WorldWideScience

Sample records for evolving rotating systems

  1. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  2. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  3. Evolving energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, E.

    1991-04-01

    This thesis presents scenarios of future energy systems, a cost-benefit analysis of measures to avoid greenhouse-gas emissions, an analysis of the effect of energy prices on end-use efficiencies and fuel choices, and an evaluation of financial-incentive programs designed to induce investments in efficient energy use. Twelve integrated energy supply/demand scenarios for the Swedish heat-and-power sector are presented to illustrate the potential for improvements in end-use efficiency and increased utilization of renewable energy sources. The results show that greenhouse-gas emissions could be reduced by 35 per cent from 1987 levels by 2010, with a net economic benefit compared to a business-as-usual scenario. A generalized methodology for calculating the net costs of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions is applied to a variety of fuel choices and energy end-use technologies. A key finding is that a combination of increased end-use efficiencies and use of renewable energy systems is required to achieve maximum cost-effective emissions reductions. End-use efficiencies and inter-fuel competition in Denmark and Sweden are compared during a time period in which real electricity prices were declining in Sweden and increasing in Denmark. Despite these different price environments, efficiencies and choices of heating fuels did not generally develop as expected according to economic theory. The influences of counter-price and non-price factors are important in understanding this outcome. Relying on prices alone injects considerable uncertainty into the energy planning process, and precludes efficiency improvements and fuel choices attainable with other mechanisms. Incentive programs can be used to promote energy-efficient technologies. Utilities in Europe have recently offered financial incentives intended to stimulate the adoption of compact-fluorescent lamps. These programs have been cost-effective in comparison to new electric supply. (au).

  4. Path integral of the angular momentum eigenstates evolving with the parameter linked with rotation angle under the space rotation transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongcan; Hu Chenguo; Fang Zhenyun

    1998-01-01

    The authors study the method which directly adopts the azimuthal angles and the rotation angle of the axis to describe the evolving process of the angular momentum eigenstates under the space rotation transformation. The authors obtain the angular momentum rotation and multi-rotation matrix elements' path integral which evolves with the parameter λ(0→θ,θ the rotation angle), and establish the general method of treating the functional (path) integral as a normal multi-integrals

  5. Time evolution of some quantum-mechanical systems. Wavefunction cloning in evolving rotating systems. Finite range boundary conditions for time dependent Schroedinger Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvieu, R.; Carbonell, J.; Gignoux, C.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Rozmej, P.

    1997-01-01

    The time evolution of coherent rotational wave packets associated to a diatomic molecule or to a deformed nucleus has been studied. Assuming a rigid body dynamics the J(J+1) law leads to a mechanism of cloning: the way function is divided into wave packets identical to the initial one at specific time. Applications are studied for a nuclear wave packed formed by Coulomb excitation. Exact boundary conditions at finite distance for the solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation are derived. A numerical scheme based on Crank-Nicholson method is proposed to illustrate its applicability in several examples. (authors)

  6. Armada, an Evolving Database System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E. Groffen (Fabian)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractIn a world where data usage becomes more and more widespread, single system solutions are no longer adequate to meet the data requirements of today. No longer one monolithic system, but instead a group of smaller and cheaper ones have to manage the workload of the system, preferably

  7. Sophisticated fuel handling system evolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The control systems at Sellafield fuel handling plant are described. The requirements called for built-in diagnostic features as well as the ability to handle a large sequencing application. Speed was also important; responses better than 50ms were required. The control systems are used to automate operations within each of the three main process caves - two Magnox fuel decanners and an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel dismantler. The fuel route within the fuel handling plant is illustrated and described. ASPIC (Automated Sequence Package for Industrial Control) which was developed as a controller for the plant processes is described. (U.K.)

  8. Integrated delivery systems. Evolving oligopolies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, T A

    1998-01-01

    The proliferation of Integrated Delivery Systems (IDSs) in regional health care markets has resulted in the movement of these markets from a monopolistic competitive model of behavior to an oligopoly. An oligopoly is synonymous with competition among the few, as a small number of firms supply a dominant share of an industry's total output. The basic characteristics of a market with competition among the few are: (1) A mutual interdependence among the actions and behaviors of competing firms; (2) competition tends to rely on the differentiation of products; (3) significant barriers to entering the market exist; (4) the demand curve for services may be kinked; and (5) firms can benefit from economies of scale. An understanding of these characteristics is essential to the survival of IDSs as regional managed care markets mature.

  9. Views on Evolvability of Embedded Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, P. van de; Punter, T.

    2011-01-01

    Evolvability, the ability to respond effectively to change, represents a major challenge to today's high-end embedded systems, such as those developed in the medical domain by Philips Healthcare. These systems are typically developed by multi-disciplinary teams, located around the world, and are in

  10. Views on evolvability of embedded systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van de P.J.L.J.; Punter, H.T.

    2011-01-01

    Evolvability, the ability to respond effectively to change, represents a major challenge to today's high-end embedded systems, such as those developed in the medical domain by Philips Healthcare. These systems are typically developed by multi-disciplinary teams, located around the world, and are in

  11. Evolving Intelligent Systems Methodology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Angelov, Plamen; Kasabov, Nik

    2010-01-01

    From theory to techniques, the first all-in-one resource for EIS. There is a clear demand in advanced process industries, defense, and Internet and communication (VoIP) applications for intelligent yet adaptive/evolving systems. Evolving Intelligent Systems is the first self- contained volume that covers this newly established concept in its entirety, from a systematic methodology to case studies to industrial applications. Featuring chapters written by leading world experts, it addresses the progress, trends, and major achievements in this emerging research field, with a strong emphasis on th

  12. The evolving definition of systemic arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, C Venkata S; Giles, Thomas D

    2010-05-01

    Systemic hypertension is an important risk factor for premature cardiovascular disease. Hypertension also contributes to excessive morbidity and mortality. Whereas excellent therapeutic options are available to treat hypertension, there is an unsettled issue about the very definition of hypertension. At what level of blood pressure should we treat hypertension? Does the definition of hypertension change in the presence of co-morbid conditions? This article covers in detail the evolving concepts in the diagnosis and management of hypertension.

  13. Evolving NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, J.; Behnke, J.; Murphy, K. J.; Lowe, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System Project (ESDIS) is charged with managing, maintaining, and evolving NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and is responsible for processing, archiving, and distributing NASA Earth science data. The system supports a multitude of missions and serves diverse science research and other user communities. Keeping up with ever-changing information technology and figuring out how to leverage those changes across such a large system in order to continuously improve and meet the needs of a diverse user community is a significant challenge. Maintaining and evolving the system architecture and infrastructure is a continuous and multi-layered effort. It requires a balance between a "top down" management paradigm that provides a coherent system view and maintaining the managerial, technological, and functional independence of the individual system elements. This presentation will describe some of the key elements of the current system architecture, some of the strategies and processes we employ to meet these challenges, current and future challenges, and some ideas for meeting those challenges.

  14. The Comet Cometh: Evolving Developmental Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Johannes; Laubichler, Manfred; Callebaut, Werner

    In a recent opinion piece, Denis Duboule has claimed that the increasing shift towards systems biology is driving evolutionary and developmental biology apart, and that a true reunification of these two disciplines within the framework of evolutionary developmental biology (EvoDevo) may easily take another 100 years. He identifies methodological, epistemological, and social differences as causes for this supposed separation. Our article provides a contrasting view. We argue that Duboule's prediction is based on a one-sided understanding of systems biology as a science that is only interested in functional, not evolutionary, aspects of biological processes. Instead, we propose a research program for an evolutionary systems biology, which is based on local exploration of the configuration space in evolving developmental systems. We call this approach-which is based on reverse engineering, simulation, and mathematical analysis-the natural history of configuration space. We discuss a number of illustrative examples that demonstrate the past success of local exploration, as opposed to global mapping, in different biological contexts. We argue that this pragmatic mode of inquiry can be extended and applied to the mathematical analysis of the developmental repertoire and evolutionary potential of evolving developmental mechanisms and that evolutionary systems biology so conceived provides a pragmatic epistemological framework for the EvoDevo synthesis.

  15. EVOLVE

    CERN Document Server

    Deutz, André; Schütze, Oliver; Legrand, Pierrick; Tantar, Emilia; Tantar, Alexandru-Adrian

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises nine selected works on numerical and computational methods for solving multiobjective optimization, game theory, and machine learning problems. It provides extended versions of selected papers from various fields of science such as computer science, mathematics and engineering that were presented at EVOLVE 2013 held in July 2013 at Leiden University in the Netherlands. The internationally peer-reviewed papers include original work on important topics in both theory and applications, such as the role of diversity in optimization, statistical approaches to combinatorial optimization, computational game theory, and cell mapping techniques for numerical landscape exploration. Applications focus on aspects including robustness, handling multiple objectives, and complex search spaces in engineering design and computational biology.

  16. Meniscus Stability in Rotating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Yvonne; Dreyer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the stability of free surfaces of fluid between two rotating coaxial, circular disks is examined. Radially mounted baffles are used to form menisci of equal size. To the center of the upper disk, a tube is connected in which a separate meniscus is formed. Assuming solid-body rotation and ignoring dynamic effects, it is observed that the free surfaces between the disks fail to remain stable once the rotation speed exceeds a critical value. In other words, Rayleigh-Taylor instability ensues when the capillary forces fail to balance centrifugal forces. Dimensionless critical rotation speeds are studied by means of the Surface Evolver via SE-FIT for varied number of baffles, the normalized distance between the disks, and the normalized central tube radius. Drop tower tests are performed to confirm some of the numerical results. The computation also reveals that there are different modes of instability as a function of the relevant parameters. This study was funded by the space agency of the German Aerospace Center with resources of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology on the basis of a resolution of the German Bundestag under grant number 50 RL 1320.

  17. PCBA demand forecasting using an evolving Takagi-Sugeno system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, M.; Almeida, R.J.; Kaymak, U.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of using an evolving fuzzy system for printed circuit board (PCBA) demand forecasting. The algorithm is based on the evolving Takagi-Sugeno (eTS) fuzzy system, which has the ability to incorporate new patterns by changing its internal structure in an on-line fashion.

  18. Refueling system with small diameter rotatable plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a liquid-metal fastbreeder nuclear reactor comprising a reactor pressure vessel and closure head therefor, a reactor core barrel disposed within the reactor vessel and enclosing a reactor core having therein a large number of closely spaced fuel assemblies, and the reactor core barrel and the reactor core having an approximately concentric circular cross-sectional configuration with a geometric center in predetermined location within the reactor vessel. The improved refueling system described here comprises: a large controllably rotatable plug means comprising the substantial portion of the closure head, a reactor upper internals structure mounted from the large rotatable plug means. The large rotatable plug means has an approximately circular configuration which approximates the cross-sectional configuration of the reactor core barrel with a center of rotation positioned a first predetermined distance from the geometric center of the reactor core barrel so that the large rotatable plug means rotates eccentrically with respect to the reactor core barrel; a small controllably rotatable plug means affixed to the large rotatable plug means and rotatable with respect thereto. The small rotatable plug means has a center of rotation which is offset a second predetermined distance from the rotational center of the large rotatable plug means so that the small rotatable plug means rotates eccentrically with respect to the large rotatable plug means

  19. An Evolved System of Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, M.

    2004-01-01

    The current system of radiological protection based on the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) hypothesis has greatly contributed to the minimization of doses received by workers and members of the public. However, it has brought about r adiophobia a mong people and waste of resources due to over-regulation, because the LNT implies that radiation is harmful no matter how small the dose is. The author reviewed the results of research on health effects of radiation including major epidemiological studies on radiation workers and found no clear evidence of deleterious health effects from radiation exposures below the current maximum dose limits (50 mSv/y for workers and 5 mSv/y for members of the public), which have been adopted worldwide in the second half of the 20th century. Now that the existence of bio-defensive mechanisms such as DNA repair, apoptosis and adaptive response are well recognized, the linearity assumption cannot be said to be s cientific . Evidences increasingly imply that there are threshold effects in risk of radiation. A concept of practical thresholds or virtually safe doses will have to be introduced into the new system of radiological protection in order to resolve the low dose issues. Practical thresholds may be defined as dose levels below which induction of detectable radiogenic cancers or hereditary effects are not expected. If any workers and members of the public do not gain benefits from being exposed, excepting intentional irradiation for medical purposes, their radiation exposures should be kept below practical thresholds. On the assumption that the current dose limits are below practical thresholds and with no radiation detriments, there is no need of justification and optimization (ALARA) principles for occupational and public exposures. Then the ethical issue of justification to allow benefit to society to offset radiation detriments to individuals can be resolved. And also the ethical issue of optimization to exchange health or safety for

  20. A Conceptual Framework for Evolving, Recommender Online Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, K. Dharini Amitha; Gallupe, R. Brent

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive conceptual framework is developed and described for evolving recommender-driven online learning systems (ROLS). This framework describes how such systems can support students, course authors, course instructors, systems administrators, and policy makers in developing and using these ROLS. The design science information systems…

  1. Evolving Systems: An Outcome of Fondest Hopes and Wildest Dreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    New theory is presented for evolving systems, which are autonomously controlled subsystems that self-assemble into a new evolved system with a higher purpose. Evolving systems of aerospace structures often require additional control when assembling to maintain stability during the entire evolution process. This is the concept of Adaptive Key Component Control that operates through one specific component to maintain stability during the evolution. In addition, this control must often overcome persistent disturbances that occur while the evolution is in progress. Theoretical results will be presented for Adaptive Key Component control for persistent disturbance rejection. An illustrative example will demonstrate the Adaptive Key Component controller on a system composed of rigid body and flexible body modes.

  2. A new evolutionary system for evolving artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, X; Liu, Y

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new evolutionary system, i.e., EPNet, for evolving artificial neural networks (ANNs). The evolutionary algorithm used in EPNet is based on Fogel's evolutionary programming (EP). Unlike most previous studies on evolving ANN's, this paper puts its emphasis on evolving ANN's behaviors. Five mutation operators proposed in EPNet reflect such an emphasis on evolving behaviors. Close behavioral links between parents and their offspring are maintained by various mutations, such as partial training and node splitting. EPNet evolves ANN's architectures and connection weights (including biases) simultaneously in order to reduce the noise in fitness evaluation. The parsimony of evolved ANN's is encouraged by preferring node/connection deletion to addition. EPNet has been tested on a number of benchmark problems in machine learning and ANNs, such as the parity problem, the medical diagnosis problems, the Australian credit card assessment problem, and the Mackey-Glass time series prediction problem. The experimental results show that EPNet can produce very compact ANNs with good generalization ability in comparison with other algorithms.

  3. Evaluation and testing methodology for evolving entertainment systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurgelionis, A.; Bellotti, F.; IJsselsteijn, W.A.; Kort, de Y.A.W.; Bernhaupt, R.; Tscheligi, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a testing and evaluation methodology for evolving pervasive gaming and multimedia systems. We introduce the Games@Large system, a complex gaming and multimedia architecture comprised of a multitude of elements: heterogeneous end user devices, wireless and wired network

  4. Evolving information systems: meeting the ever-changing environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, J.L.H.; Proper, H.A.; Falkenberg, E.D.

    1994-01-01

    To meet the demands of organizations and their ever-changing environment, information systems are required which are able to evolve to the same extent as organizations do. Such a system has to support changes in all time-and application-dependent aspects. In this paper, requirements and a conceptual

  5. Computational Genetic Regulatory Networks Evolvable, Self-organizing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Knabe, Johannes F

    2013-01-01

    Genetic Regulatory Networks (GRNs) in biological organisms are primary engines for cells to enact their engagements with environments, via incessant, continually active coupling. In differentiated multicellular organisms, tremendous complexity has arisen in the course of evolution of life on earth. Engineering and science have so far achieved no working system that can compare with this complexity, depth and scope of organization. Abstracting the dynamics of genetic regulatory control to a computational framework in which artificial GRNs in artificial simulated cells differentiate while connected in a changing topology, it is possible to apply Darwinian evolution in silico to study the capacity of such developmental/differentiated GRNs to evolve. In this volume an evolutionary GRN paradigm is investigated for its evolvability and robustness in models of biological clocks, in simple differentiated multicellularity, and in evolving artificial developing 'organisms' which grow and express an ontogeny starting fr...

  6. A rotating target wheel system for gammasphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A description is given for a low-mass, rotating target wheel to be used within the Gammasphere target chamber. This system was developed for experiments employing high beam currents in order to extend lifetimes of targets using low-melting point target material. The design is based on a previously successful implementation of rotating target wheels for the Argonne Positron Experiment (APEX) as well as the Fragment Mass Analyser (FMA) at ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System). A brief history of these rotating target wheel systems is given as well as a discussion on target preparation and performance

  7. Boundary Layer Control of Rotating Convection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E. M.; Stellmach, S.; Noir, J.; Hansen, U.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Rotating convection is ubiquitous in the natural universe, and is likely responsible for planetary processes such magnetic field generation. Rapidly rotating convection is typically organized by the Coriolis force into tall, thin, coherent convection columns which are aligned with the axis of rotation. This organizational effect of rotation is thought to be responsible for the strength and structure of magnetic fields generated by convecting planetary interiors. As thermal forcing is increased, the relative influence of rotation weakens, and fully three-dimensional convection can exist. It has long been assumed that rotational effects will dominate convection dynamics when the ratio of buoyancy to the Coriolis force, the convective Rossby number, Roc, is less than unity. We investigate the influence of rotation on turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection via a suite of coupled laboratory and numerical experiments over a broad parameter range: Rayleigh number, 10310; Ekman number, 10-6≤ E ≤ ∞; and Prandtl number, 1≤ Pr ≤ 100. In particular, we measure heat transfer (as characterized by the Nusselt number, Nu) as a function of the Rayleigh number for several different Ekman and Prandtl numbers. Two distinct heat transfer scaling regimes are identified: non-rotating style heat transfer, Nu ~ Ra2/7, and quasigeostrophic style heat transfer, Nu~ Ra6/5. The transition between the non-rotating regime and the rotationally dominant regime is described as a function of the Ekman number, E. We show that the regime transition depends not on the global force balance Roc, but on the relative thicknesses of the thermal and Ekman boundary layers. The transition scaling provides a predictive criterion for the applicability of convection models to natural systems such as Earth's core.

  8. An evolving systems-based methodology for healthcare planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Jon; Bell, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare planning seems beset with problems at all hierarchical levels. These are caused by the 'soft' nature of many of the issues present in healthcare planning and the high levels of complexity inherent in healthcare services. There has, in recent years, been a move to utilize systems thinking ideas in an effort to gain a better understanding of the forces at work within the healthcare environment and these have had some success. This paper argues that systems-based methodologies can be further enhanced by metrication and modeling which assist in exploring the changed emergent behavior of a system resulting from management intervention. The paper describes the Holon Framework as an evolving systems-based approach that has been used to help clients understand complex systems (in the education domain) that would have application in the analysis of healthcare problems.

  9. Evolving cell models for systems and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongqing; Romero-Campero, Francisco J; Heeb, Stephan; Cámara, Miguel; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2010-03-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology for the automated design of cell models for systems and synthetic biology. Our modelling framework is based on P systems, a discrete, stochastic and modular formal modelling language. The automated design of biological models comprising the optimization of the model structure and its stochastic kinetic constants is performed using an evolutionary algorithm. The evolutionary algorithm evolves model structures by combining different modules taken from a predefined module library and then it fine-tunes the associated stochastic kinetic constants. We investigate four alternative objective functions for the fitness calculation within the evolutionary algorithm: (1) equally weighted sum method, (2) normalization method, (3) randomly weighted sum method, and (4) equally weighted product method. The effectiveness of the methodology is tested on four case studies of increasing complexity including negative and positive autoregulation as well as two gene networks implementing a pulse generator and a bandwidth detector. We provide a systematic analysis of the evolutionary algorithm's results as well as of the resulting evolved cell models.

  10. The Systems Biology Research Tool: evolvable open-source software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Jeremiah

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research in the field of systems biology requires software for a variety of purposes. Software must be used to store, retrieve, analyze, and sometimes even to collect the data obtained from system-level (often high-throughput experiments. Software must also be used to implement mathematical models and algorithms required for simulation and theoretical predictions on the system-level. Results We introduce a free, easy-to-use, open-source, integrated software platform called the Systems Biology Research Tool (SBRT to facilitate the computational aspects of systems biology. The SBRT currently performs 35 methods for analyzing stoichiometric networks and 16 methods from fields such as graph theory, geometry, algebra, and combinatorics. New computational techniques can be added to the SBRT via process plug-ins, providing a high degree of evolvability and a unifying framework for software development in systems biology. Conclusion The Systems Biology Research Tool represents a technological advance for systems biology. This software can be used to make sophisticated computational techniques accessible to everyone (including those with no programming ability, to facilitate cooperation among researchers, and to expedite progress in the field of systems biology.

  11. A low frequency rotational energy harvesting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Febbo, M; Machado, S P; Ramirez, J M; Gatti, C D

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a rotary power scavenging unit comprised of two systems of flexible beams connected by two masses which are joined by means of a spring, considering a PZT (QP16N, Midé Corporation) piezoelectric sheet mounted on one of the beams. The energy harvesting (EH) system is mounted rigidly on a rotating hub. The gravitational force on the masses causes sustained oscillatory motion in the flexible beams as long as there is rotary motion. The intention is to use the EH system in the wireless autonomous monitoring of wind turbines under different wind conditions. Specifically, the development is oriented to monitor the dynamic state of the blades of a wind generator of 30 KW which rotates between 50 and 150 rpm. The paper shows a complete set of experimental results on three devices, modifying the amount of beams in the frame supporting the system. The results show an acceptable sustained voltage generation for the expected range, in the three proposed cases. Therefore, it is possible to use this system for generating energy in a low-frequency rotating environment. As an alternative, the system can be easily adapted to include an array of piezoelectric sheets to each of the beams, to provide more power generation. (paper)

  12. Rotating Machinery Predictive Maintenance Through Expert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sarath Kumar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern rotating machines such as turbomachines, either produce or absorb huge amount of power. Some of the common applications are: steam turbine-generator and gas turbine-compressor-generator trains produce power and machines, such as pumps, centrifugal compressors, motors, generators, machine tool spindles, etc., are being used in industrial applications. Condition-based maintenance of rotating machinery is a common practice where the machine's condition is monitored constantly, so that timely maintenance can be done. Since modern machines are complex and the amount of data to be interpreted is huge, we need precise and fast methods in order to arrive at the best recommendations to prevent catastrophic failure and to prolong the life of the equipment. In the present work using vibration characteristics of a rotor-bearing system, the condition of a rotating machinery (electrical rotor is predicted using an off-line expert system. The analysis of the problem is carried out in an Object Oriented Programming (OOP framework using the finite element method. The expert system which is also developed in an OOP paradigm gives the type of the malfunctions, suggestions and recommendations. The system is implemented in C++.

  13. Dynamics of Large Systems of Nonlinearly Evolving Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhixin

    The dynamics of large systems of many nonlinearly evolving units is a general research area that has great importance for many areas in science and technology, including biology, computation by artificial neural networks, statistical mechanics, flocking in animal groups, the dynamics of coupled neurons in the brain, and many others. While universal principles and techniques are largely lacking in this broad area of research, there is still one particular phenomenon that seems to be broadly applicable. In particular, this is the idea of emergence, by which is meant macroscopic behaviors that "emerge" from a large system of many "smaller or simpler entities such that...large entities" [i.e., macroscopic behaviors] arise which "exhibit properties the smaller/simpler entities do not exhibit." In this thesis we investigate mechanisms and manifestations of emergence in four dynamical systems consisting many nonlinearly evolving units. These four systems are as follows. (a) We first study the motion of a large ensemble of many noninteracting particles in a slowly changing Hamiltonian system that undergoes a separatrix crossing. In such systems, we find that separatrix-crossing induces a counterintuitive effect. Specifically, numerical simulation of two sets of densely sprinkled initial conditions on two energy curves appears to suggest that the two energy curves, one originally enclosing the other, seemingly interchange their positions. This, however, is topologically forbidden. We resolve this paradox by introducing a numerical simulation method we call "robust" and study its consequences. (b) We next study the collective dynamics of oscillatory pacemaker neurons in Suprachiasmatic Nucleus (SCN), which, through synchrony, govern the circadian rhythm of mammals. We start from a high-dimensional description of the many coupled oscillatory neuronal units within the SCN. This description is based on a forced Kuramoto model. We then reduce the system dimensionality by using

  14. Architectural Analysis of Complex Evolving Systems of Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall, Mikael; Stratton, William C.; Sibol, Deane E.; Ray, Arnab; Ackemann, Chris; Yonkwa, Lyly; Ganesan, Dharma

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this collaborative project between FC-MD, APL, and GSFC and supported by NASA IV&V Software Assurance Research Program (SARP), was to develop a tool, Dynamic SAVE, or Dyn-SAVE for short, for analyzing architectures of systems of systems. The project team was comprised of the principal investigator (PI) from FC-MD and four other FC-MD scientists (part time) and several FC-MD students (full time), as well as, two APL software architects (part time), and one NASA POC (part time). The PI and FC-MD scientists together with APL architects were responsible for requirements analysis, and for applying and evaluating the Dyn-SAVE tool and method. The PI and a group of FC-MD scientists were responsible for improving the method and conducting outreach activities, while another group of FC-MD scientists were responsible for development and improvement of the tool. Oversight and reporting was conducted by the PI and NASA POC. The project team produced many results including several prototypes of the Dyn-SAVE tool and method, several case studies documenting how the tool and method was applied to APL s software systems, and several published papers in highly respected conferences and journals. Dyn-SAVE as developed and enhanced throughout this research period, is a software tool intended for software developers and architects, software integration testers, and persons who need to analyze software systems from the point of view of how it communicates with other systems. Using the tool, the user specifies the planned communication behavior of the system modeled as a sequence diagram. The user then captures and imports the actual communication behavior of the system, which is then converted and visualized as a sequence diagram by Dyn-SAVE. After mapping the planned to the actual and specifying parameter and timing constraints, Dyn-SAVE detects and highlights deviations between the planned and the actual behavior. Requirements based on the need to analyze two inter-system

  15. Asteroseismic inference on rotation, gyrochronology and planetary system dynamics of 16 Cygni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, G. R.; Chaplin, W. J.; Farr, W. M.

    2014-01-01

    The solar analogs 16 Cyg A and 16 Cyg B are excellent asteroseismic targets in the \\Kepler field of view and together with a red dwarf and a Jovian planet form an interesting system. For these more evolved Sun-like stars we cannot detect surface rotation with the current \\Kepler data but instead...

  16. Adoption of Geospatial Systems towards evolving Sustainable Himalayan Mountain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, M. S. R.; Bajracharya, B.; Pradhan, S.; Shestra, B.; Bajracharya, R.; Shakya, K.; Wesselmann, S.; Ali, M.; Bajracharya, S.; Pradhan, S.

    2014-11-01

    Natural resources dependence of mountain communities, rapid social and developmental changes, disaster proneness and climate change are conceived as the critical factors regulating sustainable Himalayan mountain development. The Himalayan region posed by typical geographic settings, diverse physical and cultural diversity present a formidable challenge to collect and manage data, information and understands varied socio-ecological settings. Recent advances in earth observation, near real-time data, in-situ measurements and in combination of information and communication technology have transformed the way we collect, process, and generate information and how we use such information for societal benefits. Glacier dynamics, land cover changes, disaster risk reduction systems, food security and ecosystem conservation are a few thematic areas where geospatial information and knowledge have significantly contributed to informed decision making systems over the region. The emergence and adoption of near-real time systems, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), board-scale citizen science (crowd-sourcing), mobile services and mapping, and cloud computing have paved the way towards developing automated environmental monitoring systems, enhanced scientific understanding of geophysical and biophysical processes, coupled management of socio-ecological systems and community based adaptation models tailored to mountain specific environment. There are differentiated capacities among the ICIMOD regional member countries with regard to utilization of earth observation and geospatial technologies. The region can greatly benefit from a coordinated and collaborative approach to capture the opportunities offered by earth observation and geospatial technologies. The regional level data sharing, knowledge exchange, and Himalayan GEO supporting geospatial platforms, spatial data infrastructure, unique region specific satellite systems to address trans-boundary challenges would go a long way in

  17. Assessing the evolving fragility of the global food system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Michael J.; Bose, Satyajit; Chon, So Young; Cook, Benjamin I.

    2015-02-01

    The world food crisis in 2008 highlighted the susceptibility of the global food system to price shocks. Here we use annual staple food production and trade data from 1992-2009 to analyse the changing properties of the global food system. Over the 18 year study period, we show that the global food system is relatively homogeneous (85% of countries have low or marginal food self-sufficiency) and increases in complexity, with the number of global wheat and rice trade connections doubling and trade flows increasing by 42 and 90%, respectively. The increased connectivity and flows within these global trade networks suggest that the global food system is vulnerable to systemic disruptions, especially considering the tendency for exporting countries to switch to non-exporting states during times of food scarcity in the global markets. To test this hypothesis, we superimpose continental-scale disruptions on the wheat and rice trade networks. We find greater absolute reductions in global wheat and rice exports along with larger losses in network connectivity as the networks evolve due to disruptions in European wheat and Asian rice production. Importantly, our findings indicate that least developed countries suffer greater import losses in more connected networks through their increased dependence on imports for staple foods (due to these large-scale disturbances): mean (median) wheat losses as percentages of staple food supply are 8.9% (3.8%) for 1992-1996, increasing to 11% (5.7%) for 2005-2009. Over the same intervals, rice losses increase from 8.2% (2.2%) to 14% (5.2%). Our work indicates that policy efforts should focus on balancing the efficiency of international trade (and its associated specialization) with increased resilience of domestic production and global demand diversity.

  18. Assessing the evolving fragility of the global food system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puma, Michael J; Bose, Satyajit; Chon, So Young; Cook, Benjamin I

    2015-01-01

    The world food crisis in 2008 highlighted the susceptibility of the global food system to price shocks. Here we use annual staple food production and trade data from 1992–2009 to analyse the changing properties of the global food system. Over the 18 year study period, we show that the global food system is relatively homogeneous (85% of countries have low or marginal food self-sufficiency) and increases in complexity, with the number of global wheat and rice trade connections doubling and trade flows increasing by 42 and 90%, respectively. The increased connectivity and flows within these global trade networks suggest that the global food system is vulnerable to systemic disruptions, especially considering the tendency for exporting countries to switch to non-exporting states during times of food scarcity in the global markets. To test this hypothesis, we superimpose continental-scale disruptions on the wheat and rice trade networks. We find greater absolute reductions in global wheat and rice exports along with larger losses in network connectivity as the networks evolve due to disruptions in European wheat and Asian rice production. Importantly, our findings indicate that least developed countries suffer greater import losses in more connected networks through their increased dependence on imports for staple foods (due to these large-scale disturbances): mean (median) wheat losses as percentages of staple food supply are 8.9% (3.8%) for 1992–1996, increasing to 11% (5.7%) for 2005–2009. Over the same intervals, rice losses increase from 8.2% (2.2%) to 14% (5.2%). Our work indicates that policy efforts should focus on balancing the efficiency of international trade (and its associated specialization) with increased resilience of domestic production and global demand diversity. (letter)

  19. Assessing the Evolving Fragility of the Global Food System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Michael Joseph; Bose, Satyajit; Chon, So Young; Cook, Benjamin I.

    2015-01-01

    The world food crisis in 2008 highlighted the susceptibility of the global food system to price shocks. Here we use annual staple food production and trade data from 1992-2009 to analyse the changing properties of the global food system. Over the 18-year study period, we show that the global food system is relatively homogeneous (85 of countries have low or marginal food self-sufficiency) and increases in complexity, with the number of global wheat and rice trade connections doubling and trade flows increasing by 42 and 90, respectively. The increased connectivity and flows within these global trade networks suggest that the global food system is vulnerable to systemic disruptions, especially considering the tendency for exporting countries to switch to non-exporting states during times of food scarcity in the global markets. To test this hypothesis, we superimpose continental-scale disruptions on the wheat and rice trade networks. We find greater absolute reductions in global wheat and rice exports along with larger losses in network connectivity as the networks evolve due to disruptions in European wheat and Asian rice production. Importantly, our findings indicate that least developed countries suffer greater import losses in more connected networks through their increased dependence on imports for staple foods (due to these large-scale disturbances): mean (median) wheat losses as percentages of staple food supply are 8.9 (3.8) for 1992-1996, increasing to 11 (5.7) for 20052009. Over the same intervals, rice losses increase from 8.2 (2.2) to 14 (5.2). Our work indicates that policy efforts should focus on balancing the efficiency of international trade (and its associated specialization) with increased resilience of domestic production and global demand diversity.

  20. Thermodynamic equilibrium in relativistic rotating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suen, W.M.; Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO; Young, K.

    1988-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium configurations of relativistic rotating stars are studied using the maximum entropy principle. It is shown that the heuristic arguments for the equilibrium conditions can be developed into a maximum entropy principle in which the variations are carried out in a fixed background spacetime. This maximum principle with the fixed background assumption is technically simpler than, but has to be justified by, a maximum entropy principle without the assumption. Such a maximum entropy principle is formulated in this paper, showing that the general relativistic system can be treated on the same footing as other long-range force systems. (author)

  1. Macroscopic Theory for Evolving Biological Systems Akin to Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Furusawa, Chikara

    2018-05-20

    We present a macroscopic theory to characterize the plasticity, robustness, and evolvability of biological responses and their fluctuations. First, linear approximation in intracellular reaction dynamics is used to demonstrate proportional changes in the expression of all cellular components in response to a given environmental stress, with the proportion coefficient determined by the change in growth rate as a consequence of the steady growth of cells. We further demonstrate that this relationship is supported through adaptation experiments of bacteria, perhaps too well as this proportionality is held even across cultures of different types of conditions. On the basis of simulations of cell models, we further show that this global proportionality is a consequence of evolution in which expression changes in response to environmental or genetic perturbations are constrained along a unique one-dimensional curve, which is a result of evolutionary robustness. It then follows that the expression changes induced by environmental changes are proportionally reduced across different components of a cell by evolution, which is akin to the Le Chatelier thermodynamics principle. Finally, with the aid of a fluctuation-response relationship, this proportionality is shown to hold between fluctuations caused by genetic changes and those caused by noise. Overall, these results and support from the theoretical and experimental literature suggest a formulation of cellular systems akin to thermodynamics, in which a macroscopic potential is given by the growth rate (or fitness) represented as a function of environmental and evolutionary changes.

  2. Multiple operating system rotation environment moving target defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nathaniel; Thompson, Michael

    2016-03-22

    Systems and methods for providing a multiple operating system rotation environment ("MORE") moving target defense ("MTD") computing system are described. The MORE-MTD system provides enhanced computer system security through a rotation of multiple operating systems. The MORE-MTD system increases attacker uncertainty, increases the cost of attacking the system, reduces the likelihood of an attacker locating a vulnerability, and reduces the exposure time of any located vulnerability. The MORE-MTD environment is effectuated by rotation of the operating systems at a given interval. The rotating operating systems create a consistently changing attack surface for remote attackers.

  3. Evolving Metadata in NASA Earth Science Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A.; Cechini, M. F.; Walter, J.

    2011-12-01

    NASA's effort to continually evolve its data systems led ECHO to enhancing the method in which it receives inventory metadata from the data centers to allow for multiple metadata formats including ISO 19115. ECHO's metadata model will also be mapped to the NASA-specific convention for ingesting science metadata into the ECHO system. As NASA's new Earth Science missions and data centers are migrating to the ISO 19115 standards, EOSDIS is developing metadata management resources to assist in the reading, writing and parsing ISO 19115 compliant metadata. To foster interoperability with other agencies and international partners, NASA is working to ensure that a common ISO 19115 convention is developed, enhancing data sharing capabilities and other data analysis initiatives. NASA is also investigating the use of ISO 19115 standards to encode data quality, lineage and provenance with stored values. A common metadata standard across NASA's Earth Science data systems promotes interoperability, enhances data utilization and removes levels of uncertainty found in data products.

  4. Influence of defects on the vibrations of rotating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, A.

    2008-01-01

    For high rotation speeds, the imperfections (cracks, anisotropy...) of rotating machinery of the energy sector lead to a specific vibratory behavior which can damage the machine. The simulation of rotating machinery are usually realized for systems without defect. The aim of this thesis is to understand the influence of defects and to propose an algorithm to predict the dynamical behavior. In a first part the author studies the simplified rotating oscillators to propose a numerical method in order to taking into account the dynamic of these systems. This method is then applied to real rotating machinery with the Cast3m software. The numerical results are validated with experiments. (A.L.B.)

  5. Relativistic effects in a rotating coordinate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chugreev, Y.V.

    1989-01-01

    The general approach to calculating various physical effects in a rotating, noninertial reference frame based on the tetrad formalism for observables is discussed. It is shown that the method based on the search for the ''true'' coordinate transformation from an inertial to the rotating frame is ill-founded. Most special relativistic effects in a rotating frame have been calculated without any nonrelativistic restrictions. It is shown how simple physical experiments can be used to determine whether a circle is at rest in the equatorial plane of a Kerr--Newman gravitational source in the relativistic theory of gravity or is rotating about an axis through its center

  6. Development of NTD Hydraulic Rotation System for Kijang Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hanok; Park, Kijung; Park, Yongsoo; Kim, Seong Hoon; Park, Cheol

    2014-01-01

    The KJRR will be mainly utilized for isotope production, NTD (Neutron Transmutation Doping) production, and related research activities. During irradiation for the NTD process, the irradiation rigs containing the silicon ingot rotate at a constant speed to ensure precisely defined homogeneity of the irradiation. The NTDHRS requires only hydraulic piping conveniently routed to the rotating devices inside the reactor pool. The resulting layout leaves the pool area clear of obstructions which might obscure vision and hinder target handling for operators. Pump banks and control valves are located remotely in a dedicated plant room allowing easy access and online maintenance. The necessities and major characteristic of NTD hydraulic rotation system are described in this study. A new NTD hydraulic rotation system are being developed to rotate the irradiation rigs at a constant speed and supply cooling flow for the irradiation rigs and reflector assembly. The configuration of the NTD hydraulic rotation device is discussed and practical methods to improve the rotational performance are suggested

  7. Development of NTD Hydraulic Rotation System for Kijang Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hanok; Park, Kijung; Park, Yongsoo; Kim, Seong Hoon; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The KJRR will be mainly utilized for isotope production, NTD (Neutron Transmutation Doping) production, and related research activities. During irradiation for the NTD process, the irradiation rigs containing the silicon ingot rotate at a constant speed to ensure precisely defined homogeneity of the irradiation. The NTDHRS requires only hydraulic piping conveniently routed to the rotating devices inside the reactor pool. The resulting layout leaves the pool area clear of obstructions which might obscure vision and hinder target handling for operators. Pump banks and control valves are located remotely in a dedicated plant room allowing easy access and online maintenance. The necessities and major characteristic of NTD hydraulic rotation system are described in this study. A new NTD hydraulic rotation system are being developed to rotate the irradiation rigs at a constant speed and supply cooling flow for the irradiation rigs and reflector assembly. The configuration of the NTD hydraulic rotation device is discussed and practical methods to improve the rotational performance are suggested.

  8. Evolving Systems: Adaptive Key Component Control and Inheritance of Passivity and Dissipativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, S. A.; Balas, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new framework called Evolving Systems to describe the self-assembly, or autonomous assembly, of actively controlled dynamical subsystems into an Evolved System with a higher purpose. Autonomous assembly of large, complex flexible structures in space is a target application for Evolving Systems. A critical requirement for autonomous assembling structures is that they remain stable during and after assembly. The fundamental topic of inheritance of stability, dissipativity, and passivity in Evolving Systems is the primary focus of this research. In this paper, we develop an adaptive key component controller to restore stability in Nonlinear Evolving Systems that would otherwise fail to inherit the stability traits of their components. We provide sufficient conditions for the use of this novel control method and demonstrate its use on an illustrative example.

