoparticles after skin contact. Our finding raises questions about the potential consequences of nanoparticles remaining on the skin and whether alternative washing methods should be proposed. Further studies on skin decontamination beyond use of soap and water are needed to improve the understanding of the potential health consequences of dermal exposure to nanoparticles.

  16. Ex vivo expansion and pluripotential differentiation of cryopreserved human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Ying; ZHENG Qiang; JIA Bing-bing; HUANG Guo-ping; Xu Yu-lin; WANG Jin-fu; PAN Zhi-jun

    2007-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the potentials of ex vivo expansion and pluri-differentiation of cryopreservation of adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into chondrocytes, adipocytes and neurocytes. Cryopreserved hMSCs were resuscitated and cultured for 15 passages, and then induced into chondrocytes, adipocytes and neurocytes with corresponding induction medium. The induced cells were observed for morphological properties and detected for expressions of type II collagen, triglyceride or neuron-specific enolase and nestin. The result showed that the resuscitated cells could differentiate into chondrocytes after exposure to transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and vitamin C (Vc), and uniformly changed morphologically from a spindle-like fibroblastic appearance to a polygonal shape in three weeks. The induced cells were heterochromatic to safranin O and expressed cartilage matrix-procollagenal (II) mRNA. The resuscitated cells cultured in induction medium consisting of dexamethasone, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, indomethacin and IGF-I showed adipogenesis, and lipid vacuoles accumulation was detectable after 21 d. The resuscitated hMSCs were also induced into neurocytes and expressed nestin and neuron specific endolase (NSE) that were special surface markers associated with neural cells at different stage. This study suggested that the resuscitated hMSCs should be still a population of pluripotential cells and that it could be used for establishing an abundant hMSC reservoir for further experiment and treatment of various clinical diseases.

  17. Laparoscopic Nephrectomy, Ex Vivo Partial Nephrectomy, and Autotransplantation for the Treatment of Complex Renal Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmir Gopal Nayak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary era of minimally invasive surgery, very few T1/T2 renal lesions are not amenable to nephron-sparing surgery. However, centrally located lesions continue to pose a clinical dilemma. We sought to describe our local experience with three cases of laparoscopic nephrectomy, ex vivo partial nephrectomy, and autotransplantation. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy was performed followed by immediate renal cooling and perfusion with isotonic solution. Back-table partial nephrectomy, renorrhaphy, and autotransplantation were then performed. Mean warm ischemia (WIT and cold ischemic times (CIT were 2 and 39 minutes, respectively. Average blood loss was 267 mL. All patients preserved their renal function postoperatively. Final pathology confirmed pT1, clear cell renal cell carcinoma with negative margins in all. All are disease free at up to 39 months follow-up with stable renal function. In conclusion, the described approach remains a viable option for the treatment of complex renal masses preserving oncological control and renal function.

  18. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection of Mucosal Tissue Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Yanille M; Park, Seo Young; Dezzutti, Charlene S

    2016-02-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs) specific for HIV are being investigated for use in HIV prevention. Due to their ability to inhibit HIV attachment to and entry into target cells, nAbs may be suitable for use as topical HIV microbicides. As such, they would present an alternative intervention for individuals who may not benefit from using antiretroviral-based products for HIV prevention. We theorize that nAbs can inhibit viral transmission through mucosal tissue, thus reducing the incidence of HIV infection. The efficacy of the PG9, PG16, VRC01, and 4E10 antibodies was evaluated in an ex vivo human model of mucosal HIV transmission. nAbs reduced HIV transmission, causing 1.5- to 2-log10 reductions in HIV replication in ectocervical tissues and ≈3-log10 reductions in HIV replication in colonic tissues over 21 days. These antibodies demonstrated greater potency in colonic tissues, with a 50-fold higher dose being required to reduce transmission in ectocervical tissues. Importantly, nAbs retained their potency and reduced viral transmission in the presence of whole semen. No changes in tissue viability or immune activation were observed in colonic or ectocervical tissue after nAb exposure. Our data suggest that topically applied nAbs are safe and effective against HIV infection of mucosal tissue and support further development of nAbs as a topical microbicide that could be used for anal as well as vaginal protection.

  19. Influence of massage and occlusion on the ex vivo skin penetration of rigid liposomes and invasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauer, Sindy; Richter, Heike; Kuntsche, Judith; Büttemeyer, Rolf; Liebsch, Manfred; Linscheid, Michael; Fahr, Alfred; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Lademann, Jürgen; Patzelt, Alexa

    2014-02-01

    Liposomes are frequently described as drug delivery systems for dermal and transdermal applications. Recently, it has been shown that particulate substances penetrate effectively into hair follicles and that the follicular penetration depth can be increased by massaging the skin, which simulates the in vivo movement of hairs in the hair follicles. In the present study, massage was applied to skin mounted to Franz diffusion cells. By means of confocal laser scanning microscopy, the influence of massage and occlusion on the follicular penetration depths of rigid and flexible liposomes loaded with a hydrophilic and lipophilic dye was investigated. The application of massage increased follicular penetration significantly. Occlusion resulted in an increased follicular penetration depth only for rigid liposomes, whereas invasomes did not penetrate more effectively if occlusion was applied. The results confirm that massage is an important tool for increasing follicular penetration in ex vivo studies using Franz diffusion cells. Occlusion may reduce the efficacy of follicular penetration depending on the specific liposomal preparation. Rigidity in particular appears to be a relevant parameter.

  20. Bridging the gap: functional healing of embryonic small intestine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Riccardo; Roberts, Neil A; Oltrabella, Francesca; Khalil, Basem A; Morabito, Antonino; Woolf, Adrian S

    2016-02-01

    The ability to grow embryonic organs ex vivo provides an opportunity to follow their differentiation in a controlled environment, with resulting insights into normal development. Additionally, similar strategies can be used to assess effects on organogenesis of physical and chemical manipulations. This study aimed to create an organ culture model with which to test physical manipulations to enhance healing of gut segments, thus generating a single functional organ. Embryonic mouse jejunum was isolated and cut into 2-3 mm tubes, which were placed in pairs, separated by a small gap, on semi-permeable supports. Each pair was linked by a nylon suture threaded through their lumens. After 3 days in organ culture fed by defined serum-free media, the rudiments differentiated to form tubes of smooth muscle surrounding a core of rudimentary villi. Of 34 such pairs, 74% had touching and well aligned proximate ends. Of these joined structures, 80% (59% of the total pairs) had a continuous lumen, as assessed by observing the trajectories of fluorescent dextrans injected into their distal ends. Fused organ pairs formed a single functional unit, as assessed by spontaneous contraction waves propagated along their lengths. In these healed intestines, peripherin(+) neurons formed a nexus in the zone of fusion, linking the rudiment pairs. In future, this system could be used to test whether growth factors enhance fusion. Such results should in turn inform the design of novel treatments for short bowel syndrome, a potentially fatal condition with a currently limited and imperfect range of therapies.

  1. Blind source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, July; Perez, Sandra; Montoya, Yonatan; Botina, Deivid; Garzón, Johnson

    2015-05-01

    Blind Source Separation methods (BSS) aim for the decomposition of a given signal in its main components or source signals. Those techniques have been widely used in the literature for the analysis of biomedical images, in order to extract the main components of an organ or tissue under study. The analysis of skin images for the extraction of melanin and hemoglobin is an example of the use of BSS. This paper presents a proof of concept of the use of source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral Images. The images are acquired with an interference filter-based imaging system. The images are processed by means of two algorithms: Independent Components analysis and Non-negative Matrix Factorization. In both cases, it is possible to obtain maps that quantify the concentration of the main chromophores present in aortic tissue. Also, the algorithms allow for spectral absorbance of the main tissue components. Those spectral signatures were compared against the theoretical ones by using correlation coefficients. Those coefficients report values close to 0.9, which is a good estimator of the method's performance. Also, correlation coefficients lead to the identification of the concentration maps according to the evaluated chromophore. The results suggest that Multi/hyper-spectral systems together with image processing techniques is a potential tool for the analysis of cardiovascular tissue.

  2. Mechanically loaded ex vivo bone culture system 'Zetos': Systems and culture preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C M Davies

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the culture preparation of ovine, bovine and human cancellous bone cores to be used in an explants model Zetos. The three dimensional (3D bone cores were prepared and evaluated for all three animals. Bone cells in vivo constantly interact with each other, migratory cells, surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM and interstitial fluid in a microenvironment, which continuously responds to various endogenous and exogenous stimuli. The Zetos system was designed to culture and mechanically load viable cancellous bone explants in their near natural microenvironment. This 3D ex vivo system bridges the current gap between in vitro and in vivo methods. One aim of this work was to compare the macro and micro-architecture of ovine, bovine and human cancellous bone tissue in preparation for culture within the Zetos system in order to determine the optimal source of experimental material. A second aim was to optimise the preparations of the bone cores as well as develop techniques involved during tissue maintenance. Bone core response was visualised using histological and immunohistochemical methods. The results demonstrate that cancellous bone explants vary greatly in trabecular density and bone volume depending on species, age and location. Sheep and human samples displayed the greatest variation between bones cores when compared to bovine. Even cores taken from the same animal possessed very different characteristics. The histology demonstrated normal bone and cell structure after the core preparation. Immunohistochemistry results demonstrated antigen retention after preparation methods.

  3. Ex vivo encapsulation of dexamethasone sodium phosphate into human autologous erythrocytes using fully automated biomedical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mambrini, Giovanni; Mandolini, Marco; Rossi, Luigia; Pierigè, Francesca; Capogrossi, Giovanni; Salvati, Patricia; Serafini, Sonja; Benatti, Luca; Magnani, Mauro

    2017-01-30

    Erythrocyte-based drug delivery systems are emerging as potential new solutions for the release of drugs into the bloodstream. The aim of the present work was to assess the performance of a fully automated process (EDS) for the ex-vivo encapsulation of the pro-drug dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) into autologous erythrocytes in compliance with regulatory requirements. The loading method was based on reversible hypotonic hemolysis, which allows the opening of transient pores in the cell membrane to be crossed by DSP. The efficiency of encapsulation and the biochemical and physiological characteristics of the processed erythrocytes were investigated in blood samples from 34 healthy donors. It was found that the processed erythrocytes maintained their fundamental properties and the encapsulation process was reproducible. The EDS under study showed greater loading efficiency and reduced variability compared to previous EDS versions. Notably, these results were confirmed using blood samples from Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients, 9.33±1.40 and 19.41±2.10mg of DSP (mean±SD, n=134) by using 62.5 and 125mg DSP loading quantities, respectively. These results support the use of the new EDS version 3.2.0 to investigate the effect of erythrocyte-delivered dexamethasone in regulatory trials in patients with AT.

  4. Metabolomics reveals the heterogeneous secretome of two entomopathogenic fungi to ex vivo cultured insect tissues.

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    Charissa de Bekker

    Full Text Available Fungal entomopathogens rely on cellular heterogeneity during the different stages of insect host infection. Their pathogenicity is exhibited through the secretion of secondary metabolites, which implies that the infection life history of this group of environmentally important fungi can be revealed using metabolomics. Here metabolomic analysis in combination with ex vivo insect tissue culturing shows that two generalist isolates of the genus Metarhizium and Beauveria, commonly used as biological pesticides, employ significantly different arrays of secondary metabolites during infectious and saprophytic growth. It also reveals that both fungi exhibit tissue specific strategies by a distinguishable metabolite secretion on the insect tissues tested in this study. In addition to showing the important heterogeneous nature of these two entomopathogens, this study also resulted in the discovery of several novel destruxins and beauverolides that have not been described before, most likely because previous surveys did not use insect tissues as a culturing system. While Beauveria secreted these cyclic depsipeptides when encountering live insect tissues, Metarhizium employed them primarily on dead tissue. This implies that, while these fungi employ comparable strategies when it comes to entomopathogenesis, there are most certainly significant differences at the molecular level that deserve to be studied.

  5. Ex vivo microbial leakage after using different final irrigation regimens with chlorhexidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther NAVARRO-ESCOBAR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the influence of final irrigation protocols with chlorhexidine in the coronal leakage of Enterococcus faecalis in filled root canals. Material and Methods Seventy single-root canals from extracted teeth were prepared using ProTaper instruments. The irrigation protocol accomplished an alternating irrigation with 5 mL of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCI and 17% EDTA between each file. The teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups (n=15 according to the final irrigation regimen: group 1, without final irrigation; group 2, irrigation with 10 mL 2.0% chlorhexidine (CHX; group 3, with a final application of EC40™; and group 4, irrigation with the combination (1:1 of 0.2% CHX + 0.1% cetrimide (CTR. All the teeth were mounted in a two-chamber apparatus and the coronal access was exposed to E. faecalis. The presence of turbidity in the BHI broth over a period of 180 days was observed. The Friedman test was used for statistical analysis. Results EC40™ varnish showed the least leakage at 180 days, and was statistically similar to 2% CHX. No significant differences were observed between the group without final irrigation and the 2% CHX group or 0.2% CHX + 0.1% CTR. Conclusions In this ex vivo study, EC40™ showed the longest delayed coronal leakage of E. faecalis, although without significant differences from 2% CHX.

  6. Nasal administration of metoclopramide from different dosage forms: in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Cetin; Ozkan, Cansel Kose; Savaser, Ayhan; Ozkan, Yalcin; Tasdemir, Umut; Altunay, Hikmet

    2009-04-01

    Nasal drug delivery is an interesting route of administration for metoclopramide hydrochloride (MTC) in preventing different kind of emesis. Currently, the routes of administration of antiemetics are oral or intravenous, although patient compliance is often impaired by the difficulties associated with acute emesis or invasiveness of parenteral administration. In this perspective, nasal dosage forms (solution, gel, and lyophilized powder) of MTC were prepared by using a mucoadhesive polymer sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC). In vitro and ex vivo drug release studies were performed in a modified horizontal diffusion chamber with cellulose membrane and excised cattle nasal mucosa as diffusion barriers. The tolerance of nasal mucosa to the formulation and its components were investigated using light microscopy. In vivo studies were carried out for the optimized formulations in sheep and the pharmacokinetics parameters were compared with oral solution and IV dosage form. The release of MTC from solution and powder formulations was found to be higher than gel formulation (p nasal bioavailability of gel is higher than those of solution and powder (p nasal residence time and thereby nasal absorption.

  7. Ex vivo perfusion of the swine heart as a method for pre-transplant assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colah, S; Freed, D H; Mundt, P; Germscheid, S; White, P; Ali, A; Tian, G; Large, S; Falter, F

    2012-09-01

    We describe a cost-effective, reproducible circuit in a porcine, ex vivo, continuous warm-blood, bi-ventricular, working heart model that has future possibilities for pre-transplant assessment of marginal hearts donated from brain stem dead donors and hearts donated after circulatory determination of death (DCDD). In five consecutive experiments over five days, pressure volume loops were performed. During working mode, the left ventricular end systolic pressure volume relationship (LV ESPVR) was 23.1±11.1 mmHg/ml and the LV preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) was 67.8±7.2. (Standard PVAN analysis software) (Millar Instruments, Houston, TX, USA) All five hearts were perfused for 219±64 minutes and regained normal cardiac function on the perfusion system.They displayed a significant upward and leftward shift of the end systolic pressure volume relationship, a significant increase in preload recruitable stroke work and minimal stiffness. These hearts could potentially be considered for transplantation. The circuit was effective during reperfusion and working modes whilst proving to be successful in maintaining cardiac function in excess of four hours. Using an autologous prime of approximately 20% haematocrit (Hct), electrolytes and blood gases were easy to control within this period using standard perfusion techniques.

  8. Hybrid System for Ex Vivo Hemorheological and Hemodynamic Analysis: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Eunseop; Jun Kang, Yang; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-06-19

    Precise measurement of biophysical properties is important to understand the relation between these properties and the outbreak of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, a systematic measurement for these biophysical parameters under in vivo conditions is nearly impossible because of complex vessel shape and limited practicality. In vitro measurements can provide more biophysical information, but in vitro exposure changes hemorheological properties. In this study, a hybrid system composed of an ultrasound system and microfluidic device is proposed for monitoring hemorheological and hemodynamic properties under more reasonable experimental conditions. Biophysical properties including RBC aggregation, viscosity, velocity, and pressure of blood flows are simultaneously measured under various conditions to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of this measurement system. The proposed technique is applied to a rat extracorporeal loop which connects the aorta and jugular vein directly. As a result, the proposed system is found to measure biophysical parameters reasonably without blood collection from the rat and provided more detailed information. This hybrid system, combining ultrasound imaging and microfluidic techniques to ex vivo animal models, would be useful for monitoring the variations of biophysical properties induced by chemical agents. It can be used to understand the relation between biophysical parameters and CVDs.

  9. Prion structure investigated in situ, ex vivo, and in vitro by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Janina; Miller, Lisa M.; Spassov, Sashko; Sokolowski, Fabian; Lasch, Peter; Beekes, Michael; Naumann, Dieter

    2004-07-01

    Syrian hamster nervous tissue was investigated by FTIR microspectroscopy with conventional and synchrotron infrared light sources. Various tissue structures from the cerebellum and medulla oblongata of scrapie-infected and control hamsters were investigated at a spatial resolution of 50 μm. Single neurons in dorsal root ganglia of scrapie-infected hamsters were analyzed by raster scan mapping at 6 μm spatial resolution. These measurements enabled us to (i) scrutinize structural differences between infected and non-infected tissue and (ii) analyze for the first time the distribution of different protein structures in situ within single nerve cells. Single nerve cells exhibited areas of increased β-sheet content, which co-localized consistently with accumulations of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). Spectral data were also obtained from purified, partly proteinase K digested PrPSc isolated from scrapie-infected nervous tissue of hamsters to elucidate similarities/dissimilarities between prion structure in situ and ex vivo. A further comparison is drawn to the recombinant Syrian hamster prion protein SHaPrP90-232, whose in vitro transition from the predominantly a-helical isoform to β-sheet rich oligomeric structures was also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy.

  10. Patterns of histological changes following hepatic electrolytic ablation in an ex-vivo perfused model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravante, Gianpiero; Ong, Seok Ling; West, Kevin; McGregor, Angus; Maddern, Guy J; Metcalfe, Matthew S; Lloyd, David M; Dennison, Ashley R

    2012-10-01

    Electrolytic ablation (EA) destroys the liver by releasing toxic radicles and producing modifications in the local pH without increasing the tissue temperature. We assessed the histological changes produced by EA using an ex-vivo perfused model. Five porcine livers were harvested, preserved in ice and reperfused for six hours in an extracorporeal circuit using autologous normothermic blood. One hour after reperfusion EA was performed and liver biopsies collected at the end of the experiments. The main necrotic zone consisted of coagulative necrosis, sinusoidal dilatation and haemorrhage with an unusual morphological pattern. The coagulative necrosis and haemorrhage affected mainly the peripheral area of the lobule with relative sparing of the area surrounding the centrilobular vein. Contrasting with this sinusoidal dilatation appeared to be more prominent in the centrilobular area. EA produces patterns of tissue destruction that have not been observed with the more commonly used thermal techniques. Further studies should obtain more information about the influence of adjacent biliary and vascular structures so that appropriate clinical trials can be designed.

