WorldWideScience

Sample records for ewod digitial microfluidics

  1. ALL-ELECTRONIC DROPLET GENERATION ON-CHIP WITH REAL-TIME FEEDBACK CONTROL FOR EWOD DIGITIAL MICROFLUIDICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”

    2009-01-01

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) actuation enables digital (or droplet) microfluidics where small packets of liquids are manipulated on a two-dimensional surface. Due to its mechanical simplicity and low energy consumption, EWOD holds particular promise for portable systems. To improve volume precision of the droplets, which is desired for quantitative applications such as biochemical assays, existing practices would require near-perfect device fabricaion and operation conditions unless the droplets are generated under feedback control by an extra pump setup off of the chip. In this paper, we develop an all-electronic (i.e., no ancillary pumping) real-time feedback control of on-chip droplet generation. A fast voltage modulation, capacitance sensing, and discrete-time PID feedback controller are integrated on the operating electronic board. A significant improvement is obtained in the droplet volume uniformity, compared with an open loop control as well as the previous feedback control employing an external pump. Furthermore, this new capability empowers users to prescribe the droplet volume even below the previously considered minimum, allowing, for example, 1:x (x < 1) mixing, in comparison to the previously considered n:m mixing (i.e., n and m unit droplets). PMID:18497909

  2. EWOD (electrowetting on dielectric) digital microfluidics powered by finger actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Zhongning; Kim, Chang-Jin C J; Ju, Y Sungtaek

    2014-03-21

    We report finger-actuated digital microfluidics (F-DMF) based on the manipulation of discrete droplets via the electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) phenomenon. Instead of requiring an external power supply, our F-DMF uses piezoelectric elements to convert mechanical energy produced by human fingers to electric voltage pulses for droplet actuation. Voltage outputs of over 40 V are provided by single piezoelectric elements, which is necessary for oil-free EWOD devices with thin (typically microfluidic applications.

  3. Process sequence optimization for digital microfluidic integration using EWOD technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Supriya; Joyce, Robin; Sharma, Akash Kumar; Sharma, Himani; Sharma, Niti Nipun; Varghese, Soney; Akhtar, Jamil

    2016-04-01

    Micro/nano-fluidic MEMS biosensors are the devices that detects the biomolecules. The emerging micro/nano-fluidic devices provide high throughput and high repeatability with very low response time and reduced device cost as compared to traditional devices. This article presents the experimental details for process sequence optimization of digital microfluidics (DMF) using "electrowetting-on-dielectric" (EWOD). Stress free thick film deposition of silicon dioxide using PECVD and subsequent process for EWOD techniques have been optimized in this work.

  4. DEP and EWOD Forcing for Application in Digital Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Patrick; Mohseni, Kamran

    2007-11-01

    Accurate descriptions of actuation forces and resultant droplet velocities must be available when designing a microfluidic device makinguse of discretized flows. Currently, the most promising methods of droplet actuation in microfluidic devices are electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) for conductive droplets and dielectrophoresis (DEP) for electrically insulating droplets, where in both cases droplets are transported by sweeping an applied voltage along a microchannel. Numerical modeling of the droplet dynamics for EWOD and DEP configurations has been done using approximations of the electrostatic effect, but incorporation of the electrostatic force density into a direct simulation of the fluid mechanics is desired. This talk focuses on the relationship between EWOD and DEP. The equations that govern the forcing of both mechanisms are presented in detail, including a resolution of the seemingly contradictory model of forcing in DEP; that being the Korteweg-Helmholtz and Kelvin polarization formulations. Numerical results are presented that compare the net force and force distribution in EWOD and DEP. The effect of electrode size and patterning on the total imposed force on the droplet is presented.

  5. Active thermal management of on-chip hot spots using EWOD-driven droplet microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J.-T.; Chen, C.-L.

    2010-12-01

    In response to the rapid advances in microelectronics, novel cooling technologies are needed to meet increasing cooling requirements. As a paradigm-shifting technique, electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) uses electric potential to control the movement of a liquid droplet on a dielectric surface. In this work, we developed an EWOD-based microfluidic technique for active and adaptive thermal management of on-chip hot spots. A two-dimensional array of control electrodes was patterned on the chip surface for EWOD operations. By applying DC or AC voltages with appropriate sequence and timing to the electrode units, we were able to transport microdroplets of tens of μL along a programmable path. Without the need of external pumps and valves, the droplets were precisely delivered to cooling targets. With the driving voltage as low as 40 VAC, we demonstrate high heat flux (7.6 W/cm2) cooling on a hot spot. The EWOD-induced internal circulation within the droplets led to a time-averaged Nusselt number of ~45.

  6. Active thermal management of on-chip hot spots using EWOD-driven droplet microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J.T.; Chen, C.L. [Teledyne Scientific Company, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

    2010-12-15

    In response to the rapid advances in microelectronics, novel cooling technologies are needed to meet increasing cooling requirements. As a paradigm-shifting technique, electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) uses electric potential to control the movement of a liquid droplet on a dielectric surface. In this work, we developed an EWOD-based microfluidic technique for active and adaptive thermal management of on-chip hot spots. A two-dimensional array of control electrodes was patterned on the chip surface for EWOD operations. By applying DC or AC voltages with appropriate sequence and timing to the electrode units, we were able to transport microdroplets of tens of {mu}L along a programmable path. Without the need of external pumps and valves, the droplets were precisely delivered to cooling targets. With the driving voltage as low as 40 V{sub AC}, we demonstrate high heat flux (7.6 W/cm{sup 2}) cooling on a hot spot. The EWOD-induced internal circulation within the droplets led to a time-averaged Nusselt number of {proportional_to}45. (orig.)

  7. Digital Microfluidic Dynamic Culture of Mammalian Embryos on an Electrowetting on Dielectric (EWOD) Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong-Yuan; Shen, Hsien-Hua; Tien, Chang-Hung; Li, Chin-Jung; Fan, Shih-Kang; Liu, Cheng-Hsien; Hsu, Wen-Syang; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2015-01-01

    Current human fertilization in vitro (IVF) bypasses the female oviduct and manually inseminates, fertilizes and cultivates embryos in a static microdrop containing appropriate chemical compounds. A microfluidic microchannel system for IVF is considered to provide an improved in-vivo-mimicking environment to enhance the development in a culture system for an embryo before implantation. We demonstrate a novel digitalized microfluidic device powered with electrowetting on a dielectric (EWOD) to culture an embryo in vitro in a single droplet in a microfluidic environment to mimic the environment in vivo for development of the embryo and to culture the embryos with good development and live births. Our results show that the dynamic culture powered with EWOD can manipulate a single droplet containing one mouse embryo and culture to the blastocyst stage. The rate of embryo cleavage to a hatching blastocyst with a dynamic culture is significantly greater than that with a traditional static culture (pmicrofluidic device is capable of culturing mammalian embryos in a microfluidic biological manner, presaging future clinical application.

  8. An EWOD-based microfluidic chip for single-cell isolation, mRNA purification and subsequent multiplex qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, A; Jary, D; Delattre, C; Fouillet, Y; Castellan, G; Bellemin-Comte, A; Gidrol, X

    2014-10-07

    Single cell analysis circumvents the need to average data from large populations by observing each cell individually, thus enabling the analysis of cell-to-cell variability. The ability to work on this scale presents many new opportunities for the life sciences and biomedical applications. Microfluidics has become a tool of choice for such studies and electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) technology is well adapted for samples with reduced size and biological studies at the single cell level. In the present manuscript, for the first time, we present an integrated and automated system based on EWOD that can process the complete workflow on a single device, from the isolation of a single cell to mRNA purification and gene expression analysis.

  9. An integrated hybrid system for genetic analysis combining EWOD sample preparation and magnetic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Des; Jary, Dorothee; Peponnet, Christine; Cardosa, Filipe; Freitas, Paolo; Dinca, Mihai; Aherne, Margaret; Galvin, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Over the last decade microelectronic technologies have delivered significant advances in devices for point of care diagnostics. Complex microfluidic systems integrate components such as valves, pumps etc. to manipulate liquids. In recent years, the drive is to combine biochemical protocols in a single system, delivering "sample in answer out". An Electrowetting on Dielectric (EWOD) device offers the possibility to move and manipulate 64nl volumes implementing biochemical processes, while the magnetic sensor facilitates hybridisation detection. We outline an injection molding approach where EWOD and magnetic devices are integrated into a hybrid microfluidic system with the potential to implement "sample in answer out" biological protocols.

  10. Electrochemical detection on electrowetting-on-dielectric digital microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuwan, Chanpen; Sukthang, Kreeta; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Patthanasettakul, Viyapol; Wechsatol, Wishsanuruk; Tuantranont, Adisorn

    2011-06-15

    In this work, the use of three-electrode electrochemical sensing system with an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic device is reported for quantitative analysis of iodide. T-junction EWOD mixer device was designed using arrays of 50-μm spaced square electrodes for mixing buffer reagent and analyte droplets. For fabrication of EWOD chips, 5-μm thick silver EWOD electrodes were formed on a glass substrate by means of sputtering and lift-off process. PDMS and Teflon thin films were then coated on the electrodes by spin coating to yield hydrophobic surface. An external three-electrode system consisting of Au working, Ag reference and Pt auxiliary wires were installed over EWOD electrodes at the end of T-junction mixer. In experiment, a few-microliter droplets of Tris buffer and iodide solutions were moved toward the mixing junction and transported toward electrochemical electrodes by EWOD process. A short processing time within seconds was achieved at EWOD applied voltage of 300V. The analyte droplets mixed with different concentrations were successfully analyzed by cyclic voltametry. Therefore, the combination of EWOD digital microfluidic and electrochemical sensing system has successfully been demonstrated for rapid chemical analysis with minimal reagent consumption. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrated microfluidics system using surface acoustic wave and electrowetting on dielectrics technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Y; Fu, Y. Q; Brodie, S. D; Alghane, M; Walton, A. J

    2012-01-01

    ...) and electro-wetting on dielectric (EWOD). This combination has been designed to provide enhanced microfluidic functionality and the integrated devices have been fabricated using a single mask lithographic process...

  12. Integrated microfluidics system using surface acoustic wave and electrowetting on dielectrics technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Fu, Y Q; Brodie, S D; Alghane, M; Walton, A J

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents integrated microfluidic lab-on-a-chip technology combining surface acoustic wave (SAW) and electro-wetting on dielectric (EWOD). This combination has been designed to provide enhanced microfluidic functionality and the integrated devices have been fabricated using a single mask lithographic process. The integrated technology uses EWOD to guide and precisely position microdroplets which can then be actuated by SAW devices for particle concentration, acoustic streaming, mixing and ejection, as well as for sensing using a shear-horizontal wave SAW device. A SAW induced force has also been employed to enhance the EWOD droplet splitting function.

  13. Droplet-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjiv; Srisa-Art, Monpichar; Scott, Steven; Asthana, Amit; Cass, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics or digital microfluidics is a subclass of microfluidic devices, wherein droplets are generated using active or passive methods. The active method for generation of droplets involves the use of an external factor such as an electric field for droplet generation. Two techniques that fall in this category are dielectrophoresis (DEP) and electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD). In passive methods, the droplet generation depends on the geometry and dimensions of the device. T-junction and flow focusing methods are examples of passive methods used for generation of droplets. In this chapter the methods used for droplet generation, mixing of contents of droplets, and the manipulation of droplets are described in brief. A review of the applications of digital microfluidics with emphasis on the last decade is presented.

  14. Size dependent droplet actuation in digital microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Biddut; Najjaran, Homayoun

    2009-05-01

    Digital microfluidic systems (DMFS) manipulate liquid droplets with volumes in submicroliter range in two dimensional arrays of cells. Among possible droplet actuation mechanisms, Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) actuation has been found to be most feasible and advantageous because of low power consumption, ease of signal generation and basic device fabrication. In EWOD based DMFS, droplets are actuated by applying an electric field and thus increasing the wettability on one side of the droplet. In this paper, we show that the EWOD actuation of a droplet can be modeled as a closed loop system having unity feedback of position. Electrode, dielectric and droplet are modeled as a capacitor with variable area as the droplet, considered as a conductor, moves over the dielectric layer. The EWOD force depends on the rate of change of droplet area over the actuated electrode, which in turn depends on the direction of motion and the position of the droplet between the actuated and previous electrode. Thus, EWOD actuation intrinsically utilizes the droplet position to generate sufficient force to accelerate the droplet. When the droplet approaches the final position, the magnitude of force reduces automatically so the droplet decelerates. In case the droplet has sufficient momentum to exceed the final position, the EWOD force, according to the model, will act on the opposite side of the droplet in order to bring it back to the desired position. The dynamic response has been characterized using the proposed model for different droplet sizes, actuation voltages, dielectric thicknesses and electrode sizes.

  15. Integration of Leaky Waveguide Detection with Electrowetting on Dielectric Digital Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ruchi; Goddard, Nick

    2013-06-01

    Typically, Electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic devices consist of an array of metal electrodes covered with a continuous hydrophobic dielectric layer. The monitoring of droplet position and detection in EWOD is usually achieved via microscopy, thereby resulting in increasing the size and complexity of the instrumentation associated with such devices. This work for the first time demonstrates that metal clad leaky waveguide (MCLW) is suitable for detection in EWOD devices. MCLW devices typically consist of a metal layer covered with a dielectric layer in which the leaky waveguide mode propagates. The two structures are fundamentally compatible provided the metal and dielectric layer thicknesses and refractive indices can be optimised to permit both electrowetting and waveguiding. In this work, it has been shown that titanium electrodes covered with a fluoropolymer layer can be used to perform MCLW detection of droplets on EWOD platforms.

  16. Amorphous silicon photosensors integrated in microfluidic structures as a technological demonstrator of a “true” Lab-on-Chip system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Caputo

    2015-03-01

    As a proof of the successful integration of the different technological steps we demonstrated the ability of the a-Si:H photosensors to detect the presence of a droplet over an EWOD electrode and the effective coupling between the digital and the continuous microfluidics, that can allow for functionalization, immobilization and recognition of biomolecules without external optical devices or microfluidic interconnections.

  17. Accessory extensor digiti minimi muscle simulating a soft tissue mass during surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Papathanasiou, Efthymia; Anastasopoulos, Nikolas

    2010-01-01

    During a wrist ganglion excision originating at the tendon sheath of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle, a soft tissue mass was observed just radial and distal to the surgical field. Dissection of the mass revealed an accessory extensor digiti minimi muscle belly which joined the radial extensor digiti minimi tendon. The surgical impact is discussed.

  18. Integrated polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing digital microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Hsien; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Huang, Fu-Chun; Chen, Yi-Yu; Lin, Jr-Lung

    2006-09-01

    This study reports an integrated microfluidic chip for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) applications utilizing digital microfluidic chip (DMC) technology. Several crucial procedures including sample transportation, mixing, and DNA amplification were performed on the integrated chip using electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) effect. An innovative concept of hydrophobic/hydrophilic structure has been successfully demonstrated to integrate the DMC chip with the on-chip PCR device. Sample droplets were generated, transported and mixed by the EWOD-actuation. Then the mixture droplets were transported to a PCR chamber by utilizing the hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface to generate required surface tension gradient. A micro temperature sensor and two micro heaters inside the PCR chamber along with a controller were used to form a micro temperature control module, which could perform precise PCR thermal cycling for DNA amplification. In order to demonstrate the performance of the integrated DMC/PCR chips, a detection gene for Dengue II virus was successfully amplified and detected. The new integrated DMC/PCR chips only required an operation voltage of 12V(RMS) at a frequency of 3 KHz for digital microfluidic actuation and 9V(DC) for thermal cycling. When compared to its large-scale counterparts for DNA amplification, the developed system consumed less sample and reagent and could reduce the detection time. The developed chips successfully demonstrated the feasibility of Lab-On-a-Chip (LOC) by utilizing EWOD-based digital microfluidics.

  19. Simulation and experimentation of a microfluidic device based on electrowetting on dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ling-Sheng; Lin, Guo-Hua; Lin, Yi-Liang; Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Kan, Wai-Hong; Chen, Chiun-Hsun

    2007-12-01

    Electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) moving fluid by surface tension effects offers some advantages, including simplicity of fabrication, control of minute volumes, rapid mixing, low cost and others. This work presents a numerical model using a commercial software, CFD-ACE+, and an EWOD system including a microfluidic device, a microprocessor, electric circuits, a LCD module, a keypad, a power supply and a power amplifier. The EWOD model based on a reduced form of the mass conservation and momentum equations is adopted to simulate the fluid dynamics of the droplets. The EWOD device consists of the 2 x 2 mm bottom electrodes (Au/Cr), a dielectric layer of 3,000 A nitride, 500 A Teflon and a piece of indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass as the top electrode. The complete EWOD phenomenon is elucidated by comparing simulation with the experimental data on droplet transportation, cutting and creation. In transportation testing, the speed of the droplet is 6 mm/s at 40 V(dc). In addition, the droplet division process takes 0.12 s at 60 V(dc) in the current case. Finally, a 347 nl droplet is successfully created from an on-chip reservoir at 60 V(dc).

  20. Programmable large area digital microfluidic array with integrated droplet sensing for bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadwen, B; Broder, G R; Morganti, D; Jacobs, A; Brown, C; Hector, J R; Kubota, Y; Morgan, H

    2012-09-21

    We describe a new device concept for digital microfluidics, based on an active matrix electrowetting on dielectric (AM-EWOD) device. A conventional EWOD device is limited by the number of electrical connections that can be made practically, which restricts the number and type of droplet operations. In an AM-EWOD, the patterned electrodes of a conventional EWOD device are replaced by a thin film transistor (TFT) array, as found in a liquid crystal display (LCD), facilitating independent control of each electrode. The arrays can have many thousand individually addressable electrodes, are fully reconfigurable and can be programmed to support multiple simultaneous operations. Each element is 210 μm × 210 μm in size and contains a circuit that measures the electrical impedance of the liquid above it. This is used to determine the presence and size of a droplet, a method that can improve assay reliability and accuracy. This sensor provides feedback, error detection and closed loop control of an assay sequence. We describe the design, fabrication and testing of a 64 × 64 format AM-EWOD device with impedance sensor functionality. A colorimetric assay is implemented on the device and used to measure glucose in human blood serum. Results are compared with the same assay performed on a microtitre plate.

  1. Water-oil core-shell droplets for electrowetting-based digital microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Daniel; Malic, Lidija; Normandin, François; Tabrizian, Maryam; Veres, Teodor

    2008-08-01

    Digital microfluidics based on electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) has recently emerged as one of the most promising technologies to realize integrated and highly flexible lab-on-a-chip systems. In such EWOD-based digital microfluidic devices, the aqueous droplets have traditionally been manipulated either directly in air or in an immiscible fluid such as silicone oil. However, both transporting mediums have important limitations and neither offers the flexibility required to fulfil the needs of several applications. In this paper, we report on an alternative mode of operation for EWOD-based devices in which droplets enclosed in a thin layer of oil are manipulated in air. We demonstrate the possibility to perform on-chip the fundamental fluidic operations by using such water-oil core-shell droplets and compare systematically the results with the traditional approach where the aqueous droplets are manipulated directly in air or oil. We show that the core-shell configuration combines several advantages of both the air and oil mediums. In particular, this configuration not only reduces the operation voltage of EWOD-based devices but also leads to higher transport velocities when compared with the manipulation of droplets directly in air or oil.

  2. SU-8 as Hydrophobic and Dielectric Thin Film in Electrowetting-on-Dielectric Based Microfluidics Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD based droplet actuation in microfluidic chip is designed and fabricated. EWOD is used as on-chip micro-pumping scheme for moving fluid digitally in Lab-on-a-chip devices. For enabling this scheme, stacked deposition of thin dielectric and hydrophobic layer in that order between microchannel and electrodes is done. The present paper investigates the potential use of SU-8 as hydrophobic layer in conjunction of acting as dielectric in the device. The objective for the investigation is to lower the cost and a thin simplification in fabrication process of EWOD-based devices. We have done design and optimization of dimensions of electrode array including gap between arrays for EWOD micropump. Design and optimization are carried out in CoventorWare. The designing is followed by fabrication of device and analysis for droplet motion. The fabrication of the device includes array of electrodes over the silicon surface and embedding them in hydrophobic SU-8 layer. Water droplet movement in the order of microliter of spherical shape is demonstrated. It has been shown that an SU-8 microchannel in the current design allows microfluidic flow at tens of voltages comparable with costlier and more complicated to fabricate designs reported in the literature.

  3. Hydrodynamics and Heat Transfer of Discrete Droplets in Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Robert; Shajiee, Shervin; Mohseni, Kamran

    2009-11-01

    Electrostatic manipulation of surfaces tension forces is now a standard fluid handling technique in microfluidic devices. In this investigation electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) is employed in order to use discrete droplets for thermal management of compact micro systems. Both hydro- and thermodynamics of digitized droplets are investigated by experimental, theoretical and computational means. EWOD devices have been built on silicon substrates with highly doped layers replacing metal electrodes, and higher quality thermal oxides replacing the more expensive PECVD oxides. In parallel, an experimental test rig has been built to measure the heat transfer rate of the slug flow at a macro scale. Droplets at several length and speed are created systematically. Average heat transfer rates and Nusselt numbers in constant heat flux in a tube has been experimentally measured for continuous and discrete water flow cases and the results have been compared with numerical results.

  4. Electrowetting on dielectric-based microfluidics for integrated lipid bilayer formation and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Jason L.; Nelson, Wyatt C.; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2009-07-01

    We present a microfluidic platform for the formation and electrical measurement of lipid bilayer membranes. Using electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD), two or more aqueous droplets surrounded by a lipid-containing organic phase were manipulated into contact to form a lipid bilayer at their interface. Thin-film Ag/AgCl electrodes integrated into the device enabled electrical measurement of membrane formation and the incorporation of gramicidin channels of two bilayers in parallel.

  5. Finger-Powered Electro-Digital-Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Ju, Y Sungtaek

    2017-01-01

    Portable microfluidic devices are promising for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis and bio- and environmental surveillance in resource-constrained or non-laboratory environments. Lateral-flow devices, some built off paper or strings, have been widely developed but the fixed layouts of their underlying wicking/microchannel structures limit their flexibility and present challenges in implementing multistep reactions. Digital microfluidics can circumvent these difficulties by addressing discrete droplets individually. Existing approaches to digital microfluidics, however, often require bulky power supplies/batteries and high voltage circuits. We present a scheme to drive digital microfluidic devices by converting mechanical energy of human fingers to electrical energy using an array of piezoelectric elements. We describe the integration our scheme into two promising digital microfluidics platforms: one based on the electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) phenomenon and the other on the electrophoretic control of droplet (EPD). Basic operations of droplet manipulations, such as droplet transport, merging and splitting, are demonstrated using the finger-powered digital-microfluidics.

  6. Microfluidic schemes using electrical and capillary forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T. B.

    2008-12-01

    The laboratory-on-a-chip (LOC) and indeed virtually all the technology of microTAS (micro-total-analysis systems) rely upon some microfluidic subsystem to control, transport, and manipulate small liquid masses. The most promising of these subsystems use electrical forces, which have the advantages of voltage-based control and dominance over gravity and capillarity in the 10 to 103 micron diameter range. Gravity is usually ignorable on this scale, but the interactions of electrical and capillary forces are more complex. In particular, microstructures can be designed to exploit this interplay for the cases of electrowetting on dielectric-coated electrodes (EWOD) and liquid dielectrophoresis (DEP). The complementary nature of the two effects explains the operation of droplet-based microfluidic systems in general, and the so-called DEP droplet dispenser in particular.

  7. Direct-referencing Two-dimensional-array Digital Microfluidics Using Multi-layer Printed Circuit Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”

    2008-01-01

    Digital (i.e. droplet-based) microfluidics, by the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) mechanism, has shown great potential for a wide range of applications, such as lab-on-a-chip. While most reported EWOD chips use a series of electrode pads essentially in one-dimensional line pattern designed for specific tasks, the desired universal chips allowing user-reconfigurable paths would require the electrode pads in two-dimensional pattern. However, to electrically access the electrode pads independently, conductive lines need to be fabricated underneath the pads in multiple layers, raising a cost issue especially for disposable chip applications. In this article, we report the building of digital microfluidic plates based on a printed-circuit-board (PCB), in which multilayer electrical access lines were created inexpensively using mature PCB technology. However, due to its surface topography and roughness and resulting high resistance against droplet movement, as-fabricated PCB surfaces require unacceptably high (~500 V) voltages unless coated with or immersed in oil. Our goal is EWOD operations of aqueous droplets not only on oil-covered but also on dry surfaces. To meet varying levels of performances, three types of gradually complex post-PCB microfabrication processes are developed and evaluated. By introducing land-grid-array (LGA) sockets in the packaging, a scalable digital microfluidics system with reconfigurable and low-cost chip is also demonstrated. PMID:19234613

  8. Micro-chemical synthesis of molecular probes on an electronic microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keng, Pei Yuin; Chen, Supin; Ding, Huijiang; Sadeghi, Saman; Shah, Gaurav J; Dooraghi, Alex; Phelps, Michael E; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Chatziioannou, Arion F; Kim, Chang-Jin; van Dam, R Michael

    2012-01-17

    We have developed an all-electronic digital microfluidic device for microscale chemical synthesis in organic solvents, operated by electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD). As an example of the principles, we demonstrate the multistep synthesis of [(18)F]FDG, the most common radiotracer for positron emission tomography (PET), with high and reliable radio-fluorination efficiency of [(18)F]FTAG (88 ± 7%, n = 11) and quantitative hydrolysis to [(18)F]FDG (> 95%, n = 11). We furthermore show that batches of purified [(18)F]FDG can successfully be used for PET imaging in mice and that they pass typical quality control requirements for human use (including radiochemical purity, residual solvents, Kryptofix, chemical purity, and pH). We report statistical repeatability of the radiosynthesis rather than best-case results, demonstrating the robustness of the EWOD microfluidic platform. Exhibiting high compatibility with organic solvents and the ability to carry out sophisticated actuation and sensing of reaction droplets, EWOD is a unique platform for performing diverse microscale chemical syntheses in small volumes, including multistep processes with intermediate solvent-exchange steps.

  9. Dielectrowetting manipulation for digital microfluidics: creating, transporting, splitting, and merging of droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hongyao; Feng, Jian; Stabryla, Lisa Marie; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2017-03-14

    Generating, splitting, transporting, and merging droplets are fundamental and critical unit operations for digital (droplet-based) microfluidics. State-of-the-art digital microfluidics performs such operations commonly using electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) in the typical configuration of two parallel channel plates. This paper presents such operations using dielectrowetting (derived from liquid dielectrophoresis), not EWOD, with an array of interdigitated electrodes. The major and unique feature is that the present droplet manipulations are effective for conductive (water with/without surfactant) and non-conductive (propylene carbonate) fluids. An equally important aspect is that the manipulations are performed in an open space without the covering top plate. This behavior is attributed to the intrinsic nature of dielectrowetting to generate stronger wetting forces than EWOD (with the ability to achieve complete wetting with contact angle = 0° to form a thin film). Using dielectrowetting, micro-droplets of various volumes are created from a large droplet and transported. Splitting a single droplet as well as multiple droplets and merging them are also achieved, even when the droplets are smaller than the electrode pads. The above splitting, transport, and merging operations are effective for propylene carbonate as well as DI water with/without surfactant, though the creating operation is proven only for propylene carbonate at this moment. All the above manipulations are successfully carried out on a single plate, which not only simplifies the structure and operation procedure, but could also eliminate the restriction to the volume of fluid handled.

  10. Island-ground single-plate electro-wetting on dielectric device for digital microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weiwei; Zhang, Menglun; Zhang, Daihua; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Hao

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present a single-plate electro-wetting on dielectric (SEWOD) device by integrating an island-ground electrode (IG), which is surrounded by the driving electrodes and looks like an island. Both experiments and theoretical analysis have been conducted to investigate the performance of the IG-SEWOD device. The driving voltage of a fabricated IG-SEWOD has been measured to be 15 V, which is half of that of a floating SEWOD. The digital dynamic properties of the EWOD device are greatly enhanced due to the "double locking" effect and rapid residual charges elimination provided by the IG. The proposed EWOD device shows great potential in constructing advanced microfluidics platforms for bio-chemical detection and disease diagnosis.

  11. A Study of Dip-Coatable, High-Capacitance Ion Gel Dielectrics for 3D EWOD Device Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Carlos E.; Jiang, Dongyue; Thio, Si Kuan; Park, Sung-Yong

    2017-01-01

    We present a dip-coatable, high-capacitance ion gel dielectric for scalable fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) devices such as an n × n liquid prism array. Due to the formation of a nanometer-thick electric double layer (EDL) capacitor, an ion gel dielectric offers two to three orders higher specific capacitance (c ≈ 10 μF/cm2) than that of conventional dielectrics such as SiO2. However, the previous spin-coating method used for gel layer deposition poses several issues for 3D EWOD device fabrication, particularly when assembling multiple modules. Not only does the spin-coating process require multiple repetitions per module, but the ion gel layer also comes in risks of damage or contamination due to handling errors caused during assembly. In addition, it was observed that the chemical formulation previously used for the spin-coating method causes the surface defects on the dip-coated gel layers and thus leads to poor EWOD performance. In this paper, we alternatively propose a dip-coating method with modified gel solutions to obtain defect-free, functional ion gel layers without the issues arising from the spin-coating method for 3D device fabrication. A dip-coating approach offers a single-step coating solution with the benefits of simplicity, scalability, and high throughput for deposition of high-capacitance gel layers on non-planar EWOD devices. An ion gel solution was prepared by combining the [EMIM][TFSI] ionic liquid and the [P(VDF-HFP)] copolymer at various wt % ratios in acetone solvent. Experimental studies were conducted to fully understand the effects of chemical composition ratios in the gel solution and how varying thicknesses of ion gel and Teflon layers affects EWOD performance. The effectiveness and potentiality of dip-coatable gel layers for 3D EWOD devices have been demonstrated through fabricating 5 × 1 arrayed liquid prisms using a single-step dip-coating method. Each prism module has been

  12. A Study of Dip-Coatable, High-Capacitance Ion Gel Dielectrics for 3D EWOD Device Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Clement

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a dip-coatable, high-capacitance ion gel dielectric for scalable fabrication of three-dimensional (3D electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD devices such as an n × n liquid prism array. Due to the formation of a nanometer-thick electric double layer (EDL capacitor, an ion gel dielectric offers two to three orders higher specific capacitance (c ≈ 10 μF/cm2 than that of conventional dielectrics such as SiO2. However, the previous spin-coating method used for gel layer deposition poses several issues for 3D EWOD device fabrication, particularly when assembling multiple modules. Not only does the spin-coating process require multiple repetitions per module, but the ion gel layer also comes in risks of damage or contamination due to handling errors caused during assembly. In addition, it was observed that the chemical formulation previously used for the spin-coating method causes the surface defects on the dip-coated gel layers and thus leads to poor EWOD performance. In this paper, we alternatively propose a dip-coating method with modified gel solutions to obtain defect-free, functional ion gel layers without the issues arising from the spin-coating method for 3D device fabrication. A dip-coating approach offers a single-step coating solution with the benefits of simplicity, scalability, and high throughput for deposition of high-capacitance gel layers on non-planar EWOD devices. An ion gel solution was prepared by combining the [EMIM][TFSI] ionic liquid and the [P(VDF-HFP] copolymer at various wt % ratios in acetone solvent. Experimental studies were conducted to fully understand the effects of chemical composition ratios in the gel solution and how varying thicknesses of ion gel and Teflon layers affects EWOD performance. The effectiveness and potentiality of dip-coatable gel layers for 3D EWOD devices have been demonstrated through fabricating 5 × 1 arrayed liquid prisms using a single-step dip-coating method. Each prism module has

  13. Digitial assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Kurt Gammelgaard; Petersen, Lise

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with The Danish eGOVERNMENT strategy 2011-2015 digital assessment and exam should be implemented at all Danish universities by the end of 2013. University of Southern Denmark (SDU) decided to start the implementation in May 2010.By the exam term of January 2013, the implementation proved successful, and close to completion. The majority of assessments at all of the 5 faculties and 5 campuses were digital, and students had handed in a total of 17.021 digital assessments.On the ba...

  14. Suspended microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jean BERTHIER; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Bischel, Lauren L.; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J.; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale...

  15. Biochip functionalization using electrowetting-on-dielectric digital microfluidics for surface plasmon resonance imaging detection of DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Lidija; Veres, Teodor; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2009-03-15

    This work reports on a dynamically configurable micro-array surface plasmon resonance biochip platform. The platform comprises a digital electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) microfluidic device tailored to surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). We demonstrate its application for simultaneous immobilization of different DNA probes at the designated detection sites on-chip from sub-microL volume solutions in combination with multichannel label-free real-time detection of subsequent hybridization reactions. Successful on-chip DNA probe dilution and immobilization is also demonstrated using SPRi hybridization detection. Furthermore, active control of the immobilized probe density and orientation is achieved under an applied potential using the electric interface of the EWOD device. For low probe densities, under negative applied potential, the DNA hybridization efficiency is enhanced compared to passive probe immobilization, yielding a two-fold SPR signal increase within only 8min of hybridization. EWOD microfluidic platform coupled with SPRi promises to dramatically increase the speed of detection and quantification of biomolecular interactions while reducing reagent consumption. The proposed system would enable the development of high-throughput, rapid and ultrasensitive detection of biomolecules beyond DNA microarray applications.

  16. The variations of peroneus digiti quinti muscle and its contribution to the extension of the fifth toe. A cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Berin T; Gümüşalan, Yakup; Üzel, Murat; Çevik, Hüseyin B

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the origin, prevalence, and possible effects of peroneus digiti quinti muscle (PDQ) on the fifth toe, to find out the variations of PDQ by determining the relationship between peroneus brevis muscle (PB) and PDQ, and to reveal its importance for the applications in foot and ankle surgery.  This study was conducted at the Faculty of Medicine, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras, Turkey between September 2013 and June 2014. The study was a prospective dissection of cadaveric lower limbs. Twenty-five amputated lower limbs were stored in the freezer at -15°C. The legs were dissected; prevalence and variations of peroneus digiti quinti were investigated.  Peroneus digiti quinti muscle was found in 8 (32%) of 25 dissected lower limbs. However, 2 different tendon extensions were found at 3 (37.5%) of 8, and 5 (62.5%) of them were determined to have a single tendon.  The incidence, dimensions, length, and insertions of peroneus digiti quinti are important in the evaluation and treatment of functional loss of the fifth toe, lateral foot deformities, and tendon problems behind the lateral malleolus of the ankle.

  17. Efficient radiosynthesis of 3'-deoxy-3'-18F-fluorothymidine using electrowetting-on-dielectric digital microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad Rashed; Chen, Supin; Kim, Hee-Kwon; Wei, Liu; Czernin, Johannes; Kim, Chang-Jin C J; van Dam, R Michael; Keng, Pei Yuin

    2014-02-01

    Access to diverse PET tracers for preclinical and clinical research remains a major obstacle to research in cancer and other disease research. The prohibitive cost and limited availability of tracers could be alleviated by microfluidic radiosynthesis technologies combined with a high-yield microscale radiosynthetic method. In this report, we demonstrate the multistep synthesis of 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) with high yield on an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) microfluidic radiosynthesizer, previously developed in our group. We have identified and established several parameters that are most critical in the microscale radiosynthesis, such as the reaction time, reagent concentration, and molar ratios, to successfully synthesize (18)F-FLT in this compact platform. (18)F-FLT was synthesized from the 3-N-Boc-1-[5-O-(4,4'-dimethoxytrityl)-3-O-nosyl-2-deoxy-β-D-lyxofuranosyl] thymine precursor on the EWOD chip starting from the first solvent exchange and (18)F-fluoride ion activation step to the final deprotection step. The fluorination reaction was performed in a mixture of thexyl alcohol and dimethyl sulfoxide. The crude product after deprotection was collected from the chip and purified on a custom-made solid-phase extraction cartridge and subjected to quality control testing. The purified (18)F-FLT was suitable for small-animal PET studies in multiple nude mice xenografted with the A431 carcinoma cell line. (18)F-FLT was successfully synthesized on the EWOD microdevice coupled with an off-chip solid-phase extraction purification with a decayed-corrected radiochemical yield of 63% ± 5% (n = 5) and passed all of the quality control tests required by the U.S. Pharmacopeia for radiotracers to be injected into humans. We have successfully demonstrated the synthesis of several batches of (18)F-FLT on EWOD, starting with approximately 333 MBq of radioactivity and obtained up to 52 MBq (non-decay-corrected) of (18)F-FLT on cartridge purification. The

  18. Suspended microfluidics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benjamin P. Casavant; Erwin Berthier; Ashleigh B. Theberge; Jean Berthier; Sara I. Montanez-Sauri; Lauren L. Bischel; Kenneth Brakke; Curtis J. Hedman; Wade Bushman; Nancy P. Keller; David J. Beebe

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited...

  19. General digital microfluidic platform manipulating dielectric and conductive droplets by dielectrophoresis and electrowetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shih-Kang; Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Lin, Di-Yu

    2009-05-07

    A general digital (droplet-based) microfluidic platform based on the study of dielectric droplet manipulation by dielectrophoresis (DEP) and the integration of DEP and electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) is reported. Transporting, splitting, and merging dielectric droplets are achieved by DEP in a parallel-plate device, which expands the fluids of digital microfluidics from merely being conductive and aqueous to being non-conductive. In this work, decane, hexadecane, and silicone oil droplets were successfully transported in a 150 microm-high gap between two parallel plates by applying a DC voltage above threshold voltages. Non-volatile silicone oil droplets with viscosities of 20 and 50 cSt were studied in more detail in parallel-plate geometries with spacings of 75 microm, 150 microm, and 225 microm. The threshold voltages and the required driving voltages to achieve droplet velocities up to 4 mm/s in the different circumstances were measured. By adding a dielectric layer on the driving electrodes of the tested parallel-plate device, a general digital microfluidic platform capable of manipulating both dielectric and conductive droplets was demonstrated. DEP and EWOD, selectively generated by applying different signals on the same dielectric-covered electrodes, were used to drive silicone oil and water droplets, respectively. Concurrent transporting silicone oil and water droplets along an electrode loop, merging water and oil droplets, and transporting and separating the merged water-in-oil droplet were performed.

  20. On-demand droplet loading for automated organic chemistry on digital microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gaurav J; Ding, Huijiang; Sadeghi, Saman; Chen, Supin; Kim, Chang-Jin C J; van Dam, R Michael

    2013-07-21

    Organic chemistry applications on digital microfluidic devices often involve reagents that are volatile or sensitive and must be introduced to the chip immediately before use. We present a new technique for automated, on-demand loading of ~1 μL droplets from large (~1 mL), sealed, off-chip reservoirs to a digital microfluidic chip in order to address this challenge. Unlike aqueous liquids which generally are non-wetting to the hydrophobic surface and must be actively drawn into the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) chip by electrode activation, organic liquids tend to be wetting and can spontaneously flood the chip, and hence require a retracting force for controlled liquid delivery. Using a combination of compressed inert gas and gravity to exert driving and retracting forces on the liquid, the simple loading technique enables precise loading of droplets of both wetting and non-wetting liquids in a reliable manner. A key feature from a practical point of view is that all of the wetted parts are inexpensive and potentially disposable, thus avoiding cross-contamination in chemical and biochemical applications. We provide a theoretical treatment of the underlying physics, discuss the effect of geometry and liquid properties on its performance, and show repeatable reagent loading using the technique. Its versatility is demonstrated with the loading of several aqueous and non-aqueous liquids on an EWOD digital microfluidic device.

  1. Microfabrication of a digital microfluidic platform integrated with an on-chip electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuhua; Chen, Jianfeng; Li, Jian; Yang, Sheng; Fan, Shih-Kang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-09-01

    We report on an IC compatible microfabrication process proposed for a novel monolithic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) with an electrochemical cell embedded in an electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic device. The optimized process focused on the surface modification of Teflon, selective exposure for the electrochemical module and recovery of surface properties by one-step annealing at low temperature. The optimum modification time and annealing temperature were 20 s and 210 °C, respectively. The experimental results from atomic force microscope and contact angle (CA) measurement revealed the effects of surface roughness and apparent CA on the wettability for different etch times. The multifunctionality of droplet creation, merger and transportation in the EWOD microfluidic module and sensitive electrochemical detection for the redox probe were realized simultaneously. The proposed microfabrication process has many advantages of remarkable simplicity, prominent repeatability, low cost and compatibility with standard IC processes. It shows great promise for the microsystem of the microfluidic unit and detecting cell, and gives a brilliant conception for the future fabrication of monolithic LOC integrated with functional detection.

  2. An Ion Gel as a Low-Cost, Spin-Coatable, High-Capacitance Dielectric for Electrowetting-on-Dielectric (EWOD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Vinayak; Park, Sung-Yong

    2015-08-04

    For many practical electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) applications, the use of high-capacitance dielectric materials is critically demanded to induce a large surface tension modulation. Thin-film dielectric layers such as Parylene C, silicon dioxide (SiO2), and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) have been commonly used for EWOD. However, these dielectric materials are fabricated by conventional integrated circuit (IC) processes which are typically time-consuming and require complex and expensive laboratory setups such as high-vacuum facilities. In this article, a novel ion gel material was demonstrated as a spin-coatable and high-capacitance dielectric for low-cost EWOD applications. The ion gel offers a 2 or 3 order higher capacitance (c ≈ 10 μF/cm(2)) than conventional dielectrics commonly used for EWOD while being fabricated through a simple low-cost spin-coating process. We discuss the fundamentals of an ion gel dielectric, its fabrication process of spin coating, and the interaction with a hydrophobic layer for practical EWOD applications. The ion gel films, which consist of a copolymer, poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) [P(VDF-HFP)], and an ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [EMIM][TFSI], were successfully deposited on ITO substrates by using a simple spin-coating process. The experimental demonstrations validated the theoretical modeling of the ion gel layer as a high-capacitance dielectric. The EWOD performance of the ion gel samples was compared to that of other conventional dielectric materials to show the performance improvement.

  3. Improving the dielectric properties of an electrowetting-on-dielectric microfluidic device with a low-pressure chemical vapor deposited Si3N4 dielectric layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hsien-Hua; Chung, Lung-Yuan; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2015-03-01

    Dielectric breakdown is a common problem in a digital microfluidic system, which limits its application in chemical or biomedical applications. We propose a new fabrication of an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) device using Si3N4 deposited by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) as a dielectric layer. This material exhibits a greater relative permittivity, purity, uniformity, and biocompatibility than polymeric films. These properties also increase the breakdown voltage of a dielectric layer and increase the stability of an EWOD system when applied in biomedical research. Medium droplets with mouse embryos were manipulated in this manner. The electrical properties of the Si3N4 dielectric layer-breakdown voltage, refractive index, relative permittivity, and variation of contact angle with input voltage-were investigated and compared with a traditional Si3N4 dielectric layer deposited as a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to confirm the potential of LPCVD Si3N4 applied as the dielectric layer of an EWOD digital microfluidic system.

  4. Improving the dielectric properties of an electrowetting-on-dielectric microfluidic device with a low-pressure chemical vapor deposited Si3N4 dielectric layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hsien-Hua; Chung, Lung-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown is a common problem in a digital microfluidic system, which limits its application in chemical or biomedical applications. We propose a new fabrication of an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) device using Si3N4 deposited by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) as a dielectric layer. This material exhibits a greater relative permittivity, purity, uniformity, and biocompatibility than polymeric films. These properties also increase the breakdown voltage of a dielectric layer and increase the stability of an EWOD system when applied in biomedical research. Medium droplets with mouse embryos were manipulated in this manner. The electrical properties of the Si3N4 dielectric layer—breakdown voltage, refractive index, relative permittivity, and variation of contact angle with input voltage—were investigated and compared with a traditional Si3N4 dielectric layer deposited as a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to confirm the potential of LPCVD Si3N4 applied as the dielectric layer of an EWOD digital microfluidic system. PMID:25825614

  5. Microfluidic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  6. Efficient radiosynthesis of 3′-deoxy-3′-[18F]fluorothymidine using electrowetting-on-dielectric digital microfluidic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad Rashed; Chen, Supin; Kim, Hee-Kwon; Wei, Liu; Czernin, Johannes; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”; van Dam, R. Michael; Keng, Pei Yuin

    2015-01-01

    Access to diverse PET tracers for preclinical and clinical research remains a major obstacle to research in cancer and other diseases research. The prohibitive cost and limited availability of tracers could be alleviated by microfluidic radiosynthesis technologies combined with high-yield microscale radiosynthetic method. In this report, we demonstrate the multistep synthesis of 3′-deoxy-3′-[18F]fluorothymidine ([18F]FLT) with high yield on an electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) microfluidic radiosynthesizer, previously developed in our group. We have identified and established several parameters that are most critical in the microscale radiosynthesis such as the reaction time, reagent concentration, and molar ratios, to successfully synthesize [18F]FLT in this compact platform. Methods [18F]FLT was synthesized from the 3-N-Boc-1-[5-O-(4,4′-dimethoxytrityl)-3-O-nosyl-2-deoxy-β-d-lyxofuranosyl] thymine precursor on the EWOD chip starting from the first solvent exchange and [18F]fluoride ion activation step to the final deprotection step. The fluorination reaction was performed in a mixture of thexyl alcohol and DMSO. The crude product after deprotection was collected from the chip and purified on a custom-made solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge and subjected to quality control testing. The purified [18F]FLT was suitable for microPET studies in multiple nude mice xenografted with the A431 carcinoma cell line. Results [18F]FLT was successfully synthesized on the EWOD microdevice coupled with an off-chip SPE purification with a decayed-corrected radiochemical yield of 63±5% (n=5) and passed all of the quality control test required by the United States Pharmacopeia for radiotracers to be injected into humans. We have successfully demonstrated the synthesis of several batches of [18F]FLT on EWOD starting with ∼ 333 MBq of radioactivity and obtained up to 52 MBq (non-decay corrected) of [18F]FLT upon cartridge purification. The specific activity of two

  7. Oedema of the abductor digiti quinti muscle due to subacute denervation: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, Mukai; O'Donnell, Paul; Cullen, Nicholas; Singh, Dishan

    2014-03-01

    The clinical presentation of abductor digiti quinti (ADQ) denervation is often non-specific. The diagnosis is generally clinical and may be easily missed. This case report of two patients describes the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) finding of unilateral oedema and fatty infiltration isolated to the ADQ. A 36-year old woman who presented with laterally located left foot pain was initially diagnosed as having plantar fasciitis. An MRI scan arranged due to the unusual site of the pain showed increased signal intensity within the ADQ muscle on T1 and T2 images indicating fatty infiltration. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images showed hyperintensity of the ADQ indicating oedema. The MRI scan of a 45-year old man who presented with a three month history of left heel pain revealed similar findings. These MRI appearances indicate subacute denervation, which, when involving solely the ADQ muscle suggests entrapment of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve. Consideration of this imaging finding when examining MRI scans of patients with non-specific heel pain has the potential to facilitate diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated electrotransformation of Escherichia coli on a digital microfluidic platform using bioactivated magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J A; Nemat-Gorgani, M; Madison, A C; Sandahl, M A; Punnamaraju, S; Eckhardt, A E; Pollack, M G; Vigneault, F; Church, G M; Fair, R B; Horowitz, M A; Griffin, P B

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of a digital microfluidic platform to perform multiplex automated genetic engineering (MAGE) cycles on droplets containing Escherichia coli cells. Bioactivated magnetic beads were employed for cell binding, washing, and media exchange in the preparation of electrocompetent cells in the electrowetting-on-dieletric (EWoD) platform. On-cartridge electroporation was used to deliver oligonucleotides into the cells. In addition to the optimization of a magnetic bead-based benchtop protocol for generating and transforming electrocompetent E. coli cells, we report on the implementation of this protocol in a fully automated digital microfluidic platform. Bead-based media exchange and electroporation pulse conditions were optimized on benchtop for transformation frequency to provide initial parameters for microfluidic device trials. Benchtop experiments comparing electrotransformation of free and bead-bound cells are presented. Our results suggest that dielectric shielding intrinsic to bead-bound cells significantly reduces electroporation field exposure efficiency. However, high transformation frequency can be maintained in the presence of magnetic beads through the application of more intense electroporation pulses. As a proof of concept, MAGE cycles were successfully performed on a commercial EWoD cartridge using variations of the optimal magnetic bead-based preparation procedure and pulse conditions determined by the benchtop results. Transformation frequencies up to 22% were achieved on benchtop; this frequency was matched within 1% (21%) by MAGE cycles on the microfluidic device. However, typical frequencies on the device remain lower, averaging 9% with a standard deviation of 9%. The presented results demonstrate the potential of digital microfluidics to perform complex and automated genetic engineering protocols.