  9. Evolving Systems of Care with Total Clinical Outcomes Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, John S.; Epstein, Richard A.; Jordan, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The current article proposes that further specification of the system of care concept is required. Based on the assertions that the system of care concept (a) refers to an ideal as opposed to an observable phenomenon, and (b) is engaged in offering transformational experiences, the authors propose that the system of care definition must be…

  10. A self-calibration method in single-axis rotational inertial navigation system with rotating mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanpei; Wang, Lingcao; Li, Kui

    2017-10-01

    Rotary inertial navigation modulation mechanism can greatly improve the inertial navigation system (INS) accuracy through the rotation. Based on the single-axis rotational inertial navigation system (RINS), a self-calibration method is put forward. The whole system is applied with the rotation modulation technique so that whole inertial measurement unit (IMU) of system can rotate around the motor shaft without any external input. In the process of modulation, some important errors can be decoupled. Coupled with the initial position information and attitude information of the system as the reference, the velocity errors and attitude errors in the rotation are used as measurement to perform Kalman filtering to estimate part of important errors of the system after which the errors can be compensated into the system. The simulation results show that the method can complete the self-calibration of the single-axis RINS in 15 minutes and estimate gyro drifts of three-axis, the installation error angle of the IMU and the scale factor error of the gyro on z-axis. The calibration accuracy of optic gyro drifts could be about 0.003°/h (1σ) as well as the scale factor error could be about 1 parts per million (1σ). The errors estimate reaches the system requirements which can effectively improve the longtime navigation accuracy of the vehicle or the boat.

  11. The Systems Biology Research Tool: evolvable open-source software

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, J; Wagner, A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Research in the field of systems biology requires software for a variety of purposes. Software must be used to store, retrieve, analyze, and sometimes even to collect the data obtained from system-level (often high-throughput) experiments. Software must also be used to implement mathematical models and algorithms required for simulation and theoretical predictions on the system-level. Results We introduce a free, easy-to-use, open-source, integrated software platform calle...

  12. Phase considerations in a rotating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    A neutron interferometer in constant absolute rotation will exhibit a certain phase-shift between its two beams, a phenomenon shared with the classic Sagnac or Michelson-Gale-Pearson experiments or with the modern laser-gyrocompass composed of lasers in a ring. To first order in the rotational frequency, it is possible to understand by employing only rudimentary theory, the essence of this phenomenon to any degree of relativistiness of the participating particle. This paper is mainly paedagogical, noting the similarity due to permanent rotation between photon-, electron and neutron-interferometers. Future experimentation, aside from corroborating well believed tenets, may hope with improving precision to bring new approaches to measurement of fundamental effects

  13. Advertising, product quality, and complex evolving marketing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Verbeke, Willem

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThe paper analyses the advertising as power vs. advertising as information controversy as well as its recent empirical testing. It is stressed that this distinction focuses too much on the interaction between consumer and manufacturer while ignoring the retailer as an important stake-holder. To compensate for this lack, a complex marketing system perspective is introduced in which consumer, retailer, and manufacturer interact. However, these complex marketing systems might drift t...

  14. The Existence and Structure of Rotational Systems in the Circle

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Jayakumar

    2018-01-01

    By a rotational system, we mean a closed subset X of the circle, T=R/Z, together with a continuous transformation f:X→X with the requirements that the dynamical system (X,f) be minimal and that f respect the standard orientation of T. We show that infinite rotational systems (X,f), with the property that map f has finite preimages, are extensions of irrational rotations of the circle. Such systems have been studied when they arise as invariant subsets of certain specific mappings, F:T→T. Beca...

  15. Does an onlooker stop an evolving quantum system?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toschek, P E

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of quantum mechanics has followed the critical analysis of 'gedanken' experiments. Many of these concrete speculations can become implemented today in the laboratory - thanks to now available techniques. A key experiment is concerned with the time evolution of a quantum system under repeated or continuing observation. Here, three problems overlap: 1. The microphysical measurement by a macroscopic device, 2. the system's temporal evolution, and 3. the emergence of macroscopic reality out of the microcosmos. A well-known calculation shows the evolution of a quantum system being slowed down, or even obstructed, when the system is merely observed.An experiment designed to demonstrate this 'quantum Zeno effect' and performed in the late eighties on an ensemble of identical atomic ions confirmed its quantum description, but turned out inconclusive with respect to the very origin of the impediment of evolution. During the past years, experiments on individualelectrodynamically stored and laser-cooled ions have been performed that unequivocally demonstrate the observed system's quantum evolution being impeded. Strategy and results exclude any physical reaction on the measured object, but reveal the effect of the gain of information as put forward by the particular correlation of the ion state with the detected signal. They shed light on the process of measurement as well as on the quantum evolution and allow an epistemological interpretation

  16. Evolving Reliability and Maintainability Allocations for NASA Ground Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Gisela; Toon, T.; Toon, J.; Conner, A.; Adams, T.; Miranda, D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology and value of modifying allocations to reliability and maintainability requirements for the NASA Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) programs subsystems. As systems progressed through their design life cycle and hardware data became available, it became necessary to reexamine the previously derived allocations. This iterative process provided an opportunity for the reliability engineering team to reevaluate allocations as systems moved beyond their conceptual and preliminary design phases. These new allocations are based on updated designs and maintainability characteristics of the components. It was found that trade-offs in reliability and maintainability were essential to ensuring the integrity of the reliability and maintainability analysis. This paper discusses the results of reliability and maintainability reallocations made for the GSDO subsystems as the program nears the end of its design phase.

  17. Mining and representing recommendations in actively evolving recommender systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assent, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Recommender systems provide an automatic means of filtering out interesting items, usually based on past similarity of user ratings. In previous work, we have suggested a model that allows users to actively build a recommender network. Users express trust, obtain transparency, and grow (anonymous......) recommender connections. In this work, we propose mining such active systems to generate easily understandable representations of the recommender network. Users may review these representations to provide active feedback. This approach further enhances the quality of recommendations, especially as topics...... of interest change over time. Most notably, it extends the amount of control users have over the model that the recommender network builds of their interests....

  18. The Central Nervous System and Bone Metabolism: An Evolving Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitri, Paul; Rosen, Cliff

    2017-05-01

    Our understanding of the control of skeletal metabolism has undergone a dynamic shift in the last two decades, primarily driven by our understanding of energy metabolism. Evidence demonstrating that leptin not only influences bone cells directly, but that it also plays a pivotal role in controlling bone mass centrally, opened up an investigative process that has changed the way in which skeletal metabolism is now perceived. Other central regulators of bone metabolism have since been identified including neuropeptide Y (NPY), serotonin, endocannabinoids, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), adiponectin, melatonin and neuromedin U, controlling osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, proliferation and function. The sympathetic nervous system was originally identified as the predominant efferent pathway mediating central signalling to control skeleton metabolism, in part regulated through circadian genes. More recent evidence points to a role of the parasympathetic nervous system in the control of skeletal metabolism either through muscarinic influence of sympathetic nerves in the brain or directly via nicotinic receptors on osteoclasts, thus providing evidence for broader autonomic skeletal regulation. Sensory innervation of bone has also received focus again widening our understanding of the complex neuronal regulation of bone mass. Whilst scientific advance in this field of bone metabolism has been rapid, progress is still required to understand how these model systems work in relation to the multiple confounders influencing skeletal metabolism, and the relative balance in these neuronal systems required for skeletal growth and development in childhood and maintaining skeletal integrity in adulthood.

  19. The Health and Occupation Research Network: An Evolving Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, Melanie; Hussey, Louise; Money, Annemarie; Gittins, Matthew; McNamee, Roseanne; Stocks, Susan Jill; Sen, Dil; Agius, Raymond M

    2017-09-01

    Vital to the prevention of work-related ill-health (WRIH) is the availability of good quality data regarding WRIH burden and risks. Physician-based surveillance systems such as The Health and Occupation Research (THOR) network in the UK are often established in response to limitations of statutory, compensation-based systems for addressing certain epidemiological aspects of disease surveillance. However, to fulfil their purpose, THOR and others need to have methodologic rigor in capturing and ascertaining cases. This article describes how data collected by THOR and analogous systems can inform WRIH incidence, trends, and other determinants. An overview of the different strands of THOR research is provided, including methodologic advancements facilitated by increased data quantity/quality over time and the value of the research outputs for informing Government and other policy makers. In doing so, the utility of data collected by systems such as THOR to address a wide range of research questions, both in relation to WRIH and to wider issues of public and social health, is demonstrated.

  20. Elk viewing in Pennsylvania: an evolving eco-tourism system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce E. Lord; Charles H. Strauss; Michael J. Powell

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the Pennsylvania Game Commission established an Elk Viewing Area within Pennsylvania's elk range. The viewing area has become the focus for a developing eco-tourism system. During the four years of operation, a research team from Penn State has measured the number of visitors, their expenditure patterns, and other parameters of their visit. The trends...

  1. The Health and Occupation Research Network: An Evolving Surveillance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Carder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Vital to the prevention of work-related ill-health (WRIH is the availability of good quality data regarding WRIH burden and risks. Physician-based surveillance systems such as The Health and Occupation Research (THOR network in the UK are often established in response to limitations of statutory, compensation-based systems for addressing certain epidemiological aspects of disease surveillance. However, to fulfil their purpose, THOR and others need to have methodologic rigor in capturing and ascertaining cases. This article describes how data collected by THOR and analogous systems can inform WRIH incidence, trends, and other determinants. An overview of the different strands of THOR research is provided, including methodologic advancements facilitated by increased data quantity/quality over time and the value of the research outputs for informing Government and other policy makers. In doing so, the utility of data collected by systems such as THOR to address a wide range of research questions, both in relation to WRIH and to wider issues of public and social health, is demonstrated.

  2. Evolving the Living With a Star Data System Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otranto, J. F.; Dijoseph, M.

    2003-12-01

    NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) Program is a space weather-focused and applications-driven research program. The LWS Program is soliciting input from the solar, space physics, space weather, and climate science communities to develop a system that enables access to science data associated with these disciplines, and advances the development of discipline and interdisciplinary findings. The LWS Program will implement a data system that builds upon the existing and planned data capture, processing, and storage components put in place by individual spacecraft missions and also inter-project data management systems, including active and deep archives, and multi-mission data repositories. It is technically feasible for the LWS Program to integrate data from a broad set of resources, assuming they are either publicly accessible or allow access by permission. The LWS Program data system will work in coordination with spacecraft mission data systems and science data repositories, integrating their holdings using a common metadata representation. This common representation relies on a robust metadata definition that provides journalistic and technical data descriptions, plus linkages to supporting data products and tools. The LWS Program intends to become an enabling resource to PIs, interdisciplinary scientists, researchers, and students facilitating both access to a broad collection of science data, as well as the necessary supporting components to understand and make productive use of these data. For the LWS Program to represent science data that are physically distributed across various ground system elements, information will be collected about these distributed data products through a series of LWS Program-created agents. These agents will be customized to interface or interact with each one of these data systems, collect information, and forward any new metadata records to a LWS Program-developed metadata library. A populated LWS metadata library will function as a

  3. An evolving research agenda for human-coastal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Eli D.; Ellis, Michael A.; Brad Murray, A.; Hall, Damon M.

    2016-03-01

    Within the broad discourses of environmental change, sustainability science, and anthropogenic Earth-surface systems, a focused body of work involves the coupled economic and physical dynamics of developed shorelines. Rapid rates of change in coastal environments, from wetlands and deltas to inlets and dune systems, help researchers recognize, observe, and investigate coupling in natural (non-human) morphodynamics and biomorphodynamics. This same intrinsic quality of fast-paced change also makes developed coastal zones exemplars of observable coupling between physical processes and human activities. In many coastal communities, beach erosion is a natural hazard with economic costs that coastal management counters through a variety of mitigation strategies, including beach replenishment, groynes, revetments, and seawalls. As cycles of erosion and mitigation iterate, coastline change and economically driven interventions become mutually linked. Emergent dynamics of two-way economic-physical coupling is a recent research discovery. Having established a strong theoretical basis, research into coupled human-coastal systems has passed its early proof-of-concept phase. This paper frames three major challenges that need resolving in order to advance theoretical and empirical treatments of human-coastal systems: (1) codifying salient individual and social behaviors of decision-making in ways that capture societal actions across a range of scales (thus engaging economics, social science, and policy disciplines); (2) quantifying anthropogenic effects on alongshore and cross-shore sediment pathways and long-term landscape evolution in coastal zones through time, including direct measurement of cumulative changes to sediment cells resulting from coastal development and management practices (e.g., construction of buildings and artificial dunes, bulldozer removal of overwash after major storms); and (3) reciprocal knowledge and data exchange between researchers in coastal

  4. Primary care training and the evolving healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccoralo, Lauren A; Callahan, Kathryn; Stark, Rachel; DeCherrie, Linda V

    2012-01-01

    With growing numbers of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations, and the potential implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the provision of primary care in the United States is expanding and changing. Therefore, there is an urgent need to create more primary-care physicians and to train physicians to practice in this environment. In this article, we review the impact that the changing US healthcare system has on trainees, strategies to recruit and retain medical students and residents into primary-care internal medicine, and the preparation of trainees to work in the changing healthcare system. Recruitment methods for medical students include early preclinical exposure to patients in the primary-care setting, enhanced longitudinal patient experiences in clinical clerkships, and primary-care tracks. Recruitment methods for residents include enhanced ambulatory-care training and primary-care programs. Financial-incentive programs such as loan forgiveness may encourage trainees to enter primary care. Retaining residents in primary-care careers may be encouraged via focused postgraduate fellowships or continuing medical education to prepare primary-care physicians as both teachers and practitioners in the changing environment. Finally, to prepare primary-care trainees to effectively and efficiently practice within the changing system, educators should consider shifting ambulatory training to community-based practices, encouraging resident participation in team-based care, providing interprofessional educational experiences, and involving trainees in quality-improvement initiatives. Medical educators in primary care must think innovatively and collaboratively to effectively recruit and train the future generation of primary-care physicians. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  5. Semiclassical shell structure in rotating Fermi systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magner, A. G.; Sitdikov, A. S.; Khamzin, A. A.; Bartel, J.

    2010-01-01

    The collective moment of inertia is derived analytically within the cranking model for any rotational frequency of the harmonic-oscillator potential well and at a finite temperature. Semiclassical shell-structure components of the collective moment of inertia are obtained for any potential by using the periodic-orbit theory. We found semiclassically their relation to the free-energy shell corrections through the shell-structure components of the rigid-body moment of inertia of the statistically equilibrium rotation in terms of short periodic orbits. The shell effects in the moment of inertia exponentially disappear with increasing temperature. For the case of the harmonic-oscillator potential, one observes a perfect agreement of the semiclassical and quantum shell-structure components of the free energy and the moment of inertia for several critical bifurcation deformations and several temperatures.

  6. Evolving the Land Information System into a Cloud Computing Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houser, Paul R. [CREW Services LLC, Ellicott City, MD (United States)

    2015-02-17

    The Land Information System (LIS) was developed to use advanced flexible land surface modeling and data assimilation frameworks to integrate extremely large satellite- and ground-based observations with advanced land surface models to produce continuous high-resolution fields of land surface states and fluxes. The resulting fields are extremely useful for drought and flood assessment, agricultural planning, disaster management, weather and climate forecasting, water resources assessment, and the like. We envisioned transforming the LIS modeling system into a scientific cloud computing-aware web and data service that would allow clients to easily setup and configure for use in addressing large water management issues. The focus of this Phase 1 project was to determine the scientific, technical, commercial merit and feasibility of the proposed LIS-cloud innovations that are currently barriers to broad LIS applicability. We (a) quantified the barriers to broad LIS utility and commercialization (high performance computing, big data, user interface, and licensing issues); (b) designed the proposed LIS-cloud web service, model-data interface, database services, and user interfaces; (c) constructed a prototype LIS user interface including abstractions for simulation control, visualization, and data interaction, (d) used the prototype to conduct a market analysis and survey to determine potential market size and competition, (e) identified LIS software licensing and copyright limitations and developed solutions, and (f) developed a business plan for development and marketing of the LIS-cloud innovation. While some significant feasibility issues were found in the LIS licensing, overall a high degree of LIS-cloud technical feasibility was found.

  7. The evolving system of radiological protection: the nuclear industry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coates, R.

    2003-01-01

    The World Nuclear Association (WNA) believes that the case for a significant change to the system of protection is not compelling, and any rationalizations need to be carefully judged. We have concern at some apparent over-simplification and vagueness by ICRP in its furtherance of the search for simplicity and coherence. Any changes should be evolutionary, allowing reasonable regulatory stability, and should assure adequate protection of human health and safety and the protection of the environment, promote optimal use of public and private resources and help build public trust and confidence. The proposal for a maximum constraint of 20 mSv pa on occupational exposure is too inflexible. The control of exposures in the range 20-50 mSv pa should take account of exceptional circumstances and is a matter best left for discussion and agreement between the local stakeholders - i.e., the regulators, the operator and the workforce. Our principal concern is the proposal for a maximum constraint of 0.3 mSv pa on public exposure. This level, equivalent to one tenth of average natural background exposure, cannot be justified on public health grounds or in comparison with the range of exposures from background or other practices (e.g., medical). It represents a major and unjustified change from the current limit of 1 mSv pa, and its application in a regulatory regime would have a very significant impact on the nuclear industry, particularly on uranium mining and milling and many other current major nuclear sites. There would be significant cost implications with insignificant consequential gains in health protection. To carefully examine the issue of practical implications, one must look beyond the very low off-site impacts from routine radioactive discharges from typical nuclear facilities. In particular, there is a wide range of specific situations in the nuclear industry for which a maximum constraint of 0.3 mSv pa set at the international level would be unduly unrestrictive

  8. On the dynamics of slowly rotating stellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoust, E.

    1989-01-01

    Kinematical observations are now available for stellar systems which might rotate slowly. The study of periodic orbits in model stellar systems shows that a mean motion in epicyclic or circular orbits contributes to balance the centrifugal force, in addition to the velocity dispersions. Two dynamical models, the generalized Toomre and Plummer models, are adapted to the case of slow rotation. They are applied to two globular clusters, M 3 and 47 Tucanae, and 12 clusters of galaxies. 47 Tucanae is found to rotate, but none of the clusters of galaxies has any significant mean motion, except SC 316-44. 34 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (author)

  9. Steady hydromagnetic Couette flow in a rotating system with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... Couette flow of class-II of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid in a rotating system ... Heat transfer characteristics of the flow are considered taking viscous and ...

  10. Convective heat and mass transfer in rotating disk systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shevchuk, Igor V

    2009-01-01

    The book describes results of investigations of a series of convective heat and mass transfer problems in rotating-disk systems. Methodology used included integral methods, self-similar and approximate analytical solutions, as well as CFD.

  11. Development of Rotational Smart Lighting Control System for Plant Factory

    OpenAIRE

    Won-Sub Lee; Sung-Gaun Kim

    2012-01-01

    Rotational Smart Lighting Control System can supply the quantity of lighting which is required to run plants by rotating few LED and Fluorescent instead of that are used in the existing plant factories.The initial installation of the existing plants factory is expensive, so in order to solve the problem with smart lighting control system was developed. The beam required intensity for the growth of crops, Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density(PPFD)is calculated; and the numbe...

  12. An expert system for vibration based diagnostics of rotating machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korteniemi, A.

    1990-01-01

    Very often changes in the mechanical condition of the rotating machinery can be observed as changes in its vibration. This paper presents an expert system for vibration-based diagnosis of rotating machines by describing the architecture of the developed prototype system. The importance of modelling the problem solving knowledge as well as the domain knowledge is emphasized by presenting the knowledge in several levels

  13. Magnetic nanofluids and magnetic composite fluids in rotating seal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borbath, T; Borbath, I; Boros, T; Bica, D; Vekas, L; Potencz, I

    2010-01-01

    Recent results are presented concerning the development of magnetofluidic leakage-free rotating seals for vacuum and high pressure gases, evidencing significant advantages compared to mechanical seals. The micro-pilot scale production of various types of magnetizable sealing fluids is shortly reviewed, in particular the main steps of the chemical synthesis of magnetic nanofluids and magnetic composite fluids with light hydrocarbon, mineral oil and synthetic oil carrier liquids. The behavior of different types of magnetizable fluids in the rotating sealing systems is analyzed. Design concepts, some constructive details and testing procedures of magnetofluidic rotating seals are presented such as the testing equipment. The main characteristics of several magnetofluidic sealing systems and their applications will be presented: vacuum deposition systems and liquefied gas pumps applications, mechanical and magnetic nanofluid combined seals, gas valves up to 40 bar equipped by rotating seal with magnetic nanofluids and magnetic composite fluids.

  14. Time evolution of some quantum-mechanical systems. Wavefunction cloning in evolving rotating systems. Finite range boundary conditions for time dependent Schroedinger Equation; Evolution temporelle de quelques systemes quantiques. Le clonage de la fonction d`onde dans l`evolution au cours du temps de systemes tournants. Formulation de conditions aux limites a distance finie pour l`equation de Schroedinger dependante du temps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvieu, R.; Carbonell, J.; Gignoux, C.; Mangin-Brinet, M. [Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France); Rozmej, P. [Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej, Lublin (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    The time evolution of coherent rotational wave packets associated to a diatomic molecule or to a deformed nucleus has been studied. Assuming a rigid body dynamics the J(J+1) law leads to a mechanism of cloning: the way function is divided into wave packets identical to the initial one at specific time. Applications are studied for a nuclear wave packed formed by Coulomb excitation. Exact boundary conditions at finite distance for the solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation are derived. A numerical scheme based on Crank-Nicholson method is proposed to illustrate its applicability in several examples. (authors) 3 refs.

  15. Control system for several rotating mirror camera synchronization operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ningwen; Wu, Yunfeng; Tan, Xianxiang; Lai, Guoji

    1997-05-01

    This paper introduces a single chip microcomputer control system for synchronization operation of several rotating mirror high-speed cameras. The system consists of four parts: the microcomputer control unit (including the synchronization part and precise measurement part and the time delay part), the shutter control unit, the motor driving unit and the high voltage pulse generator unit. The control system has been used to control the synchronization working process of the GSI cameras (driven by a motor) and FJZ-250 rotating mirror cameras (driven by a gas driven turbine). We have obtained the films of the same objective from different directions in different speed or in same speed.

  16. Specimen rotation system of the WSU TRIGA-fueled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, Thomas A.

    1976-01-01

    The specimen rotation system presently in use at the WSU reactor has been designed to provide maximum utilization of the irradiation capabilities achieved through use of TRIGA-type fuel. This paper describes the system with particular emphasis on characteristics which are advantageous to experimenters. (author)

  17. Patient QA systems for rotational radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredh, Anna; Scherman, J.B.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per Martin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors.......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors....

  18. Building an evolvable prototype for a multiple GAAP accounting information system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhoof, E.; De Bruyn, P.; Aerts, Walter; Verelst, J.; Aveiro, D.; Pergl, R.; Gouveia, D.

    In this paper we build a prototype of an evolvable Accounting Information System (AIS) that supports multiple Generally Accepted Accounting Standards (GAAP) reporting. Reporting in multiple GAAP can have different origins: differences in local and tax GAAP, belonging to an economic group or

  19. A Smart Mobile Lab-on-Chip-Based Medical Diagnostics System Architecture Designed For Evolvability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patou, François; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2015-01-01

    for this work. We introduce a smart-mobile and LoC-based system architecture designed for evolvability. By propagating LoC programmability, instrumentation, and control tools to the highlevel abstraction smart-mobile software layer, our architecture facilitates the realisation of new use...

  20. Mathematical Creativity, Cohen Forcing, and Evolving Systems: Elements for a Case Study on Paul Cohen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The Evolving Systems approach to case studies due initially to Piaget-contemporary Howard Gruber, and complemented by subsequent work on sociocultural factors developed by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and others, provides an inroad for examining creative achievements in a variety of domains. This paper provides a proof of concept for how one might…

  1. Development of signal acquisition device of rotating coil measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianxin; Li Li; Kang Wen; Deng Chengdong; Yin Baogui; Fu Shinian

    2013-01-01

    A new rotating coil magnetic measurement system using the technical solution of the combination of a dynamic signal acquisition card and software with specific functions was developed. The acquisition device of the system successfully implemented the function of the PDI-5025 integrator. The sampling rate, the range, the accuracy and the flexibility of the system were improved. The development program of signal acquisition equipment, the realization of the acquisition function and the reliability and stability of the system were introduced. (authors)

  2. Oscillating and rotating sine-Gordon system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, O. H.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1986-01-01

    The interaction between a 2π kink and the background or vacuum is investigated in the pure sine-Gordon system. For an oscillating background (i.e., the k=0 part of the phonon spectrum) the 2π kink oscillates, while for increasing or decreasing vacuum two phenomena have been observed, depending...

  3. Effects of organic manure and crop rotation system on potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of organic manure and crop rotation system on potato ( Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber ... Ethiopian Journal of Science and Technology ... (FYM); V2 = 2.5 t/h fresh sesbania green manure (FSB) V3 = 5 t/ha FYM; and V4 = 5 t/ha FYM +2.5 ...

  4. Magnetic suspension of a rotating system. Application to inertial flywheels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarquand, Guy

    1984-01-01

    The various possible magnetic suspension configurations compatible with rotating mechanical systems are defined from studies of the characteristics of different types of magnetic bearings. The results obtained are used in the design and realization of a magnetic suspension for an inertial flywheel. (author) [fr

  5. New portable sensor system for rotation seismic motion measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brokešová, J.; Málek, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 8 (2010), 084501 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/0925 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : rotation al seismology * sensor system Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.598, year: 2010

  6. Slip systems, dislocation boundaries and lattice rotations in deformed metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Grethe

    2009-01-01

    Metals are polycrystals and consist of grains, which are subdivided on a finer scale upon plastic deformation due to formation of dislocation boundaries. The crystallographic alignment of planar dislocation boundaries in face centred cubic metals, like aluminium and copper, deformed to moderate...... of the mechanical anisotropy of rolled sheets. The rotation of the crystallographic lattice in each grain during deformation also exhibits grain orientation dependence, originating from the slip systems. A combined analysis of dislocation boundaries and lattice rotations concludes that the two phenomena are coupled...

  7. Resonant microsphere gyroscope based on a double Faraday rotator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chengfeng; Tang, Jun; Cui, Danfeng; Wu, Dajin; Zhang, Chengfei; Li, Chunming; Zhen, Yongqiu; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun

    2016-10-15

    The resonant microsphere gyroscope is proposed based on a double Faraday rotator system for the resonant microsphere gyroscope (RMSG) that is characterized by low insertion losses and does not destroy the reciprocity of the gyroscope system. Use of the echo suppression structure and the orthogonal polarization method can effectively inhibit both the backscattering noise and the polarization error, and reduce them below the system sensitivity limit. The resonance asymmetry rate dropped from 34.2% to 2.9% after optimization of the backscattering noise and the polarization noise, which greatly improved the bias stability and the scale factor linearity of the proposed system. Additionally, based on the optimum parameters for the double Faraday rotator system, a bias stability of 0.04°/s has been established for an integration time of 10 s in 1000 s in a resonator microsphere gyroscope using a microsphere resonator with a diameter of 1 mm and a Q of 7.2×106.

  8. Induction accelerators for the phase rotator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginato, Lou; Yu, Simon; Vanecek, Dave

    2001-01-01

    The principle of magnetic induction has been applied to the acceleration of high current beams in betatrons and a variety of induction accelerators. The linear induction accelerator (LIA) consists of a simple nonresonant structure where the drive voltage is applied to an axially symmetric gap that encloses a toroidal ferromagnetic material. The change in flux in the magnetic core induces an axial electric field that provides particle acceleration. This simple nonresonant (low Q) structure acts as a single turn transformer that can accelerate from hundreds of amperes to tens of kiloamperes, basically only limited by the drive impedance. The LIA is typically a low gradient structure that can provide acceleration fields of varying shapes and time durations from tens of nanoseconds to several microseconds. The efficiency of the LIA depends on the beam current and can exceed 50% if the beam current exceeds the magnetization current required by the ferromagnetic material. The acceleration voltage available is simply given by the expression V=A dB/dt. Hence, for a given cross section of material, the beam pulse duration influences the energy gain. Furthermore, a premium is put on minimizing the diameter, which impacts the total weight or cost of the magnetic material. The diameter doubly impacts the cost of the LIA since the power (cost) to drive the cores is proportional to the volume as well. The waveform requirements during the beam pulse makes it necessary to make provisions in the pulsing system to maintain the desired dB/dt during the useful part of the acceleration cycle. This is typically done two ways, by using the final stage of the pulse forming network (PFN) and by the pulse compensation network usually in close proximity of the acceleration cell. The choice of magnetic materials will be made by testing various materials both ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic. These materials will include the nickel-iron, silicon steel amorphous and various types of ferrites not

  9. Exploring the evolutionary mechanism of complex supply chain systems using evolving hypergraphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Qi; Guo, Jin-Li; Sun, Shiwei; Liu, Han

    2018-01-01

    A new evolutionary model is proposed to describe the characteristics and evolution pattern of supply chain systems using evolving hypergraphs, in which nodes represent enterprise entities while hyperedges represent the relationships among diverse trades. The nodes arrive at the system in accordance with a Poisson process, with the evolving process incorporating the addition of new nodes, linking of old nodes, and rewiring of links. Grounded in the Poisson process theory and continuum theory, the stationary average hyperdegree distribution is shown to follow a shifted power law (SPL), and the theoretical predictions are consistent with the results of numerical simulations. Testing the impact of parameters on the model yields a positive correlation between hyperdegree and degree. The model also uncovers macro characteristics of the relationships among enterprises due to the microscopic interactions among individuals.

  10. A mysterious dust clump in a disk around an evolved binary star system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jura, M; Turner, J

    1998-09-10

    The discovery of planets in orbit around the pulsar PSR1257+12 shows that planets may form around post-main-sequence stars. Other evolved stars, such as HD44179 (an evolved star which is part of the binary system that has expelled the gas and dust that make the Red Rectangle nebula), possess gravitationally bound orbiting dust disks. It is possible that planets might form from gravitational collapse in such disks. Here we report high-angular-resolution observations at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths of the dusk disk associated with the Red Rectangle. We find a dust clump with an estimated mass near that of Jupiter in the outer region of the disk. The clump is larger than our Solar System, and far beyond where planet formation would normally be expected, so its nature is at present unclear.

  11. Translational and rotational dynamic analysis of a superconducting levitation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cansiz, A [Electric-Electronic Engineering Department, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Hull, J R [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Gundogdu, Oe [Mechanical Engineering Department, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    The rotational dynamics of a disc-shaped permanent magnet rotor levitated over a high temperature superconductor was studied experimentally and theoretically. The interaction between the rotor magnet and the superconductor was modelled by assuming the magnet to be a magnetic dipole and the superconductor a diamagnet. In the magnetomechanical analysis of the superconductor part, the frozen image concept was combined with the diamagnetic image, and the damping in the system was neglected. The interaction potential of the system is the combination of magnetic and gravitational potentials. From the dynamical analysis the equations of motion of the permanent magnet were stated as a function of lateral, vertical, tilt, precision and rotating angles. The vibration behaviour and correlation of the vibration of one direction with that of another were determined with a numerical calculation based on the Runge-Kutta method. The various vibrational frequencies identified were vertical, radial, tilt, precession and rotation. The tests performed for experimental verifications were translational and rotational. The permanent magnet was 'spun up' under vacuum conditions to analyse the dynamics of the free 'spin down' behaviour of the permanent magnet.

  12. Translational and rotational dynamic analysis of a superconducting levitation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cansiz, A; Hull, J R; Gundogdu, Oe

    2005-01-01

    The rotational dynamics of a disc-shaped permanent magnet rotor levitated over a high temperature superconductor was studied experimentally and theoretically. The interaction between the rotor magnet and the superconductor was modelled by assuming the magnet to be a magnetic dipole and the superconductor a diamagnet. In the magnetomechanical analysis of the superconductor part, the frozen image concept was combined with the diamagnetic image, and the damping in the system was neglected. The interaction potential of the system is the combination of magnetic and gravitational potentials. From the dynamical analysis the equations of motion of the permanent magnet were stated as a function of lateral, vertical, tilt, precision and rotating angles. The vibration behaviour and correlation of the vibration of one direction with that of another were determined with a numerical calculation based on the Runge-Kutta method. The various vibrational frequencies identified were vertical, radial, tilt, precession and rotation. The tests performed for experimental verifications were translational and rotational. The permanent magnet was 'spun up' under vacuum conditions to analyse the dynamics of the free 'spin down' behaviour of the permanent magnet

  13. System design in an evolving system-of-systems architecture and concept of operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovekamp, Roger N., Jr.

    Proposals for space exploration architectures have increased in complexity and scope. Constituent systems (e.g., rovers, habitats, in-situ resource utilization facilities, transfer vehicles, etc) must meet the needs of these architectures by performing in multiple operational environments and across multiple phases of the architecture's evolution. This thesis proposes an approach for using system-of-systems engineering principles in conjunction with system design methods (e.g., Multi-objective optimization, genetic algorithms, etc) to create system design options that perform effectively at both the system and system-of-systems levels, across multiple concepts of operations, and over multiple architectural phases. The framework is presented by way of an application problem that investigates the design of power systems within a power sharing architecture for use in a human Lunar Surface Exploration Campaign. A computer model has been developed that uses candidate power grid distribution solutions for a notional lunar base. The agent-based model utilizes virtual control agents to manage the interactions of various exploration and infrastructure agents. The philosophy behind the model is based both on lunar power supply strategies proposed in literature, as well as on the author's own approaches for power distribution strategies of future lunar bases. In addition to proposing a framework for system design, further implications of system-of-systems engineering principles are briefly explored, specifically as they relate to producing more robust cross-cultural system-of-systems architecture solutions.

  14. Effect of three rotation systems on weed seed bank of barely fields in Karaj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mostafa oveysi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rotation can be used as an approach for weed management, because density and combination of weed seed bank may be affected by rotation. In this study effect of rotation in diversity and density of weed seed was studied in three rotation systems (fallow – barely, maize – barely and canola – barely. Results showed that fallow – barely rotation system have high population density in seed bank and highest amount of Shannon diversity index (H = 0.84. In canola – barely rotation system because of different herbicide uses and special traits of canola, population of weed seeds in seed bank was significantly lower that other rotation systems. Results showed that canola – barely rotation system because of combination special herbicide and agronomical and biological characteristic of canola, in comparison with other rotation systems is more successful in decreasing of weed seed bank.

  15. Degeneracy: a link between evolvability, robustness and complexity in biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitacre James M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A full accounting of biological robustness remains elusive; both in terms of the mechanisms by which robustness is achieved and the forces that have caused robustness to grow over evolutionary time. Although its importance to topics such as ecosystem services and resilience is well recognized, the broader relationship between robustness and evolution is only starting to be fully appreciated. A renewed interest in this relationship has been prompted by evidence that mutational robustness can play a positive role in the discovery of adaptive innovations (evolvability and evidence of an intimate relationship between robustness and complexity in biology. This paper offers a new perspective on the mechanics of evolution and the origins of complexity, robustness, and evolvability. Here we explore the hypothesis that degeneracy, a partial overlap in the functioning of multi-functional components, plays a central role in the evolution and robustness of complex forms. In support of this hypothesis, we present evidence that degeneracy is a fundamental source of robustness, it is intimately tied to multi-scaled complexity, and it establishes conditions that are necessary for system evolvability.

  16. NMR system and method having a permanent magnet providing a rotating magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, Ross D [Berkeley, CA; Budinger, Thomas F [Berkeley, CA

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for generating a rotating magnetic field. The rotating magnetic field can be used to obtain rotating-field NMR spectra, such as magic angle spinning spectra, without having to physically rotate the sample. This result allows magic angle spinning NMR to be conducted on biological samples such as live animals, including humans.

  17. Improving the reliability of stator insulation system in rotating machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.K.; Sedding, H.G.; Culbert, I.M.

    1997-01-01

    Reliable performance of rotating machines, especially generators and primary heat transport pump motors, is critical to the efficient operation on nuclear stations. A significant number of premature machine failures have been attributed to the stator insulation problems. Ontario Hydro has attempted to assure the long term reliability of the insulation system in critical rotating machines through proper specifications and quality assurance tests for new machines and periodic on-line and off-line diagnostic tests on machines in service. The experience gained over the last twenty years is presented in this paper. Functional specifications have been developed for the insulation system in critical rotating machines based on engineering considerations and our past experience. These specifications include insulation stress, insulation resistance and polarization index, partial discharge levels, dissipation factor and tip up, AC and DC hipot tests. Voltage endurance tests are specified for groundwall insulation system of full size production coils and bars. For machines with multi-turn coils, turn insulation strength for fast fronted surges in specified and verified through tests on all coils in the factory and on samples of finished coils in the laboratory. Periodic on-line and off-line diagnostic tests were performed to assess the condition of the stator insulation system in machines in service. Partial discharges are measured on-line using several techniques to detect any excessive degradation of the insulation system in critical machines. Novel sensors have been developed and installed in several machines to facilitate measurements of partial discharges on operating machines. Several off-line tests are performed either to confirm the problems indicated by the on-line test or to assess the insulation system in machines which cannot be easily tested on-line. Experience with these tests, including their capabilities and limitations, are presented. (author)

  18. Evolving controllers for a homogeneous system of physical robots: structured cooperation with minimal sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Matt; Smith, Lincoln; Mayley, Giles; Husbands, Phil

    2003-10-15

    We report on recent work in which we employed artificial evolution to design neural network controllers for small, homogeneous teams of mobile autonomous robots. The robots were evolved to perform a formation-movement task from random starting positions, equipped only with infrared sensors. The dual constraints of homogeneity and minimal sensors make this a non-trivial task. We describe the behaviour of a successful system in which robots adopt and maintain functionally distinct roles in order to achieve the task. We believe this to be the first example of the use of artificial evolution to design coordinated, cooperative behaviour for real robots.

  19. All-optical animation projection system with rotating fieldstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yuko; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Kodate, Kashiko

    2007-06-01

    A simple and compact rewritable holographic memory system using a fieldstone of Ulexite is proposed. The role of the fieldstone is to impose random patterns on the reference beam to record plural images with the random-reference multiplexing scheme. The operations for writing and reading holograms are carried out by simply rotating the fieldstone in one direction. One of the features of this approach is found in a way to generate random patterns without computer drawings. The experimental study confirms that our system enables the smooth readout of the stored images one after another so that the series of reproduced images are projected as an animation.