  11. Amelogenin-assisted ex vivo remineralization of human enamel: effects of supersaturation degree and fluoride concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuwei; Nelson, James R.; Alvarez, Jason R.; Hagan, Joseph; Berrier, Allison; Xu, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    The formation of organized nanocrystals that resemble enamel is crucial for successful enamel remineralization. Calcium, phosphate and fluoride ions and amelogenin are important ingredients for the formation of organized hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals in vitro. However, the effects of these remineralization agents on the enamel crystal morphology have not been thoroughly studied. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of fluoride ions, supersaturation degree and amelogenin on the crystal morphology and organization of ex vivo remineralized human enamel. Extracted third molars were sliced thin and acid-etched to provide the enamel surface for immersion in different remineralization solutions. The crystal morphology and mineral phase of the remineralized enamel surface were analyzed by FE-SEM, ATR-FTIR and XRD. The concentration of fluoride and supersaturation degree of hydroxyapatite had significant effects on the crystal morphology and crystal organization, which varied from plate-like loose crystals to rod-like densely packed nanocrystal arrays. Densely packed arrays of fluoridated hydroxyapatite nanorods were observed under the following conditions: σ(HAP) = 10.2±2.0 with fluoride 1.5±0.5 mg/L and amelogenin 40±10 µg/mL, pH 6.8±0.4. A phase diagram summarized the conditions that form dense or loose hydroxyapatite nanocrystal structures. This study provides the basis for the development of novel dental materials for caries management. PMID:21256987

  12. Engineering a human bone marrow model: a case study on ex vivo erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantalaris, A; Keng, P; Bourne, P; Chang, A Y; Wu, J H

    1998-01-01

    Bone marrow, with its intricate, three-dimensional tissue structure facilitating cell-cell interactions, provides a microenvironment supporting the production of hundreds of billions of multilineal blood cells everyday. We have developed a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system in which marrow cells are cultured in a reactor packed with porous microspheres. The culture supports a three-dimensional growth configuration and multilineal hemopoiesis mimicking the bone marrow in vivo. We studied ex vivo human erythropoiesis using the three-dimensional culture system. The system sustained extensive erythropoiesis at low erythropoietin concentrations (0.2 U/mL), plus stem cell factor, interleukin-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and insulin-like growth factor-I. Erythroid cell production lasted for more than 5 weeks, and the percentage of erythroid cells in the nonadherent cell population was approximately 60%. Flow cytometric analysis using cell surface markers specific for erythroid cells (CD71 and glycophorin-A) indicated that the culture produced early, intermediate, and late erythroid cells. As the culture progressed, the erythroid cell population shifted gradually toward mature cell types. When compared to the three-dimensional culture, the traditional flask cultures failed to support extensive erythropoiesis under the same conditions. This indicates that the three-dimensional bone marrow culture system provides a microenvironment conducive to erythropoiesis under more physiological conditions and is a better bone marrow model.

  13. The Transcriptome of Exophiala dermatitidis during Ex-vivo Skin Model Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyntner, Caroline; Blasi, Barbara; Arcalis, Elsa; Mirastschijski, Ursula; Sterflinger, Katja; Tafer, Hakim

    2016-01-01

    The black yeast Exophiala dermatitidis is a widespread polyextremophile and human pathogen, that is found in extreme natural habitats and man-made environments such as dishwashers. It can cause various diseases ranging from phaeohyphomycosis and systemic infections, with fatality rates reaching 40%. While the number of cases in immunocompromised patients are increasing, knowledge of the infections, virulence factors and host response is still scarce. In this study, for the first time, an artificial infection of an ex-vivo skin model with Exophiala dermatitidis was monitored microscopically and transcriptomically. Results show that Exophiala dermatitidis is able to actively grow and penetrate the skin. The analysis of the genomic and RNA-sequencing data delivers a rich and complex transcriptome where circular RNAs, fusion transcripts, long non-coding RNAs and antisense transcripts are found. Changes in transcription strongly affect pathways related to nutrients acquisition, energy metabolism, cell wall, morphological switch, and known virulence factors. The L-Tyrosine melanin pathway is specifically upregulated during infection. Moreover the production of secondary metabolites, especially alkaloids, is increased. Our study is the first that gives an insight into the complexity of the transcriptome of Exophiala dermatitidis during artificial skin infections and reveals new virulence factors. PMID:27822460

  14. The transcriptome of Exophiala dermatitidis during ex-vivo kin model infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Poyntner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The black yeast Exophiala dermatitidis is a widespread polyextremophile and humanpathogen, that is found in extreme natural habitats and man-made environments suchas dishwashers. It can cause various diseases ranging from phaehyphomycosis andsystemic infections, with fatality rates reaching 40%. While the number of cases inimmunocompromised patients are increasing, knowledge of the infections, virulencefactors and host response is still scarce. In this study, for the first time, an artificialinfection of an ex-vivo skin model with Exophiala dermatitidis was monitoredmicroscopically and transcriptomically. Results show that Exophiala dermatitidis is ableto actively grow and penetrate the skin. The analysis of the genomic andRNA-sequencing data delivers a rich and complex transcriptome where circular RNAs,fusion transcripts, long non-coding RNAs and antisense transcripts are found. Changesin transcription strongly affect pathways related to nutrients acquisition, energymetabolism, cell wall, morphological switch, and known virulence factors. TheL-Tyrosine melanin pathway is specifically upregulated during infection. Moreover theproduction of secondary metabolites, especially alkaloids, is icreased. Our study is thefirst that gives an insight into the complexity of the transcriptome of Exophialadermatitidis during artificial skin infections and reveals new virulence factors.

  15. Improved ex vivo blood compatibility of central venous catheter with noble metal alloy coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafa Homann, Manijeh; Johansson, Dorota; Wallen, Håkan; Sanchez, Javier

    2016-10-01

    Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are a serious cause of morbidity and mortality induced by the use of central venous catheters (CVCs). Nobel metal alloy (NMA) coating is an advanced surface modification that prevents microbial adhesion and growth on catheters and thereby reduces the risk of infection. In vitro microbiological analyses have shown up to 90% reduction in microbial adhesion on coated CVC compared to uncoated ones. This study aimed to assess the blood compatibility of NMA-coated CVC according to ISO 10993-4. Hemolysis, thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex, platelet counts, fibrin deposition, and C3a and SC5b-9 complement activation were analyzed in human blood exposed to the NMA-coated and control CVCs using a Chandler-loop model. NMA-coated CVC did not induce hemolysis and fell in the "nonhemolytic" category according to ASTM F756-00. Significantly lower amounts of TAT were generated and less fibrin was deposited on NMA-coated CVC than on uncoated ones. Slightly higher platelet counts and lower complement markers were observed for NMA-coated CVC compared to uncoated ones. These data suggest that the NMA-coated CVC has better ex vivo blood compatibility compared to uncoated CVC. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1359-1365, 2016.

  16. The influence of small intestinal mucus structure on particle transport ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajka, Balázs H; Rigby, Neil M; Cross, Kathryn L; Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    Mucus provides a barrier to bacteria and toxins while allowing nutrient absorption and waste transport. Unlike colonic mucus, small intestinal mucus structure is poorly understood. This study aimed to provide evidence for a continuous, structured mucus layer and assess the diffusion of different sized particles through it. Mucus structure was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ultra-structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Tracking of 100 nm and 500 nm latex beads was conducted using ex vivo porcine mucus. The porcine jejunum and ileum were filled with mucus. Layered MUC2 staining was visible throughout the small intestine, covering villus tips. Scanning electron microscopy showed net-like mucin sheets covering villi (211 ± 7 nm pore diameter). Particle tracking of 100 nm latex beads, showed no inhibition of diffusion through mucus while 500 nm beads displayed limited diffusion. These results suggest a continuous mucus layer exists throughout the small intestine, which is highly stratified adjacent to the epithelium. The network observed is consistent with previous observations and correlates with stratified MUC2 staining. Mucin pore size is consistent with free diffusion of 100 nm and limited diffusion of 500 nm particles. Small Intestinal mucus structure has important implications for drug delivery systems and prevention and treatment of conditions like mucositis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. Telomere Attrition Occurs during Ex Vivo Expansion of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mokry

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide a detailed characteristic of stem cells isolated and expanded from the human dental pulp. Dental pulp stem cells express mesenchymal cell markers STRO-1, vimentin, CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD166, and stem cell markers Sox2, nestin, and nucleostemin. They are multipotent as shown by their osteogenic and chondrogenic potential. We measured relative telomere length in 11 dental pulp stem cell lines at different passages by quantitative real-time PCR. Despite their large proliferative capacity, stable viability, phenotype, and genotype over prolonged cultivation, human dental pulp stem cells suffer from progressive telomere shortening over time they replicate in vitro. Relative telomere length (T/S was inversely correlated with cumulative doubling time. Our findings indicate that excessive ex vivo expansion of adult stem cells should be reduced at minimum to avoid detrimental effects on telomere maintenance and measurement of telomere length should become a standard when certificating the status and replicative age of stem cells prior therapeutic applications.

  18. In vivo, Ex Vivo, and In Vitro Approaches to Study Intermediate Filaments in the Eye Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrin, Miguel; Young, Laura; Wu, Weiju; Girkin, John M; Quinlan, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    The role of the eye lens is to focus light into the retina. To perform this unique function, the ocular lens must be transparent. Previous studies have demonstrated the expression of vimentin, BFSP1, and BFSP2 in the eye lens. These intermediate filament (IF) proteins are essential to the optical properties of the lens. They are also important to its biomechanical properties, to the shape of the lens fiber cells, and to the organization and function of the plasma membrane. The eye lens is an iconic model in developmental studies, as a result different vertebrate models, including zebrafish, have been developed to study lens formation. In the present chapter, we have summarized the new approaches and the more breakthrough models (e.g., iPSc) that can be used to study the function of IFs in the ocular lens. We have presented three different groups of models. The first group includes in vitro models, where IFs can be studied and manipulated in lens cell cultures. The second includes ex vivo models. These replicate better the complex lens cell differentiation processes and the role(s) played by IFs. The third class is the in vivo models, and here, we have focused on Zebrafish and new imaging approaches using selective plane illumination microscopy. Finally, we present protocols on how to use these lens models to study IFs.

  19. Dermal absorption and skin damage following hydrofluoric acid exposure in an ex vivo human skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Kilo, Sonja; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Korinth, Gintautas; Drexler, Hans

    2016-04-25

    The wide industrial use of hydrofluoric acid (HF) poses a high risk for accidental dermal exposure. Despite local and systemic hazards associated with HF, information on percutaneous penetration and tissue damage is rare. In the present ex vivo study, the dermal absorption of HF (detected in terms of fluoride ions) was quantified and the skin damaging potential as a function of concentration and exposure duration was assessed. Percutaneous penetration of HF (c=5, 30, and 50%) at 3 exposure durations (3, 5, and 10 min) was investigated in a static diffusion cell model using freshly excised human skin. Alterations of skin were histologically evaluated. HF rapidly penetrated through skin under formation of a considerable intradermal reservoir (∼ 13-67% of total absorbed fluoride). Histologically, epidermal alterations were detected already after exposure to 5% HF for 3 min. The degree of skin damage increased with rising concentration and exposure duration leading to coagulation necrosis. For HF concentrations of ≥ 30%, skin damage progressed into deeper skin layers. Topically applied HF concentration was the principal parameter determining HF induced skin effects. The intradermal HF retention capacity associated with progression and prolongation of HF induced skin effects must be considered in the review of skin decontamination procedures.

  20. Epithelial ciliated beating cells essential for ex vivo ALI culture growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Delphine; Petit, Aurélie; Charriot, Jérémy; Knabe, Lucie; Alagha, Khuder; Gamez, Anne Sophie; Garulli, Céline; Bourdin, Arnaud; Chanez, Pascal; Molinari, Nicolas; Vachier, Isabelle

    2017-05-03

    Bronchial epithelium plays a key role in orchestrating innate and adaptive immunity. The fate of ex vivo airway epithelial cultures growing at the air liquid interface (ALI) derived from human endobronchial biopsies or brushings is not easy to predict. Calibrating and differentiating these cells is a long and expensive process requiring rigorous expertise. Pinpointing factors associated with ALI culture success would help researchers gain further insight into epithelial progenitor behavior. A successful ALI culture was defined as one in which a pseudostratified epithelium has formed after 28 days in the presence of all differentiated epithelial cell types. A 4-year prospective bi-center study was conducted with adult subjects enrolled in different approved research protocols. 463 consecutive endobronchial biopsies were obtained from normal healthy volunteers, healthy smokers, asthmatic patients and smokers with COPD. All demographic variables, the different fiber optic centers and culture operators, numbers of endo-bronchial biopsies and the presence of ciliated cells were carefully recorded. Univariate and multivariate models were developed. A stepwise procedure was used to select the final logistic regression model. ALI culture success was independently associated with the presence of living ciliated cells within the initial biopsy (OR = 2.18 [1.50-3.16], p money. It is still unknown whether successful ALI culture is related to indicators of general cell viability or a purported stem cell state specifically associated with ciliated beating cells.

  1. Ex vivo correlation of the permeability of metoprolol across human and porcine buccal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng-Lund, Emil; Marxen, Eva; Pedersen, Anne Marie L; Müllertz, Anette; Hyrup, Birgitte; Holm, Rene; Jacobsen, Jette

    2014-07-01

    The pH partition theory proposes a correlation between fraction of unionized drug substance and permeability. The aim of this study was to compare the permeability of metoprolol and mannitol in ex vivo human and porcine buccal mucosa models at varying pH to validate whether the porcine permeability model is predictive for human buccal absorption. Human (n = 9-10) and porcine (n = 6-7) buccal mucosa were mounted in a modified Ussing chamber, and the kinetics of metoprolol and mannitol transport was assessed for a period of 5.5 h with the pH values of donor medium set at 7.4, 8.5, and 9.0. In addition, hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue-van Gieson were used as tissue stains to evaluate the histology and the presence of acidic polysaccharides (e.g., mucins), respectively. The permeability of metoprolol was decreased in human buccal mucosa by almost twofold when compared with porcine buccal mucosa with a positive correlation (r(2) = 0.96) between the permeability assessed in porcine and human buccal mucosa. There was no change in the degree of either epithelial swelling or desquamation when treating with the pH 9.0 donor medium for 5.5 h. These data suggest that buccal mucosa from pigs can be used to predict human buccal absorption.

  2. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems. PMID:28151409

  3. Development of ex vivo model for determining temperature distribution in tumor tissue during photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaojie; Doughty, Austin; Mesiya, Sana; Pettitt, Alex; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.

    2017-02-01

    Temperature distribution in tissue is a crucial factor in determining the outcome of photothermal therapy in cancer treatment. In order to investigate the temperature distribution in tumor tissue during laser irradiation, we developed a novel ex vivo device to simulate the photothermal therapy on tumors. A 35°C, a thermostatic incubator was used to provide a simulation environment for body temperature of live animals. Different biological tissues (chicken breast and bovine liver) were buried inside a tissue-simulating gel and considered as tumor tissues. An 805-nm laser was used to irradiate the target tissue. A fiber with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser (10 mm) was directly inserted in the center of the tissue, and the needle probes of a thermocouple were inserted into the tissue paralleling the laser fiber at different distances to measure the temperature distribution. All of the procedures were performed in the incubator. Based on the results of this study, the temperature distribution in bovine liver is similar to that of tumor tissue under photothermal therapy with the same doses. Therefore, the developed model using bovine liver for determining temperature distribution can be used during interstitial photothermal therapy.

  4. Thiolated chitosan nanoparticles for enhancing oral absorption of docetaxel: preparation, in vitro and ex vivo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, Shahrooz; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Akhlaghi, Seyedeh Parinaz; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate mucoadhesive core-shell nanoparticles based on copolymerization of thiolated chitosan coated on poly methyl methacrylate cores as a carrier for oral delivery of docetaxel. Docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles with various concentrations were prepared via a radical emulsion polymerization method using cerium ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The physicochemical properties of the obtained nanoparticles were characterized by: dynamic light-scattering analysis for their mean size, size distribution, and zeta potential; scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy for surface morphology; and differential scanning calorimetry analysis for confirmation of molecular dispersity of docetaxel in the nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were spherical with mean diameter below 200 nm, polydispersity of below 0.15, and positive zeta potential values. The entrapment efficiency of the nanoparticles was approximately 90%. In vitro release studies showed a sustained release characteristic for 10 days after a burst release at the beginning. Ex vivo studies showed a significant increase in the transportation of docetaxel from intestinal membrane of rat when formulated as nanoparticles. Cellular uptake of nanoparticles was investigated using fluoresceinamine-loaded nanoparticles. Docetaxel nanoparticles showed a high cytotoxicity effect in the Caco-2 and MCF-7 cell lines after 72 hours. It can be concluded that by combining the advantages of both thiolated polymers and colloidal particles, these nanoparticles can be proposed as a drug carrier system for mucosal delivery of hydrophobic drugs. PMID:21289989

  5. Thermal analysis of laser interstitial thermotherapy in ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue using exponential functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, Nelson Jr. [Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, PO Box 248294, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); Manns, Fabrice [Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, PO Box 248294, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); Milne, Peter J [Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1638 NW 10th Ave, McKnight Bldg, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Denham, David B [Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1638 NW 10th Ave, McKnight Bldg, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Minhaj, Ahmed M [Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, PO Box 248294, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); Parel, Jean-Marie [Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, PO Box 248294, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); Robinson, David S [Center for Breast Care, St Luke' s Hospital of Kansas City, 4400 Broadway, Suite 509, Kansas City, MO 64111 (United States)

    2004-05-07

    A therapeutic procedure to treat small, surface breast tumours up to 10 mm in radius plus a 5 mm margin of healthy, surrounding tissue using laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is currently being investigated. The purpose of this study is to analyse and model the thermal and coagulative response of ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue, a model for breast tissue, during experimental laser interstitial thermotherapy at 980 nm. Laser radiation at 980 nm was delivered interstitially through a diffusing tip optical fibre inserted into a fibro-fatty tissue model to produce controlled heating at powers ranging from 3.2 to 8.0 W. Tissue temperature was measured with thermocouples placed at 15 positions around the fibre. The induced coagulation zone was measured on gross anatomical sections. Thermal analysis indicates that a finite sum of exponential functions is an approximate solution to the heat conduction equation that more accurately predicts the time-temperature dependence in tissue prior to carbonization (T < 100 deg. C) during LITT than the traditional model using a single exponential function. Analysis of the ellipsoid coagulation volume induced in tissue indicates that the 980 nm wavelength does not penetrate deep enough in fibro-fatty tissue to produce a desired 30 mm diameter (14.1 x 10{sup 3} mm{sup 3}) coagulation volume without unwanted tissue liquefaction and carbonization.