  9. Integration and detection of biochemical assays in digital microfluidic LOC devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Lidija; Brassard, Daniel; Veres, Teodor; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2010-02-21

    The ambition of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) systems to achieve chip-level integration of a complete analytical process capable of performing a complex set of biomedical protocols is hindered by the absence of standard fluidic components able to be assembled. As a result, most microfluidic platforms built to date are highly specialized and designed to fulfill the requirements of a single particular application within a limited set of operations. Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic technology has been recently introduced as a new methodology in the quest for LOC systems. Herein, unit volume droplets are manipulated along electrode arrays, allowing a microfluidic function to be reduced to a set of basic operations. The highly reprogrammable architecture of these systems can satisfy the needs of a diverse set of biochemical assays and ensure reconfigurability, flexibility and portability between different categories of applications and requirements. While important progress was made over past years in the fabrication, miniaturization and function programming of the basic EWOD fluidic operations, the success of this technology will in great part depend on the ability of researchers to couple or integrate digital microfluidics to detection approaches that can make the system competitive for LOC applications. The detection techniques should be able to circumvent the limitations of hydrophobic surfaces and exploit the advantages of the array format, high droplet transport speeds and rapid mixing schemes. This review provides an in-depth look at recent developments for the coupling and integration of detection techniques with digital microfluidic platforms for bio-chemical applications.

  10. Towards droplet size-aware biochemical application compilation for AM-EWOD biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Alistar, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    , but as discrete droplets on an array of electrodes. Microfluidic operations, such as transport, mixing, split, are performed on this array by routing the corresponding droplets on a series of electrodes. Several approaches have been proposed for the compilation of digital microfluidic biochips, which, starting...... from a biochemical application and a given biochip architecture, determine the allocation, resource binding, scheduling, placement and routing of the operations in the application. To simplify the compilation problem, researchers have assumed an abstract droplet size of one electrode. However......, the droplet size abstraction is not realistic and it impacts negatively the execution of the biochemical application, leading in most cases to its failure. Hence the existing compilation approaches have to be revisited to consider the size of the droplets. In this paper we take the first step towards...

  11. Radiolabelling diverse positron emission tomography (PET) tracers using a single digital microfluidic reactor chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Supin; Javed, Muhammad Rashed; Kim, Hee-Kwon; Lei, Jack; Lazari, Mark; Shah, Gaurav J; van Dam, R Michael; Keng, Pei-Yuin; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2014-03-07

    Radiotracer synthesis is an ideal application for microfluidics because only nanogram quantities are needed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Thousands of radiotracers have been developed in research settings but only a few are readily available, severely limiting the biological problems that can be studied in vivo via PET. We report the development of an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic chip that can synthesize a variety of (18)F-labeled tracers targeting a range of biological processes by confirming complete syntheses of four radiotracers: a sugar, a DNA nucleoside, a protein labelling compound, and a neurotransmitter. The chip employs concentric multifunctional electrodes that are used for heating, temperature sensing, and EWOD actuation. All of the key synthesis steps for each of the four (18)F-labeled tracers are demonstrated and characterized with the chip: concentration of fluoride ion, solvent exchange, and chemical reactions. The obtained fluorination efficiencies of 90-95% are comparable to, or greater than, those achieved by conventional approaches.

  12. Digital microfluidic platform for radiochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Michael R.; Kim, Chang-Jin; Chen, Supin; Ding, Huijiang; Shah, Gaurav Jitendra; Keng, Pei Yuin

    2016-11-01

    Disclosed herein are methods of performing microchemical reactions and electro-wetting-on-dielectric devices (EWOD devices) for use in performing those reactions. These devices and method are particularly suited for preparing radiochemical compounds, particularly compounds containing .sup.18F.

  13. Optimization of microfluidic PET tracer synthesis with Cerenkov imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooraghi, Alex A; Keng, Pei Y; Chen, Supin; Javed, Muhammad R; Kim, Chang-Jin C J; Chatziioannou, Arion F; van Dam, R Michael

    2013-10-07

    Microfluidic technologies provide an attractive platform for the synthesis of radiolabeled compounds. Visualization of radioisotopes on chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. With Cerenkov imaging, beta particle emitting isotopes can be localized with a sensitive CCD camera. In order for Cerenkov imaging to also serve as a quantitative tool, it is necessary to understand how material properties relevant to Cerenkov emission, namely, index of refraction and beta particle stopping power, affect Cerenkov light output. In this report, we investigate the fundamental physical characteristics of Cerenkov photon yield at different stages of [(18)F]FDG synthesis on the electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) microfluidic platform. We also demonstrate how Cerenkov imaging has enabled synthesis optimization. Geant4, a Monte Carlo program applied extensively in high energy physics, is used to simulate Cerenkov photon yield from (18)F beta particles traversing materials of interest during [(18)F]FDG synthesis on chip. Our simulations show that the majority (approximately two-thirds) of the (18)F beta particle energy available to produce Cerenkov photons is deposited on the glass plates of the EWOD chip. This result suggests the possibility of using a single calibration factor to convert Cerenkov signal to radioactivity, independent of droplet composition. We validate our simulations with a controlled measurement examining varying ratios of [(18)O]H2O, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and acetonitrile (MeCN), and find a consistent calibration independent of solvent composition. However, the calibration factor may underestimate the radioactivity in actual synthesis due to discoloration of the droplet during certain steps of probe synthesis. In addition to the attractive quantitative potential of Cerenkov imaging, this imaging strategy provides indispensable qualitative data to guide synthesis optimization. We are able to use this imaging technique to

  14. Two-dimensional droplet-based surface plasmon resonance imaging using electrowetting-on-dielectric microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Lidija; Veres, Teodor; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2009-02-07

    This article presents a multichannel droplet-based surface plasmon resonance platform. The platform comprises a digital electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) microfluidic device coupled to surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). SPRi is now a well-established detection technique that enables in-situ monitoring of multiple reactions occurring at the surface of the chip without the use of labels. Currently, the limiting factor in the application of SPRi for high-throughput applications is the flow-cell technology which relies on sequential sample processing within the continuous fluid flow. An original solution compared to the continuous flow-cell technology is proposed to increase the capability of existing SPRi technology. A parallel SPRi detection of different samples on the surface is achieved using the array-based digital microfluidic device.

  15. ABERRANT ABDUCTOR DIGITI MINIMI MUSCLE FOUND DURING OPEN SURGICAL DECOMPRESSION OF THE CARPAL TUNNEL: CASE REPORT. Músculo abductor digiti minimi aberrante hallado durante una cirugía abierta descompresiva del tunel carpiano: reporte de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav A Slavchev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo reportamos un caso interesante de músculo hipotenar aberrante encontrado durante una descompresión del túnel carpiano. La variante muscular surgía de la fascia antebraquial voloradial, y pasaba sobre la arteria y el nervio ulnar en el canal de Guyón, y se insertaba en la cara ulnar hipotenar. La tensión en el vientre muscular produjo ligera abducción de la quinta articulación metacarpofa-lángica, lo que confirmó que el músculo era abductor digiti minimi aberrante. Observamos asimismo las diferentes variaciones de este músculo y ponemos énfasis en su potencial implicancia clínica. Herein, we present an interesting case of an aberrant hypothenar muscle found during carpal tunnel decompression. The variant muscle arised from the voloradial antebrachial fascia and coursed over the ulnar artery and nerve in the Guyon canal, and inserted into the ulnar aspect of the hypothenar. Tension on the muscle belly provided slight abduction of the fifth metacarpophalangeal joint, which confirmed it to be an aberrant abductor digiti minimi muscle. We also discuss different variations of this muscle and emphasize its potential clinical implications.

  16. ABERRANT ABDUCTOR DIGITI MINIMI MUSCLE FOUND DURING OPEN SURGICAL DECOMPRESSION OF THE CARPAL TUNNEL: CASE REPORT. MÚSCULO ABDUCTOR DIGITI MINIMI ABERRANTE HALLADO DURANTE UNA CIRUGÍA ABIERTA DESCOMPRESIVA DEL TUNEL CARPIANO: REPORTE DE CASO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav A. Slavchev

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we present an interesting case of an aberrant hypothenar muscle found during carpal tunnel decompression. The variant muscle arised from the voloradial antebrachial fascia and coursed over the ulnar artery and nerve in the Guyon canal, and inserted into the ulnar aspect of the hypothenar. Tension on the muscle belly provided slight abduction of the fifth metacarpophalangeal joint, which confirmed it to be an aberrant abductor digiti minimi muscle. We also discuss different variations of this muscle and emphasize its potential clinical implications.En este artículo reportamos un caso interesante de músculo hipotenar aberrante encontrado durante una descompresión del túnel carpiano. La variante muscular surgía de la fascia antebraquial voloradial, y pasaba sobre la arteria y el nervio ulnar en el canal de Guyón, y se insertaba en la cara ulnar hipotenar. La tensión en el vientre muscular produjo ligera abducción de la quinta articulación metacarpofalángica, lo que confirmó que el músculo era abductor digiti minimi aberrante. Observamos asimismo las diferentes variaciones de este músculo y ponemos énfasis en su potencial implicancia clínica.

  17. A fundamental study on electrowetting by traditional and multifunctional ionic liquids: possible use in electrowetting on dielectric-based microfluidic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Yasith S; Moon, Hyejin; Payagala, Tharanga; Wijeratne, Aruna B; Crank, Jeffrey A; Sharma, Pritesh S; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2008-10-15

    Water or aqueous electrolytes are the dominant components in electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD)-based microfluidic devices. Low thermal stability, evaporation, and a propensity to facilitate corrosion of the metal parts of integrated circuits or electronics are drawbacks of aqueous solutions. The alternative use of ionic liquids (ILs) as electrowetting agents in EWOD-based applications or devices could overcome these limitations. Efficient EWOD devices could be developed using task-specific ILs. In this regard, a fundamental study on the electrowetting properties of ILs is essential. Therefore electrowetting properties of 19 different ionic liquids, including mono-, di-, and tricationic, plus mono- and dianionic ILs were examined. All tested ILs showed electrowetting of various magnitudes on an amorphous flouropolymer layer. The effects of IL structure, functionality, and charge density on the electrowetting properties were studied. The enhanced stability of ILs in electrowetting on dielectric at higher voltages was studied in comparison with water. Deviations from classical electrowetting theory were confirmed. The physical properties of ILs and their electrowetting properties were tabulated. These data can be used as references to engineer task-specific electrowetting agents (ILs) for future electrowetting-based applications.

  18. Electrowetting on dielectric digital microfluidic platform with nanostructured biosensor interface for enhanced two-dimensional surface plasmon resonance imaging detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Lidija

    The sensitive and specific detection of biomolecular interactions is at the heart of many routine analyses in fundamental research, medical diagnosis and environmental monitoring. In contrast to laborious and costly multiwell plate assays, recent years have witnessed a significant progress in miniaturized and integrated biosensors, such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), tailored to these applications. While the design of various SPR biosensors has been described in literature, a robust, multichannel, low-cost and highly sensitive solution has not yet been presented. Specifically, an integrated system that can allow surface functionalization in array format, low-volume multichannel fluidic interfacing, and increased sensitivity is sought. This thesis describes a novel electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic device with integrated nanostructured biosensor interface that addresses the aforementioned issues for enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) detection. We have taken the opportunity of the most recent advances in microfabrication, nanotechnology and SPR technique to develop this integrated platform. EWOD device is employed for the dynamic immobilization of bioreceptors on SPRi biosensor surface in an array fashion from sub-muL volume solutions. Programmable EWOD electric interface allows the application of an electric field at the biosensor surface for active control of the immobilized probe density and orientation, enhancing SPRi detection. Two-dimensional SPRi detection is achieved by coupling the EWOD device to SPRi instrumentation. Parallel manipulation of individual droplets allows more efficient exploitation of the biosensor surface by separating different samples for simultaneous and selective SPRi detection. Periodic gold structures (nanoposts, nanogratings and nanogrooves) residing on a surface of glass and plastic substrates are investigated to improve the SPRi sensitivity. The corresponding electromagnetic field

  19. Theoretical microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    Microfluidics is a young and rapidly expanding scientific discipline, which deals with fluids and solutions in miniaturized systems, the so-called lab-on-a-chip systems. It has applications in chemical engineering, pharmaceutics, biotechnology and medicine. As the lab-on-a-chip systems grow...... in complexity, a proper theoretical understanding becomes increasingly important. The basic idea of the book is to provide a self-contained formulation of the theoretical framework of microfluidics, and at the same time give physical motivation and examples from lab-on-a-chip technology. After three chapters...... introducing microfluidics, the governing equations for mass, momentum and energy, and some basic flow solutions, the following 14 chapters treat hydraulic resistance/compliance, diffusion/dispersion, time-dependent flow, capillarity, electro- and magneto-hydrodynamics, thermal transport, two-phase flow...

  20. Optimization of Liquid DiElectroPhoresis (LDEP Digital Microfluidic Transduction for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Fujita

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital microfluidic has recently been under intensive study, as an effective method to carry out liquid manipulation in Lab-On-a-Chip (LOC systems. Among droplet actuation forces, ElectroWetting on Dielectric (EWOD and Liquid DiElectroPhoresis (LDEP are powerful tools, used in many LOC platforms. Such digital microfluidic transductions do not require integration of complex mechanical components such as pumps and valves to perform the fluidic operations. However, although LDEP has been proved to be efficient to carry and manipulate biological components in insulating liquids, this microfluidic transduction requires several hundreds of volts at relatively high frequencies (kHz to MHz. With the purpose to develop integrated microsystems µ-TAS (Micro Total Analysis System or Point of Care systems, the goal here is to reduce such high actuation voltage, the power consumption, though using standard dielectric materials. This paper gives key rules to determine the best tradeoff between liquid manipulation efficiency, low-power consumption and robustness of microsystems using LDEP actuation. This study leans on an electromechanical model to describe liquid manipulation that is applied to an experimental setup, and provides precise quantification of both actuation voltage Vth and frequency fc thresholds between EWOD and LDEP regimes. In particular, several parameters will be investigated to quantify Vth and fc, such as the influence of the chip materials, the electrodes size and the device configurations. Compared to current studies in the field, significant reduction of both Vth and fc is achieved by optimization of the aforementioned parameters.

  1. Fertilization of Mouse Gametes in Vitro Using a Digital Microfluidic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong-Yuan; Shen, Hsien-Hua; Chung, Lung-Yuan; Chung, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Chih-Chen; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Fan, Shih-Kang; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrated in vitro fertilization (IVF) using a digital microfluidic (DMF) system, so-called electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD). The DMF device was proved to be biocompatible and the DMF manipulation of a droplet was harmless to the embryos. This DMF platform was then used for the fertilization of mouse gametes in vitro and for embryo dynamic culture based on a dispersed droplet form. Development of the embryos was instantaneously recorded by a time-lapse microscope in an incubator. Our results indicated that increasing the number of sperms for IVF would raise the rate of fertilization. However, the excess of sperms in the 10 μL culture medium would more easily make the embryo dead during cell culture. Dynamic culture powered with EWOD can manipulate a single droplet containing mouse embryos and culture to the eight-cell stage. The fertilization rate of IVF demonstrated by DMF system was 34.8%, and about 25% inseminated embryos dynamically cultured on a DMF chip developed into an eight-cell stage. The results indicate that the DMF system has the potential for application in assisted reproductive technology.

  2. Dynamics of Electrowetting Droplet Motion in Digital Microfluidics Systems: From Dynamic Saturation to Device Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Cui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative description of the dynamics of droplet motion has been a long-standing concern in electrowetting research. Although many static and dynamic models focusing on droplet motion induced by electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD already exist, some dynamic features do not fit these models well, especially the dynamic saturation phenomenon. In this paper, a dynamic saturation model of droplet motion on the single-plate EWOD device is presented. The phenomenon that droplet velocity is limited by a dynamic saturation effect is precisely predicted. Based on this model, the relationship between droplet motion and device physics is extensively discussed. The static saturation phenomenon is treated with a double-layer capacitance electric model, and it is demonstrated as one critical factor determining the dynamics of droplet motion. This work presents the relationship between dynamics of electrowetting induced droplet motion and device physics including device structure, surface material and interface electronics, which helps to better understand electrowetting induced droplet motions and physics of digital microfluidics systems.

  3. Parallel-plate lab-on-a-chip based on digital microfluidics for on-chip electrochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuhua; Chen, Jianfeng; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic-based lab-on-a-chip (LOC) integrated with on-chip electrochemical microsensor by IC compatible fabrication process, and its application for the entire online biosensing process capable of fully automatic analysis for ferrocenemethanol (FcM) and dopamine (DA). In this work, we made full use of the parallel-plate structure of the EWOD digital microfluidic device to fabricate the microfluidic module on the bottom plate and the three-microelectrode-system-integrated electrochemical cell together with patterned ground electrode on the top plate. The proposed LOC possesses the multifunction of: (1) creating, merging and transporting of microliter-level sample droplets, (2) online biosensing, and (3) droplets recycling. The three-electrode-integrated microsensor not only reveals a sensitive electrochemical detection for FcM in a wide concentration range (10 µM-1.0 mM), but also shows good stability, selectivity and reproducibility for surface-controlled detection of DA. The calibration of DA was linear for concentration from 1.0 to 50.0 µM with a high sensitivity of 2145 nA µM-1 cm-2 (R2 = 0.9933) and estimated detection limit of 0.42 µM (signal/noise ratio of 3). This work shows the promise of state-of-the-art digital microfluidic biosensors for fully automatic online bioanalysis in a future LOC to perform on-chip biomedical protocols in vitro diagnostic assays.

  4. Macro to microfluidics system for biological environmental monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delattre, Cyril; Allier, Cédric P; Fouillet, Yves; Jary, Dorothée; Bottausci, Frederic; Bouvier, Denis; Delapierre, Guillaume; Quinaud, Manuelle; Rival, Arnaud; Davoust, Laurent; Peponnet, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Biological environmental monitoring (BEM) is a growing field of research which challenges both microfluidics and system automation. The aim is to develop a transportable system with analysis throughput which satisfies the requirements: (i) fully autonomous, (ii) complete protocol integration from sample collection to final analysis, (iii) detection of diluted molecules or biological species in a large real life environmental sample volume, (iv) robustness and (v) flexibility and versatility. This paper discusses all these specifications in order to define an original fluidic architecture based on three connected modules, a sampling module, a sample preparation module and a detection module. The sample preparation module highly concentrates on the pathogens present in a few mL samples of complex and unknown solutions and purifies the pathogens' nucleic acids into a few μL of a controlled buffer. To do so, a two-step concentration protocol based on magnetic beads is automated in a reusable macro-to-micro fluidic system. The detection module is a PCR based miniaturized platform using digital microfluidics, where reactions are performed in 64 nL droplets handled by electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) actuation. The design and manufacture of the two modules are reported as well as their respective performances. To demonstrate the integration of the complete protocol in the same system, first results of pathogen detection are shown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Digital Microfluidic Logic Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Xu, Tao; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Microfluidic computing is an emerging application for microfluidics technology. We propose microfluidic logic gates based on digital microfluidics. Using the principle of electrowetting-on-dielectric, AND, OR, NOT and XOR gates are implemented through basic droplet-handling operations such as transporting, merging and splitting. The same input-output interpretation enables the cascading of gates to create nontrivial computing systems. We present a potential application for microfluidic logic gates by implementing microfluidic logic operations for on-chip HIV test.

  6. Biofunctionalization of electrowetting-on-dielectric digital microfluidic chips for miniaturized cell-based applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witters, Daan; Vergauwe, Nicolas; Vermeir, Steven; Ceyssens, Frederik; Liekens, Sandra; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2011-08-21

    In this paper we report on the controlled biofunctionalization of the hydrophobic layer of electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) based microfluidic chips with the aim to execute (adherent) cell-based assays. The biofunctionalization technique involves a dry lift-off method with an easy to remove Parylene-C mask and allows the creation of spatially controlled micropatches of biomolecules in the Teflon-AF(®) layer of the chip. Compared to conventional methods, this method (i) is fully biocompatible; and (ii) leaves the hydrophobicity of the chip surface unaffected by the fabrication process, which is a crucial feature for digital microfluidic chips. In addition, full control of the geometry and the dimensions of the micropatches is achieved, allowing cells to be arrayed as cell clusters or as single cells on the digital microfluidic chip surface. The dry Parylene-C lift-off technique proves to have great potential for precise biofunctionalization of digital microfluidic chips, and can enhance their use for heterogeneous bio-assays that are of interest in various biomedical applications. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  7. Bioinspired microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Diamond, Dermot; Dunne, Aishling; Bruen, Danielle; Delaney, Colm; McCluskey, Peter; McCaul, Margaret; Florea, Larisa

    2017-01-01

    Through developments in 3D fabrication technologies in recent years, it is now possible to build and characterize much more sophisticated 3D platforms than was formerly the case. Regions of differing polarity, binding behaviour, flexibility/rigidity, can be incorporated into these fluidic systems. Furthermore, materials that can switch these characteristics can be incorporated, enabling the creation of microfluidic building blocks that exhibit switchable characteristics such as programmed ...

  8. Integration of field effect transistor-based biosensors with a digital microfluidic device for a lab-on-a-chip application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyungyong; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Choi, Ji-Min; Im, Maesoon; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2012-04-21

    A new platform for lab-on-a-chip system is suggested that utilizes a biosensor array embedded in a digital microfluidic device. With field effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors embedded in the middle of droplet-driving electrodes, the proposed digital microfluidic device can electrically detect avian influenza antibody (anti-AI) in real time by tracing the drain current of the FET-based biosensor without a labeling process. Digitized transport of a target droplet enclosing anti-AI from an inlet to the embedded sensor is enabled by the actuation of electrowetting-on-dielectrics (EWOD). A reduction of the drain current is observed when the target droplet is merged with a pre-existing droplet on the embedded sensor. This reduction of the drain current is attributed to the specific binding of the antigen and the antibody of the AI. The proposed hybrid device consisting of the FET-based sensor and an EWOD device, built on a coplanar substrate by monolithic integration, is fully compatible with current fabrication technology for control and read-out circuitry. Such a completely electrical manner of inducing the transport of bio-molecules, the detection of bio-molecules, the recording of signals, signal processing, and the data transmission process does not require a pump, a fluidic channel, or a bulky transducer. Thus, the proposed platform can contribute to the construction of an all-in-one chip.

  9. Plantar fasciitis and calcaneal spur formation are associated with abductor digiti minimi atrophy on MRI of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chundru, Usha; Liebeskind, Amy; Seidelmann, Frank; Fogel, Joshua; Franklin, Peter; Beltran, Javier

    2008-06-01

    To determine the association of atrophy of the abductor digiti minimi muscle (ADMA), an MRI manifestation of chronic compression of the inferior calcaneal nerve suggesting the clinical diagnosis of Baxter's neuropathy, with MRI markers of potential etiologies, including calcaneal spur formation, plantar fasciitis, calcaneal edema, Achilles tendinosis and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Prevalence of calcaneal spur formation, plantar fasciitis, calcaneal edema, Achilles tendinosis and PTTD was assessed retrospectively on 100 MRI studies with ADMA and 100 MRI studies without ADMA. Patients ranged in age from 10-92 years. Pearson chi-square analyses and Fisher's exact test were used to compare prevalence of the above findings in patients with and without ADMA. Logistic regression was used to determine which variables were significantly associated with ADMA. Among patients with ADMA, there was significantly greater age (57.2 years vs 40.8 years, pcalcaneal edema (15.0% vs 3.0%, P=0.005), calcaneal spur (48.0% vs 7.0%, Pcalcaneal spur (OR 3.60, 95% CI 1.28, 10.17), and plantar fasciitis (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.31, 8.56) remained significant. Advancing age, calcaneal spur, and plantar fasciitis are significantly associated with ADMA. Their high odds ratios support the notion of a possible etiologic role for calcaneal spur and plantar fasciitis in the progression to Baxter's neuropathy.

  10. Droplet-on-a-wristband: chip-to-chip digital microfluidic interfaces between replaceable and flexible electrowetting modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shih-Kang; Yang, Hanping; Hsu, Wensyang

    2011-01-21

    We present a long (204 mm), curved (curvature of 0.04 mm(-1)), and closed droplet pathway in "droplet-on-a-wristband" (DOW) with the designed digital microfluidic modular interfaces for electric signal and droplet connections based on the study of electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) in inclined and curved devices. Instead of using sealed and leakage-proof pipes to transmit liquid and pumping pressure, the demonstrated modular interface for electrowetting-driven digital microfluidics provides simply electric and fluidic connections between two adjacent parallel-plate modules which are easy-to-attach/detach, showing the advantages of using droplets for microfluidic connections between modules. With the previously reported digital-to-channel interfaces (Abdelgawad et al., Lab Chip, 2009, 9, 1046-1051), the chip-to-chip interface presented here would be further applied to continuous microfluidics. Droplet pumping across a single top plate gap and through a modular interface with two gaps between overlapping plates are investigated. To ensure the droplet transportation in the DOW, we actuate droplets against gravity in an inclined or curved device fabricated on flexible PET substrates prepared by a special razor blade cutter and low temperature processes. Pumping a 2.5 μl droplet at a speed above 105 mm s(-1) is achieved by sequentially switching the entire 136 driving electrodes (1.5 mm × 1.5 mm) along the four flexible modules of the DOW fabricated by 4-inch wafer facilities.

  11. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G [Champaign, IL; Mitrovski, Svetlana M [Urbana, IL

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  12. Plantar fasciitis and calcaneal spur formation are associated with abductor digiti minimi atrophy on MRI of the foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chundru, Usha [Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Liebeskind, Amy; Beltran, Javier [Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Beachwood, Franklin and Seidelmann Subspecialty Radiology, Beachwood, OH (United States); Seidelmann, Frank; Franklin, Peter [Beachwood, Franklin and Seidelmann Subspecialty Radiology, Beachwood, OH (United States); Fogel, Joshua [Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Brooklyn College, Department of Economics, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2008-06-15

    To determine the association of atrophy of the abductor digiti minimi muscle (ADMA), an MRI manifestation of chronic compression of the inferior calcaneal nerve suggesting the clinical diagnosis of Baxter's neuropathy, with MRI markers of potential etiologies, including calcaneal spur formation, plantar fasciitis, calcaneal edema, Achilles tendinosis and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Prevalence of calcaneal spur formation, plantar fasciitis, calcaneal edema, Achilles tendinosis and PTTD was assessed retrospectively on 100 MRI studies with ADMA and 100 MRI studies without ADMA. Patients ranged in age from 10-92 years. Pearson chi-square analyses and Fisher's exact test were used to compare prevalence of the above findings in patients with and without ADMA. Logistic regression was used to determine which variables were significantly associated with ADMA. Among patients with ADMA, there was significantly greater age (57.2 years vs 40.8 years, p < 0.001), presence of Achilles tendinosis (22.0% vs 3.0%, P<0.001), calcaneal edema (15.0% vs 3.0%, P = 0.005), calcaneal spur (48.0% vs 7.0%, P < 0.001), plantar fasciitis (52.5% vs 11.0%, P<0.001), and PTTD (32.0% vs 11.0%, P<0.001). After multivariate logistic regression analysis, only age [odds ratio (OR) 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03, 1.09], calcaneal spur (OR 3.60, 95% CI 1.28, 10.17), and plantar fasciitis (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.31, 8.56) remained significant. Advancing age, calcaneal spur, and plantar fasciitis are significantly associated with ADMA. Their high odds ratios support the notion of a possible etiologic role for calcaneal spur and plantar fasciitis in the progression to Baxter's neuropathy. (orig.)

  13. Microfluidic Dye Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Balslev, Søren; Gersborg-Hansen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    A technology for miniaturized, polymer based lasers, suitable for integration with planar waveguides and microfluidic networks is presented. The microfluidic dye laser device consists of a microfluidic channel with an embedded optical resonator. The devices are fabricated in a thin polymer film...

  14. Microfluidics in biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov Dimitri; Barry Richard

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Microfluidics enables biotechnological processes to proceed on a scale (microns) at which physical processes such as osmotic movement, electrophoretic-motility and surface interactions become enhanced. At the microscale sample volumes and assay times are reduced, and procedural costs are lowered. The versatility of microfluidic devices allows interfacing with current methods and technologies. Microfluidics has been applied to DNA analysis methods and shown to accelerate DNA microarra...

  15. Tunable Microfluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Helbo, Bjarne; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2003-01-01

    We present a tunable microfluidic dye laser fabricated in SU-8. The tunability is enabled by integrating a microfluidic diffusion mixer with an existing microfluidic dye laser design by Helbo et al. By controlling the relative flows in the mixer between a dye solution and a solvent......, the concentration of dye in the laser cavity can be adjusted, allowing the wavelength to be tuned. Wavelength tuning controlled by the dye concentration was demonstrated with macroscopic dye lasers already in 1971, but this principle only becomes practically applicable by the use of microfluidic mixing...

  16. Microfluidics for chemical processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Microfluidic systems, and more specifically, microfluidic chips, have a number of features that make them particularly useful for the study of chemical reactions on-line. The present paper will discuss two examples, the study of fluidic behaviour at high pressures and the excitation and detection of

  17. Microfluidic fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Bernard; Kjeang, Erik

    2011-06-01

    A microfluidic fuel cell is a microfabricated device that produces electrical power through electrochemical reactions involving a fuel and an oxidant. Microfluidic fuel cell systems exploit co-laminar flow on the microscale to separate the fuel and oxidant species, in contrast to conventional fuel cells employing an ion exchange membrane for this function. Since 2002 when the first microfluidic fuel cell was invented, many different fuels, oxidants, and architectures have been investigated conceptually and experimentally. In this mini-review article, recent advancements in the field of microfluidic fuel cell systems are documented, with particular emphasis on design, operation, and performance. The present microfluidic fuel cell systems are categorized by the fluidic phases of the fuel and oxidant streams, featuring gaseous/gaseous, liquid/gaseous, and liquid/liquid systems. The typical cell configurations and recent contributions in each category are analyzed. Key research challenges and opportunities are highlighted and recommendations for further work are provided.

  18. Microfluidics in biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Dimitri

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microfluidics enables biotechnological processes to proceed on a scale (microns at which physical processes such as osmotic movement, electrophoretic-motility and surface interactions become enhanced. At the microscale sample volumes and assay times are reduced, and procedural costs are lowered. The versatility of microfluidic devices allows interfacing with current methods and technologies. Microfluidics has been applied to DNA analysis methods and shown to accelerate DNA microarray assay hybridisation times. The linking of microfluidics to protein analysis techologies, e.g. mass spectrometry, enables picomole amounts of peptide to be analysed within a controlled micro-environment. The flexibility of microfluidics will facilitate its exploitation in assay development across multiple biotechnological disciplines.

  19. Applying Microfluidics to Electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddington, David T.

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidics can be integrated with standard electrophysiology techniques to allow new experimental modalities. Specifically, the motivation for the microfluidic brain slice device is discussed including how the device docks to standard perfusion chambers and the technique of passive pumping which is used to deliver boluses of neuromodulators to the brain slice. By simplifying the device design, we are able to achieve a practical solution to the current unmet electrophysiology need of applying multiple neuromodulators across multiple regions of the brain slice. This is achieved by substituting the standard coverglass substrate of the perfusion chamber with a thin microfluidic device bonded to the coverglass substrate. This was then attached to the perfusion chamber and small holes connect the open-well of the perfusion chamber to the microfluidic channels buried within the microfluidic substrate. These microfluidic channels are interfaced with ports drilled into the edge of the perfusion chamber to access and deliver stimulants. This project represents how the field of microfluidics is transitioning away from proof-of concept device demonstrations and into practical solutions for unmet experimental and clinical needs. PMID:18989410

  20. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  1. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  2. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  3. Breaking new boundaries with microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics is an important emerging research platform in South Africa. It deals with the control and manipulation of very small quantities of fluids (typically microlitre and smaller) inside micro-channels. Microfluidic-based devices show great...

  4. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Korir

    Full Text Available Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  5. Efficient in-droplet separation of magnetic particles for digital microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yizhong; Zhao, Yuejun; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes a new efficient in-droplet magnetic particle concentration and separation method, where magnetic particles are concentrated and separated into a split droplet by using a permanent magnet and EWOD (electrowetting on dielectric) droplet manipulation. To evaluate the method, testing devices are fabricated by the micro fabrication technology. First, this method is examined for magnetic particle concentration, showing that over 91% of magnetic particles can be concentrated into a split daughter droplet. Then, separation between magnetic and non-magnetic particles is examined for two different cases of particle mixture, showing in both cases that over 91% of the magnetic particles can be concentrated into split daughter droplets. However, a significant number of the non-magnetic particles (over 35%) co-exist with the magnetic particles in the same daughter droplets. This problem is circumvented by adding a droplet-merging step prior to applying the magnetic field. Finally, over 94% of the total magnetic particles are separated into a one split daughter droplet while 92% of the non-magnetic particles into the other split daughter droplet. This integrated in-droplet separation method may bridge many existing magnetic particle assays to digital microfluidics and extend their application scope.

  6. Rapid and sensitive detection of antibiotic resistance on a programmable digital microfluidic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi, Sumit; Valiadi, Martha; Tsaloglou, Maria-Nefeli; Parry-Jones, Lesley; Jacobs, Adrian; Watson, Rob; Turner, Carrie; Amos, Robert; Hadwen, Ben; Buse, Jonathan; Brown, Chris; Sutton, Mark; Morgan, Hywel

    2015-07-21

    The widespread dissemination of CTX-M extended spectrum β-lactamases among Escherichia coli bacteria, both in nosocomial and community environments, is a challenge for diagnostic bacteriology laboratories. We describe a rapid and sensitive detection system for analysis of DNA containing the blaCTX-M-15 gene using isothermal DNA amplification by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) on a digital microfluidic platform; active matrix electrowetting-on-dielectric (AM-EWOD). The devices have 16,800 electrodes that can be independently controlled to perform multiple and simultaneous droplet operations. The device includes an in-built impedance sensor for real time droplet position and size detection, an on-chip thermistor for temperature sensing and an integrated heater for regulating the droplet temperature. Automatic dispensing of droplets (45 nL) from reservoir electrodes is demonstrated with a coefficient of variation (CV) in volume of approximately 2%. The RPA reaction is monitored in real-time using exonuclease fluorescent probes. Continuous mixing of droplets during DNA amplification significantly improves target DNA detection by at least 100 times compared to a benchtop assay, enabling the detection of target DNA over four-order-of-magnitude with a limit of detection of a single copy within ~15 minutes.

  7. Microfluidic Synthesis of Nanohybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junmei; Song, Yujun

    2017-05-01

    Nanohybrids composed of two or more components exhibit many distinct physicochemical properties and hold great promise for applications in optics, electronics, magnetics, new energy, environment protection, and biomedical engineering. Microfluidic systems exhibit many advantages due to their unique characteristics of narrow channels, variable length, controllable number of channels and multiple integrations. Particularly their spatial-temporarily splitting of the formation stages during nanomaterials formation along the microfluidic channels favors the online control of the reaction kinetic parameters and in situ tuning of the product properties. This Review is focused on the features of the current types of microfluidic devices in the synthesis of different types of nanohybrids based on the classification of the four main kinds of materials: metal, nonmetal inorganic, polymer and composites. Their morphologies, compositions and properties can be adjusted conveniently in these synthesis systems. Synthesis advantages of varieties of microfluidic devices for specific nanohybrids of defined surfaces and interfaces are presented according to their process and microstructure features of devices as compared with conventional methods. A summary is presented, and challenges are put forward for the future development of the microfluidic synthesis of nanohybrids for advanced applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Micromixing within microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capretto, Lorenzo; Cheng, Wei; Hill, Martyn; Zhang, Xunli

    2011-01-01

    Micromixing is a crucial process within microfluidic systems such as micro total analysis systems (μTAS). A state-of-art review on microstructured mixing devices and their mixing phenomena is given. The review first presents an overview of the characteristics of fluidic behavior at the microscale and their implications in microfluidic mixing processes. According to the two basic principles exploited to induce mixing at the microscale, micromixers are generally classified as being passive or active. Passive mixers solely rely on pumping energy, whereas active mixers rely on an external energy source to achieve mixing. Typical types of passive micromixers are discussed, including T- or Y-shaped, parallel lamination, sequential, focusing enhanced mixers, and droplet micromixers. Examples of active mixers using external forces such as pressure field, electrokinetic, dielectrophoretic, electrowetting, magneto-hydrodynamic, and ultrasound to assist mixing are presented. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of mixing in a microfluidic environment are discussed.

  9. Paper microfluidics goes digital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobel, Ryan; Kirby, Andrea E; Ng, Alphonsus H C; Farnood, Ramin R; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2014-05-01

    The first example of so-called "digital microfluidics" (DMF) implemented on paper by inkjet printing is reported. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is demonstrated as an example of a complex, multistep protocol that would be difficult to achieve with capillary-driven paper microfluidics. Furthermore, it is shown that paper-based DMF devices have comparable performance to traditional photolithographically patterned DMF devices at a fraction of the cost. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted by that enzyme......Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...

  11. Rapid manufacturing for microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Microfluidics is at the forefront of developing solutions for drug discovery, diagnostics (from glucose tests to malaria and TB testing) and environmental diagnostics (E-coli monitoring of drinking water). In order to quickly implement new designs, a rapid...

  12. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  13. Microfluidics for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.; Segerink, L.I.; Segerink, Loes Irene; Unknown, [Unknown

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices for point of care diagnostics have been present in clinics for several years now. Alongside their continual development, research is underway to bring the organs and tissue on-a-chip to the patient, amongst other medical applications of microfluidics. This book provides the

  14. Basic Microfluidics Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2015-01-01

    ,000 m−1, which is a huge difference and has a large impact on flow behavior. In this chapter the basic microfluidic theory will be presented, enabling the reader to gain a comprehensive understanding of how liquids behave at the microscale, enough to be able to engage in design of micro systems...

  15. Numerical Optimization in Microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjærg

    2017-01-01

    Numerical modelling can illuminate the working mechanism and limitations of microfluidic devices. Such insights are useful in their own right, but one can take advantage of numerical modelling in a systematic way using numerical optimization. In this chapter we will discuss when and how numerical...

  16. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  17. Microfluidic fuel cells: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeang, Erik; Djilali, Ned; Sinton, David

    A microfluidic fuel cell is defined as a fuel cell with fluid delivery and removal, reaction sites and electrode structures all confined to a microfluidic channel. Microfluidic fuel cells typically operate in a co-laminar flow configuration without a physical barrier, such as a membrane, to separate the anode and the cathode. This review article summarizes the development of microfluidic fuel cell technology, from the invention in 2002 until present, with emphasis on theory, fabrication, unit cell development, performance achievements, design considerations, and scale-up options. The main challenges associated with the current status of the technology are provided along with suggested directions for further research and development. Moreover, microfluidic fuel cell architectures show great potential for integration with biofuel cell technology. This review therefore includes microfluidic biofuel cell developments to date and presents opportunities for future work in this multi-disciplinary field.

  18. Microfluidic Chips for Semen Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerink, L.I.; Sprenkels, A.J.; Oosterhuis, G.J.E.; Vermes, I.; van den Berg, A.

    2012-01-01

    The gold standard of semen analysis is still an manual method, which is time-consuming, labour intensive and needs thorough quality control. Microfluidics can also offer advantages for this application. Therefore a first step in the development of a microfluidic chip has been made, which enables the man the semen analysis at home. In this article recent efforts to determine the concentration and motility using a microfluidic chip are summarized. PMID:27683417

  19. Microfluidic Circuitry via Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Glick, Casey Carter

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidics, the science and engineering of fluid at small scales, affords numerous benefits for applications in chemistry and biology, including rapid reaction rates, reaction uniformity and precision, and reagent minimization but the technology remains limited by the availability of appropriate control mechanisms and related microfluidic components. Microfluidic devices have traditionally been fabricated using soft-lithography, which is time-consuming, costly, and reliant on extensive fac...

  20. Microfluidics Transport and Path Control via Programmable Electrowetting on Dielectric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore W. Von Bitner, Ph.D.

    2002-08-22

    This research was conducted in collaboration with Professor Chang-Jin Kim of the University of California, Los Angeles. In phase I, the IOS-UCLA collaboration demonstrated the transport and manipulation of insulting liquid droplets using the principles of EWOD. A postage stamp sized array of electronically addressable Teflon pads, whose surface tension characteristics could be altered on command through computer algorithms, was developed and tested using deionized water as the liquid. Going beyond the tasks originally proposed for Phase I, droplet manipulation was achieved and droplet stability in the EWOD device was examined.

  1. Microfluidic Techniques for Analytes Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunlu Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics has been undergoing fast development in the past two decades due to its promising applications in biotechnology, medicine, and chemistry. Towards these applications, enhancing concentration sensitivity and detection resolution are indispensable to meet the detection limits because of the dilute sample concentrations, ultra-small sample volumes and short detection lengths in microfluidic devices. A variety of microfluidic techniques for concentrating analytes have been developed. This article presents an overview of analyte concentration techniques in microfluidics. We focus on discussing the physical mechanism of each concentration technique with its representative advancements and applications. Finally, the article is concluded by highlighting and discussing advantages and disadvantages of the reviewed techniques.

  2. Methods of making microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Buttner, Ulrich

    2017-06-01

    Microfluidics has advanced in terms of designs and structures, however, fabrication methods are either time consuming or expensive to produce, in terms of the facilities and equipment needed. A fast and economically viable method is provided to allow, for example, research groups to have access to microfluidic fabrication. Unlike most fabrication methods, a method is provided to fabricate a microfluidic device in one step. In an embodiment, a resolution of 50 micrometers was achieved by using maskless high-resolution digital light projection (MDLP). Bonding and channel fabrication of complex or simple structures can be rapidly incorporated to fabricate the microfluidic devices.

  3. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications.

  4. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a- Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments. In addition to developing computational models of the microfluidic channels, valves and pumps that form the basis of every biochip, we are also trying to identify potential problems that could arise in reduced gravity and develop solutions to these problems. One such problem is due to the prevalence of bubbly sample fluids in microgravity. A bubble trapped in a microfluidic channel could be detrimental to the operation of a biochip. Therefore, the process of bubble formation in microgravity needs to be studied, and a model of this process has been developed and used to understand how bubbles develop and move through biochip components. It is clear that some type of bubble filter would be necessary in Space, and

  5. Tunable Microfluidic Microlasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Francesco Simoni Dipartimento di Fisica e Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio Università Politecnica delle Marche Via Brecce Bianche, 60131...circuits, in order to point out advantages and drawbacks of different experimental techniques. The alignment of liquid crystal in microfluidic...Lasing was detected through an optical fiber connected to a spectrometer. A preliminary experimental result is reported in fig. 13 where the light

  6. Microfluidics realizes potential

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, Paula

    2004-01-01

    Advanced fabrication technologies are being used to make microscale tools for fluid manipulation. Interest in the development of microfluidic devices has been encouraged by the number of fluid-based processes that could benefit from miniaturization. A number of companies are now marketing fluidic ‘lab-on-a-chip’ systems for applications in biomedical research, environmental testing, and medical diagnostics. However, the full commercial potential of this technology has yet to be realized.

  7. Animal microsurgery using microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Stirman, Jeffrey N.; Harker, Bethany; Lu, Hang; Crane, Matthew M.

    2013-01-01

    Small multicellular genetic organisms form a central part of modern biological research. Using these small organisms provides significant advantages in genetic tractability, manipulation, lifespan and cost. Although the small size is generally advantageous, it can make procedures such as surgeries both time consuming and labor intensive. Over the past few years there have been dramatic improvements in microfluidic technologies that enable significant improvements in microsurgery and interroga...

  8. High-pressure microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  9. Energy: the microfluidic frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinton, David

    2014-09-07

    Global energy is largely a fluids problem. It is also large-scale, in stark contrast to microchannels. Microfluidic energy technologies must offer either massive scalability or direct relevance to energy processes already operating at scale. We have to pick our fights. Highlighted here are the exceptional opportunities I see, including some recent successes and areas where much more attention is needed. The most promising directions are those that leverage high surface-to-volume ratios, rapid diffusive transport, capacity for high temperature and high pressure experiments, and length scales characteristic of microbes and fluids (hydrocarbons, CO2) underground. The most immediate areas of application are where information is the product; either fluid sample analysis (e.g. oil analysis); or informing operations (e.g. CO2 transport in microporous media). I'll close with aspects that differentiate energy from traditional microfluidics applications, the uniquely important role of engineering in energy, and some thoughts for the research community forming at the nexus of lab-on-a-chip and energy--a microfluidic frontier.

  10. Microfluidics with fluid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Edmond J; Feuerborn, Alexander; Wheeler, James H R; Tan, Ann Na; Durham, William M; Foster, Kevin R; Cook, Peter R

    2017-10-10

    Microfluidics has great potential, but the complexity of fabricating and operating devices has limited its use. Here we describe a method - Freestyle Fluidics - that overcomes many key limitations. In this method, liquids are confined by fluid (not solid) walls. Aqueous circuits with any 2D shape are printed in seconds on plastic or glass Petri dishes; then, interfacial forces pin liquids to substrates, and overlaying an immiscible liquid prevents evaporation. Confining fluid walls are pliant and resilient; they self-heal when liquids are pipetted through them. We drive flow through a wide range of circuits passively by manipulating surface tension and hydrostatic pressure, and actively using external pumps. Finally, we validate the technology with two challenging applications - triggering an inflammatory response in human cells and chemotaxis in bacterial biofilms. This approach provides a powerful and versatile alternative to traditional microfluidics.The complexity of fabricating and operating microfluidic devices limits their use. Walsh et al. describe a method in which circuits are printed as quickly and simply as writing with a pen, and liquids in them are confined by fluid instead of solid walls.

  11. Microfluidic desalination : capacitive deionization on chip for microfluidic sample preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Susan Helena

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the work described in this thesis is to implement the desalination technique capacitive deionization (CDI) on a microfluidic chip to improve the reproducibility in the analysis of biological samples for drug development. Secondly, microfluidic CDI allows for the in situ study of ion

  12. A fluorogenic heterogeneous immunoassay for cardiac muscle troponin cTnI on a digital microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaloglou, Maria-Nefeli; Jacobs, Adrian; Morgan, Hywel

    2014-09-01

    We describe a fluorogenic two-site noncompetitive heterogeneous immunoassay with magnetic beads on a low-voltage digital microfluidic platform using closed electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD). All the steps of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed on the device using 9H-(1, 3-dichloro-9, 9-dimethylacridin-2-one-7-yl) phosphate as the fluorogenic substrate for the enzyme alkaline phosphatase. The performance of the system was demonstrated with cardiac marker Troponin I (cTnI) as a model analyte in phosphate-buffered saline samples. cTnI was detected within the diagnostically relevant range with a limit of detection of 2.0 ng/mL (CV = 6.47 %). Washing of magnetic beads was achieved by movement through a narrow region of buffer bridging one drop to another with minimal fluid transfer. More than 90 % of the unbound reagents were removed after five washes. Further experiments testing human blood serum on the same platform demonstrated a sample-to-answer time at ∼18.5 min detecting 6.79 ng/mL cTnI.