  20. Brayton rotating units for space reactor power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Bruno M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies and Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept., The Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Designs and analyses models of centrifugal-flow compressor and radial-inflow turbine of 40.8kW{sub e} Brayton Rotating Units (BRUs) are developed for 15 and 40 g/mole He-Xe working fluids. Also presented are the performance results of a space power system with segmented, gas cooled fission reactor heat source and three Closed Brayton Cycle loops, each with a separate BRU. The calculated performance parameters of the BRUs and the reactor power system are for shaft rotational speed of 30-55 krpm, reactor thermal power of 120-471kW{sub th}, and turbine inlet temperature of 900-1149 K. With 40 g/mole He-Xe, a power system peak thermal efficiency of 26% is achieved at rotation speed of 45 krpm, compressor and turbine inlet temperatures of 400 and 1149 K and 0.93 MPa at exit of the compressor. The corresponding system electric power is 122.4kW{sub e}, working fluid flow rate is 1.85 kg/s and the pressure ratio and polytropic efficiency are 1.5% and 86.3% for the compressor and 1.42% and 94.1% for the turbine. For the same nominal electrical power of 122.4kW{sub e}, decreasing the molecular weight of the working fluid (15 g/mole) decreases its flow rate to 1.03 kg/s and increases the system pressure to 1.2 MPa. (author)

  1. Plasma-liquid system with rotational gliding discharge with liquid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Solomenko, O.V; Martysh, E.V.; Fedirchuk, I.I.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-liquid system based on rotational gliding discharge with one liquid electrode was developed. Emission spectra of plasma of rotational gliding discharge with one liquid electrode were investigated. Discovered effective mechanism of controlling non-isothermal level of plasma in dynamic plasma-liquid systems. Major mechanism of expulsion of metal anode material from plasma-liquid systems with rotational discharges was shown.

  2. An electronic pan/tilt/magnify and rotate camera system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, S.; Martin, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    A new camera system has been developed for omnidirectional image-viewing applications that provides pan, tilt, magnify, and rotational orientation within a hemispherical field of view (FOV) without any moving parts. The imaging device is based on the fact that the image from a fish-eye lens, which produces a circular image of an entire hemispherical FOV, can be mathematically corrected using high-speed electronic circuitry. More specifically, an incoming fish-eye image from any image acquisition source is captured in the memory of the device, a transformation is performed for the viewing region of interest and viewing direction, and a corrected image is output as a video image signal for viewing, recording, or analysis. The image transformation device can provide corrected images at frame rates compatible with RS-170 standard video equipment. As a result, this device can accomplish the functions of pan, tilt, rotation, and magnification throughout a hemispherical FOV without the need for any mechanical devices. Multiple images, each with different image magnifications and pan-tilt-rotate parameters, can be obtained from a single camera

  3. Rotating machinery surveillance system reduces plant downtime and radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohanick, J.S.; Robinson, J.C.; Allen, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating machinery surveillance system (RMSS) was permanently installed at Grand Gulf nuclear station (GGNS) as part of a program sponsored by the US Department of Energy whose goal was to reduce radiation exposure to power plant personnel resulting from the inspection, maintenance, and repair of rotating machinery. The RMSS was installed at GGNS in 1983 to continuously monitor 173 analog vibration signals from proximity probes mounted on 26 machine trains and ∼450 process data points via a computer data link. Vibration frequency spectra, i.e., the vibration amplitude versus frequency of vibration, and various characterizations of these spectra are the fundamental data collected by the RMSS for performing machinery diagnostics. The RMSS collects vibration frequency spectra on a daily basis for all the monitored rotating equipment and automatically stores the collected spectra for review by the vibration engineer. Vibration spectra automatically stored by the RMSS fall into categories that include the last normal, alarm, minimum and maximum, past three-day data set, baseline, current, and user-saved spectra. During first and second fuel-cycle operation at GGNS, several significant vibration problems were detected by the RMSS. Two of these are presented in this paper: recirculation pumps and turbine-generator bearing degradation. The total reduction in personnel radiation exposure at GGNS from 1985 to 1987 due to the presence of the RMSS was estimated to be in the range from 49 to 54 person-rem

  4. Linear analysis of rotationally invariant, radially variant tomographic imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huesmann, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to analyze the linear imaging characteristics of rotationally invariant, radially variant tomographic imaging systems using singular value decomposition (SVD). When the projection measurements from such a system are assumed to be samples from independent and identically distributed multi-normal random variables, the best estimate of the emission intensity is given by the unweighted least squares estimator. The noise amplification of this estimator is inversely proportional to the singular values of the normal matrix used to model projection and backprojection. After choosing an acceptable noise amplification, the new method can determine the number of parameters and hence the number of pixels that should be estimated from data acquired from an existing system with a fixed number of angles and projection bins. Conversely, for the design of a new system, the number of angles and projection bins necessary for a given number of pixels and noise amplification can be determined. In general, computing the SVD of the projection normal matrix has cubic computational complexity. However, the projection normal matrix for this class of rotationally invariant, radially variant systems has a block circulant form. A fast parallel algorithm to compute the SVD of this block circulant matrix makes the singular value analysis practical by asymptotically reducing the computation complexity of the method by a multiplicative factor equal to the number of angles squared

  5. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP).

  6. Measuring the Accuracy of Simple Evolving Connectionist System with Varying Distance Formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khowarizmi; Sitompul, O. S.; Suherman; Nababan, E. B.

    2017-12-01

    Simple Evolving Connectionist System (SECoS) is a minimal implementation of Evolving Connectionist Systems (ECoS) in artificial neural networks. The three-layer network architecture of the SECoS could be built based on the given input. In this study, the activation value for the SECoS learning process, which is commonly calculated using normalized Hamming distance, is also calculated using normalized Manhattan distance and normalized Euclidean distance in order to compare the smallest error value and best learning rate obtained. The accuracy of measurement resulted by the three distance formulas are calculated using mean absolute percentage error. In the training phase with several parameters, such as sensitivity threshold, error threshold, first learning rate, and second learning rate, it was found that normalized Euclidean distance is more accurate than both normalized Hamming distance and normalized Manhattan distance. In the case of beta fibrinogen gene -455 G/A polymorphism patients used as training data, the highest mean absolute percentage error value is obtained with normalized Manhattan distance compared to normalized Euclidean distance and normalized Hamming distance. However, the differences are very small that it can be concluded that the three distance formulas used in SECoS do not have a significant effect on the accuracy of the training results.

  7. On the efficacy of cinema, or what the visual system did not evolve to do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Spatial displays, and a constraint that they do not place on the use of spatial instruments are discussed. Much of the work done in visual perception by psychologists and by computer scientists has concerned displays that show the motion of rigid objects. Typically, if one assumes that objects are rigid, one can then proceed to understand how the constant shape of the object can be perceived (or computed) as it moves through space. The author maintains that photographs and cinema are visual displays that are also powerful forms of art. Their efficacy, in part, stems from the fact that, although viewpoint is constrained when composing them, it is not nearly so constrained when viewing them. It is obvious, according to the author, that human visual systems did not evolve to watch movies or look at photographs. Thus, what photographs and movies present must be allowed in the rule-governed system under which vision evolved. Machine-vision algorithms, to be applicable to human vision, should show the same types of tolerance.

  8. Rotating Ceramic Water Filter Discs System for Water Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyadh Z. Al Zubaidy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to design, construct and operate a new laboratory scale water filtration system. This system was used to examine the efficiency of two ceramic filter discs as a medium for water filtration. These filters were made from two different ceramic mixtures of local red clay, sawdust, and water. The filtration system was designed with two rotating interfered modules of these filters. Rotating these modules generates shear force between water and the surfaces of filter discs of the filtration modules that works to reduce thickness of layer of rejected materials on the filters surfaces. Each module consists of seven filtration units and each unit consists of two ceramic filter discs. The average measured hydraulic conductivity of the first module was 13.7mm/day and that for the second module was 50mm/day. Results showed that the water filtration system can be operated continuously with a constant flow rate and the filtration process was controlled by a skin thin layer of rejected materials. The ceramic water filters of both filtration modules have high removal efficiency of total suspended solids up to 100% and of turbidity up to 99.94%.

  9. Neoclassical current and plasma rotation in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.

    1991-01-01

    In order to clarify geometrical effects of the magnetic field on the neoclassical theory in general toroidal systems, the neoclassical parallel particle flow, heat flux, current and plasma rotation of a multispecies plasma are examined using the moment approach on the basis of the original papers under the assumptions of no fluctuations, no external sources and losses except for a fast ion beam and an external inductive electric field, steady state, and |u a | Ta where u a and v Ta are the macro and thermal velocity of species a, respectively. Hence, we might have a point of view of unifying understanding the neoclassical theory in general toroidal systems. Three collisionality regimes, i.e., the 1/ν (in non-axisymmetric toroidal systems) or banana (in axisymmetric toroidal systems), plateau, and Pfirsch-Schlueter collisionality regimes are examined separately. (author) 8 refs

  10. Chaos in a new bistable rotating electromechanical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapla Fotsa, R.; Woafo, P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new electromechanical system with rotating arm and bistable potential energy is studied. • The bistability is generated by the interaction of three permanent magnets, one fixed at the end of the arm and two other fixed at equal distance relative to the central position of the arm. • It exhibits dissipative and Hamiltonian chaos. • Such a bistable electromechanical system can be used as the actuation part of chaotic sieves and mixers. - Abstract: A device consisting of an induction motor activating a rotating rigid arm is designed and comprises a bistable potential due to the presence of three permanent magnets. Its mathematical equations are established and the numerical results both in the absence and in the presence of magnets are compared. The generation of chaotic behavior is achieved using two different external excitations: sinewave and square wave. In the presence of magnets, the system presents periodic and dissipative chaotic dynamics. Approximating the global potential energy to a bistable quartic potential, the Melnikov method is used to derive the conditions for the appearance of Hamiltonian chaos. Such a device can be used for industrial and domestic applications for mixing and sieving activities.

  11. An Air Bearing Rotating Coil Magnetic Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Gottschalk, Stephen C; Taylor, David J; Thayer, William

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a rotating coil magnetic measurement system supported on air bearings. The design is optimized for measurements of 0.1micron magnetic centerline changes on long, small aperture quadrupoles. Graphite impregnated epoxy resin is used for the coil holder and coil winding forms. Coil holder diameter is 11 mm with a length between supports of 750mm. A pair of coils is used to permit quadrupole bucking during centerline measurements. Coil length is 616mm, inner radius 1.82mm, outer radius 4.74mm. The key features of the mechanical system are simplicity; air bearings for accurate, repeatable measurements without needing warm up time and a vibration isolated stand that uses a steel-topped Newport optical table with air suspension. Coil rotation is achieved by a low noise servo motor controlled by a standalone Ethernet servo board running custom servo software. Coil calibration procedures that correct wire placement errors, tests for mechanical resonances, and other system checks will also be discu...

  12. Architecture Analysis of Evolving Complex Systems of Systems: Technical Presentation [and Executive Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall, Mikael; Godfrey, Sally; Ackermann, Chris; Ray, Arnab; Yonkwa, Lyly; Ganesan, Dharma; Stratton, William C.; Sibol, Deane E.

    2008-01-01

    Analyze, Visualize, and Evaluate structure and behavior using static and dynamic information, individual systems as well as systems of systems. Next steps: Refine software tool support; Apply to other systems; and Apply earlier in system life cycle.

  13. Snake venoms are integrated systems, but abundant venom proteins evolve more rapidly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Steven D; Aggarwal, Shikha; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Tin, Mandy Man-Ying; Terada, Kouki; Mikheyev, Alexander S

    2015-08-28

    While many studies have shown that extracellular proteins evolve rapidly, how selection acts on them remains poorly understood. We used snake venoms to understand the interaction between ecology, expression level, and evolutionary rate in secreted protein systems. Venomous snakes employ well-integrated systems of proteins and organic constituents to immobilize prey. Venoms are generally optimized to subdue preferred prey more effectively than non-prey, and many venom protein families manifest positive selection and rapid gene family diversification. Although previous studies have illuminated how individual venom protein families evolve, how selection acts on venoms as integrated systems, is unknown. Using next-generation transcriptome sequencing and mass spectrometry, we examined microevolution in two pitvipers, allopatrically separated for at least 1.6 million years, and their hybrids. Transcriptomes of parental species had generally similar compositions in regard to protein families, but for a given protein family, the homologs present and concentrations thereof sometimes differed dramatically. For instance, a phospholipase A2 transcript comprising 73.4 % of the Protobothrops elegans transcriptome, was barely present in the P. flavoviridis transcriptome (king cobra genome, suggesting that rapid evolution of abundant proteins may be generally true for snake venoms. Looking more broadly at Protobothrops, we show that rapid evolution of the most abundant components is due to positive selection, suggesting an interplay between abundance and adaptation. Given log-scale differences in toxin abundance, which are likely correlated with biosynthetic costs, we hypothesize that as a result of natural selection, snakes optimize return on energetic investment by producing more of venom proteins that increase their fitness. Natural selection then acts on the additive genetic variance of these components, in proportion to their contributions to overall fitness. Adaptive

  14. Using ESB and BPEL for Evolving Healthcare Systems Towards Pervasive, Grid-Enabled SOA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufi, V.; Malamateniou, F.; Papakonstantinou, D.; Vassilacopoulos, G.

    Healthcare organizations often face the challenge of integrating diverse and geographically disparate information technology systems to respond to changing requirements and to exploit the capabilities of modern technologies. Hence, systems evolution, through modification and extension of the existing information technology infrastructure, becomes a necessity. Moreover, the availability of these systems at the point of care when needed is a vital issue for the quality of healthcare provided to patients. This chapter takes a process perspective of healthcare delivery within and across organizational boundaries and presents a disciplined approach for evolving healthcare systems towards a pervasive, grid-enabled service-oriented architecture using the enterprise system bus middleware technology for resolving integration issues, the business process execution language for supporting collaboration requirements and grid middleware technology for both addressing common SOA scalability requirements and complementing existing system functionality. In such an environment, appropriate security mechanisms must ensure authorized access to integrated healthcare services and data. To this end, a security framework addressing security aspects such as authorization and access control is also presented.

  15. Experimental investigation of rotation resistance moment energy spectra in multicylindrical circular Couette system with independently rotating cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serov Anatoly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The torque of the rotational resistance in the Ku-Etta multi-cylinder system rotating in the direction towards each other is measured. The experiments were carried out for three values of the kinematic viscosity of the working fluid that fills the multicylinder system: water at a temperature of 24 °C (viscosity 0.9 cSt, an aqueous solution of glycerol at 20 °C and 41 °C (2.5 cSt and 5.2 cSt. An attempt is made to investigate the features of a viscous flow in the multicolor Couette flow system from the analysis of the energy spectra of the moment of resistance to rotation of cylinders.

  16. How Heart Valves Evolve to Adapt to an Extreme-Pressure System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup Funder, Jonas; Christian Danielsen, Carl; Baandrup, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart valves which exist naturally in an extreme-pressure system must have evolved in a way to resist the stresses of high pressure. Giraffes are interesting as they naturally have a blood pressure twice that of humans. Thus, knowledge regarding giraffe heart valves may aid...... in developing techniques to design improved pressure-resistant biological heart valves. METHODS: Heart valves from 12 giraffes and 10 calves were explanted and subjected to either biomechanical or morphological examinations. Strips from the heart valves were subjected to cyclic loading tests, followed...... in giraffes than in calves, which would make giraffe valves more resistant to the high-pressure forces. However, collagen also stiffens and thickens the valves. The mitral leaflets showed similar (but mostly insignificant) trends in strength, stiffness, and collagen content....

  17. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjun Tang

    Full Text Available Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN, two learning processes are proposed: (1 a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2 a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE, root mean square error (RMSE, and mean absolute relative error (MARE are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR, instantaneous model (IM, linear model (LM, neural network (NN, and cumulative plots (CP.

  18. Propagation of angular errors in two-axis rotation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrington, Geoffrey K.

    2003-10-01

    Two-Axis Rotation Systems, or "goniometers," are used in diverse applications including telescope pointing, automotive headlamp testing, and display testing. There are three basic configurations in which a goniometer can be built depending on the orientation and order of the stages. Each configuration has a governing set of equations which convert motion between the system "native" coordinates to other base systems, such as direction cosines, optical field angles, or spherical-polar coordinates. In their simplest form, these equations neglect errors present in real systems. In this paper, a statistical treatment of error source propagation is developed which uses only tolerance data, such as can be obtained from the system mechanical drawings prior to fabrication. It is shown that certain error sources are fully correctable, partially correctable, or uncorrectable, depending upon the goniometer configuration and zeroing technique. The system error budget can be described by a root-sum-of-squares technique with weighting factors describing the sensitivity of each error source. This paper tabulates weighting factors at 67% (k=1) and 95% (k=2) confidence for various levels of maximum travel for each goniometer configuration. As a practical example, this paper works through an error budget used for the procurement of a system at Sandia National Laboratories.

  19. Systems, methods and apparatus for developing and maintaining evolving systems with software product lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Rash, James L. (Inventor); Pena, Joaquin (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which an evolutionary system is managed and viewed as a software product line. In some embodiments, the core architecture is a relatively unchanging part of the system, and each version of the system is viewed as a product from the product line. Each software product is generated from the core architecture with some agent-based additions. The result may be a multi-agent system software product line.

  20. Residual life estimation of electrical insulation system for rotating equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashishtha, Y.D.; Gupta, A.K.; Bhattacharyya, A.K.; Verma, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    Residual life assessment gains significance towards the end of designed life for granting plant life extensions and resource planning for costly equipment replacement. A critical review of all the diagnostic techniques presently used to assess either health of insulation system or to infer qualitatively the remaining life for rotating machines is presented. However more emphasis is required on developing quantitative methods. This paper also formulates the experimental plan for progressively censored ageing tests, measurement of partial discharge parameters, micro-structural study for delamination and electrical tree growth and measurement of electrical breakdown strength. Partial discharge (PD) patterns, electrical tree growth and time to failure data shall be taken as training set for the neural network learning which can be useful to predict residual life with only one candidate parameter i.e. PD patterns. (author). 9 refs

  1. Rose, a rotating system for 4D emittance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Michael; Groening, Lars; Xiao, Chen; Mickat, Sascha; Du, Xiaonan; Gerhard, Peter; Vormann, Hartmut [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A ROtating System for Emittance measurements ROSE, to measure the full 4 dimensional transverse beam matrix of a heavy ion beam has been developed and commissioned. Different heavy ion beams behind the HLI at GSI have been used in two commissioning beam times. All technical aspects of Rose have been tested, Rose has been benchmarked against existing emittance scanners for horizontal and vertical projections and the method, hard- and software to measure the 4D beam matrix has been upgraded, refined and successfully commissioned. The inter plane correlations of the HLI beam have been measured, yet as no significant initial correlations were found to be present, controlled coupling of the beam by using a skew triplet has been applied and confirmed with Rose. The next step is to use ROSE to measure and remove the known inter plane correlations of a Uranium beam before SIS18 injection.

  2. Galactic encounters our majestic and evolving star-system, from the big bang to time's end

    CERN Document Server

    Sheehan, William

    2015-01-01

    Written by William Sheehan, a noted historian of astronomy, and Christopher J. Conselice, a professional astronomer specializing in galaxies in the early universe, this book tells the story of how astronomers have pieced together what is known about the vast and complicated systems of stars and dust known as galaxies. The first galaxies appeared as violently disturbed exotic objects when the Universe was only a few 100 million years old.  From that tortured beginning, they have evolved though processes of accretion, merging and star formation into the majestic spirals and massive ellipticals that dominate our local part of the Universe. This of course includes the Milky Way, to which the Sun and Solar System belong; it is our galactic home, and the only galaxy we will ever know from the inside.  Sheehan and Conselice show how astronomers’ understanding has grown from the early catalogs of Charles Messier and William Herschel; developed through the pioneering efforts of astronomers like E.E. Barnard, V.M. ...

  3. Research on motor rotational speed measurement in regenerative braking system of electric vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chaofeng; Chen, Liao; Chen, Long; Jiang, Haobin; Li, Zhongxing; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Rotational speed signals acquisition and processing techniques are widely used in rotational machinery. In order to realized precise and real-time control of motor drive and regenerative braking process, rotational speed measurement techniques are needed in electric vehicles. Obtaining accurate motor rotational speed signal will contribute to the regenerative braking force control steadily and realized higher energy recovery rate. This paper aims to develop a method that provides instantaneous speed information in the form of motor rotation. It addresses principles of motor rotational speed measurement in the regenerative braking systems of electric vehicle firstly. The paper then presents ideal and actual Hall position sensor signals characteristics, the relation between the motor rotational speed and the Hall position sensor signals is revealed. Finally, Hall position sensor signals conditioning and processing circuit and program for motor rotational speed measurement have been carried out based on measurement error analysis.

  4. Intensity modulated operating mode of the rotating gamma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bishwambhar; Gulyas, Laszlo; Medlin, Donald; Koroknai, Tibor; Takacs, David; Filep, Gyorgy; Panko, Peter; Godo, Bence; Hollo, Tamas; Zheng, Xiao Ran; Fedorcsak, Imre; Dobai, Jozsef; Bognar, Laszlo; Takacs, Endre

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore two novel operation modalities of the rotating gamma systems (RGS) that could expand its clinical application to lesions in close proximity to critical organs at risk (OAR). The approach taken in this study consists of two components. First, a Geant4-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation toolkit is used to model the dosimetric properties of the RGS Vertex 360™ for the normal, intensity modulated radiosurgery (IMRS), and speed modulated radiosurgery (SMRS) operation modalities. Second, the RGS Vertex 360™ at the Rotating Gamma Institute in Debrecen, Hungary is used to collect experimental data for the normal and IMRS operation modes. An ion chamber is used to record measurements of the absolute dose. The dose profiles are measured using Gafchromic EBT3 films positioned within a spherical water equivalent phantom. A strong dosimetric agreement between the measured and simulated dose profiles and penumbra was found for both the normal and IMRS operation modes for all collimator sizes (4, 8, 14, and 18 mm diameter). The simulated falloff and maximum dose regions agree better with the experimental results for the 4 and 8 mm diameter collimators. Although the falloff regions align well in the 14 and 18 mm collimators, the maximum dose regions have a larger difference. For the IMRS operation mode, the simulated and experimental dose distributions are ellipsoidal, where the short axis aligns with the blocked angles. Similarly, the simulated dose distributions for the SMRS operation mode also adopt an ellipsoidal shape, where the short axis aligns with the angles where the orbital speed is highest. For both modalities, the dose distribution is highly constrained with a sharper penumbra along the short axes. Dose modulation of the RGS can be achieved with the IMRS and SMRS modes. By providing a highly constrained dose distribution with a sharp penumbra, both modes could be clinically applicable for the treatment of lesions in close

  5. Vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field in a rotating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacyan, S.; Sarmiento, A.

    1986-01-01

    The vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field is calculated for a uniformly rotating observer. The spectrum of vacuum fluctuations is composed of the zero-point energy with a modified density of states and a contribution due to the rotation which is not thermal. (orig.)

  6. Analytical calculations of the rotational transform angles in the torsatron systems with different plasma pressure profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.K.; Pinos, I.B.; Tyupa, V.I.

    1999-01-01

    With formulas for averaging over magnetic surfaces general analytical expressions are here deduced to determine the rotational transform angles in stellarator systems having different plasma pressure profiles

  7. Identification and prediction of dynamic systems using an interactively recurrent self-evolving fuzzy neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang-Yin; Chang, Jyh-Yeong; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a novel recurrent fuzzy neural network, called an interactively recurrent self-evolving fuzzy neural network (IRSFNN), for prediction and identification of dynamic systems. The recurrent structure in an IRSFNN is formed as an external loops and internal feedback by feeding the rule firing strength of each rule to others rules and itself. The consequent part in the IRSFNN is composed of a Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK) or functional-link-based type. The proposed IRSFNN employs a functional link neural network (FLNN) to the consequent part of fuzzy rules for promoting the mapping ability. Unlike a TSK-type fuzzy neural network, the FLNN in the consequent part is a nonlinear function of input variables. An IRSFNNs learning starts with an empty rule base and all of the rules are generated and learned online through a simultaneous structure and parameter learning. An on-line clustering algorithm is effective in generating fuzzy rules. The consequent update parameters are derived by a variable-dimensional Kalman filter algorithm. The premise and recurrent parameters are learned through a gradient descent algorithm. We test the IRSFNN for the prediction and identification of dynamic plants and compare it to other well-known recurrent FNNs. The proposed model obtains enhanced performance results.

  8. Electrodeless plasma acceleration system using rotating magnetic field method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Furukawa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF acceleration method as one of electrodeless plasma accelerations. In our experimental scheme, plasma generated by an rf (radio frequency antenna, is accelerated by RMF antennas, which consist of two-pair, opposed, facing coils, and these antennas are outside of a discharge tube. Therefore, there is no wear of electrodes, degrading the propulsion performance. Here, we will introduce our RMF acceleration system developed, including the experimental device, e.g., external antennas, a tapered quartz tube, a vacuum chamber, external magnets, and a pumping system. In addition, we can change RMF operation parameters (RMF applied current IRMF and RMF current phase difference ϕ, focusing on RMF current frequency fRMF by adjusting matching conditions of RMF, and investigate the dependencies on plasma parameters (electron density ne and ion velocity vi; e.g., higher increases of ne and vi (∼360 % and 55 %, respectively than previous experimental results were obtained by decreasing fRMF from 5 MHz to 0.7 MHz, whose RMF penetration condition was better according to Milroy’s expression. Moreover, time-varying component of RMF has been measured directly to survey the penetration condition experimentally.

  9. Using geometric algebra to understand pattern rotations in multiple mirror optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, J.; Ziock, H.

    1997-01-01

    Geometric Algebra (GA) is a new formulation of Clifford Algebra that includes vector analysis without notation changes. Most applications of Ga have been in theoretical physics, but GA is also a very good analysis tool for engineering. As an example, the authors use GA to study pattern rotation in optical systems with multiple mirror reflections. The common ways to analyze pattern rotations are to use rotation matrices or optical ray trace codes, but these are often inconvenient. The authors use GA to develop a simple expression for pattern rotation that is useful for designing or tolerancing pattern rotations in a multiple mirror optical system by inspection. Pattern rotation is used in many optical engineering systems, but it is not normally covered in optical system engineering texts. Pattern rotation is important in optical systems such as: (1) the 192 beam National ignition Facility (NIF), which uses square laser beams in close packed arrays to cut costs; (2) visual optical systems, which use pattern rotation to present the image to the observer in the appropriate orientation, and (3) the UR90 unstable ring resonator, which uses pattern rotation to fill a rectangular laser gain region and provide a filled-in laser output beam

  10. Magnetism, planetary rotation and convection in the solar system

    CERN Document Server

    1985-01-01

    On the 6th, 7th' and 8th April 1983, a conference entitled "Magnetism, planetary rotation and convection in the Solar System" was held in the School of Physics at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. The purpose of the meeting was to celebrate the 60th birthday of Prof. Stanley Keith Runcorn and his, and his students' and associates', several decades of scientific achievement. The social programme, which consisted of excursions in Northumberland and Durham with visits to ancient castles and churches, to Hexham Abbey and Durham Cathedral, and dinners in Newcastle and Durham, was greatly enjoyed by those attending the meeting and by their guests. The success ofthe scientific programme can be judged by this special edition of Geophysical Surveys which is derived mainly from the papers given at the meeting. The story starts in the late 1940s when the question of the origin of the magnetic field of the Earth and such other heavenly bodies as had at that time been discovered as having a magnetic field, was exerci...

  11. Rotating disk electrode system for elevated pressures and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleige, M J; Wiberg, G K H; Arenz, M

    2015-06-01

    We describe the development and test of an elevated pressure and temperature rotating disk electrode (RDE) system that allows measurements under well-defined mass transport conditions. As demonstrated for the oxygen reduction reaction on polycrystalline platinum (Pt) in 0.5M H2SO4, the setup can easily be operated in a pressure range of 1-101 bar oxygen, and temperature of 140 °C. Under such conditions, diffusion limited current densities increase by almost two orders of magnitude as compared to conventional RDE setups allowing, for example, fuel cell catalyst studies under more realistic conditions. Levich plots demonstrate that the mass transport is indeed well-defined, i.e., at low electrode potentials, the measured current densities are fully diffusion controlled, while at higher potentials, a mixed kinetic-diffusion controlled regime is observed. Therefore, the setup opens up a new field for RDE investigations under temperature and current density conditions relevant for low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  12. Rotating disk electrode system for elevated pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleige, M. J.; Wiberg, G. K. H.; Arenz, M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development and test of an elevated pressure and temperature rotating disk electrode (RDE) system that allows measurements under well-defined mass transport conditions. As demonstrated for the oxygen reduction reaction on polycrystalline platinum (Pt) in 0.5M H 2 SO 4 , the setup can easily be operated in a pressure range of 1–101 bar oxygen, and temperature of 140 °C. Under such conditions, diffusion limited current densities increase by almost two orders of magnitude as compared to conventional RDE setups allowing, for example, fuel cell catalyst studies under more realistic conditions. Levich plots demonstrate that the mass transport is indeed well-defined, i.e., at low electrode potentials, the measured current densities are fully diffusion controlled, while at higher potentials, a mixed kinetic-diffusion controlled regime is observed. Therefore, the setup opens up a new field for RDE investigations under temperature and current density conditions relevant for low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

  13. Rotating disk electrode system for elevated pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleige, M. J.; Wiberg, G. K. H.; Arenz, M. [Department of Chemistry and Nano-Science Center, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Ø Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-06-15

    We describe the development and test of an elevated pressure and temperature rotating disk electrode (RDE) system that allows measurements under well-defined mass transport conditions. As demonstrated for the oxygen reduction reaction on polycrystalline platinum (Pt) in 0.5M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the setup can easily be operated in a pressure range of 1–101 bar oxygen, and temperature of 140 °C. Under such conditions, diffusion limited current densities increase by almost two orders of magnitude as compared to conventional RDE setups allowing, for example, fuel cell catalyst studies under more realistic conditions. Levich plots demonstrate that the mass transport is indeed well-defined, i.e., at low electrode potentials, the measured current densities are fully diffusion controlled, while at higher potentials, a mixed kinetic-diffusion controlled regime is observed. Therefore, the setup opens up a new field for RDE investigations under temperature and current density conditions relevant for low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  14. Rotating disk electrode system for elevated pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleige, M. J.; Wiberg, G. K. H.; Arenz, M.

    2015-06-01

    We describe the development and test of an elevated pressure and temperature rotating disk electrode (RDE) system that allows measurements under well-defined mass transport conditions. As demonstrated for the oxygen reduction reaction on polycrystalline platinum (Pt) in 0.5M H2SO4, the setup can easily be operated in a pressure range of 1-101 bar oxygen, and temperature of 140 °C. Under such conditions, diffusion limited current densities increase by almost two orders of magnitude as compared to conventional RDE setups allowing, for example, fuel cell catalyst studies under more realistic conditions. Levich plots demonstrate that the mass transport is indeed well-defined, i.e., at low electrode potentials, the measured current densities are fully diffusion controlled, while at higher potentials, a mixed kinetic-diffusion controlled regime is observed. Therefore, the setup opens up a new field for RDE investigations under temperature and current density conditions relevant for low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  15. Influence of defects on the vibrations of rotating systems; Influence de defauts sur le comportement vibratoire des systemes tournants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures (DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    For high rotation speeds, the imperfections (cracks, anisotropy...) of rotating machinery of the energy sector lead to a specific vibratory behavior which can damage the machine. The simulation of rotating machinery are usually realized for systems without defect. The aim of this thesis is to understand the influence of defects and to propose an algorithm to predict the dynamical behavior. In a first part the author studies the simplified rotating oscillators to propose a numerical method in order to taking into account the dynamic of these systems. This method is then applied to real rotating machinery with the Cast3m software. The numerical results are validated with experiments. (A.L.B.)

  16. Integration of Life Cycle Assessment Into Agent-Based Modeling : Toward Informed Decisions on Evolving Infrastructure Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, C.B.; Nikoli?, I.; Dijkema, G.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented that allows for a life cycle assessment (LCA) to provide environmental information on an energy infrastructure system while it evolves. Energy conversion facilities are represented in an agent-based model (ABM) as distinct instances of technologies with owners capable of making

  17. A multi-objective approach to evolving platooning strategies in intelligent transportation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illigen, W. van; Haasdijk, E.; Kester, L.J.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    The research in this paper is inspired by a vision of intelligent vehicles that autonomously move along motorways: they join and leave trains of vehicles (platoons), overtake other vehicles, etc. We propose a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm based on NEAT and SPEA2 that evolves highlevel

  18. A Multi-Objective Approach to Evolving Platooning Strategies in Intelligent Transportation Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Willigen, W; Haasdijk, E; Kester, Leon

    2013-01-01

    The research in this paper is inspired by a vision of intelligent vehicles that autonomously move along motorways: they join and leave trains of vehicles (platoons), overtake other vehicles, etc. We propose a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm based on NEAT and SPEA2 that evolves high-level

  19. System and Method for Determining Rate of Rotation Using Brushless DC Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for measuring rate of rotation. A brushless DC motor is rotated and produces a back electromagnetic force (emf) on each winding thereof. Each winding's back-emf is squared. The squared outputs associated with each winding are combined, with the square root being taken of such combination, to produce a DC output proportional only to the rate of rotation of the motor's shaft.

  20. Development of Faraday rotators for high power glass laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kunio; Kato, Yoshiaki; Yamanaka, Chiyoe.

    1980-01-01

    As a new approach to nuclear fusion, laser-induced fusion has been recently highlighted. It is no exaggeration to say that the future success of this technique depends on the development of high power laser as the energy driver. Faraday rotators are used as photo-diodes to prevent amplifiers and oscillator assemblies from the possibility to be broken by reversely transmitting light. The authors were able to increase the isolation ratio by about 10 times as compared with conventional one by employing the large performance index, disc type Faraday glass, FR-5. In this paper, first, Faraday glasses which are the composing element of Faraday rotators and the optical characteristics of dielectric thin-film polarizers are described, and next, the design of a magnetic coil and its resulting coil characteristics are reported. Then the dominant causes limiting the isolation ratio of Faraday rotators are investigated, and it is clarified that the residual strain in Faraday glasses and the non-uniformity of magnetic field affect predominantly. The measured results are as follows: The magnetic flux densities required to rotate by 45 deg the polarizing plane of the light transmitted through the Faraday rotators A and B are both 27 kG; and the isolation ratios over the whole effective plane are 36 and 32 dB, respectively. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. A theoretical study of rotatable renewable energy system for stratospheric airship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Mingyun; Li, Jun; Zhu, Weiyu; Du, Huafei; Meng, Junhui; Sun, Kangwen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new rotatable renewable energy system is designed for stratospheric airship. • A theoretical model of optimal rotation angle and required area are studied. • The effects of latitude and date on output energy per day are investigated. • The advantages of the rotatable renewable energy system are studied. - Abstract: Renewable energy system is very critical for solving the energy problem of a long endurance stratospheric airship. Output performance of the traditional solar array fixed on the upper surface of the airship remains to be improved to reduce the area and weight of renewable energy system. Inspired by the solar tracking system and kirigami, a rotatable renewable energy system (mainly including solar array) is designed to improve the current status of the energy system. The advantages of the rotatable solar array are studied using a MATLAB computer program based on the theoretical model established in this paper. The improvements in output energy and required area of the solar array were compared between the traditional airship and improved one. Studies had shown that the rotatable renewable energy system made the total weight of energy system decreased by 1000 kg when the maximum design speed of the airship was greater than 22 m/s. The results demonstrate that the rotatable renewable energy system for the airship can be a good way to improve the output performance of solar array, and the conceptual design and theoretical model suggest a pathway towards solving the energy problem of a stratospheric airship.

  2. Fouling in a MBR system with rotating membrane discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    concentrations and a clear effluent with no bacteria present in the permeate [1]. However, the process performance is limited by membrane fouling, which results in a lower productivity and higher energy demand and hence places demands for limitation of fouling and/or cleaning of the membranes. One way to do...... uses rotating ceramic membrane discs for creation of shear, which can be changed by controlling the membrane rotation speed of the membrane. Furthermore, the influence of shear on fouling is studied at different radii from the center of rotation, by dividing membranes into different concentric rings......Membrane bioreactors (MBR) are an attractive alternative solution for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment. The MBR, which is a combination of a bioreactor for sludge degradation and a membrane for separation, has the advantages of a low footprint, ability to handle high sludge...

  3. Proposal of cancer therapy system without rotating gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Masanobu

    2002-01-01

    Beam therapy is one of useful methods for cancer therapy. Many results in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) show many abilities of beam therapy for cancer therapy. In Japan, several beam therapy facilities are constructed or under construction. If its construction budget becomes to be smaller, beam therapy may be used as the general cancer therapy. But in the present beam therapy facilities, the budget of its construction is very large. One of the reasons of big budget is the construction of the big buildings equipped with thick shielding walls. Most of space of the facilities with thick shielding walls is devoted to the treatment equipments such as rotating gantries and beam transport lines. This proposal is that using oblique beam line and rotating treatment bed, multi-portal irradiation is realized without rotating gantry. At the same time, we designed adequate beam lines to minimize the total facilities. (author)

  4. On the Interplay between the Evolvability and Network Robustness in an Evolutionary Biological Network: A Systems Biology Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2011-01-01

    In the evolutionary process, the random transmission and mutation of genes provide biological diversities for natural selection. In order to preserve functional phenotypes between generations, gene networks need to evolve robustly under the influence of random perturbations. Therefore, the robustness of the phenotype, in the evolutionary process, exerts a selection force on gene networks to keep network functions. However, gene networks need to adjust, by variations in genetic content, to generate phenotypes for new challenges in the network’s evolution, ie, the evolvability. Hence, there should be some interplay between the evolvability and network robustness in evolutionary gene networks. In this study, the interplay between the evolvability and network robustness of a gene network and a biochemical network is discussed from a nonlinear stochastic system point of view. It was found that if the genetic robustness plus environmental robustness is less than the network robustness, the phenotype of the biological network is robust in evolution. The tradeoff between the genetic robustness and environmental robustness in evolution is discussed from the stochastic stability robustness and sensitivity of the nonlinear stochastic biological network, which may be relevant to the statistical tradeoff between bias and variance, the so-called bias/variance dilemma. Further, the tradeoff could be considered as an antagonistic pleiotropic action of a gene network and discussed from the systems biology perspective. PMID:22084563

  5. Architecture and life support systems for a rotating space habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Gaurav

    Life Support Systems are critical to sustain human habitation of space over long time periods. As orbiting space habitats become operational in the future, support systems such as atmo-sphere, food, water etc. will play a very pivotal role in sustaining life. To design a long-duration space habitat, it's important to consider the full gamut of human experience of the environment. Long-term viability depends on much more than just the structural or life support efficiency. A space habitat isn't just a machine; it's a life experience. To be viable, it needs to keep the inhabitants satisfied with their condition. This paper provides conceptual research on several key factors that influence the growth and sustainability of humans in a space habitat. Apart from the main life support system parameters, the architecture (both interior and exterior) of the habitat will play a crucial role in influencing the liveability in the space habitat. In order to ensure the best possible liveability for the inhabitants, a truncated (half cut) torus is proposed as the shape of the habitat. This structure rotating at an optimum rpm will en-sure 1g pseudo gravity to the inhabitants. The truncated torus design has several advantages over other proposed shapes such as a cylinder or a sphere. The design provides minimal grav-ity variation (delta g) in the living area, since its flat outer pole ensures a constant gravity. The design is superior in economy of structural and atmospheric mass. Interior architecture of the habitat addresses the total built environment, drawing from diverse disciplines includ-ing physiology, psychology, and sociology. Furthermore, factors such as line of sight, natural sunlight and overhead clearance have been discussed in the interior architecture. Substantial radiation shielding is also required in order to prevent harmful cosmic radiations and solar flares from causing damage to inhabitants. Regolith shielding of 10 tons per meter square is proposed for the

  6. Steady hydromagnetic Couette flow in a rotating system with non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    energy equation and numerical values of rate of heat transfer at both plates are ... An investigation of MHD flow of an electrically conducting fluid in a rotating ... bounded by stationary free stream whereas MHD flow past a stationary plate ... induced magnetic field produced by fluid motion is negligible in comparison to the ...