  6. Thermal analysis of laser interstitial thermotherapy in ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue using exponential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Nelson, Jr.; Manns, Fabrice; Milne, Peter J.; Denham, David B.; Minhaj, Ahmed M.; Parel, Jean-Marie; Robinson, David S.

    2004-05-01

    A therapeutic procedure to treat small, surface breast tumours up to 10 mm in radius plus a 5 mm margin of healthy, surrounding tissue using laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is currently being investigated. The purpose of this study is to analyse and model the thermal and coagulative response of ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue, a model for breast tissue, during experimental laser interstitial thermotherapy at 980 nm. Laser radiation at 980 nm was delivered interstitially through a diffusing tip optical fibre inserted into a fibro-fatty tissue model to produce controlled heating at powers ranging from 3.2 to 8.0 W. Tissue temperature was measured with thermocouples placed at 15 positions around the fibre. The induced coagulation zone was measured on gross anatomical sections. Thermal analysis indicates that a finite sum of exponential functions is an approximate solution to the heat conduction equation that more accurately predicts the time-temperature dependence in tissue prior to carbonization (T deep enough in fibro-fatty tissue to produce a desired 30 mm diameter (14.1 × 103 mm3) coagulation volume without unwanted tissue liquefaction and carbonization.

  7. Ex vivo evaluation of carpal flexion after partial carpal arthrodesis in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulloch, Patty J; Johnston, James D; Barber, Spencer M; Gellert, Candace L; Lang, Hayley M; Panizzi, Luca

    2015-04-01

    To determine degrees of flexion after arthrodesis of the antebrachiocarpal (ABC) joint, middle carpal (MC), and carpometacarpal (CMC) joints combined (MC/CMC), and carpometacarpal (CMC) joint alone. Ex vivo study. Forelimbs (n = 9) from 2- to 10-year-old Quarter Horses (5), Thoroughbred (2), and American Paint Horse (2). Using 2 locking compression plates, 3 partial carpal arthrodesis techniques were performed. Cables and deadweights were connected to limbs and each angle of flexion determined 3 times using a protractor and then averaged. Control measurements were obtained before and after arthrodesis, the techniques randomized with Latin square design. Descriptive data were analyzed with Levene's test, Q-Q plots, ANOVA, and Bonferroni test. Mean ± SD carpal flexion results were: controls 150° ± 8°, CMC arthrodesis 149° ± 9°, MC/CMC arthrodesis 43° ± 7.6°, and ABC arthrodesis 25° ± 6.3°. There was no significant reduction in flexion after a CMC arthrodesis compared with controls (P = .21), but there was after ABC (P American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  8. Ex vivo production of autologous whole inactivated HIV-1 for clinical use in therapeutic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Cristina; Climent, Núria; García, Felipe; Hurtado, Carmen; Nieto-Márquez, Sara; León, Agathe; García, M Teresa; Rovira, Cristina; Miralles, Laia; Dalmau, Judith; Pumarola, Tomás; Almela, Manel; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Zamora, Laura; Miró, José M; Brander, Christian; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gallart, Teresa; Gatell, José M

    2011-08-05

    This study provides a detailed description and characterization of the preparation of individualized lots of autologous heat inactivated HIV-1 virions used as immunogen in a clinical trial designed to test an autologous dendritic-cell-based therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine (Clinical Trial DCV-2, NCT00402142). For each participant, ex vivo isolation and expansion of primary virus were performed by co-culturing CD4-enriched PBMCs from the HIV-1-infected patient with PBMC from HIV-seronegative unrelated healthy volunteer donors. The viral supernatants were heat-inactivated and concentrated to obtain 1 mL of autologous immunogen, which was used to load autologous dendritic cells of each patient. High sequence homology was found between the inactivated virus immunogen and the HIV-1 circulating in plasma at the time of HIV-1 isolation. Immunogens contained up to 10⁹ HIV-1 RNA copies/mL showed considerably reduced infectivity after heat inactivation (median of 5.6 log₁₀), and were free of specified adventitious agents. The production of individualized lots of immunogen based on autologous inactivated HIV-1 virus fulfilling clinical-grade good manufacturing practice proved to be feasible, consistent with predetermined specifications, and safe for use in a clinical trial designed to test autologous dendritic cell-based therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Jan Pelgrim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0. Results. CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9–1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades. Conclusion. An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques.

  10. Metabolomics reveals the heterogeneous secretome of two entomopathogenic fungi to ex vivo cultured insect tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bekker, Charissa; Smith, Philip B; Patterson, Andrew D; Hughes, David P

    2013-01-01

    Fungal entomopathogens rely on cellular heterogeneity during the different stages of insect host infection. Their pathogenicity is exhibited through the secretion of secondary metabolites, which implies that the infection life history of this group of environmentally important fungi can be revealed using metabolomics. Here metabolomic analysis in combination with ex vivo insect tissue culturing shows that two generalist isolates of the genus Metarhizium and Beauveria, commonly used as biological pesticides, employ significantly different arrays of secondary metabolites during infectious and saprophytic growth. It also reveals that both fungi exhibit tissue specific strategies by a distinguishable metabolite secretion on the insect tissues tested in this study. In addition to showing the important heterogeneous nature of these two entomopathogens, this study also resulted in the discovery of several novel destruxins and beauverolides that have not been described before, most likely because previous surveys did not use insect tissues as a culturing system. While Beauveria secreted these cyclic depsipeptides when encountering live insect tissues, Metarhizium employed them primarily on dead tissue. This implies that, while these fungi employ comparable strategies when it comes to entomopathogenesis, there are most certainly significant differences at the molecular level that deserve to be studied.

  11. Compatibility of temporary pacemaker myocardial pacing leads with magnetic resonance imaging: an ex vivo tissue study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Alexander; Drobnik, Stefanie; Rzanny, Reinhard; Aboud, Anas; Böttcher, Joachim; Schmidt, Peter; Ortmann, Christian; Mall, Gita; Hekmat, Khosro; Brehm, Bernhard; Reichenbach, Juergen; Mayer, Thomas E; Wolf, Gunter; Hansch, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    The presence of temporary myocardial pacing leads is considered a safety contraindication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this ex vivo tissue study was to measure the heating effects at the tip of the leads using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)HMRS) thermometry. The tissue effects were verified by histological analyses. Pig hearts with implanted temporary pacemaker myocardial pacing leads were examined by whole-body MRI at 1.5 Tesla. The tests were performed either by a sequence with high specific absorption rate (SAR) or by standard clinical sequences with lower SAR. Temperature changes were detected via (1)HMRS thermometry, by monitoring the frequency difference between water protons and the reference signals of N-methyl protons of creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr/PCr) and trimethylamine (TMA). Histology was performed using several staining techniques. Standard low-SAR and high-SAR sequences did not cause significant temperature increases in the myocardial tissue surrounding the implanted leads. There were no histopathological signs of thermal damage around the tips of the leads in any of the hearts or in a control implanted heart not subjected to MRI. The present data suggest that temporary pacemaker myocardial pacing leads may be compatible with MR scanning at 1.5 Tesla. However, further in vivo studies and carefully monitored patient studies are needed before final safety recommendations can be made.

  12. Inhibition of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (Ex Vivo by Morus indica (Mulberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanitha Reddy Palvai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals are the bioactive components that contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular and other degenerative diseases. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase would be an effective means of lowering plasma cholesterol in humans. The present study explores the HMG CoA reductase inhibitory effect of extracts from leaves of Morus indica varieties, M5, V1, and S36, compared with the statin, using an ex vivo method. The assay is based on the stoichiometric formation of coenzyme A during the reduction of microsomal HMG CoA to mevalonate. Dechlorophyllised extract of three varieties was studied at 300 µg. The coenzyme A released at the end of assay in control (100.31 nmoles and statins (94.46 nm was higher than the dechlorphyllised extracts of the samples. The coenzyme A released during the reduction of HMG CoA to mevalonate in dechlorophyllised extracts of the samples was as follows: S36 < M5 < V1. The results indicated that the samples were highly effective in inhibiting the enzyme compared to statins (standard drug. The results indicate the role of Morus varieties extracts in modulating the cholesterol metabolism by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase. These results provide scope for designing in vivo animal studies to confirm their effect.

  13. Ex-vivo holographic microscopy and spectroscopic analysis of head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Stephen; Wurtz, Robert; Auyeung, Kelsey; Auyeung, Kris; Paspaley-Grbavac, Milan; Mulroe, Brigid; Sobrero, Maximiliano; Miles, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Optical probes to identify tumor margins in vivo would greatly reduce the time, effort and complexity in the surgical removal of malignant tissue in head and neck cancers. Current approaches involve visual microscopy of stained tissue samples to determine cancer margins, which results in the excision of excess of tissue to assure complete removal of the cancer. Such surgical procedures and follow-on chemotherapy can adversely affect the patient's recovery and subsequent quality of life. In order to reduce the complexity of the process and minimize adverse effects on the patient, we investigate ex vivo tissue samples (stained and unstained) using digital holographic microscopy in conjunction with spectroscopic analyses (reflectance and transmission spectroscopy) in order to determine label-free, optically identifiable characteristic features that may ultimately be used for in vivo processing of cancerous tissues. The tissue samples studied were squamous cell carcinomas and associated controls from patients of varying age, gender and race. Holographic microscopic imaging scans across both cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples yielded amplitude and phase reconstructions that were correlated with spectral signatures. Though the holographic reconstructions and measured spectra indicate variations even among the same class of tissue, preliminary results indicate the existence of some discriminating features. Further analyses are presently underway to further this work and extract additional information from the imaging and spectral data that may prove useful for in vivo surgical identification.

  14. Ex vivo characterization of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples by Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ashraf, Sumara; Ahmad, Shakil; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-05-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry along with polar decomposition algorithm was employed for the characterization of ex vivo normal and adenocarcinoma human colon tissues by polarized light in the visible spectral range (425-725 nm). Six derived polarization metrics [total diattenuation (DT ), retardance (RT ), depolarization(ΔT ), linear diattenuation (DL), retardance (δ), and depolarization (ΔL)] were compared for normal and adenocarcinoma colon tissue samples. The results show that all six polarimetric properties for adenocarcinoma samples were significantly higher as compared to the normal samples for all wavelengths. The Wilcoxon rank sum test illustrated that total retardance is a good candidate for the discrimination of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples. Support vector machine classification for normal and adenocarcinoma based on the four polarization properties spectra (ΔT , ΔL, RT ,and δ) yielded 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, while both DTa nd DL showed 66.6%, 33.3%, and 83.3% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. The combination of polarization analysis and given classification methods provides a framework to distinguish the normal and cancerous tissues.

  15. Ex Vivo Assessment of a Parabolic-Tip Inflow Cannula for Pediatric Continuous-Flow VADs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Michael T; Grzywinski, Matthew F; Voorhees, Hannah J; Kameneva, Marina V; Olia, Salim E

    2016-01-01

    To address the challenge of unloading the left ventricle during pediatric mechanical circulatory support using next-generation rotary blood pumps, a novel inflow cannula was developed. This unique inflow cannula for pediatric, continuous-flow, left ventricular assist devices (VADs) with a parabolic-shaped inlet entrance was evaluated alongside a bevel-tip and fenestrated-tip cannula via an ex vivo, isolated-heart experimental setup. Performance was characterized using two clinical scenarios of over-pumping and hypovolemia, created by varying pump speed and filling preload pressure, respectively, at ideal and off-axis cannula placement to assess ventricular unloading and positional sensitivity. Quantitative and qualitative assessments were performed on the resultant hemodynamics and intra-ventricular boroscopic images to classify conditions of nonsuction, partial, gradual or severe entrainment, and ventricular collapse. The parabolic-tip cannula was found to be significantly less sensitive to placement position (p parabolic-tip cannula showed complete resistance to entrainment, whereas the fenestrated-tip had partial entrainment in 90% and 87% of the over-pumping and hypovolemic studies, respectively. We conclude that future pediatric VAD designs may benefit from incorporating the parabolic-tip inflow cannula design to maximize unloading of the left ventricle in ideal and nonoptimal conditions.

  16. Classical and adaptive control of ex vivo skeletal muscle contractions using Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Adam; Grange, Robert W.; Abaid, Nicole; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation is a promising approach to treat patients by stimulating the peripheral nerves and their corresponding motor neurons using electrical current. This technique helps maintain muscle mass and promote blood flow in the absence of a functioning nervous system. The goal of this work is to control muscle contractions from FES via three different algorithms and assess the most appropriate controller providing effective stimulation of the muscle. An open-loop system and a closed-loop system with three types of model-free feedback controllers were assessed for tracking control of skeletal muscle contractions: a Proportional-Integral (PI) controller, a Model Reference Adaptive Control algorithm, and an Adaptive Augmented PI system. Furthermore, a mathematical model of a muscle-mass-spring system was implemented in simulation to test the open-loop case and closed-loop controllers. These simulations were carried out and then validated through experiments ex vivo. The experiments included muscle contractions following four distinct trajectories: a step, sine, ramp, and square wave. Overall, the closed-loop controllers followed the stimulation trajectories set for all the simulated and tested muscles. When comparing the experimental outcomes of each controller, we concluded that the Adaptive Augmented PI algorithm provided the best closed-loop performance for speed of convergence and disturbance rejection. PMID:28273101

  17. The ex vivo neurotoxic, myotoxic and cardiotoxic activity of cucurbituril-based macrocyclic drug delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oun, Rabbab; Floriano, Rafael S; Isaacs, Lyle; Rowan, Edward G; Wheate, Nial J

    2014-11-01

    The cucurbituril family of drug delivery vehicles have been examined for their tissue specific toxicity using ex vivo models. Cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]), cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and the linear cucurbituril-derivative Motor2 were examined for their neuro-, myo- and cardiotoxic activity and compared with β-cyclodextrin. The protective effect of drug encapsulation by CB[7] was also examined on the platinum-based anticancer drug cisplatin. The results show that none of the cucurbiturils have statistically measurable neurotoxicity as measured using mouse sciatic nerve compound action potential. Cucurbituril myotoxicity was measured by nerve-muscle force of contraction through chemical and electrical stimulation. Motor2 was found to display no myotoxicity, whereas both CB[6] and CB[7] showed myotoxic activity via a presynaptic effect. Finally, cardiotoxicity, which was measured by changes in the rate and force of right and left atria contraction, was observed for all three cucurbiturils. Free cisplatin displays neuro-, myo- and cardiotoxic activity, consistent with the side-effects seen in the clinic. Whilst CB[7] had no effect on the level of cisplatin's neurotoxic activity, drug encapsulation within the macrocycle had a marked reduction in both the drug's myo- and cardiotoxic activity. Overall the results are consistent with the relative lack of toxicity displayed by these macrocycles in whole animal acute systemic toxicity studies and indicate continued potential of cucurbiturils as drug delivery vehicles for the reduction of the side effects associated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

  18. Cholesterol-lowering properties of Ganoderma lucidum in vitro, ex vivo, and in hamsters and minipigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajjaj H

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There has been renewed interest in mushroom medicinal properties. We studied cholesterol lowering properties of Ganoderma lucidum (Gl, a renowned medicinal species. Results Organic fractions containing oxygenated lanosterol derivatives inhibited cholesterol synthesis in T9A4 hepatocytes. In hamsters, 5% Gl did not effect LDL; but decreased total cholesterol (TC 9.8%, and HDL 11.2%. Gl (2.5 and 5% had effects on several fecal neutral sterols and bile acids. Both Gl doses reduced hepatic microsomal ex-vivo HMG-CoA reductase activity. In minipigs, 2.5 Gl decreased TC, LDL- and HDL cholesterol 20, 27, and 18%, respectively (P Conclusions Overall, Gl has potential to reduce LDL cholesterol in vivo through various mechanisms. Next steps are to: fully characterize bioactive components in lipid soluble/insoluble fractions; evaluate bioactivity of isolated fractions; and examine human cholesterol lowering properties. Innovative new cholesterol-lowering foods and medicines containing Gl are envisioned.

  19. An ex vivo study of the correlation between acoustic emission and microvascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Stanley; Cooper, Michol A; Bull, Joseph L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Miller, Douglas L

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an ex vivo examination of correlation between acoustic emission and tissue damage. Intravital microscopy was employed in conjunction with ultrasound exposure in cremaster muscle of male Wistar rats. Definity microbubbles were administered intravenously through the tail vein (80microL.kg(-1).min(-1)infusion rate) with the aid of a syringe pump. For the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) study, exposures were performed at four locations of the cremaster at a PRF of 1000, 500, 100 and 10Hz (one location per PRF per rat). The 100-pulse exposures were implemented at a peak rarefactional pressure (P(r)) of 2MPa, frequency of 2.25MHz with 46 cycle pulses. For the pressure amplitude threshold study, 100-pulse exposures (46 cycle pulses) were conducted at various peak rarefactional pressures from 0.5MPa to 2MPa at a frequency of 2.25MHz and PRF of 100Hz. Photomicrographs were captured before and 2-min postexposure. On a pulse-to-pulse basis, the 10Hz acoustic emission was considerably higher and more sustained than those at other PRFs (1000, 500, and 100Hz) (pCRIPS; R(2)=0.75). No visible damage was present at P(r) or =1.0MPa and it increased with increasing acoustic pressure.

  20. Material characterization of ex vivo prostate tissue via spherical indentation in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, William C; Gerling, Gregory J; Krupski, Tracey L; Kowalik, Casey G; Harper, Jeffrey C; Moskaluk, Christopher A

    2011-04-01

    The mechanical characterization of prostate tissue has not received much attention and is often disconnected from the clinic, where samples are readily attained. We developed a spherical indenter for the clinic to generate force-displacement data from ex vivo prostate tissue. Indentation velocity, depth, and sphere diameter, and four means of estimating elastic modulus (EM) were validated. EM was then estimated for 26 prostate specimens obtained via prostatectomy and 6 samples obtained from autopsy. Prostatectomy prostates were evaluated clinically upon digital rectal exam and pathologically post-extirpation. Whole-mount measurements yielded median EM of 43.2 kPa (SD=59.8 kPa). Once sliced into cross-sections, median EM for stage T2 and T3 glands were 30.9 and 71.0 kPa, respectively, but not significantly different. Furthermore, we compared within-organ EM difference for prostates with (median=46.5 kPa, SD=22.2 kPa) and without (median=31.0 kPa, SD=63.1 kPa) palpable abnormalities. This work finds that diseased prostate tissue is stiffer than normal tissue, stiffness increases with disease severity, and large variability exists between samples, even though disease differences within a prostate are detectable. A further study of late-stage cancers would help to strengthen the findings presented in this work. Copyright © 2010 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pulmonary ultrasound elastography: a feasibility study with phantoms and ex-vivo tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Man Minh; Xie, Hua; Paluch, Kamila; Stanton, Douglas; Ramachandran, Bharat

    2013-03-01

    Elastography has become widely used for minimally invasive diagnosis in many tumors as seen with breast, liver and prostate. Among different modalities, ultrasound-based elastography stands out due to its advantages including being safe, real-time, and relatively low-cost. While lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality among both men and women, the use of ultrasound elastography for lung cancer diagnosis has hardly been investigated due to the limitations of ultrasound in air. In this work, we investigate the use of static-compression based endobronchial ultrasound elastography by a 3D trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer for lung cancer diagnosis. A water-filled balloon was designed to 1) improve the visualization of endobronchial ultrasound and 2) to induce compression via pumping motion inside the trachea and bronchiole. In a phantom study, we have successfully generated strain images indicating the stiffness difference between the gelatin background and agar inclusion. A similar strain ratio was confirmed with Philips ultrasound strain-based elastography product. For ex-vivo porcine lung study, different tissue ablation methods including chemical injection, Radio Frequency (RF) ablation, and direct heating were implemented to achieve tumor-mimicking tissue. Stiff ablated lung tissues were obtained and detected with our proposed method. These results suggest the feasibility of pulmonary elastography to differentiate stiff tumor tissue from normal tissue.