  13. MICROFLUIDIC COMPONENT CAPABLE OF SELF-SEALING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A microfluidic component (100) for building a microfluidic system is provided. The microfluidic component (100) can be mounted on a microf luidic breadboard (202) in a manner that allows it to be connected to other microfluidic components (204, 206) without the requirement of additional devices. ...... (204, 206). Applying the pressure causes the two tubes to be fluidically sealed....

  14. Acoustofluidics 1: Governing equations in microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Governing equations for microfluidics and basic flow solutions are presented. Equivalent circuit modeling for determining flow rates in microfluidic networks is introduced.......Governing equations for microfluidics and basic flow solutions are presented. Equivalent circuit modeling for determining flow rates in microfluidic networks is introduced....

  15. Single-Sided Digital Microfluidic (SDMF Devices for Effective Coolant Delivery and Enhanced Two-Phase Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Yong Park

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital microfluidics (DMF driven by electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD has recently been attracting great attention as an effective liquid-handling platform for on-chip cooling. It enables rapid transportation of coolant liquid sandwiched between two parallel plates and drop-wise thermal rejection from a target heating source without additional mechanical components such as pumps, microchannels, and capillary wicks. However, a typical sandwiched configuration in DMF devices only allows sensible heat transfer, which seriously limits heat rejection capability, particularly for high-heat-flux thermal dissipation. In this paper, we present a single-sided digital microfluidic (SDMF device that enables not only effective liquid handling on a single-sided surface, but also two-phase heat transfer to enhance thermal rejection performance. Several droplet manipulation functions required for two-phase cooling were demonstrated, including continuous droplet injection, rapid transportation as fast as 7.5 cm/s, and immobilization on the target hot spot where heat flux is locally concentrated. Using the SDMF platform, we experimentally demonstrated high-heat-flux cooling on the hydrophilic-coated hot spot. Coolant droplets were continuously transported to the target hot spot which was mitigated below 40 K of the superheat. The effective heat transfer coefficient was stably maintained even at a high heat flux regime over ~130 W/cm2, which will allow us to develop a reliable thermal management module. Our SDMF technology offers an effective on-chip cooling approach, particularly for high-heat-flux thermal management based on two-phase heat transfer.

  16. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  17. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  18. Spatial manipulation with microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eLin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical gradients convey information through space, time, and concentration, and are ultimately capable of spatially resolving distinct cellular phenotypes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. How these gradients develop, evolve, and function during development, homeostasis, and various disease states is a subject of intense interest across a variety of disciplines. Microfluidic technologies have become essential tools for investigating gradient sensing in vitro due to their ability to precisely manipulate fluids on demand in well controlled environments at cellular length scales. This minireview will highlight their utility for studying gradient sensing along with relevant applications to biology.

  19. NMR-DMF: a modular nuclear magnetic resonance-digital microfluidics system for biological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ka-Meng; Mak, Pui-In; Law, Man-Kay; Martins, Rui P

    2014-12-07

    We present a modular nuclear magnetic resonance-digital microfluidics (NMR-DMF) system as a portable diagnostic platform for miniaturized biological assays. With increasing number of combinations between designed probes and a specific target, NMR has become an accurate and rapid assay tool, which is capable of detecting particular kinds of proteins, DNAs, bacteria and cells with a customized probe quantitatively. Traditional sample operation (e.g., manipulation and mixing) relied heavily on human efforts. We herein propose a modular NMR-DMF system to allow the electronic automation of multi-step reaction-screening protocols. A figure-8 shaped coil is proposed to enlarge the usable inner space of a portable magnet by 4.16 times, generating a radio frequency (RF) excitation field in the planar direction. By electronically managing the electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) effects over an electrode array, preloaded droplets with the inclusion of biological constituents and targets can be programmed to mix and be guided to the detection site (3.5 × 3.5 mm(2)) for high-sensitivity NMR screening (static B field: 0.46 T, RF field: 1.43 mT per ampere), with the result (voltage signal) displayed in real-time. To show the system's utility, automated real-time identification of 100 pM of avidin in a 14 μL droplet was achieved. The system shows promise as a robust and portable diagnostic device for a wide variety of biological analyses and screening applications.

  20. Microfluidic fuel cells and batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Kjeang, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic fuel cells and batteries represent a special type of electrochemical power generators that can be miniaturized and integrated in a microfluidic chip. Summarizing the initial ten years of research and development in this emerging field, this SpringerBrief is the first book dedicated to microfluidic fuel cell and battery technology for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Written at a critical juncture, where strategically applied research is urgently required to seize impending technology opportunities for commercial, analytical, and educational utility, the intention is

  1. Kinetic ELISA in microfluidic channels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yanagisawa, Naoki; Dutta, Debashis

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe the kinetic ELISA of Blue Tongue and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease viral antibodies in microfluidic channels by monitoring the rate of generation of the enzyme reaction...

  2. Microfluidic Multichannel Flow Cytometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a "Microfluidic Multichannel Flow Cytometer." Several novel concepts are integrated to produce the final design, which is compatible with...

  3. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kangning Ren; Wen Dai; Jianhua Zhou; Jing Su; Hongkai Wu

    2011-01-01

    ... them. In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents...

  4. Microfluidics - Sorting particles with light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    2004-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have great potential to perform complex chemical and biological processing and analysis on a single disposable chip. That goal is now a step closer with the demonstration of an efficient all-optical particle sorter.......Microfluidic systems have great potential to perform complex chemical and biological processing and analysis on a single disposable chip. That goal is now a step closer with the demonstration of an efficient all-optical particle sorter....

  5. Towards printable open air microfluidics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collord, Andrew; Cook, Adam W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Fenton, Kyle Ross (University of New Mexico); Apblett, Christopher Alan; Branson, Eric D.

    2010-04-01

    We have demonstrated a novel microfluidic technique for aqueous media, which uses super-hydrophobic materials to create microfluidic channels that are open to the atmosphere. We have demonstrated the ability to perform traditional electrokinetic operations such as ionic separations and electrophoresis using these devices. The rate of evaporation was studied and found to increase with decreasing channel size, which places a limitation on the minimum size of channel that could be used for such a device.

  6. Digital Microfluidic Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Li, Bingyu Betty; Chamberlain, M Dean; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a droplet-based liquid-handling technology that has recently become popular for cell culture and analysis. In DMF, picoliter- to microliter-sized droplets are manipulated on a planar surface using electric fields, thus enabling software-reconfigurable operations on individual droplets, such as move, merge, split, and dispense from reservoirs. Using this technique, multistep cell-based processes can be carried out using simple and compact instrumentation, making DMF an attractive platform for eventual integration into routine biology workflows. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in DMF cell culture, and describe design considerations, types of DMF cell culture, and cell-based applications of DMF.

  7. Interplay between materials and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xu; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Santiago, Grissel Trujillo-De; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Ribas, João; Jonas, Steven J.; Weiss, Paul S.; Andrews, Anne M.; Aizenberg, Joanna; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Developments in the field of microfluidics have triggered technological revolutions in many disciplines, including chemical synthesis, electronics, diagnostics, single-cell analysis, micro- and nanofabrication, and pharmaceutics. In many of these areas, rapid growth is driven by the increasing synergy between fundamental materials development and new microfluidic capabilities. In this Review, we critically evaluate both how recent advances in materials fabrication have expanded the frontiers of microfluidic platforms and how the improved microfluidic capabilities are, in turn, furthering materials design. We discuss how various inorganic and organic materials enable the fabrication of systems with advanced mechanical, optical, chemical, electrical and biointerfacial properties — in particular, when these materials are combined into new hybrids and modular configurations. The increasing sophistication of microfluidic techniques has also expanded the range of resources available for the fabrication of new materials, including particles and fibres with specific functionalities, 3D (bio)printed composites and organoids. Together, these advances lead to complex, multifunctional systems, which have many interesting potential applications, especially in the biomedical and bioengineering domains. Future exploration of the interactions between materials science and microfluidics will continue to enrich the diversity of applications across engineering as well as the physical and biomedical sciences.

  8. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  9. Rapid, low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic devices for effective implementation of various microfluidic components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith, Suzanne

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A centrifugal microfluidic platform to develop various microfluidic operations – the first of its kind in South Africa – is presented. Rapid and low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic disc devices, as well as a set-up to test the devices using centrifugal forces, is described. Preliminary results show that various microfluidic operations such as fluidic valving, transportation, and microfluidic droplet generation can be achieved. This work provides a complete centrifugal microfluidic platform and the building blocks on which to develop a variety of microfluidic applications and potential products rapidly and at a low cost.

  10. Paper based microfluidic devices for environmental diagnostics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govindasamy, K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics has found widespread application in the fields of molecular biology, DNA analysis and most recently, point of care diagnostics. We present a paper based microfluidic device for rapid, in-the-field detection of pathogenic bacteria...

  11. Microfluidics to define leukocyte migration patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boneschansker, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Leukocyte migration into tissues is characteristic of inflammation. In this thesis, we design and validate microfluidic devices that allow for precise quantification of leukocyte migration patterns. Our microfluidic platform can quantify migration patterns using single-cell quantitative metrics that

  12. Microfluidic tools for cell biological research

    OpenAIRE

    Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Le Berre, Maël; Piel, Matthieu; Tran, Phong T.

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidic technology is creating powerful tools for cell biologists to control the complete cellular microenvironment, leading to new questions and new discoveries. We review here the basic concepts and methodologies in designing microfluidic devices, and their diverse cell biological applications.

  13. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  14. Magnetic separation in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smistrup, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    , and it is argued that it is a good measure, when comparing the performance of magnetic bead separators. It is described how numeric modelling is used to aid the design of microfluidic magnetic separation systems. An example of a design optimization study is given. A robust fabrication scheme has been developed...... for fabrication of silicon based systems. This fabrication scheme is explained, and it is shown how, it is applied with variations for several designs of magnetic separators. An experimental setup for magnetic separation experiments has been developed. It has been coupled with an image analysis program......This Ph.D. thesis presents theory, modeling, design, fabrication, experiments and results for microfluidic magnetic separators. A model for magnetic bead movement in a microfluidic channel is presented, and the limits of the model are discussed. The effective magnetic field gradient is defined...

  15. Microfluidic Technologies for Synthetic Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kuk Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic technologies have shown powerful abilities for reducing cost, time, and labor, and at the same time, for increasing accuracy, throughput, and performance in the analysis of biological and biochemical samples compared with the conventional, macroscale instruments. Synthetic biology is an emerging field of biology and has drawn much attraction due to its potential to create novel, functional biological parts and systems for special purposes. Since it is believed that the development of synthetic biology can be accelerated through the use of microfluidic technology, in this review work we focus our discussion on the latest microfluidic technologies that can provide unprecedented means in synthetic biology for dynamic profiling of gene expression/regulation with high resolution, highly sensitive on-chip and off-chip detection of metabolites, and whole-cell analysis.

  16. Microfluidics for Combating Antimicrobial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengzhi; Banaei, Niaz; Ren, Kangning

    2017-08-08

    The ever-growing threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) demands immediate countermeasures. With its novelty and enabling features including downscaled analysis, precisely controlled local environment, and enhanced speed, accuracy, and cost-efficiency, microfluidics has demonstrated potential in several key areas, including furthering our understanding of bacteria, developing better susceptibility testing tools, and overcoming obstacles in discovery and research of new antibiotics. While ample research results in the field of microfluidics are available, their transformation into practical application is still lagging far behind. We believe that the challenge of AMR will give microfluidics a much-needed opportunity to leap from research papers to true productivity, and gain wider acceptance as a mature technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Microfluidics Device Simulation in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Michael; Shirk, Kathryn

    Microfluidics fluid channels have different dominant properties of flow than do macrofluidic channels. At small channel sizes, the calculations that model the fluid flow need to include slip velocity at the walls of the channel, the mean free path of particles, and other factors that can be difficult to compute. In order to reduce the potential for error and provide meaningful graphical representations of the computations, a computer program can be implemented. We are creating a MATLAB program suite to perform the relevant calculations quickly and accurately. Additionally, by building on this program, the potential for testing new ideas for microfluidic devices can be realized. This would reduce the costs associated with prototyping microfluidic devices as devices can be modeled in software without the need for creating physical devices until the concepts are shown to be viable.

  18. STUDY OF PERONEUS DIGITI MINIMI QUINTI IN INDIAN POPULATION: A CADAVERIC STUDY. Estudio del peroneo dígiti minimi quinti en la población india: Un estudio cadavérico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha D Jadhav

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes: Peroneo meñique quinti es uno de los muchos músculos peroneos accesorios que por lo general se origina como un pequeño deslizamiento del tendón del peroneo lateral corto, alrededor del maléolo lateral, y se une a la aponeurosis dorsal del quinto dígito. No se conoce con precisión la prevalencia de la misma. Hay mucha confusión en la literatura, ya que existen múltiples clasificaciones superpuestas y una gran variedad de terminología descriptiva acerca de los músculos peroneos accesorios. Peroneo meñique quinti fue observado por algunos investigadores en la literatura, pero Macalister (1872 y Testut (1921 describen este músculo con sus variaciones en  detalle. Material y métodos: Se estudiaron 100 miembros inferiores de cadáveres adultos de sexo desconocido. El compartimento lateral de cada pie se disecó cuidadosamente para determinar la incidencia del peroneo lateral del meñique quinti. Se observó su origen y la inserción, y se tomó el diámetro. Resultados: Se observó este músculo en el 51% de los casos, con predominio del lado izquierdo. Estaba presente bilateralmente sólo en un 5% las extremidades inferiores. Su diámetro varía de 0,7mm a 3mm. Informamos mayor incidencia de este músculo con la variación en sus anexos distales. El conocimiento de esta variante muscular es importante no solo para anatomistas sino también para los cirujanos en el diagnostico de dolores de la región lateral del tobillo y del pie. Este músculo también se puede utilizar en el injerto y la reconstrucción en cirugía del pie y tobillo. Nuevos estudios deben ser realizados para determinar su incidencia en diferentes poblaciones con la  ayuda del estudio en cadáver y nuevas técnicas. Background: Peroneus Digiti Minimi Quinti is one of many accessory peroneal muscles which usually originates as a small slip from the tendon of peroneus brevis, around the lateral malleolus, and attached to the dorsal aponeurosis of the

  19. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Jin, Mingliang; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots‿ with a deposited metal film, on which the localized

  20. Topology optimization of microfluidic mixers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Gersborg, Allan Roulund; Sigmund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the topology optimization method as a general and systematic approach for microfluidic mixer design. The mixing process is modeled as convection dominated transport in low Reynolds number incompressible flow. The mixer performance is maximized by altering...

  1. Optical detection in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2009-01-01

    Optical detection schemes continue to be favoured for measurements in microfluidic systems. A selection of the latest progress mainly within the last two years is critically reviewed. Emphasis is on integrated solutions, such as planar waveguides, coupling schemes to the outside world, evanescent...

  2. Mixing in a Microfluid Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Deryabin, Mikhail

    Mixing of fluids in microchannels cannot rely on turbulence since the flow takes place at extremly low Reynolds numbers. Various active and passive devices have been developed to induce mixing in microfluid flow devices. We describe here a model of an active mixer where a transverse periodic flow...

  3. A microfluidic device with pillars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides a microfluidic device for mixing liquid reagents, the device comprises, a chip forming at least one reaction chamber between a bottom and a top and extending between an inlet and an outlet. To enable manufacturing from less rigid materials, the device comprises pillars...

  4. Microfluidic Liquid-Liquid Contactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcculloch, Quinn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-25

    This report describes progress made on the microfluidic contactor. A model was developed to predict its failure, a surrogate chemical system was selected to demonstrate mass transfer, and an all-optical system has been invented and implemented to monitor carryover and flowrates.

  5. Nanostructures for all-polymer microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matschuk, Maria; Bruus, Henrik; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    antistiction coating was found to improve the replication fidelity (shape and depth) of nanoscale features substantially. Arrays of holes of 50 nm diameter/35 nm depth and 100 nm/100 nm diameter, respectively, were mass-produced in cyclic olefin copolymer (Topas 5013) by injection molding. Polymer microfluidic...... channel chip parts resulted from a separate injection molding process. The microfluidic chip part and the nanostructured chip part were successfully bonded to form a sealed microfluidic system using air plasma assisted thermal bonding....

  6. Integrated lenses in polystyrene microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports a new method for integrating microlenses into microfluidic devices for improved observation. Two demonstration microfluidic devices were provided which were fabricated using this new technique. The integrated microlenses were fabricated using a free-surface thermo-compression molding method on a polystyrene (PS) sheet which was then bonded on top of microfluidic channels as a cover plate, with the convex microlenses providing a magnified image of the channel for the easier observation of the flow in the microchannels. This approach for fabricating the integrated microlens in microfluidic devices is rapid, low cost and without the requirement of cleanroom facilities. © 2013 IEEE.

  7. Droplet microfluidics for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Philip C; Iwai, Kosuke; Kim, Peter W; Hillson, Nathan J; Singh, Anup K

    2017-10-11

    Synthetic biology is an interdisciplinary field that aims to engineer biological systems for useful purposes. Organism engineering often requires the optimization of individual genes and/or entire biological pathways (consisting of multiple genes). Advances in DNA sequencing and synthesis have recently begun to enable the possibility of evaluating thousands of gene variants and hundreds of thousands of gene combinations. However, such large-scale optimization experiments remain cost-prohibitive to researchers following traditional molecular biology practices, which are frequently labor-intensive and suffer from poor reproducibility. Liquid handling robotics may reduce labor and improve reproducibility, but are themselves expensive and thus inaccessible to most researchers. Microfluidic platforms offer a lower entry price point alternative to robotics, and maintain high throughput and reproducibility while further reducing operating costs through diminished reagent volume requirements. Droplet microfluidics have shown exceptional promise for synthetic biology experiments, including DNA assembly, transformation/transfection, culturing, cell sorting, phenotypic assays, artificial cells and genetic circuits.

  8. Integrated Microfluidic Variable Optical Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-28

    indices , the optical output power is gradually attenuated. We obtain a maximum attenuation of 28 dB when the fluid refractive index changes from 1.557 to...Electron. 23, pp. 1348-1354 (2005). 14. J. M. Ruano, V. Benoit, J. S. Aitchison , and J. M. Cooper, “Flame hydrolysis deposition of glass on silicon for...different refractive indices flowing in a microfluidic channel as the cladding for a segment of straight optical waveguide. Recently, the integration of

  9. Dielectric Elastomer Actuators for Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Maffli, Luc; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of microfluidics is to bring a whole laboratory processing chain on a few square centimeters, Lab-On-Chips (LOC). But current LOCs require many heavy and power-consuming off-chip controls like pneumatics, pumps and valves, which keep the small chip bound to the lab. Miniaturized Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA) are excellent candidates to make LOC truly portable, since they combine electrical actuation, large stroke volumes and high output forces. We report on the use of ...

  10. Multidimensional bioseparation with modular microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirica, Gabriela S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2013-08-27

    A multidimensional chemical separation and analysis system is described including a prototyping platform and modular microfluidic components capable of rapid and convenient assembly, alteration and disassembly of numerous candidate separation systems. Partial or total computer control of the separation system is possible. Single or multiple alternative processing trains can be tested, optimized and/or run in parallel. Examples related to the separation and analysis of human bodily fluids are given.

  11. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwee Teck Lim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate blood into its individual components has innumerable applications in both clinical diagnosis and biological research. Yet, processing blood is not trivial. In the past decade, a flurry of new microfluidic based technologies has emerged to address this compelling problem. Microfluidics is an attractive solution for this application leveraging its numerous advantages to process clinical blood samples. This paper reviews the various microfluidic approaches realized to successfully fractionate one or more blood components. Techniques to separate plasma from hematologic cellular components as well as isolating blood cells of interest including certain rare cells are discussed. Comparisons based on common separation metrics including efficiency (sensitivity, purity (selectivity, and throughput will be presented. Finally, we will provide insights into the challenges associated with blood-based separation systems towards realizing true point-of-care (POC devices and provide future perspectives.

  12. Bubbles and foams in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerre, Axel; Miralles, Vincent; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2014-09-28

    Microfluidics offers great tools to produce highly-controlled dispersions of gas into liquid, from isolated bubbles to organized microfoams. Potential technological applications are manifold, from novel materials to scaffolds for tissue engineering or enhanced oil recovery. More fundamentally, microfluidics makes it possible to investigate the physics of complex systems such as foams at scales where the capillary forces become dominant, in model experiments involving few well-controlled parameters. In this context, this review does not have the ambition to detail in a comprehensive manner all the techniques and applications involving bubbles and foams in microfluidics. Rather, it focuses on particular consequences of working at the microscale, under confinement, and hopes to provide insight into the physics of such systems. The first part of this work focuses on bubbles, and more precisely on (i) bubble generation, where the confinement can suppress capillary instabilities while inertial effects may play a role, and (ii) bubble dynamics, paying special attention to the lubrication film between bubble and wall and the influence of confinement. The second part addresses the formation and dynamics of microfoams, emphasizing structural differences from macroscopic foams and the influence of the confinement.

  13. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kangning; Dai, Wen; Zhou, Jianhua; Su, Jing; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-05-17

    Although microfluidics has shown exciting potential, its broad applications are significantly limited by drawbacks of the materials used to make them. In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents. Compared with other microfluidic materials [e.g., poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)] the whole-Teflon chip has a few more advantages, such as no absorption of small molecules, little adsorption of biomolecules onto channel walls, and no leaching of residue molecules from the material bulk into the solution in the channel. Various biological cells have been cultured in the whole-Teflon channel. Adherent cells can attach to the channel bottom, spread, and proliferate well in the channels (with similar proliferation rate to the cells in PDMS channels with the same dimensions). The moderately good gas permeability of the Teflon materials makes it suitable to culture cells inside the microchannels for a long time.

  14. Cell Culture Microfluidic Biochips: Experimental Throughput Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips offer a promising alternative to a conventional biochemical laboratory, integrating all necessary functionalities on-chip in order to perform biochemical applications. Researchers have started to propose computer-aided design tools for the synthesis of such biochips. Our foc...... metaheuristic for experimental design generation for the cell culture microfluidic biochips, and we have evaluated our approach using multiple experimental setups....

  15. Microfluidic tools for cell biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Le Berre, Maël; Piel, Matthieu; Tran, Phong T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Microfluidic technology is creating powerful tools for cell biologists to control the complete cellular microenvironment, leading to new questions and new discoveries. We review here the basic concepts and methodologies in designing microfluidic devices, and their diverse cell biological applications. PMID:21152269

  16. A microfluidic method to study demulsification kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of experiments studying droplet coalescence in a dense layer of emulsion droplets using microfluidic circuits. The microfluidic structure allows direct observation of collisions and coalescence events between oil droplets dispersed in water. The coalescence rate of a flowing

  17. Integrating Electronics and Microfluidics on Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Mahiar M; Ainla, Alar; Güder, Firat; Christodouleas, Dionysios C; Fernández-Abedul, M Teresa; Whitesides, George M

    2016-07-01

    Paper microfluidics and printed electronics have developed independently, and are incompatible in many aspects. Monolithic integration of microfluidics and electronics on paper is demonstrated. This integration makes it possible to print 2D and 3D fluidic, electrofluidic, and electrical components on paper, and to fabricate devices using them. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Microfluidic flow driven by electric fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil Augustine, Dileep

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics or lab on chip technology, has developed itself significantly during the past 25 years. Now it has become a robust tool to manipu- late tiny amounts of fluid or gas for various applications. Microfluidics is the process of transporting, mixing, separating small amounts of fluid in

  19. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called "tissue microfluidics" because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets.

  20. Preface book Microfluidics for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes Irene

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the major microfluidics techniques and platforms used for medicine and medical applications, providing the reader with an overview of the recent developments in this field. It is divided in three parts: (1) tissue and organs on-chip, (2) microfluidics for medicine

  1. Applications of Microfluidics in Quantitative Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Gao, Meng; Wen, Lingling; He, Caiyun; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Chenli; Fu, Xiongfei; Huang, Shuqiang

    2017-10-04

    Quantitative biology is dedicated to taking advantage of quantitative reasoning and advanced engineering technologies to make biology more predictable. Microfluidics, as an emerging technique, provides new approaches to precisely control fluidic conditions on small scales and collect data in high-throughput and quantitative manners. In this review, the authors present the relevant applications of microfluidics to quantitative biology based on two major categories (channel-based microfluidics and droplet-based microfluidics), and their typical features. We also envision some other microfluidic techniques that may not be employed in quantitative biology right now, but have great potential in the near future. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  2. Microfluidic desalination techniques and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, S H; van den Berg, A; Odijk, M

    2015-09-07

    In this review we discuss recent developments in the emerging research field of miniaturized desalination. Traditionally desalination is performed to convert salt water into potable water and research is focused on improving performance of large-scale desalination plants. Microfluidic desalination offers several new opportunities in comparison to macro-scale desalination, such as providing a platform to increase fundamental knowledge of ion transport on the nano- and microfluidic scale and new microfluidic sample preparation methods. This approach has also lead to the development of new desalination techniques, based on micro/nanofluidic ion-transport phenomena, which are potential candidates for up-scaling to (portable) drinking water devices. This review assesses microfluidic desalination techniques on their applications and is meant to contribute to further implementation of microfluidic desalination techniques in the lab-on-chip community.

  3. Manipulation of microfluidic droplets by electrorheological fluid

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Menying

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics, especially droplet microfluidics, attracts more and more researchers from diverse fields, because it requires fewer materials and less time, produces less waste and has the potential of highly integrated and computer-controlled reaction processes for chemistry and biology. Electrorheological fluid, especially giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is considered as a kind of smart material, has been applied to the microfluidic systems to achieve active and precise control of fluid by electrical signal. In this review article, we will introduce recent results of microfluidic droplet manipulation, GERF and some pertinent achievements by introducing GERF into microfluidic system: digital generation, manipulation of "smart droplets" and droplet manipulation by GERF. Once it is combined with real-time detection, integrated chip with multiple functions can be realized. © 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  4. Integration of microcolumns and microfluidic fractionators on multitasking centrifugal microfluidic platforms for the analysis of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Elizabeth A; Nicholson, Adrianne D; Jia, Guangyao; Zoval, Jim V; Madou, Marc J; Bachas, Leonidas G; Daunert, Sylvia

    2006-06-01

    This work demonstrates the development of microfluidic compact discs (CDs) for protein purification and fractionation integrating a series of microfluidic features, such as microreservoirs, microchannels, and microfluidic fractionators. The CDs were fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and each device contained multiple identical microfluidic patterns. Each pattern employed a microfluidic fractionation feature with operation that was based on the redirection of fluid into an isolation chamber as a result of an overflow. This feature offers the advantage of automated operation without the need for any external manipulation, which is independent of the size and the charge of the fractionated molecules. The performance of the microfluidic fractionator was evaluated by its integration into a protein purification microfluidic architecture. The microfluidic architecture employed a microchamber that accommodated a monolithic microcolumn, the fractionator, and an isolation chamber, which was also utilized for the optical detection of the purified protein. The monolithic microcolumn was polymerized "in situ" on the CD from a monolith precursor solution by microwave-initiated polymerization. This technique enabled the fast, efficient, and simultaneous polymerization of monoliths on disposable CD microfluidic platforms. The design of the CD employed allows the integration of various processes on a single microfluidic device, including protein purification, fractionation, isolation, and detection.

  5. Microfluidic platforms for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberle, Stefan; Zengerle, Roland

    2007-09-01

    We review microfluidic platforms that enable the miniaturization, integration and automation of biochemical assays. Nowadays nearly an unmanageable variety of alternative approaches exists that can do this in principle. Here we focus on those kinds of platforms only that allow performance of a set of microfluidic functions--defined as microfluidic unit operations-which can be easily combined within a well defined and consistent fabrication technology to implement application specific biochemical assays in an easy, flexible and ideally monolithically way. The microfluidic platforms discussed in the following are capillary test strips, also known as lateral flow assays, the "microfluidic large scale integration" approach, centrifugal microfluidics, the electrokinetic platform, pressure driven droplet based microfluidics, electrowetting based microfluidics, SAW driven microfluidics and, last but not least, "free scalable non-contact dispensing". The microfluidic unit operations discussed within those platforms are fluid transport, metering, mixing, switching, incubation, separation, droplet formation, droplet splitting, nL and pL dispensing, and detection.

  6. Kinetic ELISA in Microfluidic Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Dutta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the kinetic ELISA of Blue Tongue and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease viral antibodies in microfluidic channels by monitoring the rate of generation of the enzyme reaction product under static conditions. It has been shown that this format of the immunoassay allows very reliable quantitation of the target species using inexpensive glass microchips and a standard epifluorescence microscope system coupled to a CCD camera. For the viral antibodies assayed here, the limit of detection (LOD for the analyte concentration in our microchips was established to be 3–5 times lower than that obtained on commercial microwell plates using a fiftieth of the sample volume and less than a third of the incubation time. Our analyses further show that when compared to the end-point ELISA format, the kinetic mode of this assay yields an improvement in the LOD by over an order of magnitude in microfluidic devices. This benefit is primarily realized as the observed variation in the background fluorescence (signal at the start of the enzyme reaction period was significantly larger than that in the rate of signal generation upon repeating these assays in different microchannels/microchips. Because the kinetic ELISA results depend only on the latter quantity, the noise level in them was substantially lower compared to that in its end-point counterpart in which the absolute fluorescence measurements are of greater significance. While a similar benefit was also recorded through implementation of kinetic ELISAs on the microwell platform, the improvement in LOD registered in that system was not as significant as was observed in the case of microfluidic assays.

  7. Microfluidic Approach to Cell Microencapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Varna; Hunckler, Michael; Ramasubramanian, Melur K; Opara, Emmanuel C; Katuri, Kalyan C

    2017-01-01

    Bioartificial pancreas made of insulin-secreting islets cells holds great promise in the treatment of individuals with Type-1 diabetes. Successful islet cell microencapsulation in biopolymers is a key step for providing immunoisolation of transplanted islet cells. Because of the variability in the size and shape of pancreatic islets, one of the main obstacles in their microencapsulation is the inability to consistently control shape, size, and microstructure of the encapsulating biopolymer capsule. In this chapter, we provide a detailed description of a microfluidic approach to islet cell encapsulation in alginate that might address the microencapsulation challenges.

  8. Microfluidics and microscale transport processes

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-01-01

    With an intense focus on micro- and nanotechnology from a fluidic perspective, this book details the research activities in key directions on both the theoretical and experimental fronts. As part of the IIT Kharagpur Research Monograph series, the text discusses topics such as capillary transport in microchannels, fluid friction and heat transfer in microchannels, electrokinetics, and interfacial transport in nanochannels. It also covers nanoparticle transport in colloidal suspensions, bubble generation in microfluidic channels, micro-heat pipe, the lattice Boltzmann method for phase changing

  9. Chemiluminescence detector based on a single planar transparent digital microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangyu; Zhang, Kaidi; Pan, Jian; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Ai-Qun; Fan, Shih-Kang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-07-21

    We report on a compact and portable prototype of chemiluminescence detector based on a single planar single polar transparent electrowetting-on-dielectrics (EWOD) device. The coupling ground model was proposed to build the EWOD device, which could be driven under a single polar voltage. Such a design not only simplified the chip construction and control circuit, but also had the potential for the ball-like droplet to focus the fluorescence and enhance the detection sensitivity. Simulations and experiments both confirmed that the greater the contact angle, the stronger the detected optical signal, and thus the higher the sensitivity. The sensitivity of the prototype detector to H2O2 was 5.45 mV (mmol L(-1))(-1) and the detection limit was 0.01 mmol L(-1) when the contact angle of the EWOD surface was 120°. To further increase the sensitivity and decrease the detection limit, the contact angle of the EWOD device could be increased and the dark current of the photomultiplier decreased. The prototype shows potential applications as highly sensitive, cost effective and portable immuno-detectors, especially as a blood glucose monitor.

  10. Microfluidic Devices: Useful Tools for Bioprocess Intensification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernandes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dawn of the new millennium saw a trend towards the dedicated use of microfluidic devices for process intensification in biotechnology. As the last decade went by, it became evident that this pattern was not a short-lived fad, since the deliverables related to this field of research have been consistently piling-up. The application of process intensification in biotechnology is therefore seemingly catching up with the trend already observed in the chemical engineering area, where the use of microfluidic devices has already been upgraded to production scale. The goal of the present work is therefore to provide an updated overview of the developments centered on the use of microfluidic devices for process intensification in biotechnology. Within such scope, particular focus will be given to different designs, configurations and modes of operation of microreactors, but reference to similar features regarding microfluidic devices in downstream processing will not be overlooked. Engineering considerations and fluid dynamics issues, namely related to the characterization of flow in microchannels, promotion of micromixing and predictive tools, will also be addressed, as well as reflection on the analytics required to take full advantage of the possibilities provided by microfluidic devices in process intensification. Strategies developed to ease the implementation of experimental set-ups anchored in the use of microfluidic devices will be briefly tackled. Finally, realistic considerations on the current advantages and limitation on the use of microfluidic devices for process intensification, as well as prospective near future developments in the field, will be presented.

  11. Microfluidic ion-sensing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R Daniel; Gavalas, Vasilis G; Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas G

    2008-04-14

    Quantitative determinations of ions in a variety of media have been performed traditionally via one of three approaches: optical instrumental methods (e.g., atomic absorption, and inductively-coupled plasma-optical emission or mass spectrometry), "wet" methods, or ion-selective sensors. Each of the approaches, though, possesses limitations including: power/reagent consumption and lack of portability for instrumental techniques; laborious sample-treatment steps for wet methods; and lack of selectivity and sensitivity with sensors when employed with complex samples. Microfluidic device have emerged as a solution to some of these challenges associated with ion analysis. Such systems can integrate multiple sample handling, calibration, and detection steps ("lab-on-a-chip" concept) into a footprint amenable to portability, while requiring small amounts of sample and power. Furthermore, devices can be constructed for multi-analyte detection, either through multiple parallel fluidic architectures or by using arrays of detection elements. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of total-analysis systems for ionic species. Fabrication techniques and various fluid-handling operations are discussed briefly, followed by a number of more mature strategies for microfluidic ion analysis. A variety of approaches expected to comprise the next generation of devices are also presented.

  12. Microfluidic ion-sensing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. Daniel [Department of Chemistry, Murray State University, Murray, KY 42071-3346 (United States)], E-mail: daniel.johnson@murraystate.edu; Gavalas, Vasilis G.; Daunert, Sylvia [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Bachas, Leonidas G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States)], E-mail: bachas@uky.edu

    2008-04-14

    Quantitative determinations of ions in a variety of media have been performed traditionally via one of three approaches: optical instrumental methods (e.g., atomic absorption, and inductively-coupled plasma-optical emission or mass spectrometry), 'wet' methods, or ion-selective sensors. Each of the approaches, though, possesses limitations including: power/reagent consumption and lack of portability for instrumental techniques; laborious sample-treatment steps for wet methods; and lack of selectivity and sensitivity with sensors when employed with complex samples. Microfluidic device have emerged as a solution to some of these challenges associated with ion analysis. Such systems can integrate multiple sample handling, calibration, and detection steps ('lab-on-a-chip' concept) into a footprint amenable to portability, while requiring small amounts of sample and power. Furthermore, devices can be constructed for multi-analyte detection, either through multiple parallel fluidic architectures or by using arrays of detection elements. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of total-analysis systems for ionic species. Fabrication techniques and various fluid-handling operations are discussed briefly, followed by a number of more mature strategies for microfluidic ion analysis. A variety of approaches expected to comprise the next generation of devices are also presented.

  13. Hyperuniform materials made with microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazhgur, Pavel; Ricouvier, Joshua; Pierrat, Romain; Carminati, RéMi; Tabeling, Patrick

    Hyperuniform materials, being disordered systems with suppressed long-scale fluctuations, now attract a significant scientific interest, especially due to their potential applications for disordered photonic materials production. In our project we study a jammed packing of oil droplets in water. The droplets are produced in a PDMS microfluidic chip and directly assembled in a microfluidic channel. By varying the fluid pressures we manage to sharply control the droplet production and thereby govern the structural properties of the obtained material. The pseudo-2D (a monolayer of droplets) and 3D systems are investigated. Our results show that at appropriate experimental conditions droplets self-organize in hyperuniform patterns. Our electromagnetic simulations also show that the obtained material can be transparent while staying optically dense. As far as we know, the proposed material is one of the first examples of experimentally made hyperuniform materials. We hope that our studies will help to establish a new way of disordered photonic materials production. The Microflusa project receives funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Grant Agreement No. 664823.

  14. Frontal photopolymerization for microfluidic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, João T; Hudson, Steven D; Harrison, Christopher; Douglas, Jack F

    2004-11-09

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) offers numerous advantages for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. Quantitative utilization of this method, however, requires a control of the vertical dimensions of the patterned resist material. To address this fundamental problem, we study the ultraviolet (UV) photopolymerization of a series of multifunctional thiolene resists through a combination of experiments and analytical modeling of the polymerization fronts. We describe this nonlinear spatio-temporal growth process in terms of a "minimal" model involving an order parameter phi(x, t) characterizing the extent of monomer-to-polymer conversion, the optical attenuation T(x, t), and the solid front position h(t). The latter exhibits an induction time (or equivalent critical UV dose) characterizing the onset of frontal propagation. We also observe a novel transition between two logarithmic rates of growth, determined by the Beer-Lambert attenuation constants mu(0) and mu(infinity) of the monomer and fully polymerized material, respectively. The measured frontal kinetics and optical transmission of the thiolene resist materials are consistent with our photopolymerization model, exhibiting both "photodarkening" and "photoinvariant" polymerization. This is apparently the first observation of photodarkening reported in FPP. On the basis of these results, multilevel fluidic devices with controlled height are readily fabricated with modulated illumination. A representative two-level microfluidic device, incorporating a chaotic mixer, a T junction, and a series of controlled flow constrictions, illustrates the practical versatility of this fabrication method.

  15. Probing circulating tumor cells in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Stratton, Zackary S; Dao, Ming; Ritz, Jerome; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-02-21

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are important targets for study as we strive to better understand, diagnose, and treat cancers. However, CTCs are found in blood at extremely low concentrations; this makes isolation, enrichment, and characterization of CTCs technically challenging. Recently, the development of CTC separation devices has grown rapidly in both academia and industry. Part of this development effort centered on microfluidic platforms, exploiting the advantages of microfluidics to improve CTC separation performance and device integration. In this Focus article, we highlight some of the recent work in microfluidic CTC separation and detection systems and discuss our appraisal of what the field should do next.

  16. Microfluidic Systems for Pathogen Sensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ertl

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid pathogen sensing remains a pressing issue today since conventional identification methodsare tedious, cost intensive and time consuming, typically requiring from 48 to 72 h. In turn, chip based technologies, such as microarrays and microfluidic biochips, offer real alternatives capable of filling this technological gap. In particular microfluidic biochips make the development of fast, sensitive and portable diagnostic tools possible, thus promising rapid and accurate detection of a variety of pathogens. This paper will provide a broad overview of the novel achievements in the field of pathogen sensing by focusing on methods and devices that compliment microfluidics.

  17. Pulsatile microfluidics as an analytical tool for determining the dynamic characteristics of microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of all fluid dynamic time scales is needed to fully understand and hence exploit the capabilities of fluid flow in microfluidic systems. We propose the use of harmonically oscillating microfluidics as an analytical tool for the deduction of these time scales. Furthermore, we......-filled interconnected elastic microfluidic tubes containing a large, trapped air bubble and driven by a pulsatile pressure difference. We demonstrate good agreement between the system-level model and the experimental results, allowing us to determine the dynamic time scales of the system. However, the generic analysis...... can be applied to all microfluidic systems, both ac and dc....

  18. Microfluidic Analytical Separator for Proteomics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a microfluidic device designed to effect a 2-dimensional resolution of a mixture of proteins based on isoelectric point (pI) and molecular...

  19. A Microfluidics Approach to Investigate Axon Guidance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sohn, Lydia L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this STR project was to demonstrate and explore the capabilities of a novel microfluidic concentration-gradient generator, as it relates to developmental and regenerative neurobiology...

  20. Microfluidic chip based microfiber/nanofiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Tong, Limin

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate three microfluidic chip based microfiber/nanofiber sensors for ultra-sensitive absorption, fluorescence, and femtoliter-scale sensing, respectively. The sensors shown here may open up new opportunities for ultra-sensitive biosensing and single molecule analysis.

  1. Microfluidic Analytical Separator for Proteomics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SHOT proposes an innovative microfluidic device designed to effect a 2-dimensional resolution of a mixture of proteins based on isoelectric point (pI) and molecular...

  2. Microfluidics technology for drug delivery: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancera-Andrade, Elena I; Parsaeimehr, Ali; Arevalo-Gallegos, Alejandra; Ascencio-Favela, Guadalupe; Parra Saldivar, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Microfluidics is undoubtedly an influential technology that is currently revolutionizing the chemical and biological studies by replicating laboratory bench-top technology on a miniature chip-scale device. In the area of drug delivery science, microfluidics offers advantages, such as precise dosage, ideal delivery, target-precise delivery, sustainable and controlled release, multiple dosing, and slight side effects. These advantages bring significant assets to the drug delivery systems. Microfluidic technology has been progressively used for fabrication of drug carriers, direct drug delivery systems, high-throughput screening, and formulation and immobilization of drugs. This review discusses the recent technological progress, outcomes and available opportunities for the usage of microfluidics systems in drug delivery systems.

  3. Microfluidics for sperm analysis and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Reza; Graham, Percival J; Zhang, Biao; Riordon, Jason; Lagunov, Alexander; Hannam, Thomas G; Escobedo, Carlos; Jarvi, Keith; Sinton, David

    2017-12-01

    Infertility is a growing global health issue with far-reaching socioeconomic implications. A downward trend in male fertility highlights the acute need for affordable and accessible diagnosis and treatment. Assisted reproductive technologies are effective in treating male infertility, but their success rate has plateaued at ∼33% per cycle. Many emerging opportunities exist for microfluidics - a mature technology in other biomedical areas - in male infertility diagnosis and treatment, and promising microfluidic approaches are under investigation for addressing male infertility. Microfluidic approaches can improve our fundamental understanding of sperm motion, and developments in microfluidic devices that use microfabrication and sperm behaviour can aid semen analysis and sperm selection. Many burgeoning possibilities exist for engineers, biologists, and clinicians to improve current practices for infertility diagnosis and treatment. The most promising avenues have the potential to improve medical practice, moving innovations from research laboratories to clinics and patients in the near future.

  4. Microfluidics for investigating single-cell biodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, Scott Warren

    2008-01-01

    Progress in synthetic biology requires the development of novel techniques for investigating long-term dynamics in single cells. Here, we demonstrate the utility of microfluidics for investigating single-cell biodynamics within tightly-controlled environments in the model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. First, we develop a microfluidic chemostat for monitoring single-cell gene expression within large populations of S. cerevisiae over many cellular generations. We over...

  5. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Keating, Steven J.; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G.; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S.; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deform...

  6. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S; Benett, W; Bettencourt, K; Chang, J; Fisher, K; Hamilton, J; Krulevitch, P; Park, C; Stockton, C; Tarte, L; Wang, A; Wilson, T

    2001-08-09

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. to support detection instruments, they are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. They are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Many of these fluidic functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure or dielectrophoresis. They are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow through the fluidic circuit.

  7. Microfluidics for single cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant

    Isolation and manipulation of single cells have gained an increasing interest from researchers because of the heterogeneity of cells from the same cell culture. Single cell analysis can ensure a better understanding of differences between individual cells and potentially solve a variety of clinical...... problems. In this thesis lab on a chip systems for rare single cell analysis are investigated. The focus was to develop a commercial, disposable device for circulating tumour cell (CTC) analysis. Such a device must be able to separate rare cells from blood samples and subsequently capture the specific...... cells, and simultaneously be fabricated and operated at low costs and be user-friendly. These challenges were addressed through development of two microfluidic devices, one for rare cell isolation based on pinched flow fractionation (PFF) and one for single cell capture based on hydrodynamic trapping...

  8. Sampling by Fluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tesař

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Selecting one from several available fluid samples is a procedure often performed especially in chemical engineering. It is usually done by an array of valves sequentially opened and closed. Not generally known is an advantageous alternative: fluidic sampling units without moving parts. In the absence of complete pipe closure, cross-contamination between samples cannot be ruled out. This is eliminated by arranging for small protective flows that clear the cavities and remove any contaminated fluid. Although this complicates the overall circuit layout, fluidic sampling units with these "guard" flows were successfully built and tested. Recent interest in microchemistry leads to additional problems due very low operating Reynolds numbers. This necessitated the design of microfluidic sampling units based on new operating principles.

  9. Solution landscapes in nematic microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, M.; Majumdar, A.; Ramos, A. M.; Griffiths, I. M.

    2017-08-01

    We study the static equilibria of a simplified Leslie-Ericksen model for a unidirectional uniaxial nematic flow in a prototype microfluidic channel, as a function of the pressure gradient G and inverse anchoring strength, B. We numerically find multiple static equilibria for admissible pairs (G , B) and classify them according to their winding numbers and stability. The case G = 0 is analytically tractable and we numerically study how the solution landscape is transformed as G increases. We study the one-dimensional dynamical model, the sensitivity of the dynamic solutions to initial conditions and the rate of change of G and B. We provide a physically interesting example of how the time delay between the applications of G and B can determine the selection of the final steady state.

  10. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniesh Muthaiyan Shanmugam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology.

  11. Dynamics of Microvalve Operations in Integrated Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan T. H. Lau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic microvalves are widely used key components for automating liquid manipulation and flow control in microfluidics for more than one decade. Due to their robust operations and the ease of fabrication, tremendous microfluidic systems have been developed with the multiple microvalves for higher throughput and extended functionalities. Therefore, operation performance of the microvalves in the integrated microfluidic devices is crucial to the related applications, in fields such as micro-flows, cell analyses, drug discovery, and physical/chemical detections. It has been reported that operation performance of the microvalves are highly sensitive to the device configuration and pressurization scheme. This implies the further development of integrated microfluidics with a larger number of the valves may suffer the problems of undetermined microvalve behaviors during operations, which can become an unavoidable hurdle in the device design and optimization processes. Herein, we characterize responses of the individual microvalves for different operation configurations, e.g., membrane thicknesses and driving pressures. We investigate also the effects in microfluidics integrated with the more valves, through experiments, modeling and simulations. We show that dynamics of the microvalves is indeed influenced by the configurations, levels of design complexity and positions in the devices. Overall, taken dynamics of the microvalve responses into considerations, this work provides insights and guidelines for better designs of integrated microfluidics for the future applications requiring higher throughput and improved operation performance.

  12. Acoustic Microfluidics for Bioanalytical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Gabriel

    2013-03-01

    This talk will present new methods the use of ultrasonic standing waves in microfluidic systems to manipulate microparticles for the purpose of bioassays and bioseparations. We have recently developed multi-node acoustic focusing flow cells that can position particles into many parallel flow streams and have demonstrated the potential of such flow cells in the development of high throughput, parallel flow cytometers. These experiments show the potential for the creation of high throughput flow cytometers in applications requiring high flow rates and rapid detection of rare cells. This talk will also present the development of elastomeric capture microparticles and their use in acoustophoretic separations. We have developed simple methods to form elastomeric particles that are surface functionalized with biomolecular recognition reagents. These compressible particles exhibit negative acoustic contrast in ultrasound when suspended in aqueous media, blood serum or diluted blood. These particles can be continuously separated from cells by flowing them through a microfluidic device that uses an ultrasonic standing wave to align the blood cells, which exhibit positive acoustic contrast, at a node in the acoustic pressure distribution while aligning the negative acoustic contrast elastomeric particles at the antinodes. Laminar flow of the separated particles to downstream collection ports allows for collection of the separated negative contrast particles and cells. Separated elastomeric particles were analyzed via flow cytometry to demonstrate nanomolar detection for prostate specific antigen in aqueous buffer and picomolar detection for IgG in plasma and diluted blood samples. This approach has potential applications in the development of rapid assays that detect the presence of low concentrations of biomarkers (including biomolecules and cells) in a number of biological sample types. We acknowledge support through the NSF Research Triangle MRSEC.