  7. Study on the Contra-Rotating Propeller system design and full-scale performance prediction method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keh-Sik Min

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A ship's screw-propeller produces thrust by rotation and, at the same time, generates rotational flow behind the propeller. This rotational flow has no contribution to the generation of thrust, but instead produces energy loss. By recovering part of the lost energy in the rotational flow, therefore, it is possible to improve the propulsion efficiency. The contra-rotating propeller (CRP system is the representing example of such devices. Unfortunately, however, neither a design method nor a full-scale performance prediction procedure for the CRP system has been well established yet. The authors have long performed studies on the CRP system, and some of the results from the authors’ studies shall be presented and discussed.

  8. Comparison of the effects of different crop rotation systems on winter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... were found the best crop rotation systems under rain-fed conditions of ... Crop rotation is one of the major cultural practices in the .... components such as seed weight in a spike, harvest index, seed ..... due to high prices of product belonging to fodder pea and ... was a cash crop in agricultural marketing.

  9. A Vision-Based Dynamic Rotational Angle Measurement System for Large Civil Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Jae; Ho, Hoai-Nam; Lee, Jong-Han

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a vision-based rotational angle measurement system for large-scale civil structures. Despite the fact that during the last decade several rotation angle measurement systems were introduced, they however often required complex and expensive equipment. Therefore, alternative effective solutions with high resolution are in great demand. The proposed system consists of commercial PCs, commercial camcorders, low-cost frame grabbers, and a wireless LAN router. The calculation of rotation angle is obtained by using image processing techniques with pre-measured calibration parameters. Several laboratory tests were conducted to verify the performance of the proposed system. Compared with the commercial rotation angle measurement, the results of the system showed very good agreement with an error of less than 1.0% in all test cases. Furthermore, several tests were conducted on the five-story modal testing tower with a hybrid mass damper to experimentally verify the feasibility of the proposed system. PMID:22969348

  10. Design and Realization of Rotating Machinery Conditions Monitoring System Based on Labview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qiyuan

    Nonlinear dynamic analysis of rotating machinery system has always been the hot spot of the rotational dynamics research. This article sets up a rotating machinery condition monitoring system to realize the measurement of system dynamic characteristic parameters based on NI(National Instruments) virtual instruments technology. The measurement of vibration signal of rotating machinery system is achieved by using NI company general data acquisition module of NI company. Meanwhile, by analyzing and processing the acquired data using Labview 2012, the dynamic characteristics, such as .the speed of the rotating machinery system, the axis trajectory, spectrum parameters, are attained. The measurement results show that the rotating machinery condition monitoring system based on Labview is easy to operate, easy to realize the function extension and maintenance, and that it can be used in the industrial engineering projects with rotation characteristics. Labview as the development tools used by virtual instrument function, is very powerful data acquisition software products support is one of the features of it, so using Labview programming and data acquisition is simple and convenient [1].

  11. A stable high-speed rotational transmission system based on nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Kun; Yin, Hang; Wei, Ning; Chen, Zhen; Shi, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    A stable rotational transmission system is designed with a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based motor and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs)-based bearing. The system response is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It is found that the rotating motor can actuate the rotation of the inner tube in bearing because of the attraction between the two adjacent coaxial ends of motor and rotor (the inner tube in bearing). To have a stable nanostructure, each carbon atom on the adjacent ends of motor and rotor is bonded with a hydrogen atom. To obtain a stable high-speed rotational transmission system, both an armchair and a zigzag model are used in MD simulation. In each model, the motor with different diameters and rotational speeds is employed to examine the rotational transmission of corresponding DWCNTs. It is demonstrated that the long range van der Waals interaction between the adjacent ends of motor and rotor leads to a stable configuration of the adjacent ends, and further leads to a stable rotation of rotor when driven by a high-speed motor. As compared with the armchair model, the rotor in the zigzag model could reach a stable rotation mode much easier

  12. Rotation-invariant neural pattern recognition system with application to coin recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumi, M; Omatu, S; Takeda, F; Kosaka, T

    1992-01-01

    In pattern recognition, it is often necessary to deal with problems to classify a transformed pattern. A neural pattern recognition system which is insensitive to rotation of input pattern by various degrees is proposed. The system consists of a fixed invariance network with many slabs and a trainable multilayered network. The system was used in a rotation-invariant coin recognition problem to distinguish between a 500 yen coin and a 500 won coin. The results show that the approach works well for variable rotation pattern recognition.

  13. Power system stabilization by superconducting magnetic energystorage connected to rotating exciter

    OpenAIRE

    Mitani, Yasunori; Tsuji, K

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a combination of a rotating exciter and a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system for efficient power system stabilization. A SMES system connected to an exciter rotating with a turbine-rotor shaft is proposed. The exciter is installed exclusively to supply current for the SMES. Since electrical power output from the SMES is converted into a mechanical torque of the generator directly by the exciter, it is expected that power swings of the generator will be ...

  14. Inference of Time-Evolving Coupled Dynamical Systems in the Presence of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovski, Tomislav; Duggento, Andrea; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2012-07-01

    A new method is introduced for analysis of interactions between time-dependent coupled oscillators, based on the signals they generate. It distinguishes unsynchronized dynamics from noise-induced phase slips and enables the evolution of the coupling functions and other parameters to be followed. It is based on phase dynamics, with Bayesian inference of the time-evolving parameters achieved by shaping the prior densities to incorporate knowledge of previous samples. The method is tested numerically and applied to reveal and quantify the time-varying nature of cardiorespiratory interactions.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymmetric systems with toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, N.L.P.

    1986-01-01

    A model for studying magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymetrically confined plasma with toroidal rotation, extended to the Grad. Shafranov equation is presented. The expression used for the scalar pressure is modifiec, and the influence of toroidal magnetic field is included, The equation for general motion of axisymetrically confined plasma, particularizing for rotation movements is described. Two cases are compared: one supposes the entropy as a function of poloidal magnetic flux and other supposes the temperature as a function of flux. The equations for these two cases obtaining a simplified expression by others approximations are established. The proposed model is compared with Shibata model, which uses density as function of flux, and with the ideal spheromak model. A set of cases taking in account experimental data is studied. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. Mental rotation and the motor system: embodiment head over heels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Markus; Amorim, Michel-Ange; Ebersbach, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether body parts attached to abstract stimuli automatically force embodiment in a mental rotation task. In Experiment 1, standard cube combinations reflecting a human pose were added with (1) body parts on anatomically possible locations, (2) body parts on anatomically impossible locations, (3) colored end cubes, and (4) simple end cubes. Participants (N=30) had to decide whether two simultaneously presented stimuli, rotated in the picture plane, were identical or not. They were fastest and made less errors in the possible-body condition, but were slowest and least accurate in the impossible-body condition. A second experiment (N=32) replicated the results and ruled out that the poor performance in the impossible-body condition was due to the specific stimulus material. The findings of both experiments suggest that body parts automatically trigger embodiment, even when it is counterproductive and dramatically impairs performance, as in the impossible-body condition. It can furthermore be concluded that body parts cannot be used flexibly for spatial orientation in mental rotation tasks, compared to colored end cubes. Thus, embodiment appears to be a strong and inflexible mechanism that may, under certain conditions, even impede performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Testing of a new morphing trailing edge flap system on a novel outdoor rotating test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Barlas, Athanasios; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The morphing trailing edge system or flap system, CRTEF, has been developed over the last 10 years at DTU Wind Energy. After a promising wind tunnel test of the system in 2009 the INDUFLAP project has been carried out from 2011-2014 to transfer the technology from laboratory to industrial...... manufacturing and application. To narrow the gap between wind tunnel testing and full scale prototype testing we developed the rotating test rig. The overall objectives with the rotating test rig are: 1) to test the flap system in a realistic rotating environment with a realistic g-loading; 2) to measure...... the flap performance in real turbulent inflow and 3) to test the flap system in a realistic size and Reynolds number when comparing with full scale applications.. The rotating test rig consists of a 2.2m blade section attached to a 10m boom and mounted on a 100kW turbine platform. It was installed in June...

  18. Controllable nanoscale rotating actuator system based on carbon nanotube and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jianzhang; Han, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    A controllable nanoscale rotating actuator system consisting of a double carbon nanotube and graphene driven by a temperature gradient is proposed, and its rotating dynamics performance and driving mechanism are investigated through molecular dynamics simulations. The outer tube exhibits stable pure rotation with certain orientation under temperature gradient and the steady rotational speed rises as the temperature gradient increases. It reveals that the driving torque is caused by the difference of atomic van der Waals potentials due to the temperature gradient and geometrical features of carbon nanotube. A theoretical model for driving torque is established based on lattice dynamics theory and its predicted results agree well with molecular dynamics simulations. Further discussion is taken according to the theoretical model. The work in this study would be a guide for design and application of controllable nanoscale rotating devices based on carbon nanotubes and graphene. (paper)

  19. A BINARY ORBIT FOR THE MASSIVE, EVOLVED STAR HDE 326823, A WR+O SYSTEM PROGENITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, N. D.; Gies, D. R.; Williams, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The hot star HDE 326823 is a candidate transition-phase object that is evolving into a nitrogen-enriched Wolf-Rayet star. It is also a known low-amplitude, photometric variable with a 6.123 day period. We present new, high- and moderate-resolution spectroscopy of HDE 326823, and we show that the absorption lines show coherent Doppler shifts with this period while the emission lines display little or no velocity variation. We interpret the absorption line shifts as the orbital motion of the apparently brighter star in a close, interacting binary. We argue that this star is losing mass to a mass gainer star hidden in a thick accretion torus and to a circumbinary disk that is the source of the emission lines. HDE 326823 probably belongs to a class of objects that produce short-period WR+O binaries.

  20. Maintaining evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, James F

    2008-12-01

    Although molecular methods, such as QTL mapping, have revealed a number of loci with large effects, it is still likely that the bulk of quantitative variability is due to multiple factors, each with small effect. Typically, these have a large additive component. Conventional wisdom argues that selection, natural or artificial, uses up additive variance and thus depletes its supply. Over time, the variance should be reduced, and at equilibrium be near zero. This is especially expected for fitness and traits highly correlated with it. Yet, populations typically have a great deal of additive variance, and do not seem to run out of genetic variability even after many generations of directional selection. Long-term selection experiments show that populations continue to retain seemingly undiminished additive variance despite large changes in the mean value. I propose that there are several reasons for this. (i) The environment is continually changing so that what was formerly most fit no longer is. (ii) There is an input of genetic variance from mutation, and sometimes from migration. (iii) As intermediate-frequency alleles increase in frequency towards one, producing less variance (as p --> 1, p(1 - p) --> 0), others that were originally near zero become more common and increase the variance. Thus, a roughly constant variance is maintained. (iv) There is always selection for fitness and for characters closely related to it. To the extent that the trait is heritable, later generations inherit a disproportionate number of genes acting additively on the trait, thus increasing genetic variance. For these reasons a selected population retains its ability to evolve. Of course, genes with large effect are also important. Conspicuous examples are the small number of loci that changed teosinte to maize, and major phylogenetic changes in the animal kingdom. The relative importance of these along with duplications, chromosome rearrangements, horizontal transmission and polyploidy

  1. Particulate Organic Matter Affects Soil Nitrogen Mineralization under Two Crop Rotation Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongyan Bu

    Full Text Available Changes in the quantity and/or quality of soil labile organic matter between and after different types of cultivation system could play a dominant role in soil nitrogen (N mineralization. The quantity and quality of particulate organic matter (POM and potentially mineralizable-N (PMN contents were measured in soils from 16 paired rice-rapeseed (RR/cotton-rapeseed (CR rotations sites in Hubei province, central China. Then four paired soils encompassing low (10th percentile, intermediate (25th and 75th percentiles, and high (90th percentile levels of soil PMN were selected to further study the effects of POM on soil N mineralization by quantifying the net N mineralization in original soils and soils from which POM was removed. Both soil POM carbon (POM-C and N (POM-N contents were 45.8% and 55.8% higher under the RR rotation compared to the CR rotation, respectively. The PMN contents were highly correlated with the POM contents. The PMN and microbial biomass N (MBN contents concurrently and significantly decreased when POM was removed. The reduction rate of PMN was positively correlated with changes in MBN after the removal of POM. The reduction rates of PMN and MBN after POM removal are lower under RR rotations (38.0% and 16.3%, respectively than CR rotations (45.6% and 19.5%, respectively. Furthermore, infrared spectroscopy indicated that compounds with low-bioavailability accumulated (e.g., aromatic recalcitrant materials in the soil POM fraction under the RR rotation but not under the CR rotation. The results of the present study demonstrated that POM plays a vital role in soil N mineralization under different rotation systems. The discrepancy between POM content and composition resulting from different crop rotation systems caused differences in N mineralization in soils.

  2. Rotational patient setup errors in IGRT with XVI system in Elekta Synergy and their clinical relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhusudhana Sresty, N.V.N.; Muralidhar, K.R.; Raju, A.K.; Sha, R.L.; Ramanjappa

    2008-01-01

    The goal of Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) is to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. In this technique, it is possible to get volumetric images of patient anatomy before delivery of treatment.XVI( release 3.5) system in Elekta Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta,Crawley,UK) has the potential to ensure that, the relative positions of the target volume is same as in the treatment plan. It involves acquiring planar images produced by a kilo Voltage cone beam rotating about the patient in the treatment position. After 3 dimensional match between reference and localization images, the system gives rotational errors also along with translational shifts. One can easily perform translational shifts with treatment couch. But rotational shifts cannot be performed. Most of the studies dealt with translational shifts only. Few studies reported regarding rotational errors. It is found that in the treatment of elongated targets, even small rotational errors can show difference in results. The main objectives of this study is 1) To verify the magnitude of rotational errors in different clinical sites observed and to compare with the other reports. 2) To find its clinical relevance 3) To find difference in rotational shift results with improper selection of kV collimator

  3. Economic feasibility of a wood biomass energy system under evolving demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Guariso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In some European regions, particularly in mountainous areas, the demand for energy is evolving due to the decrease of resident population and the adoption of energy efficiency measures. Such changes are rapid enough to significantly impact on the planning process of wood-to-energy chains that are supposed to work for the following 20–25 years. The paper summarizes a study in an Italian pre-alpine district where some municipality shows a declining resident population together with increasing summer tourism. The planning of conversion plants to exploit the local availability of wood is formulated as a mathematical programming problem that maximizes the economic return of the investment, under time-varying parameters that account for the demand evolution. Such a demand is estimated from current trends, while biomass availability and transport is computed from the local cartography, through standard GIS operations. Altogether, the mixed integer optimization problem has 11 possible plant locations of different sizes and technologies taking their feedstock from about 200 parcels. The problem is solved with a commercial software package and shows that the optimal plan changes if one considers the foreseen evolution of the energy demand. As it always happen in this type of biomass-based plants, while the problem formulation is general and may be applied to other cases, the solution obtained is strongly dependent on local values and thus cannot be extrapolated to different contexts.

  4. Evolving natural gas markets: LNG possibilities for a hydrothermal power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Tiago B.; Resende, Joao P.; Costa, Agnes M. [Brazilian Ministry of Mines and Energy, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The latest advancements in the natural gas - NG industry have brought new opportunities for the resource's application, especially in the power industry. On the one hand, rapid growth in demand and falling costs of transportation over long distances, particularly as liquefied natural gas - LNG, should lead to a more integrated NG world market. On the other, the deregulation of electricity markets and the growth of independent power producers - IPPs using NG as a fuel for generating peak load power have increased the demand for more flexible NG supply contracts. These factors have allowed a shift in the timing of investment and contract negotiation in NG market. Traditionally, firms searched for trading partners and signed long-term contracts before investing in infrastructure. In the evolving LNG market, producers invest in infrastructure before they have buyers for all their expected outputs, while buyers undertake investment before having firm contracts for all their expected NG needs. These technological and market changes may foster greater participation of a fully flexible NG power plants in the Brazilian electricity market. Nowadays, thermal power long-term capacity contracts customized and negotiated in the local electricity pool (ACR) require power producer to award guarantees of NG firm supply, substantially increasing their cost. A combination of flexible LNG supply contracts and electricity pool contracts may present a solution to the lack of competitiveness of NG power plants in the Brazilian power industry. (author)

  5. Blow-up of solutions to the rotation b-family system modeling equatorial water waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the blow-up mechanism to the periodic generalized rotation b-family system (R-b-family system. This model can be derived from the f-plane governing equations for the geographical water waves with a constant underlying current in the equatorial water waves with effect of the Coriolis force. When b=2, it is a rotation two-component Camassa-Holm (R2CH system. We consider the periodic R2CH system when linear dispersion is absent (which model is called r2CH system and derive two finite-time blow-up results.

  6. Rotated Walsh-Hadamard Spreading with Robust Channel Estimation for a Coded MC-CDMA System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raulefs Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate rotated Walsh-Hadamard spreading matrices for a broadband MC-CDMA system with robust channel estimation in the synchronous downlink. The similarities between rotated spreading and signal space diversity are outlined. In a multiuser MC-CDMA system, possible performance improvements are based on the chosen detector, the channel code, and its Hamming distance. By applying rotated spreading in comparison to a standard Walsh-Hadamard spreading code, a higher throughput can be achieved. As combining the channel code and the spreading code forms a concatenated code, the overall minimum Hamming distance of the concatenated code increases. This asymptotically results in an improvement of the bit error rate for high signal-to-noise ratio. Higher convolutional channel code rates are mostly generated by puncturing good low-rate channel codes. The overall Hamming distance decreases significantly for the punctured channel codes. Higher channel code rates are favorable for MC-CDMA, as MC-CDMA utilizes diversity more efficiently compared to pure OFDMA. The application of rotated spreading in an MC-CDMA system allows exploiting diversity even further. We demonstrate that the rotated spreading gain is still present for a robust pilot-aided channel estimator. In a well-designed system, rotated spreading extends the performance by using a maximum likelihood detector with robust channel estimation at the receiver by about 1 dB.

  7. The Reach-and-Evolve Algorithm for Reachability Analysis of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Collins (Pieter); A. Goldsztejn

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper introduces a new algorithm dedicated to the rigorous reachability analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems. The algorithm is initially presented in the context of discrete time dynamical systems, and then extended to continuous time dynamical systems driven by ODEs. In

  8. Evolved finite state controller for hybrid system in reduced search space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Jean-Francois; Fan, Zhun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary methodology to automatically generate finite state automata (FSA) controllers to control hybrid systems. The proposed approach reduces the search space using an invariant analysis of the system. FSA controllers for a case study of two-tank system have been...

  9. System and Method for Obtaining Simultaneous Levitation and Rotation of a Ferromagnetic Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subrata; Sarkar, Mrinal Kanti; Ghosh, Arnab

    2017-02-01

    In this work a practical demonstration for simultaneous levitation and rotation for a ferromagnetic cylindrical object is presented. A hollow steel cylinder has been arranged to remain suspended stably under I-core electromagnet utilizing dc attraction type levitation principle and then arranged to rotate the levitated object around 1000 rpm speed based on eddy current based energy meter principle. Since the object is to be rotating during levitated condition the device will be frictionless, energy-efficient and robust. This technology may be applied to frictionless energy meter, wind turbine, machine tool applications, precision instruments and many other devices where easy energy-efficient stable rotation will be required. The cascade lead compensation control scheme has been applied for stabilization of unstable levitation system. The proposed device is successfully tested in the laboratory and experimental results have been produced.

  10. A Faraday rotation search for magnetic fields in quasar damped Ly alpha absorption systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Abraham L.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a Faraday rotation survey of 61 radio-bright QSOs conducted at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA). The Galactic contribution to the Faraday rotation is estimated and subtracted to determine the extragalactic rotation measure (RRM) for each source. Eleven of these QSOs are known to exhibit damped Ly alpha absorption. The rate of incidence of significant Faraday rotation of these 11 sources is compared to the remaining 50 and is found to be higher at the 99.8% confidence level. However, as this is based upon only two detections of Faraday rotation in the damped Ly alpha sample, the result is only tentative. If the two detections in the damped Ly alpha sample are dug to the absorbing systems, then the inferred rotation measure induced by these systems is roughly 250 rad/sq m. The two detections were for the two lowest redshift absorbers in the sample. We find that a rotation measure of 250 rad/sq m would have gone undetected for any other absorber in the damped Ly alpha sample due to the 1/(1 + 2) squared dilution of the observed RRM with redshift. Thus the data are consistent with, but do not prove, the hypothesis that Faraday rotation is a generic property of damped Ly alpha absorbers. We do not confirm the suggestion that the amplitude of RRMs increases with redshift. Rather, the data are consistent with no redshift evolution. We find that the uncertainty in the estimation of the Galactic rotation measure (GRM) is a more serious problem than previously realized for extra-galactic Faraday rotation studies of QSO absorbers. A careful analysis of current methods for estimating GRM indicate that it can be determined to an accuracy of about 15 - 20 rad/sq m. Previous studies underestimated this uncertainty by more than a factor of 2. Due to this uncertainty, rotation measures such as we suspect are associated with damped Ly alpha absorption systems can only be detected at redshifts less than z approximately

  11. Plant Residual Management in different Crop Rotations System on Potato Tuber Yield Loss Affected by Wireworms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zarea Feizabadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Selection a proper crop rotation based on environmental conservation rules is a key factor for increasing long term productivity. On the other hand, the major problem in reaching agricultural sustainability is lack of soil organic matter. Recently, a new viewpoint has emerged based on efficient use of inputs, environmental protection, ecological economy, food supply and security. Crop rotation cannot supply and restore plant needed nutrients, so gradually the productivity of rotation system tends to be decreased. Returning the plant residues to the soil helps to increase its organic matter and fertility in long-term period. Wireworms are multi host pests and we can see them in wheat and barley too. The logic way for their control is agronomic practices like as crop rotation. Wireworms’ population and damages are increased with using grasses and small seed gramineas in mild winters, variation in cropping pattern, reduced chemical control, and cover crops in winter. In return soil cultivation, crop rotation, planting date, fertilizing, irrigation and field health are the examples for the effective factors in reducing wireworms’ damage. Materials and Methods: In order to study the effect of crop rotations, residue management and yield damage because of wireworms’ population in soil, this experiment was conducted using four rotation systems for five years in Jolgeh- Rokh agricultural research station. Crop rotations were included, 1 Wheat monoculture for the whole period (WWWWW, 2 Wheat- wheat- wheat- canola- wheat (WWWCW, 3 Wheat- sugar beet- wheat- potato- wheat (WSWPW, 4 Wheat- maize- wheat- potato- wheat (WMWPW as main plots and three levels of returning crop residues to soil (returning 0, 50 and 100% produced crop residues to soil were allocated as sub plots. This experiment was designed as split plot based on RCBD design with three replications. After ending each rotation treatment, the field was sowed with potato cv. Agria

  12. Biosphere 2: a prototype project for a permanent and evolving life system for Mars base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M; Allen, J P; Dempster, W F

    1992-01-01

    As part of the ground-based preparation for creating long-term life systems needed for space habitation and settlement, Space Biospheres Ventures (SBV) is undertaking the Biosphere 2 project near Oracle, Arizona. Biosphere 2, currently under construction, is scheduled to commence its operations in 1991 with a two-year closure period with a crew of eight people. Biosphere 2 is a facility which will be essentialy materially-closed to exchange with the outside environment. It is open to information and energy flow. Biosphere 2 is designed to achieve a complex life-support system by the integration of seven areas or "biomes"--rainforest, savannah, desert, marsh, ocean, intensive agriculture and human habitat. Unique bioregenerative technologies, such as soil bed reactors for air purification, aquatic waste processing systems, real-time analytic systems and complex computer monitoring and control systems are being developed for the Biosphere 2 project. Its operation should afford valuable insight into the functioning of complex life systems necessary for long-term habitation in space. It will serve as an experimental ground-based prototype and testbed for the stable, permanent life systems needed for human exploration of Mars.

  13. Biosphere 2: A prototype project for a permanent and evolving life system for Mars base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Allen, John P.; Dempster, William F.

    As part of the ground-based preparation for creating long-term life systems needed for space habitation and settlement, Space Biopsheres Ventures (SBV) is undertaking the Biosphere 2 project near Oracle, Arizona. Biosphere 2, currently under construction, is scheduled to commence its operations in 1991 with a two-year closure period with a crew of eight people. Biosphere 2 is a facility which will be essentially materially-closed to exchange with the outside environment. It is open to information and energy flow. Biosphere 2 is designed to achieve a complex life-support system by the integration of seven areas or ``biomes'' - rainforest, savannah, desert, marsh, ocean, intensive agriculture and human habitat. Unique bioregenerative technologies, such as soil bed reactors for air purification, aquatic waste processing systems, real-time analytic systems and complex computer monitoring and control systems are being developed for the Biosphere 2 project. Its operation should afford valuable insight into the functioning of complex life systems necessary for long-term habitation in space. It will serve as an experimental ground-based prototype and testbed for the stable, permanent life systems needed for human exploration of Mars.

  14. Chemically evolving systems for oil recovery enhancement in heavy oil deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunina, L. K.; Kuvshinov, I. V.; Kuvshinov, V. A.; Stasyeva, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents the results of laboratory studies and field tests of new physicochemical technologies for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil fields under natural development conditions and with thermal-steam stimulation using oil-displacing "smart" systems. The systems are based on surfactants and buffer systems. Their rheological and acid-base properties can be regulated by their chemical evolution directly in the formation. Field tests of the technologies carried out on high-viscosity oil deposit in the Usinskoye oilfield have shown that the EOR technologies are environmentally friendly and technologically effective.

  15. A Framework for the Management of Evolving Requirements in Software Systems Supporting Network-Centric Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, Linda K

    2006-01-01

    .... There are many sources of requirements for these software systems supporting NCO, which may increase in number as the Services continue to develop the capabilities necessary for the transformation...

  16. Adaptive and Context-Aware Reconciliation of Reactive and Pro-active Behavior in Evolving Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajcevski, Goce; Scheuermann, Peter

    One distinct characteristics of the context-aware systems is their ability to react and adapt to the evolution of the environment, which is often a result of changes in the values of various (possibly correlated) attributes. Based on these changes, reactive systems typically take corrective actions, e.g., adjusting parameters in order to maintain the desired specifications of the system's state. Pro-active systems, on the other hand, may change the mode of interaction with the environment as well as the desired goals of the system. In this paper we describe our (ECA)2 paradigm for reactive behavior with proactive impact and we present our ongoing work and vision for a system that is capable of context-aware adaptation, while ensuring the maintenance of a set of desired behavioral policies. Our main focus is on developing a formalism that provides tools for expressing normal, as well as defeasible and/or exceptional specification. However, at the same time, we insist on a sound semantics and the capability of answering hypothetical "what-if" queries. Towards this end, we introduce the high-level language L_{ EAR} that can be used to describe the dynamics of the problem domain, specify triggers under the (ECA)2 paradigm, and reason about the consequences of the possible evolutions.

  17. Modal Analysis in Periodic, Time-Varying Systems with emphasis to the Coupling between Flexible Rotating Beams and Non-Rotating Flexible Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saracho, C. M.; Santos, Ilmar

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of dynamical response of a system built by a non-rotating structure coupled to flexible rotating beams is the purpose of this work. The effect of rotational speed upon the beam natural frequencies is well-known, so that an increase in the angular speeds leads to an increase in beam...... natural frequencies, the so-called centrifugal stiffening. The equations of motion of such a global system present matrices with time-depending coefficients, which vary periodically with the angular rotor speed, and introduce parametric vibrations into the system response. The principles of modal analysis...... for time-invariant linear systems are expanded to investigate time-varying systems. Concepts as eigenvalues and eigenvectors, which in this special case are also time-varying, are used to analyse the dynamical response of global system. The time-varying frequencies and modes are also illustrated....

  18. Maintaining evolvability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-23

    % of the variance would have passed the stringent tests for inclusion in the ... genetic complication (e.g. a balanced lethal system) or in- compatibility of .... have important evolutionary roles (genes of large effect; du- plications ...

  19. Evolving rule-based systems in two medical domains using genetic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakonas, Athanasios; Dounias, Georgios; Jantzen, Jan; Axer, Hubertus; Bjerregaard, Beth; von Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf

    2004-11-01

    To demonstrate and compare the application of different genetic programming (GP) based intelligent methodologies for the construction of rule-based systems in two medical domains: the diagnosis of aphasia's subtypes and the classification of pap-smear examinations. Past data representing (a) successful diagnosis of aphasia's subtypes from collaborating medical experts through a free interview per patient, and (b) correctly classified smears (images of cells) by cyto-technologists, previously stained using the Papanicolaou method. Initially a hybrid approach is proposed, which combines standard genetic programming and heuristic hierarchical crisp rule-base construction. Then, genetic programming for the production of crisp rule based systems is attempted. Finally, another hybrid intelligent model is composed by a grammar driven genetic programming system for the generation of fuzzy rule-based systems. Results denote the effectiveness of the proposed systems, while they are also compared for their efficiency, accuracy and comprehensibility, to those of an inductive machine learning approach as well as to those of a standard genetic programming symbolic expression approach. The proposed GP-based intelligent methodologies are able to produce accurate and comprehensible results for medical experts performing competitive to other intelligent approaches. The aim of the authors was the production of accurate but also sensible decision rules that could potentially help medical doctors to extract conclusions, even at the expense of a higher classification score achievement.

  20. Using grey literature to prepare pharmacy students for an evolving healthcare delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Laura E; Walker, Desiree'

    2013-05-13

    To assess the impact of using "grey literature" (information internally produced in print or electronic format by agencies such as hospitals, government, businesses, etc) rather than a textbook in a course on healthcare delivery systems on students' perception of the relevance of healthcare delivery system topics and their ability to identify credible sources of this information. A reading from the grey literature was identified and assigned to the students for each topic in the course. Pre- and post-course survey instruments were used for the assessment. Students reported healthcare delivery systems topics to be moderately relevant to the profession of pharmacy on both the pre- and post-course survey instruments. Students' knowledge of current and credible sources of information on healthcare delivery system topics significantly improved based on self-reports and scores on objective assessments (pgrey literature in a course on healthcare delivery systems can be used to ensure that information in the pharmacy school curriculum is the most current and credible information available.

  1. Strategic optimisation of microgrid by evolving a unitised regenerative fuel cell system operational criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhansali, Gaurav; Singh, Bhanu Pratap; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the problem of microgrid optimisation with storage has been addressed in an unaccounted way rather than confining it to loss minimisation. Unitised regenerative fuel cell (URFC) systems have been studied and employed in microgrids to store energy and feed it back into the system when required. A value function-dependent on line losses, URFC system operational cost and stored energy at the end of the day are defined here. The function is highly complex, nonlinear and multi dimensional in nature. Therefore, heuristic optimisation techniques in combination with load flow analysis are used here to resolve the network and time domain complexity related with the problem. Particle swarm optimisation with the forward/backward sweep algorithm ensures optimal operation of microgrid thereby minimising the operational cost of the microgrid. Results are shown and are found to be consistently improving with evolution of the solution strategy.

  2. The evolving network structure of US airline system during 1990-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingyi; Ban, Yifang

    2014-09-01

    This paper analyzes the growth and evolution of topological features of the US airline network over a 20-year period. It captures the change in the network system from different dimensions of complex networks such as centrality distribution and various structural properties of the network over time. We first illustrate the results of a set of measures, including degree, strength, betweenness centrality, and clustering structure. The geographic features of airport systems, spatial distance and network efficiency are also discussed in this section. In order to further capture the dynamics of the system, this paper also explores the correlation between different measures, and investigates various interactions inside the network. Overall this study offers a novel approach to understanding the growth and evolution of real physical networks.

  3. Generating Artificial Plant Morphologies for Function and Aesthetics through Evolving L-Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veenstra, Frank; Faina, Andres; Støy, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Due to the replacement of natural flora and fauna with ur- ban environments, a significant part of the earth’s organisms that function as primary consumers have been dispelled. To compensate for the reduction in the amount of primary con- sumers, robotic systems that mimic plant-like organisms...... are interesting to mimic for their potential functional and aes- thetic value in urban environments. To investigate how to utilize plant developmental strategies in order to engender ur- ban artificial plants, we built a simple evolutionary model that applies an L-System based grammar as an abstraction of plant...

  4. Efficient computation of quasiperiodic oscillations in nonlinear systems with fast rotating parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schilder, Frank; Rübel, Jan; Starke, Jens

    2008-01-01

    We present a numerical method for the investigation of quasiperiodic oscillations in applications modeled by systems of ordinary differential equations. We focus on systems with parts that have a significant rotational speed. An important element of our approach is that it allows us to verify whe...

  5. SU-F-T-649: Dosimetric Evaluation of Non-Coplanar Arc Therapy Using a Novel Rotating Gamma Ray System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldib, A; Chibani, O; Jin, L; Fan, J; Veltchev, I; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal); Li, J [Cyber Medical Inc, Xian, Shaanxi (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic intra and extra-cranial body radiation therapy has evolved with advances in treatment accuracy, effective radiation dose, and parameters necessary to maximize machine capabilities. Novel gamma systems with a ring type gantry were developed having the ability to perform oblique arcs. The aim of this study is to explore the dosimetric advantages of this new system. Methods: The rotating Gamma system is named CybeRay (Cyber Medical Corp., Xian, China). It has a treatment head of 16 cobalt-60 sources focused to the isocenter, which can rotate 360° on the ring gantry and swing 35° in the superior direction. Treatment plans were generated utilizing our in-house Monte Carlo treatment planning system. A cylindrical phantom was modeled with 2mm voxel size. Dose inside the cylindrical phantom was calculated for coplanar and non-coplanar arcs. Dosimetric differences between CybeRay cobalt beams and CyberKnife 6MV beams were compared in a lung phantom and for previously treated SBRT patients. Results: The full width at half maxima of cross profiles in the S-I direction for the coplanar setup matched the cone sizes, while for the non-coplanar setup, FWHM was larger by 2mm for a 10mm cone and about 5mm for larger cones. In the coronal and sagittal view, coplanar beams showed elliptical shaped isodose lines, while non-coplanar beams showed circular isodose lines. Thus proper selection of the oblique angle and cone size can aid optimal dose matching to the target volume. Comparing a single 5mm cone from CybeRay to that from CyberKnife showed similar penumbra in a lung phantom but CybeRay had significant lower doses beyond lung tissues. Comparable treatment plans were obtained with CybeRay as that from CyberKnife.ConclusionThe noncoplanar multiple source arrangement of CybeRay will be of great clinical benefits for stereotactic intra and extra-cranial radiation therapy.

  6. Evolving Rule-Based Systems in two Medical Domains using Genetic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakonas, A.; Dounias, G.; Jantzen, Jan

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate, compare and discuss the application of two genetic programming methodologies for the construction of rule-based systems in two medical domains: the diagnosis of Aphasia's subtypes and the classification of Pap-Smear Test examinations. The first approach consists of a scheme...

  7. Using a Ternary Diagram to Display a System's Evolving Energy Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzle, Bob; Tapp, Anne

    2016-01-01

    A ternary diagram is a graphical representation used for systems with three components. They are familiar to mineralogists (who typically use them to categorize varieties of solid solution minerals such as feldspar) but are not yet widely used in the physics community. Last year the lead author began using ternary diagrams in his introductory…

  8. Deliberation in the Motor System: Reflex Gains Track Evolving Evidence Leading to a Decision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selen, L.P.J.; Shadlen, M.N.; Wolpert, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Both decision making and sensorimotor control require real-time processing of noisy information streams. Historically these processes were thought to operate sequentially: cognitive processing leads to a decision, and the outcome is passed to the motor system to be converted into action. Recently,

  9. EPIC 219217635: A Doubly Eclipsing Quadruple System Containing an Evolved Binary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkovits, T.; Albrecht, S.; Rappaport, S.

    2018-01-01

    We have discovered a doubly eclipsing, bound, quadruple star system in the field of K2 Campaign 7. EPIC 219217635 is a stellar image with Kp = 12.7 that contains an eclipsing binary (‘EB’) with PA = 3.59470 d and a second EB with PB = 0.61825 d. We have obtained followup radial-velocity (‘RV’) sp...

  10. Scientists' coping strategies in an evolving research system: the case of life scientists in the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morris, Norma; Rip, Arie

    2006-01-01

    Scientists in academia have struggled to adjust to a policy climate of uncertain funding and loss of freedom from direction and control. How UK life scientists have negotiated this challenge, and with what consequences for their research and the research system, is the empirical entrance point of

  11. Characteristics of steady vibration in a rotating hub-beam system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen; Liu, Caishan; Ma, Wei

    2016-02-01

    A rotating beam features a puzzling character in which its frequencies and modal shapes may vary with the hub's inertia and its rotating speed. To highlight the essential nature behind the vibration phenomena, we analyze the steady vibration of a rotating Euler-Bernoulli beam with a quasi-steady-state stretch. Newton's law is used to derive the equations governing the beam's elastic motion and the hub's rotation. A combination of these equations results in a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) that fully reflects the mutual interaction between the two kinds of motion. Via the Fourier series expansion within a finite interval of time, we reduce the PDE into an infinite system of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) in spatial domain. We further nondimensionalize the ODE and discretize it via a difference method. The frequencies and modal shapes of a general rotating beam are then determined numerically. For a low-speed beam where the ignorance of geometric stiffening is feasible, the beam's vibration characteristics are solved analytically. We validate our numerical method and the analytical solutions by comparing with either the past experiments or the past numerical findings reported in existing literature. Finally, systematic simulations are performed to demonstrate how the beam's eigenfrequencies vary with the hub's inertia and rotating speed.

  12. The Nano-X Linear Accelerator: A Compact and Economical Cancer Radiotherapy System Incorporating Patient Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslick, Enid M; Keall, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Rapid technological improvements in radiotherapy delivery results in improved outcomes to patients, yet current commercial systems with these technologies on board are costly. The aim of this study was to develop a state-of-the-art cancer radiotherapy system that is economical and space efficient fitting with current world demands. The Nano-X system is a compact design that is light weight combining a patient rotation system with a vertical 6 MV fixed beam. In this paper, we present the Nano-X system design configuration, an estimate of the system dimensions and its potential impact on shielding cost reductions. We provide an assessment of implementing such a radiotherapy system clinically, its advantages and disadvantages compared to a compact conventional gantry rotating linac. The Nano-X system has several differentiating features from current radiotherapy systems, it is [1] compact and therefore can fit into small vaults, [2] light weight, and [3] engineering efficient, i.e., it rotates a relatively light component and the main treatment delivery components are not under rotation (e.g., DMLCs). All these features can have an impact on reducing the costs of the system. In terms of shielding requirements, leakage radiation was found to be the dominant contributor to the Nano-X vault and as such no primary shielding was necessary. For a low leakage design, the Nano-X vault footprint and concrete volume required is 17 m2 and 35 m3 respectively, compared to 54 m2 and 102 m3 for a conventional compact linac vault, resulting in decreased costs in shielding. Key issues to be investigated in future work are the possible patient comfort concerns associated with the patient rotation system, as well as the magnitude of deformation and subsequent adaptation requirements. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Willow coppice systems in short rotation forestry: effects of plant spacing, rotation length and clonal composition on biomass production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willebrand, E.; Ledin, S.; Verwijst, T. (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research)

    1993-01-01

    Above ground biomass production was determined for ten Salix clones grown in pure and mixed stands at a square spacing of 1 m and seven rotation periods (1 to 6 and 8 years), and of one clone grown at four square spacings (0.5, 0.6, 0.7 and 1 m), with rotation cycles of 1 to 5 years. Most clones reached a maximum mean annual increment (8 to 14 tons dry matter ha[sup -1] yr[sup -1]) under a rotation period of 4 to 5 years. Densely spaced stands exhibited a higher production than wider spacings during the first harvests under the shortest rotation periods. Neither in later harvests of short cycles (1 to 3 years) nor in any harvests of longer cycles (> 3 years) did spacing affect biomass production. Some clones suffered from leaf rust and grazing by roe deer. Clone mixtures showed a higher biomass production in the later stages due to the compensatory effect of the successful clones which, when growing in mixtures, could fill out the gaps left by individuals that suffered from impacts other than competition. We conclude that extremely short rotations (1 to 2 years) are unsuitable for Swedish conditions, and that 4- to 6-year rotations perform best. In such longer rotations, biomass production of stands with 2 x 10[sup 4] plants per hectare equals the production of denser stands. (Author)

  14. Review on evolvement of systems of ionizing radiation quantities and units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Junzheng; Zeng Zhi

    2009-01-01

    To scientifically and practically measure the ionizing radiation in unison is an indispensable prerequisite and foundation for the extensive uses of nuclear science and technology, development of radiological protection and safety standards, as well as prevention and treatment of ionizing radiation hazards. Concerning about the quantities and units of ionizing radiation as well as their corresponding measurement and application methods, relevant international organizations and all countries in the world generally adopt the systems proposed by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) which is a well recognized and authoritative academic organization.In the paper,the major evolutions of the systems for ionizing radiation quantities and units in the past decades are summarized. (authors)

  15. Quantization of systems with temporally varying discretization. I. Evolving Hilbert spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höhn, Philipp A.