  2. ESTUDIO EX VIVO DE LA LIBERACIÓN TRANSDÉRMICA DE ENALAPRIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Lhez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se estudió el comportamiento ex vivo de una formulación de enalapril maleato para su administración por vía transdérmica, utilizando piel de oreja de cerdo. Los experimentos se realizaron en celdas de difusión vertical tipo Franz. El principio activo fue formulado en una dispersión de carbopol. A partir de las cantidades acumuladas de enalapril en el compartimento receptor, se evaluó el flujo y el coeficiente de permeabilidad. Con el fin de optimizar la penetración del principio activo, se investigó el efecto de L-mentol como potenciador de la permeabildiad. Se determinó que este compuesto contribuye favorablemente a la penetración de enalapril a través de la piel y que los parámetros de permeabilidad, flujo y coeficiente de permeabilidad, alcanzan sus máximos valores cuando L-mentol está presente en un 3,82% en la formulación enalapril/carbopol.

  3. A novel ex vivo skin model for the assessment of the potential transcutaneous anti-inflammatory effect of topically applied Harpagophytum procumbens extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouitas, Nassima Abdelouahab; Heard, Charles M

    2009-07-06

    Using ex vivo skin as a model, this work tested the hypothesis that the major pharmacologically active components of topically applied Harpagophytum procumbens (H. procumbens) can elicit anti-inflammatory responses in deeper tissues post-transcutaneous delivery. Using Franz-type diffusion cells, ethanol extract of powdered H. procumbens tuber was dosed onto freshly excised porcine skin. After 24 h the receptor phase was recovered, analysed for the major glycosides of DC, then used directly to dose further freshly excised skin membranes. After 6h the skin was recovered and probed for the expression of the three major enzymes involved in the inflammatory factors: cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and its product prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2), lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), using immunocytochemistry and Western blotting analyses. It was found that the receptor phase at 24 h contained (0.8, 25, 1.8, 3 x 10(-3)) micromol mL(-1) of harpagoside, harpagide, verbascoside, 8-O-p-coumaroyl-harpagide, respectively. When applied to skin, this solution effectively inhibited the expression of COX-2 and its product PGE-2. However, it did not have a significant effect on either 5-LOX or iNOS compared to control samples (PBS only). These data support the hypothesis that the transcutaneous delivery of H. procumbens can treat inflammation in deeper tissues such as in arthritis. Moreover, a novel ex vivo model has been described for assessing the potential anti-inflammatory activity of permeants delivered to deeper subcutaneous regions.

  4. Accurate in vivo dielectric properties of liver from 500 MHz to 40 GHz and their correlation to ex vivo measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, L; Wismayer, P Schembri; Mangion, L Zammit; Sammut, C V

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report on the characterization of the dielectric properties of in vivo rat liver at 36.4°C from 500 MHz up to 40 GHz with less than 5% uncertainty. The measured data were fitted to a Cole-Cole model and dielectric parameters are presented together with their respective 95% confidence interval. The root mean square error is 0.42. Moreover, ex vivo measurements were conducted in situ at 1, 2, 4 and 6 min after animal death and are compared to in vivo measurements. The results show that immediate changes in [Formula: see text]and [Formula: see text] are within experimental uncertainty, and therefore changes between in vivo and published ex vivo dielectric properties can be attributed to tissue hydration.

  5. Ex vivo measures of muscle mitochondrial capacity reveal quantitative limits of oxygen delivery by the circulation during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert; Saltin, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    of the body mass will be discussed in relation to mitochondrial capacity measured ex vivo. These analyses reveal that as the mass of muscle engaged in exercise increases from one-leg knee extension, to 2-arm cranking, to 2-leg cycling and x-country skiing, the magnitude of blood flow and oxygen delivery...... decrease. Accordingly, a 2-fold higher oxygen delivery and oxygen uptake per unit muscle mass are seen in vivo during 1-leg exercise compared to 2-leg cycling indicating a significant limitation of the circulation during exercise with a large muscle mass. This analysis also reveals that mitochondrial......Muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity measured ex vivo provides a physiological reference to assess cellular oxidative capacity as a component in the oxygen cascade in vivo. In this article, the magnitude of muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake during exercise involving a small-to-large fraction...

  6. Transplant of ex vivo incubated bone marrow with rIL -7 for the enhancement of immuno-hematopoietic reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hai, Ali; Ben Yehuda, Aryeh; Slavin, Shimon; Or, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a critical cytokine in early B and T cell development. Peripheral T cell expansion and thymopoiesis and is a result of the ongoing reconstitution from uncommitted stem cells after transplant. We investigated the efficacy of ex vivo incubated bone marrow cells treated with recombinant human IL-7 (rIL-7) on subsequent in vivo murine models of syngeneic bone marrow (BM) transplant. After ex vivo culture with rIL-7, we observed a 1½-fold increase in BM cellularity; this increase was associated with an enhanced reconstitution of bone marrow cells and thymocytes at 45 days post-transplant. In addition to increased cellularity, lymphocytes from mice transplanted with cultured rIL-7 showed enhanced proliferative responses to mitogenic stimulation. These findings suggest rIL-7 to be a promising agent for the clinical application of treating immune deficiency and enhancing immuno-hematopoietic reconstitution of the stem cell auto/allograft.

  7. Ex vivo cutaneous penetration of econazole nitrate from SLN incorporated in hydrophilic gels

    OpenAIRE

    Canu, Giacomina; Sanna, Vanna Annunziata; Gavini, Elisabetta; Cossu, Massimo; Rassu, Giovanna; Giunchedi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) are considered as innovative drug carrier for topical application. The small size of the lipid particles ensures close contact to the stratum corneum and can increase the amount of the drug penetrating into the skin and it allows controlled drug release. The aim of this study was to develop controlled release gels containing SLN dispersions loaded with Econazole Nitrate (ECN) and to evaluate ex vivo skin penetration of the drug released from t...

  8. UV laser ablation to measure cell and tissue-generated forces in the zebrafish embryo in vivo and ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smutny, Michael; Behrndt, Martin; Campinho, Pedro; Ruprecht, Verena; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Mechanically coupled cells can generate forces driving cell and tissue morphogenesis during development. Visualization and measuring of these forces is of major importance to better understand the complexity of the biomechanic processes that shape cells and tissues. Here, we describe how UV laser ablation can be utilized to quantitatively assess mechanical tension in different tissues of the developing zebrafish and in cultures of primary germ layer progenitor cells ex vivo.

  9. Ex vivo expansion of bovine corneal endothelial cells in xeno-free medium supplemented with platelet releasate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Li; Burnouf, Thierry; Wang, Tsung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Clinical-grade ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelial cells can increase the availability of corneal tissues for transplantation and treatment of corneal blindness. However, these cells have very limited proliferative capacity. Successful propagation has required so far to use very complex growth media supplemented with fetal bovine serum and other xenocomponents. We hypothesized that human platelet releasates rich in multiple growth factors, and in particular neurotrophins, could potentially be a useful supplement for ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelium cells due to their neural crest origin. Platelet releasates were prepared by calcium salt activation of apheresis platelet concentrates, subjected or not to complement inactivation by heat treatment at 56°C for 30 minutes. Platelet releasates were characterized for their content in proteins and were found to contain high amount of growth factors including platelet-derived growth factor-AB (30.56 to 39.08 ng/ml) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (30.57 to 37.11 ng/ml) neurotrophins. We compared the growth and viability of corneal endothelium cells in DMEM-F12 medium supplemented with different combinations of components, including 2.5%∼10% of the platelet releasates. Corneal endothelium cells expanded in platelet releasates exhibited good adhesion and a typical hexagonal morphology. Their growth and viability were enhanced when using the complement-inactivated platelet releasate at a concentration of 10%. Immunostaining and Western blots showed that CECs maintained the expressions of four important membrane markers: Na-K ATPase α1, zona occludens-1, phospho-connexin 43 and N-cadherin. In conclusion, our study provides the first proof-of-concept that human platelet releasates can be used for ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelium cells. These findings open a new paradigm for ex vivo propagation protocols of corneal endothelium cells in compliance with good tissue culture practices and regulatory

  10. In vitro-ex vivo correlations between a cell-laden hydrogel and mucosal tissue for screening composite delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakney, Anna K; Little, Adam B; Jiang, Yonghou; Woodrow, Kim A

    2016-11-01

    Composite delivery systems where drugs are electrospun in different layers and vary the drug stacking-order are posited to affect bioavailability. We evaluated how the formulation characteristics of both burst- and sustained-release electrospun fibers containing three physicochemically diverse drugs: dapivirine (DPV), maraviroc (MVC) and tenofovir (TFV) affect in vitro and ex vivo release. We developed a poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) hydrogel release platform for the rapid, inexpensive in vitro evaluation of burst- and sustained-release topical or dermal drug delivery systems with varying microarchitecture. We investigated properties of the hydrogel that could recapitulate ex vivo release into nonhuman primate vaginal tissue. Using a dimethyl sulfoxide extraction protocol and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, we achieved >93% recovery from the hydrogels and >88% recovery from tissue explants for all three drugs. We found that DPV loading, but not stacking order (layers of fiber containing a single drug) or microarchitecture (layers with isolated drug compared to all drugs in the same layer) impacted the burst release in vitro and ex vivo. Our burst-release formulations showed a correlation for DPV accumulation between the hydrogel and tissue (R(2)=( )0.80), but the correlation was not significant for MVC or TFV. For the sustained-release formulations, the PLGA/PCL content did not affect TFV release in vitro or ex vivo. Incorporation of cells into the hydrogel matrix improved the correlation between hydrogel and tissue explant release for TFV. We expect that this hydrogel-tissue mimic may be a promising preclinical model to evaluate topical or transdermal drug delivery systems with complex microarchitectures.

  11. Ex vivo expansion of bovine corneal endothelial cells in xeno-free medium supplemented with platelet releasate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Li Chou

    Full Text Available Clinical-grade ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelial cells can increase the availability of corneal tissues for transplantation and treatment of corneal blindness. However, these cells have very limited proliferative capacity. Successful propagation has required so far to use very complex growth media supplemented with fetal bovine serum and other xenocomponents. We hypothesized that human platelet releasates rich in multiple growth factors, and in particular neurotrophins, could potentially be a useful supplement for ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelium cells due to their neural crest origin. Platelet releasates were prepared by calcium salt activation of apheresis platelet concentrates, subjected or not to complement inactivation by heat treatment at 56°C for 30 minutes. Platelet releasates were characterized for their content in proteins and were found to contain high amount of growth factors including platelet-derived growth factor-AB (30.56 to 39.08 ng/ml and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (30.57 to 37.11 ng/ml neurotrophins. We compared the growth and viability of corneal endothelium cells in DMEM-F12 medium supplemented with different combinations of components, including 2.5%∼10% of the platelet releasates. Corneal endothelium cells expanded in platelet releasates exhibited good adhesion and a typical hexagonal morphology. Their growth and viability were enhanced when using the complement-inactivated platelet releasate at a concentration of 10%. Immunostaining and Western blots showed that CECs maintained the expressions of four important membrane markers: Na-K ATPase α1, zona occludens-1, phospho-connexin 43 and N-cadherin. In conclusion, our study provides the first proof-of-concept that human platelet releasates can be used for ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelium cells. These findings open a new paradigm for ex vivo propagation protocols of corneal endothelium cells in compliance with good tissue culture practices

  12. Rapid and specific biotin labelling of the erythrocyte surface antigens of both cultured and ex-vivo Plasmodium parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson Joanne; Sowa Kordai MP; Sharling Lisa; Kyriacou Helen M; Arnot David E

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Sensitive detection of parasite surface antigens expressed on erythrocyte membranes is necessary to further analyse the molecular pathology of malaria. This study describes a modified biotin labelling/osmotic lysis method which rapidly produces membrane extracts enriched for labelled surface antigens and also improves the efficiency of antigen recovery compared with traditional detergent extraction and surface radio-iodination. The method can also be used with ex-vivo para...

  13. The effect of ex vivo CDDO-Me activation on nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway in white blood cells from patients with septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Sanjeev; Zheng, Laura; Navas-Acien, Ana; Fuchs, Ralph J

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) has been shown to protect against experimental sepsis in mice and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in ex vivo white blood cells from healthy subjects by upregulating cellular antioxidant genes. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that ex vivo methyl 2-cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) activates NRF2-regulated antioxidant genes in white blood cells from patients with septic shock and protects against LPS-induced inflammation and reactive oxidative species production. Peripheral blood was collected from 18 patients with septic shock who were being treated in medical and surgical intensive care units. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the expression of NRF2 target genes (NQO1, HO-1, GCLM, and FTL) and IL-6 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), monocytes, and neutrophils after CDDO-Me treatment alone or after subsequent LPS exposure. Superoxide anion (O2) was measured to assess the effect of CDDO-Me pretreatment on subsequent LPS exposure. Treatment with CDDO-Me increased the gene expression of NQO1 (P = 0.04) and decreased the expression of HO-1 (P = 0.03) in PBMCs from patients with septic shock. Purified monocytes exhibited significant increases in the expression of NQO1 (P = 0.01) and GCLM (P = 0.003) after CDDO-Me treatment. Levels of other NRF2 target genes (HO-1 and FTL) remained similar to those of vehicle-treated cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed a trend toward increased IL-6 gene expression after CDDO-Me treatment, whereas purified monocytes showed a trend toward decreased IL-6. There was no discernible trend in the IL-6 expression subsequent to LPS treatment in either vehicle-treated or CDDO-Me-treated PBMCs and monocytes. Treatment with CDDO-Me significantly increased O2 production in PBMCs (P = 0.04). Although CDDO-Me pretreatment significantly attenuated O2 production to subsequent LPS exposure (P = 0.03), the

  14. Analysis of Endothelial Adherence of Bartonella henselae and Acinetobacter baumannii Using a Dynamic Human Ex Vivo Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidensdorfer, Marko; Chae, Ju Ik; Makobe, Celestine; Stahl, Julia; Averhoff, Beate; Müller, Volker; Schürmann, Christoph; Brandes, Ralf P; Wilharm, Gottfried; Ballhorn, Wibke; Christ, Sara; Linke, Dirk; Fischer, Doris; Göttig, Stephan; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2015-12-28

    Bacterial adherence determines the virulence of many human-pathogenic bacteria. Experimental approaches elucidating this early infection event in greater detail have been performed using mainly methods of cellular microbiology. However, in vitro infections of cell monolayers reflect the in vivo situation only partially, and animal infection models are not available for many human-pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, ex vivo infection of human organs might represent an attractive method to overcome these limitations. We infected whole human umbilical cords ex vivo with Bartonella henselae or Acinetobacter baumannii under dynamic flow conditions mimicking the in vivo infection situation of human endothelium. For this purpose, methods for quantifying endothelium-adherent wild-type and trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA)-deficient bacteria were set up. Data revealed that (i) A. baumannii binds in a TAA-dependent manner to endothelial cells, (ii) this organ infection model led to highly reproducible adherence rates, and furthermore, (iii) this model allowed to dissect the biological function of TAAs in the natural course of human infections. These findings indicate that infection models using ex vivo human tissue samples ("organ microbiology") might be a valuable tool in analyzing bacterial pathogenicity with the capacity to replace animal infection models at least partially.

  15. How to Recondition Ex Vivo Initially Rejected Donor Lungs for Clinical Transplantation: Clinical Experience from Lund University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Lindstedt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major problem in clinical lung transplantation is the shortage of donor lungs. Only about 20% of donor lungs are accepted for transplantation. We have recently reported the results of the first six double lung transplantations performed with donor lungs reconditioned ex vivo that had been deemed unsuitable for transplantation by the Scandiatransplant, Eurotransplant, and UK Transplant organizations because the arterial oxygen pressure was less than 40 kPa. The three-month survival of patients undergoing transplant with these lungs was 100%. One patient died due to sepsis after 95 days, and one due to rejection after 9 months. Four recipients are still alive and well 24 months after transplantation, with no signs of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. The donor lungs were reconditioned ex vivo in an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit using STEEN solution mixed with erythrocytes, to dehydrate edematous lung tissue. Functional evaluation was performed with deoxygenated perfusate at different inspired fractions of oxygen. The arterial oxygen pressure was significantly improved in this model. This ex vivo evaluation model is thus a valuable addition to the armamentarium in increasing the number of acceptable lungs in a donor population with inferior arterial oxygen pressure values, thereby, increasing the lung donor pool for transplantation. In the following paper we present our clinical experience from the first six patients in the world. We also present the technique we used in detail with flowchart.

  16. Alternative solution for ex vivo lung perfusion, experimental study on donated human lungs non-accepted for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Mariani, Alessandro Wasum; Medeiros, Israel Lopes de; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Abdalla, Luís Gustavo; Correia, Aristides Tadeu; Nepomuceno, Natália Aparecida; Canzian, Mauro; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate a new perfusate solution to be used for ex vivo lung perfusion. Randomized experimental study using lungs from rejected brain-dead donors harvested and submitted to 1 hour of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) using mainstream solution or the alternative. From 16 lungs blocs tested, we found no difference on weight after EVLP: Steen group (SG) = 1,097±526g; Alternative Perfusion Solution (APS) = 743±248g, p=0.163. Edema formation, assessed by Wet/dry weigh ratio, was statistically higher on the Alternative Perfusion Solution group (APS = 3.63 ± 1.26; SG = 2.06 ± 0.28; p = 0.009). No difference on PaO2 after EVLP (SG = 498±37.53mmHg; APS = 521±55.43mmHg, p=0.348, nor on histological analyses: pulmonary injury score: SG = 4.38±1.51; APS = 4.50±1.77, p=0.881; apoptotic cells count after perfusion: SG = 2.4 ± 2.0 cells/mm2; APS = 4.8 ± 6.9 cells/mm2; p = 0.361). The ex vivo lung perfusion using the alternative perfusion solution showed no functional or histological differences, except for a higher edema formation, from the EVLP using Steen Solution(r) on lungs from rejected brain-dead donors.