  13. Digitial Elevation Model (DEM) 100K

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is the terminology adopted by the USG to describe terrain elevation data sets in a digital raster form. The standard DEM consists of a...

  14. Compartmentalized 3D Tissue Culture Arrays under Controlled Microfluidic Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gümüscü, B.; Albers, Hugo J.; Van Den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Van Der Meer, Andries D.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate an in vitro microfluidic cell culture platform that consists of periodic 3D hydrogel compartments with controllable shapes. The microchip is composed of approximately 500 discontinuous collagen gel compartments locally patterned in between PDMS pillars, separated by microfluidic

  15. Field-free particle focusing in microfluidic plugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurup, G. K; Basu, Amar S

    2012-01-01

    Particle concentration is a key unit operation in biochemical assays. Although there are many techniques for particle concentration in continuous-phase microfluidics, relatively few are available in multiphase (plug-based) microfluidic...

  16. Unilamellar Vesicle Formation and Encapsulation by Microfluidic Jetting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeanne C. Stachowiak; David L. Richmond; Thomas H. Li; Allen P. Liu; Sapun H. Parekh; Daniel A. Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    ...) using a pulsed microfluidic jet. Akin to blowing a bubble, the microfluidic jet deforms a planar lipid bilayer into a vesicle that is filled with solution from the jet and separates from the planar bilayer...

  17. An easy-to-use microfluidic interconnection system to create quick and reversibly interfaced simple microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Dimaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The presented microfluidic interconnection system provides an alternative for the individual interfacing of simple microfluidic devices fabricated in polymers such as polymethylmethacrylate, polycarbonate and cyclic olefin polymer. A modification of the device inlet enables the direct attachment...

  18. Isolation of cancer cells by "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vitis, Stefania; Matarise, Giuseppina; Pardeo, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a microfluidic immunosensor for the immobilization of cancer cells and their separation from healthy cells by using "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols. These protocols allow to link antibodies on microfluidic device surfaces and can be...

  19. Controlling two-phase flow in microfluidic systems using electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Electrowetting (EW)-based digital microfluidic systems (DMF) and droplet-based two-phase flow microfluidic systems (TPF) with closed channels are the most widely used microfluidic platforms. In general, these two approaches have been considered independently. However, integrating the two

  20. New microfluidic platform for life sciences in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hugo, S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available : Components of the lab-on-a disc platform: microfluidic device and control and testing system Microfluidic device The microfluidic discs are made from polycarbonate and pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) layers. The channels and chambers of the device...

  1. Mapping of enzyme kinetics on a microfluidic device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rho, Hoon Suk; Hanke, Alexander Thomas; Ottens, Marcel; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic platform or “microfluidic mapper” is demonstrated, which in a single experiment performs 36 parallel biochemical reactions with 36 different combinations of two reagents in stepwise concentration gradients. The volume used in each individual reaction was 36 nl. With the microfluidic

  2. Valve Concepts for Microfluidic Cell Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grabowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present various pneumatically actuated microfluidic valves to enable user-defined fluid management within a microfluidic chip. To identify a feasible valve design, certain valve concepts are simulated in ANSYS to investigate the pressure dependent opening and closing characteristics of each design. The results are verified in a series of tests. Both the microfluidic layer and the pneumatic layer are realized by means of soft-lithographic techniques. In this way, a network of channels is fabricated in photoresist as a molding master. By casting these masters with PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane we get polymeric replicas containing the channel network. After a plasma-enhanced bonding process, the two layers are irreversibly bonded to each other. The bonding is tight for pressures up to 2 bar. The valves are integrated into a microfluidic cell handling system that is designed to manipulate cells in the presence of a liquid reagent (e.g. PEG – polyethylene glycol, for cell fusion. For this purpose a user-defined fluid management system is developed. The first test series with human cell lines show that the microfluidic chip is suitable for accumulating cells within a reaction chamber, where they can be flushed by a liquid medium.

  3. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-09-09

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  4. Material Biocompatibility for PCR Microfluidic Chips

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2010-04-23

    As part of the current miniaturization trend, biological reactions and processes are being adapted to microfluidics devices. PCR is the primary method employed in DNA amplification, its miniaturization is central to efforts to develop portable devices for diagnostics and testing purposes. A problem is the PCR-inhibitory effect due to interaction between PCR reagents and the surrounding environment, which effect is increased in high-surface-are-to-volume ration microfluidics. In this study, we evaluated the biocompatibility of various common materials employed in the fabrication of microfluidic chips, including silicon, several kinds of silicon oxide, glasses, plastics, wax, and adhesives. Two-temperature PCR was performed with these materials to determine their PCR-inhibitory effect. In most of the cases, addition of bovine serum albumin effectively improved the reaction yield. We also studied the individual PCR components from the standpoint of adsorption. Most of the materials did not inhibit the DNA, whereas they did show noticeable interaction with the DNA polymerase. Our test, instead of using microfluidic devices, can be easily conducted in common PCR tubes using a standard bench thermocycler. Our data supports an overview of the means by which the materials most bio-friendly to microfluidics can be selected.

  5. Electrowetting dynamics of microfluidic actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K-L; Jones, T B

    2005-04-26

    When voltage is suddenly applied to vertical, parallel dielectric-coated electrodes dipped into a liquid with finite conductivity, the liquid responds by rising up to reach a new hydrostatic equilibrium height. On the microfluidic scale, the dominating mechanism impeding this electromechanically induced actuation appears to be a dynamic friction force that is directly proportional to the velocity of the contact line moving along the solid surface. This mechanism has its origin in the molecular dynamics of the liquid coming into contact with the solid surface. A simple reduced-order model for the rising column of liquid is used to quantify the magnitude of this frictional effect by providing estimates for the contact line friction coefficient. Above some critical threshold of voltage, the electromechanical force is clamped, presumably by the same mechanism responsible for contact angle saturation and previously reported static height-of-rise limits. The important distinction for the dynamic case is that the onset of the saturation effect is delayed in time until the column has risen more than about halfway to its static equilibrium height.

  6. Compact dynamic microfluidic iris array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmle, Christina; Doering, Christoph; Steuer, Anna; Fouckhardt, Henning

    2011-09-01

    A dynamic microfluidic iris is realized. Light attenuation is achieved by absorption of an opaque liquid (e.g. black ink). The adjustment of the iris diameter is achieved by fluid displacement via a transparent elastomer (silicone) half-sphere. This silicone calotte is hydraulically pressed against a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate as the bottom window, such that the opaque liquid is squeezed away, this way opening the iris. With this approach a dynamic range of more than 60 dB can be achieved with response times in the ms to s regime. The design allows the realization of a single iris as well as an iris array. So far the master for the molded silicone structure was fabricated by precision mechanics. The aperture diameter was changed continuously from 0 to 8 mm for a single iris and 0 to 4 mm in case of a 3 x 3 iris array. Moreover, an iris array was combined with a PMMA lens array into a compact module, the distance of both arrays equaling the focal length of the lenses. This way e.g. spatial frequency filter arrays can be realized. The possibility to extend the iris array concept to an array with many elements is demonstrated. Such arrays could be applied e.g. in light-field cameras.

  7. Fabrication of microfluidic integrated biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Tijjani; Dhahi, Th S.; Mohammed, Mohammed; Hashim, U.; Noriman, N. Z.; Dahham, Omar S.

    2017-09-01

    An event of miniaturizing for sensor systems to carry out biological diagnostics are gaining wade spread acceptance. The system may contain several different sensor units for the detection of specific analyte, the analyte to be detected might be any kind of biological molecules (DNA, mRNA or proteins) or chemical substances. In most cases, the detection is based on receptor-ligand binding like DNA hybridization or antibody-antigen interaction, achieving this on a nanostructure. DNA or protein must be attached to certain locations within the structure. Critical for this is to have a robust binding chemistry to the surface in the microstructure. Here we successfully designed and fabricated microfluidics element for passive fluid delivery into polysilicon Nanowire sensing domain, we further demonstrated a very simple and effective way of integrating the two devices to give full functionalities of laboratory on a single chip. The sensing element was successfully surface modified and tested on real biomedical clinical sample for evaluation and validation.

  8. Droplet Microfluidics for Virus Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Assaf; Cockrell, Shelley; Guo, Mira; Pipas, James; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    The ability to detect, isolate, and characterize an infectious agent is important for diagnosing and curing infectious diseases. Detecting new viral diseases is a challenge because the number of virus particles is often low and/or localized to a small subset of cells. Even if a new virus is detected, it is difficult to isolate it from clinical or environmental samples where multiple viruses are present each with very different properties. Isolation is crucial for whole genome sequencing because reconstructing a genome from fragments of many different genomes is practically impossible. We present a Droplet Microfluidics platform that can detect, isolate and sequence single viral genomes from complex samples containing mixtures of many viruses. We use metagenomic information about the sample of mixed viruses to select a short genomic sequence whose genome we are interested in characterizing. We then encapsulate single virions from the same sample in picoliter volume droplets and screen for successful PCR amplification of the sequence of interest. The selected drops are pooled and their contents sequenced to reconstruct the genome of interest. This method provides a general tool for detecting, isolating and sequencing genetic elements in clinical and environmental samples.

  9. Particle Image Velocimetry for Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhart, Carl; Chiu, Richard; Santiago, Juan

    1997-11-01

    A micro PIV system is being developed to measure velocity vectors with spatial resolutions of the order of several microns. Advancements in microfabrication technologies have facilitated the development of many new microfluidic devices. These devices present new and challenging fluid problems at the micro-scale, which are not present at the macro-scale. In general, analysis of fluid problems at the micron-scale have often been limited to measuring only bulk properties of the flow field. Lanzillotto et al. (1996) have used x-ray tomography to obtain whole-field velocity measurements in 500 - 1000 micron diameter tubes. They report velocity-vector spacings of roughly 40 microns. The current research is an attempt to extend the super-resolution PIV technique of Keane et al. (1995), to address fluid mechanics problems in microfabricated devices. Here, 50 - 200 nm diameter particles are imaged using an epi-fluorescent microscope and a scientific-grade CCD camera. Particles are illuminated by a continuously emitting Mercury arc lamp or by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The spatial resolution of optical techniques are fundamentally limited by the diffraction of light. We will discuss the ultimate spatial and temporal resolution limits of PIV for micro-flows, and report recent experimental.

  10. Microfluidics of soft granular gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Ryan; Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas E.

    Microfluidic methods for encapsulating cells and particles typically involve drop making with two immiscible fluids. The main materials constraint in this approach is surface tension, creating inherent instability between the two fluids. We can eliminate this instability by using miscible inner and outer phases. This is achieved by using granular micro gels which are chemically miscible but physically do not mix. These microgels are yield stress materials, so they flow as solid plugs far from shear gradients, and fluidize where gradients are generated - near an injection nozzle for example. We have found that tuning the yield stress of the material by varying polymer concentration, device performance can be controlled. The solid like behavior of the gel allows us to produces infinitely stable jets that maintain their integrity and configuration over long distances and times. These properties can be combined and manipulated to produce discrete particulate bunches of an inner phase, flowing inside of an outer phase, well enough even to print a Morse code message suspended within flow chambers about a millimeter in diameter moving at millimeters a second.

  11. Microfluidic Pumps Containing Teflon [Trademark] AF Diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Peter; White, Victor; Grunthaner, Frank; Ikeda, Mike; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic pumps and valves based on pneumatically actuated diaphragms made of Teflon AF polymers are being developed for incorporation into laboratory-on-a-chip devices that must perform well over temperature ranges wider than those of prior diaphragm-based microfluidic pumps and valves. Other potential applications include implanted biomedical microfluidic devices, wherein the biocompatability of Teflon AF polymers would be highly advantageous. These pumps and valves have been demonstrated to function stably after cycling through temperatures from -125 to 120 C. These pumps and valves are intended to be successors to similar prior pumps and valves containing diaphragms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [commonly known as silicone rubber]. The PDMS-containing valves ae designed to function stably only within the temperature range from 5 to 80 C. Undesirably, PDMS membranes are somwehat porous and retain water. PDMS is especially unsuitable for use at temperatures below 0 C because the formation of ice crystals increases porosity and introduces microshear.

  12. Design and Testing of Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yang

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive methodology for automated design, test and diagnosis, and use of robust, low-cost, and manufacturable digital microfluidic systems. It focuses on the development of a comprehensive CAD optimization framework for digital microfluidic biochips that unifies different design problems. With the increase in system complexity and integration levels, biochip designers can utilize the design methods described in this book to evaluate different design alternatives, and carry out design-space exploration to obtain the best design point. Describes practical design automation tools that address different design problems (e.g., synthesis, droplet routing, control-pin mapping, testing and diagnosis, and error recovery) in a unified manner; Applies test pattern generation and error-recovery techniques for digital microfluidics-based biochips; Uses real bioassays as evaluation examples, e.g., multiplexed in vitro human physiological fluids diagnostics, PCR, protein crystallization.  

  13. Bridging Flows: Microfluidic End‐User Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David

    . A second practical challenge users face stems from the peripheral equipment, e.g. pumps, required to drive microfluidic devices. This equipment is often costly and bulky and results in limitations and restrictions on microfluidic device operation, such as the number of channels or devices which can...... be actuated or microscopic observation. To address the above issues interconnection and pumping solutions were developed. Methods for creating multiple, aligned, parallel and planar interconnections well suited to microscopy are described. Both reusable, non‐integrated, and permanent, integrated...... interconnection solutions are presented. The construction of twelve and eight channel miniaturized, mechanically actuated peristaltic pumps is also described. The small footprint of the pumps allows their placement adjacent to microfluidic devices and on microscope stages. The reusable, non...

  14. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  15. 3D-printed microfluidic automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Anthony K; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F; Chang, Tim C; Folch, Albert

    2015-04-21

    Microfluidic automation - the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels - generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology's use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer.

  16. Temperature Sensing in Modular Microfluidic Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisna C. Bhargava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discrete microfluidic element with integrated thermal sensor was fabricated and demonstrated as an effective probe for process monitoring and prototyping. Elements were constructed using stereolithography and market-available glass-bodied thermistors within the modular, standardized framework of previous discrete microfluidic elements demonstrated in the literature. Flow rate-dependent response due to sensor self-heating and microchannel heating and cooling was characterized and shown to be linear in typical laboratory conditions. An acid-base neutralization reaction was performed in a continuous flow setting to demonstrate applicability in process management: the ratio of solution flow rates was varied to locate the equivalence point in a titration, closely matching expected results. This element potentially enables complex, three-dimensional microfluidic architectures with real-time temperature feedback and flow rate sensing, without application specificity or restriction to planar channel routing formats.

  17. Recent Advancements towards Full-Systems Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Miled

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics is quickly becoming a key technology in an expanding range of fields, such as medical sciences, biosensing, bioactuation, chemical synthesis, and more. This is helping its transformation from a promising R&D tool to commercially viable technology. Fuelling this expansion is the intensified focus on automation and enhanced functionality through integration of complex electrical control, mechanical properties, in situ sensing and flow control. Here we highlight recent contributions to the Sensors Special Issue series called “Microfluidics-Based Microsystem Integration Research” under the following categories: (i Device fabrication to support complex functionality; (ii New methods for flow control and mixing; (iii Towards routine analysis and point of care applications; (iv In situ characterization; and (v Plug and play microfluidics.

  18. A self-triggered picoinjector in microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based microfluidics has recently emerged as a potential platform for studies of single-cell, directed evolution, and genetic sequencing. In droplet-based microfluidics, adding reagents into drops is one of the most important functions. In this paper, we develop a new self-triggered picoinjector to add controlled volumes of reagent into droplets at kilohertz rates. In the picoinjector, the reagent injecting is triggered by the coming droplet itself, without needing a droplet detection module. Meanwhile, the dosing volume can be precisely controlled. These features make the system more practical and reliable. We expect the new picoinjector will find important applications of droplet-based microfluidics in automated biological assay, directed evolution, enzyme assay, and so on.

  19. A self-triggered picoinjector in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiming; Liu, Songsheng; Jia, Chunping; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhou, Hongbo

    2016-12-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has recently emerged as a potential platform for studies of single-cell, directed evolution, and genetic sequencing. In droplet-based microfluidics, adding reagents into drops is one of the most important functions. In this paper, we develop a new self-triggered picoinjector to add controlled volumes of reagent into droplets at kilohertz rates. In the picoinjector, the reagent injecting is triggered by the coming droplet itself, without needing a droplet detection module. Meanwhile, the dosing volume can be precisely controlled. These features make the system more practical and reliable. We expect the new picoinjector will find important applications of droplet-based microfluidics in automated biological assay, directed evolution, enzyme assay, and so on.

  20. Recent Advancements towards Full-System Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miled, Amine; Greener, Jesse

    2017-07-25

    Microfluidics is quickly becoming a key technology in an expanding range of fields, such as medical sciences, biosensing, bioactuation, chemical synthesis, and more. This is helping its transformation from a promising R&D tool to commercially viable technology. Fuelling this expansion is the intensified focus on automation and enhanced functionality through integration of complex electrical control, mechanical properties, in situ sensing and flow control. Here we highlight recent contributions to the Sensors Special Issue series called "Microfluidics-Based Microsystem Integration Research" under the following categories: (i) Device fabrication to support complex functionality; (ii) New methods for flow control and mixing; (iii) Towards routine analysis and point of care applications; (iv) In situ characterization; and (v) Plug and play microfluidics.

  1. Preparation of nanoparticles by continuous-flow microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahn, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.jahn@nist.gov; Reiner, Joseph E.; Vreeland, Wyatt N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); DeVoe, Don L. [University of Maryland (United States); Locascio, Laurie E.; Gaitan, Michael [National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)

    2008-08-15

    We review a variety of micro- and nanoparticle formulations produced with microfluidic methods. A diverse variety of approaches to generate microscale and nanoscale particles has been reported. Here we emphasize the use of microfluidics, specifically microfluidic systems that operate in a continuous flow mode, thereby allowing continuous generation of desired particle formulations. The generation of semiconductor quantum dots, metal colloids, emulsions, and liposomes is considered. To emphasize the potential benefits of the continuous-flow microfluidic methodology for nanoparticle generation, preliminary data on the size distribution of liposomes formed using the microfluidic approach is compared to the traditional bulk alcohol injection method.

  2. Integrated Microfluidic Sensor System with Magnetostrictive Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Cai

    2011-12-08

    The present embodiments describe a method that integrates a magnetostrictive sensor with driving and detecting elements into a microfluidic chip to detect a chemical, biochemical or biomedical species. These embodiments may also measure the properties of a fluid such as viscosity, pH values. The whole system can be referred to lab-on-a-chip (LOC) or micro-total-analysis-systems (.mu.TAS). In particular, this present embodiments include three units, including a microfluidics unit, a magnetostrictive sensor, and driving/detecting elements. An analyzer may also be provided to analyze an electrical signal associated with a feature of a target specimen.

  3. Recent Advances in Applications of Droplet Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lung Chou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based microfluidics is a colloidal and interfacial system that has rapidly progressed in the past decade because of the advantages of low fabrication costs, small sample volumes, reduced analysis durations, high-throughput analysis with exceptional sensitivity, enhanced operational flexibility, and facile automation. This technology has emerged as a new tool for many recently used applications in molecular detection, imaging, drug delivery, diagnostics, cell biology and other fields. Herein, we review recent applications of droplet microfluidics proposed since 2013.

  4. Diffusion dynamics in microfluidic dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the bleaching dynamics that occur in opto-fluidic dye lasers, where the liquid laser dye in a channel is locally bleached due to optical pumping. Our studies suggest that for micro-fluidic devices, the dye bleaching may be compensated through diffusion of dye molecules alone....... By relying on diffusion rather than convection to generate the necessary dye replenishment, our observation potentially allows for a significant simplification of opto-fluidic dye laser device layouts, omitting the need for cumbersome and costly external fluidic handling or on-chip micro-fluidic pumping...

  5. From Single Microparticles to Microfluidic Emulsification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinoshita, K.; Ortiz, Elisa Parra; Hussein, Abdirazak

    2016-01-01

    The micropipette manipulation technique is capable of making fundamental single particle measurements and analyses. This information is critical for establishing processing parameters in systems such as microfluidics and homogenization. To demonstrate what can be achieved at the single particle......) micelles was directly visualized microscopically for the first time by the micropipette technique, showing that such micellization could increase the solubility of Ibp from 4 to 80 mM at 100 mM SDS. We also introduce a particular microfluidic device that has recently been used to make PLGA microspheres...

  6. Microfluidic Apps for off-the-shelf instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Daniel; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland

    2012-07-21

    Within the last decade a huge increase in research activity in microfluidics could be observed. However, despite several commercial success stories, microfluidic chips are still not sold in high numbers in mass markets so far. Here we promote a new concept that could be an alternative approach to commercialization: designing microfluidic chips for existing off-the-shelf instruments. Such "Microfluidic Apps" could significantly lower market entry barriers and provide many advantages: developers of microfluidic chips make use of existing equipment or platforms and do not have to develop instruments from scratch; end-users can profit from microfluidics without the need to invest in new equipment; instrument manufacturers benefit from an expanded customer base due to the new applications that can be implemented in their instruments. Microfluidic Apps could be considered as low-cost disposables which can easily be distributed globally via web-shops. Therefore they could be a door-opener for high-volume mass markets.

  7. Incubated protein reduction and digestion on an electrowetting-on-dielectric digital microfluidic chip for MALDI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Wyatt C; Peng, Ivory; Lee, Geun-An; Loo, Joseph A; Garrell, Robin L; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2010-12-01

    Localized heating of droplets on an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) chip has been implemented and shown to accelerate trypsin digestion reaction rates, sample drying, and matrix crystallization for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Achieving this involved extending the functionality of previous EWOD droplet-based techniques by developing a multifunctional electrode with closed-loop temperature control, while minimizing overall system complexity and addressing challenges associated with rapid evaporation. For the EWOD chip design, we discuss the performance of multifunctional surface electrodes for actuation, localized Joule heating, and thermistic temperature sensing. Furthermore, a hydrophilic pattern is formed in the multifunctional electrode to control the location of an evaporating droplet on the electrode. To demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of this technique, we performed three experiments and measured the results using MALDI-MS: (i) insulin disulfide reductions in dithiothreitol (DTT) over a range of heater temperatures (22-70 °C) to show how reaction rates can be affected by thermal control, (ii) insulin disulfide reductions at 130 °C in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to demonstrate a reaction in a high boiling point solvent, and (iii) tryptic digestions of cytochrome c at 22 and 40 °C to show that heated droplets can yield reasonably higher peptide sequence coverage than unheated droplets. Although they do not decouple the effects of changing temperatures and concentrations, these experiments verified that thermal cycling by EWOD electrodes accelerates reaction rates in liquid droplets in air.

  8. Rapid, low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic devices for effective implementation of various microfluidic operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hugo, S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available particularly attractive solution for implementing microfluidic operations, as pumps, valves and other fluidic operations can be achieved primarily using centrifugal forces, with only a small motor required to power the system. Numerous devices can...

  9. Microfluidics' great promise for Biology - Microfluidics as a new engine for the molecular sciences

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2010-06-04

    History of the Life Sciences Origins of life Discoveries and instrumentation The power of genetic variation Diagnostics based on DNA/ protein variation Genomic scanning providers DNA sequencing companies Microfluidics story Commercial products available P

  10. Development & Characterization of Multifunctional Microfluidic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Ahmet Burak

    The field of microfluidics has been mostly investigated for miniaturized lab on a chip devices for analytical and clinical applications. However, there is an emerging class of "smart" microfluidic materials, combining microfluidics with soft polymers to yield new functionalities. The best inspiration for such materials found in nature is skin, whose functions are maintained and controlled by a vascular "microfluidic" network. We report here the development and characterization of a few new classes of microfluidic materials. First, we introduced microfluidic materials that can change their stiffness on demand. These materials were based on an engineered microchannel network embedded into a matrix of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), whose channels were filled with a liquid photoresist (SU- 8). The elastomer filled with the photoresist was initially soft. The materials were shaped into a desired geometry and then exposed to UV-light. Once photocured, the material preserved the defined shape and it could be bent, twisted or stretched with a very high recoverable strain. As soon as the external force was removed the material returned back to its predefined shape. Thus, the polymerized SU-8 acted as the 'endoskeleton' of the microfluidic network, which drastically increased the composite's elastic and bending moduli. Second, we demonstrated a class of simple and versatile soft microfluidic materials that can be turned optically transparent or colored on demand. These materials were made in the form of flexible sheets containing a microchannel network embedded in PDMS, similar to the photocurable materials. However, this time the channels were filled with a glycerolwater mixture, whose refractive index was matched with that of the PDMS matrix. By pumping such dye solutions into the channel network and consecutively replacing the medium, we showed that we can control the material's color and light transmittance in the visible and near-infrared regions, which can be used for

  11. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Chen; Chengcheng Xue; Yang Zhao; Deyong Chen; Min-Hsien Wu; Junbo Wang

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance ...

  12. Microfluidic desalination techniques and their potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Susan Helena; van den Berg, Albert; Odijk, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss recent developments in the emerging research field of miniaturized desalination. Traditionally desalination is performed to convert salt water into potable water and research is focused on improving performance of large-scale desalination plants. Microfluidic desalination

  13. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  14. Porous Microfluidic Devices - Fabrication adn Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; Geerken, M.J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The major part of microfluidic devices nowadays consists of a dense material that defines the fluidic structure. A generic fabrication method enabling the production of completely porous micro devices with user-defined channel networks is developed. The channel walls can be used as a (selective)

  15. Integrated microfluidic biochips for DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Robin Hui; Dill, Kilian; Fuji, H Sho; McShea, Andy

    2006-03-01

    A fully integrated and self-contained microfluidic biochip device has been developed to automate the fluidic handling steps required to perform a gene expression study of the human leukemia cell line (K-562). The device consists of a DNA microarray semiconductor chip with 12,000 features and a microfluidic cartridge that consists of microfluidic pumps, mixers, valves, fluid channels and reagent storage chambers. Microarray hybridization and subsequent fluidic handling and reactions (including a number of washing and labeling steps) were performed in this fully automated and miniature device before fluorescent image scanning of the microarray chip. Electrochemical micropumps were integrated in the cartridge to provide pumping of liquid solutions. A micromixing technique based on gas bubbling generated by electrochemical micropumps was developed. Low-cost check valves were implemented in the cartridge to prevent cross-talk of the stored reagents. A single-color transcriptional analysis of K-562 cells with a series of calibration controls (spiked-in controls) was performed to characterize this new platform with regard to sensitivity, specificity and dynamic range. The device detected sample RNAs with a concentration as low as 0.375 pM. Detection was quantitative over more than 3 orders of magnitude. Experiments also demonstrated that chip-to-chip variability was low, indicating that the integrated microfluidic devices eliminate manual fluidic handling steps that can be a significant source of variability in genomic analysis.

  16. Inventions Utilizing Microfluidics and Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, David W.; Gong, Tieying; Oakey, John; Terray, Alexander V.; Wu, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Several related inventions pertain to families of devices that utilize microfluidics and/or colloidal particles to obtain useful physical effects. The families of devices can be summarized as follows: (1) Microfluidic pumps and/or valves wherein colloidal-size particles driven by electrical, magnetic, or optical fields serve as the principal moving parts that propel and/or direct the affected flows. (2) Devices that are similar to the aforementioned pumps and/or valves except that they are used to manipulate light instead of fluids. The colloidal particles in these devices are substantially constrained to move in a plane and are driven to spatially order them into arrays that function, variously, as waveguides, filters, or switches for optical signals. (3) Devices wherein the ultra-laminar nature of microfluidic flows is exploited to effect separation, sorting, or filtering of colloidal particles or biological cells in suspension. (4) Devices wherein a combination of confinement and applied electrical and/or optical fields forces the colloidal particles to become arranged into three-dimensional crystal lattices. Control of the colloidal crystalline structures could be exploited to control diffraction of light. (5) Microfluidic devices, incorporating fluid waveguides, wherein switching of flows among different paths would be accompanied by switching of optical signals.

  17. Microfluidic manipulation with artificial/bioinspired cilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Onck, Patrick R.

    A recent development, inspired by nature, is the use of 'artificial cilia' to create pumping and/or mixing in microfluidic devices. Cilia are small hairs that can be found in biology and are used for (fluid) actuation and sensing. Microscopic actuators resembling cilia, actuated to move under the

  18. Microfluidics with ultrasound-driven bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmottant, P.; Marmottant, P.G.M.; Raven, J.P.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Bomer, Johan G.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Hilgenfeldt, S.

    2006-01-01

    Microstreaming from oscillating bubbles is known to induce vigorous vortex flow. Here we show how to harness the power of bubble streaming in an experiment to achieve directed transport flow of high velocity, allowing design and manufacture of microfluidic MEMS devices. By combining oscillating

  19. Review of Recent Metamaterial Microfluidic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Ahmed; Lim, Sungjoon

    2018-01-15

    Metamaterial elements/arrays exhibit a sensitive response to fluids yet with a small footprint, therefore, they have been an attractive choice to realize various sensing devices when integrated with microfluidic technology. Micro-channels made from inexpensive biocompatible materials avoid any contamination from environment and require only microliter-nanoliter sample for sensing. Simple design, easy fabrication process, light weight prototype, and instant measurements are advantages as compared to conventional (optical, electrochemical and biological) sensing systems. Inkjet-printed flexible sensors find their utilization in rapidly growing wearable electronics and health-monitoring flexible devices. Adequate sensitivity and repeatability of these low profile microfluidic sensors make them a potential candidate for point-of-care testing which novice patients can use reliably. Aside from degraded sensitivity and lack of selectivity in all practical microwave chemical sensors, they require an instrument, such as vector network analyzer for measurements and not readily available as a self-sustained portable sensor. This review article presents state-of-the-art metamaterial inspired microfluidic bio/chemical sensors (passive devices ranging from gigahertz to terahertz range) with an emphasis on metamaterial sensing circuit and microfluidic detection. We also highlight challenges and strategies to cope these issues which set future directions.

  20. Droplet Manipulations in Two Phase Flow Microfluidics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pit, Arjen; Duits, Michael H.G.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2015-01-01

    Even though droplet microfluidics has been developed since the early 1980s, the number of applications that have resulted in commercial products is still relatively small. This is partly due to an ongoing maturation and integration of existing methods, but possibly also because of the emergence of

  1. Biodegradable Microfluidic Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    bonding multiple microfluidic layers. Introduction Overcoming the problems of nutrient transport is critical in the design of tissue engineering...an intrinsic vascular network within these scaffolds. More specifically, the application of microfabrication and BioMEMS technology has been focused

  2. A Centrifugal Microfluidic Platform Using SLM Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Sune Zoëga; Burger, Robert; Emnéus, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a pump-less microfluidic pla>orm which performs sample clean-up and enrichment in a single step, by integraAng Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) extracAon. Our pla>orm offers a simple, yet very efficient, method for achieving sample pre-treatment and enrichment of rare analytes...

  3. Droplet microfluidics in (bio) chemical analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basova, E. Y.; Foret, František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 1 (2015), s. 22-38 ISSN 0003-2654 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : droplet chemistry * bioanalysis * microfluidics * protein Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.033, year: 2015

  4. Recent Advances in Magnetic Microfluidic Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Giouroudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of portable biosening devices for the detection of biological entities such as biomolecules, pathogens, and cells has become extremely significant over the past years. Scientific research, driven by the promise for miniaturization and integration of complex laboratory equipment on inexpensive, reliable, and accurate devices, has successfully shifted several analytical and diagnostic methods to the submillimeter scale. The miniaturization process was made possible with the birth of microfluidics, a technology that could confine, manipulate, and mix very small volumes of liquids on devices integrated on standard silicon technology chips. Such devices are then directly translating the presence of these entities into an electronic signal that can be read out with a portable instrumentation. For the aforementioned tasks, the use of magnetic markers (magnetic particles—MPs—functionalized with ligands in combination with the application of magnetic fields is being strongly investigated by research groups worldwide. The greatest merits of using magnetic fields are that they can be applied either externally or from integrated microconductors and they can be well-tuned by adjusting the applied current on the microconductors. Moreover, the magnetic markers can be manipulated inside microfluidic channels by high gradient magnetic fields that can in turn be detected by magnetic sensors. All the above make this technology an ideal candidate for the development of such microfluidic biosensors. In this review, focus is given only to very recent advances in biosensors that use microfluidics in combination with magnetic sensors and magnetic markers/nanoparticles.

  5. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Xiuqing

    2013-10-10

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes . The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP ). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  6. Ceramic microfluidic monoliths by ice templating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Jumeng; Salamon, David; Lefferts, Leonardus; Wessling, Matthias; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Meso/macro-porous alumina microfluidic monoliths were fabricated by an ice-templating (or freeze-casting) technique. A (green) compact with sufficient strength is obtained after controlled freezing and simple drying under ambient conditions by starting with an aqueous suspension of a mixture of

  7. Particle manipulation methods in droplet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenje, Maria; Fornell, Anna; Ohlin, Mathias; Nilsson, Johan

    2017-11-30

    This Feature article describes the different particle manipulation techniques available in the droplet microfluidics tool-box to handle particles encapsulated inside droplets and to manipulate whole droplets. We address the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques to guide new users.

  8. Microfluidics for Antibiotic Susceptibility and Toxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major concern for worldwide policy makers as very few new antibiotics have been developed in the last twenty-five years. To prevent the death of millions of people worldwide, there is an urgent need for a cheap, fast and accurate set of tools and techniques that can help to discover and develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the past decade, microfluidic platforms have emerged as potential systems for conducting pharmacological studies. Recent studies have demonstrated that microfluidic platforms can perform rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests to evaluate antimicrobial drugs’ efficacy. In addition, the development of cell-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip platforms have enabled the early drug testing, providing more accurate insights into conventional cell cultures on the drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity, at the early and cheaper stage of drug development, i.e., prior to animal and human testing. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of microfluidic platforms for rapid antibiotics susceptibility testing, investigating bacterial persistence and non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA bacteria, evaluating antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms and combinatorial effect of antibiotics, as well as microfluidic platforms that can be used for in vitro antibiotic toxicity testing.

  9. DNA and microfluidics: Building molecular electronics systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Yun [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Chen Lu [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Liu Xuezhu [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Krull, Ulrich J. [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada)]. E-mail: ukrull@utm.utoronto.ca

    2006-05-24

    The development of molecular electronics using DNA molecules as the building blocks and using microfluidics to build nanowire arrays is reviewed. Applications of DNA conductivity to build sensors and nanowire arrays, and DNA conjugation with other nanostructures, offers an exciting opportunity to build extremely small analytical devices that are suitable for single-molecule detection and also target screening.

  10. Understanding cell passage through constricted microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartas-Ayala, Marco A.; Karnik, Rohit

    2012-11-01

    Recently, several microfluidic platforms have been proposed to characterize cells based on their behaviour during cell passage through constricted channels. Variables like transit time have been analyzed in disease states like sickle cell anemia, malaria and sepsis. Nevertheless, it is hard to make direct comparisons between different platforms and cell types. We present experimental results of the relationship between solid deformable particle properties, i.e. stiffness and relative particle size, and flow properties, i.e. particle's velocity. We measured the hydrodynamic variables during the flow of HL-60 cells, a white myeloid cell type, in narrow microfluidic square channels using a microfluidic differential manometer. We measured the flow force required to move cells of different sizes through microchannels and quantified friction forces opposing cell passage. We determined the non-dimensional parameters that influence the flow of cells and we used them to obtain a non dimensional expression that can be used to predict the forces needed to drive cells through microchannels. We found that the friction force needed to flow HL-60 through a microfluidic channel is the sum of two parts. The first part is a static friction force that is proportional to the force needed to keep the force compressed. The second part is a factor that is proportional to the cell velocity, hence a dynamic term, and slightly sensitive to the compressive force. We thank CONACYT (Mexican Science and Technology Council) for supporting this project, grant 205899.

  11. Design of microfluidic bioreactors using topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Bruus, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    We address the design of optimal reactors for supporting biological cultures using the method of topology optimization. For some years this method have been used to design various optimal microfluidic devices.1-4 We apply this method to distribute optimally biologic cultures within a flow...

  12. Mixing in polymeric microfluidic devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Davis, Robert H. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO); Brotherton, Christopher M. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO)

    2006-04-01

    This SAND report describes progress made during a Sandia National Laboratories sponsored graduate fellowship. The fellowship was funded through an LDRD proposal. The goal of this project is development and characterization of mixing strategies for polymeric microfluidic devices. The mixing strategies under investigation include electroosmotic flow focusing, hydrodynamic focusing, physical constrictions and porous polymer monoliths. For electroosmotic flow focusing, simulations were performed to determine the effect of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with heterogeneous surface potential. The heterogeneous surface potential caused recirculations to form within the microchannel. These recirculations could then be used to restrict two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the mixing region surface potential to the average channel surface potential was made large in magnitude and negative in sign, and when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the characteristic diffusion time was minimized. Based on these results, experiments were performed to evaluate the manipulation of surface potential using living-radical photopolymerization. The material chosen to manipulate typically exhibits a negative surface potential. Using living-radical surface grafting, a positive surface potential was produced using 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and a neutral surface was produced using a poly(ethylene glycol) surface graft. Simulations investigating hydrodynamic focusing were also performed. For this technique, mixing is enhanced by using a tertiary fluid stream to constrict the two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the tertiary flow stream flow-rate to the mixing streams flow-rate was maximized. Also, like the electroosmotic focusing mixer, mixing was also maximized when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the

  13. Digital microfluidic operations on micro-electrode dot array architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G; Teng, D; Fan, S-K

    2011-12-01

    As digital microfluidics-based biochips find more applications, their complexity is expected to increase significantly owing to the trend of multiple and concurrent assays on the chip. There is a pressing need to deliver a top-down design methodology that the biochip designer can leverage the same level of computer-aided design support as the semi-conductor industry now does. Moreover, as microelectronics fabrication technology is scaling up and integrated device performance is improving, it is expected that these microfluidic biochips will be integrated with microelectronic components in next-generation system-on-chip designs. This study presents the analysis and experiments of digital microfluidic operations on a novel electrowetting-on-dielectric-based 'micro-electrode dot array architecture' that fosters a development path for hierarchical top-down design approach for digital microfluidics. The proposed architecture allows dynamic configurations and activations of identical basic microfluidic unit called 'micro-electrode cells' to design microfluidic components, layouts, routing, microfluidic operations and applications of the biochip hierarchically. Fundamental microfluidic operations have been successfully performed by the architecture. In addition, this novel architecture demonstrates a number of advantages and flexibilities over the conventional digital microfluidics in performing advanced microfluidic operations.

  14. Microfluidics as a tool for C. elegans research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Miguel, Adriana; Lu, Hang

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidics has emerged as a set of powerful tools that have greatly advanced some areas of biological research, including research using C. elegans. The use of microfluidics has enabled many experiments that are otherwise impossible with conventional methods. Today there are many examples that demonstrate the main advantages of using microfluidics for C. elegans research, achieving precise environmental conditions and facilitating worm handling. Examples range from behavioral analysis under precise chemical or odor stimulation, locomotion studies in well-defined structural surroundings, and even long-term culture on chip. Moreover, microfluidics has enabled coupling worm handling and imaging thus facilitating genetic screens, optogenetic studies, and laser ablation experiments. In this article, we review some of the applications of microfluidics for C. elegans research and provide guides for the design, fabrication, and use of microfluidic devices for C. elegans research studies. PMID:24065448

  15. Integrated microfluidic platforms for investigating neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Joon

    This dissertation describes the development and application of integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms to study neuronal activities in the nervous system in-vitro. The assay platforms were fabricated using soft lithography and micro/nano fabrication including microfluidics, surface patterning, and nanomaterial synthesis. The use of integrated microfluidics-based assay platform allows culturing and manipulating many types of neuronal tissues in precisely controlled microenvironment. Furthermore, they provide organized multi-cellular in-vitro model, long-term monitoring with live cell imaging, and compatibility with molecular biology techniques and electrophysiology experiment. In this dissertation, the integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms are developed for investigation of neuronal activities such as local protein synthesis, impairment of axonal transport by chemical/physical variants, growth cone path finding under chemical/physical cues, and synaptic transmission in neuronal circuit. Chapter 1 describes the motivation, objectives, and scope for developing in-vitro platform to study various neuronal activities. Chapter 2 introduces microfluidic culture platform for biochemical assay with large-scale neuronal tissues that are utilized as model system in neuroscience research. Chapter 3 focuses on the investigation of impaired axonal transport by beta-Amyloid and oxidative stress. The platform allows to control neuronal processes and to quantify mitochondrial movement in various regions of axons away from applied drugs. Chapter 4 demonstrates the development of microfluidics-based growth cone turning assay to elucidate the mechanism underlying axon guidance under soluble factors and shear flow. Using this platform, the behaviors of growth cone of mammalian neurons are verified under the gradient of inhibitory molecules and also shear flow in well-controlled manner. In Chapter 5, I combine in-vitro multicellular model with microfabricated MEA

  16. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments...... a double-fluorescent probe-system also used by Fath et al5. Future challenges include integrating both these systems into a microfluidic device for plant tissue culture....

  17. Tetra-Responsive Grafted Hydrogels for Flow Control in Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Gräfe, David

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidics covers the science of manipulating small quantities of fluids using microscale devices with great potential in analysis, multiplexing, automation and high-throughput screening. Compared to conventional systems, microfluidics benefits from miniaturization resulting in shortened time of experiments, decreased sample and reagent consumptions as well as reduced overall costs. For microfluidic devices where further weight and cost reduction is additionally required, stimuli-responsiv...

  18. A microfluidic gas damper for stabilizing gas pressure in portable microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinjie; Zhu, Zhixian; Xiang, Nan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2016-09-01

    Pressure fluctuations, which invariably occur in microfluidic systems, usually result in the unstable fluid delivery in microfluidic channels. In this work, a novel microfluidic gas damper is proposed and applied for providing stable fluid-driving pressures. Then, a pressure-driven flow setup is constructed to investigate the gas damping characteristics of our damper. Since the pressure-driven flow setup functions as a resistor-capacitor low-pass filter, the damper significantly decreases the amplitude of the input pressures via self-regulating its pneumatic resistance. In addition, the gas volume and pressure frequency are found to have direct effects on the pressure fluctuations. The practical application of the gas damper is examined through a portable pressure-driven system, which consists of an air blower, a gas damper, and a centrifuge tube. By periodically pressing the air blower, precise flow rates with low throughput (∼9.64  μ l min -1 ) and high throughput (∼1367.15  μ l min -1 ) are successfully delivered. Future integration of our microfluidic gas damper with miniaturized pressure generators (e.g., peristaltic or pressure-driven micropumps) can fully exploit the potential of the gas damper for low-cost, portable microfluidics where stable pressures or flow rates are required.

  19. Expanding imaging capabilities for microfluidics: applicability of darkfield internal reflection illumination (DIRI to observations in microfluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Kawano

    Full Text Available Microfluidics is used increasingly for engineering and biomedical applications due to recent advances in microfabrication technologies. Visualization of bubbles, tracer particles, and cells in a microfluidic device is important for designing a device and analyzing results. However, with conventional methods, it is difficult to observe the channel geometry and such particles simultaneously. To overcome this limitation, we developed a Darkfield Internal Reflection Illumination (DIRI system that improved the drawbacks of a conventional darkfield illuminator. This study was performed to investigate its utility in the field of microfluidics. The results showed that the developed system could clearly visualize both microbubbles and the channel wall by utilizing brightfield and DIRI illumination simultaneously. The methodology is useful not only for static phenomena, such as clogging, but also for dynamic phenomena, such as the detection of bubbles flowing in a channel. The system was also applied to simultaneous fluorescence and DIRI imaging. Fluorescent tracer beads and channel walls were observed clearly, which may be an advantage for future microparticle image velocimetry (μPIV analysis, especially near a wall. Two types of cell stained with different colors, and the channel wall, can be recognized using the combined confocal and DIRI system. Whole-slide imaging was also conducted successfully using this system. The tiling function significantly expands the observing area of microfluidics. The developed system will be useful for a wide variety of engineering and biomedical applications for the growing field of microfluidics.

  20. Recent Advances and Future Perspectives on Microfluidic Liquid Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Trung Nguyen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interdisciplinary research field of microfluidics has the potential to revolutionize current technologies that require the handling of a small amount of fluid, a fast response, low costs and automation. Microfluidic platforms that handle small amounts of liquid have been categorised as continuous-flow microfluidics and digital microfluidics. The first part of this paper discusses the recent advances of the two main and opposing applications of liquid handling in continuous-flow microfluidics: mixing and separation. Mixing and separation are essential steps in most lab-on-a-chip platforms, as sample preparation and detection are required for a variety of biological and chemical assays. The second part discusses the various digital microfluidic strategies, based on droplets and liquid marbles, for the manipulation of discrete microdroplets. More advanced digital microfluidic devices combining electrowetting with other techniques are also introduced. The applications of the emerging field of liquid-marble-based digital microfluidics are also highlighted. Finally, future perspectives on microfluidic liquid handling are discussed.

  1. Reversible Control of Anisotropic Electrical Conductivity using Colloidal Microfluidic Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beskok, Ali; Bevan, Michael; Lagoudas, Dimitris; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Bahukudumbi, Pradipkumar; Everett, William

    2007-01-01

    This research addresses the tunable assembly of reversible colloidal structures within microfluidic networks to engineer multifunctional materials that exhibit a wide range of electrical properties...

  2. Novel Polymer Microfluidics Technology for In Situ Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a novel microfluidic device that combines rigid monolithic porous polymer based micro-capillary electrochromatography...

  3. Microfluidic-Based Robotic Sampling System for Radioactive Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack D. Law; Julia L. Tripp; Tara E. Smith; Veronica J. Rutledge; Troy G. Garn; John Svoboda; Larry Macaluso

    2014-02-01

    A novel microfluidic based robotic sampling system has been developed for sampling and analysis of liquid solutions in nuclear processes. This system couples the use of a microfluidic sample chip with a robotic system designed to allow remote, automated sampling of process solutions in-cell and facilitates direct coupling of the microfluidic sample chip with analytical instrumentation. This system provides the capability for near real time analysis, reduces analytical waste, and minimizes the potential for personnel exposure associated with traditional sampling methods. A prototype sampling system was designed, built and tested. System testing demonstrated operability of the microfluidic based sample system and identified system modifications to optimize performance.

  4. Soft tubular microfluidics for 2D and 3D applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Wang; Kong, Fang; Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Longteng; Sonam, Surabhi; Dao, Ming; Gong, Xiaobo; Teck Lim, Chwee

    2017-10-01

    Microfluidics has been the key component for many applications, including biomedical devices, chemical processors, microactuators, and even wearable devices. This technology relies on soft lithography fabrication which requires cleanroom facilities. Although popular, this method is expensive and labor-intensive. Furthermore, current conventional microfluidic chips precludes reconfiguration, making reiterations in design very time-consuming and costly. To address these intrinsic drawbacks of microfabrication, we present an alternative solution for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic elements such as microtubes, valves, and pumps. In addition, we demonstrate how microtubes with channels of various lengths and cross-sections can be attached modularly into 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for functional applications. We introduce a facile method of fabricating elastomeric microtubes as the basic building blocks for microfluidic devices. These microtubes are transparent, biocompatible, highly deformable, and customizable to various sizes and cross-sectional geometries. By configuring the microtubes into deterministic geometry, we enable rapid, low-cost formation of microfluidic assemblies without compromising their precision and functionality. We demonstrate configurable 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for applications in different domains. These include microparticle sorting, microdroplet generation, biocatalytic micromotor, triboelectric sensor, and even wearable sensing. Our approach, termed soft tubular microfluidics, provides a simple, cheaper, and faster solution for users lacking proficiency and access to cleanroom facilities to design and rapidly construct microfluidic devices for their various applications and needs.