    2014-01-01

    A temporally varying discretization often features in discrete gravitational systems and appears in lattice field theory models subject to a coarse graining or refining dynamics. To better understand such discretization changing dynamics in the quantum theory, an according formalism for constrained variational discrete systems is constructed. While this paper focuses on global evolution moves and, for simplicity, restricts to flat configuration spaces R N , a Paper II [P. A. Höhn, “Quantization of systems with temporally varying discretization. II. Local evolution moves,” J. Math. Phys., e-print http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1401.7731 [gr-qc].] discusses local evolution moves. In order to link the covariant and canonical picture, the dynamics of the quantum states is generated by propagators which satisfy the canonical constraints and are constructed using the action and group averaging projectors. This projector formalism offers a systematic method for tracing and regularizing divergences in the resulting state sums. Non-trivial coarse graining evolution moves lead to non-unitary, and thus irreversible, projections of physical Hilbert spaces and Dirac observables such that these concepts become evolution move dependent on temporally varying discretizations. The formalism is illustrated in a toy model mimicking a “creation from nothing.” Subtleties arising when applying such a formalism to quantum gravity models are discussed

  16. Evolving the JET virtual reality system for delivering the JET EP2 shutdown remote handling tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.williams@oxfordtechnologies.co.uk [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sanders, Stephen [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Weder, Gerard [Tree-C Technology BV, Buys Ballotstraat 8, 6716 BL Ede (Netherlands); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bastow, Roger; Allan, Peter; Hazel, Stuart [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The quality, functionality and performance of the virtual reality (VR) system used at JET for preparation and implementation of remote handling (RH) operations has been progressively enhanced since its first use in the original JET remote handling shutdown in 1998. As preparation began for the JET EP2 (Enhanced Performance 2) shutdown it was recognised that the VR system being used was unable to cope with the increased functionality and the large number of 3D models needed to fully represent the JET in-vessel components and tooling planned for EP2. A bespoke VR software application was developed in collaboration with the OEM, which allowed enhancements to be made to the VR system to meet the requirements of JET remote handling in preparation for EP2. Performance improvements required to meet the challenges of EP2 could not be obtained from the development of the new VR software alone. New methodologies were also required to prepare source, CATIA models for use in the VR using a collection of 3D software packages. In collaboration with the JET drawing office, techniques were developed within CATIA using polygon reduction tools to reduce model size, while retaining surface detail at required user limits. This paper will discuss how these developments have played an essential part in facilitating EP2 remote handling task development and examine their impact during the EP2 shutdown.

  17. Evolving the JET virtual reality system for delivering the JET EP2 shutdown remote handling tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Adrian; Sanders, Stephen; Weder, Gerard; Bastow, Roger; Allan, Peter; Hazel, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The quality, functionality and performance of the virtual reality (VR) system used at JET for preparation and implementation of remote handling (RH) operations has been progressively enhanced since its first use in the original JET remote handling shutdown in 1998. As preparation began for the JET EP2 (Enhanced Performance 2) shutdown it was recognised that the VR system being used was unable to cope with the increased functionality and the large number of 3D models needed to fully represent the JET in-vessel components and tooling planned for EP2. A bespoke VR software application was developed in collaboration with the OEM, which allowed enhancements to be made to the VR system to meet the requirements of JET remote handling in preparation for EP2. Performance improvements required to meet the challenges of EP2 could not be obtained from the development of the new VR software alone. New methodologies were also required to prepare source, CATIA models for use in the VR using a collection of 3D software packages. In collaboration with the JET drawing office, techniques were developed within CATIA using polygon reduction tools to reduce model size, while retaining surface detail at required user limits. This paper will discuss how these developments have played an essential part in facilitating EP2 remote handling task development and examine their impact during the EP2 shutdown.

  18. An Experimental Framework for Generating Evolvable Chemical Systems in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, David A.; Vetsigian, Kalin

    2017-12-01

    Most experimental work on the origin of life has focused on either characterizing the chemical synthesis of particular biochemicals and their precursors or on designing simple chemical systems that manifest life-like properties such as self-propagation or adaptive evolution. Here we propose a new class of experiments, analogous to artificial ecosystem selection, where we select for spontaneously forming self-propagating chemical assemblages in the lab and then seek evidence of a response to that selection as a key indicator that life-like chemical systems have arisen. Since surfaces and surface metabolism likely played an important role in the origin of life, a key experimental challenge is to find conditions that foster nucleation and spread of chemical consortia on surfaces. We propose high-throughput screening of a diverse set of conditions in order to identify combinations of "food," energy sources, and mineral surfaces that foster the emergence of surface-associated chemical consortia that are capable of adaptive evolution. Identification of such systems would greatly advance our understanding of the emergence of self-propagating entities and the onset of adaptive evolution during the origin of life.

  19. Rotating target wheel system for super-heavy element production at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, J P; Falout, J; Janssens, R V F

    2004-01-01

    A new scattering chamber housing a large diameter rotating target wheel has been designed and constructed in front of the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) for the production of very heavy nuclei (Z greater than 100) using beams from the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS). In addition to the target and drive system, the chamber is extensively instrumented in order to monitor target performance and deterioration. Capabilities also exist to install rotating entrance and exit windows for gas cooling of the target within the scattering chamber. The design and initial tests are described.

  20. Methods Evolved by Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Montessori's idea of the child's nature and the teacher's perceptiveness begins with amazing simplicity, and when she speaks of "methods evolved," she is unveiling a methodological system for observation. She begins with the early childhood explosion into writing, which is a familiar child phenomenon that Montessori has written about…

  1. ''Fast track'' lunar NTR systems assessment for NASA's first lunar outpost and its evolvability to Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowski, S.K.; Alexander, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    Integrated systems and missions studies are presented for an evolutionary lunar-to-Mars space transportion system (STS) based on nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) technology. A ''standardized'' set of engine and stage components are identified and used in a ''building block'' fashion to configure a variety of piloted and cargo, lunar and Mars vehicles. The reference NTR characteristics include a thrust of 50 thousand pounds force (klbf), specific impulse (I sp ) of 900 seconds, and an engine thrust-to-weight ratio of 4.3. For the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) First Lunar Outpost (FLO) mission, an expendable NTR stage powered by two such engines can deliver ∼96 metric tonnes (t) to trans-lunar injection (TLI) conditions for an initial mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO) of ∼198 t compared to 250 t for a cryogenic chemical system. The stage liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) tank has a diameter, length, and capacity of 10 m, 14.5 m and 66 t, respectively. By extending the stage length and LH 2 capacity to ∼20 m and 96 t, a single launch Mars cargo vehicle could deliver to an elliptical Mars parking orbit a 63 t Mars excursion vehicle (MEV) with a 45 t surface payload. Three 50 klbf engines and the two standardized LH 2 tanks developed for the lunar and Mars cargo vehicles are used to configure the vehicles supporting piloted Mars missions as early as 2010. The ''modular'' NTR vehicle approach forms the basis for an efficient STS able to handle the needs of a wide spectrum of lunar and Mars missions

  2. Networks in biological systems: An investigation of the Gene Ontology as an evolving network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronnello, C; Tumminello, M; Micciche, S; Mantegna, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Many biological systems can be described as networks where different elements interact, in order to perform biological processes. We introduce a network associated with the Gene Ontology. Specifically, we construct a correlation-based network where the vertices are the terms of the Gene Ontology and the link between each two terms is weighted on the basis of the number of genes that they have in common. We analyze a filtered network obtained from the correlation-based network and we characterize its evolution over different releases of the Gene Ontology.

  3. Evaluate the effectiveness of job rotation system and its impact on employees' readiness for job rotation: Case study of: Maskan bank branches in the city of Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali-Mohammadi Farshid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of job rotation system and its impact on employees' readiness for organizational change in the Maskan bank branches in the city of Tabriz. For this purpose, the effectiveness of job rotation system is defined based on the theory of Nana Edom and employees' readiness for organizational change based on the theory of Dunham et al., as three main hypotheses have been developed. The statistical population includes employees of Maskan bank branches in the city of Tabriz, equal to 485 people. The sample estimated 214 employees by using the Cochrane formula and selection performed by stratified random sampling method. Data collection tool was two questionnaires: the effectiveness of job rotation system referred to Nana Edom and employees' readiness for organizational change by Dunham et al. After ensuring the validity and reliability, the questionnaire distributed among them. For statistical data analysis, descriptive and inferential statistical methods were used. Thus, for classifying, summarizing and describing statistical data, we used descriptive statistics methods, and to test hypotheses, t-test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, r Pearson and Spearman regression in SPSS software were used. The results show that the effectiveness of the job rotation system and employees' readiness for organizational change in the Maskan bank branches in the city of Tabriz level is higher than average. The results of this study show that the effectiveness of the job rotation system on employees' readiness for organizational change in the Maskan bank branches in the city of Tabriz is influential.

  4. Process improvement program evolves into compliance program at an integrated delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyk, R C; Hylton, P G

    1998-09-01

    An integrated delivery system discovered questionable practices when it undertook a process-improvement initiative for its revenue-to-cash cycle. These discoveries served as a wake-up call to the organization that it needed to develop a comprehensive corporate compliance program. The organization engaged legal counsel to help it establish such a program. A corporate compliance officer was hired, and a compliance committee was set up. They worked with counsel to develop the structure and substance of the program and establish a corporate code of conduct that became a part of the organization's policies and procedures. Teams were formed in various areas of the organization to review compliance-related activities and suggest improvements. Clinical and nonclinical staff attended mandatory educational sessions about the program. By approaching compliance systematically, the organization has put itself in an excellent position to avoid fraudulent and abusive activities- and the government scrutiny they invite.

  5. Evolving hydrologic connectivity in discontinuous permafrost lowlands: what it means for lake systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walvoord, M. A.; Jepsen, S. M.; Rover, J.; Voss, C. I.; Briggs, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Permafrost influence on the hydrologic connectivity of surface water bodies in high-latitude lowlands is complicated by subsurface heterogeneity and the propensity of the system to change over time. In general, permafrost limits the subsurface exchange of water, solute, and nutrients between lakes and rivers. It follows that permafrost thaw could enhance subsurface hydrologic connectivity among surface water bodies, but the impact of this process on lake distribution is not well known. Changes in the extent of lakes in interior Alaska have important ecological and societal impacts since lakes provide (1) critical habitat for migratory arctic shorebirds and waterfowl, fish, and wildlife, and (2) provisional, recreational, and cultural resources for local communities. We utilize electromagnetic imaging of the shallow subsurface and remote sensing of lake level dynamics in the Yukon Flats of interior Alaska, USA, together with water balance modeling, to gain insight into the influence of discontinuous permafrost on lowland lake systems. In the study region with relatively low precipitation, observations suggest that lakes that are hydrologically isolated during normal conditions are sustained by periodic river flooding events, including ice-jam floods that occur during river ice break-up. Climatically-influenced alterations in flooding frequency and intensity, as well as depth to permafrost, are quantitatively assessed in the context of lake maintenance. Scenario modeling is used to evaluate lake level evolution under plausible changing conditions. Model results demonstrate how permafrost degradation can reduce the dependence of typical lowland lakes on flooding events. Study results also suggest that river flooding may recharge a more spatially widespread zone of lakes and wetlands under future scenarios of permafrost table deepening and enhanced subsurface hydrologic connectivity.

  6. Self locking drive system for rotating plug of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brubaker, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    A self locking drive system for rotating the plugs on the head of a nuclear reactor which is able to restrain plug motion if a seismic event whould occur during reactor refueling is described. A servomotor is engaged via a gear train and a bull gear to the plug. Connected to the gear train is a feedback control system which allows the motor to rotate the plug to predetermined locations for refueling of the reactor. The gear train contains a self locking double enveloping worm gear set. The worm gear set is utilized for its self locking nature to prevent unwanted rotation of the plugs as the result of an earthquake. The double enveloping type is used because its unique contour spreads the load across several teeth providing added strength and allowing the use of a conventional size worm

  7. Where The Money Goes: The Evolving Expenses Of The US Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glied, Sherry; Ma, Stephanie; Solis-Roman, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    National health care expenditures constitute revenue to the health care system. However, little is known about how this revenue is distributed across sectors. This article calculates revenues and detailed expenditures for physicians' offices, hospitals, and outpatient care centers in 1997, 2002, 2007, and 2012, using a range of Census Bureau and Bureau of Labor Statistics sources. Between 1997 and 2012, spending on these three sectors rose by $580 billion, and employment rose by 1.7 million people. Just under half of all 2012 revenues were spent on labor compensation. The labor compensation share of spending declined slightly; within these sectors, the share of compensation paid to physicians and nurses increased. Although employment of nonprofessional labor grew during the study period, this group did not account for much of the sector's increased spending. The plurality of the 1997-2012 spending increase went to producers of purchased materials and services, which now account for more than one-third of payments. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  8. Endogenous retroviruses of sheep: a model system for understanding physiological adaptation to an evolving ruminant genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas E; Palmarini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are present in the genome of all vertebrates and are remnants of ancient exogenous retroviral infections of the host germline transmitted vertically from generation to generation. Sheep betaretroviruses offer a unique model system to study the complex interaction between retroviruses and their host. The sheep genome contains 27 endogenous betaretroviruses (enJSRVs) related to the exogenous and pathogenic Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), the causative agent of a transmissible lung cancer in sheep. The enJSRVs can protect their host against JSRV infection by blocking early and late steps of the JSRV replication cycle. In the female reproductive tract, enJSRVs are specifically expressed in the uterine luminal and glandular epithelia as well as in the conceptus (embryo and associated extraembryonic membranes) trophectoderm and in utero loss-of-function experiments found the enJSRVs envelope (env) to be essential for conceptus elongation and trophectoderm growth and development. Collectively, available evidence in sheep and other mammals indicate that ERVs coevolved with their hosts for millions of years and were positively selected for biological roles in genome plasticity and evolution, protection of the host against infection of related pathogenic and exogenous retroviruses, and placental development.

  9. Charting a path forward: policy analysis of China's evolved DRG-based hospital payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Shi, Jianwei; Yang, Beilei; Jin, Chunlin; Sun, Pengfei; Wu, Lingfang; Yu, Dehua; Xiong, Linping; Wang, Zhaoxin

    2017-09-01

    At present, the diagnosis-related groups-based prospective payment system (DRG-PPS) that has been implemented in China is merely a prototype called the simplified DRG-PPS, which is known as the 'ceiling price for a single disease'. Given that studies on the effects of a simplified DRG-PPS in China have usually been controversial, we aim to synthesize evidence examining whether DRGs can reduce medical costs and length of stay (LOS) in China. Data were searched from both Chinese [Wan Fang and China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI)] and international databases (Web of Science and PubMed), as well as the official websites of Chinese health departments in the 2004-2016 period. Only studies with a design that included both experimental (with DRG-PPS implementation) and control groups (without DRG-PPS implementation) were included in the review. The studies were based on inpatient samples from public hospitals distributed in 12 provinces of mainland China. Among them, 80.95% (17/21) revealed that hospitalization costs could be reduced significantly, and 50.00% (8/16) indicated that length of stay could be decreased significantly. In addition, the government reports showed the enormous differences in pricing standards and LOS in various provinces, even for the same disease. We conclude that the simplified DRGs are useful in controlling hospitalization costs, but they fail to reduce LOS. Much work remains to be done in China to improve the simplified DRG-PPS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. An imaging method of wavefront coding system based on phase plate rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Rigui; Chen, Xi; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2018-01-01

    Wave-front coding has a great prospect in extending the depth of the optical imaging system and reducing optical aberrations, but the image quality and noise performance are inevitably reduced. According to the theoretical analysis of the wave-front coding system and the phase function expression of the cubic phase plate, this paper analyzed and utilized the feature that the phase function expression would be invariant in the new coordinate system when the phase plate rotates at different angles around the z-axis, and we proposed a method based on the rotation of the phase plate and image fusion. First, let the phase plate rotated at a certain angle around the z-axis, the shape and distribution of the PSF obtained on the image surface remain unchanged, the rotation angle and direction are consistent with the rotation angle of the phase plate. Then, the middle blurred image is filtered by the point spread function of the rotation adjustment. Finally, the reconstruction images were fused by the method of the Laplacian pyramid image fusion and the Fourier transform spectrum fusion method, and the results were evaluated subjectively and objectively. In this paper, we used Matlab to simulate the images. By using the Laplacian pyramid image fusion method, the signal-to-noise ratio of the image is increased by 19% 27%, the clarity is increased by 11% 15% , and the average gradient is increased by 4% 9% . By using the Fourier transform spectrum fusion method, the signal-to-noise ratio of the image is increased by 14% 23%, the clarity is increased by 6% 11% , and the average gradient is improved by 2% 6%. The experimental results show that the image processing by the above method can improve the quality of the restored image, improving the image clarity, and can effectively preserve the image information.

  11. Equations of motion for free-flight systems of rotating-translating bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodapp, A.E. Jr.

    1976-09-01

    General vector differential equations of motion are developed for a system of rotating-translating, unbalanced, constant mass bodies. Complete flexibility is provided in placement of the reference coordinates within the system of bodies and in placement of body fixed axes within each body. Example cases are presented to demonstrate the ease in reduction of these equations to the equations of motion for systems of interest

  12. PI and repetitive control for single phase inverter based on virtual rotating coordinate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengqi; Tong, Yibin; Jiang, Jiuchun; Liang, Jiangang

    2018-03-01

    Microgrid technology developed rapidly and nonlinear loads were connected increasingly. A new control strategy was proposed for single phase inverter when connected nonlinear loads under island condition. PI and repetitive compound controller was realized under synchronous rotating coordinate system and acquired high quality sinusoidal voltage output without voltage spike when loads step changed. Validity and correctness were verified by simulation using MATLAB/Simulink.

  13. Rotating light ion beam-plasma system in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, H.; Okada, T.

    1997-01-01

    The stabilizing mechanism of filamentation instability in light ion beam propagation is studied numerically by using a particle-in-cell code. Rotating light ion beam scheme has been proposed for the light ion beam propagation. The filamentation instability is stabilized by the external magnetic field which is induced by the rotating light ion beams. From a dispersion relation, linear growth rates of filamentation instabilities are obtained in a light ion beam-plasma system with an external magnetic field. The theory and simulation comparisons illustrate the results. (author)

  14. Noise test system of rotating machinery in nuclear power station based on microphone array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xincai; Guan, Jishi; Qi, Liangcai

    2017-12-01

    Rotating machinery plays an important role in all walks of life. Once the equipment fails, equipment maintenance and shutdown will cause great social harm and economic losses. Equipment safety operations at nuclear power stations have always been of top priority. It is prone to noise when the equipment is out of order or aging. Failure to find or develop equipment at the initial stage of equipment failure or ageing will pose a serious threat to the safety of the plant’s equipment. In this paper, sound imaging diagnosis technology is applied as a supplementary method to the condition monitoring and diagnosis system of rotating machinery in nuclear power stations. It provides a powerful guarantee for the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotating machinery in nuclear power stations.

  15. Advanced Wastewater Treatment Engineering—Investigating Membrane Fouling in both Rotational and Static Membrane Bioreactor Systems Using Empirical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced wastewater treatment using membranes are popular environmental system processes since they allow reuse and recycling. However, fouling is a key limiting factor and so proprietary systems such as Avanti’s RPU-185 Flexidisks membrane bioreactor (MBR use novel rotating membranes to assist in ameliorating it. In earlier research, this rotating process was studied by creating a simulation model based on first principles and traditional fouling mechanisms. In order to directly compare the potential benefits of this rotational system, this follow-up study was carried out using Avanti’s newly developed static (non-rotating Flexidisks MBR system. The results from operating the static pilot unit were simulated and modelled using the rotational fouling model developed earlier however with rotational switching functions turned off and rotational parameters set to a static mode. The study concluded that a rotating MBR system could increase flux throughput when compared against a similar static system. It is thought that although the slowly rotating spindle induces a weak crossflow shear, it is still able to even out cake build up across the membrane surface, thus reducing the likelihood of localised critical flux being exceeded at the micro level and lessening the potential of rapid trans-membrane pressure increases at the macro level.

  16. Detection Thresholds for Rotation and Translation Gains in 360° Video-Based Telepresence Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingxin; Langbehn, Eike; Krupke, Dennis; Katzakis, Nicholas; Steinicke, Frank

    2018-04-01

    Telepresence systems have the potential to overcome limits and distance constraints of the real-world by enabling people to remotely visit and interact with each other. However, current telepresence systems usually lack natural ways of supporting interaction and exploration of remote environments (REs). In particular, single webcams for capturing the RE provide only a limited illusion of spatial presence, and movement control of mobile platforms in today's telepresence systems are often restricted to simple interaction devices. One of the main challenges of telepresence systems is to allow users to explore a RE in an immersive, intuitive and natural way, e.g., by real walking in the user's local environment (LE), and thus controlling motions of the robot platform in the RE. However, the LE in which the user's motions are tracked usually provides a much smaller interaction space than the RE. In this context, redirected walking (RDW) is a very suitable approach to solve this problem. However, so far there is no previous work, which explored if and how RDW can be used in video-based 360° telepresence systems. In this article, we conducted two psychophysical experiments in which we have quantified how much humans can be unknowingly redirected on virtual paths in the RE, which are different from the physical paths that they actually walk in the LE. Experiment 1 introduces a discrimination task between local and remote translations, and in Experiment 2 we analyzed the discrimination between local and remote rotations. In Experiment 1 participants performed straightforward translations in the LE that were mapped to straightforward translations in the RE shown as 360° videos, which were manipulated by different gains. Then, participants had to estimate if the remotely perceived translation was faster or slower than the actual physically performed translation. Similarly, in Experiment 2 participants performed rotations in the LE that were mapped to the virtual rotations

  17. An out-of-plane rotational energy harvesting system for low frequency environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Febbo, M.; Machado, S.P.; Gatti, C.D.; Ramirez, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An alternative to cantilever beam-type systems for energy harvesting is proposed. • The device generates energy in a low frequency rotational environment. • It comprises two beams, a spring and two heavy masses joined by the spring. • By varying the flexibility of one beam, the device increments output DC power. • The generated DC power suffices to feed low power wireless transmitters. - Abstract: We present a novel design of a rotational power scavenging system as an alternative to cantilever beams attached to a hub. The device is meant to provide energy to wireless autonomous monitoring systems in low frequency environments such as wind turbines of 30 kW with rotational speeds of between 50 and 150 rpm. These characteristics define the bandwidth of the rotational energy harvesting system (REH) and its physical dimensions. A versatile geometric configuration with two elastic beams and two heavy masses joined by a spring is proposed. A piezoelectric sheet is mounted on the primary beam while the REH is placed on a rotating hub with the gravitational force acting as a periodic source. This kind of double-beam system offers the possibility to modify the vibration characteristics of the harvester for achieving high power density. An analytical framework using the Lagrangian formulation is derived to describe the motion of the system and the voltage output as a function of rotation speed. Several sets of experiments were performed to characterize the system and to validate the assumed hypothesis. In the experimental setup, a wireless data acquisition system based on Arduino technology was implemented to avoid slip-ring mechanisms. The results show very good agreement between the theoretical and experimental tests. Moreover, the output power of a simple harvesting circuit, which serves as an energy storage device, yields values ranging 26–105 μW over the whole frequency range. This allows us to use the proposed device for the designed purpose

  18. Seismic Evidence for Conjugate Slip and Block Rotation Within the San Andreas Fault System, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Craig; Seeber, Leonardo; Williams, Patrick; Sykes, Lynn R.

    1986-08-01

    The pattern of seismicity in southern California indicates that much of the activity is presently occurring on secondary structures, several of which are oriented nearly orthogonal to the strikes of the major through-going faults. Slip along these secondary transverse features is predominantly left-lateral and is consistent with the reactivation of conjugate faults by the current regional stress field. Near the intersection of the San Jacinto and San Andreas faults, however, these active left-lateral faults appear to define a set of small crustal blocks, which in conjunction with both normal and reverse faulting earthquakes, suggests contemporary clockwise rotation as a result of regional right-lateral shear. Other left-lateral faults representing additional rotating block systems are identified in adjacent areas from geologic and seismologic data. Many of these structures predate the modern San Andreas system and may control the pattern of strain accumulation in southern California. Geodetic and paleomagnetic evidence confirm that block rotation by strike-slip faulting is nearly ubiquitous, particularly in areas where shear is distributed, and that it accommodates both short-term elastic and long-term nonelastic strain. A rotating block model accounts for a number of structural styles characteristic of strike-slip deformation in California, including: variable slip rates and alternating transtensional and transpressional features observed along strike of major wrench faults; domains of evenly-spaced antithetic faults that terminate against major fault boundaries; continued development of bends in faults with large lateral displacements; anomalous focal mechanisms; and differential uplift in areas otherwise expected to experience extension and subsidence. Since block rotation requires a detachment surface at depth to permit rotational movement, low-angle structures like detachments, of either local or regional extent, may be involved in the contemporary strike

  19. Development of a hemispherical rotational modulation collimator system for imaging spatial distribution of radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, M.; Lee, S.; Kim, G.; Kim, H. S.; Rho, J.; Ok, J. G.

    2017-12-01

    Detecting and mapping the spatial distribution of radioactive materials is of great importance for environmental and security issues. We design and present a novel hemispherical rotational modulation collimator (H-RMC) system which can visualize the location of the radiation source by collecting signals from incident rays that go through collimator masks. The H-RMC system comprises a servo motor-controlled rotating module and a hollow heavy-metallic hemisphere with slits/slats equally spaced with the same angle subtended from the main axis. In addition, we also designed an auxiliary instrument to test the imaging performance of the H-RMC system, comprising a high-precision x- and y-axis staging station on which one can mount radiation sources of various shapes. We fabricated the H-RMC system which can be operated in a fully-automated fashion through the computer-based controller, and verify the accuracy and reproducibility of the system by measuring the rotational and linear positions with respect to the programmed values. Our H-RMC system may provide a pivotal tool for spatial radiation imaging with high reliability and accuracy.

  20. Construction of a Vibration Monitoring System for HANARO's Rotating Machinery and Analysis of Pump Vibration Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Soo; Yoon, Doo Byung

    2005-01-01

    HANARO is an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor with a thermal power of 30MW. In order to remove the heat generated by the reactor core and the reflector vessel, primary cooling pumps and reflector cooling pumps circulate coolant. These pumps are installed at the RCI(Reactor Concrete Island) which is covered by heavy concrete hatches. For the prevention of an abnormal operation of these pumps in the RCI, it is necessary to construct a vibration monitoring system that provides an alarm signal to the reactor control room when the rotating speed or the vibration level exceeds the allowable limit. The first objective of this work is to construct a vibration monitoring system for HANARO's rotating machinery. The second objective is to verify the possibility of condition monitoring of the rotating machinery. To construct a vibration monitoring system, as a first step, the standards and references related to the vibration monitoring system were investigated. In addition, to determine the number and the location of sensors that can effectively characterize the overall vibration of a pump, the vibration of the primary cooling pumps and the reflector cooling pumps were measured. Based on these results, detailed construction plans for the vibration monitoring system for HANARO were established. Then, in accordance with the construction plans, the vibration monitoring system for HANARO's rotating machinery was manufactured and installed at HANARO. To achieve the second objective, FFT analysis and bearing fault detection of the measured vibration signals were performed. The analysis results demonstrate that the accelerometers mounted at the bearing locations of the pumps can effectively monitor the pump condition

  1. Evolving African attitudes to European education: Resistance, pervert effects of the single system paradox, and the ubuntu framework for renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assié-Lumumba, N'Dri Thérèse

    2016-02-01

    This paper is a reflection that critically examines the dynamics of education and the struggle by African people for freedom, control of the mind, self-definition and the right to determine their own destiny from the start of colonial rule to the present. The primary methodological approach is historical structuralism, which stipulates that social reality and facts are determined and created by social agents within structural and historical contingencies. It addresses some of the most powerful challenges and contradictions that explain the ineffectiveness of numerous post-independence reforms, and presents the arguments for relevance and use of African languages, for instance, that have been made since the 1960s. The first section of the paper deals with the colonial imperatives for setting new education systems in the colonised societies of Africa and the initial attitudes of the Africans towards colonial education. The second section critically examines the evolving meanings of Western education in Europeanising African societies, the articulation of their rationale and the mechanism for resistance. It analyses the turning point when Africans began to embrace European education and demand it in the colonial and post-independence era. The third section addresses the roots of the inadequacies of received post-colonial education and the imperative of deconstruction and re-appropriation of African education using an ubuntu framework for an African renewal.

  2. Systems Analysis of In-Space Manufacturing Applications for the International Space Station and the Evolvable Mars Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Andrew C.; De Weck, Olivier L.

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance logistics support is a significant challenge for extended human operations in space, especially for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). For missions to Mars (such as NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC)), where timely resupply or abort in the event of emergency will not be possible, maintenance logistics mass is directly linked to the Probability of Loss of Crew (P(LoC)), and the cost of driving down risk is an exponential increase in mass requirements. The logistics support strategies that have maintained human operations in LEO will not be effective for these deep space missions. In-Space Manufacturing (ISM) is a promising technological solution that could reduce logistics requirements, mitigate risks, and augment operational capabilities, enabling Earth- independent human spaceflight. This paper reviews maintenance logistics challenges for spaceflight operations in LEO and beyond, and presents a summary of selected results from a systems analysis of potential ISM applications for the ISS and EMC. A quantitative modeling framework and sample assessment of maintenance logistics and risk reduction potential of this new technology is also presented and discussed.

  3. Misalignment calibration of geomagnetic vector measurement system using parallelepiped frame rotation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Hongfeng; Zhu, XueJun; Pan, Mengchun; Zhang, Qi; Wan, Chengbiao; Luo, Shitu; Chen, Dixiang; Chen, Jinfei; Li, Ji; Lv, Yunxiao

    2016-01-01

    Misalignment error is one key factor influencing the measurement accuracy of geomagnetic vector measurement system, which should be calibrated with the difficulties that sensors measure different physical information and coordinates are invisible. A new misalignment calibration method by rotating a parallelepiped frame is proposed. Simulation and experiment result show the effectiveness of calibration method. The experimental system mainly contains DM-050 three-axis fluxgate magnetometer, INS (inertia navigation system), aluminium parallelepiped frame, aluminium plane base. Misalignment angles are calculated by measured data of magnetometer and INS after rotating the aluminium parallelepiped frame on aluminium plane base. After calibration, RMS error of geomagnetic north, vertical and east are reduced from 349.441 nT, 392.530 nT and 562.316 nT to 40.130 nT, 91.586 nT and 141.989 nT respectively. - Highlights: • A new misalignment calibration method by rotating a parallelepiped frame is proposed. • It does not need to know sensor attitude information or local dip angle. • The calibration system attitude change angle is not strictly required. • It can be widely used when sensors measure different physical information. • Geomagnetic vector measurement error is reduced evidently.

  4. Misalignment calibration of geomagnetic vector measurement system using parallelepiped frame rotation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Hongfeng [Academy of Equipment, Beijing 101416 (China); College of Mechatronics Engineering and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhu, XueJun, E-mail: zhuxuejun1990@126.com [College of Mechatronics Engineering and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Pan, Mengchun; Zhang, Qi; Wan, Chengbiao; Luo, Shitu; Chen, Dixiang; Chen, Jinfei; Li, Ji; Lv, Yunxiao [College of Mechatronics Engineering and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Misalignment error is one key factor influencing the measurement accuracy of geomagnetic vector measurement system, which should be calibrated with the difficulties that sensors measure different physical information and coordinates are invisible. A new misalignment calibration method by rotating a parallelepiped frame is proposed. Simulation and experiment result show the effectiveness of calibration method. The experimental system mainly contains DM-050 three-axis fluxgate magnetometer, INS (inertia navigation system), aluminium parallelepiped frame, aluminium plane base. Misalignment angles are calculated by measured data of magnetometer and INS after rotating the aluminium parallelepiped frame on aluminium plane base. After calibration, RMS error of geomagnetic north, vertical and east are reduced from 349.441 nT, 392.530 nT and 562.316 nT to 40.130 nT, 91.586 nT and 141.989 nT respectively. - Highlights: • A new misalignment calibration method by rotating a parallelepiped frame is proposed. • It does not need to know sensor attitude information or local dip angle. • The calibration system attitude change angle is not strictly required. • It can be widely used when sensors measure different physical information. • Geomagnetic vector measurement error is reduced evidently.

  5. An Improved Calibration Method for a Rotating 2D LIDAR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadan Zeng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved calibration method of a rotating two-dimensional light detection and ranging (R2D-LIDAR system, which can obtain the 3D scanning map of the surroundings. The proposed R2D-LIDAR system, composed of a 2D LIDAR and a rotating unit, is pervasively used in the field of robotics owing to its low cost and dense scanning data. Nevertheless, the R2D-LIDAR system must be calibrated before building the geometric model because there are assembled deviation and abrasion between the 2D LIDAR and the rotating unit. Hence, the calibration procedures should contain both the adjustment between the two devices and the bias of 2D LIDAR itself. The main purpose of this work is to resolve the 2D LIDAR bias issue with a flat plane based on the Levenberg–Marquardt (LM algorithm. Experimental results for the calibration of the R2D-LIDAR system prove the reliability of this strategy to accurately estimate sensor offsets with the error range from −15 mm to 15 mm for the performance of capturing scans.

  6. An Improved Calibration Method for a Rotating 2D LIDAR System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yadan; Yu, Heng; Dai, Houde; Song, Shuang; Lin, Mingqiang; Sun, Bo; Jiang, Wei; Meng, Max Q-H

    2018-02-07

    This paper presents an improved calibration method of a rotating two-dimensional light detection and ranging (R2D-LIDAR) system, which can obtain the 3D scanning map of the surroundings. The proposed R2D-LIDAR system, composed of a 2D LIDAR and a rotating unit, is pervasively used in the field of robotics owing to its low cost and dense scanning data. Nevertheless, the R2D-LIDAR system must be calibrated before building the geometric model because there are assembled deviation and abrasion between the 2D LIDAR and the rotating unit. Hence, the calibration procedures should contain both the adjustment between the two devices and the bias of 2D LIDAR itself. The main purpose of this work is to resolve the 2D LIDAR bias issue with a flat plane based on the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. Experimental results for the calibration of the R2D-LIDAR system prove the reliability of this strategy to accurately estimate sensor offsets with the error range from -15 mm to 15 mm for the performance of capturing scans.

  7. A control system for and a method of controlling a superconductive rotating electrical machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of controlling and a control system (100) for a superconductive rotating electric machine (200) comprising at least one superconductive winding (102; 103), where the control system (100) is adapted to control a power unit (101) supplying during use the at least...... or more actual values (110, 111)of one or more parameters for a given superconductive winding (102; 103), each parameter representing a physical condition of the given superconductive winding (102; 103), and to dynamically derive one or more electrical current values to be maintained in the given...... superconductive winding (102; 103) by the power unit (101) where the one or more electrical current values is/are derived taking into account the received one or more actual values (110, 111). In this way,greater flexibility and more precise control of the performance of the superconducting rotating electrical...

  8. Analysis of Effects of Organizational Behavior on Evolving System of Systems Acquisition Programs Through Agent Based Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    function is based on how individualistic or collectivistic a system is. Low individualism values mean the system is more collective and is less likely...Hofstede’s cultural dimensions, integrated with a modified version of the Bak- Sneppen biological evolutionary model, this research highlights which set...14 Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions

  9. Testing of the line element of special relativity with rotating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Jose G.; Torr, Douglas G.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments with rotating systems are examined from the point of view of a test theory of the Lorentz transformations (LTs), permitting, in principle, the verification of the simultaneity relation. The significance of the experiments involved in the testing of the LTs can be determined using Robertson's test theory (RTT). A revised RTT is discussed, and attention is given to the Ehrenfest paradox in connection with the testing of the LTs.

  10. Test of rotating wheel system for measuring correlated α-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaolei; Gan Zaiguo; Guo Junsheng; Fan Hongmei; Qin Zhi

    2005-01-01

    A rotating-wheel set-up used for measuring and studying the heavy nuclei with α-decay was built. This system was tested experimentally by using ion-beam from SFC. The test results prove that this set-up was useful and reliable. It provides simple and effective equipment and technique to synthesize and identify new nuclides of Z=107 in the near future. (authors)

  11. M-dwarf rapid rotators and the detection of relatively young multiple M-star systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappaport, S.; Joss, M.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.

    2014-01-01

    We have searched the Kepler light curves of ∼3900 M-star targets for evidence of periodicities that indicate, by means of the effects of starspots, rapid stellar rotation. Several analysis techniques, including Fourier transforms, inspection of folded light curves, 'sonograms', and phase tracking of individual modulation cycles, were applied in order to distinguish the periodicities due to rapid rotation from those due to stellar pulsations, eclipsing binaries, or transiting planets. We find 178 Kepler M-star targets with rotation periods, P rot , of <2 days, and 110 with P rot < 1 day. Some 30 of the 178 systems exhibit two or more independent short periods within the same Kepler photometric aperture, while several have 3 or more short periods. Adaptive optics imaging and modeling of the Kepler pixel response function for a subset of our sample support the conclusion that the targets with multiple periods are highly likely to be relatively young physical binary, triple, and even quadruple M star systems. We explore in detail the one object with four incommensurate periods all less than 1.2 days, and show that two of the periods arise from one of a close pair of stars, while the other two arise from the second star, which itself is probably a visual binary. If most of these M-star systems with multiple periods turn out to be bound M stars, this could prove a valuable way discovering young hierarchical M-star systems; the same approach may also be applicable to G and K stars. The ∼5% occurrence rate of rapid rotation among the ∼3900 M star targets is consistent with spin evolution models that include an initial contraction phase followed by magnetic braking, wherein a typical M star can spend several hundred Myr before spinning down to periods longer than 2 days.

  12. A dissipative model of solar system and stability of stationary rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilke, V. G.