  17. In Vivo Tracking of Murine Adipose Tissue-Derived Multipotent Adult Stem Cells and Ex Vivo Cross-Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Garrovo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by the ability to renew themselves and to differentiate into specialized cell types, while stem cell therapy is believed to treat a number of different human diseases through either cell regeneration or paracrine effects. Herein, an in vivo and ex vivo near infrared time domain (NIR TD optical imaging study was undertaken to evaluate the migratory ability of murine adipose tissue-derived multipotent adult stem cells [mAT-MASC] after intramuscular injection in mice. In vivo NIR TD optical imaging data analysis showed a migration of DiD-labelled mAT-MASC in the leg opposite the injection site, which was confirmed by a fibered confocal microendoscopy system. Ex vivo NIR TD optical imaging results showed a systemic distribution of labelled cells. Considering a potential microenvironmental contamination, a cross-validation study by multimodality approaches was followed: mAT-MASC were isolated from male mice expressing constitutively eGFP, which was detectable using techniques of immunofluorescence and qPCR. Y-chromosome positive cells, injected into wild-type female recipients, were detected by FISH. Cross-validation confirmed the data obtained by in vivo/ex vivo TD optical imaging analysis. In summary, our data demonstrates the usefulness of NIR TD optical imaging in tracking delivered cells, giving insights into the migratory properties of the injected cells.

  18. Uptake of phenothiazines by the harvested chylomicrons ex vivo model: influence of self-nanoemulsifying formulation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnaz, Gul; Hartl, Markus; Barthelmes, Jan; Leithner, Katharina; Sarti, Federica; Hintzen, Fabian; Rahmat, Deni; Salvenmoser, Willi; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the potential of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) on the uptake of the lipophilic and poorly water soluble phenothiazines thioridazine and chlorpromazine with the isolated plasma derived chylomicron (CM) ex vivo model. The multi-component delivery systems were optimized by evaluating their ability to self-emulsify when introduced to an aqueous medium under gentle agitation. The uptake of phenothiazines by isolated plasma derived chylomicrons was investigated with short chain triglyceride (SCT) SNEDDS, medium chain triglyceride (MCT) SNEDDS, and long chain triglyceride (LCT) SNEDDS. SNEDDS were also evaluated for their stabilities, dispersibilities, percentage transmittances and by particle size analyses. For thioridazine a 5.6-fold and for chlorpromazine a 3.7-fold higher CM uptake could be observed using a LCT-SNEDDS formulation compared to the drugs without formulation. In contrast, ex vivo uptake by isolated CM was not significantly increased by SNEDDS formulations based on MCT and SCT. Compared with isolated CM, the CM sizes were increased 2.5-fold in LCT-SNEDDS, whereas in MCT-SNEDDS or SCT-SNEDDS only a small, non-significant (P<0.05) increase in CM size was observed. These results show that distinct SNEDDS formulations containing phenothiazines are efficiently uptaken by plasma derived chylomicrons ex vivo.

  19. In vitro and ex vivo evaluation of cyclic aminoalkyl benzilates as potential emission tomography ligands for the muscarinic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, C A; Mulholland, G K; Perry, S E; Combs, R; Sherman, P S; Fisher, S J

    1989-01-01

    A series of muscarinic antagonists were screened as potential receptor imaging agents. (+)2 alpha-tropanyl benzilate (TRB), N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate (NMPB) and several analogs amenable to labeling with positron emitting isotopes were evaluated for muscarinic binding to mouse brain tissue in vitro and ex vivo using [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate as the probe. The in vitro assay directly compared the innate binding affinities of the compounds. The rank order of binding (IC50) was TRB (0.7 nm), QNB (0.8 nm), scopolamine (1.3 nm) and NMPB (1.6 nm). The ex vivo assay was used to gain information regarding the pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of the compounds in live animals. Ex vivo results demonstrated that TRB was rapidly taken up into the brain and was equipotent with QNB in occupying muscarinic binding sites at early time points, but TRB binding decreased twice as fast over time as QNB binding. The results suggest TRB would be a good candidate for radiolabeling and further study.

  20. The development of a three-dimensional scaffold for ex vivo biomimicry of human acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Teresa Mortera; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander; Panoskaltsis, Nicki

    2010-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a cancer of haematopoietic cells that develops in three-dimensional (3-D) bone marrow niches in vivo. The study of AML has been hampered by lack of appropriate ex vivo models that mimic this microenvironment. We hypothesised that fabrication and optimisation of suitable biomimetic scaffolds for culturing leukaemic cells ex vivo might facilitate the study of AML in its native 3-D niche. We evaluated the growth of three leukaemia subtype-specific cell lines, K-562, HL60 and Kasumi-6, on highly porous scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymeric materials, such as poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyurethane (PU), poly (methyl-methacrylate), poly (D, L-lactade), poly (caprolactone), and polystyrene. Our results show that PLGA and PU supported the best seeding efficiency and leukaemic growth. Furthermore, the PLGA and PU scaffolds were coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen type I (62.5 or 125 microg/ml) and fibronectin (25 or 50 microg/ml) to provide biorecognition signals. The 3 leukaemia subtype-specific lines grew best on PU scaffolds coated with 62.5 microg/ml collagen type I over 6 weeks in the absence of exogenous growth factors. In conclusion, PU-collagen scaffolds may provide a practical model to study the biology and treatment of primary AML in an ex vivo mimicry. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Hernández-Cortés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA—assessed implant stability (ISQ values with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP (n=7 or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA (n=10. Sixty 4.5×13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA (P0.5 in all cases, and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P>0.08. Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA. This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies.

  2. Ex vivo and in vivo coherent Raman imaging of the peripheral and central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Terry Brandon

    A hallmark of nervous system disorders is damage or degradation of the myelin sheath. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying myelin degeneration and repair represent one of the great challenges in medicine. This thesis work details the development and utilization of advanced optical imaging methods to gain insight into the structure and function of myelin in both healthy and diseased states in the in vivo environment. This first part of this thesis discusses ex vivo studies of the effects of high-frequency stimulation of spinal tissues on the structure of the node of Ranvier as investigated by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging (manuscript submitted to Journal of Neurosciece). Reversible paranodal myelin retraction at the nodes of Ranvier was observed during 200 Hz electrical stimulation, beginning minutes after the onset and continuing for up to 10 min after stimulation was ceased. A mechanistic study revealed a Ca2+ dependent pathway: high-frequency stimulation induced paranodal myelin retraction via pathologic calcium influx into axons, calpain activation, and cytoskeleton degradation through spectrin break-down. Also, the construction of dual-scanning CARS microscope for large area mapping of CNS tissues is detailed (Optics Express, 2008, 16:19396-193409). A confocal scanning head equipped with a rotating polygon mirror provides high speed, high resolution imaging and is coupled with a motorized sample stage to generate high-resolution large-area images of mouse brain coronal section and guinea pig spinal cord cross section. The polygon mirror decreases the mosaic acquisition time significantly without reducing the resolution of individual images. The ex vivo studies are then extended to in vivo imaging of mouse sciatic nerve tissue by CARS and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging (Journal of Microscopy, 2007, 225: 175-182). Following a minimally invasive surgery to open the skin, CARS imaging of myelinated axons and SHG imaging of the

  3. Enzima inativadora de bradicinina liberada de fígado preservado ex-vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morais F.V.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: - O fígado inativa quantidades consideráveis de bradicinina; a principal enzima hepática cinino-inativadora (BIE, bradykinin inativating endopeptidase hidrolisa especificamente a ligação Phe5-Ser6 do nonapeptídio e foi caracterizada como sendo a oligoendopeptidase EC 3.4. 24.15. No transplante ortotópico de fígado existe correlação entre aumento da concentração de aminoácidos no líquido de preservação (conseqüência de proteólise e falência do enxerto. O objetivo deste trabalho é verificar se ocorre liberação da BIE de fígados preservados ex-vivo no líquido Braun-Collins ou em solução de Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonato (Krebs. MÉTODO: Fígados de ratos Wistar (180-220g foram exsangüinados e após remoção foram preservados em líquido Braun Collins ou em solução Krebs, a 4oC. Foram retiradas alíquotas do líquido de preservação nos tempos 0, 4, 8 e 24 horas, para dosagem de ALT, AST, DHL e BIE. A atividade fluorimétrica da BIE foi ensaiada com o substrato Abz-RPPGFSPFRQ-EDDnp (análogo sintético da bradicinina e sua presença confirmada por immunoblotting, revelado com anticorpo específico anti-EC 3.4.24.15. RESULTADOS: A liberação de ALT, AST, DHL e BIE é significativa no período 8-24hs. Nas alíquotas de 24 hs, em relação ao tempo zero, a concentração das quatro enzimas aumentou, respectivamente, no líquido Braun Collins, 8, 7, 19 e 10 vezes e, na solução de Krebs, 21, 17, 27 e 21 vezes; a relação ALT/DHL foi sempre inferior a um. CONCLUSÃO: Ocorre liberação de BIE durante a preservação ex-vivo do fígado, o que poderá servir como indicação da condição de preservação do enxerto; diminuição da capacidade cinino-inativadora do fígado poderá afetar sua reatividade vascular.

  4. Ozone therapy as an adjuvant for endondontic protocols: microbiological – ex vivo study and citotoxicity analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOGALES, Carlos Goes; FERREIRA, Marina Beloti; MONTEMOR, Antonio Fernando; RODRIGUES, Maria Filomena de Andrade; Lage-MARQUES, José Luiz; ANTONIAZZI, João Humberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study evaluated the antimicrobial efficacy of ozone therapy in teeth contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus aureus using a mono-species biofilm model. Parallel to this, the study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of ozone for human gingival fibroblasts. Material and Methods: One hundred and eighty single-root teeth were contaminated with a mono-species biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. Groups were formed: Group I – control; Group II – standard protocol; Group III – standard protocol + ozone gas at 40 µg/mL; and Group IV – standard protocol + aqueous ozone at 8 µg/mL. In parallel, human gingival fibroblasts were submitted to the MTT test. Cells were plated, then ozone was applied as follows: Group I (control) – broth medium; Group II – aqueous ozone at 2 µg/mL; Group III – aqueous ozone at 5 µg/mL; and Group IV – aqueous ozone at 8 µg/mL. Data were submitted to the Kruskal Wallis test and Bonferroni post hoc analyses to assess microbiology and cytotoxicity, respectively (p<0.05%). Results The results revealed antimicrobial efficacy by Group IV with no CFU count. The cytotoxicity assay showed Groups III and IV to be the most aggressive, providing a decrease in cell viability at hour 0 from 100% to 77.3% and 68.6%, respectively. Such a decrease in cell viability was reverted, and after 72 hours Groups III and IV provided the greatest increase in cell viability, being statistically different from Groups I and II. Conclusion According to the applied methodology and the limitations of this study, it was possible to conclude that ozone therapy improved the decontamination of the root canal ex vivo. Ozone was toxic to the cells on first contact, but cell viability was recovered. Thus, these findings suggest that ozone might be useful to improve root canal results. PMID:28076466

  5. Fluorescence imaging of tryptophan and collagen cross-links to evaluate wound closure ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Farinelli, Bill; Anderson, R. R.; Franco, Walfre

    2016-02-01

    Wound size is a key parameter in monitoring healing. Current methods to measure wound size are often subjective, time-consuming and marginally invasive. Recently, we developed a non-invasive, non-contact, fast and simple but robust fluorescence imaging (u-FEI) method to monitor the healing of skin wounds. This method exploits the fluorescence of native molecules to tissue as functional and structural markers. The objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using variations in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan and cross-links of collagen to evaluate proliferation of keratinocyte cells and quantitate size of wound during healing, respectively. Circular dermal wounds were created in ex vivo human skin and cultured in different media. Two serial fluorescence images of tryptophan and collagen cross-links were acquired every two days. Histology and immunohistology were used to validate correlation between fluorescence and epithelialization. Images of collagen cross-links show fluorescence of the exposed dermis and, hence, are a measure of wound area. Images of tryptophan show higher fluorescence intensity of proliferating keratinocytes forming new epithelium, as compared to surrounding keratinocytes not involved in epithelialization. These images are complementary since collagen cross-links report on structure while tryptophan reports on function. HE and immunohistology show that tryptophan fluorescence correlates with newly formed epidermis. We have established a fluorescence imaging method for studying epithelialization processes during wound healing in a skin organ culture model, our approach has the potential to provide a non-invasive, non-contact, quick, objective and direct method for quantitative measurements in wound healing in vivo.

  6. Penetration Potential of a Silver Diamine Fluoride Solution on Dentin Surfaces. An Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willershausen, Ines; Schulte, Daniel; Azaripour, Adriano; Weyer, Veronica; Briseño, Benjamin; Willershausen, Brita

    2015-01-01

    Occurrence of open dentinal tubules as a cause of dental hypersensitivity is a very common pnenomenon in patients. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of a silver diamine fluoride solution (Ag(NH3)2 F) on human dentin samples. A total of five fully retained wisdom teeth were selected for this study. The crowns of the teeth were separated from the roots and the occlusal enamel surface was removed. All dentin samples were treated for 60 seconds with phosphoric acid (36%) and rinsed thoroughly to remove the smear layer. Then the desensitizing agent (Riva Star, SDI; 38% Ag(NH3)2 F) was placed according to the manufacturer's instruction. Three dentin samples were prepared for element analysis using an electron beam microprobe analyzer (JEOL JXA 8900RL). The Ag concentrations in the dentin samples were measured in depths ranging from 5 to 40 μm. The other two dentin samples were vertically fractured and accordingly prepared for visualization with SEM (Zeiss DSM). The application of the desensitizing agent on the dentin areas demonstrated an increased Ag concentration (JEOL JXA 8900RL). On the dentin surface an Ag concentration of 1.7 weight % (? 0.7) was measured, but at a depth of 20 μm only 0.3 weight % (± 0.1) were detected. In depths greater than 40 μm the Ag concentration was below the detection limit. The SEM results showed that deposits could be found in a covering on the dentin layer and in the dentinal tubules to a depth of 20 μm. In this ex vivo study, the effect of silver diamine fluoride on dentin surfaces could be demonstrated. The desensitizing agent formed a film on the dentin surface and in some dentinal tubules deposits were detected. These findings can explain a certain desensitizing effect, but a direct translation to in vivo conditions can only be done with caution.

  7. Structural layers of ex vivo rat hippocampus at 7T MRI.

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    Jeanine Manuella Kamsu

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI applied to the hippocampus is challenging in studies of the neurophysiology of memory and the physiopathology of numerous diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, ischemia, and depression. The hippocampus is a well-delineated cerebral structure with a multi-layered organization. Imaging of hippocampus layers is limited to a few studies and requires high magnetic field and gradient strength. We performed one conventional MRI sequence on a 7T MRI in order to visualize and to delineate the multi-layered hippocampal structure ex vivo in rat brains. We optimized a volumic three-dimensional T2 Rapid Acquisition Relaxation Enhancement (RARE sequence and quantified the volume of the hippocampus and one of its thinnest layers, the stratum granulare of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, we tested passive staining by gadolinium with the aim of decreasing the acquisition time and increasing image contrast. Using appropriated settings, six discrete layers were differentiated within the hippocampus in rats. In the hippocampus proper or Ammon's Horn (AH: the stratum oriens, the stratum pyramidale of, the stratum radiatum, and the stratum lacunosum moleculare of the CA1 were differentiated. In the dentate gyrus: the stratum moleculare and the stratum granulare layer were seen distinctly. Passive staining of one brain with gadolinium decreased the acquisition time by four and improved the differentiation between the layers. A conventional sequence optimized on a 7T MRI with a standard receiver surface coil will allow us to study structural layers (signal and volume of hippocampus in various rat models of neuropathology (anxiety, epilepsia, neurodegeneration.

  8. Rapid infrared laser sealing and cutting of porcine renal vessels, ex vivo

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    Giglio, Nicholas C.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Perkins, William C.; Latimer, Cassandra; Ward, Arlen; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-03-01

    Suture ligation with subsequent cutting of blood vessels to maintain hemostasis during surgery is time consuming and skill intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical and ultrasonic devices are often used to replace sutures and mechanical clips to provide rapid hemostasis, and decrease surgical time. Some of these devices may create undesirably large collateral zones of thermal damage and tissue necrosis, or require separate mechanical blades for cutting. Infrared lasers are currently being explored as alternative energy sources for vessel sealing applications. In a previous study, a 1470-nm laser was used to seal vessels of 1-6 mm in diameter in 5 s, yielding burst pressures of ~ 500 mmHg. The purpose of this study was to provide faster sealing, incorporate transection of the sealed vessels, and increase the burst pressure. A 110-Watt, 1470-nm laser beam was transmitted through a fiber and beam shaping optics, producing a linear beam 3.0 mm by 9.5 mm for sealing, and 1.1 mm by 9.6 mm for cutting (FWHM). A twostep process sealed then transected ex vivo porcine renal vessels (1-8.5 mm diameter) in a bench top setup. Seal and cut times were 1.0 s each. A standard burst pressure system measured resulting seal strength, and gross and histologic thermal damage measurements were also recorded. All blood vessels tested (n = 30) were sealed and cut, with total irradiation times of 2.0 s, mean burst pressures > 1000 mmHg (compared to normal systolic blood pressure of 120 mmHg), and combined seal/collateral thermal coagulation zones of 2-3 mm. The results of this study demonstrated that an optical-based system is capable of precisely sealing and cutting a wide range of porcine renal vessel sizes, and with further development, may provide an alternative to radiofrequency and ultrasound-based vessel sealing devices.

  9. EX VIVO STUDY OF QUANTITATIVE ULTRASOUND PARAMETERS IN FATTY RABBIT LIVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Goutam; Lavarello, Roberto J.; Kemmerer, Jeremy P.; Miller, Rita J.; Oelze, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects more than 30% of Americans, and with increasing problems of obesity in the United States, NAFLD is poised to become an even more serious medical concern. At present, accurate classification of steatosis (fatty liver) represents a significant challenge. In this study, the use of high-frequency (8 to 25 MHz) quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging to quantify fatty liver was explored. QUS is an imaging technique that can be used to quantify properties of tissue giving rise to scattered ultrasound. The changes in the ultrasound properties of livers in rabbits undergoing atherogenic diets of varying durations were investigated using QUS. Rabbits were placed on a special fatty diet for 0, 3, or 6 weeks. The fattiness of the livers was quantified by estimating the total lipid content of the livers. Ultrasonic properties, such as speed of sound, attenuation, and backscatter coefficients, were estimated in ex vivo rabbit liver samples from animals that had been on the diet for varying periods. Two QUS parameters were estimated based on the backscatter coefficient: effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and effective acoustic concentration (EAC), using a spherical Gaussian scattering model. Two parameters were estimated based on the backscattered envelope statistics (the k parameter and the μ parameter) according to the homodyned K distribution. The speed of sound decreased from 1574 to 1565 m/s and the attenuation coefficient increased from 0.71 to 1.27 dB/cm/MHz, respectively, with increasing fat content in the liver. The ESD decreased from 31 to 17 μm and the EAC increased from 38 to 63 dB/cm3 with increasing fat content in the liver. A significant increase in the μ parameter from 0.18 to 0.93 scatterers/mm3 was observed with increasing fat content in the liver samples. The results of this study indicate that QUS parameters are sensitive to fat content in the liver. PMID:23062376

  10. Hydrogen sulfide activates the carotid body chemoreceptors in cat, rabbit and rat ex vivo preparations.

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    Jiao, Yingfu; Li, Qian; Sun, Biying; Zhang, Guohua; Rong, Weifang

    2015-03-01

    We and others previously reported experimental evidence suggesting an important role for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in oxygen sensing in murine carotid body chemoreceptors. More recent data implicated abnormal H2S-mediated chemoreceptor signaling in pathological conditions such as chronic heart failure and hypertension. However, the idea of H2S as a mediator of oxygen-sensing in chemoreceptors has been challenged. In particular, it was shown that exogenous H2S inhibited the release of neurotransmitters (ACh and ATP) from the cat carotid body, raising the possibility that there exists significant species difference in H2S-mediated signaling in chemoreceptors. This study was designed specifically to determine the effect of H2S on chemoreceptors in different species. We conducted multiunit extracellular recordings of the sinus nerve in the ex vivo carotid body preparation taken from the rat, the cat and the rabbit. As observed in the mouse carotid body, H2S donors (NaHS or Na2S) evoked qualitatively similar excitatory responses of the afferent sinus nerves of the species studied here. The excitatory effects of the H2S donors were concentration-dependent and reversible. The sinus nerve responses to H2S donors were prevented by blockade of the transmission between type I cells and the afferent terminals, as was the response to hypoxia. These results demonstrate that exogenous H2S exerts qualitatively similar excitatory effects on chemoreceptor afferents of different species. The role of endogenous H2S-mediated signaling in carotid body function in different species awaits further investigation.