  5. Soft tubular microfluidics for 2D and 3D applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Wang; Kong, Fang; Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Longteng; Sonam, Surabhi; Dao, Ming; Gong, Xiaobo; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2017-10-03

    Microfluidics has been the key component for many applications, including biomedical devices, chemical processors, microactuators, and even wearable devices. This technology relies on soft lithography fabrication which requires cleanroom facilities. Although popular, this method is expensive and labor-intensive. Furthermore, current conventional microfluidic chips precludes reconfiguration, making reiterations in design very time-consuming and costly. To address these intrinsic drawbacks of microfabrication, we present an alternative solution for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic elements such as microtubes, valves, and pumps. In addition, we demonstrate how microtubes with channels of various lengths and cross-sections can be attached modularly into 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for functional applications. We introduce a facile method of fabricating elastomeric microtubes as the basic building blocks for microfluidic devices. These microtubes are transparent, biocompatible, highly deformable, and customizable to various sizes and cross-sectional geometries. By configuring the microtubes into deterministic geometry, we enable rapid, low-cost formation of microfluidic assemblies without compromising their precision and functionality. We demonstrate configurable 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for applications in different domains. These include microparticle sorting, microdroplet generation, biocatalytic micromotor, triboelectric sensor, and even wearable sensing. Our approach, termed soft tubular microfluidics, provides a simple, cheaper, and faster solution for users lacking proficiency and access to cleanroom facilities to design and rapidly construct microfluidic devices for their various applications and needs.

  6. Microfluidics for electronic paper-like displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Lingling; Hayes, Robert A; Jin, Mingliang; Zhang, Xiao; Bai, Pengfei; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu

    2014-07-21

    Displays are ubiquitous in modern life, and there is a growing need to develop active, full color, video-rate reflective displays that perform well in high-light conditions. The core of display technology is to generate or manipulate light in the visible wavelength. Colored fluids or fluids with particles can be used to tune the light intensity (greyscale) or wavelength (colors) of reflective displays by different actuation methods. Microfluidic technology plays an increasing role in fluidic manipulation in microscale devices used in display areas. In this article, we will review microfluidic technologies based on different actuation methods used for display applications: pressure-driven flow, electrophoresis, electroosmosis, electrowetting, magnetic-driven flow, and cell-actuation principles.

  7. Capacitive coupling synchronizes autonomous microfluidic oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesher-Perez, Sasha Cai; Zhang, Chao; Takayama, Shuichi

    2018-01-31

    Even identically-designed autonomous microfluidic oscillators have device-to-device oscillation variability that arises due to inconsistencies in fabrication, materials, and operation conditions. This work demonstrates, experimentally and theoretically, that with appropriate capacitive coupling these microfluidic oscillators can be synchronized. The size and characteristics of the capacitive coupling needed and the range of input flow rate differences that can be synchronized are also characterized. In addition to device-to-device variability, there is also within-device oscillation noise that arises. An additional advantage of coupling multiple fluidic oscillators together is that the oscillation noise decreases. The ability to synchronize multiple autonomous oscillators is also a first step towards enhancing their usefulness as tools for biochemical research applications where multiplicate experiments with identical temporal-stimulation conditions are required. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Bonding PMMA microfluidics using commercial microwave ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, A.; Moghadas, H.; Daneshmand, M.; Sameoto, D.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel low-cost, rapid substrate-bonding technique is successfully applied to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microfluidics bonding for the first time. This technique uses a thin intermediate metallic microwave susceptor layer at the interface of the bonding site (microchannels) which produces localized heating required for bonding during microwave irradiation. The metallic susceptor pattern is designed using a multiphysics simulation model developed in ANSYS Multiphysics software (high-frequency structural simulation (HFSS) coupled with ANSYS-Thermal). In our experiments, the required microwave energy for bonding is delivered using a relatively inexpensive, widely accessible commercial microwave oven. Using this technique, simple PMMA microfluidics prototypes are successfully bonded and sealed in less than 35 seconds with a minimum measured bond strength of 1.375 MPa.

  9. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Keating

    Full Text Available We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  10. Microfluidic device for unidirectional axon growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malishev, E.; Pimashkin, A.; Gladkov, A.; Pigareva, Y.; Bukatin, A.; Kazantsev, V.; Mukhina, I.; Dubina, M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the communication and connectivity development of neuron networks, we designed microfluidic devices with several chambers for growing dissociated neuronal cultures from mice fetal hippocampus (E18). The chambers were connected with microchannels providing unidirectional axonal growth between “Source” and “Target” neural sub-networks. Experiments were performed in a hippocampal cultures plated in a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip, aligned with a 60 microelectrode array (MEA). Axonal growth through microchannels was observed with brightfield, phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, and after 7 days in vitro electrical activity was recorded. Visual inspection and spike propagation analysis showed the predominant axonal growth in microchannels in a direction from “Source” to “Target”.

  11. Droplet Manipulations in Two Phase Flow Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen M. Pit

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though droplet microfluidics has been developed since the early 1980s, the number of applications that have resulted in commercial products is still relatively small. This is partly due to an ongoing maturation and integration of existing methods, but possibly also because of the emergence of new techniques, whose potential has not been fully realized. This review summarizes the currently existing techniques for manipulating droplets in two-phase flow microfluidics. Specifically, very recent developments like the use of acoustic waves, magnetic fields, surface energy wells, and electrostatic traps and rails are discussed. The physical principles are explained, and (potential advantages and drawbacks of different methods in the sense of versatility, flexibility, tunability and durability are discussed, where possible, per technique and per droplet operation: generation, transport, sorting, coalescence and splitting.

  12. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Steven J; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  13. Plasmonic nanoshell synthesis in microfluidic composite foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraiswamy, Suhanya; Khan, Saif A

    2010-09-08

    The availability of robust, scalable, and automated nanoparticle manufacturing processes is crucial for the viability of emerging nanotechnologies. Metallic nanoparticles of diverse shape and composition are commonly manufactured by solution-phase colloidal chemistry methods, where rapid reaction kinetics and physical processes such as mixing are inextricably coupled, and scale-up often poses insurmountable problems. Here we present the first continuous flow process to synthesize thin gold "nanoshells" and "nanoislands" on colloidal silica surfaces, which are nanoparticle motifs of considerable interest in plasmonics-based applications. We assemble an ordered, flowing composite foam lattice in a simple microfluidic device, where the lattice cells are alternately aqueous drops containing reagents for nanoparticle synthesis or gas bubbles. Microfluidic foam generation enables precisely controlled reagent dispensing and mixing, and the ordered foam structure facilitates compartmentalized nanoparticle growth. This is a general method for aqueous colloidal synthesis, enabling continuous, inherently digital, scalable, and automated production processes for plasmonic nanomaterials.

  14. Designing Polymeric Microfluidic Platforms for Biomedical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedarethinam, Indumathi

    Cytogenetics laboratories. During the course of this project, initially the suitability of the polymeric chip substrate was tested and a microfluidic device was developed for performing interphase FISH analysis. With this device, the key factors involved in chromosome spreading crucial to FISH analysis were...... further investigated. Based on the insights gained, a micro splashing device was designed to achieve well-spread chromosomes and a rapidly assembled microFISH device was presented for metaphase analysis. Further, a single polymeric microfluidic device was developed to semi-automate the FISH analysis. ii......) Culturing brain slices and monitoring the integration of neuronal stem cells upon cultured brain slices. These studies will aid to design novel therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative disease. The aim of this project was to create a microfludic cell culture chamber and keep a brain slice alive...

  15. Nanoplasmonic and Microfluidic Devices for Biological Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, G.

    2017-02-16

    In this chapter we report about recent advances on the development and application of 2D and 3D plasmonic nanostructures used for sensing of biological samples by Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution of analysis. Besides, we explain how the integration of these nanodevices in a microfluidic apparatus can simplify the analysis of biological samples. In the first part we introduce and motivate the convenience of using nanoplasmonic enhancers and Raman spectroscopy for biological sensing, describing the phenomena and the current approaches to fabricate nanoplasmonic structures. In the second part, we explain how specific multi-element devices produce the optimal enhancement of the Raman scattering. We report cases where biological sensing of DNA was performed at few molecules level with nanometer spatial resolutions. Finally, we show an example of microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices to sort and drive biological samples, like living cells, towards the optical probe in order to obtain optimal conditions of analysis.

  16. Microfluidic Wheatstone bridge for rapid sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyeri, Melikhan; Ranka, Mikhil; Sittipolkul, Natawan; Schroeder, Charles M

    2011-12-21

    We developed a microfluidic analogue of the classic Wheatstone bridge circuit for automated, real-time sampling of solutions in a flow-through device format. We demonstrate precise control of flow rate and flow direction in the "bridge" microchannel using an on-chip membrane valve, which functions as an integrated "variable resistor". We implement an automated feedback control mechanism in order to dynamically adjust valve opening, thereby manipulating the pressure drop across the bridge and precisely controlling fluid flow in the bridge channel. At a critical valve opening, the flow in the bridge channel can be completely stopped by balancing the flow resistances in the Wheatstone bridge device, which facilitates rapid, on-demand fluid sampling in the bridge channel. In this article, we present the underlying mechanism for device operation and report key design parameters that determine device performance. Overall, the microfluidic Wheatstone bridge represents a new and versatile method for on-chip flow control and sample manipulation.

  17. Tuning Fluidic Resistance via Liquid Crystal Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Sengupta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Flow of molecularly ordered fluids, like liquid crystals, is inherently coupled with the average local orientation of the molecules, or the director. The anisotropic coupling—typically absent in isotropic fluids—bestows unique functionalities to the flowing matrix. In this work, we harness this anisotropy to pattern different pathways to tunable fluidic resistance within microfluidic devices. We use a nematic liquid crystalline material flowing in microchannels to demonstrate passive and active modulation of the flow resistance. While appropriate surface anchoring conditions—which imprint distinct fluidic resistances within microchannels under similar hydrodynamic parameters—act as passive cues, an external field, e.g., temperature, is used to actively modulate the flow resistance in the microfluidic device. We apply this simple concept to fabricate basic fluidic circuits, which can be hierarchically extended to create complex resistance networks, without any additional design or morphological patterning of the microchannels.

  18. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  19. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2017-05-09

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  20. Structural Optimization of non-Newtonian Microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjærg; Okkels, Fridolin

    2011-01-01

    We present results for topology optimization of a non-Newtonian rectifier described with a differential constitutive model. The results are novel in the sense that a differential constitutive model has not been combined with topology optimization previously. We find that it is necessary to apply ...... optimization of fluids. We test the method on a microfluidic rectifier and find solutions topologically different from experimentally realized designs....

  1. Biofunctionalization of PDMS-based microfluidic systems

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Bergoi Ibarlucea, Cesar Fernández-Sánchez, Stefanie Demming, Stephanus Büttgenbach & Andreu Llobera ### Abstract Three simple approaches for the selective immobilization of biomolecules on the surface of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic systems that do not require any specific instrumentation, are described and compared. They are based in the introduction of hydroxyl groups on the PDMS surface by direct adsorption of either polyethylene glycol (PEG) or polyvinyl...

  2. Fluid delivery manifolds and microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, Ronald F.; Sommer, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.; Hatch, Anson V.; Claudnic, Mark R.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Van de Vreugde, James L.

    2017-02-28

    Embodiments of fluid distribution manifolds, cartridges, and microfluidic systems are described herein. Fluid distribution manifolds may include an insert member and a manifold base and may define a substantially closed channel within the manifold when the insert member is press-fit into the base. Cartridges described herein may allow for simultaneous electrical and fluidic interconnection with an electrical multiplex board and may be held in place using magnetic attraction.

  3. Fabrication of paper based microfluidic devices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govindasamy, K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available flow tests) which operate on a similar principal, are an example of point of care diagnostics. Paper based microfluidics aims to address the inherent inadequacies of standard lateral flow tests. This includes improving the sensitivity...@uj.ac.za). maintaining low cost and simplicity. Development of low cost diagnostics is vital for developing countries like South Africa, where rural communities lack access to basic health care and clean drinking water. These tests provide a rapid alternative...

  4. Microfluidics apparatus and methods for use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, John P.; Wiggins, Thomas; Ghosh, Madhushree; Bottomley, Lawrence A.; Seminara, Salvatore; Hu, Zhiyu; Seeley, Timothy; Kossek, Sebastian

    2005-08-09

    A microfluidics device includes a plurality of interaction cells and fluid control means including i) means for providing to the interaction cells a preparation fluid, and ii) means for providing to the interaction cells a sample fluid, wherein each interaction cell receives a different sample fluid. A plurality of microcantilevers may be disposed in each of the interaction cells, wherein each of the plurality of microcantilevers configured to deflect in response to an interaction involving a component of the sample fluid.

  5. Research highlights: microfluidically-fabricated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jaekyung; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Kittur, Harsha; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-10-07

    Polymer particles with precise shapes or chemistries are finding unique uses in a variety of applications, including tissue engineering, drug delivery, barcoding, and diagnostic imaging. Microfluidic systems have been and are continuing to play a large role in enabling the precision synthesis of designer particles in a uniform manner. To expand the impact of these microfluidic-fabricated materials additional fundamental capabilities should still be developed. The capability to fabricate microparticles with complex three-dimensional shapes and increase the production rate of particles to an industrial scale will allow evaluation of shaped particles in a range of new applications to enhance biological, magnetic, optical, surface wetting, as well as other interfacial or mechanical properties of materials. Here we highlight work applying large collections of simple spherical microgels, with unique surface chemistry that allows in situ particle-particle annealing, to form microporous injectable scaffolds for accelerated tissue regeneration. We also report on two other techniques that are addressing the ability to create 3D-shaped microparticles by first sculpting a fluid precursor stream, and increasing the rate of production of particles using contact lithography to millions of particles per hour. The combination of these capabilities and the applications they will enable suggest a bright future for microfluidics in making the next materials.

  6. Microfab-less Microfluidic Capillary Electrophoresis Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segato, Thiago P; Bhakta, Samir A; Gordon, Matthew; Carrilho, Emanuel; Willis, Peter A; Jiao, Hong; Garcia, Carlos D

    2013-04-07

    Compared to conventional bench-top instruments, microfluidic devices possess advantageous characteristics including great portability potential, reduced analysis time (minutes), and relatively inexpensive production, putting them on the forefront of modern analytical chemistry. Fabrication of these devices, however, often involves polymeric materials with less-than-ideal surface properties, specific instrumentation, and cumbersome fabrication procedures. In order to overcome such drawbacks, a new hybrid platform is proposed. The platform is centered on the use of 5 interconnecting microfluidic components that serve as the injector or reservoirs. These plastic units are interconnected using standard capillary tubing, enabling in-channel detection by a wide variety of standard techniques, including capacitively-coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D). Due to the minimum impact on the separation efficiency, the plastic microfluidic components used for the experiments discussed herein were fabricated using an inexpensive engraving tool and standard Plexiglas. The presented approach (named 5(2)-platform) offers a previously unseen versatility: enabling the assembly of the platform within minutes using capillary tubing that differs in length, diameter, or material. The advantages of the proposed design are demonstrated by performing the analysis of inorganic cations by capillary electrophoresis on soil samples from the Atacama Desert.

  7. Microfluidics for High School Chemistry Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemling, Melissa; Crooks, John A; Oliver, Piercen M; Brenner, Katie; Gilbertson, Jennifer; Lisensky, George C; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-01-14

    We present a laboratory experiment that introduces high school chemistry students to microfluidics while teaching fundamental properties of acid-base chemistry. The procedure enables students to create microfluidic systems using nonspecialized equipment that is available in high school classrooms and reagents that are safe, inexpensive, and commercially available. The experiment is designed to ignite creativity and confidence about experimental design in a high school chemistry class. This experiment requires a computer program (e.g., PowerPoint), Shrinky Dink film, a readily available silicone polymer, weak acids, bases, and a colorimetric pH indicator. Over the span of five 45-min class periods, teams of students design and prepare devices in which two different pH solutions mix in a predictable way to create five different pH solutions. Initial device designs are instructive but rarely optimal. During two additional half-class periods, students have the opportunity to use their initial observations to redesign their microfluidic systems to optimize the outcome. The experiment exposes students to cutting-edge science and the design process, and solidifies introductory chemistry concepts including laminar flow, neutralization of weak acids-bases, and polymers.

  8. Smartphones & microfluidics: marriage for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hárendarčíková, Lenka; Petr, Jan

    2018-02-27

    Smartphones have become widely recognized as a very interesting detection and controlling tool in microfluidics. They are portable devices with built-in cameras and internal microprocessors which carry out image processing. In this case, the external computers are not needed and phones can provide fast and accurate results. Moreover, the connectivity of smartphones gives the possibility to share and provide real-time results when needed, whether in health diagnostics, environmental monitoring, immunoassays or food safety. Undoubtedly, the marriage of smartphones and microfluidics has a brilliant future in building low-cost and easily operable systems for analysis in the field, realizing the idea of people's "smartlife". The aim of this review is to present and summarize the main advantages and disadvantages of the use of smartphones as well as to take a closer look at some novel achievements published during the last couple of years. In the next paragraphs, readers will find specific uses of a combination of smartphones and microfluidics such as water analysis, health analysis (virus and bacteria detection), and measurement of physical properties or smartphone liquid control in polymer devices. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Microfluidic biosensing systems using magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Keplinger, Franz

    2013-09-09

    In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses) into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles.

  10. Manufacturable plastic microfluidic valves using thermal actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchaimani, Karthik; Sapp, Brian C; Winter, Adam; Gispanski, Austin; Nishida, Toshikazu; Hugh Fan, Z

    2009-11-07

    A low-cost, manufacturable, thermally actuated, plastic microfluidic valve has been developed. The valve contains an encapsulated, temperature-sensitive fluid, which expands, deflecting a thin elastomeric film into a fluidic channel to control fluid flow. The power input for thermal expansion of each microfluidic valve can be controlled using a printed circuit board (PCB)-based controller, which is suitable for mass production and large-scale integration. A plastic microfluidic device with such valves was fabricated using compression molding and thermal lamination. The operation of the valves was investigated by measuring a change in the microchannel's ionic conduction current mediated by the resistance variation corresponding to the deflection of the microvalve. Valve closing was also confirmed by the disappearance of fluorescence when a fluorescent solution was displaced in the valve region. Valve operation was characterized for heater power ranging from 36 mW to 80 mW. When the valve was actuating, the local channel temperature was 10 to 19 degrees C above the ambient temperature depending on the heater power used. Repetitive valve operations (up to 50 times) have been demonstrated with a flow resulting from a hydrostatic head. Valve operation was tested for a flow rate of 0.33-4.7 microL/min.

  11. Microfluidic extensional rheometry using stagnation point flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haward, S J

    2016-07-01

    Characterization of the extensional rheometry of fluids with complex microstructures is of great relevance to the optimization of a wide range of industrial applications and for understanding various natural processes, biological functions, and diseases. However, quantitative measurement of the extensional properties of complex fluids has proven elusive to researchers, particularly in the case of low viscosity, weakly elastic fluids. For some time, microfluidic platforms have been recognized as having the potential to fill this gap and various approaches have been proposed. This review begins with a general discussion of extensional viscosity and the requirements of an extensional rheometer, before various types of extensional rheometers (particularly those of microfluidic design) are critically discussed. A specific focus is placed on microfluidic stagnation point extensional flows generated by cross-slot type devices, for which some important developments have been reported during the last 10 years. Additional emphasis is placed on measurements made on relevant biological fluids. Finally, the operating limits of the cross-slot extensional rheometer (chiefly imposed by the onset of elastic and inertial flow instabilities) are discussed.

  12. Logic control of microfluidics with smart colloid

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Limu

    2010-01-01

    We report the successful realization of a microfluidic chip with switching and corresponding inverting functionalities. The chips are identical logic control components incorporating a type of smart colloid, giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which possesses reversible characteristics via a liquid-solid phase transition under external electric field. Two pairs of electrodes embedded on the sides of two microfluidic channels serve as signal input and output, respectively. One, located in the GERF micro-channel is used to control the flow status of GERF, while another one in the ither micro-fluidic channel is used to detect the signal generated with a passing-by droplet (defined as a signal droplet). Switching of the GERF from the suspended state (off-state) to the flowing state (on-state) or vice versa in the micro-channel is controlled by the appearance of signal droplets whenever they pass through the detection electrode. The output on-off signals can be easily demonstrated, clearly matching with GERF flow status. Our results show that such a logic switch is also a logic IF gate, while its inverter functions as a NOT gate. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010.

  13. Mobility-shift analysis with microfluidics chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jarrod; Shevchuk, Taras; Swiderski, Piotr M; Dabur, Rajesh; Crocitto, Laura E; Buryanov, Yaroslav I; Smith, Steven S

    2003-09-01

    Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis (EMSA) is a well-characterized and widely used technique for the analysis of proten-DNA interaction and the analysis of transcription factor combinatorics. Currently implemented EMSA generally involves the time-consuming use of radiolabeled DNA and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We are studying the bionanoscience of self-assembling supramolecular protein-nucleic nanostructures. We have undertaken these studies because they promise to enhance our understanding of assemblies formed during prebiotic evolution, provide tools for analysis of biological processes like DNA recombination, and may lead to the development of nanoscale biosensors designed for site-specific molecular targeting. During the course of that work, we noted that EMSA of these complex structures could be effectively implemented with microfluidics chips designed for the separation of DNA fragments. In this report we compare the two techniques and demonstrate that the microfluidics system is also capable of resolving complex mixtures produced by decorating DNA recombination intermediates with mixtures of DNA binding proteins. Moreover, the microfluidics chip system improves EMSA by permitting analysis with smaller samples, avoiding the use of radiolabeling, and reducing the time involved to a matter of minutes.

  14. Orientation-Based Control of Microfluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila Norouzi

    Full Text Available Most microfluidic chips utilize off-chip hardware (syringe pumps, computer-controlled solenoid valves, pressure regulators, etc. to control fluid flow on-chip. This expensive, bulky, and power-consuming hardware severely limits the utility of microfluidic instruments in resource-limited or point-of-care contexts, where the cost, size, and power consumption of the instrument must be limited. In this work, we present a technique for on-chip fluid control that requires no off-chip hardware. We accomplish this by using inert compounds to change the density of one fluid in the chip. If one fluid is made 2% more dense than a second fluid, when the fluids flow together under laminar flow the interface between the fluids quickly reorients to be orthogonal to Earth's gravitational force. If the channel containing the fluids then splits into two channels, the amount of each fluid flowing into each channel is precisely determined by the angle of the channels relative to gravity. Thus, any fluid can be routed in any direction and mixed in any desired ratio on-chip simply by holding the chip at a certain angle. This approach allows for sophisticated control of on-chip fluids with no off-chip control hardware, significantly reducing the cost of microfluidic instruments in point-of-care or resource-limited settings.

  15. A Review on Mixing in Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmo Kang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale mixing is of uttermost importance in bio- and chemical analyses using micro TAS (total analysis systems or lab-on-chips. Many microfluidic applications involve chemical reactions where, most often, the fluid diffusivity is very low so that without the help of chaotic advection the reaction time can be extremely long. In this article, we will review various kinds of mixers developed for use in microfluidic devices. Our review starts by defining the terminology necessary to understand the fundamental concept of mixing and by introducing quantities for evaluating the mixing performance, such as mixing index and residence time. In particular, we will review the concept of chaotic advection and the mathematical terms, Poincare section and Lyapunov exponent. Since these concepts are developed from nonlinear dynamical systems, they should play important roles in devising microfluidic devices with enhanced mixing performance. Following, we review the various designs of mixers that are employed in applications. We will classify the designs in terms of the driving forces, including mechanical, electrical and magnetic forces, used to control fluid flow upon mixing. The advantages and disadvantages of each design will also be addressed. Finally, we will briefly touch on the expected future development regarding mixer design and related issues for the further enhancement of mixing performance.

  16. Microfluidics for Positron Emission Tomography Probe Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing to increased needs for positron emission tomography (PET, high demands for a wide variety of radiolabeled compounds will have to be met by exploiting novel radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of PET probes. The application of microfluidic reactors to perform radiosyntheses is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional labeling systems. Microfluidics-based radiochemistry can lead to the use of smaller quantities of precursors, accelerated reaction rates, and easier purification processes with greater yield and higher specific activity of desired probes. Several proof-of-principle examples along with the basics of device architecture and operation and the potential limitations of each design are discussed. Along with the concept of radioisotope distribution from centralized cyclotron facilities to individual imaging centers and laboratories (“decentralized model”, an easy-to-use, stand-alone, flexible, fully automated, radiochemical microfluidic platform can provide simpler and more cost-effective procedures for molecular imaging using PET.

  17. Continuous microfluidic reactors for polymer particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Minseok

    In this thesis, we present a versatile new method for preparing highly monodisperse droplets, polymer particles, double emulsions, and self-assemblies of droplets in continuous microfluidic reactors. Recently, microfluidic systems are significantly being used in many areas of chemistry and biotechnology to achieve improved performance. Microfluidics provides the ability to automate highly repetitive laboratory tasks by replacing huge cumbersome equipment with miniaturized and integrated systems, and it enables the handling of small amounts, e.g., from microliters to femtoliters of fluids, reactants and products. These methods have the following useful features: (1) the generation of extremely monodisperse droplets, (2) the generation and control of both the shape and the size of the droplets, (3) the use of a wide variety of materials, including: gels, monomers, polymers, copolymers, and polymers doped with functional additives, (4) a possibility of in situ solidification of the droplets by means of photopolymerization and/or thermopolymerization, and (5) the ability to scale up the production of large quantities of particles. We focus on the effect of the properties of the disperse and continuous phases on the emulsification process, the effect of the polymerization rate on the production of high-quality particles, the role of the material and geometry of the microfluidic device in droplet formation, and the synthesis of particles with different shapes and compositions. This thesis also describes emulsification in a microfluidic double droplet generator (DDR) comprising two consecutive flow-focusing devices with locally modified surface chemistry. We generated water-in-oil- in-water (W/O/W), oil-in-oil-in water (O/O/W) and oil-in-water-in-oil (O/W/O) double emulsions with precisely controlled sizes and morphology of droplets. Secondly, by combining two mechanisms of droplet formation (the flow-focusing mechanism and the break up of liquid threads at T-junction) we

  18. Desktop aligner for fabrication of multilayer microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Yu, Zeta Tak For; Geraldo, Dalton; Weng, Shinuo; Alve, Nitesh; Dun, Wu; Kini, Akshay; Patel, Karan; Shu, Roberto; Zhang, Feng; Li, Gang; Jin, Qinghui; Fu, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Multilayer assembly is a commonly used technique to construct multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices with complex 3D architecture and connectivity for large-scale microfluidic integration. Accurate alignment of structure features on different PDMS layers before their permanent bonding is critical in determining the yield and quality of assembled multilayer microfluidic devices. Herein, we report a custom-built desktop aligner capable of both local and global alignments of PDMS layers covering a broad size range. Two digital microscopes were incorporated into the aligner design to allow accurate global alignment of PDMS structures up to 4 in. in diameter. Both local and global alignment accuracies of the desktop aligner were determined to be about 20 μm cm-1. To demonstrate its utility for fabrication of integrated multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices, we applied the desktop aligner to achieve accurate alignment of different functional PDMS layers in multilayer microfluidics including an organs-on-chips device as well as a microfluidic device integrated with vertical passages connecting channels located in different PDMS layers. Owing to its convenient operation, high accuracy, low cost, light weight, and portability, the desktop aligner is useful for microfluidic researchers to achieve rapid and accurate alignment for generating multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices.

  19. Optical manipulation with two beam traps in microfluidic polymer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoury Arvelo, Maria; Matteucci, Marco; Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl

    2015-01-01

    An optical trapping system with two opposing laser beams, also known as the optical stretcher, are naturally constructed inside a microfluidic lab-on-chip system. We present and compare two approaches to combine a simple microfluidic system with either waveguides directly written in the microflui...

  20. A microfluidic device based on an evaporation-driven micropump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nie, C.; Frijns, A.J.H.; Mandamparambil, R.; Toonder, J.M.J. den

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a microfluidic device ultimately to be applied as a wearable sweat sensor. We show proof-of-principle of the microfluidic functions of the device, namely fluid collection and continuous fluid flow pumping. A filter-paper based layer, that eventually will form the interface

  1. Microfluidics as a tool for micro-manipulation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Potgieter, S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available times and process-specific designs. Another advantage of microfluidics is that micron-sizes particles can be manipulated with great precision. A microfluidic device is being designed to facilitate the sorting and self-assembly of components of a...

  2. Multi-layer microfluidic glass chips for microanalytical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daridon, Antoine; Fascio, Valia; Lichtenberg, Jan; Wütrich, Rolf; Langen, Hans; Verpoorte, Elisabeth; De Rooij, Nico F.

    2001-01-01

    A new, versatile architecture is presented for microfluidic devices made entirely from glass, for use with reagents which would prove highly corrosive for silicon. Chips consist of three layers of glass wafers bonded together by fusion bonding. On the inside wafer faces a network of microfluidic

  3. Microfluidic devices for forensic DNA analysis: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijns, Brigitte Bibiche; van Asten, A.; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for

  4. Microfluidics and Microfabrication in a Chemical Engineering Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Shivaun D.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics, the manipulation of fluids in channels with micron dimensions, has emerged as an exciting new field that impacts the broad area of nano/microtechnology. This is an important area to train the next generation of chemical engineers. This paper describes an experiment where students are given a problem to design a microfluidic mixer…

  5. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-09-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules.

  6. Microfluidic tunable inkjet-printed metamaterial absorber on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Kenyu; Yoo, Minyeong; Su, Wenjing; Kim, Kyeongseob; Cook, Benjamin; Tentzeris, Manos M; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-01-12

    In this paper, we propose a novel microfluidic tunable metamaterial (MM) absorber printed on a paper substrate in silver nanoparticle ink. The metamaterial is designed using a periodic array consisting of square patches. The conductive patterns are inkjet-printed on paper using silver nanoparticle inks. The microfluidic channels are laser-etched on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The conductive patterns on paper and the microfluidic channels on PMMA are bonded by an SU-8 layer that is also inkjet-printed on the conductive patterns. The proposed MM absorber provides frequency-tuning capability for different fluids in the microfluidic channels. We performed full-wave simulations and measurements that confirmed that the resonant frequency decreased from 4.42 GHz to 3.97 GHz after the injection of distilled water into the microfluidic channels. For both empty and water-filled channels, the absorptivity is higher than 90% at horizontal and vertical polarizations.

  7. Microfluidic process monitor for industrial solvent extraction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelis, Artem; Pereira, Candido; Nichols, Kevin Paul Flood

    2016-01-12

    The present invention provides a system for solvent extraction utilizing a first electrode with a raised area formed on its surface, which defines a portion of a microfluidic channel; a second electrode with a flat surface, defining another portion of the microfluidic channel that opposes the raised area of the first electrode; a reversibly deformable substrate disposed between the first electrode and second electrode, adapted to accommodate the raised area of the first electrode and having a portion that extends beyond the raised area of the first electrode, that portion defining the remaining portions of the microfluidic channel; and an electrolyte of at least two immiscible liquids that flows through the microfluidic channel. Also provided is a system for performing multiple solvent extractions utilizing several microfluidic chips or unit operations connected in series.

  8. Microfluidics for rapid cytokeratin immunohistochemical staining in frozen sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajkovic, Saska; Dupouy, Diego G; de Leval, Laurence; Gijs, Martin Am

    2017-08-01

    Frozen sections (FS) of tumor samples represent a cornerstone of pathological intraoperative consultation and have an important role in the microscopic analysis of specimens during surgery. So far, immunohistochemical (IHC) stainings on FS have been demonstrated for a few markers using manual methods. Microfluidic technologies have proven to bring substantial improvement in many fields of diagnostics, though only a few microfluidic devices have been designed to improve the performance of IHC assays. In this work, we show optimization of a complete pan-cytokeratin chromogenic immunostaining protocol on FS using a microfluidic tissue processor into a protocol taking <12 min. Our results showed specificity and low levels of background. The dimensions of the microfluidic prototype device are compatible with the space constraints of an intraoperative pathology laboratory. We therefore anticipate that the adoption of microfluidic technologies in the field of surgical pathology can significantly improve the way FSs influence surgical procedures.

  9. Microfluidics-Nano-Integration for Synthesis and Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumaran Packirisamy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent progress and achievements in the development of preparation of nano and microparticles in a microfluidic environment is reviewed. Microfluidics exploit fluid mechanics to create particles with a narrow range of sizes and offers a finely controllable route to tune the shape and composition of nanomaterials. The advantages of both continuous flow- and droplet-based synthesis of polymers and nanoparticles, in comparison with the traditional stirred flasks methods are discussed in detail by using numerous recent examples from the literature as well as from the authors’ work. The controllability of the size distribution of the particles is discussed in terms of the fabrication approach and the characteristics of the microfluidic reactors. A special attention is paid to metal-polymer nanocomposites prepared through microfluidic routes and their application in bio-sensing. Directions for future development of microfluidic synthesis of high quality nanoparticles are discussed.

  10. Microfluidics @ the Beach: Introduction of Microfluidics Technology to the ChE Curriculum at Cal State Long Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Roger C.; Bhatia, Hina; Venkatraman, Rahul; Jang, Larry K.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics involves the study of the behavior of fluids at microscale, fluid manipulations, and the design of the devices that can effectively perform such manipulations. We are developing two new elective courses to include microfluidics in our curriculum at CSULB. Herein, we present the results of the first course, Microfabrication and…

  11. Recent advances of controlled drug delivery using microfluidic platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjay, Sharma T; Zhou, Wan; Dou, Maowei; Tavakoli, Hamed; Ma, Lei; Xu, Feng; Li, XiuJun

    2017-09-15

    Conventional systematically-administered drugs distribute evenly throughout the body, get degraded and excreted rapidly while crossing many biological barriers, leaving minimum amounts of the drugs at pathological sites. Controlled drug delivery aims to deliver drugs to the target sites at desired rates and time, thus enhancing the drug efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and bioavailability while maintaining minimal side effects. Due to a number of unique advantages of the recent microfluidic lab-on-a-chip technology, microfluidic lab-on-a-chip has provided unprecedented opportunities for controlled drug delivery. Drugs can be efficiently delivered to the target sites at desired rates in a well-controlled manner by microfluidic platforms via integration, implantation, localization, automation, and precise control of various microdevice parameters. These features accordingly make reproducible, on-demand, and tunable drug delivery become feasible. On-demand self-tuning dynamic drug delivery systems have shown great potential for personalized drug delivery. This review presents an overview of recent advances in controlled drug delivery using microfluidic platforms. The review first briefly introduces microfabrication techniques of microfluidic platforms, followed by detailed descriptions of numerous microfluidic drug delivery systems that have significantly advanced the field of controlled drug delivery. Those microfluidic systems can be separated into four major categories, namely drug carrier-free micro-reservoir-based drug delivery systems, highly integrated carrier-free microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems, drug carrier-integrated microfluidic systems, and microneedles. Microneedles can be further categorized into five different types, i.e. solid, porous, hollow, coated, and biodegradable microneedles, for controlled transdermal drug delivery. At the end, we discuss current limitations and future prospects of microfluidic platforms for controlled drug delivery. Copyright

  12. Hydrophilic PEO-PDMS for microfluidic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mingjin; Fang, Ji

    2012-02-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a popularly used nontoxic and biocompatible material in microfluidic systems, which is relatively cheap and does not break easily like glass. The simple fabrication, optical transparency and elastomeric property make PDMS a handy material to work with. In order to develop different applications of PDMS in microfluidics and bioengineering, it is necessary to modify the PDMS surface nature to improve wetting characteristics, and to have a better control in nonspecific binding of proteins and cells, as well as to increase adhesion. At the moment, the hydrophilic surface modification performance of PDMS is known to recover its hydrophobicity shortly after oxidation modification, which is not stable in the long term (Owen and Smith 1994 J. Adhes. Sci. Technol. 8 1063-75). This paper presents a long-term stable hydrophilic surface modification processing of PDMS. The poly(dimethylsiloxane-ethylene oxide polymeric) (PDMS-b-PEO) is used in this project as a surfactant additive to be added into the PDMS base and the curing agent mixture during polymerization and to create hydrophilic PEO-PDMS. The contact angle can be controlled at 21.5-80.9° with the different mixing ratios and the hydrophilicity will remain stable for two months and then slightly varied later. We also investigate the bonding conditions of the modified PDMS to a silicon wafer and a glass wafer. To demonstrate its applications, we designed a device which consists of microchannels on a silicon wafer, and PEO-PDMS is utilized as a cover sheet. The capillary function was investigated under the different contact angles of PED-PDMS and with different aspect ratios of microchannels. All of the processes and testing data are presented in detail. This easy and cost-effective modified PDMS with a good bonding property can be widely used in the capillary device and systems, and microfluidic devices for fluid flow control of the microchannels in biological, chemical, medical

  13. Electrowetting-based microfluidics for analysis of peptides and proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Aaron R; Moon, Hyejin; Kim, Chang-Jin; Loo, Joseph A; Garrell, Robin L

    2004-08-15

    A new technique for preparing samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is reported. The technique relies on electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) to move droplets containing proteins or peptides and matrix to specific locations on an array of electrodes for analysis. Standard MALDI-MS reagents, analytes, concentrations, and recipes are demonstrated to be compatible with the technique. Mass spectra are comparable to those collected by conventional methods. Nonspecific adsorption of analytes to device surfaces is demonstrated to be negligible. The results suggest that EWOD may be a useful tool for automating sample preparation for high-throughput proteomics and other applications of MALDI-MS.

  14. Microfluidic system for enhanced cardiac tissue formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busek Mathias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hereby a microfluidic system for cell cultivation is presented in which human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were cultivated under perfusion. Besides micro-perfusion this system is also capable to produce well-defined oxygen contents, apply defined forces and has excellent imaging characteristics. Cardiomyocytes attach to the surface, start spontaneous beating and stay functional for up to 14 days under perfusion. The cell motion was subsequently analysed using an adapted video analysis script to calculate beating rate, beating direction and contraction or relaxation speed.

  15. Scintillation particle detection based on microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Renaud, P; Gorini, B; Trivino, N Vico; Jiguet, S; Vandelli, W; Haguenauer, M

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of particle detector based on scintillation, with precise spatial resolution and high radiation hardness, is being studied. It consists of a single microfluidic channel filled with a liquid scintillator and is designed to define an array of scintillating waveguides each independently coupled to a photodetector. Prototype detectors built using an SU-8 epoxy resin have been tested with electrons from a radioactive source. The experimental results show a light yield compatible with the theoretical expectations and confirm the validity of the approach. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An automated Teflon microfluidic peptide synthesizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Wang, Weizhi; Li, Xiaojun; Wang, Zihua; Hood, Leroy; Lausted, Christopher; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2013-09-07

    We present a microfluidic synthesizer made entirely of Teflon material for solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). Solvent-resistant perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) was used to construct chip-sized devices featuring multiple tri-layer pneumatic microvalves. Using these devices, model peptides were automatically synthesized and cleaved in situ in a continuous-flow manner. The total coupling and cleavage time was significantly reduced compared to conventional bulk reactors. The synthesis of a decapeptide, for instance, took less than 6 h using our device while it usually takes more than three days using conventional reactors.

  17. Absorption of charged particulate surfactants in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Tiantian; Liu, Zhou; Yao, Xiaoxue; Liu, Yaming

    2017-11-01

    We use microfluidics to uncouple the generation of Pickering emulsion droplets and stability analysis against coalescence. By designing the microchannels, we control the packing time for charged particles arriving at the droplet interfaces, and subsequently test the droplet stability in a coalescence chamber. The critical particle coverage on interfaces that prevents coalescence are estimated by an adsorption model. We further investigate the dependence of the critical particle coverage on its properties such as particle sizes, surface charge densities, and bulk concentrations. Our studies are potentially beneficial to the applications involving particle-stabilized droplets including cosmetics, food products, and oil recovery. NSFC 11504238,JCYJ20160308092144035,2016A050503048.

  18. Nanostructured surfaces for microfluidics and sensing applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picraux, Samuel Thomas (Arizona State University); Piech, Marcin (United Technologies Corp.); Schneider, John F.; Vail, Sean (Arizona State University); Hayes, Mark A. (Arizona State University); Garcia, Anthony A.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Gust, D (Arizona State University); Yang, Dongqing (Arizona State University)

    2007-01-01

    The present work demonstrates the use of light to move liquids on a photoresponsive monolayer, providing a new method for delivering analyses in lab-on-chip environments for microfluidic systems. The light-driven motion of liquids was achieved on photoresponsive azobenzene modified surfaces. The surface energy components of azobenzene modified surfaces were calculated by Van Oss theory. The motion of the liquid was achieved by generation of a surface tension gradient by isomerization of azobenzene monolayers using UV and Visible light, thereby establishing a surface energy heterogeneity on the edge of the droplet. Contact angle measurements of various solvents were used to demonstrate the requirement for fluid motion.

  19. Photonic integration platform with pump free microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R; Harrison, A; Barrow, D; Smowton, P M

    2017-10-02

    Chip based particle sensing using 3D capillary fill microfluidics integrated with monolithically integrated lasers and photodetectors is used to demonstrate the feasibility of true chip scale photonic measurements of fluids. The approach is scalable and manufactured using industry standard compound semiconductor fabrication tools. The need for fluid speed regulation via external pumps is removed by measuring local particle velocity at the point of interrogation and particle position within the fluid flow is derived from multiple time resolved forward scattered light signals. Particle size discrimination of 10 and 15 μm polystyrene microbeads is used as an example.

  20. Shrinking microbubbles with microfluidics: mathematical modelling to control microbubble sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, A; Gnyawali, V; Griffiths, I M; Karshafian, R; Kolios, M C; Tsai, S S H

    2017-11-29

    Microbubbles have applications in industry and life-sciences. In medicine, small encapsulated bubbles (<10 μm) are desirable because of their utility in drug/oxygen delivery, sonoporation, and ultrasound diagnostics. While there are various techniques for generating microbubbles, microfluidic methods are distinguished due to their precise control and ease-of-fabrication. Nevertheless, sub-10 μm diameter bubble generation using microfluidics remains challenging, and typically requires expensive equipment and cumbersome setups. Recently, our group reported a microfluidic platform that shrinks microbubbles to sub-10 μm diameters. The microfluidic platform utilizes a simple microbubble-generating flow-focusing geometry, integrated with a vacuum shrinkage system, to achieve microbubble sizes that are desirable in medicine, and pave the way to eventual clinical uptake of microfluidically generated microbubbles. A theoretical framework is now needed to relate the size of the microbubbles produced and the system's input parameters. In this manuscript, we characterize microbubbles made with various lipid concentrations flowing in solutions that have different interfacial tensions, and monitor the changes in bubble size along the microfluidic channel under various vacuum pressures. We use the physics governing the shrinkage mechanism to develop a mathematical model that predicts the resulting bubble sizes and elucidates the dominant parameters controlling bubble sizes. The model shows a good agreement with the experimental data, predicting the resulting microbubble sizes under different experimental input conditions. We anticipate that the model will find utility in enabling users of the microfluidic platform to engineer bubbles of specific sizes.

  1. A versatile electrowetting-based digital microfluidic platform for quantitative homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergauwe, Nicolas; Witters, Daan; Ceyssens, Frederik; Vermeir, Steven; Verbruggen, Bert; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) lab-on-a-chip systems have already proven their potential within a broad range of bio-assays. Nevertheless, research on the analytical performance of those systems is limited, yet crucial for a further breakthrough in the diagnostic field. Therefore, this paper presents the intrinsic possibilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip as a versatile platform for homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays with high analytical performance. Both droplet dispensing and splitting cause variations in droplet size, thereby directly influencing the assay's performance. The extent to which they influence the performance is assessed by a theoretical sensitivity analysis, which allows the definition of a basic framework for the reduction of droplet size variability. Taking advantage of the optimized droplet manipulations, both homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays are implemented in the EWOD lab-on-a-chip to demonstrate the analytical capabilities and versatility of the device. A fully on-chip enzymatic assay is realized with high analytical performance. It demonstrates the promising capabilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip in food-related and medical applications, such as nutritional and blood analyses. Further, a magnetic bio-assay for IgE detection using superparamagnetic nanoparticles is presented whereby the nanoparticles are used as solid carriers during the bio-assay. Crucial elements are the precise manipulation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with respect to dispensing and separation. Although the principle of using nano-carriers is demonstrated for protein detection, it can be easily extended to a broader range of bio-related applications like DNA sensing. In heterogeneous bio-assays the chip surface is actively involved during the execution of the bio-assay. Through immobilization of specific biological compounds like DNA, proteins and cells a reactive chip surface is realized, which enhances the bio-assay performance. To demonstrate

  2. Towards an electrowetting-based digital microfluidic platform for magnetic immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Vincent; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Kalabukhov, Alexey; Schneiderman, Justin F; Oisjöen, Fredrik; Jesorka, Aldo; Astalan, Andrea Prieto; Krozer, Anatol; Rusu, Cristina; Enoksson, Peter; Winkler, Dag

    2009-12-07

    We demonstrate ElectroWetting-On-Dielectric (EWOD) transport and SQUID gradiometer detection of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) suspended in a 2 microl de-ionized water droplet. This proof-of-concept methodology constitutes the first development step towards a highly sensitive magnetic immunoassay platform with SQUID readout and droplet-based sample handling. Magnetic AC-susceptibility measurements were performed on MNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm using a high-Tc dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) gradiometer as detector. We observed that the signal amplitude per unit volume is 2.5 times higher for a 2 microl sample droplet compared to a 30 microl sample volume.

  3. Microfluidic one-way streets for algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Jorn; Kantsler, Vasily; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2012-02-01

    Controlling locomotion and transport of microorganisms is a key challenge in the development of future biotechnological applications. Here, we demonstrate the use of optimized microfluidic ratchets to rectify the mean swimming direction in suspensions of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is a promising candidate for the photosynthetic production of hydrogen. To assess the potential of microfluidic barriers for the manipulation of algal swimming, we studied first the scattering of individual C. reinhardtii from solid boundaries. High-speed imaging reveals the surprising result that these quasi-spherical ``puller''-type microswimmers primarily interact with surfaces via direct flagellar contact, whereas hydrodynamic effects play a subordinate role. A minimal theoretical model, based on run-and-turn motion and the experimentally measured surface-scattering law, predicts the existence of optimal wedge-shaped ratchets that maximize rectification of initially uniform suspensions. We confirm this prediction in experimental measurements with different geometries. Since the mechano-elastic properties of eukaryotic flagella are conserved across many genera, we expect that our results and methods are applicable to a broad class of biflagellate microorganisms.