    2009-04-01

    In classical model of Solar system the planets are represented by the material points cooperating under the law of universal gravitation. This model remains fair if planet to consider as absolutely rigid spheres with spherical distribution of density. The gravitational potential of such body coincides with potential of a material point, and rotation of each sphere concerning his centre of mass occurs to constant angular velocity. The motion of the centers of mass of spherical planets identically to motion in the appropriate problem of points. Let's notice, that forms of planets of Solar system are close to spherical as dominant forces at formation of planets are gravitational forces to which forces of molecular interaction in substance of a planet counteract. The model of the isolated Solar system submitted in a not indignant condition by homogeneous viscoelastic spheres is considered. Under action of own rotation and tidal gravitational forces the spherical planet changes the shape: there is "flattening" of a planet in a direction of a vector of its angular velocity and formation of tidal bulgs on the lines connecting the centre of a planet with the centers of other planets. From a variational principle of Hamilton the full system of the equations describing movements of the centers of mass of planets, rotations of systems of coordinates, by integrated image connected with planets, and deformations of planets be relative these of systems of coordinates has been obtained. It is supposed, that tidal gravitational, centrifugal and elastic forces result in small change of the spherical form of a planet. In system there are small parameters - inversely proportional of the Young modules of materials of the planets, providing small deformations of planets at influence on them of the centrifugal forces produced by own rotation of planets, and the small tidal deformations arising under influence of gradients of gravitational forces. The method of division of movements

  13. The AmeriFlux data activity and data system: an evolving collection of data management techniques, tools, products and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, T. A.; Krassovski, M.; Yang, B.

    2013-06-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the US Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Among the many data archived and available from CDIAC are collections from long-term measurement projects. One current example is the AmeriFlux measurement network. AmeriFlux provides continuous measurements from forests, grasslands, wetlands, and croplands in North, Central, and South America and offers important insight about carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. To successfully manage AmeriFlux data and support climate change research, CDIAC has designed flexible data systems using proven technologies and standards blended with new, evolving technologies and standards. The AmeriFlux data system, comprised primarily of a relational database, a PHP-based data interface and a FTP server, offers a broad suite of AmeriFlux data. The data interface allows users to query the AmeriFlux collection in a variety of ways and then subset, visualize and download the data. From the perspective of data stewardship, on the other hand, this system is designed for CDIAC to easily control database content, automate data movement, track data provenance, manage metadata content, and handle frequent additions and corrections. CDIAC and researchers in the flux community developed data submission guidelines to enhance the AmeriFlux data collection, enable automated data processing, and promote standardization across regional networks. Both continuous flux and meteorological data and irregular biological data collected at AmeriFlux sites are carefully scrutinized by CDIAC using established quality-control algorithms before the data are ingested into the AmeriFlux data system. Other tasks at CDIAC include reformatting and standardizing the diverse and heterogeneous datasets received from individual sites into a uniform and consistent network database

  14. The AmeriFlux data activity and data system: an evolving collection of data management techniques, tools, products and services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Boden

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, USA has provided scientific data management support for the US Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Among the many data archived and available from CDIAC are collections from long-term measurement projects. One current example is the AmeriFlux measurement network. AmeriFlux provides continuous measurements from forests, grasslands, wetlands, and croplands in North, Central, and South America and offers important insight about carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. To successfully manage AmeriFlux data and support climate change research, CDIAC has designed flexible data systems using proven technologies and standards blended with new, evolving technologies and standards. The AmeriFlux data system, comprised primarily of a relational database, a PHP-based data interface and a FTP server, offers a broad suite of AmeriFlux data. The data interface allows users to query the AmeriFlux collection in a variety of ways and then subset, visualize and download the data. From the perspective of data stewardship, on the other hand, this system is designed for CDIAC to easily control database content, automate data movement, track data provenance, manage metadata content, and handle frequent additions and corrections. CDIAC and researchers in the flux community developed data submission guidelines to enhance the AmeriFlux data collection, enable automated data processing, and promote standardization across regional networks. Both continuous flux and meteorological data and irregular biological data collected at AmeriFlux sites are carefully scrutinized by CDIAC using established quality-control algorithms before the data are ingested into the AmeriFlux data system. Other tasks at CDIAC include reformatting and standardizing the diverse and heterogeneous datasets received from individual sites into a uniform and consistent

  15. Soil Labile Organic Matter under Long-term Crop Rotation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saljnikov, E.

    2009-04-01

    Temperate grassland soils, typically Mollisols, have remained agriculturally productive with limited inputs for many years, despite the mining of energy and nutrients reserves contained within the soil organic fraction (Janzen, 1987; Tiessen et al., 1994). Such system can be considered resilient, at least initially, but one must question for how long such systems can be sustained. Effect of long-term land-use on biologically active fractions of soil organic matter is not well understood. Investigations were conducted in more than 40-year static experiments in northern Kazakhstan. We examined five fallow-wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cropping systems with different frequencies of the fallow phase: continuous wheat (CW), 6-y rotation (6R), 4-y rotation (4R), 2-y rotation (2R) and continuous fallow (CF). A unique sample from nationally protected virgin steppe near the experimental field was sampled for comparison with long-term cultivated soils. Soil samples were collected from the two phases of each rotation, pre- and post-fallow, and analyzed for biological soil properties that are potentially mineralizable C (PMC), potentially mineralizable N (PMN), microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN) and "light fraction" C (LFC) and N (LFN). Potentially mineralizable C was inversely proportional to the frequency of fallow and was highest in CW. Potentially mineralizable N was more responsive to rotation phase than other indices of SOM. Light fraction OM was negatively correlated to the frequency of fallow and was higher in pre-fallow than in post-fallow phases. All studied biological characteristics were drastically greater in the soil from the natural steppe. The results suggested that the yearly input of plant residues in a less frequently fallowed system built up more PMC, whereas PMN was closely correlated to recent inputs of substrate added as plant residue. We concluded that a frequent fallowing for long period may deplete SOM via accelerated mineralization. The results may

  16. Rotating cell for in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of photosensitive redox systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavan, Ladislav; Janda, Pavel; Krause, Matthias; Ziegs, Frank; Dunsch, Lothar

    2009-03-01

    A recently developed rotating spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ Raman spectroscopic studies of photoreactive compounds without marked decomposition of the sample is presented. Photochemically and thermally sensitive redox systems are difficult to be studied under stationary conditions by in situ spectroelectrochemistry using laser excitation as in Raman spectroscopy. A rotating spectroelectrochemical cell can circumvent these difficulties. It can be used for any type of a planar electrode and for all electrode materials in contact with aqueous or nonaqueous solutions as well as with ionic liquids. The innovative technical solution consists of the precession movement of the spectroelectrochemical cell using an eccentric drive. This precession movement allows a fixed electrical connection to be applied for interfacing the electrochemical cell to a potentiostat. Hence, any electrical imperfections and noise, which would be produced by sliding contacts, are removed. A further advantage of the rotating cell is a dramatic decrease of the thermal load of the electrochemical system. The size of the spectroelectrochemical cell is variable and dependent on the thickness of the cuvettes used ranging up to approximately 10 mm. The larger measuring area causes a higher sensitivity in the spectroscopic studies. The as constructed spectroelectrochemical cell is easy to handle. The performance of the cell is demonstrated for ordered fullerene C(60) layers and the spectroelectrochemical behavior of nanostructured fullerenes. Here the charge transfer at highly ordered fullerene C(60) films was studied by in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry under appropriate laser power and accumulation time without marked photodecomposition of the sample.

  17. A 100-W grade closed-cycle thermosyphon cooling system used in HTS rotating machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Brice; Miki, Motohiro; Tsuzuki, Keita; Shinohara, Nobuyuki; Hayakawa, Hironao; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2012-06-01

    The cooling systems used for rotating High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) machines need a cooling power high enough to ensure a low temperature during various utilization states. Radiation, torque tube or current leads represent hundreds of watts of invasive heat. The architecture also has to allow the rotation of the refrigerant. In this paper, a free-convection thermosyphon using two Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocoolers is presented. The cryogen is mainly neon but helium can be added for an increase of the heat transfer coefficient. The design of the heat exchangers was first optimized with FEM thermal analysis. After manufacture, they were assembled for preliminary experiments and the necessity of annealing was studied for the copper parts. A single evaporator was installed to evaluate the thermal properties of such a heat syphon. The maximum bearable static heat load was also investigated, but was not reached even at 150 W of load. Finally, this cooling system was tested in the cooling down of a 100-kW range HTS rotating machine containing 12 Bi-2223 double-pancake coils (DPC).

  18. Design and Experimental Characterization of a Vibration Energy Harvesting Device for Rotational Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutao Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new vibration based electromagnetic power generator to transfer energy from stationary to rotating equipment, which can be a new attempt to substitute slip ring in rotational systems. The natural frequencies and modes are simulated in order to have a maximum and steady power output from the device. Parameters such as piezoelectric disk location and relative motion direction of the magnet are theoretically and experimentally analyzed. The results show that the position that is close to the fixed end of the cantilever and the relative motion along the long side gives higher power output. Moreover, the capability of the energy harvester to extract power from lower energy environment is experimentally validated. The voltage and power output are measured at different excitation frequencies.

  19. Development of a Comprehensive Fouling Model for a Rotating Membrane Bioreactor System Treating Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane bioreactors (MBRs are now main stream wastewater treatment technologies. In recent times, novel pressure driven rotating membrane disc modules have been specially developed that induce high shear on the membrane surface, thereby reducing fouling. Previous research has produced dead-end filtration fouling model which combines all three classical mechanisms that was later used by another researcher as a starting point for a greatly refined model of a cross flow side-stream MBR that incorporated both hydrodynamics and soluble microbial products’ (SMP effects. In this study, a comprehensive fouling model was created based on this earlier work that incorporated all three classical fouling mechanisms for a rotating MBR system. It was tested and validated for best fit using appropriate data sets. The initial model fit appeared good for all simulations, although it still needs to be calibrated using further appropriate data sets.

  20. Evolving a lingua franca and associated software infrastructure for computational systems biology: the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucka, M; Finney, A; Bornstein, B J; Keating, S M; Shapiro, B E; Matthews, J; Kovitz, B L; Schilstra, M J; Funahashi, A; Doyle, J C; Kitano, H

    2004-06-01

    Biologists are increasingly recognising that computational modelling is crucial for making sense of the vast quantities of complex experimental data that are now being collected. The systems biology field needs agreed-upon information standards if models are to be shared, evaluated and developed cooperatively. Over the last four years, our team has been developing the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) in collaboration with an international community of modellers and software developers. SBML has become a de facto standard format for representing formal, quantitative and qualitative models at the level of biochemical reactions and regulatory networks. In this article, we summarise the current and upcoming versions of SBML and our efforts at developing software infrastructure for supporting and broadening its use. We also provide a brief overview of the many SBML-compatible software tools available today.

  1. Image-based tracking system for vibration measurement of a rotating object using a laser scanning vibrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongkyu, E-mail: akein@gist.ac.kr; Khalil, Hossam; Jo, Youngjoon; Park, Kyihwan, E-mail: khpark@gist.ac.kr [School of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Buk-gu, Gwangju, South Korea, 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-28

    An image-based tracking system using laser scanning vibrometer is developed for vibration measurement of a rotating object. The proposed system unlike a conventional one can be used where the position or velocity sensor such as an encoder cannot be attached to an object. An image processing algorithm is introduced to detect a landmark and laser beam based on their colors. Then, through using feedback control system, the laser beam can track a rotating object.

  2. Autonomous Agent-Based Systems and Their Applications in Fluid Dynamics, Particle Separation, and Co-evolving Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeser, Oliver

    evolution of the agents is defined by the rules of the dynamic model and depends on the relationship between agents, i.e., the state of the network. In return, the evolution of the network depends on the state of the dynamic model. The concept is introduced through the adaptive SIS model. We show that the previously used criterion determining the critical infected fraction, i.e., the number of infected agents required to sustain the epidemic, is inappropriate for this model. We introduce a different criterion and show that the critical infected fraction so determined is in good agreement with results obtained by numerical simulations. We further discuss the concept of co-evolving dynamics using the Snowdrift Game as a model paradigm. Co-evolution occurs through agents cutting dissatisfied links and rewiring to other agents at random. The effect of co-evolution on the emergence of cooperation is discussed using a mean-field theory and numerical simulations. A transition between a connected and a disconnected, highly cooperative state of the system is observed, and explained using the mean-field model. Quantitative deviations regarding the level of cooperation in the disconnected regime can be fully resolved through an improved mean-field theory that includes the effect of random fluctuations into its model.

  3. Evolving Expert Knowledge Bases: Applications of Crowdsourcing and Serious Gaming to Advance Knowledge Development for Intelligent Tutoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floryan, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents a novel effort to develop ITS technologies that adapt by observing student behavior. In particular, we define an evolving expert knowledge base (EEKB) that structures a domain's information as a set of nodes and the relationships that exist between those nodes. The structure of this model is not the particularly novel…

  4. Interstitial laser coagulation in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia using a diode laser system: results of an evolving technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mårtenson, A. C.; de la Rosette, J. J. M. C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) treatment is a recent technique in the treatment of BPH that is evolving rapidly. The results of a prospective randomised study vs transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is presented as well as results of patients treated with a temperature sensing laser

  5. Impact of Organic Amendments on Global Warming Potential of Diversified Tropical Rice Rotation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, B.; Weller, S.; Kraus, D.; Wassmann, R.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Ralf, K.

    2017-12-01

    Paddy rice cultivation is increasingly challenged by irrigation water scarcity, which is forcing farmers to change traditional rice cultivation from flooded double-rice systems to the introduction of well-aerated upland crops during dry season. Emissions of methane (CH4) are expected to decrease, while there is a risk of increasing emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and decreasing soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks through volatilization in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2). We present a unique dataset of long-term continuous greenhouse gas emission measurements (CH4 and N2O) in the Philippines to assess global warming potentials (GWP) of diversified rice crop rotations including different field management practices such as straw residue application and legume intercropping. Since 2012, more than four years of CH4 and N2O emissions in double-rice cropping (R-R) and paddy rice rotations diversified with either maize (R-M) or aerobic rice (R-A) during dry season have been collected. Introduction of upland crops reduced irrigation water use and CH4 emissions by 66-81% and 95-99%, respectively. Although dry season N2O emissions increased twice- to threefold in the diversified systems, the strong reduction of CH4 led to a significantly lower annual GWP (CH4 + N2O) as compared to the traditional R-R system. Diversified crop management practices were first implemented during land-preparation for dry season 2015 where i) 6 t/ha rice straw was returned to the field and ii) mungbean was grown as a cover-crop between dry and wet season in addition to rice straw application. The input of organic material (straw and mungbean) led to higher substrate availability for methanogens during the following season. Therefore, GWP was 9-39% higher following straw incorporation than the control treatment. This increase was mainly driven by additional CH4 emissions. Even more, mungbean intercropping further increased GWPs, whereby the increment was highest in R-R rotation (88%) and lowest in R

  6. A model for size- and rotation-invariant pattern processing in the visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitboeck, H J; Altmann, J

    1984-01-01

    The mapping of retinal space onto the striate cortex of some mammals can be approximated by a log-polar function. It has been proposed that this mapping is of functional importance for scale- and rotation-invariant pattern recognition in the visual system. An exact log-polar transform converts centered scaling and rotation into translations. A subsequent translation-invariant transform, such as the absolute value of the Fourier transform, thus generates overall size- and rotation-invariance. In our model, the translation-invariance is realized via the R-transform. This transform can be executed by simple neural networks, and it does not require the complex computations of the Fourier transform, used in Mellin-transform size-invariance models. The logarithmic space distortion and differentiation in the first processing stage of the model is realized via "Mexican hat" filters whose diameter increases linearly with eccentricity, similar to the characteristics of the receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells. Except for some special cases, the model can explain object recognition independent of size, orientation and position. Some general problems of Mellin-type size-invariance models-that also apply to our model-are discussed.

  7. Effects of stray lights on Faraday rotation measurement for polarimeter-interferometer system on EAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Z Y; Liu, H Q; Ding, W X; Chen, J; Brower, D L; Lian, H; Wang, S X; Li, W M; Yao, Y; Zeng, L; Jie, Y X

    2018-01-01

    A double-pass radially view 11 chords polarimeter-interferometer system has been operated on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak and provides important current profile information for plasma control. Stray light originating from spurious reflections along the optical path (unwanted reflections from various optical components/mounts and transmissive optical elements such as windows, waveplates, and lens as well as the detectors) and also direct feedback from the retro-reflector used to realize the double-pass configuration can both contribute to contamination of the Faraday rotation measurement accuracy. Modulation of the Faraday rotation signal due to the interference from multiple reflections is observable when the interferometer phase (plasma density) varies with time. Direct reflection from the detector itself can be suppressed by employing an optical isolator consisting of a λ/4-waveplate and polarizer positioned in front of the mixer. A Faraday angle oscillation during the density ramping up (or down) can be reduced from 5°-10° to 1°-2° by eliminating reflections from the detector. Residual modulation arising from misalignment and stray light from other sources must be minimized to achieve accurate measurements of Faraday rotation.

  8. Flow field investigations in rotating facilities by means of stationary PIV systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armellini, A; Mucignat, C; Casarsa, L; Giannattasio, P

    2012-01-01

    The flow field inside rotating test sections can be investigated by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV) operated in the phase-locked mode. With this experimental approach, the measurement system is kept fixed and it is synchronized with the periodical passage of the test section. Therefore, the direct output of the PIV measurements is the absolute velocity field, while the relative one is indirectly obtained from proper data processing that relies on accurate knowledge of the peripheral velocity field. This work provides an uncertainty analysis about the evaluation of the peripheral displacement field in phase-locked PIV measurements. The analysis leads to the detection of the levels of accuracy required in the estimation of both the angular velocity and the position of the center of rotation to ensure correct evaluation of the peripheral displacement field. In this regard, a simple methodology is proposed to evaluate the center of rotation position with an accuracy below 1 px. Finally, a procedure to pre-process the PIV images by subtracting the peripheral displacement is described. The advantages of its implementation are highlighted by the comparison with the performance of a more standard methodology where the peripheral field is subtracted from the absolute velocity field and not directly from the PIV raw data

  9. Space-Frequency Block Code with Matched Rotation for MIMO-OFDM System with Limited Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thushara D. Abhayapala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel matched rotation precoding (MRP scheme to design a rate one space-frequency block code (SFBC and a multirate SFBC for MIMO-OFDM systems with limited feedback. The proposed rate one MRP and multirate MRP can always achieve full transmit diversity and optimal system performance for arbitrary number of antennas, subcarrier intervals, and subcarrier groupings, with limited channel knowledge required by the transmit antennas. The optimization process of the rate one MRP is simple and easily visualized so that the optimal rotation angle can be derived explicitly, or even intuitively for some cases. The multirate MRP has a complex optimization process, but it has a better spectral efficiency and provides a relatively smooth balance between system performance and transmission rate. Simulations show that the proposed SFBC with MRP can overcome the diversity loss for specific propagation scenarios, always improve the system performance, and demonstrate flexible performance with large performance gain. Therefore the proposed SFBCs with MRP demonstrate flexibility and feasibility so that it is more suitable for a practical MIMO-OFDM system with dynamic parameters.

  10. Rotational multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound: bimodal system for intravascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marcu, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report the development and validation of a hybrid intravascular diagnostic system combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for cardiovascular imaging applications. A prototype FLIm system based on fluorescence pulse sampling technique providing information on artery biochemical composition was integrated with a commercial IVUS system providing information on artery morphology. A customized 3-Fr bimodal catheter combining a rotational side-view fiberoptic and a 40-MHz IVUS transducer was constructed for sequential helical scanning (rotation and pullback) of tubular structures. Validation of this bimodal approach was conducted in pig heart coronary arteries. Spatial resolution, fluorescence detection efficiency, pulse broadening effect, and lifetime measurement variability of the FLIm system were systematically evaluated. Current results show that this system is capable of temporarily resolving the fluorescence emission simultaneously in multiple spectral channels in a single pullback sequence. Accurate measurements of fluorescence decay characteristics from arterial segments can be obtained rapidly (e.g., 20 mm in 5 s), and accurate co-registration of fluorescence and ultrasound features can be achieved. The current finding demonstrates the compatibility of FLIm instrumentation with in vivo clinical investigations and its potential to complement conventional IVUS during catheterization procedures. PMID:24898604

  11. Design of the Driving and Clamp Rotation Hydraulic Control System for the Heavy Load Forging Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Geqiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The manipulator was equipped with full hydraulic drive. We designed the hydraulic systems for the driving and clamping rotation. We used a fuzzy PID control strategy to design the electro-hydraulic proportional control system. We built a united simulation model based on the co-simulation of MATLAB/Simulink and AMEsim. A mathematical model of the system was also established. We did separate simulations of the system’s dynamic characteristics for fast forging and normal forging working conditions. The parameters were optimized. The field test shows that the steady-state error of the hydraulic system is small and the system response is fast. The system’s rapid response speed, high precision, and stability under heavy load were realized.

  12. Performance of intact and castrated beef cattle in an intensive croppasture rotation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tercilio Turini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research had as objective to evaluate the performance of intact or castrated beef cattle in a croppasture rotation system. The experiment was conducted during 2004 and 2005, and carried out at the Cooperativa Agropecuária Mourãoense (COAMO Experimental Farm, in Campo Mourão city, Paraná state. It was used a completely randomized design, with two treatments, intact or castrated. Forty ½Angus+½Nelore crossbred animals, with average age of nine months, were used. Half of the animals were castrated at weaning, and the other half was kept intact. Pasture was composed of two areas. The winter field, established after soybean crop, was composed by a mixture of black oat (Avena strigosa and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiforum. The summer field was composed by stargrass (Cynodon nlemfuensis and Mombaça grass (Panicum maximum. During the winter time it was used a continues grazing system, with regulator animals (put and take, and during the summer an intensive rotational system, with regulator animals and fixed grazing period. Intact animals presented higher average daily weight gain (0.907 vs 0.698 kg, slaughter weight (490.9 vs 442.2 kg, and hot carcass weight (250.2 vs 232.6 kg. Slaughter age was influenced by sexual condition, being lesser in the intact animals. Carcass dressing percentage was similar for the groups. Castrated animals showed better finishing fat cover and backfat thickness (3.45 vs 2.70 mm compared to intact ones. Therefore, it can be concluded that intact animals presents better performance than castrated ones when finished in an intensive crop-pasture rotation system, however, they may not present the minimum required fat cover, when slaughter at young ages.

  13. A review on prognostic techniques for non-stationary and non-linear rotating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Man Shan; Tan, Andy C. C.; Mathew, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    The field of prognostics has attracted significant interest from the research community in recent times. Prognostics enables the prediction of failures in machines resulting in benefits to plant operators such as shorter downtimes, higher operation reliability, reduced operations and maintenance cost, and more effective maintenance and logistics planning. Prognostic systems have been successfully deployed for the monitoring of relatively simple rotating machines. However, machines and associated systems today are increasingly complex. As such, there is an urgent need to develop prognostic techniques for such complex systems operating in the real world. This review paper focuses on prognostic techniques that can be applied to rotating machinery operating under non-linear and non-stationary conditions. The general concept of these techniques, the pros and cons of applying these methods, as well as their applications in the research field are discussed. Finally, the opportunities and challenges in implementing prognostic systems and developing effective techniques for monitoring machines operating under non-stationary and non-linear conditions are also discussed.

  14. Gravitational Jaynes–Cummings model beyond the rotating wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, the quantum properties of a two-level atom and the cavity-field in the Jaynes–Cummings model with the gravity beyond the rotating wave approximation are investigated. For this purpose, by solving the Schrödinger equation in the interaction picture, the evolving state of the system is found by which the ...

  15. Counter-rotating type axial flow pump unit in turbine mode for micro grid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, R; Takano, G; Komaki, K; Murakami, T; Kanemoto, T

    2012-01-01

    Traditional type pumped storage system contributes to adjust the electric power unbalance between day and night, in general. This serial research proposes the hybrid power system combined the wind power unit with the pump-turbine unit, to provide the constant output for the grid system, even at the suddenly fluctuating/turbulent wind. In the pumping mode, the pump should operate unsteadily at not only the normal but also the partial discharge. The operation may be unstable in the rising portion of the head characteristics at the lower discharge, and/or bring the cavitation at the low suction head. To simultaneously overcome both weak points, the authors have proposed a superior pump unit that is composed of counter-rotating type impellers and a peculiar motor with double rotational armatures. This paper discusses the operation at the turbine mode of the above unit. It is concluded with the numerical simulations that this type unit can be also operated acceptably at the turbine mode, because the unit works so as to coincide the angular momentum change through the front runners/impellers with that thorough the rear runners/impellers, namely to take the axial flow at not only the inlet but also the outlet without the guide vanes.

  16. Shift-, rotation-, and scale-invariant shape recognition system using an optical Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Volker R.; Bader, Gerhard; Lueder, Ernst H.

    1998-02-01

    We present a hybrid shape recognition system with an optical Hough transform processor. The features of the Hough space offer a separate cancellation of distortions caused by translations and rotations. Scale invariance is also provided by suitable normalization. The proposed system extends the capabilities of Hough transform based detection from only straight lines to areas bounded by edges. A very compact optical design is achieved by a microlens array processor accepting incoherent light as direct optical input and realizing the computationally expensive connections massively parallel. Our newly developed algorithm extracts rotation and translation invariant normalized patterns of bright spots on a 2D grid. A neural network classifier maps the 2D features via a nonlinear hidden layer onto the classification output vector. We propose initialization of the connection weights according to regions of activity specifically assigned to each neuron in the hidden layer using a competitive network. The presented system is designed for industry inspection applications. Presently we have demonstrated detection of six different machined parts in real-time. Our method yields very promising detection results of more than 96% correctly classified parts.

  17. A wideband optical monitor for a planetary-rotation coating-system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanelli, M.B.; Smith, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    A substrate-specific, through-planet, wideband optical coating monitor is being developed to increase production yield and the understanding of physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings fabricated in the Optical Manufacturing Laboratory at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. In-situ wideband optical monitoring of planetary rotation systems allows direct monitoring of large, expensive substrates with complex layering schemes. The optical monitor discussed here is under development for coating several large (e.g., 80.7 x 41.7 x 9.0 cm) polarizers for the National Ignition Facility. Wideband optical monitoring of the production substrates is used in concert with an array of crystal monitors for process control, film parameter evaluation, and error detection with associated design reoptimization. The geometry of a planetary rotation system, which produces good uniformity across large substrates, makes optical monitoring more difficult. Triggering and timing techniques for data acquisition become key to the process because the optical coating is available only intermittently for monitoring. Failure to properly consider the effects of the system dynamics during data retrieval and processing may result in significant decreases in the spectral data's reliability. Improved data accuracy allows better determination of film thicknesses, indices, and inhomogeneities and enables in-situ error detection for design reoptimization

  18. Greenhouse gas emissions and global warming potential of traditional and diversified tropical rice rotation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Sebastian; Janz, Baldur; Jörg, Lena; Kraus, David; Racela, Heathcliff S U; Wassmann, Reiner; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Global rice agriculture will be increasingly challenged by water scarcity, while at the same time changes in demand (e.g. changes in diets or increasing demand for biofuels) will feed back on agricultural practices. These factors are changing traditional cropping patterns from double-rice cropping to the introduction of upland crops in the dry season. For a comprehensive assessment of greenhouse gas (GHG) balances, we measured methane (CH4 )/nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions and agronomic parameters over 2.5 years in double-rice cropping (R-R) and paddy rice rotations diversified with either maize (R-M) or aerobic rice (R-A) in upland cultivation. Introduction of upland crops in the dry season reduced irrigation water use and CH4 emissions by 66-81% and 95-99%, respectively. Moreover, for practices including upland crops, CH4 emissions in the subsequent wet season with paddy rice were reduced by 54-60%. Although annual N2 O emissions increased two- to threefold in the diversified systems, the strong reduction in CH4 led to a significantly lower (P < 0.05) annual GWP (CH4  + N2 O) as compared to the traditional double-rice cropping system. Measurements of soil organic carbon (SOC) contents before and 3 years after the introduction of upland crop rotations indicated a SOC loss for the R-M system, while for the other systems SOC stocks were unaffected. This trend for R-M systems needs to be followed as it has significant consequences not only for the GWP balance but also with regard to soil fertility. Economic assessment showed a similar gross profit span for R-M and R-R, while gross profits for R-A were reduced as a consequence of lower productivity. Nevertheless, regarding a future increase in water scarcity, it can be expected that mixed lowland-upland systems will expand in SE Asia as water requirements were cut by more than half in both rotation systems with upland crops. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Development of Sorting System for Fishes by Feed-forward Neural Networks Using Rotation Invariant Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yuhki; Takeda, Fumiaki

    In this research, we have developed a sorting system for fishes, which is comprised of a conveyance part, a capturing image part, and a sorting part. In the conveyance part, we have developed an independent conveyance system in order to separate one fish from an intertwined group of fishes. After the image of the separated fish is captured in the capturing part, a rotation invariant feature is extracted using two-dimensional fast Fourier transform, which is the mean value of the power spectrum with the same distance from the origin in the spectrum field. After that, the fishes are classified by three-layered feed-forward neural networks. The experimental results show that the developed system classifies three kinds of fishes captured in various angles with the classification ratio of 98.95% for 1044 captured images of five fishes. The other experimental results show the classification ratio of 90.7% for 300 fishes by 10-fold cross validation method.

  20. On the Dynamical Structure of the Jet System in the Disk with the Keplerian Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Sook Jeong

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available The classical sloar wind theory proposed by Parker(1963 explains well the dynamics of the wind pheonomena such as stellar wind accretion disk. While the stellar wind system like the solar wind has the spherically symmetric wind structure, there are various jet phenomena which collimate the system into the narrow space. We can find these dynamical structures in SS433, in the optical jet of M87, and around the active galactic nulei. We present the dynamical structure of the jet system in disks, which conserves the angular momentum, with the Keplerian rotation and the strong relation between the geometrical cross section and the physical change of the jet stream on the basis of the hydrodynamic equations.

  1. Efficient methodologies for system matrix modelling in iterative image reconstruction for rotating high-resolution PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuno, J E; Kontaxakis, G; Rubio, J L; Santos, A [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica (DIE), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Guerra, P [Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: juanen@die.upm.es

    2010-04-07

    A fully 3D iterative image reconstruction algorithm has been developed for high-resolution PET cameras composed of pixelated scintillator crystal arrays and rotating planar detectors, based on the ordered subsets approach. The associated system matrix is precalculated with Monte Carlo methods that incorporate physical effects not included in analytical models, such as positron range effects and interaction of the incident gammas with the scintillator material. Custom Monte Carlo methodologies have been developed and optimized for modelling of system matrices for fast iterative image reconstruction adapted to specific scanner geometries, without redundant calculations. According to the methodology proposed here, only one-eighth of the voxels within two central transaxial slices need to be modelled in detail. The rest of the system matrix elements can be obtained with the aid of axial symmetries and redundancies, as well as in-plane symmetries within transaxial slices. Sparse matrix techniques for the non-zero system matrix elements are employed, allowing for fast execution of the image reconstruction process. This 3D image reconstruction scheme has been compared in terms of image quality to a 2D fast implementation of the OSEM algorithm combined with Fourier rebinning approaches. This work confirms the superiority of fully 3D OSEM in terms of spatial resolution, contrast recovery and noise reduction as compared to conventional 2D approaches based on rebinning schemes. At the same time it demonstrates that fully 3D methodologies can be efficiently applied to the image reconstruction problem for high-resolution rotational PET cameras by applying accurate pre-calculated system models and taking advantage of the system's symmetries.

  2. Long rotation swidden systems maintain higher carbon stocks than rubber plantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Thilde Bech; Berry, Nicholas; De Neergaard, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    in fallows were 1.5 ± 0.12 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 and 1.9 ± 0.14 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 in rubber plantations. When comparing time-averaged carbon stocks of swidden systems to rubber plantations with 30 year rotation periods, the stocks of swidden systems with rotation times of 5 and 10 years were 19% and 13% lower......Conversion of shifting cultivation to rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations is one of the dominant land use changes in montane mainland areas of Southeast Asia, with the area of rubber expected to quadruple by 2050. However, the impacts of this transition on total ecosystem carbon stocks...... are poorly quantified. We undertook a chronosequence study to quantify changes in ecosystem carbon stocks following conversion from swidden agriculture to rubber plantations in Northern Laos. We measured above-ground biomass stocks and collected volume specific soil samples across rubber plantations...

  3. Impact of wheat / faba bean mixed cropping or rotation systems on soil microbial functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanâa Wahbi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cropping systems based on carefully designed species mixtures reveal many potential advantages in terms of enhancing crop productivity, reducing pest and diseases and enhacing ecological serices. Associating cereals and legume production either through intercropping or rotations might be a relevant strategy of producing both type of culture, while benefiting from combined nitrogen fixed by the legume through its symbiotic association with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and from a better use of P and water through mycorrhizal associations. These practices also participate to the diversification of agricultural productions, enabling to secure the regularity of income returns across the seasonal and climatic uncertainties. In this context, we designed a field experiment aiming to estimate the two years impact of these practices on wheat yield and on soil microbial activities as estimated through Substrate Induced Respiration (SIR method and mycorrhizal soil infectivity (MSI measurement. It is expected that understanding soil microbial functionalities in response to these agricultural practices might allows to target the best type of combination, in regard to crop productivity. We found that the tested cropping systems largely impacted soil microbial functionalities and mycorrhizal soil infectivity. Intercropping gave better results in terms of crop productivity than the rotation practice after 2 cropping seasons. Benefits resulting from intercrop should be highly linked with changes recorded on soil microbial functionalities.

  4. Comparison of functional results of two fixation systems using single-row suturing of rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniesa-Herrero, M P; Torres-Campos, A; Urgel-Granados, A; Blanco-Llorca, J A; Floría-Arnal, L J; Roncal-Boj, J C; Castro-Sauras, A

    Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff disorders is a technically demanding but successful procedure. Many anchor and suture alternatives are now available. The choice of the implant by the surgeon is less important than the configuration of the suture used to fix the tendon, however it is necessary to know if there are differences in the results, using each one of them. The aim of the study is to evaluate if there are differences between the knotted and non-knotted implant in terms of functional and satisfaction results. A retrospective study was carried out on 83 patients operated between 2010 and 2014 in our center using 2anchoring systems with and without knotting (39 versus 44 patients respectively), with single row in complete rupture of the rotator cuff. At the end of the follow-up, an average score was obtained on the Constant scale of 74.6 points. 98% of the patients considered the result of the surgery satisfactory. Statistically, there were no significant differences between the 2groups in terms of functionality, satisfaction or reincorporation to activities. The functional results of the single-row cuff suture are satisfactory, although biomechanical studies show advantages in favor of sutures that reproduce a transoseo system. It our series of patients the presence of knotting does not show per se a significant functional difference being both superimposable techniques in absolute values of functionality and patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2018 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. [Responses of rice-wheat rotation system in south Jiangsu to organic-inorganic compound fertilizers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Heng-Da; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Jian-Chao; Wang, Qiu-Jun; Xu, Da-Bing; Yibati, Halihashi; Xu, Jia-Le; Huang, Qi-Wei

    2011-11-01

    In 2006-2007, a field trial was conducted to study the effects of applying three kinds of organic-inorganic compound fertilizers [rapeseed cake compost plus inorganic fertilizers (RCC), pig manure compost plus inorganic fertilizers (PMC), and Chinese medicine residues plus inorganic fertilizers (CMC)] on the crop growth and nitrogen (N) use efficiency of rice-wheat rotation system in South Jiangsu. Grain yield of wheat and rice in the different fertilization treatments was significantly higher than the control (no fertilization). In treatments RCC, PMC and CMC, the wheat yield was 13.1%, 32.2% and 39.3% lower than that of the NPK compound fertilizer (CF, 6760 kg x hm(-2)), respectively, but the rice yield (8504-9449 kg x hm(-2)) was significantly higher than that (7919 kg x hm(-2)) of CF, with an increment of 7.4%-19.3%. In wheat season, the aboveground dry mass, N accumulation, and N use efficiency in treatments RCC, PMC, and CMC were lower than those of CF, but in rice season, these parameters were significantly higher than or as the same as CF. In sum, all the test three compound fertilizers had positive effects on the rice yield and its nitrogen use efficiency in the rice-wheat rotation system, being most significant for RCC.

  6. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  7. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Graves

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish

  8. Partitioning carbon fluxes from a Midwestern corn and soybean rotation system using footprint analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, C.; Hatfield, J.; Prueger, J. H.; Wacha, K.

    2017-12-01

    Midwestern US agriculture is dominated by corn and soybean production. Corn has typically higher Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) than soybean due to increased carboxylation efficiency and different crop management. The conjoined NEE may be measured with eddy covariance (EC) stations covering both crops, however, it is often unclear what the contribution of each crop is, as the CO2 source area remains unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the contribution of CO2 fluxes from each crop for a conventional corn-soybean rotation system from 2007 - 2015. Therefore, the combined CO2 flux of three adjacent fields with annual corn-soybean rotation was measured with a 9.1 m EC tower (Flux 30). In the center of two of these fields, additional EC towers (Flux 10 and Flux 11) were positioned above the corn and soybean canopy to validate Flux 30 NEE. For each EC system the annual 90% NEE footprint area was calculated, footprints were partitioned among fields, and NEE separated accordingly. The average annual 90% footprint area of Flux 30, and Flux 10/11 corn and soybean was estimated to 206, 11 and 7 ha, respectively. The annual average (±SE) NEE of Flux 30 was -693 ± 47 g CO2 m-2 yr-1, of which 83% out of 90% originated from the three adjacent fields. Corn and soybean NEE measured at Flux 10 and 11 was -1124 ± 95 and 173 ± 73 g CO2 m-2 yr-1, respectively, and 89% and 90% originated from these fields. That demonstrates, that Flux 30 represents the combined NEE of a corn-soybean rotation, and Flux 10 and 11 measured NEE from a single crop. However, the share of Flux 30 NEE originating from corn and soybean grown on the Flux 10/11 fields was -192 ± 16 and -205 ± 18 g CO2 m-2 yr-1, indicating a substantial difference to single crop NEE. While it was possible to measure the NEE of a corn-soybean rotation with a tall EC tower, footprint partitioning could not retrieve NEE for each crop, probably due to differences in measurement height and footprint source area.

  9. Rotator cuff repair in the Brazilian Unified Health System: Brazilian trends from 2003 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Angeli Malavolta

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To assess the historical trend of rotator cuff repairs in Brazil between 2003 and 2015, using the database of the Brazilian Unified Health System's (Sistema Único de Saúde [SUS] Department of Informatics (DataSUS. METHODS: Historical series using DataSUS. Surgeries performed between 2003 and 2015 were included and data relating to cuff tear repair were assessed, including decompression procedures were included. The numerator was the total number of rotator cuff repair and the denominator, the total population of the assessed locality. Population data were based on information from the Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (IBGE. RESULTS: During the period, 50,207 surgeries were performed. The rate was presented as number of procedures per 100,000 inhabitants, and increased from 0.83 to 2.81, a growth of 238%. In 2015, the South region had the highest rate, 6.32, followed by the Southeast, 3.62, while the North had the lowest rate, 0.13. The growing trend can be observed in the Southeast, South, and Midwest, while the rate is stable in the North and Northeast. CONCLUSION: The rate of rotator cuff repairs in Brazil performed through the SUS increased from 0.83 to 2.81 between 2003 and 2015, representing a growth of 238%, but remains lower than that of developed countries. A trend of growth can be observed in the Southeast, South, and Midwest, while the rate is stable in the North and Northeast.