  11. Ex vivo expansion protocol for human tumor specific T cells for adoptive T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Anne-Marie; Borelli, Gabriel; Hoel, Hanna Julie; Lislerud, Kari; Gaudernack, Gustav; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Aarvak, Tanja

    2010-04-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy is a promising treatment strategy for patients with different types of cancer. The methods used for generation of high numbers of tumor specific T cells usually require long-term ex vivo culture, which frequently lead to generation of terminally differentiated effector cells, demonstrating low persistence in vivo. Therefore, optimization of protocols for generation of T cells for adoptive cell therapy is warranted. The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for expansion of antigen-specific T cells using Dynabeads CD3/CD28 to obtain T cells expressing markers important for in vivo persistence and survival. To achieve high numbers of antigen-specific T cells following expansion, we have tested the effect of depleting regulatory T cells using Dynabeads CD25 and including a pre-stimulation step with peptide prior to the non-specific expansion with Dynabeads. Our data demonstrate that virus- and tumor specific T cells can be expanded to high numbers using Dynabeads CD3/CD28 following optimization of the culture conditions. The expansion protocol presented here results in enrichment of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells with an early/intermediate memory phenotype. This is observed even when the antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells demonstrated a terminal effector phenotype prior to expansion. This protocol thus results in expanded T cells with a phenotypic profile which may increase the chance of retaining long-term persistence following adoptive transfer. Based on these data we have developed a cGMP protocol for expansion of tumor specific T cells for adoptive T cell therapy.

  12. Removing biofilms from microstructured titanium ex vivo: a novel approach using atmospheric plasma technology.

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    Stefan Rupf

    Full Text Available The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra: 1.96 µm were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 5 each. Plasma treatment of biofilms was carried out ex vivo using a microwave-driven pulsed plasma source working at temperatures from 39 to 43°C. Following plasma treatment, one group was air/water spray treated before re-treatment by second plasma pulses. Vital microorganisms on the titanium surfaces were identified by contact culture (Rodac agar plates. Biofilm presence and bacterial viability were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Morphology of titanium surfaces and attached biofilms was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Total protein amounts of biofilms were colorimetrically quantified. Untreated and air/water treated biofilms served as controls. Cold plasma treatment of native biofilms with a mean thickness of 19 µm (24 h to 91 µm (72 h covering the microstructure of the titanium surface caused inactivation of biofilm bacteria and significant reduction of protein amounts. Total removal of biofilms, however, required additional application of air/water spray, and a second series of plasma treatment. Importantly, the microstructure of the titanium discs was not altered by plasma treatment. The combination of atmospheric plasma and non-abrasive air/water spray is applicable for complete elimination of oral biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants and may enable new routes for the therapy of periimplant disease.

  13. Human Dupuytren's Ex Vivo Culture for the Study of Myofibroblasts and Extracellular Matrix Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkampouna, Sofia; Kloen, Peter; Obdeijn, Miryam C; Riester, Scott M; van Wijnen, Andre J; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Organ fibrosis or "scarring" is known to account for a high death toll due to the extensive amount of disorders and organs affected (from cirrhosis to cardiovascular diseases). There is no effective treatment and the in vitro tools available do not mimic the in vivo situation rendering the progress of the out of control wound healing process still enigmatic. To date, 2D and 3D cultures of fibroblasts derived from DD patients are the main experimental models available. Primary cell cultures have many limitations; the fibroblasts derived from DD are altered by the culture conditions, lack cellular context and interactions, which are crucial for the development of fibrosis and weakly represent the derived tissue. Real-time PCR analysis of fibroblasts derived from control and DD samples show that little difference is detectable. 3D cultures of fibroblasts include addition of extracellular matrix that alters the native conditions of these cells. As a way to characterize the fibrotic, proliferative properties of these resection specimens we have developed a 3D culture system, using intact human resections of the nodule part of the cord. The system is based on transwell plates with an attached nitrocellulose membrane that allows contact of the tissue with the medium but not with the plastic, thus, preventing the alteration of the tissue. No collagen gel or other extracellular matrix protein substrate is required. The tissue resection specimens maintain their viability and proliferative properties for 7 days. This is the first "organ" culture system that allows human resection specimens from DD patients to be grown ex vivo and functionally tested, recapitulating the in vivo situation.

  14. Laser-induced cartilage damage: an ex-vivo model using confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, Martin; Zueger, Benno J.; Monin, D.; Weiler, C.; Mainil-Varlet, P. M.; Weber, Heinz P.; Schaffner, Thomas

    1999-06-01

    Although there is an increasing popularity of lasers in orthopedic surgery, there is a growing concern about negative side effects of this therapy e.g. prolonged restitution time, radiation damage to adjacent cartilage or depth effects like bone necrosis. Despite case reports and experimental investigations over the last few years little is known about the extent of acute cartilage damage induced by different lasers types and energies. Histological examination offers only limited insights in cell viability and metabolism. Ho:YAG and Er:YAG lasers emitting at 2.1 micrometer and 2.94 micrometer, respectively, are ideally suited for tissue treatment because these wavelengths are strongly absorbed in water. The Purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of laser type and energy on chondrocyte viability in an ex vivo model. Free running Er:YAG (E equals 100 and 150 mJ) and Ho:YAG (E equals 500 and 800 mJ) lasers were used at different energy levels using a fixed pulse length of 400 microseconds. The energy was delivered at 8 Hz through optical fibers. Fresh bovine hyaline cartilage samples were mounted in a water bath at room temperature and the fiber was positioned at 30 degree and 180 degree angles relative to the tissue surface. After laser irradiation the samples were assessed by a life-dead cell viability test using a confocal microscope and by standard histology. Thermal damage was much deeper with Ho:YAG (up to 1800 micrometer) than with the Er:YAG laser (up to 70 micrometer). The cell viability test revealed a damage zone about twice the one determined by standard histology. Confocal microscopy is a powerful tool for assessing changes in tissue structure after laser treatment. In addition this technique allows to quantify these alterations without necessitating time consuming and expensive animal experiments.

  15. Ex vivo perfusion of the isolated rat small intestine as a novel model of Salmonella enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Erin C; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Braun, Janin; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Grassl, Guntram A

    2016-01-15

    Using an ex vivo perfused rat small intestinal model, we examined pathological changes to the tissue, inflammation induction, as well as dynamic changes to smooth muscle activity, metabolic competence, and luminal fluid accumulation during short-term infection with the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica. Although few effects were seen upon Yersinia infection, this system accurately modeled key aspects associated with Salmonella enteritis. Our results confirmed the importance of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1)-encoded type 3 secretion system (T3SS) in pathology, tissue invasion, inflammation induction, and fluid secretion. Novel physiological consequences of Salmonella infection of the small intestine were also identified, namely, SPI-1-dependent vasoconstriction and SPI-1-independent reduction in the digestive and absorptive functions of the epithelium. Importantly, this is the first small animal model that allows for the study of Salmonella-induced fluid secretion. Another major advantage of this model is that one can specifically determine the contribution of resident cell populations. Accordingly, we can conclude that recruited cell populations were not involved in the pathological damage, inflammation induction, fluid accumulation, nutrient absorption deficiency, and vasoconstriction observed. Although fluid loss induced by Salmonella infection is hypothesized to be due to damage caused by recruited neutrophils, our data suggest that bacterial invasion and inflammation induction in resident cell populations are sufficient for fluid loss into the lumen. In summary, this model is a novel and useful tool that allows for detailed examination of the early physiopathological effects of Salmonella infection on the small intestine.

  16. Nonlinear acoustic properties of ex vivo bovine liver and the effects of temperature and denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, E J; Coussios, C-C; Cleveland, R O

    2014-06-21

    Thermal ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has a great potential for the non-invasive treatment of solid tumours. Due to the high pressure amplitudes involved, nonlinear acoustic effects must be understood and the relevant medium property is the parameter of nonlinearity B/A. Here, B/A was measured in ex vivo bovine liver, over a heating/cooling cycle replicating temperatures reached during HIFU ablation, adapting a finite amplitude insertion technique, which also allowed for measurement of sound-speed and attenuation. The method measures the nonlinear progression of a plane wave through liver and B/A was chosen so that numerical simulations matched the measured waveforms. To create plane-wave conditions, sinusoidal bursts were transmitted by a 100 mm diameter 1.125 MHz unfocused transducer and measured using a 15 mm diameter 2.25 MHz broadband transducer in the near field. Attenuation and sound-speed were calculated using a reflected pulse from the smaller transducer using the larger transducer as the reflecting interface. Results showed that attenuation initially decreased with heating then increased after denaturation, the sound-speed initially increased with temperature and then decreased, and B/A showed an increase with temperature but no significant post-heating change. The B/A data disagree with other reports that show a significant change and we suggest that any nonlinear enhancement in the received ultrasound signal post-treatment is likely due to acoustic cavitation rather than changes in tissue nonlinearity.

  17. Measurement of the hyperelastic properties of 44 pathological ex vivo breast tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Joseph J.; Samani, Abbas

    2009-04-01

    The elastic and hyperelastic properties of biological soft tissues have been of interest to the medical community. There are several biomedical applications where parameters characterizing such properties are critical for a reliable clinical outcome. These applications include surgery planning, needle biopsy and brachtherapy where tissue biomechanical modeling is involved. Another important application is interpreting nonlinear elastography images. While there has been considerable research on the measurement of the linear elastic modulus of small tissue samples, little research has been conducted for measuring parameters that characterize the nonlinear elasticity of tissues included in tissue slice specimens. This work presents hyperelastic measurement results of 44 pathological ex vivo breast tissue samples. For each sample, five hyperelastic models have been used, including the Yeoh, N = 2 polynomial, N = 1 Ogden, Arruda-Boyce, and Veronda-Westmann models. Results show that the Yeoh, polynomial and Ogden models are the most accurate in terms of fitting experimental data. The results indicate that almost all of the parameters corresponding to the pathological tissues are between two times to over two orders of magnitude larger than those of normal tissues, with C11 showing the most significant difference. Furthermore, statistical analysis indicates that C02 of the Yeoh model, and C11 and C20 of the polynomial model have very good potential for cancer classification as they show statistically significant differences for various cancer types, especially for invasive lobular carcinoma. In addition to the potential for use in cancer classification, the presented data are very important for applications such as surgery planning and virtual reality based clinician training systems where accurate nonlinear tissue response modeling is required.

  18. Impact of AQP3 inducer treatment on cultured human keratinocytes, ex vivo human skin and volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, N; Gondran, C; Menon, G; Mur, L; Oberto, G; Guerif, Y; Dal Farra, C; Domloge, N

    2011-10-01

    One of the main functions of the skin is to protect the organism against environmental threats, such as thermal stress. Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) facilitates water and glycerol transport across cell membranes and therefore regulates osmotic balance in different situations of stress. This mechanism seems to be particularly important for the resistance of different organisms to cold stress. Consequently, we were interested in investigating the effect of cold and osmotic stress on AQP3 expression in normal human keratinocytes. We developed a new active ingredient to stimulate aquaporins in skin and demonstrated the partial restoration of AQP3 expression in keratinocytes transfected with AQP3 siRNA. Moreover, we examined the effect of cold stress on cell morphology and the impact of a pre-treatment with the active ingredient. Our results indicated that induction of AQP3 helped maintain a correct organization of the actin cytoskeleton, preserving cell morphology and preventing cells from rounding. Immunofluorescent staining revealed cytoplasmic localization of AQP3 and its translocation to the cell membrane following osmotic stress. Histological ex vivo studies of skin under different conditions, such as cold environment and tape-stripping, indicated that increase in AQP3 expression appears to be involved in skin protection and showed that the pattern of AQP3 expression was more enhanced in the active ingredient-treated samples. In vivo confocal microscopy by Vivascope showed a generally healthier appearance of the skin in the treated areas. These results attest to the potential value of the active ingredient in optimizing environmental stress resistance and protecting the skin from stratum corneum damage.

  19. Ex vivo vs. in vivo antibacterial activity of two antiseptics on oral biofilm

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    ISABEL ePRADA-LÓPEZ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the immediate antibacterial effect of two application methods (passive immersion and active mouthwash of two antiseptic solutions on the in situ oral biofilm.Material and Methods: A randomized observer-masked crossover study was conducted. Fifteen healthy volunteers wore a specific intraoral device for 48 hours to form a biofilm in three glass disks. One of these disks was used as a baseline; another one was immersed in a solution of 0.2% Chlorhexidine (0.2% CHX, remaining the third in the device, placed in the oral cavity, during the 0.2% CHX mouthwash application. After a two-week washout period, the protocol was repeated using a solution of Essential Oils (EO. Samples were analysed for bacterial viability with the confocal laser scanning microscope after previous staining with LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™.Results: The EO showed a better antibacterial effect compared to the 0.2% CHX after the mouthwash application (% of bacterial viability= 1.16 ± 1.00% vs. 5.08 ± 5.79%, respectively, and was more effective in all layers (p<0.05. In the immersion, both antiseptics were significantly less effective (% of bacterial viability= 26.93 ± 13.11%, EO vs. 15.17 ± 6.14%, 0.2% CHX; in the case of EO immersion, there were no significant changes in the bacterial viability of the deepest layer in comparison with the baseline. Conclusions: The method of application conditioned the antibacterial activity of the 0.2% CHX and EO solutions on the in situ oral biofilm. The in vivo active mouthwash was more effective than the ex vivo passive immersion in both antiseptic solutions. There was more penetration of the antiseptic inside the biofilm with an active mouthwash, especially with the EO.

  20. Novel Techniques for Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood: Clinical Trials

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    Rohtesh S Mehta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cord blood (CB provides an excellent alternative source of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC for patients lacking human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched peripheral blood or bone marrow graft for transplantation. However, due to the limited cell dose in CB graft, it is associated with prolonged time to engraftment, risk of graft rejection, infections and treatment-related mortality. To increase the cell dose, a variety of ex vivo expansion techniques have been developed. Results of traditional methods of CB expansion using cytokines alone were disappointing. Expanding CB cells with mesenchymal progenitor cells led to sizeable increase in graft content and improved engraftment. Other methods used HPC-differentiation blockers, such as nicotinamide analogs, copper chelators, inducing constitutive Notch signaling, or an aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist (StemReginin1. Many of these methods lead to substantial expansions of total nucleated cells and CD34+ cells, and significantly improved time to neutrophil or platelet engraftment in patients transplanted with the expanded products compared to the recipients of unmanipulated CBT. These studies differ not only in the expansion method, but also with regards to the cytokines used, patient population, conditioning regimens and transplantation practices, to name a few. Some of these methods employed expansion of a portion of CB unit in the setting of single CBT, while others in the setting of double CBT. Here, we review various procedures used for CB expansion and highlight some of the key differences. Novel methods of improving engraftment that aim at improving bone marrow homing potential of CB cells are not reviewed.

  1. Irrigation of human prepared root canal – ex vivo based computational fluid dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šnjarić, Damir; Čarija, Zoran; Braut, Alen; Halaji, Adelaida; Kovačević, Maja; Kuiš, Davor

    2012-01-01

    Aim To analyze the influence of the needle type, insertion depth, and irrigant flow rate on irrigant flow pattern, flow velocity, and apical pressure by ex-vivo based endodontic irrigation computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Methods Human upper canine root canal was prepared using rotary files. Contrast fluid was introduced in the root canal and scanned by computed tomography (CT) providing a three-dimensional object that was exported to the computer-assisted design (CAD) software. Two probe points were established in the apical portion of the root canal model for flow velocity and pressure measurement. Three different CAD models of 27G irrigation needles (closed-end side-vented, notched open-end, and bevel open-end) were created and placed at 25, 50, 75, and 95% of the working length (WL). Flow rates of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mL/s were simulated. A total of 60 irrigation simulations were performed by CFD fluid flow solver. Results Closed-end side-vented needle required insertion depth closer to WL, regarding efficient irrigant replacement, compared to open-end irrigation needle types, which besides increased velocity produced increased irrigant apical pressure. For all irrigation needle types and needle insertion depths, the increase of flow rate was followed by an increased irrigant apical pressure. Conclusions The human root canal shape obtained by CT is applicable in the CFD analysis of endodontic irrigation. All the analyzed values –irrigant flow pattern, velocity, and pressure – were influenced by irrigation needle type, as well as needle insertion depth and irrigant flow rate. PMID:23100209

  2. Ex vivo and in vivo diffusion of ropivacaine through spinal meninges: influence of absorption enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhonneur, Nolwenn; Dollo, Gilles; Ratajczak-Enselme, Maja; Deniau, Anne Laure; Chevanne, François; Estèbe, Jean Pierre; Legrand, Alain; Le Corre, Pascal

    2011-02-14

    Following epidural administration, cerebrospinal fluid bioavailability of local anesthetics is low, one major limiting factor being diffusion across the arachnoid mater barrier. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of absorption enhancers on the meningeal permeability of epidurally administered ropivacaine. Five enhancers known for their ability to increase drug permeability via transcellular and/or paracellular pathways, i.e. palmitoyl carnitine, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, sodium caprate, dodecylphosphocholine and pentylglycerol, were tested ex vivo on fresh specimen of meninges removed from cervical to lumbar level of rabbit spine following laminectomy and placed in diffusion chambers. Among them, sodium caprate lead to the best permeability improvement for both marker and drug (440% and 112% for mannitol and ropivacaine, respectively) and was therefore selected for in vivo study in a sheep model using microdialysis technique to evaluate epidural and intrathecal ropivacaine concentrations following epidural administration. Resulting dialysate and plasma concentrations were used to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters. Following sodium caprate pre-treatment, ropivacaine intrathecal maximal concentration (Cmax) was 1.6 times higher (78 ± 16 μg ml(-1) vs 129 ± 26 μg ml(-1), p<0.05) but the influence of the absorption enhancer was only effective the first 30 min following ropivacaine injection, as seen with the significantly increase of intrathecal AUC(0-30 min) (1629 ± 437 μg min ml(-1) vs 2477 ± 559 μg min ml(-1), p<0.05) resulting in a bioavailable fraction 130% higher 30 min after ropivavaine administration. Co-administration of local anesthetics with sodium caprate seems to allow a transient and reversible improvement of transmeningeal passage into intrathecal space.