  4. Connecting interface for modularization of digital microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hanping; Fan, Shih-Kang; Hsu, Wensyang

    2008-02-01

    Here, interconnection technique to link digital microfluidic chips is proposed. Three kinds of digital microfluidic modules with connecting interface, including flexible module and two types of connector modules, are designed and fabricated. Since these modules are fabricated on a compliant polymer-based substrate (ITO PET), chip-to-chip droplet transportation even at different planes can be achieved by the proposed technique. A low-temperature fabrication process is developed for the polymer substrates, where the SU-8 acts as the insulator. Droplet transportation through electrowetting on curved surface is confirmed by testing on the bended flexible modules with different curvatures from 0 to 0.06 mm -1 at around 70 V AC. Then the droplet transportations between flexible and connector modules are investigated. It is found that the gap size between two modules and the sidewall profiles at interface affect the droplet transportation directly. For the gap size around 50μm with a smooth perpendicular sidewall profile, 80 V AC is shown to actuate droplet of 1.5 μl, 2.5 μl, or 3.5 μl to cross over the interface successfully.

  5. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Buie, Cullen R.

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX®, which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX® after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes. PMID:26893024

  6. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  7. Security Assessment of Cyberphysical Digital Microfluidic Biochips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk Subidh; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Sinanoglu, Ozgur; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu; Karri, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    A digital microfluidic biochip (DMFB) is an emerging technology that enables miniaturized analysis systems for point-of-care clinical diagnostics, DNA sequencing, and environmental monitoring. A DMFB reduces the rate of sample and reagent consumption, and automates the analysis of assays. In this paper, we provide the first assessment of the security vulnerabilities of DMFBs. We identify result-manipulation attacks on a DMFB that maliciously alter the assay outcomes. Two practical result-manipulation attacks are shown on a DMFB platform performing enzymatic glucose assay on serum. In the first attack, the attacker adjusts the concentration of the glucose sample and thereby modifies the final result. In the second attack, the attacker tampers with the calibration curve of the assay operation. We then identify denial-of-service attacks, where the attacker can disrupt the assay operation by tampering either with the droplet-routing algorithm or with the actuation sequence. We demonstrate these attacks using a digital microfluidic synthesis simulator. The results show that the attacks are easy to implement and hard to detect. Therefore, this work highlights the need for effective protections against malicious modifications in DMFBs.

  8. Rapid contrast matching by microfluidic SANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Marco; Poulos, Andreas S; Miller, Ruhina M; Lopez, Carlos G; Martel, Anne; Porcar, Lionel; Cabral, João T

    2017-05-02

    We report a microfluidic approach to perform small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of contrast variation and matching, extensively employed in soft and biological matter research. We integrate a low scattering background microfluidic mixer and serpentine channel in a SANS beamline to yield a single phase, continuous flow, reconfigurable liquid cell. By contrast with conventional, sequential measurements of discrete (typically 4-6) solutions of varying isotopic solvent composition, our approach continually varies solution composition during SANS acquisition. We experimentally and computationally determine the effects of flow dispersion and neutron beam overillumination of microchannels in terms of the composition resolution and precision. The approach is demonstrated with model systems: H2O/D2O mixtures, a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), a triblock copolymer (pluronic F127), and silica nanoparticles (Ludox) in isotopic aqueous mixtures. The system is able to zoom into a composition window to refine contrast matching conditions, and robustly resolve solute structure and form factors by simultaneous fitting of scattering data with continuously varying contrast. We conclude by benchmarking our microflow-SANS with the discrete approach, in terms of volume required, composition resolution and (preparation and measurement) time required, proposing a leap forward in equilibrium, liquid solution phase mapping and contrast variation by SANS.

  9. Selective droplet coalescence using microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazutis, Linas; Griffiths, Andrew D

    2012-04-24

    We report a microfluidic approach, which allows selective and controlled 1 : 1, 2 : 1 or 3 : 1 droplet fusion. A surfactant-stabilized droplet with an interfacial surfactant coverage, Γ, of >98% will fuse spontaneously with a second droplet when Γ of the latter droplet is droplet is ~66%, the two droplets will not fuse, unless they have previously been brought into contact for critical time τ. Therefore, controlling the number of droplets in contact for time τ allows precise control over the number of fused droplets. We have demonstrated efficient (proportion of droplets coalesced p(c) = 1.0, n > 1000) and selective 1 : 1, 2 : 1 or 3 : 1 droplet fusion (proportion of correctly fused droplets p(s) > 0.99, n > 1000). Coalescence in this regime is induced by hydrodynamic flow causing interface separation and is efficient at different Ca numbers and using different dispersed phases, continuous phases and surfactants. However, when Γ of the second droplet is ~96% coalescence is no longer observed. Droplet-based microfluidic systems, in which each droplet functions as an independent microreactor, are proving a promising tool for a wide range of ultrahigh-throughput applications in biology and chemistry. The addition of new reagents to pre-formed droplets is critical to many of these applications and we believe the system described here is a simple and flexible method to do so, as well as a new tool to study interfacial stability phenomena.

  10. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  11. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  12. Microfluidics, Chromatography, and Atomic-Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A Raman-and-atomic-force microscope (RAFM) has been shown to be capable of performing several liquid-transfer and sensory functions essential for the operation of a microfluidic laboratory on a chip that would be used to perform rapid, sensitive chromatographic and spectro-chemical analyses of unprecedentedly small quantities of liquids. The most novel aspect of this development lies in the exploitation of capillary and shear effects at the atomic-force-microscope (AFM) tip to produce shear-driven flow of liquids along open microchannels of a microfluidic device. The RAFM can also be used to perform such functions as imaging liquids in microchannels; removing liquid samples from channels for very sensitive, tip-localized spectrochemical analyses; measuring a quantity of liquid adhering to the tip; and dip-pen deposition from a chromatographic device. A commercial Raman-spectroscopy system and a commercial AFM were integrated to make the RAFM so as to be able to perform simultaneous topographical AFM imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) at the AFM tip. The Raman-spectroscopy system includes a Raman microprobe attached to an optical microscope, the translation stage of which is modified to accommodate the AFM head. The Raman laser excitation beam, which is aimed at the AFM tip, has a wavelength of 785 nm and a diameter of about 5 m, and its power is adjustable up to 10 mW. The AFM is coated with gold to enable tip-localized SERS.

  13. Research of bubble flow characteristics in microfluidic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chao; Cheng, Han; Chen, Shuxian

    2017-04-01

    Bubble is the heart of the microfluidic chip, which takes a significant role in drug release, biological detection and so on. In this case, bubble flow characteristics in microfluidic chip are the key to realize its function. In this paper, bubble flow characteristics in the microfluidic chip have been studied with high speed photography system by controlling the wettability and the heat flux of the microelectrode surface. The result shows that bubble flows faster on the electrode with hydrophobic surface. In addition, loading current to the electrode with hydrophilic surface could also speed up the movement of bubble, and the flow rate of bubble increases with the increasing heat flux of the electrode.

  14. Selective distribution of enzymes in a microfluidic reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Pereira Rosinha Grundtvig, Ines; Krühne, Ulrich

    Off stoichiometric thiol-ene mixtures are well suited for preparation of microfluidic devices with highly functional surfaces. Here a two stage process employing first thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) to prepare two opposite parts of a microfluidic system with a 30x30 mm reactor and subsequently a thiol......-epoxy bonding was used to prepare a fully sealed microfluidic system. The reactor was surface functionalized in-situ with allyl glycidyl ether in different patterns (half-reactor, full-reactor, checkerboard structures) on the surface to provide a controlled distribution of epoxides. The method additionally...

  15. Batch-reactor microfluidic device: first human use of a microfluidically produced PET radiotracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Artem; Miraghaie, Reza; Kotta, Kishore; Ball, Carroll E; Zhang, Jianzhong; Buchsbaum, Monte S; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Elizarov, Arkadij

    2013-01-07

    The very first microfluidic device used for the production of (18)F-labeled tracers for clinical research is reported along with the first human Positron Emission Tomography scan obtained with a microfluidically produced radiotracer. The system integrates all operations necessary for the transformation of [(18)F]fluoride in irradiated cyclotron target water to a dose of radiopharmaceutical suitable for use in clinical research. The key microfluidic technologies developed for the device are a fluoride concentration system and a microfluidic batch reactor assembly. Concentration of fluoride was achieved by means of absorption of the fluoride anion on a micro ion-exchange column (5 μL of resin) followed by release of the radioactivity with 45 μL of the release solution (95 ± 3% overall efficiency). The reactor assembly includes an injection-molded reactor chip and a transparent machined lid press-fitted together. The resulting 50 μL cavity has a unique shape designed to minimize losses of liquid during reactor filling and liquid evaporation. The cavity has 8 ports for gases and liquids, each equipped with a 2-way on-chip mechanical valve rated for pressure up to 20.68 bar (300 psi). The temperature is controlled by a thermoelectric heater capable of heating the reactor up to 180 °C from RT in 150 s. A camera captures live video of the processes in the reactor. HPLC-based purification and reformulation units are also integrated in the device. The system is based on "split-box architecture", with reagents loaded from outside of the radiation shielding. It can be installed either in a standard hot cell, or as a self-shielded unit. Along with a high level of integration and automation, split-box architecture allowed for multiple production runs without the user being exposed to radiation fields. The system was used to support clinical trials of [(18)F]fallypride, a neuroimaging radiopharmaceutical under IND Application #109,880.

  16. Microfluidic pneumatic logic circuits and digital pneumatic microprocessors for integrated microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Minsoung; Burns, Mark A

    2009-11-07

    We have developed pneumatic logic circuits and microprocessors built with microfluidic channels and valves in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The pneumatic logic circuits perform various combinational and sequential logic calculations with binary pneumatic signals (atmosphere and vacuum), producing cascadable outputs based on Boolean operations. A complex microprocessor is constructed from combinations of various logic circuits and receives pneumatically encoded serial commands at a single input line. The device then decodes the temporal command sequence by spatial parallelization, computes necessary logic calculations between parallelized command bits, stores command information for signal transportation and maintenance, and finally executes the command for the target devices. Thus, such pneumatic microprocessors will function as a universal on-chip control platform to perform complex parallel operations for large-scale integrated microfluidic devices. To demonstrate the working principles, we have built 2-bit, 3-bit, 4-bit, and 8-bit microprocessors to control various target devices for applications such as four color dye mixing, and multiplexed channel fluidic control. By significantly reducing the need for external controllers, the digital pneumatic microprocessor can be used as a universal on-chip platform to autonomously manipulate microfluids in a high throughput manner.

  17. Applications of electrowetting-based digital microfluidics in clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Michael G; Pamula, Vamsee K; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen E

    2011-05-01

    Digital microfluidics based on electrowetting is a type of microfluidic platform in which liquids are processed as individual unit-sized droplets that are dispensed from a source, merged together, split apart or transported between locations on demand. These devices are implemented using arrays of surface electrodes to control the shape and position of droplets through the electrowetting effect. A major thrust of digital microfluidics research has been the development of integrated lab-on-a-chip devices to perform clinical in vitro diagnostic assays. A variety of preparatory and analytical processes have been implemented and feasibility has been demonstrated for test types ranging from clinical chemistries to immunoassays, nucleic acid tests and cell-based assays. In this article, the current state and future potential of digital microfluidics for clinical diagnostic testing is reviewed and evaluated.

  18. CMOS Enabled Microfluidic Systems for Healthcare Based Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Sherjeel M.

    2018-02-27

    With the increased global population, it is more important than ever to expand accessibility to affordable personalized healthcare. In this context, a seamless integration of microfluidic technology for bioanalysis and drug delivery and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology enabled data-management circuitry is critical. Therefore, here, the fundamentals, integration aspects, and applications of CMOS-enabled microfluidic systems for affordable personalized healthcare systems are presented. Critical components, like sensors, actuators, and their fabrication and packaging, are discussed and reviewed in detail. With the emergence of the Internet-of-Things and the upcoming Internet-of-Everything for a people-process-data-device connected world, now is the time to take CMOS-enabled microfluidics technology to as many people as possible. There is enormous potential for microfluidic technologies in affordable healthcare for everyone, and CMOS technology will play a major role in making that happen.

  19. Synergy of Microfluidics and Ultrasound: Process Intensification Challenges and Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Kuhn, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A compact snapshot of the current convergence of novel developments relevant to chemical engineering is given. Process intensification concepts are analysed through the lens of microfluidics and sonochemistry. Economical drivers and their influence on scientific activities are mentioned, including

  20. Microfluidic Cytometer for Complete Blood Count Analysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We will fabricate and test microfluidic designs for a micro-electromechanical system based complete blood count (CBC) analysis in separate modules and integrate them...

  1. Opto-Microfluidic Immunosensors: From Colorimetric to Plasmonic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Long He

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical detection has long been the most popular technique in immunosensing. Recent developments in the synthesis of luminescent probes and the fabrication of novel nanostructures enable more sensitive and efficient optical detection, which can be miniaturized and integrated with microfluidics to realize compact lab-on-a-chip immunosensors. These immunosensors are portable, economical and automated, but their sensitivity is not compromised. This review focuses on the incorporation and implementation of optical detection and microfluidics in immunosensors; it introduces the working principles of each optical detection technique and how it can be exploited in immunosensing. The recent progress in various opto-microfluidic immunosensor designs is described. Instead of being comprehensive to include all opto-microfluidic platforms, the report centers on the designs that are promising for point-of-care immunosensing diagnostics, in which ease of use, stability and cost-effective fabrication are emphasized.

  2. Optical sensing for on-chip digital microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jacqueline; Landry, Emily L.; Born, Brandon; Wiltshire, Michael; Collier, Christopher M.; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2012-03-01

    A digital microfluidic architecture is introduced for micron-scale localized fluid actuation and in in-situ optical sensing. Contemporary device integration challenges related to localization and device scalability are overcome through the introduction of a bi-layered digital microfluidic multiplexer. Trinary inputs are applied through differential combinations of voltage signals between upper (column) electrodes and lower (row) electrodes. The ultimate layout provides increased scalability for massively parallel microfluidic actuation applications with a minimal number of inputs. The on-chip sensing technique employed here incorporates a microlens in a folded-cavity arrangement (fabricated by a new voltage-tuned polymer electro-dispensing technique). Such a geometry heightens the sensitivity between the optical probe and fluid refractive properties and allows the device to probe the refractive index of the internal fluid. This optical refractometry sensing technique is merged with the actuation capabilities of the digital microfluidic multiplexer on a single lab-on-a-chip device.

  3. Four Thruster Microfluidic Electrospray Propulsion (MEP) Cubesat Board Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cubesat Microfluidic Electrospray Propulsion (MEP) system module prototype will be designed, built and tested to demonstrate that a four MEP thruster system can...

  4. Liquid density effect on burst frequency in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Joseph, Karunan; Mohktar, Mas S; Madou, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms are widely used in various advanced processes such as biomedical diagnostics, chemical analysis and drug screening. This paper investigates the effect of liquid density on the burst frequency of the centrifugal microfluidic platform. This effect is experimentally investigated and compared to theoretical values. It is found that increasing the liquid density results in lower burst frequency and it is in agreement with theoretical calculations. Moreover, in this study we proposed the use of the microfluidic CD platform as an inexpensive and simple sensor for liquid density measurements. The proposed liquid sensor requires much less liquid volume (in the range of microliters) compared to conventional density meters. This study presents fundamental work which allows for future advance studies with the aim of designing and fabricating centrifugal microfluidic platforms for more complex tasks such as blood analysis.

  5. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments...... to approach in vivo conditions. Microfluidics also allow implementation of a wide range of electrochemical or optical assays for online, real-time, parallel analysis of important parameters such as redox activity, O2 and H2O2 concentration, extracellular pH, cell viability and enzyme activity1,2. Currently...... a double-fluorescent probe-system also used by Fath et al5. Future challenges include integrating both these systems into a microfluidic device for plant tissue culture....

  6. Interface of nanocatalysis and microfluidic reactors for green chemistry methods

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgwane, PR

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of green catalytic methods for chemical synthesis and energy generation based on nanocoated catalyst microfluidic systems is a growing area of innovative research. The interface between heterogeneous catalysis and microchannel...

  7. Microfluidic Cytometer for Complete Blood Count Analysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RMD proposes to develop a MEMS based complete blood count (CBC) instrument that can be used aboard a spacecraft. We will produce a microfluidic scale combination...

  8. Integration of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers to Microfluidic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Viržonis, Darius

    2013-10-22

    The design and manufacturing flexibility of capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUT) makes them attractive option for integration with microfluidic devices both for sensing and fluid manipulation. CMUT concept is introduced here by presentin

  9. Novel Polymer Microfluidics Technology for In Situ Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a new polymer based microfluidics technology for NASA planetary science applications. In particular, we will design, build and...

  10. A truly Lego®-like modular microfluidics platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittayarukskul, Kevin; Lee, Abraham Phillip

    2017-03-01

    Ideally, a modular microfluidics platform should be simple to assemble and support 3D configurations for increased versatility. The modular building blocks should also be mass producible like electrical components. These are fundamental features of world-renowned Legos® and why Legos® inspire many existing modular microfluidics platforms. In this paper, a truly Lego®-like microfluidics platform is introduced, and its basic feasibility is demonstrated. Here, PDMS building blocks resembling 2  ×  2 Lego® bricks are cast from 3D-printed master molds. The blocks are pegged and stacked on a traditional Lego® plate to create simple, 3D microfluidic networks, such as a single basket weave. Characteristics of the platform, including reversible sealing and automatic alignment of channels, are also analyzed and discussed in detail.

  11. Surface Micromachine Microfluidics: Design, Fabrication, Packaging, and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul; Eaton, William P.; Shul, Randy; Willison, Christi Gober; Sniegowski, Jeffrey J.; Miller, Samuel L.; Guttierez, Daniel

    1999-06-30

    The field of microfluidics is undergoing rapid growth in terms of new device and system development. Among the many methods of fabricating microfluidic devices and systems, surface micromachining is relatively underrepresented due to difficulties in the introduction of fluids into the very small channels produced, packaging problems, and difficulties in device and system characterization. The potential advantages of using surface micromachining including compatibility with the existing integrated circuit tool set, integration of electronic sensing and actuation with microfluidics, and fluid volume minimization. In order to explore these potential advantages we have developed first generation surface micromachined microfluidic devices (channels) using an adapted pressure sensor fabrication process to produce silicon nitride channels, and the SUMMiT process to produce polysilicon channels. The channels were characterized by leak testing and flow rate vs. pressure measurements. The fabrication processes used and results of these tests are reported in this paper.

  12. Collective waves in dense and confined microfluidic droplet arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Ulf D; Fleury, Jean-Baptiste; Seemann, Ralf; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-08-07

    Excitation mechanisms for collective waves in confined dense one-dimensional microfluidic droplet arrays are investigated by experiments and computer simulations. We demonstrate that distinct modes can be excited by creating specific 'defect' patterns in flowing droplet trains. Excited longitudinal modes exhibit a short-lived cascade of pairs of laterally displacing droplets. Transversely excited modes obey the dispersion relation of microfluidic phonons and induce a coupling between longitudinal and transverse modes, whose origin is the hydrodynamic interaction of the droplets with the confining walls. Moreover, we investigate the long-time behaviour of the oscillations and discuss possible mechanisms for the onset of instabilities. Our findings demonstrate that the collective dynamics of microfluidic droplet ensembles can be studied particularly well in dense and confined systems. Experimentally, the ability to control microfluidic droplets may allow the modulation of the refractive index of optofluidic crystals, which is a promising approach for the production of dynamically programmable metamaterials.

  13. Clear Castable Polyurethane Elastomer for Fabrication of Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domansky, Karel; Leslie, Daniel C.; McKinney, James; Fraser, Jacob P.; Sliz, Josiah D.; Hamkins-Indik, Tiama; Hamilton, Geraldine A.; Bahinski, Anthony; Ingber, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has numerous desirable properties for fabricating microfluidic devices, including optical transparency, flexibility, biocompatibility, and fabrication by casting; however, partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into the bulk of PDMS hinders industrial acceptance of PDMS microfluidic devices for chemical processing and drug development applications. Here we describe an attractive alternative material that is similar to PDMS in terms of optical transparency, flexibility and castability, but that is also resistant to absorption of small hydrophobic molecules. PMID:23954953

  14. A Microfluidic Device for Spatiotemporal Delivery of Stimuli to Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaidah Ningsih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Living cells encounter many stimuli from the immediate environment. Receptors recognize these environmental cues and transduce signals to produce cell responses. The frequency of a signal is now emerging as an important factor determining cell responses. As a componentry system in understanding temporal stimulation, microfluidic devices allow the observation of cell behaviour under dynamic stimulation and controllable environment. In this paper we describe the design, construction and characterization of a microfluidic device suitable for cell stimulation studies.

  15. 1D photonic crystal sensor integrated in a microfluidic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Pedro; Mortensen, Asger; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2009-01-01

    A refractive index sensor was designed as a 1D resonator incorporated in a microfluidic channel, where aqueous solutions were injected. A sensitivity of 480 nm/RIU and a minimum difference of Deltan = 0.002 were determined.......A refractive index sensor was designed as a 1D resonator incorporated in a microfluidic channel, where aqueous solutions were injected. A sensitivity of 480 nm/RIU and a minimum difference of Deltan = 0.002 were determined....

  16. Optical two-beam traps in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2016-01-01

    An attractive solution for optical trapping and stretching by means of two counterpropagating laser beams is to embed waveguides or optical fibers in a microfluidic system. The microfluidic system can be constructed in different materials, ranging from soft polymers that may easily be cast in a r...... written waveguides and in an injection molded polymer chip with grooves for optical fibers. (C) 2016 The Japan Society of Applied Physics....

  17. Microfluidic Chip Fabrication and Method to Detect Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Qingqing; Fan, Andy; Klapperich, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Fast and effective diagnostics play an important role in controlling infectious disease by enabling effective patient management and treatment. Here, we present an integrated microfluidic thermoplastic chip with the ability to amplify influenza A virus in patient nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs and aspirates. Upon loading the patient sample, the microfluidic device sequentially carries out on-chip cell lysis, RNA purification and concentration steps within the solid phase extraction (SPE), reverse ...

  18. Disposable world-to-chip interface for digital microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dam, R. Michael; Shah, Gaurav; Keng, Pei-Yuin

    2017-05-16

    The present disclosure sets forth incorporating microfluidic chips interfaces for use with digital microfluidic processes. Methods and devices according to the present disclosure utilize compact, integrated platforms that interface with a chip upstream and downstream of the reaction, as well as between intermediate reaction steps if needed. In some embodiments these interfaces are automated, including automation of a multiple reagent process. Various reagent delivery systems and methods are also disclosed.

  19. Experimental and numerical studies of two-phase microfluidic flows

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbanjwa, MB

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available patterns in a T-junction microchannels as a function the capillary number of the oil phase (Cac) Figure 4: Various flow patterns in a T-junction microchannels MODELLING AND SIMULATION The CFD modelling and simulation was achieved using COMSOL.... REFERENCES 1. Bruus, H. 2008. Theoretical microfluidics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2. Tabeling, P. 2005. Introduction to microfluidics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 3. COMSOL AG, Sweden. www.comsol.com 4. Olsson, E. &Kreiss, G. 2005. A...

  20. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-07

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  1. Microfluidics and Nanofluidics Handbook Fabrication, Implementation, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Sushanta K

    2011-01-01

    The Microfluidics and Nanofluidics Handbook: Two-Volume Set comprehensively captures the cross-disciplinary breadth of the fields of micro- and nanofluidics, which encompass the biological sciences, chemistry, physics and engineering applications. To fill the knowledge gap between engineering and the basic sciences, the editors pulled together key individuals, well known in their respective areas, to author chapters that help graduate students, scientists, and practicing engineers understand the overall area of microfluidics and nanofluidics. Topics covered include Finite Volume Method for Num

  2. Controlled droplet microfluidic systems for multistep chemical and biological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, T S; Garstecki, P

    2017-10-16

    Droplet microfluidics is a relatively new and rapidly evolving field of science focused on studying the hydrodynamics and properties of biphasic flows at the microscale, and on the development of systems for practical applications in chemistry, biology and materials science. Microdroplets present several unique characteristics of interest to a broader research community. The main distinguishing features include (i) large numbers of isolated compartments of tiny volumes that are ideal for single cell or single molecule assays, (ii) rapid mixing and negligible thermal inertia that all provide excellent control over reaction conditions, and (iii) the presence of two immiscible liquids and the interface between them that enables new or exotic processes (the synthesis of new functional materials and structures that are otherwise difficult to obtain, studies of the functions and properties of lipid and polymer membranes and execution of reactions at liquid-liquid interfaces). The most frequent application of droplet microfluidics relies on the generation of large numbers of compartments either for ultrahigh throughput screens or for the synthesis of functional materials composed of millions of droplets or particles. Droplet microfluidics has already evolved into a complex field. In this review we focus on 'controlled droplet microfluidics' - a portfolio of techniques that provide convenient platforms for multistep complex reaction protocols and that take advantage of automated and passive methods of fluid handling on a chip. 'Controlled droplet microfluidics' can be regarded as a group of methods capable of addressing and manipulating droplets in series. The functionality and complexity of controlled droplet microfluidic systems can be positioned between digital microfluidics (DMF) addressing each droplet individually using 2D arrays of electrodes and ultrahigh throughput droplet microfluidics focused on the generation of hundreds of thousands or even millions of

  3. Droplet-based microfluidic method for synthesis of microparticles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbanjwa, MB

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based microfluidics has, in recent years, received increased attention as an important tool for performing numerous methods in modern day chemistry and biology such as the synthesis of hydrogel microparticles. Hydrogels have been used in many..., in recent years, received increased attention as an important tool for performing numerous methods in modern day chemistry and biology, such as synthesis of hydrogel microparticles. CONCLUSION AND OUTLOOK The droplet-based microfluidic method offers...

  4. Microencapsulation for tailored food using microfluidics in industrial processes.

    OpenAIRE

    Davalos Saucedo, Cristian Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidics technologies are of great interest on research due to their advantages and the possibility to use it on different industrial areas. For food industry could be an important innovation for the microencapsulation of aromas to improve flavors or mask disgusting flavors improving the palatability of the product or giving an added value to the product. The aim of this work was to develop a microfluidic device to encapsulate essential oil through a flow-focusing technique using mainly ...

  5. Microfluidics in microbiology: putting a magnifying glass on microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sanya; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Moraes, Christopher

    2016-09-12

    Microfluidic technologies enable unique studies in the field of microbiology to facilitate our understanding of microorganisms. Using miniaturized and high-throughput experimental capabilities in microfluidics, devices with controlled microenvironments can be created for microbial studies in research fields such as healthcare and green energy. In this research highlight, we describe recently developed tools for diagnostic assays, high-throughput mutant screening, and the study of human disease development as well as a future outlook on microbes for renewable energy.

  6. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1 early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2 microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3 microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4 integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications.

  7. Microfluidic impedance flow cytometry enabling high-throughput single-cell electrical property characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-04-29

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications.

  8. Development of Droplet Microfluidics Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent developments in droplet microfluidics enabling high-throughput single-cell analysis. Five key aspects in this field are included in this review: (1 prototype demonstration of single-cell encapsulation in microfluidic droplets; (2 technical improvements of single-cell encapsulation in microfluidic droplets; (3 microfluidic droplets enabling single-cell proteomic analysis; (4 microfluidic droplets enabling single-cell genomic analysis; and (5 integrated microfluidic droplet systems enabling single-cell screening. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on key performances of throughput, multifunctionality, and absolute quantification.

  9. Digital implementations for integrated microfluidic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, A.; Nichols, J.; Hoorfar, M.; Najjaran, H.; Holzman, J. F.

    2009-05-01

    A bi-layer digital microfluidic structure is introduced. The integrated design employs a two-dimensional structure with perpendicular linear electrode arrays controlling x- and y- directional actuation. The introduced structure is capable of electrowetting-based fluid control, and it is presented here as an implementation capable of electrical sensing of the state of fluids within the device. The state of conductive fluids within the bi-layer structure is sampled through differential measurements of conductance values between the x- and y-channels. It is shown here that the features of microdroplets within the device can be effectively mapped onto these differential conductance measurements. An electronic acquisition system is ultimately employed to sense these conductance states and extract the position and size of microdroplets within the device. The complete system is demonstrated here for both single microdroplet and multiple microdroplet implementations.

  10. Droplet Microfluidics for Chip-Based Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaler, Karan V. I. S.; Prakash, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Droplet microfluidics (DMF) is a fluidic handling technology that enables precision control over dispensing and subsequent manipulation of droplets in the volume range of microliters to picoliters, on a micro-fabricated device. There are several different droplet actuation methods, all of which can generate external stimuli, to either actively or passively control the shape and positioning of fluidic droplets over patterned substrates. In this review article, we focus on the operation and utility of electro-actuation-based DMF devices, which utilize one or more micro-/nano-patterned substrates to facilitate electric field-based handling of chemical and/or biological samples. The underlying theory of DMF actuations, device fabrication methods and integration of optical and opto-electronic detectors is discussed in this review. Example applications of such electro-actuation-based DMF devices have also been included, illustrating the various actuation methods and their utility in conducting chip-based laboratory and clinical diagnostic assays. PMID:25490590

  11. Digital Microfluidics for Nucleic Acid Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Beatriz; Veigas, Bruno; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Águas, Hugo; Igreja, Rui; Baptista, Pedro V

    2017-06-25

    Digital Microfluidics (DMF) has emerged as a disruptive methodology for the control and manipulation of low volume droplets. In DMF, each droplet acts as a single reactor, which allows for extensive multiparallelization of biological and chemical reactions at a much smaller scale. DMF devices open entirely new and promising pathways for multiplex analysis and reaction occurring in a miniaturized format, thus allowing for healthcare decentralization from major laboratories to point-of-care with accurate, robust and inexpensive molecular diagnostics. Here, we shall focus on DMF platforms specifically designed for nucleic acid amplification, which is key for molecular diagnostics of several diseases and conditions, from pathogen identification to cancer mutations detection. Particular attention will be given to the device architecture, materials and nucleic acid amplification applications in validated settings.

  12. Digital Microfluidics: A New Paradigm for Radiochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Yuin Keng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging technology of digital microfluidics is opening up the possibility of performing radiochemistry at the microliter scale to produce tracers for positron emission tomography (PET labeled with fluorine-18 or other isotopes. Working at this volume scale not only reduces reagent costs but also improves specific activity (SA by reducing contamination by the stable isotope. This technology could provide a practical means to routinely prepare high-SA tracers for applications such as neuroimaging and could make it possible to routinely achieve high SA using synthesis strategies such as isotopic exchange. Reagent droplets are controlled electronically, providing high reliability, a compact control system, and flexibility for diverse syntheses with a single-chip design. The compact size may enable the development of a self-shielded synthesizer that does not require a hot cell. This article reviews the progress of this technology and its application to the synthesis of PET tracers.

  13. Microfluidic Control of Cell Pairing and Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Alison M.; Kirak, Oktay; Suh, Heikyung; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Voldman, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Cell fusion has been used for many different purposes, including generation of hybridomas and reprogramming of somatic cells. The fusion step represents the key event in initiation of these procedures. Standard fusion techniques, however, provide poor and random cell contact, leading to low yields. We present here a microfluidic device to trap and properly pair thousands of cells. Using this device we were able to pair different cell types, including fibroblasts, mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), and myeloma cells, achieving pairing efficiencies up to 70%. The device is compatible with both chemical and electrical fusion protocols. We observed that electrical fusion was more efficient than chemical fusion, with membrane reorganization efficiencies of up to 89%. We achieved greater than 50% properly paired and fused cells over the entire device, 5× greater than a commercial electrofusion chamber, and were able to observe reprogramming in hybrids between mESCs and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. PMID:19122668

  14. Digital Microfluidics for Nucleic Acid Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Coelho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital Microfluidics (DMF has emerged as a disruptive methodology for the control and manipulation of low volume droplets. In DMF, each droplet acts as a single reactor, which allows for extensive multiparallelization of biological and chemical reactions at a much smaller scale. DMF devices open entirely new and promising pathways for multiplex analysis and reaction occurring in a miniaturized format, thus allowing for healthcare decentralization from major laboratories to point-of-care with accurate, robust and inexpensive molecular diagnostics. Here, we shall focus on DMF platforms specifically designed for nucleic acid amplification, which is key for molecular diagnostics of several diseases and conditions, from pathogen identification to cancer mutations detection. Particular attention will be given to the device architecture, materials and nucleic acid amplification applications in validated settings.

  15. Droplet Microfluidics for Artificial Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punnamaraju, Srikoundinya; Steckl, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Droplet interface bilayer is a versatile approach that allows formation of artificial lipid bilayer membrane at the interface of two lipid monolayer coated aqueous droplets in a lipid filled oil medium. Versatility exists in the form of voltage control of DIB area, ability of forming networks of DIBs, volume control of droplets and lipid-oil, and ease of reformation. Significant effect of voltage on the area and capacitance of DIB as well as DIB networks are characterized using simultaneous optical and electrical recordings. Mechanisms behind voltage-induced effects on DIBs are investigated. Photo induced effect on the DIB membrane porosity is obtained by incorporating UVC-sensitive photo-polymerizable lipids in DIB. Photo-induced effects can be extended for in-vitro studies of triggered release of encapsulated contents across membranes. A droplet based low voltage digital microfluidic platform is developed to automate DIB formation, which could potentially be used for forming arrays of lipid bilayer membranes.

  16. Membrane-less microfiltration using inertial microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Tay, Andy Kah Ping; Guan, Guofeng; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-01-01

    Microfiltration is a ubiquitous and often crucial part of many industrial processes, including biopharmaceutical manufacturing. Yet, all existing filtration systems suffer from the issue of membrane clogging, which fundamentally limits the efficiency and reliability of the filtration process. Herein, we report the development of a membrane-less microfiltration system by massively parallelizing inertial microfluidics to achieve a macroscopic volume processing rates (~ 500 mL/min). We demonstrated the systems engineered for CHO (10–20 μm) and yeast (3–5 μm) cells filtration, which are two main cell types used for large-scale bioreactors. Our proposed system can replace existing filtration membrane and provide passive (no external force fields), continuous filtration, thus eliminating the need for membrane replacement. This platform has the desirable combinations of high throughput, low-cost, and scalability, making it compatible for a myriad of microfiltration applications and industrial purposes. PMID:26154774

  17. Microfluidic Flow of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Wiese, Oliver; Henrich, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explore the rheology and flow-induced morphological changes of cholesteric liquid crystal patterns subject to Poiseuille flow within a slab geometry, and under different anchoring conditions at the wall. Our focus is particularly on the behaviour of Cholesteric Fingers of the first kind and of Blue Phase II. Depending on the applied pressure gradient, we observe a number of dynamic regimes with different rheological properties. Our results provide the first insight into the flow response of cholesteric phases with fully two- or three-dimensional director field patterns and normal and planar degenerate anchoring conditions as commonly realised in experiments. They are also of high relevance for a fundamental understanding of complex liquid crystals in confinement and an important step towards future microfluidic applications that are based on cholesteric liquid crystals.

  18. Digital Microfluidics: A New Paradigm for Radiochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keng, Pei Yuin; van Dam, R Michael

    2015-12-05

    The emerging technology of digital microfluidics is opening up the possibility of performing radiochemistry at the microliter scale to produce tracers for positron emission tomography (PET) labeled with fluorine-18 or other isotopes. Working at this volume scale not only reduces reagent costs but also improves specific activity (SA) by reducing contamination by the stable isotope. This technology could provide a practical means to routinely prepare high-SA tracers for applications such as neuroimaging and could make it possible to routinely achieve high SA using synthesis strategies such as isotopic exchange. Reagent droplets are controlled electronically, providing high reliability, a compact control system, and flexibility for diverse syntheses with a single-chip design. The compact size may enable the development of a self-shielded synthesizer that does not require a hot cell. This article reviews the progress of this technology and its application to the synthesis of PET tracers.

  19. A Transdermal Measurement Platform Based on Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ying Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Franz diffusion cell is one of the most widely used devices to evaluate transdermal drug delivery. However, this static and nonflowing system has some limitations, such as a relatively large solution volume and skin area and the development of gas bubbles during sampling. To overcome these disadvantages, this study provides a proof of concept for miniaturizing models of transdermal delivery by using a microfluidic chip combined with a diffusion cell. The proposed diffusion microchip system requires only 80 μL of sample solution and provides flow circulation. Two model compounds, Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 and potassium ferricyanide, were successfully tested for transdermal delivery experiments. The diffusion rate is high for a high sample concentration or a large membrane pore size. The developed diffusion microchip system, which is feasible, can be applied for transdermal measurement in the future.

  20. Active matter logic for autonomous microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Francis G.; Dunkel, Jörn

    2017-04-01

    Chemically or optically powered active matter plays an increasingly important role in materials design, but its computational potential has yet to be explored systematically. The competition between energy consumption and dissipation imposes stringent physical constraints on the information transport in active flow networks, facilitating global optimization strategies that are not well understood. Here, we combine insights from recent microbial experiments with concepts from lattice-field theory and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to introduce a generic theoretical framework for active matter logic. Highlighting conceptual differences with classical and quantum computation, we demonstrate how the inherent non-locality of incompressible active flow networks can be utilized to construct universal logical operations, Fredkin gates and memory storage in set-reset latches through the synchronized self-organization of many individual network components. Our work lays the conceptual foundation for developing autonomous microfluidic transport devices driven by bacterial fluids, active liquid crystals or chemically engineered motile colloids.

  1. Droplet Microfluidics for Chip-Based Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan V. I. S. Kaler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Droplet microfluidics (DMF is a fluidic handling technology that enables precision control over dispensing and subsequent manipulation of droplets in the volume range of microliters to picoliters, on a micro-fabricated device. There are several different droplet actuation methods, all of which can generate external stimuli, to either actively or passively control the shape and positioning of fluidic droplets over patterned substrates. In this review article, we focus on the operation and utility of electro-actuation-based DMF devices, which utilize one or more micro-/nano-patterned substrates to facilitate electric field-based handling of chemical and/or biological samples. The underlying theory of DMF actuations, device fabrication methods and integration of optical and opto-electronic detectors is discussed in this review. Example applications of such electro-actuation-based DMF devices have also been included, illustrating the various actuation methods and their utility in conducting chip-based laboratory and clinical diagnostic assays.

  2. Sample transport with thermocapillary force for microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, N-T; Pang, W W; Huang, X [School of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Nanyang Technological University 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a novel concept for transport of aqueous sample in capillaries. The concept is based on the thermocapillary effect, which utilizes the temperature dependency of surface tension to drive a sample droplet. To date, the major problem of this concept was the evaporation of the aqueous sample. In our approach, a liquid-liquid system was used for delivering the sample. The aqueous sample is protected by silicone oil, thus evaporation can be avoided. A transient temperature field drives both liquids away from a heater. The paper first presents a theoretical model for the coupled thermocapillary problem. Next, the paper compares and discusses experimental results with different capillary sizes. The results show the huge potential of this concept for handling sample droplets dispersed in oil, which are often created by droplet-based microfluidics.

  3. Microfluidic Systems with Ion-Selective Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slouka, Zdenek; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2014-06-01

    When integrated into microfluidic chips, ion-selective nanoporous polymer and solid-state membranes can be used for on-chip pumping, pH actuation, analyte concentration, molecular separation, reactive mixing, and molecular sensing. They offer numerous functionalities and are hence superior to paper-based devices for point-of-care biochips, with only slightly more investment in fabrication and material costs required. In this review, we first discuss the fundamentals of several nonequilibrium ion current phenomena associated with ion-selective membranes, many of them revealed by studies with fabricated single nanochannels/nanopores. We then focus on how the plethora of phenomena has been applied for transport, separation, concentration, and detection of biomolecules on biochips.

  4. Optics-Integrated Microfluidic Platforms for Biomolecular Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Kathleen E.; Lu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Compared with conventional optical methods, optics implemented on microfluidic chips provide small, and often much cheaper ways to interrogate biological systems from the level of single molecules up to small model organisms. The optical probing of single molecules has been used to investigate the mechanical properties of individual biological molecules; however, multiplexing of these measurements through microfluidics and nanofluidics confers many analytical advantages. Optics-integrated microfluidic systems can significantly simplify sample processing and allow a more user-friendly experience; alignments of on-chip optical components are predetermined during fabrication and many purely optical techniques are passively controlled. Furthermore, sample loss from complicated preparation and fluid transfer steps can be virtually eliminated, a particularly important attribute for biological molecules at very low concentrations. Excellent fluid handling and high surface area/volume ratios also contribute to faster detection times for low abundance molecules in small sample volumes. Although integration of optical systems with classical microfluidic analysis techniques has been limited, microfluidics offers a ready platform for interrogation of biophysical properties. By exploiting the ease with which fluids and particles can be precisely and dynamically controlled in microfluidic devices, optical sensors capable of unique imaging modes, single molecule manipulation, and detection of minute changes in concentration of an analyte are possible. PMID:27119629

  5. A microfluidic dialysis device for complex biological mixture SERS analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a microfluidic device fabricated with a simple and inexpensive process allowing rapid filtering of peptides from a complex mixture. The polymer microfluidic device can be used for sample preparation in biological applications. The device is fabricated by micromilling and solvent assisted bonding, in which a microdialysis membrane (cut-off of 12-14 kDa) is sandwiched in between an upper and a bottom microfluidic chamber. An external frame connects the microfluidic device to external tubes, microvalves and syringe pumps. Bonding strength and interface sealing are pneumatically tested. Microfluidic protocols are also described by using the presented device to filter a sample composed of specific peptides (MW 1553.73 Da, at a concentration of 1.0 ng/μl) derived from the BRCA1 protein, a tumor-suppressor molecule which plays a pivotal role in the development of breast cancer, and albumin (MW 66.5 kDa, at a concentration of 35 μg/μl), the most represented protein in human plasma. The filtered samples coming out from the microfluidic device were subsequently deposited on a SERS (surface enhanced Raman scattering) substrate for further analysis by Raman spectroscopy. By using this approach, we were able to sort the small peptides from the bigger and highly concentrated protein albumin and to detect them by using a label-free technique at a resolution down to 1.0 ng/μl.

  6. An electrochemical albumin-sensing system utilizing microfluidic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-June; Lu, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Thong-Yueh; Chou, Tse-Chuan; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-04-01

    This paper reports an integrated microfluidic chip capable of detecting the concentration of albumin in urine by using an electrochemical method in an automatic format. The integrated microfluidic chip was fabricated by using microelectromechanical system techniques. The albumin detection was conducted by using the electrochemical sensing method, in which the albumin in urine was detected by measuring the difference of peak currents between a bare reference electrode and an albumin-adsorption electrode. To perform the detection of the albumin in an automatic format, pneumatic microvalves and micropumps were integrated onto the microfluidic chip. The albumin sample and interference mixture solutions such as homovanillic acid, dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine were first stored in one of the three reservoirs. Then the solution comprising the albumin sample and interference solutions was transported to pass through the detection zone utilizing the pneumatic micropump. Experimental data showed that the developed system can successfully detect the concentration of the albumin in the existence of interference materials. When compared with the traditional albumin-sensing method, smaller amounts of samples were required to perform faster detection by using the integrated microfluidic chip. Additionally, the microfluidic chip integrated with pneumatic micropumps and microvalves facilitates the transportation of the samples in an automatic mode with lesser human intervention. The development of the integrated microfluidic albumin-sensing system may be promising for biomedical applications. Preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 2nd International Meeting on Microsensors and Microsystems 2006 (National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, 15-18 January).

  7. Rapid prototyping of multiphase microfluidics with robotic cutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zidong; Zhao, Zhengtuo; Lo, Joe Fu-jiou

    2014-03-01

    Microfluidic devices offer novel techniques to address biological and biomedical issues. Standard microfluidic fabrication uses photolithography to pattern channels on silicon wafers with high resolution. Even the relatively straightforward SU8 and soft lithography in microfluidics require investing and training in photolithography, which is also time consuming due to complicated thick resist procedures, including sensitive substrate pretreatment, coating, soft bake, expose, post-exposure bake, and developing steps. However, for applications where low resolution (>200 μm) and high turn-around (> 4 designs/day) prototyping are met with little or no lithography infrastructure, robotic cutters [1] offer flexible options for making glass and PDMS microfluidics. We describe the use of robotics cutters for designing microfluidic geometries, and compliment it with safe glass etching, with depths down to 60 μm. Soft lithography patterning of 200 μm thick PDMS membrane was also explored. Without high equipment investment and lengthy student training, both glass and PDMS microfluidics can be achieved in small facilities using this technique.

  8. Open-source, community-driven microfluidics with Metafluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, David S; Thorsen, Todd A; Babb, Jonathan; Wick, Scott T; Gam, Jeremy J; Weiss, Ron; Carr, Peter A

    2017-06-07

    Microfluidic devices have the potential to automate and miniaturize biological experiments, but open-source sharing of device designs has lagged behind sharing of other resources such as software. Synthetic biologists have used microfluidics for DNA assembly, cell-free expression, and cell culture, but a combination of expense, device complexity, and reliance on custom set-ups hampers their widespread adoption. We present Metafluidics, an open-source, community-driven repository that hosts digital design files, assembly specifications, and open-source software to enable users to build, configure, and operate a microfluidic device. We use Metafluidics to share designs and fabrication instructions for both a microfluidic ring-mixer device and a 32-channel tabletop microfluidic controller. This device and controller are applied to build genetic circuits using standard DNA assembly methods including ligation, Gateway, Gibson, and Golden Gate. Metafluidics is intended to enable a broad community of engineers, DIY enthusiasts, and other nontraditional participants with limited fabrication skills to contribute to microfluidic research.

  9. Three-dimensional interconnected microporous poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Po Ki; Su, Hui; Goral, Vasiliy N; Fink, Katherine A

    2011-04-21

    This technical note presents a fabrication method and applications of three-dimensional (3D) interconnected microporous poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices. Based on soft lithography, the microporous PDMS microfluidic devices were fabricated by molding a mixture of PDMS pre-polymer and sugar particles in a microstructured mold. After curing and demolding, the sugar particles were dissolved and washed away from the microstructured PDMS replica revealing 3D interconnected microporous structures. Other than introducing microporous structures into the PDMS replica, different sizes of sugar particles can be used to alter the surface wettability of the microporous PDMS replica. Oxygen plasma assisted bonding was used to enclose the microstructured microporous PDMS replica using a non-porous PDMS with inlet and outlet holes. A gas absorption reaction using carbon dioxide (CO(2)) gas acidified water was used to demonstrate the advantages and potential applications of the microporous PDMS microfluidic devices. We demonstrated that the acidification rate in the microporous PDMS microfluidic device was approximately 10 times faster than the non-porous PDMS microfluidic device under similar experimental conditions. The microporous PDMS microfluidic devices can also be used in cell culture applications where gas perfusion can improve cell survival and functions.

  10. Microporous Nanocomposite Enabled Microfluidic Biochip for Cardiac Biomarker Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nawab; Ali, Md Azahar; Rai, Prabhakar; Sharma, Ashutosh; Malhotra, B D; John, Renu

    2017-10-04

    This paper demonstrates an ultrasensitive microfluidic biochip nanoengineered with microporous manganese-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite for detection of cardiac biomarker, namely human cardiac troponin I. In this device, the troponin sensitive microfluidic electrode consisted of a thin layer of manganese-reduced graphene oxide (Mn3O4-RGO) nanocomposite material. This nanocomposite thin layer was formed on surface of a patterned indium tin oxide substrate after modification with 3-aminopropyletriethoxysilane and was assembled with a polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic system. The nanoengineered microelectrode was functionalized with antibodies specific to cardiac troponin I. The uniformly distributed flower-shaped nanostructured manganese oxide (nMn3O4) onto RGO nanosheets offered large surface area for enhanced loading of antibody molecules and improved electrochemical reaction at the sensor surface. This microfluidic device showed an excellent sensitivity of log [87.58] kΩ/(ng mL-1)/cm2 for quantification of human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) molecules in a wide detection range of 0.008-20 ng/mL. This device was found to have high stability, high reproducibility, and minimal interference with other biomarkers cardiac troponin C and T, myoglobin, and B-type natriuretic peptide. These advantageous features of the Mn3O4-RGO nanocomposite, in conjunction with microfluidic integration, enabled a promising microfluidic biochip platform for point-of-care detection of cardiac troponin.