  10. Rotational Grazing System for Beef Cows on Dwarf Elephantgrass Pasture for Two Years after Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mukhtar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An intensive rotational grazing system for dwarf and late heading (DL elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach pasture was examined in a summer period for two years following establishment. Four 0.05 of DL elephant grass pastures (20×25 m were established on May 2003. They were rotationally grazed for 1 week, followed by a 3-week rest period by three breeding or raising beef cattle for three and six cycles during the first and second years of establishment respectively. Before grazing, the plant height, leaf area index and the ratio of leaf blade to stem were at the highest, while tiller number increased and herbage mass tended to increase, except for the first grazing cycle both two years and for one paddock in the second year. Herbage consumption, the rate of herbage consumption and dry matter intake tended to decrease in three paddocks from the first to the third cycle in the first year, but increase as grazing occurred in the second year. Dry matter intake averaged 10.2-14.5 and 15.4–23.2 g DM/kg/live weight (LW/day over the four paddocks in the first and second year, respectively, and average daily gains were 0.09 and 0.35 kg/head/day in the first and second year respectively. The carrying capacities were estimated at 1,016 and 208 cow-days (CD/ha (annual total 1,224 CD/ha in the first year and 1,355 and 207 CD/ha (annual total 1,562 CD/ha in the second year. Thus, DL elephant grass pasture can expand the grazing period for beef cows for the following two-year establishment. (Animal Production 13(1:10-17 (2011 Key Words: dwarf elephant grass, herbage mass, plant characters, rotational grazing

  11. Weed populations and crop rotations: exploring dynamics of a structured periodic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, S.K.; Bosch, F. van den; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2002-01-01

    The periodic growing of a certain set of crops in a prescribed order, called a crop rotation, is considered to be an important tool for managing weed populations. Nevertheless, the effects of crop rotations on weed population dynamics are not well understood. Explanations for rotation effects on

  12. Development of the Simulation Program for the In-Vessel Fuel Handling System of Double Rotating Plug Type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    In-vessel fuel handling machines are the main equipment of the in-vessel fuel handling system, which can move the core assembly inside the reactor vessel along with the rotating plug during refueling. The in vessel fuel handling machines for an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor(SFR) demonstration plant are composed of a direct lift machine(DM) and a fixed arm machine(FM). These machines should be able to access all areas above the reactor core by means of the rotating combination of double rotating plugs. Thus, in the in vessel fuel handling system of the double rotating plug type, it is necessary to decide the rotating plug size and evaluate the accessibility of in-vessel fuel handling machines in given core configuration. In this study, the simulation program based on LABVIEW which can effectively perform the arrangement design of the in vessel fuel handling system and simulate the rotating plug motion was developed. Fig. 1 shows the flow chart of the simulation program

  13. 46 CFR 108.437 - Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment. 108.437 Section 108.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.437 Pipe sizes and discharge rates for...

  14. PRACT (Prototyping Rotation and Association with Cover crop and no Till) - a tool for designing conservation agriculture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naudin, K.; Husson, M.O.; Scopel, E.; Auzoux, S.; Giller, K.E.

    2015-01-01

    Moving to more agroecological cropping systems implies deep changes in the organization of cropping systems. We propose a method for formalizing the process of innovating cropping system prototype design using a tool called PRACT (Prototyping Rotation and Association with Cover crop and no Till)

  15. The Nonsmooth Vibration of a Relative Rotation System with Backlash and Dry Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjia He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a relative rotation system with backlash and dry friction. Firstly, the corresponding nonsmooth characters are discussed by the differential inclusion theory, and the analytic conditions for stick and nonstick motions are developed to understand the motion switching mechanism. Based on such analytic conditions of motion switching, the influence of the maximal static friction torque and the driving torque on the stick motion is studied. Moreover, the sliding time bifurcation diagrams, duty cycle figures, time history diagrams, and the K-function time history diagram are also presented, which confirm the analytic results. The methodology presented in this paper can be applied to predictions of motions in nonsmooth dynamical systems.

  16. A robust rotation-invariance displacement measurement method for a micro-/nano-positioning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng; Li, Hai; Gan, Jinqiang

    2018-05-01

    A robust and high-precision displacement measurement method for a compliant mechanism-based micro-/nano-positioning system is proposed. The method is composed of an integer-pixel and a sub-pixel matching procedure. In the proposed algorithm (Pro-A), an improved ring projection transform (IRPT) and gradient information are used as features for approximating the coarse candidates and fine locations, respectively. Simulations are conducted and the results show that the Pro-A has the ability of rotation-invariance and strong robustness, with a theoretical accuracy of 0.01 pixel. To validate the practical performance, a series of experiments are carried out using a computer micro-vision and laser interferometer system (LIMS). The results demonstrate that both the LIMS and Pro-A can achieve high precision, while the Pro-A has better stability and adaptability.

  17. ANALYSIS OF DISTURBANCE TORQUE INFLUENCE ON CRITICAL STATE IN ROTATIONAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogumił CHILIŃSKI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently most of existing means of transport contains different types of rotational systems. In many cases the dynamics of such rotors substantially can influence exploitation of the whole vehicle. Moreover, in order to minimize mass of the whole object modern construction materials are applied. This causes that the dynamic phenomena may be fundamental of exploitation. The paper presents preliminary analysis of disturbance torque influence on critical state in rotational system. The consideration assumed simple physical object in the form of heavy disk embedded on weightless, elastic shaft. The shaft was supported on two bearings. In particular chapters of paper, path leading from proposition of physical model, by solution of it, to qualitative conclusions about considered object and torque disturbances influence of motion of this system, was presented. In introduction, outline of considered problem and potential opportunities of it, were demonstrated. In the next chapter, physical and mathematical model of the analysed object, was described. Next and also the last but one chapter gives a detailed discussion of mathematical model in the form of nonlinear ordinary differential equations proposed earlier. The first part of the chapter presents the possibility to solve such a problem, then it shows the simplifications which are used. Furthermore, the influence of used simplifications on the shape of analysed problem was demonstrated. Additionally, the possibility of equations solution presented in the paper was discussed. Moreover, the series of interesting properties of analysed system of equations has been shown based on founded approximate solutions. The whole paper was summarized with plans for future work and synthetic conclusions concerning the innovative control method of critical states.

  18. Sleep and satisfaction in 8- and 12-h forward-rotating shift systems: Industrial employees prefer 12-h shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhula, Kati; Härmä, Mikko; Ropponen, Annina; Hakola, Tarja; Sallinen, Mikael; Puttonen, Sampsa

    2016-01-01

    Twelve-hour shift systems have become more popular in industry. Survey data of shift length, shift rotation speed, self-rated sleep, satisfaction and perceived health were investigated for the associations among 599 predominantly male Finnish industrial employees. The studied forward-rotating shift systems were 12-h fast (12fast, DDNN------, n = 268), 8-h fast (8fast, MMEENN----, n = 161) and 8-h slow (8slow, MMMM-EEEE-NNNN, n = 170). Satisfaction with shift system differed between the groups (p effects on sleep and alertness were rare (8%) in the 12fast group (53% 8fast, 66% 8 slow, p effects of the current shift system on general health (12fast 4%, 8fast 30%, 8slow 41%, p work-life balance (12fast 8%, 8fast 52%, 8slow 63%, p effects of shift work were dependent on both shift length and shift rotation speed: employees in the 12-h rapidly forward-rotating shift system were most satisfied, perceived better work-life balance and slept better than the employees in the 8fast or especially the employees in the 8-h slowly rotating systems.

  19. Harvesting of short rotation coppice. Harvesting trials with a cut and storage system in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweier, J.; Becker, G.

    2012-11-01

    Short rotation coppice (SRC) harvesting techniques are available in Germany, but broad experience and knowledge about machine performance and the related effective costs of harvesting operations are still missing. This information is crucial, as harvesting costs strongly influence the economic performance of the overall supply chain. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to collect and analyze productivity data of different harvesting systems for SRC. The combined cut and chip system on the one hand and the cut and storage system on the other hand were studied by literature review. Several studies analyze the combined cut and chip systems and the reported machine productivities showed great variations. The average was 30 green tons per scheduled machine hour (gt smh{sup -1}). Few studies are analysing the cut and storage system. They report that machines still are under development and that further research is needed. Therefore, time studies of harvesting operations using the cut and storage system were carried out. Five trials were performed with the harvesting machine 'Stemster MK III' developed by Nordic Biomass. The share of productive working time was 85% and the average productivity was 21 gt smh{sup -1}. These results were compared with values from the literature. Resulting harvesting costs were calculated per oven dry ton (Euro odt{sup -1}). The advantages and disadvantages of both harvesting systems are highlighted. (orig.)

  20. Development of short-rotation willow coppice systems for environmental purposes in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirck, Jaconette; Verwijst, Theo; Isebrands, J.G.; Ledin, Stig

    2005-01-01

    During the last three decades, driving forces behind the development of short-rotation willow coppice (SRWC) in Sweden have been changing from a primary focus on biomass production towards emphasis on environmental applications. In most cases, current commercial SRWC practice is geared towards a combination of biomass production for energy purposes and environmental goals. The latter goals range from decreasing the impact of specific contaminants in the environment to organic waste handling in a recycling system in urban and/or agricultural areas. Where biomass production and pollutant management overlap, the science of phytoremediation has its practical application. Through phytoremediation, waste products that previously have been a burden for society can be used as valuable resources to increase short-rotation willow biomass production. In this paper we will present the terminology and definitions of different types of phytoremediation. We also give an overview of five different cases of phytoremediation activities with a potential for large-scale implementation. Some of the types of activities are already commercially used in Sweden; others seem promising but still need further development. (Author)

  1. Rotating and standing waves in a diffractive nonlinear optical system with delayed feedback under O(2) Hopf bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinskiy, S. S.; Razgulin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we study one-dimensional rotating and standing waves in a model of an O(2)-symmetric nonlinear optical system with diffraction and delay in the feedback loop whose dynamics is governed by a system of coupled delayed parabolic equation and linear Schrodinger-type equation. We elaborate a two-step approach: transition to a rotating coordinate system to obtain the profiles of the waves as small parameter expansions and the normal form technique to study their qualitative dynamic behavior and stability. Theoretical results stand in a good agreement with direct computer simulations presented.

  2. Conceptual and experimental approach to the vulnerability of human resources in the evolving structure of the national power system to 2030 period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Gheorghiu, Ioan; Visa, Ion; Carabulea, Anatol; Morar, Adrian; Popper, Laurentiu; Popper, Gabriel; Bucur, Camelia

    2010-09-15

    We present the causes generating vulnerabilities and propose the models for diminishing the risks and catastrophes based on the education of the human resources incorporated in the evolution of the local power system and not only. We specify the fuzzy structure of the model for increasing the quality of the human factor and of the models for rating the human resources in power plants and the networks of the power systems exemplified on the evolving structure of the Romanian installations subject to dynamic reconfiguring over the forecast interval (2020 - 2035).

  3. Magnetic pseudo-fields in a rotating electron-nuclear spin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A. A.; Lilette, E.; Fein, Y. Y.; Perunicic, V. S.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.; Scholten, R. E.; Martin, A. M.

    2017-11-01

    Analogous to the precession of a Foucault pendulum observed on the rotating Earth, a precessing spin observed in a rotating frame of reference appears frequency-shifted. This can be understood as arising from a magnetic pseudo-field in the rotating frame that nevertheless has physically significant consequences, such as the Barnett effect. To detect these pseudo-fields, a rotating-frame sensor is required. Here we use quantum sensors, nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres, in a rapidly rotating diamond to detect pseudo-fields in the rotating frame. Whereas conventional magnetic fields induce precession at a rate proportional to the gyromagnetic ratio, rotation shifts the precession of all spins equally, and thus primarily affect 13C nuclear spins in the sample. We are thus able to explore these effects via quantum sensing in a rapidly rotating frame, and define a new approach to quantum control using rotationally induced nuclear spin-selective magnetic fields. This work provides an integral step towards realizing precision rotation sensing and quantum spin gyroscopes.

  4. CFD Modeling of Flow and Ion Exchange Kinetics in a Rotating Bed Reactor System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina; Schjøtt Andersen, Patrick Alexander; Byström, Emil

    2017-01-01

    A rotating bed reactor (RBR) has been modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The flow pattern in the RBR was investigated and the flow through the porous material in it was quantified. A simplified geometry representing the more complex RBR geometry was introduced and the simplified...... model was able to reproduce the main characteristics of the flow. Alternating reactor shapes were investigated, and it was concluded that the use of baffles has a very large impact on the flows through the porous material. The simulations suggested, therefore, that even faster reaction rates could...... be achieved by making the baffles deeper. Two-phase simulations were performed, which managed to reproduce the deflection of the gas–liquid interface in an unbaffled system. A chemical reaction was implemented in the model, describing the ion-exchange phenomena in the porous material using four different...

  5. Evaluation Of Rotation Frequency Gas-Diesel Engines When Using Automatic Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilenkov, A.; Efremov, A.

    2017-01-01

    A possibility of quality improvement of stabilization of rotation frequency of the gas-diesels used as prime mover of generator set in the multigenerator units working for abruptly variable load of large power is considered. An evaluation is made on condition of fuzzy controller use developed and described by the authors in a number of articles. An evaluation has shown that theoretically, the revolution range of gas-diesel engine may be reduced at 25-30 times at optimal settings of the controller in all the power range. The results of modeling showing a considerable quality improvement of transient processes in the investigated system at a sharp change of loading are presented in this article.

  6. Research on Measurement Accuracy of Laser Tracking System Based on Spherical Mirror with Rotation Errors of Gimbal Mount Axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhaoyao; Song, Huixu; Chen, Hongfang; Sun, Yanqiang

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a novel experimental approach for confirming that spherical mirror of a laser tracking system can reduce the influences of rotation errors of gimbal mount axes on the measurement accuracy. By simplifying the optical system model of laser tracking system based on spherical mirror, we can easily extract the laser ranging measurement error caused by rotation errors of gimbal mount axes with the positions of spherical mirror, biconvex lens, cat's eye reflector, and measuring beam. The motions of polarization beam splitter and biconvex lens along the optical axis and vertical direction of optical axis are driven by error motions of gimbal mount axes. In order to simplify the experimental process, the motion of biconvex lens is substituted by the motion of spherical mirror according to the principle of relative motion. The laser ranging measurement error caused by the rotation errors of gimbal mount axes could be recorded in the readings of laser interferometer. The experimental results showed that the laser ranging measurement error caused by rotation errors was less than 0.1 μm if radial error motion and axial error motion were within ±10 μm. The experimental method simplified the experimental procedure and the spherical mirror could reduce the influences of rotation errors of gimbal mount axes on the measurement accuracy of the laser tracking system.

  7. SU-E-T-94: An Advanced Rotating Gamma Ray System for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Chibani, O; Li, J; Chen, L [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Co-60 beams have unique dosimetric properties that are ideally suited for cranial treatments. Co-60 sources with cone-shaped collimators provide conformal dose distributions allowing for ablative treatments with rapid dose falloff to spare nearby critical structures. This work investigates a novel, image-guided, rotational Gamma ray system that provides both superior dose conformity/gradient and accurate stereotaxy for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: The SupeRay system (Cyber Medical Corp., China) consists of a rotating source chamber containing 30 gamma sources focusing at the isocenter with 4 collimators measuring 3, 4, 8 and 16mm in diameter. A novel switch design enables the 30 Gamma sources to be turned off at any arbitrarily selected 60° interval in order to avoid critical structures. The 3D treatment couch provides automatic treatment positioning between individual shots and the kV imaging system provides orthogonal images with a spatial resolution of 0.24mm to facilitate target localization. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose distributions and compare with measurements and other Gamma ray SRS systems. Results: Monte Carlo results confirmed the SupeRay design parameters including output factors and 3D dose distributions. Its beam penumbra/dose gradient is similar to or slightly better than that of the Elekta Gamma Knife. The penumbra in the (x,y,z) direction was (7.38mm,7.38mm,3.86mm) for the 16mm collimator, (4.83mm,4.83mm,3.12mm) for the 8mm collimator, and (3.03mm,3.03mm,2.38mm) for the 4mm collimator, respectively, on the SupeRay system while it was (9.5mm,10.0mm,2.9mm), (4.3mm,4.3mm,2.9mm) and (3.2mm,3.2mm,1.9mm) for the same collimator sizes, respectively, on the Perfexion system. The kV imaging system together with a non-invasive relocatable frame provides accurate target localization (<0.5mm) for cases requiring multiple treatment fractions. Conclusion: Because of the unique dosimetric properties of Co-60 sources

  8. D Modelling of AN Indoor Space Using a Rotating Stereo Frame Camera System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J.; Lee, I.

    2016-06-01

    Sophisticated indoor design and growing development in urban architecture make indoor spaces more complex. And the indoor spaces are easily connected to public transportations such as subway and train stations. These phenomena allow to transfer outdoor activities to the indoor spaces. Constant development of technology has a significant impact on people knowledge about services such as location awareness services in the indoor spaces. Thus, it is required to develop the low-cost system to create the 3D model of the indoor spaces for services based on the indoor models. In this paper, we thus introduce the rotating stereo frame camera system that has two cameras and generate the indoor 3D model using the system. First, select a test site and acquired images eight times during one day with different positions and heights of the system. Measurements were complemented by object control points obtained from a total station. As the data were obtained from the different positions and heights of the system, it was possible to make various combinations of data and choose several suitable combinations for input data. Next, we generated the 3D model of the test site using commercial software with previously chosen input data. The last part of the processes will be to evaluate the accuracy of the generated indoor model from selected input data. In summary, this paper introduces the low-cost system to acquire indoor spatial data and generate the 3D model using images acquired by the system. Through this experiments, we ensure that the introduced system is suitable for generating indoor spatial information. The proposed low-cost system will be applied to indoor services based on the indoor spatial information.

  9. 3D MODELLING OF AN INDOOR SPACE USING A ROTATING STEREO FRAME CAMERA SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sophisticated indoor design and growing development in urban architecture make indoor spaces more complex. And the indoor spaces are easily connected to public transportations such as subway and train stations. These phenomena allow to transfer outdoor activities to the indoor spaces. Constant development of technology has a significant impact on people knowledge about services such as location awareness services in the indoor spaces. Thus, it is required to develop the low-cost system to create the 3D model of the indoor spaces for services based on the indoor models. In this paper, we thus introduce the rotating stereo frame camera system that has two cameras and generate the indoor 3D model using the system. First, select a test site and acquired images eight times during one day with different positions and heights of the system. Measurements were complemented by object control points obtained from a total station. As the data were obtained from the different positions and heights of the system, it was possible to make various combinations of data and choose several suitable combinations for input data. Next, we generated the 3D model of the test site using commercial software with previously chosen input data. The last part of the processes will be to evaluate the accuracy of the generated indoor model from selected input data. In summary, this paper introduces the low-cost system to acquire indoor spatial data and generate the 3D model using images acquired by the system. Through this experiments, we ensure that the introduced system is suitable for generating indoor spatial information. The proposed low-cost system will be applied to indoor services based on the indoor spatial information.

  10. Physician training rotations in a large urban health department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Ellen; Kim-Farley, Robert; Gunzenhauser, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Hospitals are the normal setting for physician residency training within the United States. When a hospital cannot provide the specific training needed, a special rotation for that experience is arranged. Linkages between clinical and public health systems are vital to achieving improvements in overall health status in the United States. Nevertheless, most physicians in postgraduate residency programs receive neither training nor practical experience in the practice of public health. For many years, public health rotations have been available within the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (and its antecedent organizations). Arrangements that existed with local medical schools for residents to rotate with Los Angeles County Department of Health hospitals were extended to include a public health rotation. A general model for the rotation ensured that each resident received education and training relevant to the clinician in practice. Some parts of the model for experience have changed over time while others have not. Also, the challenges and opportunities for both trainees and preceptors have evolved and varied over time. A logic model demonstrates the components and changes with the public health rotation. Changes included alterations in recruitment, expectations, evaluation, formal education, and concepts related to the experience. Changes in the rotation model occurred in the context of other major environmental changes such as new electronic technology, changing expectations for residents, and evolving health services and public health systems. Each impacted the public health rotation. The evaluation method developed included content tests, assessment of competencies by residents and preceptors, and satisfaction measures. Results from the evaluation showed increases in competency and a high level of satisfaction after a public health rotation. The article includes examples of challenges and benefits to a local health department in providing a public

  11. PET image reconstruction with rotationally symmetric polygonal pixel grid based highly compressible system matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yunhan; Xia Yan; Liu Yaqiang; Wang Shi; Ma Tianyu; Chen Jing; Hong Baoyu

    2013-01-01

    To achieve a maximum compression of system matrix in positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction, we proposed a polygonal image pixel division strategy in accordance with rotationally symmetric PET geometry. Geometrical definition and indexing rule for polygonal pixels were established. Image conversion from polygonal pixel structure to conventional rectangular pixel structure was implemented using a conversion matrix. A set of test images were analytically defined in polygonal pixel structure, converted to conventional rectangular pixel based images, and correctly displayed which verified the correctness of the image definition, conversion description and conversion of polygonal pixel structure. A compressed system matrix for PET image recon was generated by tap model and tested by forward-projecting three different distributions of radioactive sources to the sinogram domain and comparing them with theoretical predictions. On a practical small animal PET scanner, a compress ratio of 12.6:1 of the system matrix size was achieved with the polygonal pixel structure, comparing with the conventional rectangular pixel based tap-mode one. OS-EM iterative image reconstruction algorithms with the polygonal and conventional Cartesian pixel grid were developed. A hot rod phantom was detected and reconstructed based on these two grids with reasonable time cost. Image resolution of reconstructed images was both 1.35 mm. We conclude that it is feasible to reconstruct and display images in a polygonal image pixel structure based on a compressed system matrix in PET image reconstruction. (authors)

  12. Biomechanical Reconstruction Using the Tacit Learning System: Intuitive Control of Prosthetic Hand Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Shintaro; Shimoda, Shingo; Alnajjar, Fady S K; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Hoshiyama, Minoru; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: For mechanically reconstructing human biomechanical function, intuitive proportional control, and robustness to unexpected situations are required. Particularly, creating a functional hand prosthesis is a typical challenge in the reconstruction of lost biomechanical function. Nevertheless, currently available control algorithms are in the development phase. The most advanced algorithms for controlling multifunctional prosthesis are machine learning and pattern recognition of myoelectric signals. Despite the increase in computational speed, these methods cannot avoid the requirement of user consciousness and classified separation errors. "Tacit Learning System" is a simple but novel adaptive control strategy that can self-adapt its posture to environment changes. We introduced the strategy in the prosthesis rotation control to achieve compensatory reduction, as well as evaluated the system and its effects on the user. Methods: We conducted a non-randomized study involving eight prosthesis users to perform a bar relocation task with/without Tacit Learning System support. Hand piece and body motions were recorded continuously with goniometers, videos, and a motion-capture system. Findings: Reduction in the participants' upper extremity rotatory compensation motion was monitored during the relocation task in all participants. The estimated profile of total body energy consumption improved in five out of six participants. Interpretation: Our system rapidly accomplished nearly natural motion without unexpected errors. The Tacit Learning System not only adapts human motions but also enhances the human ability to adapt to the system quickly, while the system amplifies compensation generated by the residual limb. The concept can be extended to various situations for reconstructing lost functions that can be compensated.

  13. Analysis and Compensation of Modulation Angular Rate Error Based on Missile-Borne Rotation Semi-Strapdown Inertial Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayu Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The Semi-Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SSINS provides a new solution to attitude measurement of a high-speed rotating missile. However, micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS inertial measurement unit (MIMU outputs are corrupted by significant sensor errors. In order to improve the navigation precision, a rotation modulation technology method called Rotation Semi-Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (RSSINS is introduced into SINS. In fact, the stability of the modulation angular rate is difficult to achieve in a high-speed rotation environment. The changing rotary angular rate has an impact on the inertial sensor error self-compensation. In this paper, the influence of modulation angular rate error, including acceleration-deceleration process, and instability of the angular rate on the navigation accuracy of RSSINS is deduced and the error characteristics of the reciprocating rotation scheme are analyzed. A new compensation method is proposed to remove or reduce sensor errors so as to make it possible to maintain high precision autonomous navigation performance by MIMU when there is no external aid. Experiments have been carried out to validate the performance of the method. In addition, the proposed method is applicable for modulation angular rate error compensation under various dynamic conditions.

  14. System level mechanisms of adaptation, learning, memory formation and evolvability: the role of chaperone and other networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurko, David M; Soti, Csaba; Stetak, Attila; Csermely, Peter

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade, network approaches became a powerful tool to describe protein structure and dynamics. Here, we describe first the protein structure networks of molecular chaperones, then characterize chaperone containing sub-networks of interactomes called as chaperone-networks or chaperomes. We review the role of molecular chaperones in short-term adaptation of cellular networks in response to stress, and in long-term adaptation discussing their putative functions in the regulation of evolvability. We provide a general overview of possible network mechanisms of adaptation, learning and memory formation. We propose that changes of network rigidity play a key role in learning and memory formation processes. Flexible network topology provides ' learning-competent' state. Here, networks may have much less modular boundaries than locally rigid, highly modular networks, where the learnt information has already been consolidated in a memory formation process. Since modular boundaries are efficient filters of information, in the 'learning-competent' state information filtering may be much smaller, than after memory formation. This mechanism restricts high information transfer to the 'learning competent' state. After memory formation, modular boundary-induced segregation and information filtering protect the stored information. The flexible networks of young organisms are generally in a 'learning competent' state. On the contrary, locally rigid networks of old organisms have lost their 'learning competent' state, but store and protect their learnt information efficiently. We anticipate that the above mechanism may operate at the level of both protein-protein interaction and neuronal networks.

  15. Transmission of High Frequency Vibrations in Rotating Systems. Application to Cavitation Detection in Hydraulic Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Valentín

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main causes of damage in hydraulic turbines is cavitation. While not all cavitation appearing in a turbine is of a destructive type, erosive cavitation can severely affect the structure, thus increasing maintenance costs and reducing the remaining useful life of the machine. Of all types of cavitation, the maximum erosion occurs when clouds of bubbles collapse on the runner surface (cloud cavitation. When this occurs it is associated with a substantial increase in noise, and vibrations that are propagated everywhere throughout the machine. The generation of these cavitation clouds may occur naturally or it may be the response to a periodic pressure fluctuation, like the rotor/stator interaction in a hydraulic turbine. Erosive bubble cavitation generates high-frequency vibrations that are modulated by the shedding frequency. Therefore, the methods for the detection of erosive cavitation in hydraulic turbines are based on the measurement and demodulation of high-frequency vibrations. In this paper, the feasibility of detecting erosive cavitation in hydraulic turbines is investigated experimentally in a rotating disk system, which represents a simplified hydraulic turbine structure. The test rig used consists of a rotating disk submerged in a tank of water and confined with nearby axial and radial rigid surfaces. The excitation patterns produced by cloud cavitation are reproduced with a PZT (piezoelectric patch located on the disk. These patterns include pseudo-random excitations of different frequency bands modulated by one low carrier frequency, which model the erosive cavitation characteristics. Different types of sensors have been placed in the stationary and in the rotating parts (accelerometers, acoustic emission (AE, and a microphone in order to detect the excitation pattern. The results obtained for all the sensors tested have been compared in detail for the different excitation patterns applied to the disk. With this information

  16. The past and present Earth-Moon system: the speed of light stays steady as tides evolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James G; Turyshev, Slava G; Boggs, Dale H

    Tides induce a semimajor axis rate of +38.08 ± 0.19 mm/yr, corresponding to an acceleration of the Moon's orbital mean longitude of -25.82 ± 0.13 "/cent 2 , as determined by the analysis of 43 yr of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data. The LLR result is consistent with analyses made with different data spans, different analysis techniques, analysis of optical observations, and independent knowledge of tides. Plate motions change ocean shapes, and geological evidence and model calculations indicate lower rates of tidal evolution for extended past intervals. Earth rotation has long-term slowing due to tidal dissipation, but it also experiences variations for times up to about 10 5  yr due to changes in the moment of inertia. An analysis of LLR data also tests for any rate of change in either the speed of light c or apparent mean distance. The result is (-2.8 ± 3.4)×10 -12 /yr for either scale rate or -(d c /d t )/ c , or equivalently -1.0 ± 1.3 mm/yr for apparent distance rate. The lunar range does not reveal any change in the speed of light.

  17. A neighbourhood evolving network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.J.; Wang, G.Z.; Jiang, Q.Y.; Han, Z.X.

    2006-01-01

    Many social, technological, biological and economical systems are best described by evolved network models. In this short Letter, we propose and study a new evolving network model. The model is based on the new concept of neighbourhood connectivity, which exists in many physical complex networks. The statistical properties and dynamics of the proposed model is analytically studied and compared with those of Barabasi-Albert scale-free model. Numerical simulations indicate that this network model yields a transition between power-law and exponential scaling, while the Barabasi-Albert scale-free model is only one of its special (limiting) cases. Particularly, this model can be used to enhance the evolving mechanism of complex networks in the real world, such as some social networks development

  18. Magnetostrictive patch sensor system for battery-less real-time measurement of torsional vibrations of rotating shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Kyu; Seung, Hong Min; Park, Chung Il; Lee, Joo Kyung; Lim, Do Hyeong; Kim, Yoon Young

    2018-02-01

    Real-time uninterrupted measurement for torsional vibrations of rotating shafts is crucial for permanent health monitoring. So far, strain gauge systems with telemetry units have been used for real-time monitoring. However, they have a critical disadvantage in that shaft operations must be stopped intermittently to replace telemetry unit batteries. To find an alternative method to carry out battery-less real-time measurement for torsional vibrations of rotating shafts, a magnetostrictive patch sensor system was proposed in the present study. Since the proposed sensor does not use any powered telemetry system, no battery is needed and thus there is no need to stop rotating shafts for battery replacement. The proposed sensor consists of magnetostrictive patches and small magnets tightly bonded onto a shaft. A solenoid coil is placed around the shaft to convert magnetostrictive patch deformation by shaft torsional vibration into electric voltage output. For sensor design and characterization, investigations were performed in a laboratory on relatively small-sized stationary solid shaft. A magnetostrictive patch sensor system was then designed and installed on a large rotating propulsion shaft of an LPG carrier ship in operation. Vibration signals were measured using the proposed sensor system and compared to those measured with a telemetry unit-equipped strain gauge system.

  19. Experimental investigation of thermal processes in the multi-ring Couette system with counter rotation of cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamonov, V. N.; Nazarov, A. D.; Serov, A. F.; Terekhov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of parameters of the multi-ring Couette system with counter rotating coaxial cylinders on the process of thermal energy release in a viscous liquid filling this system is considered with regard to the problem of determining the possibility of creating the high-performance wind heat generator. The multi-cylinder rotor design allows directly conversion of the mechanical power of a device consisting of two "rotor" wind turbines with a common axis normal to the air flow into the thermal energy in a wide range of rotational speed of the cylinders. Experimental results on the measurement of thermal power released in the pilot heat generator at different relative angular speeds of cylinder rotation are presented.

  20. Infrared spectroscopy of evolved objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.K.; Roche, P.F.

    1984-01-01

    In this review, the authors are concerned with spectroscopic observations of evolved objects made in the wavelength range 1-300μm. Spectroscopic observations can conveniently be divided into studies of narrow lines, bands and broader continua. The vibrational frequencies of molecular groups fall mainly in this spectral region and appear as vibration-rotation bands from the gas phase, and as less structured, but often broader, features from the solid state. Many ionic lines, including recombination lines of abundant species and fine structure lines of astrophysically important ions also appear in this region. The continuum can arise from a number of mechanisms - photospheric emission, radiation from dust, free-free transitions in ionized gas and non-thermal processes. (Auth.)

  1. Long-term effects of conservation systems on productivity for the old rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter legumes in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production is not new to the Southeast. In 1896, the Old Rotation experiment at Auburn University was established to study the feasibility of producing cotton in crop rotations with winter legumes managed as a green manure crop. Throughout the experim...

  2. Free vibration analysis of a multiple rotating nano-beams system based on the Eringen nonlocal elasticity theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafarian, M.; Ariaei, A., E-mail: ariaei@eng.ui.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-07

    The free vibration analysis of a multiple rotating nanobeams' system applying the nonlocal Eringen elasticity theory is presented. Multiple nanobeams' systems are of great importance in nano-optomechanical applications. At nanoscale, the nonlocal effects become non-negligible. According to the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, the governing partial differential equations are derived by incorporating the nonlocal scale effects. Assuming a structure of n parallel nanobeams, the vibration of the system is described by a coupled set of n partial differential equations. The method involves a change of variables to uncouple the equations and the differential transform method as an efficient mathematical technique to solve the nonlocal governing differential equations. Then a number of parametric studies are conducted to assess the effect of the nonlocal scaling parameter, rotational speed, boundary conditions, hub radius, and the stiffness coefficients of the elastic interlayer media on the vibration behavior of the coupled rotating multiple-carbon-nanotube-beam system. It is revealed that the bending vibration of the system is significantly influenced by the rotational speed, elastic mediums, and the nonlocal scaling parameters. This model is validated by comparing the results with those available in the literature. The natural frequencies are in a reasonably good agreement with the reported results.

  3. Volcanic-plutonic connections and metal fertility of highly evolved magma systems: A case study from the Herberton Sn-W-Mo Mineral Field, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanbo; Spandler, Carl; Chang, Zhaoshan; Clarke, Gavin

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the connection between the highly evolved intrusive and extrusive systems is essential to explore the evolution of high silicic magma systems, which plays an important role in discussions of planetary differentiation, the growth of continents, crustal evolution, and the formation of highly evolved magma associated Sn-W-Mo mineral systems. To discern differences between "fertile" and "non-fertile" igneous rocks associated with Sn-W-Mo mineralization and reveal the genetic links between coeval intrusive and extrusive rocks, we integrate whole rock geochemistry, geochronology and Hf isotope signatures of igneous zircons from contemporaneous plutonic and volcanic rocks from the world-class Herberton Mineral Field of Queensland, Australia. The 310-300 Ma intrusive rocks and associated intra-plutonic W-Mo mineralization formed from relatively oxidized magmas after moderate degrees of crystal fractionation. The geochemical and isotopic features of the coeval volcanic succession are best reconciled utilizing the widely-accepted volcanic-plutonic connection model, whereby the volcanic rocks represent fractionated derivatives of the intrusive rocks. Older intrusions emplaced at 335-315 Ma formed from relatively low fO2 magmas that fractionated extensively to produce highly evolved granites that host Sn mineralization. Coeval volcanic rocks of this suite are compositionally less evolved than the intrusive rocks, thereby requiring a different model to link these plutonic-volcanic sequences. In this case, we propose that the most fractionated magmas were not lost to volcanism, but instead were effectively retained at the plutonic level, which allowed further localized build-up of volatiles and lithophile metals in the plutonic environment. This disconnection to the volcanism and degassing may be a crucial step for forming granite-hosted Sn mineralization. The transition between these two igneous regimes in Herberton region over a ∼30 m.y. period is attributed to

  4. Comparing planar image quality of rotating slat and parallel hole collimation: influence of system modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holen, Roel van; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2008-01-01

    The main remaining challenge for a gamma camera is to overcome the existing trade-off between collimator spatial resolution and system sensitivity. This problem, strongly limiting the performance of parallel hole collimated gamma cameras, can be overcome by applying new collimator designs such as rotating slat (RS) collimators which have a much higher photon collection efficiency. The drawback of a RS collimated gamma camera is that, even for obtaining planar images, image reconstruction is needed, resulting in noise accumulation. However, nowadays iterative reconstruction techniques with accurate system modeling can provide better image quality. Because the impact of this modeling on image quality differs from one system to another, an objective assessment of the image quality obtained with a RS collimator is needed in comparison to classical projection images obtained using a parallel hole (PH) collimator. In this paper, a comparative study of image quality, achieved with system modeling, is presented. RS data are reconstructed to planar images using maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) with an accurate Monte Carlo derived system matrix while PH projections are deconvolved using a Monte Carlo derived point-spread function. Contrast-to-noise characteristics are used to show image quality for cold and hot spots of varying size. Influence of the object size and contrast is investigated using the optimal contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR o ). For a typical phantom setup, results show that cold spot imaging is slightly better for a PH collimator. For hot spot imaging, the CNR o of the RS images is found to increase with increasing lesion diameter and lesion contrast while it decreases when background dimensions become larger. Only for very large background dimensions in combination with low contrast lesions, the use of a PH collimator could be beneficial for hot spot imaging. In all other cases, the RS collimator scores better. Finally, the simulation of a

  5. Block Copolymer Modified Epoxy Amine System for Reactive Rotational Molding: Structures, Properties and Processability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Eva; Nony, Fabien; Tcharkhtchi, Abbas; Gérard, Jean-François

    2011-05-01

    Poly(styrene-butadiene-methylmethacrylate) (SBM) and poly(methylmethacrylate-butyle-acrylate-methylmethacrylate) (MAM) triblock copolymers have been dissolved in liquid DGEBA epoxy resin which is subsequently polymerized by meta-xylene diamine (MXDA) or Jeffamine EDR-148. A chemorheology study of these formulations by plate-plate rheology and by thermal analysis has allowed to conclude that the addition of these copolymer blocks improve the reactive rotational moulding processability without affecting the processing time. Indeed, it prevents the pooling of the formulation at the bottom of the mould and a too rapid build up of resin viscosity of these thermosetting systems. The morphology of the cured blends examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows an increase of fracture surface area and thereby a potential increase of the toughness with the modification of epoxy system. Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMA) and opalescence of final material show that the block PMMA, initially miscible, is likely to induce phase separation from the epoxy-amine matrix. Thereby, the poor compatibilisation between the toughener and the matrix has a detrimental effect on the tensile mechanical properties. The compatibilisation has to be increased to improve in synergy the processability and the final properties of these block copolymer modified formulations. First attempts could be by adapting the length and ratio of each block.

  6. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Takuro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles. The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis - the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy - and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  7. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takuro; Archibald, John M

    2012-04-24

    The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles.The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis--the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy--and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  8. Supervision and prognosis architecture based on dynamical classification method for the predictive maintenance of dynamical evolving systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traore, M.; Chammas, A.; Duviella, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we are concerned by the improvement of the safety, availability and reliability of dynamical systems’ components subjected to slow degradations (slow drifts). We propose an architecture for efficient Predictive Maintenance (PM) according to the real time estimate of the future state of the components. The architecture is built on supervision and prognosis tools. The prognosis method is based on an appropriated supervision technique that consists in drift tracking of the dynamical systems using AUDyC (AUto-adaptive and Dynamical Clustering), that is an auto-adaptive dynamical classifier. Thus, due to the complexity and the dynamical of the considered systems, the Failure Mode Effect and Criticity Analysis (FMECA) is used to identify the key components of the systems. A component is defined as an element of the system that can be impacted by only one failure. A failure of a key component causes a long downtime of the system. From the FMECA, a Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) of the system are built to determine the propagation laws of a failure on the system by using a deductive method. The proposed architecture is implemented for the PM of a thermoregulator. The application on this real system highlights the interests and the performances of the proposed architecture

  9. Cultivar specific plant-soil feedback overrules soil legacy effects of elevated ozone in a rice-wheat rotation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Qi; Yang, Yue; Bao, Xuelian; Zhu, Jianguo; Liang, Wenju; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tropospheric ozone has been recognized as one of the most important air pollutants. Many studies have shown that elevated ozone negatively impacts yields of important crops such as wheat or rice, but how ozone influences soil ecosystems of these crops and plant growth in rotation systems is

  10. Conversion of the magnetic field measured in three components on the magnetic sensor body's random coordinate system into three components on geographical coordinate system through quaternion rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIM, M.; PARK, Y.; Jung, H.; SHIN, Y.; Rim, H.; PARK, C.