  3. Ethosomes for skin delivery of ropivacaine: preparation, characterization and ex vivo penetration properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yingjie; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yi; Liu, Jiyong; Wang, Zimin; Zhai, Guangxi

    2015-01-01

    Ropivacaine, a novel long-acting local anesthetic, has been proved to own superior advantage. However, Naropin® Injection, the applied form in clinic, can cause patient non-convenience. The purpose of this study was to formulate ropivacaine (RPV) in ethosomes and evaluate the potential of ethosome formulation in delivering RPV transdermally. The RPV-loaded ethosomes were prepared with thin-film dispersion technique and the formulation was characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. The results showed that the optimized RPV-ethosomes displayed a typical lipid bilayer structure with a narrow size distribution of 73.86 ± 2.40 nm and drug loading of 8.27 ± 0.37%, EE of 68.92 ± 0.29%. The results of DSC and XRD study indicated that RPV was in amorphous state when encapsulated into ethosomes. Furthermore, the results of ex vivo permeation study proved that RPV-ethosomes could promote the permeability in a high-efficient, rapid way (349.0 ± 11.5 μg cm(-2) at 12 h and 178.8 ± 7.1 μg cm(-2) at 0.5 h). The outcomes of histopathology study forecasted that the interaction between ethosomes and skin could loosen the tight conjugation of corneocyte layers and weaken the permeation barrier. In conclusion, RPV-ethosomes could be a promising delivery system to encapsulate RPV and deliver RPV for transdermal administration.

  4. Removing biofilms from microstructured titanium ex vivo: a novel approach using atmospheric plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupf, Stefan; Idlibi, Ahmad Nour; Marrawi, Fuad Al; Hannig, Matthias; Schubert, Andreas; von Mueller, Lutz; Spitzer, Wolfgang; Holtmann, Henrik; Lehmann, Antje; Rueppell, Andre; Schindler, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra): 1.96 µm) were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each) to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 5 each). Plasma treatment of biofilms was carried out ex vivo using a microwave-driven pulsed plasma source working at temperatures from 39 to 43°C. Following plasma treatment, one group was air/water spray treated before re-treatment by second plasma pulses. Vital microorganisms on the titanium surfaces were identified by contact culture (Rodac agar plates). Biofilm presence and bacterial viability were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Morphology of titanium surfaces and attached biofilms was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total protein amounts of biofilms were colorimetrically quantified. Untreated and air/water treated biofilms served as controls. Cold plasma treatment of native biofilms with a mean thickness of 19 µm (24 h) to 91 µm (72 h) covering the microstructure of the titanium surface caused inactivation of biofilm bacteria and significant reduction of protein amounts. Total removal of biofilms, however, required additional application of air/water spray, and a second series of plasma treatment. Importantly, the microstructure of the titanium discs was not altered by plasma treatment. The combination of atmospheric plasma and non-abrasive air/water spray is applicable for complete elimination of oral biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants and may enable new routes for the therapy of periimplant disease.

  5. Endodontic filling removal procedure: an ex vivo comparative study between two rotary techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Sampaio do Vale

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we compared the ex vivo removal capacity of two endodontic rotary techniques and determined whether there was a significant quantitative difference in residual material when comparing root thirds. Forty extracted molars were used. The palatal roots were selected, and the canals were prepared using a step-back technique and filled using a lateral condensation technique with gutta-percha points and Endofill sealer. After two weeks of storage in a 0.9% saline solution at 37ºC in an oven, the specimens were divided into 2 groups of 20, with group 1 samples subjected to Gates-Glidden drills and group 2 samples subjected to the ProTaper retreatment System. Hedstroem files and eucalyptol solvent were used in both groups to complete the removal procedure. Then, the roots thirds were radiographed and the images were submitted to the NIH ImageJ program to measure the residual filling material in mm. Each root third was related to the total area of the root canals. The data were analyzed using Student's t test. There was a statistically significant difference between the two techniques as more filling material was removed by technique 2 (ProTaper than technique 1 (Gates-Glidden drills, p < 0.05. The apical third had a greater amount of residual filling material than the cervical and middle thirds, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05. None of the selected techniques removed all filling material, and the material was most difficult to remove from the apical third. The ProTaper files removed more material than the Gates-Glidden drills

  6. Ex-vivo assessment of chronic toxicity of low levels of cadmium on testicular meiotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy-Siraudin, Cendrine; Perrard, Marie-Hélène; Ghalamoun-Slaimi, Rahma; Ali, Sazan; Chaspoul, Florence; Lanteaume, André; Achard, Vincent; Gallice, Philippe; Durand, Philippe; Guichaoua, Marie-Roberte

    2012-08-01

    Using a validated model of culture of rat seminiferous tubules, we assessed the effects of 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/L cadmium (Cd) on spermatogenic cells over a 2-week culture period. With concentrations of 1 and 10 μg/L in the culture medium, the Cd concentration in the cells, determined by ICP-MS, increased with concentration in the medium and the day of culture. Flow cytometric analysis enabled us to evaluate changes in the number of Sertoli cells and germ cells during the culture period. The number of Sertoli cells did not appear to be affected by Cd. By contrast, spermatogonia and meiotic cells were decreased by 1 and 10 μg/L Cd in a time and dose dependent manner. Stage distribution of the meiotic prophase I and qualitative study of the synaptonemal complexes (SC) at the pachytene stage were performed by immunocytochemistry with an anti SCP3 antibody. Cd caused a time-and-dose-dependent increase of total abnormalities, of fragmented SC and of asynapsis from concentration of 0.1 μg/L. Additionally, we observed a new SC abnormality, the "motheaten" SC. This abnormality is frequently associated with asynapsis and SC widening which increased with both the Cd concentration and the duration of exposure. This abnormality suggests that Cd disrupts the structure and function of proteins involved in pairing and/or meiotic recombination. These results show that Cd induces dose-and-time-dependent alterations of the meiotic process of spermatogenesis ex-vivo, and that the lowest metal concentration, which induces an adverse effect, may vary with the cell parameter studied.

  7. Quantitative mechanical assessment of the whole prostate gland ex vivo using dynamic instrumented palpation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Steven J; Good, Daniel W; Scanlan, Paul; Palacio-Torralba, Javier; Phipps, Simon; Stewart, Grant D; Shu, Will; Chen, Yuhang; McNeill, S Alan; Reuben, Robert L

    2017-09-01

    An instrumented palpation sensor, designed for measuring the dynamic modulus of tissue in vivo, has been developed and trialled on ex vivo whole prostate glands. The sensor consists of a flexible membrane sensor/actuator with an embedded strain gauge and is actuated using a dynamically varying airflow at frequencies of 1 and 5 Hz. The device was calibrated using an indentation stiffness measurement rig and gelatine samples with a range of static modulus similar to that reported in the literature for prostate tissue. The glands were removed from patients with diagnosed prostate cancer scheduled for radical prostatectomy, and the stiffness was measured within 30 min of surgical removal. Each prostate was later examined histologically in a column immediately below each indentation point and graded into one of the four groups; normal, benign prostatic hyperplasia, cancerous and mixed cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. In total, 11 prostates were assessed using multiple point probing, and the complex modulus at 1 and 5 Hz was calculated on a point-by-point basis. The device yielded values of quasi-static modulus of 15 ± 0.5 kPa and dynamic modulus of 20 ± 0.5 kPa for whole prostates, and a sensitivity of up to 80% with slightly lower specificity was achieved on diagnosis of prostate cancer using a combination of mechanical measures. This assessment did not take into account some obvious factors such as edge effects, overlap and clinical significance of the cancer, all of which would improve performance. The device, as currently configured, is immediately deployable in vivo. A number of improvements are also identified which could improve the sensitivity and specificity in future embodiments of the probe.

  8. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geer, M.A.; Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Bakker, C.T.; ten Kate, F.J.W.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Bosma, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions. METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices. Tissue slic

  9. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geer, M.A.; Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Bakker, C.T.; ten Kate, F.J.W.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Bosma, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions. METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices. Tissue slic

  10. Quantification of fibrosis in infarcted swine hearts by ex vivo late gadolinium-enhancement and diffusion-weighted MRI methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Mihaela; Ghugre, Nilesh R.; Ramanan, Venkat; Morikawa, Lily; Stanisz, Greg; Dick, Alexander J.; Wright, Graham A.

    2013-08-01

    Many have speculated that MRI signal characteristics can be used to identify regions of heterogeneous infarct associated with an arrhythmogenic substrate; however, direct evidence of this relationship is limited. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the remodelling characteristics of fibrosis by means of histology and high-resolution MR imaging. For this purpose, we performed whole-mount histology in heart samples (n = 9) collected from five swine at six weeks post-infarction and compared the extent of fibrosis in the infarcted areas delineated in these histological images with that obtained ex vivo by MRI using late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) methods. All MR images were obtained at a submillimetre resolution (i.e., voxel size of 0.6×0.6×1.2 mm3). Specifically, in the histology images, we differentiated moderate fibrosis (consisting of a mixture of viable and non-viable myocytes, known as border zone, BZ) from severe fibrosis (i.e., the dense scar). Correspondingly, tissue heterogeneities in the MR images were categorized by a Gaussian mixture model into healthy, BZ and scar. Our results showed that (a) both MRI methods were capable of qualitatively distinguishing sharp edges between dense scar and healthy tissue from regions of heterogeneous BZ; (b) the BZ and dense scar areas had intermediate-to-high increased values of signal intensity in the LGE images and of apparent diffusion coefficient in the DWI, respectively. In addition, as demonstrated by the Picrosirius Red and immunohistochemistry stains, the viable bundles in the BZ were clearly separated by thin collagen strands and had reduced expression of Cx43, whereas the core scar was composed of dense fibrosis. A quantitative analysis demonstrated that the comparison between BZ/scar extent in LGE and DWI to the corresponding areas identified in histology yielded very good correlations (i.e., for the scar identified by LGE, R2 was 0.96 compared to R2 = 0.93 for the

  11. In vitro and ex vivo models indicate that the molecular clock in fast skeletal muscle of Atlantic cod is not autonomous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazado, Carlo C; Kumaratunga, Hiruni P S; Nagasawa, Kazue; Babiak, Igor; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A; Fernandes, Jorge M O

    2014-10-01

    The notion that the circadian rhythm is exclusively regulated by a central clock has been challenged by the discovery of peripheral oscillators. These peripheral clocks are known to have a direct influence on the biological processes in a tissue or cell. In fish, several peripheral clocks respond directly to light, thus raising the hypothesis of autonomous regulation. Several clock genes are expressed with daily rhythmicity in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) fast skeletal muscle. In the present study, myosatellite cell culture and short-term cultured fast skeletal muscle explant models were developed and characterized, in order to investigate the autonomy of the clock system in skeletal muscle of Atlantic cod. Myosatellite cells proliferated and differentiated in vitro, as shown by the changes in cellular and myogenic gene markers. The high expression of myogenic differentiation 1 during the early days post-isolation implied the commitment to myogenic lineage and the increasing mRNA levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (pcna) indicated the proliferation of the cells in vitro. Transcript levels of myogenic marker genes such as pcna and myogenin increased during 5 days in culture of skeletal muscle explants, indicating that the muscle cells were proliferating and differentiating under ex vivo conditions. Transcript levels of the clock gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like 2 (arntl2) in myosatellite cells showed no daily oscillation regardless of photoperiod manipulation. On the other hand, mRNA levels of the clock gene circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (clock) showed circadian rhythmicity in 5-day-old skeletal muscle explant under different photoperiod regimes. The expression of arntl2, cryptochrome2 (cry2), period 2a (per2a) and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 was not rhythmic in muscle explants but photoperiod manipulation had a significant effect on mRNA levels of cry2 and per2a. Taken together, the lack of rhythmicity

  12. Statistical estimation of cell-cycle progression and lineage commitment in Plasmodium falciparum reveals a homogeneous pattern of transcription in ex vivo culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Jacob E; Gomez-Escobar, Natalia; Feller, Avi; Carret, Celine; Amambua-Ngwa, Alfred; Pinches, Robert; Day, Felix; Kyes, Sue A; Conway, David J; Holmes, Chris C; Newbold, Chris I

    2009-05-05

    We have cultured Plasmodium falciparum directly from the blood of infected individuals to examine patterns of mature-stage gene expression in patient isolates. Analysis of the transcriptome of P. falciparum is complicated by the highly periodic nature of gene expression because small variations in the stage of parasite development between samples can lead to an apparent difference in gene expression values. To address this issue, we have developed statistical likelihood-based methods to estimate cell cycle progression and commitment to asexual or sexual development lineages in our samples based on microscopy and gene expression patterns. In cases subsequently matched for temporal development, we find that transcriptional patterns in ex vivo culture display little variation across patients with diverse clinical profiles and closely resemble transcriptional profiles that occur in vitro. These statistical methods, available to the research community, assist in the design and interpretation of P. falciparum expression profiling experiments where it is difficult to separate true differential expression from cell-cycle dependent expression. We reanalyze an existing dataset of in vivo patient expression profiles and conclude that previously observed discrete variation is consistent with the commitment of a varying proportion of the parasite population to the sexual development lineage.

  13. Visualizing typical features of breast fibroadenomas using phase-contrast CT: an ex-vivo study.

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    Susanne Grandl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibroadenoma is the most common benign solid breast lesion type and a very common cause for histologic assessment. To justify a conservative therapy, a highly specific discrimination between fibroadenomas and other breast lesions is crucial. Phase-contrast imaging offers improved soft-tissue contrast and differentiability of fine structures combined with the potential of 3-dimensional imaging. In this study we assessed the potential of grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging for visualizing diagnostically relevant features of fibroadenomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Grating-based phase-contrast CT was performed on six ex-vivo formalin-fixed breast specimens containing a fibroadenoma and three samples containing benign changes that resemble fibroadenomas using Talbot Lau interferometry and a polychromatic X-ray source. Phase-contrast and simultaneously acquired absorption-based 3D-datasets were manually matched with corresponding histological slices. The visibility of diagnostically valuable features was assessed in comparison with histology as the gold-standard. RESULTS: In all cases, matching of grating-based phase-contrast CT images and histology was successfully completed. Grating-based phase-contrast CT showed greatly improved differentiation of fine structures and provided accurate depiction of strands of fibrous tissue within the fibroadenomas as well as of the diagnostically valuable dilated, branched ductuli of the fibroadenomas. A clear demarcation of tumor boundaries in all cases was provided by phase- but not absorption-contrast CT. CONCLUSIONS: Pending successful translation of the technology to a clinical setting and considerable reduction of the required dose, the data presented here suggest that grating-based phase-contrast CT may be used as a supplementary non-invasive diagnostic tool in breast diagnostics. Phase-contrast CT may thus contribute to the reduction of false positive findings and reduce the recall and core

  14. Accuracy of five electronic foramen locators with different operating systems: an ex vivo study

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    Bruno Carvalho de Vasconcelos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate, ex vivo, the precision of five electronic root canal length measurement devices (ERCLMDs with different operating systems: the Root ZX, Mini Apex Locator, Propex II, iPex, and RomiApex A-15, and the possible influence of the positioning of the instrument tips short of the apical foramen. Material and Methods: Forty-two mandibular bicuspids had their real canal lengths (RL previously determined. Electronic measurements were performed 1.0 mm short of the apical foramen (-1.0, followed by measurements at the apical foramen (0.0. The data resulting from the comparison of the ERCLMD measurements and the RL were evaluated by the Wilcoxon and Friedman tests at a significance level of 5%. Results: Considering the measurements performed at 0.0 and -1.0, the precision rates for the ERCLMDs were: 73.5% and 47.1% (Root ZX, 73.5% and 55.9% (Mini Apex Locator, 67.6% and 41.1% (Propex II, 61.7% and 44.1% (iPex, and 79.4% and 44.1% (RomiApex A-15, respectively, considering ±0.5 mm of tolerance. Regarding the mean discrepancies, no differences were observed at 0.0; however, in the measurements at -1.0, the iPex, a multi-frequency ERCLMD, had significantly more discrepant readings short of the apical foramen than the other devices, except for the Propex II, which had intermediate results. When the ERCLMDs measurements at -1.0 were compared with those at 0.0, the Propex II, iPex and RomiApex A-15 presented significantly higher discrepancies in their readings. Conclusions: Under the conditions of the present study, all the ERCLMDs provided acceptable measurements at the 0.0 position. However, at the -1.0 position, the ERCLMDs had a lower precision, with statistically significant differences for the Propex II, iPex, and RomiApex A-15.