  11. Microfluidics: A Groundbreaking Technology for PET Tracer Production?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Wängler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Application of microfluidics to Positron Emission Tomography (PET tracer synthesis has attracted increasing interest within the last decade. The technical advantages of microfluidics, in particular the high surface to volume ratio and resulting fast thermal heating and cooling rates of reagents can lead to reduced reaction times, increased synthesis yields and reduced by-products. In addition automated reaction optimization, reduced consumption of expensive reagents and a path towards a reduced system footprint have been successfully demonstrated. The processing of radioactivity levels required for routine production, use of microfluidic-produced PET tracer doses in preclinical and clinical imaging as well as feasibility studies on autoradiolytic decomposition have all given promising results. However, the number of microfluidic synthesizers utilized for commercial routine production of PET tracers is very limited. This study reviews the state of the art in microfluidic PET tracer synthesis, highlighting critical design aspects, strengths, weaknesses and presenting several characteristics of the diverse PET market space which are thought to have a significant impact on research, development and engineering of microfluidic devices in this field. Furthermore, the topics of batch- and single-dose production, cyclotron to quality control integration as well as centralized versus de-centralized market distribution models are addressed.

  12. Single cell microfluidics for systems oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong

    2012-02-01

    The singular term ``cancer'' is never one kind of disease, but deceivingly encompasses a large number of heterogeneous disease states, which makes it impossible to completely treat cancer using a generic approach. Rather systems approaches are urgently required to assess cancer heterogeneity, stratify patients and enable the most effective, individualized treatment. The heterogeneity of tumors at the single cell level is reflected by the hierarchical complexity of the tumor microenvironment. To identify all the cellular components, including both tumor and infiltrating immune cells, and to delineate the associated cell-to-cell signaling network that dictates tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, we developed a single cell microfluidics chip that can analyze a panel of proteins that are potentially associated inter-cellular signaling network in tumor microenvironment from hundreds of single cells in parallel. This platform integrates two advanced technologies -- microfluidic single cell handling and ultra-high density protein array. This device was first tested for highly multiplexed profiling of secreted proteins including tumor-immune signaling molecules from monocytic leukemia cells. We observed profound cellular heterogeneity with all functional phenotypes quantitatively identified. Correlation analysis further indicated the existence of an intercellular cytokine network in which TNFα-induced secondary signaling cascades further increased functional cellular diversity. It was also exploited to evaluate polyfunctionality of tumor antigen-specific T cells from melanoma patients being treated with adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy. This platform could be further extended to analyze both solid tumor cells (e.g. human lung carcinoma cells) and infiltrating immune cells (e.g. macrophages) so as to enable systems analysis of the complex tumor microenvironment from small amounts of clinical specimens, e.g. skinny needle biopsies. Thus, it could potentially

  13. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  14. Biosensing with Quantum Dots: A Microfluidic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannoy, Charles H.; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have served as the basis for signal development in a variety of biosensing technologies and in applications using bioprobes. The use of QDs as physical platforms to develop biosensors and bioprobes has attracted considerable interest. This is largely due to the unique optical properties of QDs that make them excellent choices as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and well suited for optical multiplexing. The large majority of QD-based bioprobe and biosensing technologies that have been described operate in bulk solution environments, where selective binding events at the surface of QDs are often associated with relatively long periods to reach a steady-state signal. An alternative approach to the design of biosensor architectures may be provided by a microfluidic system (MFS). A MFS is able to integrate chemical and biological processes into a single platform and allows for manipulation of flow conditions to achieve, by sample transport and mixing, reaction rates that are not entirely diffusion controlled. Integrating assays in a MFS provides numerous additional advantages, which include the use of very small amounts of reagents and samples, possible sample processing before detection, ultra-high sensitivity, high throughput, short analysis time, and in situ monitoring. Herein, a comprehensive review is provided that addresses the key concepts and applications of QD-based microfluidic biosensors with an added emphasis on how this combination of technologies provides for innovations in bioassay designs. Examples from the literature are used to highlight the many advantages of biosensing in a MFS and illustrate the versatility that such a platform offers in the design strategy. PMID:22163723

  15. Stimulus-responsive polymers and other functional polymer surfaces as components in glass microfluidic channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieviet, B.D.; Schön, Peter Manfred; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2014-01-01

    The integration of smart stimulus-responsive polymers as functional elements within microfluidic devices has greatly improved the performance capabilities of controlled fluid delivery. For their use as actuators in microfluidic systems, reversible expansion and shrinking are unique mechanisms which

  16. A Microfluidics-HPLC/Differential Mobility Spectrometer Macromolecular Detection System for Human and Robotic Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, S. L.; Killeen, K.; Han, J.; Eiceman, G. A.; Kanik, I.; Kidd, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a unique, miniaturized, solute analyzer based on microfluidics technology. The analyzer consists of an integrated microfluidics High Performance Liquid Chromatographic chip / Differential Mobility Spectrometer (?HPLCchip/ DMS) detection system

  17. In search of low cost biological analysis: Wax or acrylic glue bonded paper microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2011-11-04

    In this body of work we have been developing and characterizing paper based microfluidic fabrication technologies to produce low cost biological analysis. Specifically we investigated the performance of paper microfluidics that had been bonded using wax o

  18. Selection of Easily Accessible PCR- and Bio-Compatible Materials for Microfluidic Chips

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Kang

    2013-10-30

    Conventional fabrication of microfluidic chip is a complicated and time, effort and material consuming process. Consequently, due to high expenses, it has poor applicability for performing mass biological analysis by microfluidics. In this study, we repor

  19. Batch-reactor microfluidic device: first human use of a microfluidically produced PET radiotracer†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraghaie, Reza; Kotta, Kishore; Ball, Carroll E.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Buchsbaum, Monte S.; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Elizarov, Arkadij

    2013-01-01

    The very first microfluidic device used for the production of 18F-labeled tracers for clinical research is reported along with the first human Positron Emission Tomography scan obtained with a microfluidically produced radiotracer. The system integrates all operations necessary for the transformation of [18F]fluoride in irradiated cyclotron target water to a dose of radiopharmaceutical suitable for use in clinical research. The key microfluidic technologies developed for the device are a fluoride concentration system and a microfluidic batch reactor assembly. Concentration of fluoride was achieved by means of absorption of the fluoride anion on a micro ion-exchange column (5 μL of resin) followed by release of the radioactivity with 45 μL of the release solution (95 ± 3% overall efficiency). The reactor assembly includes an injection-molded reactor chip and a transparent machined lid press-fitted together. The resulting 50 μL cavity has a unique shape designed to minimize losses of liquid during reactor filling and liquid evaporation. The cavity has 8 ports for gases and liquids, each equipped with a 2-way on-chip mechanical valve rated for pressure up to 20.68 bar (300 psi). The temperature is controlled by a thermoelectric heater capable of heating the reactor up to 180 °C from RT in 150 s. A camera captures live video of the processes in the reactor. HPLC-based purification and reformulation units are also integrated in the device. The system is based on “split-box architecture”, with reagents loaded from outside of the radiation shielding. It can be installed either in a standard hot cell, or as a self-shielded unit. Along with a high level of integration and automation, split-box architecture allowed for multiple production runs without the user being exposed to radiation fields. The system was used to support clinical trials of [18F]fallypride, a neuroimaging radiopharmaceutical under IND Application #109,880. PMID:23135409

  20. Two-phase microfluidics in electrowetting displays and its effect on optical performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Tao; Jin, Mingliang; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    Driving microfluidic flow in micropixels by electrowetting to realize light switches and displays is of both practical and fundamental significance. The electro-optical performance related to microfluidic behavior needs to be clarified to optimize device functions. In this article, the microfluidic

  1. Polymer Microfluidics: Simple, Low-Cost Fabrication Process Bridging Academic Lab Research to Commercialized Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wen Tsao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Using polymer materials to fabricate microfluidic devices provides simple, cost effective, and disposal advantages for both lab-on-a-chip (LOC devices and micro total analysis systems (μTAS. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS elastomer and thermoplastics are the two major polymer materials used in microfluidics. The fabrication of PDMS and thermoplastic microfluidic device can be categorized as front-end polymer microchannel fabrication and post-end microfluidic bonding procedures, respectively. PDMS and thermoplastic materials each have unique advantages and their use is indispensable in polymer microfluidics. Therefore, the proper selection of polymer microfabrication is necessary for the successful application of microfluidics. In this paper, we give a short overview of polymer microfabrication methods for microfluidics and discuss current challenges and future opportunities for research in polymer microfluidics fabrication. We summarize standard approaches, as well as state-of-art polymer microfluidic fabrication methods. Currently, the polymer microfluidic device is at the stage of technology transition from research labs to commercial production. Thus, critical consideration is also required with respect to the commercialization aspects of fabricating polymer microfluidics. This article provides easy-to-understand illustrations and targets to assist the research community in selecting proper polymer microfabrication strategies in microfluidics.

  2. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  3. A microfluidic approach for hemoglobin detection in whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparia, Nikita; Platten, Kimsey C.; Anderson, Kristin B.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    2017-10-01

    Diagnosis of anemia relies on the detection of hemoglobin levels in a blood sample. Conventional blood analyzers are not readily available in most low-resource regions where anemia is prevalent, so detection methods that are low-cost and point-of-care are needed. Here, we present a microfluidic approach to measure hemoglobin concentration in a sample of whole blood. Unlike conventional approaches, our microfluidic approach does not require hemolysis. We detect the level of hemoglobin in a blood sample optically by illuminating the blood in a microfluidic channel at a peak wavelength of 540 nm and measuring its absorbance using a CMOS sensor coupled with a lens to magnify the image onto the detector. We compare measurements in microchannels with channel heights of 50 and 115 μm and found the channel with the 50 μm height provided a better range of detection. Since we use whole blood and not lysed blood, we fit our data to an absorption model that includes optical scattering in order to obtain a calibration curve for our system. Based on this calibration curve and data collected, we can measure hemoglobin concentration within 1 g/dL for severe cases of anemia. In addition, we measured optical density for blood flowing at a shear rate of 500 s-1 and observed it did not affect the nonlinear model. With this method, we provide an approach that uses microfluidic detection of hemoglobin levels that can be integrated with other microfluidic approaches for blood analysis.

  4. Towards rapid prototyped convective microfluidic DNA amplification platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajit, Smrithi; Praveen, Hemanth Mithun; Puneeth, S. B.; Dave, Abhishek; Sesham, Bharat; Mohan, K. N.; Goel, Sanket

    2017-02-01

    Today, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based DNA amplification plays an indispensable role in the field of biomedical research. Its inherent ability to exponentially amplify sample DNA has proven useful for the identification of virulent pathogens like those causing Multiple Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The intervention of Microfluidics technology has revolutionized the concept of PCR from being a laborious and time consuming process into one that is faster, easily portable and capable of being multifunctional. The Microfluidics based PCR outweighs its traditional counterpart in terms of flexibility of varying reaction rate, operation simplicity, need of a fraction of volume and capability of being integrated with other functional elements. The scope of the present work involves the development of a real-time continuous flow microfluidic device, fabricated by 3D printing-governed rapid prototyping method, eventually leading to an automated and robust platform to process multiple DNA samples for detection of MDRTB-associated mutations. The thermal gradient characteristic to the PCR process is produced using peltier units appropriate to the microfluidic environment fully monitored and controlled by a low cost controller driven by a Data Acquisition System. The process efficiency achieved in the microfluidic environment in terms of output per cycle is expected to be on par with the traditional PCR and capable of earning the additional advantages of being faster and minimizing the handling.

  5. Microfluidic Devices for Forensic DNA Analysis: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijns, Brigitte; van Asten, Arian; Tiggelaar, Roald; Gardeniers, Han

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for point-of-care use. In the forensic field, one may expect microfluidic technology to become particularly relevant for the analysis of biological traces containing human DNA. This would require a number of consecutive steps, including sample work up, DNA amplification and detection, as well as secure storage of the sample. This article provides an extensive overview of microfluidic devices for cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, DNA amplification and detection and analysis techniques for DNA. Topics to be discussed are polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on-chip, digital PCR (dPCR), isothermal amplification on-chip, chip materials, integrated devices and commercially available techniques. A critical overview of the opportunities and challenges of the use of chips is discussed, and developments made in forensic DNA analysis over the past 10–20 years with microfluidic systems are described. Areas in which further research is needed are indicated in a future outlook. PMID:27527231

  6. Teaching microfluidic diagnostics using Jell-O(®) chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng Wei T; Lagally, Eric T

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidics has emerged as a versatile technology that has found many applications, including DNA chips, fuel cells, and diagnostics. As the field of microfluidic diagnostics grows, it is important to introduce the principles of this technology to young students and the general public. The objective of this project was to create a simple and effective method that could be used to teach key microfluidics concepts using easily accessible materials. Similar to the poly(dimethylsiloxane) soft lithography technique, a Jell-O(®) "chip" is produced by pouring a mixture of Jell-O(®) and gelatine solution into a mold, which is constructed using foam plate, coffee stirrers, and double-sided tape. The plate is transferred to a 4°C refrigerator for curing, and then the Jell-O(®) chip is peeled off for experimental demonstrations. Three types of chips have been fabricated with different molds: a JELLO mold, a Y-channel mold, and a pH-sensor mold. Using these devices, the basics of microfluidic diagnostics can be demonstrated in one or two class periods. The method described in this chapter provides teachers with a fast and inexpensive way to introduce this technology, and students with a fun and hands-on way to understand the basics of microfluidic diagnostics.

  7. Pneumatic oscillator circuits for timing and control of integrated microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Philip N.; Nguyen, Transon V.; Hui, Elliot E.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency references are fundamental to most digital systems, providing the basis for process synchronization, timing of outputs, and waveform synthesis. Recently, there has been growing interest in digital logic systems that are constructed out of microfluidics rather than electronics, as a possible means toward fully integrated laboratory-on-a-chip systems that do not require any external control apparatus. However, the full realization of this goal has not been possible due to the lack of on-chip frequency references, thus requiring timing signals to be provided from off-chip. Although microfluidic oscillators have been demonstrated, there have been no reported efforts to characterize, model, or optimize timing accuracy, which is the fundamental metric of a clock. Here, we report pneumatic ring oscillator circuits built from microfluidic valves and channels. Further, we present a compressible-flow analysis that differs fundamentally from conventional circuit theory, and we show the utility of this physically based model for the optimization of oscillator stability. Finally, we leverage microfluidic clocks to demonstrate circuits for the generation of phase-shifted waveforms, self-driving peristaltic pumps, and frequency division. Thus, pneumatic oscillators can serve as on-chip frequency references for microfluidic digital logic circuits. On-chip clocks and pumps both constitute critical building blocks on the path toward achieving autonomous laboratory-on-a-chip devices. PMID:24145429

  8. Pneumatic oscillator circuits for timing and control of integrated microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Philip N; Nguyen, Transon V; Hui, Elliot E

    2013-11-05

    Frequency references are fundamental to most digital systems, providing the basis for process synchronization, timing of outputs, and waveform synthesis. Recently, there has been growing interest in digital logic systems that are constructed out of microfluidics rather than electronics, as a possible means toward fully integrated laboratory-on-a-chip systems that do not require any external control apparatus. However, the full realization of this goal has not been possible due to the lack of on-chip frequency references, thus requiring timing signals to be provided from off-chip. Although microfluidic oscillators have been demonstrated, there have been no reported efforts to characterize, model, or optimize timing accuracy, which is the fundamental metric of a clock. Here, we report pneumatic ring oscillator circuits built from microfluidic valves and channels. Further, we present a compressible-flow analysis that differs fundamentally from conventional circuit theory, and we show the utility of this physically based model for the optimization of oscillator stability. Finally, we leverage microfluidic clocks to demonstrate circuits for the generation of phase-shifted waveforms, self-driving peristaltic pumps, and frequency division. Thus, pneumatic oscillators can serve as on-chip frequency references for microfluidic digital logic circuits. On-chip clocks and pumps both constitute critical building blocks on the path toward achieving autonomous laboratory-on-a-chip devices.

  9. Waste-to-energy conversion from a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, B.; Jiménez-Valdés, R. J.; Moreno-Zuria, A.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Ledesma-García, J.; García-Cordero, J. L.; Arriaga, L. G.

    2017-08-01

    This work reports the successful harvesting of energy from waste produced in a microfluidic device using a fuel cell. A miniaturized glucose air-breathing microfluidic fuel cell (ABμFFC) was designed, fabricated and tested with three different configurations according to their electrode nature: inorganic, hybrid and biofuel cell. Each ABμFFC was characterized using an ideal medium, with sterile cell culture medium, and with waste produced on a microfluidic device. The inorganic-ABμFFC exhibited the highest performance compared to the rest of the configurations. As a proof-of-concept, cancer cells were cultured on a microfluidic device and the consumed cell culture media (glucose concentration <11 mM) was used as an energy source without further treatment, into the inorganic-ABμFFC. The fuel cell generated a maximum total power of 5.2 μW, which is enough energy to power low-consumption microelectronic chips. This application demonstrates that the waste produced by microfluidic applications could be potentially scavenged to produce electrical energy. It also opens the possibility to develop truly energy self-sufficient portable devices.

  10. Teflon films for chemically-inert microfluidic valves and pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, William H; von Muhlen, Marcio G; Manalis, Scott R

    2008-06-01

    We present a simple method for fabricating chemically-inert Teflon microfluidic valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. These structures are modeled after monolithic membrane valves and pumps that utilize a featureless polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane bonded between two etched glass wafers. The limited chemical compatibility of PDMS has necessitated research into alternative materials for microfluidic devices. Previous work has shown that spin-coated amorphous fluoropolymers and Teflon-fluoropolymer laminates can be fabricated and substituted for PDMS in monolithic membrane valves and pumps for space flight applications. However, the complex process for fabricating these spin-coated Teflon films and laminates may preclude their use in many research and manufacturing contexts. As an alternative, we show that commercially-available fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) Teflon films can be used to fabricate chemically-inert monolithic membrane valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. The FEP Teflon valves and pumps presented here are simple to fabricate, function similarly to their PDMS counterparts, maintain their performance over extended use, and are resistant to virtually all chemicals. These structures should facilitate lab-on-a-chip research involving a vast array of chemistries that are incompatible with native PDMS microfluidic devices.

  11. Laser micromachined hybrid open/paper microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumo, B; Muluneh, M; Issadore, D

    2013-01-01

    Paper-based microfluidics are an increasingly popular alternative to devices with conventional open channel geometries. The low cost of fabrication and the absence of external instrumentation needed to drive paper microchannels make them especially well suited for medical diagnostics in resource-limited settings. Despite the advantages of paper microfluidics, many assays performed using conventional open channel microfluidics are challenging to translate onto paper, such as bead, emulsion, and cell-based assays. To overcome this challenge, we have developed a hybrid open-channel/paper channel microfluidic device. In this design, wick-driven paper channels control the flow rates within conventional microfluidics. We fabricate these hybrid chips using laser-micromachined polymer sheets and filter paper. In contrast to previous efforts that utilized external, macroscopic paper-based pumps, we integrated micro-scale paper and open channels onto a single chip to control multiple open channels and control complex laminar flow-pattern within individual channels. We demonstrated that flow patterns within the open channels can be quantitatively controlled by modulating the geometry of the paper channels, and that these flow rates agree with Darcy's law. The utility of these hybrid chips, for applications such as bead-, cell-, or emulsion-based assays, was demonstrated by constructing a hybrid chip that hydrodynamically focused micrometer-sized polystyrene beads stably for >10 min, as well as cells, without external instrumentation to drive fluid flow.

  12. Microfluidic Devices for Forensic DNA Analysis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijns, Brigitte; van Asten, Arian; Tiggelaar, Roald; Gardeniers, Han

    2016-08-05

    Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for point-of-care use. In the forensic field, one may expect microfluidic technology to become particularly relevant for the analysis of biological traces containing human DNA. This would require a number of consecutive steps, including sample work up, DNA amplification and detection, as well as secure storage of the sample. This article provides an extensive overview of microfluidic devices for cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, DNA amplification and detection and analysis techniques for DNA. Topics to be discussed are polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on-chip, digital PCR (dPCR), isothermal amplification on-chip, chip materials, integrated devices and commercially available techniques. A critical overview of the opportunities and challenges of the use of chips is discussed, and developments made in forensic DNA analysis over the past 10-20 years with microfluidic systems are described. Areas in which further research is needed are indicated in a future outlook.

  13. Parameter Screening in Microfluidics Based Hydrodynamic Single-Cell Trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic cell-based arraying technology is widely used in the field of single-cell analysis. However, among developed devices, there is a compromise between cellular loading efficiencies and trapped cell densities, which deserves further analysis and optimization. To address this issue, the cell trapping efficiency of a microfluidic device with two parallel micro channels interconnected with cellular trapping sites was studied in this paper. By regulating channel inlet and outlet status, the microfluidic trapping structure can mimic key functioning units of previously reported devices. Numerical simulations were used to model this cellular trapping structure, quantifying the effects of channel on/off status and trapping structure geometries on the cellular trapping efficiency. Furthermore, the microfluidic device was fabricated based on conventional microfabrication and the cellular trapping efficiency was quantified in experiments. Experimental results showed that, besides geometry parameters, cellular travelling velocities and sizes also affected the single-cell trapping efficiency. By fine tuning parameters, more than 95% of trapping sites were taken by individual cells. This study may lay foundation in further studies of single-cell positioning in microfluidics and push forward the study of single-cell analysis.

  14. Fast Dynamic Visualizations in Microfluidics Enabled by Fluorescent Carbon Nanodots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Xiao, Lian; An, Tingting; Lim, Wenxiang; Wong, Teckneng; Sun, Handong

    2017-09-01

    Microfluidic systems have become a superior platform for explorations of fascinating fluidic physics at microscale as well as applications in biomedical devices, chemical reactions, drug delivery, etc. Exploitations of this platform are built upon the fundamental techniques of flow visualizations. However, the currently employed fluorescent materials for microfluidic visualization are far from satisfaction, which severely hinders their widespread applications. Here fluorescent carbon nanodots are documented as a game-changer, applicable in versatile fluidic environment for the visualization in microfluidics with unprecedented advantages. One of the fastest fluorescent imaging speeds up to 2500 frames per second under a normal contionous wave (CW) laser line is achieved by adopting carbon nanodots in microfluidics. Besides better visualizations of the fluid or interface, fluorescent carbon nanodots-based microparticles enable quantitative studies of high speed dynamics in fluids at microscale with a more than 90% lower cost, which is inaccessible by traditionally adopted fluorescent dye based seeding particles. The findings hold profound influences to microfluidic investigations and may even lead to revolutionary changes to the relevant industries. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Electrical Textile Valves for Paper Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainla, Alar; Hamedi, Mahiar M; Güder, Firat; Whitesides, George M

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes electrically-activated fluidic valves that operate based on electrowetting through textiles. The valves are fabricated from electrically conductive, insulated, hydrophobic textiles, but the concept can be extended to other porous materials. When the valve is closed, the liquid cannot pass through the hydrophobic textile. Upon application of a potential (in the range of 100-1000 V) between the textile and the liquid, the valve opens and the liquid penetrates the textile. These valves actuate in less than 1 s, require low energy (≈27 µJ per actuation), and work with a variety of aqueous solutions, including those with low surface tension and those containing bioanalytes. They are bistable in function, and are, in a sense, the electrofluidic analog of thyristors. They can be integrated into paper microfluidic devices to make circuits that are capable of controlling liquid, including autonomous fluidic timers and fluidic logic. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Planar Microfluidic Drop Splitting and Merging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Sean; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie; MAD-LAB Team

    2015-11-01

    Open drop microfluidic platforms offer attractive alternatives to closed microchannel devices, however, to be effective they require efficient schemes for planar drop transport and manipulation. While there are many methods that have been reported for drop transport, it is far more difficult to carry out drop operations of dispensing, merging and splitting. In this work, we introduce a novel alternative to merge and split drops using laterally-offset modulated surface acoustic waves (SAWs). To do so, the energy delivery into the drop is modulated to induce drop stretching. Upon removal of the SAW energy, capillary forces at the center of the elongated drop drain the capillary bridge region towards both ends, resulting in its collapse and consequential splitting of the drop. This occurs only below a critical Ohnesorge number, a balance between the viscous forces that retard the drainage and the sufficiently large capillary forces that cause the liquid bridge to pinch. By this scheme we show the possibility of both reliable symettric splitting of a drop with an average deviation in droplet volumes of only around 4%, and no greater than 10%, as well as asymmetric splitting, by tuning the input energy to the device--thus presenting a comparable alternative to electrowetting.

  17. Evaporative Lithography in Open Microfluidic Channel Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Lone, Saifullah

    2017-02-24

    We demonstrate a direct capillary-driven method based on wetting and evaporation of various suspensions to fabricate regular two-dimensional wires in an open microfluidic channel through continuous deposition of micro- or nanoparticles under evaporative lithography, akin to the coffee-ring effect. The suspension is gently placed in a loading reservoir connected to the main open microchannel groove on a PDMS substrate. Hydrophilic conditions ensure rapid spreading of the suspension from the loading reservoir to fill the entire channel length. Evaporation during the spreading and after the channel is full increases the particle concentration toward the end of the channel. This evaporation-induced convective transport brings particles from the loading reservoir toward the channel end where this flow deposits a continuous multilayered particle structure. The particle deposition front propagates backward over the entire channel length. The final dry deposit of the particles is thereby much thicker than the initial volume fraction of the suspension. The deposition depth is characterized using a 3D imaging profiler, whereas the deposition topography is revealed using a scanning electron microscope. The patterning technology described here is robust and passive and hence operates without an external field. This work may well become a launching pad to construct low-cost and large-scale thin optoelectronic films with variable thicknesses and interspacing distances.

  18. Microfluidic approach of Sickled Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Loiseau, Etienne; Massiera, Gladys

    2012-11-01

    Sickle Cell Anemia is a disorder of the microcirculation caused by a genetic point mutation that produces an altered hemoglobin protein called HbS. HbS self-assembles reversibly into long rope like fibers inside the red blood cells. The resulting distorded sickled red blood cells are believed to block the smallest capillaries of the tissues producing anemia. Despite the large amount of work that provided a thorough understanding of HbS polymerization in bulk as well as in intact red blood cells at rest, no consequent cellular scale approaches of the study of polymerization and its link to the capillary obstruction have been proposed in microflow, although the problem of obstruction is in essence a circulatory problem. Here, we use microfluidic channels, designed to mimic physiological conditions (flow velocity, oxygen concentration, hematocrit...) of the microcirculation to carry out a biomimetic study at the cellular scale of sickled cell vaso-occlusion. We show that flow geometry, oxygen concentration, white blood cells and free hemoglobin S are essential in the formation of original cell aggregates which could play a role in the vaso-occlusion events.

  19. Vapor-fed microfluidic hydrogen generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modestino, M A; Dumortier, M; Hosseini Hashemi, S M; Haussener, S; Moser, C; Psaltis, D

    2015-05-21

    Water-splitting devices that operate with humid air feeds are an attractive alternative for hydrogen production as the required water input can be obtained directly from ambient air. This article presents a novel proof-of-concept microfluidic platform that makes use of polymeric ion conductor (Nafion®) thin films to absorb water from air and performs the electrochemical water-splitting process. Modelling and experimental tools are used to demonstrate that these microstructured devices can achieve the delicate balance between water, gas, and ionic transport processes required for vapor-fed devices to operate continuously and at steady state, at current densities above 3 mA cm(-2). The results presented here show that factors such as the thickness of the Nafion films covering the electrodes, convection of air streams, and water content of the ionomer can significantly affect the device performance. The insights presented in this work provide important guidelines for the material requirements and device designs that can be used to create practical electrochemical hydrogen generators that work directly under ambient air.

  20. Evaporative Lithography in Open Microfluidic Channel Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Saifullah; Zhang, Jia Ming; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-03-21

    We demonstrate a direct capillary-driven method based on wetting and evaporation of various suspensions to fabricate regular two-dimensional wires in an open microfluidic channel through continuous deposition of micro- or nanoparticles under evaporative lithography, akin to the coffee-ring effect. The suspension is gently placed in a loading reservoir connected to the main open microchannel groove on a PDMS substrate. Hydrophilic conditions ensure rapid spreading of the suspension from the loading reservoir to fill the entire channel length. Evaporation during the spreading and after the channel is full increases the particle concentration toward the end of the channel. This evaporation-induced convective transport brings particles from the loading reservoir toward the channel end where this flow deposits a continuous multilayered particle structure. The particle deposition front propagates backward over the entire channel length. The final dry deposit of the particles is thereby much thicker than the initial volume fraction of the suspension. The deposition depth is characterized using a 3D imaging profiler, whereas the deposition topography is revealed using a scanning electron microscope. The patterning technology described here is robust and passive and hence operates without an external field. This work may well become a launching pad to construct low-cost and large-scale thin optoelectronic films with variable thicknesses and interspacing distances.

  1. Liquid Therapy Delivery Models Using Microfluidic Airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Waisman, Dan; Filoche, Marcel; Sznitman, Josué

    2013-11-01

    The propagation and break-up of viscous and surfactant-laden liquid plugs in the lungs is an active area of research in view of liquid plug installation in the lungs to treat a host of different pulmonary conditions. This includes Infant Respiratory Distress Syndrome (IRDS) the primary cause of neonatal death and disability. Until present, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to low-viscosity Newtonian fluids along a single bifurcation. However, these fluids reflect poorly the actual liquid medication therapies used to treat pulmonary conditions. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of liquid plugs in the airway tree using microfluidic models spanning three or more generations of the bronchiole tree. Our approach allows the dynamics of plug propagation and break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one scale in vitro model, as a function of fluid rheology, trailing film dynamics and bronchial tree geometry. Understanding these dynamics are a first and necessary step to deliver more effectively boluses of liquid medication to the lungs while minimizing the injury caused to epithelial cells lining the lungs from the rupture of such liquid plugs.

  2. Polymeric microbead arrays for microfluidic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jason A.; Du, Xiaoguang; Grogan, Joseph M.; Schrlau, Michael G.; Bau, Haim H.

    2010-11-01

    Microbeads offer a convenient and efficient means of immobilizing biomolecules and capturing target molecules of interest in microfluidic immunoassay devices. In this study, hot embossing is used to form wells enabling the direct incorporation of a microbead array in a plastic substrate. We demonstrate two techniques to populate the well array with beads. In the first case, encoded beads with various functionalizations are distributed randomly among the wells and their position is registered by reading their encoding. Alternatively, beads are controllably placed at predetermined positions and decoding is not required. The random placement technique is demonstrated with two functionalized bead types that are distributed among the wells and then decoded to register their locations. The alternative, deliberate placement technique is demonstrated by controllably placing magnetic beads at selected locations in the array using a magnetic probe. As a proof of concept to illustrate the biosensing capability of the randomly assembled array, an on-chip, bead-based immunoassay is employed to detect the inflammatory protein Interleukin-8. The principle of the assay, however, can be extended to detect multiple targets simultaneously. Our method eliminates the need to interface silicon components with plastic devices to form microarrays containing individually addressable beads. This has the potential to reduce the cost and complexity of lab-on-chip devices for medical diagnosis, food and water quality inspection, and environmental monitoring.

  3. Microfluidic platform for optimization of crystallization conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuheng; Gerard, Charline J. J.; Ikni, Aziza; Ferry, Gilles; Vuillard, Laurent M.; Boutin, Jean A.; Ferte, Nathalie; Grossier, Romain; Candoni, Nadine; Veesler, Stéphane

    2017-08-01

    We describe a universal, high-throughput droplet-based microfluidic platform for crystallization. It is suitable for a multitude of applications, due to its flexibility, ease of use, compatibility with all solvents and low cost. The platform offers four modular functions: droplet formation, on-line characterization, incubation and observation. We use it to generate droplet arrays with a concentration gradient in continuous long tubing, without using surfactant. We control droplet properties (size, frequency and spacing) in long tubing by using hydrodynamic empirical relations. We measure droplet chemical composition using both an off-line and a real-time on-line method. Applying this platform to a complicated chemical environment, membrane proteins, we successfully handle crystallization, suggesting that the platform is likely to perform well in other circumstances. We validate the platform for fine-gradient screening and optimization of crystallization conditions. Additional on-line detection methods may well be integrated into this platform in the future, for instance, an on-line diffraction technique. We believe this method could find applications in fields such as fluid interaction engineering, live cell study and enzyme kinetics.

  4. Microfluidics microFACS for Life Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Donald W.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype micro-scale Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter (microFACS) for life detection has been built and is undergoing testing. A functional miniature microfluidics instrument with the ability to remotely distinguish live or dead bacterial cells from abiotic particulates in ice or permafrost of icy bodies of the solar system would be of fundamental value to NASA. The use of molecular probes to obtain the bio-signature of living or dead cells could answer the most fundamental question of Astrobiology: Does life exist beyond Earth? The live-dead fluorescent stains to be used in the microFACS instrument function only with biological cell walls. The detection of the cell membranes of living or dead bacteria (unlike PAH's and many other Biomarkers) would provide convincing evidence of present or past life. This miniature device rapidly examine large numbers of particulates from a polar ice or permafrost sample and distinguish living from dead bacteria cells and biological cells from mineral grains and abiotic particulates and sort the cells and particulates based on a staining system. Any sample found to exhibit fluorescence consistent with living cells could then be used in conjunction with a chiral labeled release experiment or video microscopy system to seek addition evidence for cellular metabolism or motility. Results of preliminary testing and calibration of the microFACS prototype instrument system with pure cultures and enrichment assemblages of microbial extremophiles will be reported.

  5. Microfluidics Based Point-of-Care Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Augustine, Shine; Kumar, Saurabh; Kumar, Suveen; Nara, Sharda; Srivastava, Saurabh; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2017-11-27

    Point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices have been predicted to provide a boon in health care especially in the diagnosis and detection of diseases. POC devices have been found to have many advantages like a rapid and precise response, portability, low cost, and non-requirement of specialized equipment. The major objective of a POC diagnostic research is to develop a chip-based, self-containing miniaturized device that can be used to examine different analytes in complex samples. Further, the integration of microfluidics (MF) with advanced biosensor technologies is likely to result in improved POC diagnostics. This paper presents the overview of the different materials (glass, silicon, polymer, paper) and techniques for the fabrication of MF based POC devices along with their wide range of biosensor applications. Besides this, the authors have presented in brief the challenges that MF is currently facing along with possible solutions that may result in the availability of the accessible, reliable and cost-efficient technology. The development of these devices requires the combination of developed MF components into POC devices that are user-friendly, sensitive, stable, accurate, low cost and minimally invasive. These MF based POC devices have tremendous potential in providing improved healthcare including easy monitoring, early detection of disease, and increased personalization. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Microfluidic Platform for Circulating Tumor Cells Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueras-Mari, I.; Rodriguez-Trujillo, L.; Samitier-Marti, J.

    2016-07-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are released from primary tumors into the bloodstream and transported to distant organs, promoting metastasis, which is known to be responsible for most cancer‐related deaths. Currently tumors are not found until symptoms appear or by chance when the patient undergoes a medical test, which in both situations can be too late. Once a tumor is found it is studied from tissue samples obtained directly from the patient in an invasive way. This invasive procedure is known as biopsy and apart from being invasive, it is costly, time consuming and can sometimes be painful and even risky for the patients’ health condition. Therefore, CTCs detection in blood also addressed as “liquid biopsy” would be very useful because by running routine blood analysis CTCs could be detected and collected suggesting tumor presence. However, due to the scarce presence in blood of these cells and to the huge amount of contamination from other cellular components a perfect method providing good capture and purity of CTCs has not been developed yet. In this project, a spiral size sorter microfluidic device has been manufactured and tested in order to determine its performance and limitations. Device performance was tested with different dilutions of healthy donor blood samples mixed with 30 micron particles simulating CTCs. The results obtained from these experiments show very good CTC recovery of up to 100% and the depletion of blood cellular components is around 99.9%. (Author)

  7. Integrated microfluidic linking chip for scanning probe nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kee Suk; Wang, Xuefeng; Shaikh, Kashan; Bullen, David; Goluch, Edgar; Zou, Jun; Liu, Chang; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2004-07-01

    This letter reports an architecture for a microfluidic chip that dresses (inks) multiple nanolithography tips in a high-density array in a parallel and multiplexed fashion. The microfluidic chip consists of multiple precision patterned thin-film poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) patches serving as porous inking pads. Inking chemicals are supplied from loading reservoirs to the inking pads through microfluidic channels. The gas-permeable thin PDMS membranes allow ink molecules to diffuse through while preventing bulk liquid from overflowing or evaporating. The inking chip provides high-density inking, easy loading of inks, and reduced evaporation losses. We present the fabrication process and inking of scanning probe contact printing probes and commercial nitride probes.

  8. Microfluidic and Nanofluidic Resistive Pulse Sensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Song

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The resistive pulse sensing (RPS method based on the Coulter principle is a powerful method for particle counting and sizing in electrolyte solutions. With the advancement of micro- and nano-fabrication technologies, microfluidic and nanofluidic resistive pulse sensing technologies and devices have been developed. Due to the unique advantages of microfluidics and nanofluidics, RPS sensors are enabled with more functions with greatly improved sensitivity and throughput and thus have wide applications in fields of biomedical research, clinical diagnosis, and so on. Firstly, this paper reviews some basic theories of particle sizing and counting. Emphasis is then given to the latest development of microfuidic and nanofluidic RPS technologies within the last 6 years, ranging from some new phenomena, methods of improving the sensitivity and throughput, and their applications, to some popular nanopore or nanochannel fabrication techniques. The future research directions and challenges on microfluidic and nanofluidic RPS are also outlined.

  9. Enhancing Single Molecule Imaging in Optofluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas E. Vasdekis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics and optofluidics have revolutionized high-throughput analysis and chemical synthesis over the past decade. Single molecule imaging has witnessed similar growth, due to its capacity to reveal heterogeneities at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, both resolution types are dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR of the image. In this paper, we review how the SNR can be enhanced in optofluidics and microfluidics. Starting with optofluidics, we outline integrated photonic structures that increase the signal emitted by single chromophores and minimize the excitation volume. Turning then to microfluidics, we review the compatible functionalization strategies that reduce noise stemming from non-specific interactions and architectures that minimize bleaching and blinking.

  10. A review on self-assembly in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yingying; Wang, Bingsheng; Jin, Mingliang; Yu, Ying; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2017-11-01

    Self-assembly is a process that operates over a vast range of length and time scales. Microfluidic technology has been proven to be a powerful tool to manipulate micro- and nano-scale substrates with precise control over size and speed using various fluidic materials and properties. In this review, we discuss the current status of microfluidic technology in manipulating fluid dynamics and interfacial phenomena which influence self-assembly process and resulted structures. The self-assembled materials/structures were summarized and discussed as the sequence of the objective size at the micro-, nano- and molecular scale. Overall, microfluidics is becoming a useful tool to manipulate various fluids regarding to physical and chemical properties, being inherently suitable for self-assembly process control.

  11. Various On-Chip Sensors with Microfluidics for Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review recent advances in on-chip sensors integrated with microfluidics for biological applications. Since the 1990s, much research has concentrated on developing a sensing system using optical phenomena such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS to improve the sensitivity of the device. The sensing performance can be significantly enhanced with the use of microfluidic chips to provide effective liquid manipulation and greater flexibility. We describe an optical image sensor with a simpler platform for better performance over a larger field of view (FOV and greater depth of field (DOF. As a new trend, we review consumer electronics such as smart phones, tablets, Google glasses, etc. which are being incorporated in point-of-care (POC testing systems. In addition, we discuss in detail the current optical sensing system integrated with a microfluidic chip.

  12. Protein Microarrays with Novel Microfluidic Methods: Current Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra K. Dixit

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic-based micromosaic technology has allowed the pattering of recognition elements in restricted micrometer scale areas with high precision. This controlled patterning enabled the development of highly multiplexed arrays multiple analyte detection. This arraying technology was first introduced in the beginning of 2001 and holds tremendous potential to revolutionize microarray development and analyte detection. Later, several microfluidic methods were developed for microarray application. In this review we discuss these novel methods and approaches which leverage the property of microfluidic technologies to significantly improve various physical aspects of microarray technology, such as enhanced imprinting homogeneity, stability of the immobilized biomolecules, decreasing assay times, and reduction of the costs and of the bulky instrumentation.

  13. Phaseguides: a paradigm shift in microfluidic priming and emptying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulto, Paul; Podszun, Susann; Meyer, Philipp; Hermann, Carsten; Manz, Andreas; Urban, Gerald A

    2011-05-07

    Phaseguide technology gives complete control over filling and emptying of any type of microfluidic structures, independent of the chamber and channel geometry. The technique is based on a step-wise advancement of the liquid-air interface using the meniscus pinning effect. In this paper, the main effects and parameters underlying the phaseguiding principle are discussed and a demonstration is given of its potential for dead angle filling, spatially controlled phaseguide overflow and sequential phaseguide overflow, all accumulating in a passive valving approach. Phaseguides represent a new direction in microfluidic design thinking that will prove a leap forward towards more simple, flexible and reliable microfluidic systems. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  14. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Applications of micro/nanoparticles in microfluidic sensors: a review.

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Yusheng

    2014-04-21

    This paper reviews the applications of micro/nanoparticles in microfluidics device fabrication and analytical processing. In general, researchers have focused on two properties of particles--electric behavior and magnetic behavior. The applications of micro/nanoparticles could be summarized on the chip fabrication level and on the processing level. In the fabrication of microfluidic chips (chip fabrication level), particles are good additives in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to prepare conductive or magnetic composites which have wide applications in sensors, valves and actuators. On the other hand, particles could be manipulated according to their electric and magnetic properties under external electric and magnetic fields when they are travelling in microchannels (processing level). Researchers have made a great progress in preparing modified PDMS and investigating the behaviors of particles in microchannels. This article attempts to present a discussion on the basis of particles applications in microfluidics.

  16. Routing-based Synthesis of Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maftei, Elena; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate on-chip all the basic functsions for biochemical analysis. The "digital" microfluidic biochips are manipulating liquids not as a continuous flow, but as discrete droplets on a two-dimensional array...... of electrodes. Basic microfluidic operations, such as mixing and dilution, are performed on the array, by routing the corresponding droplets on a series of electrodes. So far, researchers have assumed that these operations are executed on rectangular virtual devices, formed by grouping several adjacent...... the concept of virtual modules and allow the droplets to move on the chip on any route during operation execution. Thus, the synthesis problem is transformed into a routing problem. We propose an approach derived from a Greedy Randomized Adaptive Search Procedure (GRASP) and we show that by considering...

  17. Evaluation of microfluidic channels with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, J.; Prykäri, T.; Alarousu, E.; Lauri, J.; Myllylä, R.

    2010-11-01

    Application of time domain, ultra high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) in evaluation of microfluidic channels is demonstrated. Presented study was done using experimental UHR-OCT device based on a Kerr-lens mode locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser, a photonic crystal fibre and modified, free-space Michelson interferometer. To show potential of the technique, microfluidic chip fabricated by VTT Center for Printed Intelligence (Oulu, Finland) was measured. Ability for full volumetric reconstruction in non-contact manner enabled complete characterization of closed entity of a microfluidic channel without contamination and harm for the sample. Measurement, occurring problems, and methods of postprocessing for raw data are described. Results present completely resolved physical structure of the channel, its spatial dimensions, draft angles and evaluation of lamination quality.

  18. Evaluation of microfluidic channels with optical coherence tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Czajkowski, J.

    2010-06-25

    Application of time domain, ultra high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) in evaluation of microfluidic channels is demonstrated. Presented study was done using experimental UHR-OCT device based on a Kerr-lens mode locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser, a photonic crystal fibre and modified, free-space Michelson interferometer. To show potential of the technique, microfluidic chip fabricated by VTT Center for Printed Intelligence (Oulu, Finland) was measured. Ability for full volumetric reconstruction in non-contact manner enabled complete characterization of closed entity of a microfluidic channel without contamination and harm for the sample. Measurement, occurring problems, and methods of postprocessing for raw data are described. Results present completely resolved physical structure of the channel, its spatial dimensions, draft angles and evaluation of lamination quality.

  19. Microfluidic system for in-vitro hypoxia assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busek, M.; Grünzner, S.; Steege, T.; Steinfelder, C.; Schmieder, F.; Klotzbach, U.; Sonntag, F.

    2017-02-01

    Hereby presented is a microfluidic system, including a micro pump, an oxygenator and a cell culture chamber for perfusion controlled hypoxia assays. It consists of laser-structured polycarbonate (PC) foils and an elastomeric membrane which were joined together using thermal diffusion bonding. The elastomer forms an oxygenator element. The microfluidic system is characterized using non-invasive flow measurement based on micro-Particle-ImageVelocimetry (μPIV) and optical oxygen measurement utilizing the oxygen dependent fluorescence decay. Based on those experimental results and mathematical considerations, the oxygenator and mass transport phenomena within the microfluidic system can be described. This oxygen sensor, the micro pump, a controlling device and the gas mixture at the oxygenator forms a regulatory circuit to adjust the oxygen content in the cell culture chamber and helps to produce well-defined hypoxic conditions for the cells.

  20. Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS Based Microfluidic Devices for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Afzulpurkar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS based microfluidic devices have gained popularity in biomedicine field over the last few years. In this paper, a comprehensive overview of microfluidic devices such as micropumps and microneedles has been presented for biomedical applications. The aim of this paper is to present the major features and issues related to micropumps and microneedles, e.g., working principles, actuation methods, fabrication techniques, construction, performance parameters, failure analysis, testing, safety issues, applications, commercialization issues and future prospects. Based on the actuation mechanisms, the micropumps are classified into two main types, i.e., mechanical and non-mechanical micropumps. Microneedles can be categorized according to their structure, fabrication process, material, overall shape, tip shape, size, array density and application. The presented literature review on micropumps and microneedles will provide comprehensive information for researchers working on design and development of microfluidic devices for biomedical applications.

  1. A microfluidic sub-critical water extraction instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Noell, Aaron C.; Fisher, Anita; Lee, Mike C.; Takano, Nobuyuki; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kutzer, Thomas C.; Grunthaner, Frank

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses a microfluidic subcritical water extraction (SCWE) chip for autonomous extraction of amino acids from astrobiologically interesting samples. The microfluidic instrument is composed of three major components. These include a mixing chamber where the soil sample is mixed and agitated with the solvent (water), a subcritical water extraction chamber where the sample is sealed with a freeze valve at the chip inlet after a vapor bubble is injected into the inlet channels to ensure the pressure in the chip is in equilibrium with the vapor pressure and the slurry is then heated to ≤200 °C in the SCWE chamber, and a filter or settling chamber where the slurry is pumped to after extraction. The extraction yield of the microfluidic SCWE chip process ranged from 50% compared to acid hydrolysis and 80%-100% compared to a benchtop microwave SCWE for low biomass samples.

  2. Improving agglutination tests by working in microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degré, G; Brunet, E; Dodge, A; Tabeling, P

    2005-06-01

    Latex agglutination tests are used for the diagnosis of diseases in man and animals. They are generally simple, cheap, and do not require sophisticated equipment, nor highly specialized skills. In this Technical Note, we put latex agglutination tests in a microfluidic format. The experiment is performed in PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) microchannels, using streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic beads and a magnetic field. The target molecule is biotinylated protein A. By taking full advantage of the microfluidic conditions (scaling down of the detection volume and controlled action of the shear flow), we achieved an analytical sensitivity of 10 fmol l(-1)(several hundreds of fg ml(-1)) and a fast response (a few minutes) ; the test is also quantitative. Performances of agglutination tests can thus be improved by orders of magnitude by adapting them to a microfluidic format; this comes in addition to the usual advantages offered by this technology (integration, high throughput etc.).

  3. Microfluidic etching and oxime-based tailoring of biodegradable polyketoesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Devin G; Lamb, Brian M; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2008-09-02

    A straightforward, flexible, and inexpensive method to etch biodegradable poly(1,2,6-hexanetriol alpha-ketoglutarate) films is reported. Microfluidic delivery of the etchant, a solution of NaOH, can create micron-scale channels through local hydrolysis of the polyester film. In addition, the presence of a ketone in the repeat unit allows for prior or post chemoselective modifications, enabling the design of functionalized microchannels. Delivery of oxyamine tethered ligands react with ketone groups on the polyketoester to generate covalent oxime linkages. By thermally sealing an etched film to a second flat surface, poly(1,2,6-hexanetriol alpha-ketoglutarate) can be used to create biodegradable microfluidic devices. In order to determine the versatility of the microfluidic etch technique, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) was etched with acetone. This strategy provides a facile method for the direct patterning of biodegradable materials, both through etching and chemoselective ligand immobilization.

  4. Droplet Microfluidics for the Production of Microparticles and Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Droplet microfluidics technology is recently a highly interesting platform in material fabrication. Droplets can precisely monitor and control entire material fabrication processes and are superior to conventional bulk techniques. Droplet production is controlled by regulating the channel geometry and flow rates of each fluid. The micro-scale size of droplets results in rapid heat and mass-transfer rates. When used as templates, droplets can be used to develop reproducible and scalable microparticles with tailored sizes, shapes and morphologies, which are difficult to obtain using traditional bulk methods. This technology can revolutionize material processing and application platforms. Generally, microparticle preparation methods involve three steps: (1 the formation of micro-droplets using a microfluidics generator; (2 shaping the droplets in micro-channels; and (3 solidifying the droplets to form microparticles. This review discusses the production of microparticles produced by droplet microfluidics according to their morphological categories, which generally determine their physicochemical properties and applications.

  5. Digital Microfluidics for Manipulation and Analysis of a Single Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Long He

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The basic structural and functional unit of a living organism is a single cell. To understand the variability and to improve the biomedical requirement of a single cell, its analysis has become a key technique in biological and biomedical research. With a physical boundary of microchannels and microstructures, single cells are efficiently captured and analyzed, whereas electric forces sort and position single cells. Various microfluidic techniques have been exploited to manipulate single cells through hydrodynamic and electric forces. Digital microfluidics (DMF, the manipulation of individual droplets holding minute reagents and cells of interest by electric forces, has received more attention recently. Because of ease of fabrication, compactness and prospective automation, DMF has become a powerful approach for biological application. We review recent developments of various microfluidic chips for analysis of a single cell and for efficient genetic screening. In addition, perspectives to develop analysis of single cells based on DMF and emerging functionality with high throughput are discussed.

  6. Paper-based microfluidic devices by plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Tian, Junfei; Nguyen, Thanh; Shen, Wei

    2008-12-01

    Paper-based microfluidic patterns have been demonstrated in recent literature to have a significant potential in developing low-cost analytical devices for telemedicine and general health monitoring. This study reports a new method for making microfluidic patterns on a paper surface using plasma treatment. Paper was first hydrophobized and then treated using plasma in conjunction with a mask. This formed well defined hydrophilic channels on the paper. Paper-based microfluidic systems produced in this way retained the flexibility of paper and a variety of patterns could be formed. A major advantage of this system is that simple functional elements such as switches and filters can be built into the patterns. Examples of these elements are given in this study.

  7. Integrated microchip incorporating atomic magnetometer and microfluidic channel for NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Micah P [Oakland, CA; Savukov, Igor M [Los Alamos, NM; Budker, Dmitry [El Cerrito, CA; Shah, Vishal K [Plainsboro, NJ; Knappe, Svenja [Boulder, CO; Kitching, John [Boulder, CO; Michalak, David J [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Shoujun [Houston, TX; Pines, Alexander [Berkeley, CA

    2011-08-09

    An integral microfluidic device includes an alkali vapor cell and microfluidic channel, which can be used to detect magnetism for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Small magnetic fields in the vicinity of the vapor cell can be measured by optically polarizing and probing the spin precession in the small magnetic field. This can then be used to detect the magnetic field of in encoded analyte in the adjacent microfluidic channel. The magnetism in the microfluidic channel can be modulated by applying an appropriate series of radio or audio frequency pulses upstream from the microfluidic chip (the remote detection modality) to yield a sensitive means of detecting NMR and MRI.

  8. [Advances on enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Feng-Hua; Ye, Jian-Qing; Chen, Zuan-Guang; Cheng, Zhi-Yi

    2010-06-01

    With the continuous development in microfluidic fabrication technology, microfluidic analysis has evolved from a concept to one of research frontiers in last twenty years. The research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors based on microfluidic devices has also made great progress. Microfluidic technology improved greatly the analytical performance of the research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors by reducing the consumption of reagents, decreasing the analysis time, and developing automation. This review focuses on the development and classification of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices.

  9. Visual Estimation of Bacterial Growth Level in Microfluidic Culture Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyukwang; Kim, Seunggyu; Jeon, Jessie S

    2018-02-03

    Microfluidic devices are an emerging platform for a variety of experiments involving bacterial cell culture, and has advantages including cost and convenience. One inevitable step during bacterial cell culture is the measurement of cell concentration in the channel. The optical density measurement technique is generally used for bacterial growth estimation, but it is not applicable to microfluidic devices due to the small sample volumes in microfluidics. Alternately, cell counting or colony-forming unit methods may be applied, but these do not work in situ; nor do these methods show measurement results immediately. To this end, we present a new vision-based method to estimate the growth level of the bacteria in microfluidic channels. We use Fast Fourier transform (FFT) to detect the frequency level change of the microscopic image, focusing on the fact that the microscopic image becomes rough as the number of cells in the field of view increases, adding high frequencies to the spectrum of the image. Two types of microfluidic devices are used to culture bacteria in liquid and agar gel medium, and time-lapsed images are captured. The images obtained are analyzed using FFT, resulting in an increase in high-frequency noise proportional to the time passed. Furthermore, we apply the developed method in the microfluidic antibiotics susceptibility test by recognizing the regional concentration change of the bacteria that are cultured in the antibiotics gradient. Finally, a deep learning-based data regression is performed on the data obtained by the proposed vision-based method for robust reporting of data.

  10. Optical two-beam trap in a polymer microfluidic chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina; Catak, Darmin; Marie, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    An optical two-beam trap, composed from two counter propagating laser beams, is an interesting setup due to the ability of the system to trap, hold, and stretch soft biological objects like vesicles or single cells. Because of this functionality, the system was also named "the optical stretcher...... will outline the design, the production procedures, and results obtained in a fiber-based experimental setup built within an injection molded microfluidic polymer chip. The microfluidic chip is constructed with a three layer technology in which we ensure both horizontal and vertical focusing of the cells we...

  11. Convection with local thermal non-equilibrium and microfluidic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Straughan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This book is one of the first devoted to an account of theories of thermal convection which involve local thermal non-equilibrium effects, including a concentration on microfluidic effects. The text introduces convection with local thermal non-equilibrium effects in extraordinary detail, making it easy for readers newer to the subject area to understand. This book is unique in the fact that it addresses a large number of convection theories and provides many new results which are not available elsewhere. This book will be useful to researchers from engineering, fluid mechanics, and applied mathematics, particularly those interested in microfluidics and porous media.

  12. Celloidosomes® via glass-based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundabala, V. R.; Martinez-Escobar, S.; Marquez, S. M.; Marquez, M.; Fernandez-Nieves, A.

    2013-03-01

    We report a glass-based microfluidic route for the generation of a particular class of celloidosomes consisting of an assembly of yeast cells at the outskirts of liquid drops inside an also liquid continuous phase. This is the first demonstration of the encapsulation of cells into shells of alginate surrounding a liquid core. The microfluidic method based on double emulsion technology allows precise control on the size of the celloidosomes, thickness of the outer shell, and the cell density. In addition, this surface encapsulation technique can potentially overcome cell viability issues usually associated with bulk cell encapsulation techniques.

  13. Use of Vacuum Bagging for Fabricating Thermoplastic Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Christopher L.; Simon, Andrew J.; Liu, Wei; Fredrickson, Carl; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a novel thermal bonding method for thermoplastic microfluidic devices. This simple method employs a modified vacuum bagging technique, a concept borrowed from the aerospace industry, to produce conventional thick substrate microfluidic devices, as well as multi-layer film devices. The bonds produced using this method are superior to those obtained using conventional thermal bonding methods, including thermal lamination, and are capable of sustaining burst pressures in excess of 550 kPa. To illustrate the utility of this method, thick substrate devices were produced, as well as a six-layer film device that incorporated several complex features. PMID:25329244

  14. Simulation and fabrication of integrated polystyrene microlens in microfluidic system

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-05-17

    This paper presents a simple and quick method to integrate microlens with the microfluidics systems. The polystyrene (PS) based microlens is fabricated with the free surface thermal compression molding methods, a thin PS sheet with the microlens is bonded to a PMMA substrate which contains the laser ablated microchannels. The convex profiler of the microlens will give a magnified images of the microchannels for easier observation. Optical simulation software is being used for the design and simulation of the microlens to have optimal optical performance with the desired focal length. A microfluidic system with the integrated PS microlens is also fabricated for demonstration.

  15. Reconfigurable microfluidic pump enabled by opto-electrical-thermal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masaru; Hagiwara, Masaya; Haulot, Gauvain; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Flexible integration of a microfluidic system comprising pumps, valves, and microchannels was realized by an optoelectronic reconfigurable microchannels (OERM) technique. Projecting a low light fluidic device pattern—e.g., pumps, valves, and channels—onto an OERM platform generates Joule heating and melts the substrate in the bright area on the platform; thus, the fluidic system can be reconfigured by changing the projected light pattern. Hexadecane was used as the substrate of the microfluidic system. The volume change of hexadecane during the liquid-solid phase transition was utilized to generate pumping pressure. The system can pump nanoliters of water within several seconds.

  16. Towards a programmable magnetic bead microarray in a microfluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smistrup, Kristian; Bruus, Henrik; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2007-01-01

    A new hybrid magnetic bead separator that combines an external magnetic field with 175@mm thick current lines buried in the back side of a silicon wafer is presented. A microfluidic channel was etched into the front side of the wafer. The large cross-section of the current lines makes it possible...... to use larger currents and obtain forces of longer range than from thin current lines at a given power limit. Guiding of magnetic beads in the hybrid magnetic separator and the construction of a programmable microarray of magnetic beads in the microfluidic channel by hydrodynamic focusing is presented....

  17. A Sensitive Chemotaxis Assay Using a Novel Microfluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing chemotaxis assays do not generate stable chemotactic gradients and thus—over time—functionally measure only nonspecific random motion (chemokinesis. In comparison, microfluidic technology has the capacity to generate a tightly controlled microenvironment that can be stably maintained for extended periods of time and is, therefore, amenable to adaptation for assaying chemotaxis. We describe here a novel microfluidic device for sensitive assay of cellular migration and show its application for evaluating the chemotaxis of smooth muscle cells in a chemokine gradient.

  18. Microfluidics: From crystallization to serial time-resolved crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Sui

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Capturing protein structural dynamics in real-time has tremendous potential in elucidating biological functions and providing information for structure-based drug design. While time-resolved structure determination has long been considered inaccessible for a vast majority of protein targets, serial methods for crystallography have remarkable potential in facilitating such analyses. Here, we review the impact of microfluidic technologies on protein crystal growth and X-ray diffraction analysis. In particular, we focus on applications of microfluidics for use in serial crystallography experiments for the time-resolved determination of protein structural dynamics.

  19. Fabricating PFPE Membranes for Microfluidic Valves and Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Frank; White, Victor E.; Lee, Michael C.; Willis, Peter A.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Rolland, Jason; Rolland, Jason

    2009-01-01

    A process has been developed for fabricating membranes of a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and integrating them into valves and pumps in laboratory-on-achip microfluidic devices. Membranes of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) [PTFE] and poly(dimethylsilane) [PDMS] have been considered for this purpose and found wanting. By making it possible to use PFPE instead of PTFE or PDMS, the present process expands the array of options for further development of microfluidic devices for diverse applications that could include detection of biochemicals of interest, detection of toxins and biowarfare agents, synthesis and analysis of proteins, medical diagnosis, and synthesis of fuels.

  20. Microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip Platforms: Requirements, Characteristics and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D.; Haeberle, S.; Roth, G.; von Stetten, F.; Zengerle, R.

    This review summarizes recent developments in microfluidic platform approaches. In contrast to isolated application-specific solutions, a microfluidic platform provides a set of fluidic unit operations, which are designed for easy combination within a well-defined fabrication technology. This allows the implementation of different application-specific (bio-) chemical processes, automated by microfluidic process integration [1]. A brief introduction into technical advances, major market segments and promising applications is followed by a detailed characterization of different microfluidic platforms, comprising a short definition, the functional principle, microfluidic unit operations, application examples as well as strengths and limitations. The microfluidic platforms in focus are lateral flow tests, linear actuated devices, pressure driven laminar flow, microfluidic large scale integration, segmented flow microfluidics, centrifugal microfluidics, electro-kinetics, electrowetting, surface acoustic waves, and systems for massively parallel analysis. The review concludes with the attempt to provide a selection scheme for microfluidic platforms which is based on their characteristics according to key requirements of different applications and market segments. Applied selection criteria comprise portability, costs of instrument and disposable, sample throughput, number of parameters per sample, reagent consumption, precision, diversity of microfluidic unit operations and the flexibility in programming different liquid handling protocols.

  1. Microfluidic device for continuous single cells analysis via Raman spectroscopy enhanced by integrated plasmonic nanodimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Candeloro, Patrizio; De Grazia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In this work a Raman flow cytometer is presented. It consists of a microfluidic device that takes advantages of the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry. The microfluidic device integrates calibrated microfluidic channels-where the cells can flow one-by-one -, allowing single...... of the each cell. Experiments are performed on red blood cells (RBCs), peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and myelogenous leukemia tumor cells (K562)....... cell Raman analysis. The microfluidic channel integrates plasmonic nanodimers in a fluidic trapping region. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on single cell. These allow a label-free analysis, providing information about the biochemical content of membrane and cytoplasm......In this work a Raman flow cytometer is presented. It consists of a microfluidic device that takes advantages of the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry. The microfluidic device integrates calibrated microfluidic channels-where the cells can flow one-by-one -, allowing single...

  2. Printing-based fabrication method using sacrificial paper substrates for flexible and wearable microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daehan; Gray, Bonnie L.

    2017-11-01

    We present a simple, fast, and inexpensive new printing-based fabrication process for flexible and wearable microfluidic channels and devices. Microfluidic devices are fabricated on textiles (fabric) for applications in clothing-based wearable microfluidic sensors and systems. The wearable and flexible microfluidic devices are comprised of water-insoluable screen-printable plastisol polymer. Sheets of paper are used as sacrificial substrates for multiple layers of polymer on the fabric’s surface. Microfluidic devices can be made within a short time using simple processes and inexpensive equipment that includes a laser cutter and a thermal laminator. The fabrication process is characterized to demonstrate control of microfluidic channel thickness and width. Film thickness smaller than 100 micrometers and lateral dimensions smaller than 150 micrometers are demonstrated. A flexible microfluidic mixer is also developed on fabric and successfully tested on both flat and curved surfaces at volumetric flow rates ranging from 5.5-46 ml min-1.

  3. Rapid spheroid clearing on a microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Santisteban, Tomas; Rabajania, Omid; Kalinina, Iana; Robinson, Stephen; Meier, Matthias

    2017-12-19

    Spheroids are three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures that aim to bridge the gap between the use of whole animals and cellular monolayers. Microfluidics is regarded as an enabling technology to actively control the chemical environment of 3D cell cultures. Although a wide variety of platforms have been developed to handle spheroid cultures, the development of analytical systems for spheroids remains a major challenge. In this study, we engineered a microfluidic large-scale integration (mLSI) chip platform for tissue-clearing and imaging. To enable handling and culturing of spheroids on mLSI chips, with diameters within hundreds of microns, we first developed a general rapid prototyping procedure, which allows scaling up of the size of pneumatic membrane valves (PMV). The presented prototyping method makes use of milled poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) molds for obtaining semi-circular microchannels with heights up to 750 μm. Semi-circular channel profiles are required for the functioning of the commonly used PMVs in normally open configuration. Height limits to tens of microns for this channel profile on photolithographic molds have hampered the application of 3D tissue models on mLSI chips. The prototyping technique was applied to produce an mLSI chip for miniaturization, automation, and integration of the steps involved in the tissue clearing method CLARITY, including spheroid fixation, acrylamide hydrogel infiltration, temperature-initiated hydrogel polymerization, lipid extraction, and immuno-fluorescence staining of the mitochondrial protein COX-IV, and metabolic enzyme GAPDH. Precise fluidic control over the liquids in the spheroid culturing chambers allowed implementation of a local hydrogel polymerization reaction, exclusively within the spheroid tissue. Hydrogel-embedded spheroids undergo swelling and shrinkage depending on the pH of the surrounding buffer solution. A pH-jump from 8.5 to 5.5 shrinks the hydrogel-embedded spheroid volume by 108% with a rate

  4. Microfluidics and photonics for Bio-System-on-a-Chip: A review of advancements in technology towards a microfluidic flow cytometry chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Jessica; Chen, Chun-Hao; Cho, Sung Hwan; Qiao, Wen; Tsai, Frank; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidics and photonics come together to form a field commonly referred to as ‘optofluidics’. Flow cytometry provides the field with a technology base from which both microfluidic and photonic components be developed and integrated into a useful device. This article reviews some of the more recent developments to familiarize a reader with the current state of the technologies and also highlights the requirements of the device and how researchers are working to meet these needs. A microfluidic flow cytometer protoype employing on-chip lenses for illumination and light collection in conjunction with a microfluidic sample flow system for device miniaturization. PMID:19343660

  5. Microfluidic step-emulsification in axisymmetric geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, I; Ricouvier, J; Yazhgur, P; Tabeling, P; Leshansky, A M

    2017-10-25

    Biphasic step-emulsification (Z. Li et al., Lab Chip, 2015, 15, 1023) is a promising microfluidic technique for high-throughput production of μm and sub-μm highly monodisperse droplets. The step-emulsifier consists of a shallow (Hele-Shaw) microchannel operating with two co-flowing immiscible liquids and an abrupt expansion (i.e., step) to a deep and wide reservoir. Under certain conditions the confined stream of the disperse phase, engulfed by the co-flowing continuous phase, breaks into small highly monodisperse droplets at the step. Theoretical investigation of the corresponding hydrodynamics is complicated due to the complex geometry of the planar device, calling for numerical approaches. However, direct numerical simulations of the three dimensional surface-tension-dominated biphasic flows in confined geometries are computationally expensive. In the present paper we study a model problem of axisymmetric step-emulsification. This setup consists of a stable core-annular biphasic flow in a cylindrical capillary tube connected co-axially to a reservoir tube of a larger diameter through a sudden expansion mimicking the edge of the planar step-emulsifier. We demonstrate that the axisymmetric setup exhibits similar regimes of droplet generation to the planar device. A detailed parametric study of the underlying hydrodynamics is feasible via inexpensive (two dimensional) simulations owing to the axial symmetry. The phase diagram quantifying the different regimes of droplet generation in terms of governing dimensionless parameters is presented. We show that in qualitative agreement with experiments in planar devices, the size of the droplets generated in the step-emulsification regime is independent of the capillary number and almost insensitive to the viscosity ratio. These findings confirm that the step-emulsification regime is solely controlled by surface tension. The numerical predictions are in excellent agreement with in-house experiments with the axisymmetric

  6. Microfluidics without channels: highly-flexible synthesis on a digital-microfluidic chip for production of diverse PET tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dam, Robert Michael [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is used for fundamental studies of living biological organisms and microbial ecosystems in applications ranging from biofuel production to environmental remediation to the study, diagnosis, and treatment monitoring of human disease. Routine access to PET imaging, to monitor biochemical reactions in living organisms in real time, could accelerate a broad range of research programs of interest to DOE. Using PET requires access to short-lived radioactive-labeled compounds that specifically probe the desired living processes. The overall aims of this project were to develop a miniature liquid-handling technology platform (called “microfluidics”) that increases the availability of diverse PET probes by reducing the cost and complexity of their production. Based on preliminary experiments showing that microfluidic chips can synthesis such compounds, we aimed to advance this technology to improve its robustness, increase its flexibility for a broad range of probes, and increase its user-friendliness. Through the research activities of this project, numerous advances were made; Tools were developed to enable the visualization of radioactive materials within microfluidic chips; Fundamental advances were made in the microfluidic chip architecture and fabrication process to increase its robustness and reliability; The microfluidic chip technology was shown to produce useful quantities of an example PET probes, and methods to further increase the output were successfully pursued; A “universal” chip was developed that could produce multiple types of PET probes, enabling the possibility of “on demand” synthesis of different probes; and Operation of the chip was automated to ensure minimal radiation exposure to the operator Based on the demonstrations of promising technical feasibility and performance, the microfluidic chip technology is currently being commercialized. It is anticipated that costs of microfluidic chips can be

  7. Inhibitory effect of common microfluidic materials on PCR outcome

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2012-02-20

    Microfluidic chips have a variety of applications in the biological sciences and medicine. In contrast with traditional experimental approaches, microfluidics entails lower sample and reagent consumption, allows faster reactions and enables efficient separation. Additionally microfluidics offers other advantages accruing from the fluids’ various distinct behaviors, such as energy dissipation, fluidic resistance, laminar flow, and surface tension. Biological molecules suspended in fluid and transported through microfluidics channels interact with the channel-wall material. This interaction is even stronger in high surface-area-to-volume ratio (SAVR) microfluidic channels. Adsorption and inhibition of biomolecules occur when these materials come in contact with biomolecular reaction components. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a thermal cycling procedure for amplifying target DNA. The PCR compatibility of silicon, silicon dioxide (SiO2) and other surfaces have been studied; however the results are inconclusive. Usually for protein-surface interaction measurements, bulky and expensive equipment is used, such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning or Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM), spectrophotometric protein concentration measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) or X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). \\tThe PCR reaction components include the DNA template, primers, DNA polymerase (the main component), dNTPs, a buffer, divalent ions (MgCl2), and KCl. \\tWe designed a simple, relatively quick measurement that only requires a PCR cycler; thus it mimics actual conditions in PCR cycling. In our study, we evaluated the inhibitory affect of different materials on PCR, which is one of the most frequently used enzymatic reactions in microfluidics. PCR reaction optimization through choice of surface materials is of the upmost importance, as it enables and improves enzymatic reaction in microfluidics. Our assessment of the PCR

  8. Coplanar electrowetting-induced stirring as a tool to manipulate biological samples in lubricated digital microfluidics. Impact of ambient phase on drop internal flow pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoust, Laurent; Fouillet, Yves; Malk, Rachid; Theisen, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Oscillating electrowetting on dielectrics (EWOD) with coplanar electrodes is investigated in this paper as a way to provide efficient stirring within a drop with biological content. A supporting model inspired from Ko et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 194102 (2009)] is proposed allowing to interpret oscillating EWOD-induced drop internal flow as the result of a current streaming along the drop surface deformed by capillary waves. Current streaming behaves essentially as a surface flow generator and the momentum it sustains within the (viscous) drop is even more significant as the surface to volume ratio is small. With the circular electrode pair considered in this paper, oscillating EWOD sustains toroidal vortical flows when the experiments are conducted with aqueous drops in air as ambient phase. But when oil is used as ambient phase, it is demonstrated that the presence of an electrode gap is responsible for a change in drop shape: a pinch-off at the electrode gap yields a peanut-shaped drop and a symmetry break-up of the EWOD-induced flow pattern. Viscosity of oil is also responsible for promoting an efficient damping of the capillary waves which populate the surface of the actuated drop. As a result, the capillary network switches from one standing wave to two superimposed traveling waves of different mechanical energy, provided that actuation frequency is large enough, for instance, as large as the one commonly used in electrowetting applications (f ∼ 500 Hz and beyond). Special emphasis is put on stirring of biological samples. As a typical application, it is demonstrated how beads or cell clusters can be focused under flow either at mid-height of the drop or near the wetting plane, depending on how the nature of the capillary waves is (standing or traveling), and therefore, depending on the actuation frequency (150 Hz-1 KHz).

  9. Flow characterization and patch clamp dose responses using jet microfluidics in a tubeless microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resto, Pedro J; Bhat, Abhishek; Stava, Eric; Lor, Chong; Merriam, Elliot; Diaz-Rivera, Ruben E; Pearce, Robert; Blick, Robert; Williams, Justin C

    2017-11-01

    Surface tension passive pumping is a way to actuate flow without the need for pumps, tubing or valves by using the pressure inside small drop to move liquid via a microfluidic channel. These types of tubeless devices have typically been used in cell biology. Herein we present the use of tubeless devices as a fluid exchange platform for patch clamp electrophysiology. Inertia from high-speed droplets and jets is used to create flow and perform on-the-fly mixing of solutions. These are then flowed over GABA transfected HEK cells under patch in order to perform a dose response analysis. TIRF imaging and electrical recordings are used to study the fluid exchange properties of the microfluidic device, resulting in 0-90% fluid exchange times of hundreds of milliseconds. COMSOL is used to model flow and fluid exchange within the device. Patch-clamping experiments show the ability to use high-speed passive pumping and its derivatives for studying peak dose responses, but not for studying ion channel kinetics. Our system results in fluid exchange times slower than when using a standard 12-barrel application system and is not as stable as traditional methods, but it offers a new platform with added functionality. Surface tension passive pumping and tubeless devices can be used in a limited fashion for electrophysiology. Users may obtain peak dose responses but the system, in its current form, is not capable of fluid exchange fast enough to study the kinetics of most ion channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic particle diverter in an integrated microfluidic format

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekas, Nikola [Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3111 (United States); Granger, Michael [Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3111 (United States); Tondra, Mark [NVE Corporation, Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55344 (United States); Popple, Anthony [NVE Corporation, Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55344 (United States); Porter, Marc D. [Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3111 (United States)]. E-mail: mporter@porter1.ameslab.gov

    2005-05-15

    A fully integrated micromagnetic particle diverter and microfluidic system are described. Particles are diverted via an external uniform magnetic field perturbed at the microscale by underlying current straps. The resulting magnetic force deflects particles across a flow stream into one of the two channels at a Y-shaped junction. The basic theoretical framework, design, and operational demonstration of the device are presented.

  11. Integrated acoustic and magnetic separation in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, Jonathan; Thevoz, Patrick; Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    -based magnetic separation. Toward this aim, we report on the integration of microfluidic acoustic and magnetic separation in a monolithic device for multiparameter particle separation. Using our device, we demonstrate high-purity separation of a multicomponent particle mixture at a throughput of up to 10...

  12. Redundancy Optimization for Error Recovery in Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic-based biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis. The digital microfluidic biochips are based on the manipulation of liquids not as a continuous flow, but as discrete droplets. Research......Microfluidic-based biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis. The digital microfluidic biochips are based on the manipulation of liquids not as a continuous flow, but as discrete droplets...... of a bioassay, operations could experience transient errors (e.g., erroneous droplet volumes), thus impacting negatively the correctness of the application. Researchers have proposed fault-tolerance approaches, which apply predetermined recovery actions at the moment when errors are detected. In this paper, we...... for fault-tolerance. Error recovery is performed such that the number of transient errors tolerated is maximized and the timing constraints of the biochemical application are satisfied. The proposed redundancy optimization approach has been evaluated using several benchmarks....

  13. Electrowetting-enhanced microfluidic device for drop generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, H.; Malloggi, F.G.J.; Vanapalli, Srinivas; Vanapalli Veera, V.S.A.R.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2008-01-01

    We integrated electrowetting into a microfluidic flow focusing device to study drop generation under the influence of electric fields. Using both the dispersed phase inlet pressure and the applied voltage as control parameters, we find that the range of drop sizes and the drop generation rate can be

  14. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  15. Scaling Fundamentals and Applications of Digital Microfluidic Microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, R. B.

    With the first experimental demonstration of droplet flow on an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWD) array platform in 2000, there has been significant interest in droplet actuation for lab-on-a-chip applications. A hydrodynamic scaling model of droplet actuation in a EWD actuator is presented that takes into account the effects of contact angle hysteresis, drag from the filler fluid, drag from the solid walls, and change in the actuation force while a droplet traverses a neighboring electrode. Based on this model, it is shown that scaling models of droplet splitting, actuation, and liquid dispensing all show a similar scaling dependence on{[ {{{t}}/{\\varepsilon _{{r}}}( {{{d}}/{{L}}} )} ]^{{{1}}/{{2}}}} where t is insulator thickness and d/L is the aspect ratio of the device. It is also determined that reliable operation of a EWD actuator is possible as long as the device is operated within the limits of the Lippmann-Young equation. Also discussed are fluidic operations possible with digital microfluidics. Significant advances have been made in chip technology that allow for users to access digital microfluidic chips and to program these chips to perform numerous operations and applications on a common array of electrodes. Whereas in the past, microfluidic devices have been application specific, lacking reconfigurability and programmability, today's digital microfluidic chips enable versatile, reconfigurable chip architectures that are capable of accommodating and adapting to multiple applications on the same platform.

  16. Isolation of cancer cells by "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols

    KAUST Repository

    De Vitis, Stefania

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a microfluidic immunosensor for the immobilization of cancer cells and their separation from healthy cells by using "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols. These protocols allow to link antibodies on microfluidic device surfaces and can be used to study the interaction between cell membrane and biomolecules. Moreover they allow to perform analysis with high processing speed, small quantity of reagents and samples, short reaction times and low production costs. In this work the developed protocols were used in microfluidic devices for the isolation of cancer cells in heterogeneous blood samples by exploiting the binding of specific antibody to an adhesion protein (EpCAM), overexpressed on the tumor cell membranes. The presented biofunctionalization protocols can be performed right before running the experiment: this allows to have a flexible platform where biomolecules of interest can be linked on the device surface according to the user\\'s needs. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A multi-functional bubble-based microfluidic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Almansouri, Abdullah; Albloushi, Hamad; Yi, Pyshar; Soffe, Rebecca; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the bubble-based systems have offered a new paradigm in microfluidics. Gas bubbles are highly flexible, controllable and barely mix with liquids, and thus can be used for the creation of reconfigurable microfluidic systems. In this work, a hydrodynamically actuated bubble-based microfluidic system is introduced. This system enables the precise movement of air bubbles via axillary feeder channels to alter the geometry of the main channel and consequently the flow characteristics of the system. Mixing of neighbouring streams is demonstrated by oscillating the bubble at desired displacements and frequencies. Flow control is achieved by pushing the bubble to partially or fully close the main channel. Patterning of suspended particles is also demonstrated by creating a large bubble along the sidewalls. Rigorous analytical and numerical calculations are presented to describe the operation of the system. The examples presented in this paper highlight the versatility of the developed bubble-based actuator for a variety of applications; thus providing a vision that can be expanded for future highly reconfigurable microfluidics. PMID:25906043

  18. Automated microfluidic cartridges for point-of-care cell counting

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents microfluidic cartridges for automated blood cell counting towards a point-of-care (POC) full blood count (FBC). Total white blood cell count (WBC) and red blood cell count (RBC) tests were implemented using low-cost, disposable...

  19. Long-term brain slice culturing in a microfluidic platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Avaliani, N.; Tønnesen, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present the development of a transparent poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microfluidic culture system for handling long-term brain slice cultures independent of an incubator. The different stages of system development have been validated by culturing GFP producing brain...... brain slice culturing for 16 days....

  20. Microfluidics for biological analysis: Triumphs and hurdles of CD ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research on microfluidic technologies has become extensive, particularly in regards to the develop- ...... Validation of the CD platform showed that it ... and the instrument. The final step in NA analysis is detection. Madou et al have developed a rapid, flow-through DNA hybridization disposable designed for detection via.

  1. Hybrid Integrated Silicon Microfluidic Platform for Fluorescence Based Biodetection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Darveau

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The desideratum to develop a fully integrated Lab-on-a-chip device capable ofrapid specimen detection for high throughput in-situ biomedical diagnoses and Point-of-Care testing applications has called for the integration of some of the novel technologiessuch as the microfluidics, microphotonics, immunoproteomics and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS. In the present work, a silicon based microfluidic device hasbeen developed for carrying out fluorescence based immunoassay. By hybrid attachment ofthe microfluidic device with a Spectrometer-on-chip, the feasibility of synthesizing anintegrated Lab-on-a-chip type device for fluorescence based biosensing has beendemonstrated. Biodetection using the microfluidic device has been carried out usingantigen sheep IgG and Alexafluor-647 tagged antibody particles and the experimentalresults prove that silicon is a compatible material for the present application given thevarious advantages it offers such as cost-effectiveness, ease of bulk microfabrication,superior surface affinity to biomolecules, ease of disposability of the device etc., and is thussuitable for fabricating Lab-on-a-chip type devices.

  2. How to fabricate robust microfluidic systems for a dollar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Florian; Cameron, Neil R.; Oakeshott, John; Peat, Thomas; Zhu, Yonggang

    2013-12-01

    Since the past decade, the interest towards microfluidic devices has sensibly grown due to the wide variety of multidisciplinary applications. One branch of the microfluidic domain consists in the synthesis of various types of emulsions requested by cosmetic, food and biotechnological industries In particular, monodisperse water-in-oil microemulsion synthetised in microfluidic devices are quickly becoming the new generation of emulsions for precise bead control and high surface area. These microemulsions are generally aqueous bioreactors in the form of droplets from 500 nm to 10 μm in diameter, enclosed in an oil environment. An increasing demand for bigger emulsions has led us to investigate new techniques for fabricating fluidic devices allowing a better control over the final size of the droplets. An easy, cheap, reproducible and fast technology for generating emulsions in the range of 100s μm with high throughout (up to mL/h) is reported. Simply using pipette tips and tubing, an innovative microfluidic device was fabricated, able to synthetise water-in-oil emulsions within the range 50 - 500 _μm and double emulsions. These new emulsions are currently used for the synthesis of highly porous polymers beads from High Internal Phase Emulsion (HIPE). These beads will find high potential in 3D cell culture due to their high porosity (up to 90%) and pore size (from 5 to 30μm).

  3. Microfluidic production of multiple emulsions and functional microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Tae Yong; Choi, Tae Min; Shim, Tae Soup; Frijns, Raoul A.M.; Kim, Shin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in microfluidics have enabled the controlled production of multiple-emulsion drops with onion-like topology. The multiple-emulsion drops possess an intrinsic core-shell geometry, which makes them useful as templates to create microcapsules with a solid membrane. High flexibility

  4. Femtosecond Laser Fabrication of Monolithically Integrated Microfluidic Sensors in Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei He

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond lasers have revolutionized the processing of materials, since their ultrashort pulse width and extremely high peak intensity allows high-quality micro- and nanofabrication of three-dimensional (3D structures. This unique capability opens up a new route for fabrication of microfluidic sensors for biochemical applications. The present paper presents a comprehensive review of recent advancements in femtosecond laser processing of glass for a variety of microfluidic sensor applications. These include 3D integration of micro-/nanofluidic, optofluidic, electrofluidic, surface-enhanced Raman-scattering devices, in addition to fabrication of devices for microfluidic bioassays and lab-on-fiber sensors. This paper describes the unique characteristics of femtosecond laser processing and the basic concepts involved in femtosecond laser direct writing. Advanced spatiotemporal beam shaping methods are also discussed. Typical examples of microfluidic sensors fabricated using femtosecond lasers are then highlighted, and their applications in chemical and biological sensing are described. Finally, a summary of the technology is given and the outlook for further developments in this field is considered.

  5. Applications of microfluidics in microalgae biotechnology: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Yi-Je; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2016-03-01

    Microalgae have been one of the important sources for biofuel production owing to their competitive advantages such as no need to tap into the global food supply chain, higher energy density, and absorbing carbon dioxide to mitigate global warming. One of the key factors to ensure successful biofuel production is that it requires not only bioprospecting of the microalgae with high lipid content, high growth rate and tolerance to environmental parameters but also on-site monitoring of the cultivation process and optimization of the culturing conditions. However, as the conventional techniques usually involve in complicated procedures, or are time-consuming or labor intensive, microfluidics technology offers an attractive alternative to resolve these issues. In this review, applications of microfluidics to bioprospecting in microalgae biotechnology were discussed such as cell identification, cell sorting/screening, cell culturing and cell disruption. In addition, utilization of microalgae in micro-sized fuel cells and microfluidic platforms for biosensing was addressed. This review reports the recent studies and offers a look into how microfluidics is exploited to tackle the issues encountered in the microalgae biotechnology. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Hybrid Integrated Silicon Microfluidic Platform for Fluorescence Based Biodetection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arvind; Acharya, Ashwin; You, Jian Liang; Soo, Kim Young; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Stiharu, Ion; Darveau, Andre

    2007-01-01

    The desideratum to develop a fully integrated Lab-on-a-chip device capable of rapid specimen detection for high throughput in-situ biomedical diagnoses and Point-of-Care testing applications has called for the integration of some of the novel technologies such as the microfluidics, microphotonics, immunoproteomics and Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). In the present work, a silicon based microfluidic device has been developed for carrying out fluorescence based immunoassay. By hybrid attachment of the microfluidic device with a Spectrometer-on-chip, the feasibility of synthesizing an integrated Lab-on-a-chip type device for fluorescence based biosensing has been demonstrated. Biodetection using the microfluidic device has been carried out using antigen sheep IgG and Alexafluor-647 tagged antibody particles and the experimental results prove that silicon is a compatible material for the present application given the various advantages it offers such as cost-effectiveness, ease of bulk microfabrication, superior surface affinity to biomolecules, ease of disposability of the device etc., and is thus suitable for fabricating Lab-on-a-chip type devices. PMID:28903204

  7. Advances in Microfluidics Applied to Single Cell Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xu-Dong; Chu, Ju; Wang, Yong-Hong

    2017-12-08

    The field of microbiology have traditionally been concerned with and focused on studies at the population level. Microfluidic platforms have emerged as important tools for biology research at a small scale, even down to a single cell level. The spatial and temporal control of cells and stimuli transported by microfluidic channels in well-designed microsystems realized the studies of specific cells in a controlled microenvironment. The true cellular physiology responses, which are obtained mostly by inference from population-level data, could be revealed in this way. Nowadays, significant applications like cell culture, analysis, sorting, genomics, and proteomics at the single cell level have been achieved in microfluidic chips. Highly integrated microfluidic systems with complete bio-analytic functions are also coming forth and of great promise for single cell related physiology, biomedical, and high throughput screening research. Herein, the leads of technologies applied to single cell operation are reviewed. Challenges and potentials of these works are also summarized, to highlight fields for further research. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A High-Throughput SU-8Microfluidic Magnetic Bead Separator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bu, Minqiang; Christensen, T. B.; Smistrup, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel microfluidic magnetic bead separator based on SU-8 fabrication technique for high through-put applications. The experimental results show that magnetic beads can be captured at an efficiency of 91 % and 54 % at flow rates of 1 mL/min and 4 mL/min, respectively. Integration of s...

  9. A microfluidic chip for electrochemical conversions in drug metabolism studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, Mathieu; Baumann, A.; Lohmann, W.; van den Brink, Floris Teunis Gerardus; Olthuis, Wouter; Karst, U.; van den Berg, Albert

    2009-01-01

    We have designed a microfluidic microreactor chip for electrochemical conversion of analytes, containing a palladium reference electrode and platinum working and counter electrodes. The counter electrode is placed in a separate side-channel on chip to prevent unwanted side-products appearing in the

  10. Microfluidic chip for high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A Microfluidic chip (100) for transmission electron microscopy has a monolithic body (101) with a front side (102) and a back side (103). The monolithic body (101) comprises an opening (104) on the back side (103) extending in a vertical direction from the back side (103) to a membrane (107...

  11. Label-free monitoring of diffusion in microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Kristensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Label-free, real-time detection of concentration gradients is demonstrated in a microfluidic H-filter, using an integrated photonic crystal slab sensor to monitor sample refractive index with spatial resolution. The recorded diffusion profiles reveal root-mean-square diffusion lengths for non...

  12. Microfluidic device and method for processing of macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    A microfluidic device and method for enzymatic processing of ultra-long macromolecules is disclosed. The device comprises a reaction chamber with a first manifold, a second manifold, and a plurality of reaction channels, each reaction channel extending from the first manifold to the second manifold...

  13. Liquid-phase microextraction in a microfluidic-chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payán, María D. Ramos; Jensen, Henrik; Petersen, Nickolaj J.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a microfluidic-chip based system for liquid-phase microextraction (LPME-chip) was developed. Sample solutions were pumped into the LPME-chip with a micro-syringe pump at a flow rate of 3-4µLmin(-1). Inside the LPME chip, the sample was in direct contact with a supported liquid...

  14. Bisecting Microfluidic Channels with Metallic Nanowires Fabricated by Nanoskiving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, Gerard A; Zhang, Yanxi; Monachino, Enrico; Mathwig, Klaus; Kamminga, Machteld E; Pourhossein Aghbolagh, Parisa; Oomen, Pieter E; Stratmann, Sarah A; Zhao, Zhiyuan; van Oijen, Antoine M; Verpoorte, Elisabeth; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of millimeter-long gold nanowires that bisect the center of microfluidic channels. We fabricated the nanowires by nanoskiving and then suspended them over a trench in a glass structure. The channel was sealed by bonding it to a complementary

  15. Synthesis of bioactive microcapsules using a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong Il; Jeong, Soon Woo; Lee, Kyoung G; Park, Tae Jung; Park, Jung Youn; Song, Jae Jun; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive microcapsules containing Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) spores were generated by a combination of a hydro gel, microfluidic device and chemical polymerization method. As a proof-of-principle, we used BT spores displaying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) on the spore surface to spatially direct the EGFP-presenting spores within microcapsules. BT spore-encapsulated microdroplets of uniform size and shape are prepared through a flow-focusing method in a microfluidic device and converted into microcapsules through hydrogel polymerization. The size of microdroplets can be controlled by changing both the dispersion and continuous flow rate. Poly(N-isoproplyacrylamide) (PNIPAM), known as a hydrogel material, was employed as a biocompatible material for the encapsulation of BT spores and long-term storage and outstanding stability. Due to these unique properties of PNIPAM, the nutrients from Luria-Bertani complex medium diffused into the microcapsules and the microencapsulated spores germinated into vegetative cells under adequate environmental conditions. These results suggest that there is no limitation of transferring low-molecular-weight-substrates through the PNIPAM structures, and the viability of microencapsulated spores was confirmed by the culture of vegetative cells after the germinations. This microfluidic-based microencapsulation methodology provides a unique way of synthesizing bioactive microcapsules in a one-step process. This microfluidic-based strategy would be potentially suitable to produce microcapsules of various microbial spores for on-site biosensor analysis.

  16. Pin-count reduction for continuous flow microfluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Alexander; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers integrating the necessary functions on-chip. We are interested in flow-based biochips, where a continuous flow of liquid is manipulated using integrated microvalves, controlled from external pressure sources via off...

  17. The upcoming 3D-printing revolution in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Urrios, Arturo; Kang, Shawn; Folch, Albert

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, the vast majority of microfluidic systems have been built in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by soft lithography, a technique based on PDMS micromolding. A long list of key PDMS properties have contributed to the success of soft lithography: PDMS is biocompatible, elastomeric, transparent, gas-permeable, water-impermeable, fairly inexpensive, copyright-free, and rapidly prototyped with high precision using simple procedures. However, the fabrication process typically involves substantial human labor, which tends to make PDMS devices difficult to disseminate outside of research labs, and the layered molding limits the 3D complexity of the devices that can be produced. 3D-printing has recently attracted attention as a way to fabricate microfluidic systems due to its automated, assembly-free 3D fabrication, rapidly decreasing costs, and fast-improving resolution and throughput. Resins with properties approaching those of PDMS are being developed. Here we review past and recent efforts in 3D-printing of microfluidic systems. We compare the salient features of PDMS molding with those of 3D-printing and we give an overview of the critical barriers that have prevented the adoption of 3D-printing by microfluidic developers, namely resolution, throughput, and resin biocompatibility. We also evaluate the various forces that are persuading researchers to abandon PDMS molding in favor of 3D-printing in growing numbers. PMID:27101171

  18. Thermal effects in microfluidics with thermal conductivity spatially modulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Toro, Agustín.

    2014-05-01

    A heat transfer model on a microfluidic is resolved analytically. The model describes a fluid at rest between two parallel plates where each plate is maintained at a differentially specified temperature and the thermal conductivity of the microfluidic is spatially modulated. The heat transfer model in such micro-hydrostatic configuration is analytically resolved using the technique of the Laplace transform applying the Bromwich Integral and the Residue theorem. The temperature outline in the microfluidic is presented as an infinite series of Bessel functions. It is shown that the result for the thermal conductivity spatially modulated has as a particular case the solution when the thermal conductivity is spatially constant. All computations were performed using the computer algebra software Maple. It is claimed that the analytical obtained results are important for the design of nanoscale devices with applications in biotechnology. Furthermore, it is suggested some future research lines such as the study of the heat transfer model in a microfluidic resting between coaxial cylinders with radially modulated thermal conductivity in order to achieve future developments in this area.

  19. Microfluidic sedimentation cytometer for milk quality and bovine mastitis monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cordero, Jose L; Barrett, Louise M; O'Kennedy, Richard; Ricco, Antonio J

    2010-12-01

    We report a rapid, low-cost, portable microfluidic sedimentation cytometer (SeCy) for assessing the somatic cell count and fat content of milk in 15 min using a "sample-in, answer-out" approach. The system consists of 12 independent microfluidic devices, essentially flattened funnel structures, fabricated on the footprint of a single plastic compact disc (CD). Each funnel structure holds 150 μL of milk, has an inlet for milk filling and an outlet for air to escape, and ends in a narrow, closed-end microfluidic channel that facilitates packing of the cells into a column whose length is proportional to cell count. The closed-end channel provides accurate cell counts over the range 50,000->3,000,000 cells per mL. The assay separates cells and fat globules based on their densities (by differential sedimentation), concentrating white cells in the closed-end channel near the outer rim of the CD for estimation of total "cell pellet" volume, while fat globules move toward the center of disc rotation, forming a fat "band" in the funnel. After adding milk to two or more microfluidic devices, the CD is loaded onto a custom-built reader unit that spins the disc for 15 min. Two low-cost microscopes in the reader image the centrifuged cell pellet and the fat band, providing a sufficiently accurate cell count to diagnose mastitis and measuring fat content as an indication of health and nutritional status.

  20. Microfluidic Mixing Technology for a Universal Health Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eugene Y.; Bae, Candice

    2009-01-01

    A highly efficient means of microfluidic mixing has been created for use with the rHEALTH sensor an elliptical mixer and passive curvilinear mixing patterns. The rHEALTH sensor provides rapid, handheld, complete blood count, cell differential counts, electrolyte measurements, and other lab tests based on a reusable, flow-based microfluidic platform. These geometries allow for cleaning in a reusable manner, and also allow for complete mixing of fluid streams. The microfluidic mixing is performed by flowing two streams of fluid into an elliptical or curvilinear design that allows the combination of the flows into one channel. The mixing is accomplished by either chaotic advection around micro - fluidic loops. All components of the microfluidic chip are flow-through, meaning that cleaning solution can be introduced into the chip to flush out cells, plasma proteins, and dye. Tests were performed on multiple chip geometries to show that cleaning is efficient in any flowthrough design. The conclusion from these experiments is that the chip can indeed be flushed out with microliter volumes of solution and biological samples are cleaned readily from the chip with minimal effort. The technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring at patient s bedside or in a doctor s office, and real-time clinical intervention in acute situations. It also can be used for daily measurement of hematocrit for patients on anticoagulant drugs, or to detect acute myocardial damage outside a hospital.