  15. Lyophilized phytosomal nanocarriers as platforms for enhanced diosmin delivery: optimization and ex vivo permeation

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    Freag MS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available May S Freag, Yosra SR Elnaggar, Ossama Y AbdallahDepartment of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Alexandria, EgyptAbstract: Diosmin (DSN is an outstanding phlebotonic flavonoid with a tolerable potential for the treatment of colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. Being highly insoluble, DSN bioavailability suffers from high inter-subject variation due to variable degrees of permeation. This work endeavored to develop novel DSN loaded phytosomes in order to improve drug dissolution and intestinal permeability. Three preparation methods (solvent evaporation, salting out, and lyophilization were compared. Nanocarrier optimization encompassed different soybean phospholipid (SPC types, different solvents, and different DSN:SPC molar ratios (1:1, 1:2, and 1:4. In vitro appraisal encompassed differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, transmission electron microscopy, drug content, and in vitro stability. Comparative dissolution studies were performed under sink versus non-sink conditions. Ex vivo intestinal permeation studies were performed on rats utilizing noneverted sac technique and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The results revealed lyophilization as the optimum preparation technique using SPC and solvent mixture (Dimethyl sulphoxide:t-butylalchol in a 1:2 ratio. Complex formation was contended by differential scanning calorimetry and infrared data. Optimal lyophilized phytosomal nanocarriers (LPNs exhibited the lowest particle size (316 nm, adequate zeta-potential (−27 mV, and good in vitro stability. Well formed, discrete vesicles were revealed by transmission electron microscopy, drug content, and in vitro stability. Comparative dissolution studies were performed. LPNs demonstrated significant enhancement in DSN dissolution compared to crude drug, physical mixture, and generic and brand DSN products. Permeation studies revealed 80% DSN

  16. Trimetazidine therapy for diabetic mouse hearts subjected to ex vivo acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedt, Emilene; Lacerda, Lydia; Essop, M Faadiel

    2017-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the most common primary diagnosis for hospitalized heart diseases in Africa. As increased fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) during heart failure triggers detrimental effects on the myocardium, we hypothesized that trimetazidine (TMZ) (partial FAO inhibitor) offers cardioprotection under normal and obese-related diabetic conditions. Hearts were isolated from 12-14-week-old obese male and female diabetic (db/db) mice versus lean non-diabetic littermates (db/+) controls. The Langendorff retrograde isolated heart perfusion system was employed to establish an ex vivo AHF model: a) Stabilization phase-Krebs Henseleit buffer (10 mM glucose) at 100 mmHg (25 min); b) Critical Acute Heart Failure (CAHF) phase-(1.2 mM palmitic acid, 2.5 mM glucose) at 20 mmHg (25 min); and c) Recovery Acute Heart Failure phase (RAHF)-(1.2 mM palmitic acid, 10 mM glucose) at 100 mmHg (25 min). Treated groups received 5 μM TMZ in the perfusate during either the CAHF or RAHF stage for the full duration of each respective phase. Both lean and obese males benefited from TMZ treatment administered during the RAHF phase. Sex differences were observed only in lean groups where the phases of the estrous cycle influenced therapy; only the lean follicular female group responded to TMZ treatment during the CAHF phase. Lean luteal females rather displayed an inherent cardioprotection (without treatments) that was lost with obesity. However, TMZ treatment initiated during RAHF was beneficial for obese luteal females. TMZ treatment triggered significant recovery for male and obese female hearts when administered during RAHF. There were no differences between lean and obese male hearts, while lean females displayed a functional recovery advantage over lean males. Thus TMZ emerges as a worthy therapeutic target to consider for AHF treatment in normal and obese-diabetic individuals (for both sexes), but only when administered during the recovery phase and not during the very acute

  17. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P; Kim, Kang

    2014-02-21

    .037%). Using histology as a gold standard to classify mouse livers, US-TSI had a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 90%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.775. This ex vivo study demonstrates the feasibility of using US-TSI to detect fatty livers and warrants further investigation of US-TSI as a diagnostic tool for hepatic steatosis.

  18. Prediction of intraocular antibody drug stability using ex-vivo ocular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sulabh; Stracke, Jan Olaf; Altenburger, Ulrike; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Metzger, Philipp; Shende, Pankaj; Jere, Dhananjay

    2017-03-01

    Following intravitreal (IVT) injection, therapeutic proteins get exposed to physiological pH, temperature and components in the vitreous humor (VH) for a significantly long time. Therefore, it is of interest to study the stability of the proteins in the VH. However, the challenge posed by the isolated VH (such as pH shift upon isolation and incubation due to the formation of smaller molecular weight (MW) degradation products) can result in artefacts when investigating protein stability in relevance for the actual in vivo situation. In this current study, an ex-vivo intravitreal horizontal stability model (ExVit-HS) has been successfully developed and an assessment of long-term stability of a bi-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug in the isolated VH for 3months at physiological conditions has been conducted. The stability assessment was performed using various analytical techniques such as microscopy, UV visible for protein content, target binding ELISA, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Capillary-electrophoresis-SDS, Size Exclusion (SEC) and Ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) and SPR-Biacore. The results show that the ExVit-HS model was successful in maintaining the VH at physiological conditions and retained a majority of protein in the VH-compartment throughout the study period. The mAb exhibited significantly less fragmentation in the VH relative to the PBS control; however, chemical stability of the mAb was equally compromised in VH and PBS. Interestingly, in the PBS control, mAb showed a rapid linear loss in the binding affinity. The loss in binding was almost 20% higher compared to that in VH after 3months. The results clearly suggest that the mAb has different degradation kinetics in the VH compared to PBS. These results suggest that it is beneficial to investigate the stability in the VH for drugs intended for IVT injection and that are expected longer residence times in the VH. The studies show that the ExVit-HS model may become a valuable tool

  19. A novel human ex vivo model for the analysis of molecular events during lung cancer chemotherapy

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    Lang Dagmar S

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC causes most of cancer related deaths in humans and is characterized by poor prognosis regarding efficiency of chemotherapeutical treatment and long-term survival of the patients. The purpose of the present study was the development of a human ex vivo tissue culture model and the analysis of the effects of conventional chemotherapy, which then can serve as a tool to test new chemotherapeutical regimens in NSCLC. Methods In a short-term tissue culture model designated STST (Short-Term Stimulation of Tissues in combination with the novel *HOPE-fixation and paraffin embedding method we examined the responsiveness of 41 human NSCLC tissue specimens to the individual cytotoxic drugs carboplatin, vinorelbine or gemcitabine. Viability was analyzed by LIFE/DEAD assay, TUNEL-staining and colorimetric MTT assay. Expression of Ki-67 protein and of BrdU (bromodeoxyuridine uptake as markers for proliferation and of cleaved (activated effector caspase-3 as indicator of late phase apoptosis were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Transcription of caspase-3 was analyzed by RT-PCR. Flow cytometry was utilized to determine caspase-3 in human cancer cell lines. Results Viability, proliferation and apoptosis of the tissues were moderately affected by cultivation. In human breast cancer, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and human cell lines (CPC-N, HEK proliferative capacity was clearly reduced by all 3 chemotherapeutic agents in a very similar manner. Cleavage of caspase-3 was induced in the chemo-sensitive types of cancer (breast cancer, SCLC. Drug-induced effects in human NSCLC tissues were less evident than in the chemo-sensitive tumors with more pronounced effects in adenocarcinomas as compared to squamous cell carcinomas. Conclusion Although there was high heterogeneity among the individual tumor tissue responses as expected, we clearly demonstrate specific multiple drug-induced effects simultaneously. Thus, STST

  20. Ex Vivo Host and Parasite Response to Antileishmanial Drugs and Immunomodulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon-Pratt, Diane; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2015-01-01

    antimoniate. However, pentoxifylline diminished secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-13, cytokines associated with the outcome of infection by species of the Viannia subgenus. Exposure to CpG diminished the leishmanicidal effect of meglumine antimoniate, but not miltefosine, and significantly reduced secretion of IL -10, alone and in combination with either antileishmanial drug. IL-13 increased in response to CpG plus miltefosine. Conclusions and Significance Human PBMCs allow integrated ex vivo assessment of antileishmanial treatments, providing information on host and parasite determinants of therapeutic response that may be used to tailor therapeutic strategies to optimize clinical resolution. PMID:26024228

  1. Ex vivo and in vivo evaluation of an ultrasonic device for precise dissection, coagulation, and transection

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    Bertke BD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Brian D Bertke,1 Patrick J Scoggins,1 Alissa L Welling,1 Tamara V Widenhouse,1 Chaoyang Chen,2 Srinivasu Kallakuri,2 John M Cavanaugh,2 Jeffrey W Clymer,1 Joseph F Amaral1 1Ethicon, Inc., Cincinnati, OH, USA; 2Spine Research Laboratory, Bioengineering Center, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA Background: A new ultrasonic device, Harmonic Focus®+, has been developed that is smaller and delivers energy more efficiently than its predecessor via the inclusion of Adaptive Tissue Technology. This study was undertaken to compare its dissection capabilities to an advanced bipolar electrosurgery device in benchtop and preclinical evaluations. Methods: In ex vivo testing, Focus+ and LigaSure™ Small Jaw were evaluated for physical dimensions, device and tissue temperature after repeated applications to porcine jejunum, and burst pressure of vessel seals, transection time, and tissue sticking in 3–5 mm porcine carotid arteries. In in vivo testing, the devices were tested on intact porcine carotid arteries for thermal damage via collagen denaturation and in muscle incisions near rat sciatic nerve for acute inflammation via hematoxylin and eosin and for impaired axonal transport via β-APP. Results: Focus+ was smaller than the Small Jaw in width and height, yet it had a longer active blade and larger jaw aperture. Device temperatures were not different after application, but thermal spread (tissue temperature above 50°C was 78% greater for Small Jaw (9.6 mm than for Focus+ (5.4 mm. Burst pressures of sealed vessels were not significantly different between the devices: 900 (±466 mmHg for Focus+ versus 974 (±500 mmHg for Small Jaw. Small Jaw had a shorter individual transection time (5.0 seconds compared to 6.3 seconds for Focus+, whereas Focus+ had 70% less tissue sticking. Thermal damage, neural inflammation, and impaired axonal transport were all significantly lower for Focus+ compared to Small Jaw, by 19%, 57%, and 50%, respectively

  2. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P.; Kim, Kang

    2014-02-01

    under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.775. This ex vivo study demonstrates the feasibility of using US-TSI to detect fatty livers and warrants further investigation of US-TSI as a diagnostic tool for hepatic steatosis.

  3. Manganese ferrite-based nanoparticles induce ex vivo, but not in vivo, cardiovascular effects

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    Nunes ADC

    2014-07-01

    rate or arterial blood pressure in conscious rats. In summary, although the MNPs were able to induce effects ex vivo, no significant changes were observed in vivo. Thus, given the proper dosages, these MNPs should be considered for possible therapeutic applications. Keywords: cardiac function, isolated heart, magnetic fluids, magnetic nanoparticles, nanomedicine

  4. Formulation and in Vitro, ex Vivo and in Vivo Evaluation of Elastic Liposomes for Transdermal Delivery of Ketorolac Tromethamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Mendoza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to formulate ketorolac tromethamine-loaded elastic liposomes and evaluate their in vitro drug release and their ex vivo and in vivo transdermal delivery. Ketorolac tromethamine (KT, which is a potent analgesic, was formulated in elastic liposomes using Tween 80 as an edge activator. The elastic vesicles were prepared by film hydration after optimizing the sonication time and number of extrusions. The vesicles exhibited an entrapment efficiency of 73 ± 11%, vesicle size of 127.8 ± 3.4 nm and a zeta potential of −12 mV. In vitro drug release was analyzed from liposomes and an aqueous solution, using Franz diffusion cells and a cellophane dialysis membrane with molecular weight cut-off of 8000 Da. Ex vivo permeation of KT across pig ear skin was studied using a Franz diffusion cell, with phosphate buffer (pH 7.4 at 32 °C as receptor solution. An in vivo drug permeation study was conducted on healthy human volunteers using a tape-stripping technique. The in vitro results showed (i a delayed release when KT was included in elastic liposomes, compared to an aqueous solution of the drug; (ii a flux of 0.278 mg/cm2h and a lag time of about 10 h for ex vivo permeation studies, which may indicate that KT remains in the skin (with the possibility of exerting a local effect before reaching the receptor medium; (iii a good correlation between the total amount permeated, the penetration distance (both determined by tape stripping and transepidermal water loss (TEWL measured during the in vivo permeation studies. Elastic liposomes have the potential to transport the drug through the skin, keep their size and drug charge, and release the drug into deep skin layers. Therefore, elastic liposomes hold promise for the effective topical delivery of KT.

  5. Microwave ablation: results in ex vivo and in vivo porcine livers with 2450-MHz cooled-shaft antenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qi; JIN Xing; JIAO De-chao; ZHANG Fu-jun; ZHANG Liang; HAN Xin-wei; DUAN Guang-feng; LI Chuan-xing; HAN Jian-jun

    2011-01-01

    Background Imaging-guided thermal ablation using different energy sources continues to gain favor as a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic malignant tumors.This study aimed to evaluate the performance of microwave ablation with 2450-MHz internally cooled-shaft antenna in ex vivo and in vivo porcine livers.Methods All studies were animal care and ethics committee approved.Microwave ablation was performed using a noncooled or cooled-shaft antenna in 23 ex vivo (92 ablations) and eight in vivo (36 ablations) porcine livers.Diameters of the coagulation zone were observed on gross specimens.The coagulation diameters achieved in different microwave ablation parameter groups were compared.Curve estimation analysis was performed to characterize the relationship between applied power and treatment duration and coagulation diameter (including short-axis and long-axis diameter).Results Coagulation zones were elliptical and an arrowed-shaped carbonization zone around the shaft was observed in all groups.But the antenna track was also coagulated in the noncooled-shaft antenna groups.In ex vivo livers,the short-axis diameter correlated with the power output in a quadratic curve fashion (R2=0.95) by fixing ablation duration to 10 minutes,and correlated with the ablation duration in a logarithmic curve fashion (R2=0.98) by fixing power output to 80 W.The short-axis reached a relative plateau within 25 minutes.In in vivo livers,short-axis diameter correlated with the coagulation duration in a sigmoidal curve fashion (60 W group R2=0.76,80 W group R2=0.87),with a relative plateau achieved within 10 minutes for power settings of 60 W and 80 W.Conclusions The internally cooled microwave antenna may be advantageous to minimize collateral damage.The short-axis diameter enlargement has a plateau by fixing power output.

  6. TGF-b Downregulation by RNAi Technique in ex Vivo-Expanded HSCs on 3D DBM Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Amirizadeh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bone Marrow Transplantations (BMT are limited by low CD34+ cell counts in umbilical cord blood (UCB and these cells need to be expanded for success in such procedures. To achieve this goal, ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs by enhancing their self-renewal activity on demineralized bone matrix (DBM scaffold coated with mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs and unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs was recommended. TGF-b pathway is a key inhibitory factor for HSCs self-renewal. In this study ex vivo expansion and downregulation of TGF-b pathway were simultaneously performed. Methods: USSC cells were isolated from UCB and then coated on DBM scaffold as a feeder layer. UCB CD34+ cells were isolated from UCB by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS method and were transfected by siRNA against TGFbR2 in two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D cultures by co-cultivation with USSC. TGFbR2 expression levels were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Cell count and flow cytometry were performed and clonogenic activity was evaluated. Results: Ex vivo expansion of CD34+ cells was significantly enhanced (41±0.7 folds by TGFbR2 downregulation, especially in 2D than 3D cultures. Finally, 2D culture showed less TGFbR2 expression levels and higher increase in the percentage of CD34 markers by flow cytometry assay. Conclusion: The 3D siRNA delivery system would be of lower efficiency in contrast to 2D settings where the cells have less freedom and are in more contact with the feeder layer.

  7. Effect of anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab on ex-vivo culture of umbilical cord blood stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law Ping

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive maturation of hematopoietic cells leads to a reduction of long-term proliferative capability during cord blood (CB expansion. In this study, we report the effects of anit-CD52 (Alemtuzumab, Campath on both short- and long-term ex vivo expansion of CB hematopoietic stem cells (HSC by evaluating the potential role of Alemtuzumab in preserving the repopulating capability in CB HSC and nonlymphoid progenitors. Methods Ex vivo expansion experiments were carried out using freshly purified CB CD34+ cells in StemSpan™ SFEM medium in the presence of stem cell factor, Flt3-Ligand and thrombopoietin at 50 ng/ml. Alemtuzumab (10 μg/ml was used to deplete CD52+ cells during the cultures. Flow cytometry was used to monitor CB HSC and their differentiation. Colony forming unit (CFU assays and long term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC assays were performed on cells obtained from day 0 (before culture and day 14 after cultures. Secondary cultures was performed using CD34+ cells isolated at 35 days from primary cultures and further cultured in StemSpan™ SFEM medium for another 14 days to confirm the long term effect of alemtuzumab in liquid cultures. Results Compared to cytokines alone, addition of alemtuzumab resulted in a significant increase in total nucleated cells, absolute CD34+ cells, myeloid and megakaryocytic progenitors, multi-lineage and myeloid CFU and LTC-IC. Conclusion The results from current study suggested that the use of alemtuzumab for ex vivo expansion of CBHSC maybe advantageous. Our findings may improve current technologies for CBHSC expansion and increase the availability of CB units for transplantation. However, in vivo studies using animal models are likely needed in further studies to test the hematopoietic effects using such expanded CB products.

  8. Microwave ablation of ex vivo bovine tissues using a dual slot antenna with a floating metallic sleeve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibitoye, Ayo Zaccheaus; Nwoye, Ephraim Okeke; Aweda, Adebayo Moses; Oremosu, Ademola A; Anunobi, Chidozie Charles; Akanmu, Nurudeen Olanrewaju

    2016-12-01

    To study the efficiency of a dual slot antenna with a floating metallic sleeve on the ablation of different ex vivo bovine tissues. COMSOL Multiphysics® version 4.4 (Stockholm, Sweden), which is based on finite element methods (FEM), was used to design and simulate monopole and dual slot with sleeve antennas. Power, specific absorption rate (SAR), temperature and necrosis distributions in the selected tissues were determined using these antennas. Monopole and dual slot with sleeve antennas were designed, simulated, constructed and applied in this study based on a semi-rigid coaxial cable. Ex vivo experiments were performed on liver, lung, muscle and heart of bovine obtained from a public animal slaughter house. The microwave energy was delivered using a 2.45 GHz solid-state microwave generator at 40 W for 3, 5 and 10 min. Aspect ratio, ablation length and ablation diameter were also determined on ablated tissues and compared with simulated results. Student's t-test was used to compare the statistically significant difference between the performance of the two antennas. The dual slot antenna with sleeve produces localised microwave energy better than the monopole antenna in all ablated tissues using simulation and experimental validation methods. There were significant differences in ablation diameter and aspect ratio between the sleeve antenna and monopole antenna. Additionally, there were no significant differences between the simulation and experimental results. This study demonstrated that the dual slot antenna with sleeve produced larger ablation zones and higher sphericity index in ex vivo bovine tissues with minimal backward heating when compared with the monopole antenna.

  9. Determination of the Transport Rate of Xenobiotics and Nanomaterials Across the Placenta using the ex vivo Human Placental Perfusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmüller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Krug, Harald F.; Wick, Peter; von Mandach, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Decades ago the human placenta was thought to be an impenetrable barrier between mother and unborn child. However, the discovery of thalidomide-induced birth defects and many later studies afterwards proved the opposite. Today several harmful xenobiotics like nicotine, heroin, methadone or drugs as well as environmental pollutants were described to overcome this barrier. With the growing use of nanotechnology, the placenta is likely to come into contact with novel nanoparticles either accidentally through exposure or intentionally in the case of potential nanomedical applications. Data from animal experiments cannot be extrapolated to humans because the placenta is the most species-specific mammalian organ 1. Therefore, the ex vivo dual recirculating human placental perfusion, developed by Panigel et al. in 1967 2 and continuously modified by Schneider et al. in 1972 3, can serve as an excellent model to study the transfer of xenobiotics or particles. Here, we focus on the ex vivo dual recirculating human placental perfusion protocol and its further development to acquire reproducible results. The placentae were obtained after informed consent of the mothers from uncomplicated term pregnancies undergoing caesarean delivery. The fetal and maternal vessels of an intact cotyledon were cannulated and perfused at least for five hours. As a model particle fluorescently labelled polystyrene particles with sizes of 80 and 500 nm in diameter were added to the maternal circuit. The 80 nm particles were able to cross the placental barrier and provide a perfect example for a substance which is transferred across the placenta to the fetus while the 500 nm particles were retained in the placental tissue or maternal circuit. The ex