    2017-12-01

    To measure all components of a physical property, for example the magnetic field, is more useful than to measure its magnitude only in interpretation and application thereafter. To convert the physical property measured in 3 components on a random coordinate system, for example on moving magnetic sensor body's coordinate system, into 3 components on a fixed coordinate system, for example on geographical coordinate system, by the rotations of coordinate system around Euler angles for example, we should have the attitude values of the sensor body in time series, which could be acquired by an INS-GNSS system of which the axes are installed coincident with those of the sensor body. But if we want to install some magnetic sensors in array at sea floor but without attitude acquisition facility of the magnetic sensors and to monitor the variation of magnetic fields in time, we should have also some way to estimate the relation between the geographical coordinate system and each sensor body's coordinate system by comparison of the vectors only measured on both coordinate systems on the assumption that the directions of the measured magnetic field on both coordinate systems are the same. For that estimation, we have at least 3 ways. The first one is to calculate 3 Euler angles phi, theta, psi from the equation Vgeograph = Rx(phi) Ry(theta) Rz(psi) Vrandom, where Vgeograph is the vector on geographical coordinate system etc. and Rx(phi) is the rotation matrix around the x axis by the angle phi etc. The second one is to calculate the difference of inclination and declination between the 2 vectors on spherical coordinate system. The third one, used by us for this study, is to calculate the angle of rotation along a great circle around the rotation axis, and the direction of the rotation axis. We installed no. 1 and no. 2 FVM-400 fluxgate magnetometers in array near Cheongyang Geomagnetic Observatory (IAGA code CYG) and acquired time series of magnetic fields for CYG and for

  11. Self-calibration method for rotating laser positioning system using interscanning technology and ultrasonic ranging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Yu, Zhijing; Zhuge, Jingchang

    2016-04-01

    A rotating laser positioning system (RLPS) is an efficient measurement method for large-scale metrology. Due to multiple transmitter stations, which consist of a measurement network, the position relationship of these stations must be first calibrated. However, with such auxiliary devices such as a laser tracker, scale bar, and complex calibration process, the traditional calibration methods greatly reduce the measurement efficiency. This paper proposes a self-calibration method for RLPS, which can automatically obtain the position relationship. The method is implemented through interscanning technology by using a calibration bar mounted on the transmitter station. Each bar is composed of three RLPS receivers and one ultrasonic sensor whose coordinates are known in advance. The calibration algorithm is mainly based on multiplane and distance constraints and is introduced in detail through a two-station mathematical model. The repeated experiments demonstrate that the coordinate measurement uncertainty of spatial points by using this method is about 0.1 mm, and the accuracy experiments show that the average coordinate measurement deviation is about 0.3 mm compared with a laser tracker. The accuracy can meet the requirements of most applications, while the calibration efficiency is significantly improved.

  12. An overview of rotating machine systems with high-temperature bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Difan; Izumi, Mitsuru; Miki, Motohiro; Felder, Brice; Ida, Tetsuya; Kitano, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    The paper contains a review of recent advancements in rotating machines with bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTS). The high critical current density of bulk HTS enables us to design rotating machines with a compact configuration in a practical scheme. The development of an axial-gap-type trapped flux synchronous rotating machine together with the systematic research works at the Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology since 2001 are briefly introduced. Developments in bulk HTS rotating machines in other research groups are also summarized. The key issues of bulk HTS machines, including material progress of bulk HTS, in situ magnetization, and cooling together with AC loss at low-temperature operation are discussed.

  13. Application of Coulomb and Lorentz gauge conditions for the pertubative treatment of a rotation fermions system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bes, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The history of the development of quantum field theory for treating coupling between phonons and fermions are summarized. These perturbative theories are applied introducing concept of gauge invariance for the problem of rotation nuclei. (L.C.) [pt

  14. A modeling and control framework for operating large-scale electric power systems under present and newly evolving competitive industry structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija D. Ilić

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a systematic, structure-based modeling framework for analysis and control of electric power systems for processes evolving over the mid-term and long-term time horizons. Much simpler models than the detailed dynamics specifically for control design at different hierarchical levels are obtained by applying both temporal and spatial separation. These simple models, or the aggregate models, represent the net effect of interactions among interconnected regions on specific hierarchical levels. They are exact, since no assumptions on weak interconnections among the subsystems are made. Moreover they are easily understood in terms of power flows among the regions. The approach is essential for improving present performance of the system. It is also potentially useful in a competitive utility environment in which it is critical to study the interplay between technical and economic processes.

  15. Rotating flow

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, Peter R N

    2010-01-01

    Rotating flow is critically important across a wide range of scientific, engineering and product applications, providing design and modeling capability for diverse products such as jet engines, pumps and vacuum cleaners, as well as geophysical flows. Developed over the course of 20 years' research into rotating fluids and associated heat transfer at the University of Sussex Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Research Centre (TFMRC), Rotating Flow is an indispensable reference and resource for all those working within the gas turbine and rotating machinery industries. Traditional fluid and flow dynamics titles offer the essential background but generally include very sparse coverage of rotating flows-which is where this book comes in. Beginning with an accessible introduction to rotating flow, recognized expert Peter Childs takes you through fundamental equations, vorticity and vortices, rotating disc flow, flow around rotating cylinders and flow in rotating cavities, with an introduction to atmospheric and oceanic circul...

  16. Rotational seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    Rotational seismology is an emerging study of all aspects of rotational motions induced by earthquakes, explosions, and ambient vibrations. It is of interest to several disciplines, including seismology, earthquake engineering, geodesy, and earth-based detection of Einstein’s gravitation waves.Rotational effects of seismic waves, together with rotations caused by soil–structure interaction, have been observed for centuries (e.g., rotated chimneys, monuments, and tombstones). Figure 1a shows the rotated monument to George Inglis observed after the 1897 Great Shillong earthquake. This monument had the form of an obelisk rising over 19 metres high from a 4 metre base. During the earthquake, the top part broke off and the remnant of some 6 metres rotated about 15° relative to the base. The study of rotational seismology began only recently when sensitive rotational sensors became available due to advances in aeronautical and astronomical instrumentations.

  17. The Information Ecology of Personal Health Record Systems: Secure Messaging as Catalyst and Its Evolving Impact on Use and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazi, Kim M.

    2012-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) and PHR systems have been designed as consumer-oriented tools to empower patients and improve health care. Despite significant consumer interest and anticipated benefits, adoption remains low. Understanding the consumer perspective is necessary, but insufficient by itself. Consumer PHR use also has broad implications…

  18. From the doctor's workshop to the iron cage? Evolving modes of physician control in US health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchener, Martin; Caronna, Carol A; Shortell, Stephen M

    2005-03-01

    As national health systems pursue the common goals of containing expenditure growth and improving quality, many have sought to replace autonomous modes (systems) of physician control that rely on initial professional training and subsequent peer review. A common approach has involved extending bureaucratic modes of physician control that employ techniques such as hierarchical coordination and salaried positions. This paper applies concepts from studies of professional work to frame an empirical analysis of emergent bureaucratic modes of physician control in US hospital-based systems. Conceptually, we draw from recent studies to update Scott's (Health Services Res. 17(3) (1982) 213) typology to specify three bureaucratic modes of physician control: heteronomous, conjoint, and custodial. Empirically, we use case study evidence from eight US hospital-based systems to illustrate the heterogeneity of bureaucratic modes of physician control that span each of the ideal types. The findings indicate that some influential analysts perpetuate a caricature of bureaucratic organization which underplays its capacity to provide multiple modes of physician control that maintain professional autonomy over the content of work, and present opportunities for aligning practice with social goals.

  19. A Qualitative Assessment of Current CCF Guidance Based on a Review of Safety System Digital Implementation Changes with Evolving Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsah, Kofi [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Muhlheim, Michael David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wood, Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is initiating a new rulemaking project to develop a digital system common-cause failure (CCF) rule. This rulemaking will review and modify or affirm the NRC's current digital system CCF policy as discussed in the Staff Requirements Memorandum to the Secretary of the Commission, Office of the NRC (SECY) 93-087, Policy, Technical, and Licensing Issues Pertaining to Evolutionary and Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Designs, and Branch Technical Position (BTP) 7-19, Guidance on Evaluation of Defense-in-Depth and Diversity in Digital Computer-Based Instrumentation and Control Systems, as well as Chapter 7, Instrumentation and Controls, in NRC Regulatory Guide (NUREG)-0800, Standard Review Plan for Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants (ML033580677). The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is providing technical support to the NRC staff on the CCF rulemaking, and this report is one of several providing the technical basis to inform NRC staff members. For the task described in this report, ORNL examined instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology implementations in nuclear power plants in the light of current CCF guidance. The intent was to assess whether the current position on CCF is adequate given the evolutions in digital safety system implementations and, if gaps in the guidance were found, to provide recommendations as to how these gaps could be closed.

  20. Global properties of locally rotational symmetric Bianchi I spacetimes in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-dilaton system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Makoto [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2006-12-21

    We discuss the strong cosmic censorship conjecture for cosmological spacetimes in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-dilaton system. Locally rotational symmetric Bianchi I spacetimes are considered. We show local and global existence theorems for the system. Asymptotic behaviour for the spacetimes is also investigated. The curvature invariant is blowup at the initial singularities and the spacetimes are future geodesic complete. Thus, the strong cosmic censorship conjecture for the spacetimes holds.

  1. Global properties of locally rotational symmetric Bianchi I spacetimes in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-dilaton system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the strong cosmic censorship conjecture for cosmological spacetimes in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-dilaton system. Locally rotational symmetric Bianchi I spacetimes are considered. We show local and global existence theorems for the system. Asymptotic behaviour for the spacetimes is also investigated. The curvature invariant is blowup at the initial singularities and the spacetimes are future geodesic complete. Thus, the strong cosmic censorship conjecture for the spacetimes holds

  2. Evolvement of soft templates in surfactant/cosurfactant system for shape control of ZnSe nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Bo; Liu Yongjun; Li Yanjuan; Yuan Bo; Jia Mingfen; Jiang Fengzhi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Soft templates were found in the shape control synthesis of ZnSe nanocrystals. ► Micelle formation model in the soft templates system was proposed and proved. ► Different shapes of ZnSe nanocrystals were prepared and explained by proposed model. - Abstract: The evolution of soft templates in the synthesis of ZnSe nanocrystals realized through a surfactant/cosurfactant system was investigated and a micelle formation process model was proposed. Through freeze-fracture electron microscopy, it was proven that template micelles were formed in the zinc precursors. Furthermore, it was found that a long stirring period was essential for achieving the lowest energy state of the soft templates which were used for synthesizing monodisperse ZnSe quantum dots.

  3. Evolvement of soft templates in surfactant/cosurfactant system for shape control of ZnSe nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Bo [Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry for Natural Resource, Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Science and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Liu Yongjun [Advanced Analysis and Measurement Center, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Li Yanjuan [Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry for Natural Resource, Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Science and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Yuan Bo [Advanced Analysis and Measurement Center, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Jia Mingfen [Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry for Natural Resource, Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Science and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Jiang Fengzhi, E-mail: fengzhij@ynu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry for Natural Resource, Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Science and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Advanced Analysis and Measurement Center, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China)

    2012-03-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soft templates were found in the shape control synthesis of ZnSe nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micelle formation model in the soft templates system was proposed and proved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different shapes of ZnSe nanocrystals were prepared and explained by proposed model. - Abstract: The evolution of soft templates in the synthesis of ZnSe nanocrystals realized through a surfactant/cosurfactant system was investigated and a micelle formation process model was proposed. Through freeze-fracture electron microscopy, it was proven that template micelles were formed in the zinc precursors. Furthermore, it was found that a long stirring period was essential for achieving the lowest energy state of the soft templates which were used for synthesizing monodisperse ZnSe quantum dots.

  4. National monetary policy by regional design: the evolving role of the Federal Reserve banks in Federal Reserve System policy

    OpenAIRE

    David C. Wheelock

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the history of Federal Reserve Bank input into Federal Reserve System monetary policymaking. From the Fed's founding in 1914 through the Great Depression, the Reserve Banks held the balance of power. Dissatisfaction with the Fed's performance, however, led to a wholesale reorganization in 1935 that greatly enhanced the authority of the Federal Reserve Board, but retained a role for the Federal Banks through the membership of their presidents on the FOMC, as well as in sett...

  5. Human Factors Design Criteria for Future Systems. FAADS Design Criteria Evolving from the Sgt. York Follow-On Evaluation 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    and MIL-., TD -11172C. These are the most widely used documents providing human factors design criteria for the development of military systems through...4) 4bd 4)(.E c4- z - v -. r-f .r40 m 0 S -( OD Q) 0k .1 .o1 u .d 44). o- C.~) V QCf 44)) :0 J0 Al4 L .4Uv.-4 C4)LI.-44(U(E *4)4)( U . S- M 0 a *-P 4

  6. How nervous systems evolve in relation to their embodiment: what we can learn from octopuses and other molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochner, Binyamin

    2013-01-01

    Cephalopods such as the octopus show the most advanced behavior among invertebrates, which they accomplish with an exceptionally flexible body plan. In this review I propose that the embodied organization approach, developed by roboticists to design efficient autonomous robots, is useful for understanding the evolution and development of the efficient adaptive interaction of animals with their environment, using the octopus as the leading example. The embodied organization approach explains adaptive behavior as emerging from the continuous dynamical and reciprocal physical and informational interactions between four elements: the controller, the mechanical and the sensory systems and the environment. In contrast to hierarchical organization, in embodied organization, self-organization processes can take part in the emergence of the adaptive properties. I first discuss how the embodiment concept explains covariation of body form, nervous system organization, and level of behavioral complexity using the Mollusca as an example. This is an ideal phylum to test such a qualitative correlation between body/brain/behavior, because they show the greatest variations of body plan within a single phylum. In some cases the covariation of nervous system and body structure seems to arise independently of close phylogenetic relationships. Next, I dwell on the octopus as an ideal model to test the embodiment concept within a single biological system. Here, the unusual body morphology of the octopus exposes the uniqueness of the four components comprising the octopus' embodiment. Considering together the results from behavioral, physiological, anatomical, and motor control research suggests that these four elements mutually influence each other. It is this mutual interactions and self-organization which have led to their unique evolution and development to create the unique and highly efficient octopus embodiment. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  8. Comments on Frequency Swept Rotating Input Perturbation Techniques and Identification of the Fluid Force Models in Rotor/bearing/seal Systems and Fluid Handling Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    Perturbation techniques used for identification of rotating system dynamic characteristics are described. A comparison between two periodic frequency-swept perturbation methods applied in identification of fluid forces of rotating machines is presented. The description of the fluid force model identified by inputting circular periodic frequency-swept force is given. This model is based on the existence and strength of the circumferential flow, most often generated by the shaft rotation. The application of the fluid force model in rotor dynamic analysis is presented. It is shown that the rotor stability is an entire rotating system property. Some areas for further research are discussed.

  9. Comparison of three types of oil crop rotation systems for effective use and remediation of heavy metal contaminated agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhou, Xihong; Tie, Boqing; Peng, Liang; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Kelin; Zeng, Qingru

    2017-12-01

    Selecting suitable plants tolerant to heavy metals and producing products of economic value may be a key factor in promoting the practical application of phytoremediation polluted soils. The aim of this study is to further understand the utilization and remediation of seriously contaminated agricultural soil. In a one-year field experiment, we grew oilseed rape over the winter and then subsequently sunflowers, peanuts and sesame after the first harvest. This three rotation system produced high yields of dry biomass; the oilseed rape-sunflower, oilseed rape-peanut and oilseed rape-sesame rotation allowed us to extract 458.6, 285.7, and 134.5 g ha -1 of cadmium, and 1264.7, 1006.1, and 831.1 g ha -1 of lead from soil, respectively. The oilseed rape-sunflower rotation showed the highest phytoextraction efficiency (1.98%) for cadmium. Lead and cadmium in oils are consistent with standards after extraction with n-hexane. Following successive extractions with potassium tartrate, concentrations of lead and cadmium in oilseed rape and peanut seed meals were lower than levels currently permissible for feeds. Thus, this rotation system could be useful for local farmers as it would enable the generation of income during otherwise sparse phytoremediation periods. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. [The role of the mental health community in an evolving mental health system. State of knowledge and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Guy; Fleury, Marie-Josée

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this article are: 1) to trace the history and role of mental health community organizations (MHCO) in the Quebec mental health system as well as their specific values and practices; and 2) to examine the impact of the Quebec Mental Health Plan 2005-2010 on the functioning of community organizations and their relations with the public healthcare system. This article draws upon writings produced by the principal provincial and regional community organization associations in Québec, as well as results of previous studies related to inter-organizational relations among MHCO. The Quebec community-based system consists of several successive generations of the MHCO, each constructed within a particular context. Before 1960, the Canadian Mental Health Association offered activities for promotion and prevention in mental health and participated in the development of several MHCO. The 1970s witnessed the formation of groups aimed at the protection of human rights and the first alternative resources. During the 1980s and 90s, a proliferation of MHCO followed upon their formal recognition by the Ministère de la Santé et des services sociaux (MSSS). These new organizations were established not so much in opposition, or as an alternative, to the public mental health system, but in complement with it. By 2012-13, there were 412 MCHO financed by the MSSS offering services to the population. Roughly half were located in the regions of Montreal, Montérégie and the Capitale Nationale. The MHCO are distinguished from public institutions by a number of characteristics: 1) treatment based not on diagnosis but on the overall situation of the person; 2) shared experience with peers; and 3) empowerment, inviting the person to become involved in decisions concerning his/her treatment and service use as well as decisions that concern the functioning of the organization; 4) establishment of more egalitarian relationships between service users and treating professionals

  11. Evolving the Nation's Energy Infrastructure: A Challenging System Issue for the Twenty-First Century; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, B.

    2007-04-01

    Over the next several decades, a profound transformation of the global energy enterprise will occur driven largely by population growth and economic development. How this growing demand for energy is met poses one of the most complex and challenging issues of our time. The current national energy dialogue reflects the challenge in simultaneously considering the social, political, economic, and technical issues as the energy system is defined, technical targets are established, and programs and investments are implemented to meet those technical targets. This paper examines the general concepts and options for meeting this challenge.

  12. Evolvement of transgenic male-sterility and fertility-restoration system in rice for production of hybrid varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gundra Sivakrishna; Deveshwar, Priyanka; Sharma, Malini; Kapoor, Sanjay; Rao, Khareedu Venkateswara

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a unique male-sterility and fertility-restoration system in rice by combining Brassica napus cysteine-protease gene (BnCysP1) with anther-specific P12 promoter of rice for facilitating production of hybrid varieties. In diverse crop plants, male-sterility has been exploited as a useful approach for production of hybrid varieties to harness the benefits of hybrid vigour. The promoter region of Os12bglu38 gene of rice has been isolated from the developing panicles and was designated as P12. The promoter was fused with gusA reporter gene and was expressed in Arabidopsis and rice systems. Transgenic plants exhibited GUS activity in tapetal cells and pollen of the developing anthers indicating anther/pollen-specific expression of the promoter. For engineering nuclear male sterility, the coding region of Brassica napus cysteine protease1 (BnCysP1) was isolated from developing seeds and fused to P12 promoter. Transgenic rice plants obtained with P12-BnCysP1 failed to produce functional pollen grains. The F 1 seeds obtained from BnCysP1 male-sterile plants and untransformed controls showed 1:1 (tolerant:sensitive) ratio when germinated on the MS medium supplemented with phosphinothricin (5 mg/l), confirming that the male sterility has been successfully engineered in rice. For male fertility restoration, transgenic rice plants carrying BnCysP1Si silencing system were developed. The pollination of BnCysP1 male-sterile (female-fertile) plants with BnCysP1Si pollen resulted in normal grain filling. The F 1 seeds of BnCysP1 × BnCysP1Si when germinated on the MS basal medium containing PPT (5 mg/l) and hygromycin (70 mg/l) exhibited 1:1 (tolerant:sensitive) ratio and the tolerant plants invariably showed normal grain filling. The overall results clearly suggest that the customized male-sterility & fertility-restoration system can be exploited for quality hybrid seed production in various crops.

  13. Governing Laws of Complex System Predictability under Co-evolving Uncertainty Sources: Theory and Nonlinear Geophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, R. A. P.

    2017-12-01

    Predictability assessments are traditionally made on a case-by-case basis, often by running the particular model of interest with randomly perturbed initial/boundary conditions and parameters, producing computationally expensive ensembles. These approaches provide a lumped statistical view of uncertainty evolution, without eliciting the fundamental processes and interactions at play in the uncertainty dynamics. In order to address these limitations, we introduce a systematic dynamical framework for predictability assessment and forecast, by analytically deriving governing equations of predictability in terms of the fundamental architecture of dynamical systems, independent of any particular problem under consideration. The framework further relates multiple uncertainty sources along with their coevolutionary interplay, enabling a comprehensive and explicit treatment of uncertainty dynamics along time, without requiring the actual model to be run. In doing so, computational resources are freed and a quick and effective a-priori systematic dynamic evaluation is made of predictability evolution and its challenges, including aspects in the model architecture and intervening variables that may require optimization ahead of initiating any model runs. It further brings out universal dynamic features in the error dynamics elusive to any case specific treatment, ultimately shedding fundamental light on the challenging issue of predictability. The formulated approach, framed with broad mathematical physics generality in mind, is then implemented in dynamic models of nonlinear geophysical systems with various degrees of complexity, in order to evaluate their limitations and provide informed assistance on how to optimize their design and improve their predictability in fundamental dynamical terms.

  14. In-flight measurements of aircraft propeller deformation by means of an autarkic fast rotating imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasicki, Boleslaw; Boden, Fritz

    2015-03-01

    The non-intrusive in-flight measurement of the deformation and pitch of the aircraft propeller is a demanding task. The idea of an imaging system integrated and rotating with the aircraft propeller has been presented on the 30th International Congress on High-Speed Imaging and Photonics (ICHSIP30) in 2012. Since then this system has been constructed and tested in the laboratory as well as on the real aircraft. In this paper we outline the principle of Image Pattern Correlation Technique (IPCT) based on Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and describe the construction of a dedicated autarkic 3D camera system placed on the investigated propeller and rotating at its full speed. Furthermore, the results of the first ground and in-flight tests are shown and discussed. This development has been found by the European Commission within the 7th frame project AIM2 (contract no. 266107).

  15. Radio Frequency Trap for Containment of Plasmas in Antimatter Propulsion Systems Using Rotating Wall Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor); Martin, James Joseph (Inventor); Lewis, Raymond A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A containment apparatus for containing a cloud of charged particles comprises a cylindrical vacuum chamber having a longitudinal axis. Within the vacuum chamber is a containment region. A magnetic field is aligned with the longitudinal axis of the vacuum chamber. The magnetic field is time invariant and uniform in strength over the containment region. An electric field is also aligned with the longitudinal axis of the vacuum chamber and the magnetic field. The electric field is time invariant, and forms a potential well over the containment region. One or more means are disposed around the cloud of particles for inducing a rotating electric field internal to the vacuum chamber. The rotating electric field imparts energy to the charged particles within the containment region and compress the cloud of particles. The means disposed around the outer surface of the vacuum chamber for inducing a rotating electric field are four or more segments forming a segmented ring, the segments conforming to the outer surface of the vacuum chamber. Each of the segments is energized by a separate alternating voltage. The sum of the voltages imposed on each segment establishes the rotating field. When four segments form a ring, the rotating field is obtained by a signal generator applying a sinusoidal signal phase delayed by 90,180 and 270 degrees in sequence to the four segments.

  16. Mentoring: An Evolving Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle; Florczak, Kristine L

    2017-04-01

    The column concerns itself with mentoring as an evolving relationship between mentor and mentee. The collegiate mentoring model, the transformational transcendence model, and the humanbecoming mentoring model are considered in light of a dialogue with mentors at a Midwest university and conclusions are drawn.

  17. The Energy Effectiveness Of Crops In Crop Rotation Under Different Soil Tillage Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strašil Zdeněk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper identifies and compares the energy balance of winter wheat, spring barley and white mustard – all grown in crop rotation under different tillage conditions. The field trial included the conventional tillage (CT method, minimum tillage (MT and a system with no tillage (NT. The energy inputs included both the direct and indirect energy component. Energy outputs are evaluated as gross calorific value (gross heating value of phytomass dry matter of the primary product and the total harvested production. The energy effectiveness (energy output: energy input was selected for evaluation. The greatest energy effectiveness for the primary product was established as 6.35 for barley, 6.04 for wheat and 3.68 for mustard; in the case of total production, it was 9.82 for barley, 10.08 for wheat and 9.72 for mustard. When comparing the different tillage conditions, the greatest energy effectiveness was calculated for the evaluated crops under the MT operation and represented the primary product of wheat at 6.49, barley at 6.69 and mustard at 3.92. The smallest energy effectiveness for the primary product was found in wheat 5.77 and barley 6.10 under the CT option; it was 3.55 for mustard under the option of NT. Throughout the entire cropping pattern, the greatest energy effectiveness was established under the minimum tillage option – 5.70 for the primary product and 10.47 for the total production. On the other hand, the smallest values were calculated under CT – 5.22 for the primary product and 9.71 for total production.

  18. High-resolution simulations of unstable cylindrical gravity currents undergoing wandering and splitting motions in a rotating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Albert; Wu, Ching-Sen

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution simulations of unstable cylindrical gravity currents when wandering and splitting motions occur in a rotating system are reported. In this study, our attention is focused on the situation of unstable rotating cylindrical gravity currents when the ratio of Coriolis to inertia forces is larger, namely, 0.5 ≤ C ≤ 2.0, in comparison to the stable ones when C ≤ 0.3 as investigated previously by the authors. The simulations reproduce the major features of the unstable rotating cylindrical gravity currents observed in the laboratory, i.e., vortex-wandering or vortex-splitting following the contraction-relaxation motion, and good agreement is found when compared with the experimental results on the outrush radius of the advancing front and on the number of bulges. Furthermore, the simulations provide energy budget information which could not be attained in the laboratory. After the heavy fluid is released, the heavy fluid collapses and a contraction-relaxation motion is at work for approximately 2-3 revolutions of the system. During the contraction-relaxation motion of the heavy fluid, the unstable rotating cylindrical gravity currents behave similar to the stable ones. Towards the end of the contraction-relaxation motion, the dissipation rate in the system reaches a local minimum and a quasi-geostrophic equilibrium state is reached. After the quasi-geostrophic equilibrium state, vortex-wandering or vortex-splitting may occur depending on the ratio of Coriolis to inertia forces. The vortex-splitting process begins with non-axisymmetric bulges and, as the bulges grow, the kinetic energy increases at the expense of decreasing potential energy in the system. The completion of vortex-splitting is accompanied by a local maximum of dissipation rate and a local maximum of kinetic energy in the system. A striking feature of the unstable rotating cylindrical gravity currents is the persistent upwelling and downwelling motions, which are observed for both the

  19. Diversity of segetal weeds in pea (Pisum sativum L. depending on crops chosen for a crop rotation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta K. Kostrzewska

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study, lasting from 1999 to 2006, was conducted at the Research Station in Tomaszkowo, which belongs to the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn. The experiment was set up on brown rusty soil classified as good rye complex 5 in the Polish soil valuation system. The analysis comprised weeds in fields sown with pea cultivated in two four-field crop rotation systems with a different first crop: A. potato – spring barley – pea – spring barley; B. mixture of spring barley with pea – spring barley – pea – spring barley. Every year, at the 2–3 true leaf stage of pea, the species composition and density of individual weed species were determined; in addition, before harvesting the main crop, the dry matter of weeds was weighed. The results were used to analyze the constancy of weed taxa, species diversity, and the evenness and dominance indices, to determine the relationships between all biological indicators analyzed and weather conditions, and to calculate the indices of similarity, in terms of species composition, density and biomass of weeds, between the crop rotations compared. The species richness, density and biomass of weeds in fields with field pea were not differentiated by the choice of the initial crop in a given rotation system. In the spring, the total number of identified taxa was 28 and it increased to 36 before the harvest of pea plants. Chenopodium album and Echinochloa crus-galli were the most numerous. Chenopodium album, Echinochloa crus-galli, Sonchus arvensis, Fallopia convolvulus and Viola arvensis were constant in all treatments, regardless of what the first crop in rotation was or when the observations were made. The species diversity and the evenness and species dominance indices varied significantly between years and dates of observations. Species diversity calculated on the basis of the density of weed species was higher in the rotation with a mixture of cereals and legumes, while that calculated on

  20. Body surface posture evaluation: construction, validation and protocol of the SPGAP system (Posture evaluation rotating platform system).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwertner, Debora Soccal; Oliveira, Raul; Mazo, Giovana Zarpellon; Gioda, Fabiane Rosa; Kelber, Christian Roberto; Swarowsky, Alessandra

    2016-05-04

    Several posture evaluation devices have been used to detect deviations of the vertebral column. However it has been observed that the instruments present measurement errors related to the equipment, environment or measurement protocol. This study aimed to build, validate, analyze the reliability and describe a measurement protocol for the use of the Posture Evaluation Rotating Platform System (SPGAP, Brazilian abbreviation). The posture evaluation system comprises a Posture Evaluation Rotating Platform, video camera, calibration support and measurement software. Two pilot studies were carried out with 102 elderly individuals (average age 69 years old, SD = ±7.3) to establish a protocol for SPGAP, controlling the measurement errors related to the environment, equipment and the person under evaluation. Content validation was completed with input from judges with expertise in posture measurement. The variation coefficient method was used to validate the measurement by the instrument of an object with known dimensions. Finally, reliability was established using repeated measurements of the known object. Expert content judges gave the system excellent ratings for content validity (mean 9.4 out of 10; SD 1.13). The measurement of an object with known dimensions indicated excellent validity (all measurement errors reality. To verify the images of objects with known dimensions the values for the width and height were, respectively, CV 0.88 (width) and 2.33 (height), SD 0.22 (width) and 0.35 (height), minimum and maximum values 24.83-25.2 (width) and 14.56 - 15.75 (height). In the analysis of different images (similar) of an individual, greater discrepancies were observed in the values found. The cervical index, for example, presented minimum and maximum values of 15.38 and 37.5, a coefficient of variation of 0.29 and a standard deviation of 6.78. The SPGAP was shown to be a valid and reliable instrument for the quantitative analysis of body posture with applicability and

  1. Vibration analysis of rotating nanobeam systems using Eringen's two-phase local/nonlocal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaniki, Hossein Bakhshi

    2018-05-01

    Due to the inability of differential form of nonlocal elastic theory in modelling cantilever beams and inaccurate results for some type of boundaries, in this study, a reliable investigation on transverse vibrational behavior of rotating cantilever size-dependent beams is presented. Governing higher order equations are written in the framework of Eringen's two-phase local/nonlocal model and solved using a modified generalized differential quadrature method. In order to indicate the influence of different material and scale parameters, a comprehensive parametric study is presented. It is shown that increasing the nonlocality term leads to lower natural frequency terms for cantilever nanobeams especially for the fundamental frequency parameter which differential nonlocal model is unable to track appropriately. Moreover, it is shown that rotating speed and hub radius have a remarkable effect in varying the mechanical behavior of rotating cantilever nanobeams. This study is a step forward in analyzing nanorotors, nanoturbines, nanoblades, etc.

  2. Development and applications of single particle orientation and rotational tracking in dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kuangcai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    The goal of this study is to help with future data analysis and experiment designs in rotational dynamics research using DIC-based SPORT technique. Most of the current studies using DIC-based SPORT techniques are technical demonstrations. Understanding the mechanisms behind the observed rotational behaviors of the imaging probes should be the focus of the future SPORT studies. More efforts are still needed in the development of new imaging probes, particle tracking methods, instrumentations, and advanced data analysis methods to further extend the potential of DIC-based SPORT technique.

  3. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuna, Miguel A.; Zaman, Luis; Ofria, Charles; Wagner, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms fr...

  4. Monitoring evolving urban cluster systems using DMSP/OLS nighttime light data: a case study of the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao; Yang, Shan; Wang, Shuguang; Shen, Yan

    2017-10-01

    The assessment of the dynamic urban structure has been affected by lack of timely and accurate spatial information for a long period, which has hindered the measurements of structural continuity at the macroscale. Defense meteorological satellite program's operational linescan system (DMSP/OLS) nighttime light (NTL) data provide an ideal source for urban information detection with a long-time span, short-time interval, and wide coverage. In this study, we extracted the physical boundaries of urban clusters from corrected NTL images and quantitatively analyzed the structure of the urban cluster system based on rank-size distribution, spatial metrics, and Mann-Kendall trend test. Two levels of urban cluster systems in the Yangtze River Delta region (YRDR) were examined. We found that (1) in the entire YRDR, the urban cluster system showed a periodic process, with a significant trend of even distribution before 2007 but an unequal growth pattern after 2007, and (2) at the metropolitan level, vast disparities exist in four metropolitan areas for the fluctuations of Pareto's exponent, the speed of cluster expansion, and the dominance of core cluster. The results suggest that the extracted urban cluster information from NTL data effectively reflect the evolving nature of regional urbanization, which in turn can aid in the planning of cities and help achieve more sustainable regional development.

  5. Reactive scattering with row-orthonormal hyperspherical coordinates. 4. Four-dimensional-space Wigner rotation function for pentaatomic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppermann, Aron

    2011-05-14

    The row-orthonormal hyperspherical coordinate (ROHC) approach to calculating state-to-state reaction cross sections and bound state levels of N-atom systems requires the use of angular momentum tensors and Wigner rotation functions in a space of dimension N - 1. The properties of those tensors and functions are discussed for arbitrary N and determined for N = 5 in terms of the 6 Euler angles involved in 4-dimensional space.

  6. Microbiological parameters as indicators of soil quality under various soil management and crop rotation systems in southern Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    FRANCHINI, J. C.; CRISPINO, C. C.; SOUZA, R. A.; TORRES, E.; HUNGRIA, M.

    2006-01-01

    Metadata only record This article attempts to recognize soil parameters that can be used to monitor soil quality under different crop and soil management systems. The rates of CO2 emissions (soil respiration) were affected by variations in the sampling period, as well as in soil management and crop rotation. Considering all samples, CO2 emissions were 21% greater in conventional tillage. Soil microbial biomass was also influenced by sampling period and soil management, but not by crop rota...

  7. Effects of different tillage and straw return on soil organic carbon in a rice-wheat rotation system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Zhu

    Full Text Available Soil management practices, such as tillage method or straw return, could alter soil organic carbon (C contents. However, the effects of tillage method or straw return on soil organic C (SOC have showed inconsistent results in different soil/climate/cropping systems. The Yangtze River Delta of China is the main production region of rice and wheat, and rice-wheat rotation is the most important cropping system in this region. However, few studies in this region have been conducted to assess the effects of different tillage methods combined with straw return on soil labile C fractions in the rice-wheat rotation system. In this study, a field experiment was used to evaluate the effects of different tillage methods, straw return and their interaction on soil total organic C (TOC and labile organic C fractions at three soil depths (0-7, 7-14 and 14-21 cm for a rice-wheat rotation in Yangzhong of the Yangtze River Delta of China. Soil TOC, easily oxidizable C (EOC, dissolved organic C (DOC and microbial biomass C (MBC contents were measured in this study. Soil TOC and labile organic C fractions contents were significantly affected by straw returns, and were higher under straw return treatments than non-straw return at three depths. At 0-7 cm depth, soil MBC was significantly higher under plowing tillage than rotary tillage, but EOC was just opposite. Rotary tillage had significantly higher soil TOC than plowing tillage at 7-14 cm depth. However, at 14-21 cm depth, TOC, DOC and MBC were significantly higher under plowing tillage than rotary tillage except for EOC. Consequently, under short-term condition, rice and wheat straw both return in rice-wheat rotation system could increase SOC content and improve soil quality in the Yangtze River Delta.

  8. Global rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosquist, K.

    1980-01-01

    Global rotation in cosmological models is defined on an observational basis. A theorem is proved saying that, for rigid motion, the global rotation is equal to the ordinary local vorticity. The global rotation is calculated in the space-time homogeneous class III models, with Godel's model as a special case. It is shown that, with the exception of Godel's model, the rotation in these models becomes infinite for finite affine parameter values. In some directions the rotation changes sign and becomes infinite in a direction opposite to the local vorticity. The points of infinite rotation are identified as conjugate points along the null geodesics. The physical interpretation of the infinite rotation is discussed, and a comparison with the behaviour of the area distance at conjugate points is given. (author)

  9. Establishing a New Screening System for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease with Mental Rotation Tasks that Evaluate Visuospatial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ayuko; Shinozaki, Jun; Yazawa, Shogo; Ueki, Yoshino; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Shimohama, Shun; Nagamine, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    The mental rotation task is well-known for the assessment of visuospatial function; however, it has not been used for screening of dementia patients. The aim of this study was to create a simple screening test for patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) by focusing on non-amnestic symptoms. Age-matched healthy controls (age 75.3±6.8), patients with MCI (76.5±5.5), and AD (78.2±5.0) participated in this study. They carried out mental rotation tasks targeting geometric graphics or alphabetical characters with three rotating angles (0°, 90°, and 180°) and indicated the correct answer. Response accuracy and reaction time were recorded along with their eye movements using an eye tracker. To quantify their visual processing strategy, the run count ratio (RC ratio) was calculated by dividing the mean number of fixations in incorrect answers by that in correct answers. AD patients showed lower accuracy and longer reaction time than controls. They also showed a significantly greater number of fixation and smaller saccade amplitude than controls, while fixation duration did not differ significantly. The RC ratio was higher for AD, followed by MCI and control groups. By setting the cut-off value to 0.47 in the 180° rotating angle task, we could differentiate MCI patients from controls with a probability of 80.0%. We established a new screening system for dementia patients by evaluating visuospatial function. The RC ratio during a mental rotation task is useful for discriminating MCI patients from controls.

  10. Imaging of the Coronary Venous System: Validation of Three-Dimensional Rotational Venous Angiography Against Dual-Source Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knackstedt, Christian; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Mischke, Karl; Bruners, Philipp; Schimpf, Thomas; Frechen, Dirk; Schummers, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Kelm, Malte; Schauerte, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Information on the anatomy of the cardiac venous system (CVS) is increasingly important for cardiac resynchronization therapy or percutaneous transvenous mitral valve annuloplasty. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging can further improve the understanding of the relationship of cardiac structures. This study was performed to validate the accuracy of rotational coronary sinus angiography (CSA) displaying the 3D anatomy of the CVS compared to ECG-gated, contrast-enhanced, cardiac dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). Five domestic pigs (60 kg) underwent DSCT using a standardized examination protocol. Using a standard C-arm for fluoroscopy, a rotational CSA was obtained and 3D-image reconstructions performed. Side branches were identified using both methods and enumerated. Vessel visibility was estimated for each side branch and great cardiac vein/anterior interventricular vein. Also, vessel diameters were measured at distinct landmarks, i.e., side branching. The amount of contrast medium was determined and the effective radiation exposure of both methods was calculated. There was no significant difference regarding the vessel diameter of the great cardiac vein/anterior interventricular vein or its side branches. Also, estimation of vessel visibility was not different between the two imaging modalities. Estimated radiation exposure and amount of contrast medium were lower for rotational CSA. In conclusion, a 3D reconstruction of rotational CSA images is possible. All parts of the CVS are well depicted, allowing a 3D overview of the CVS anatomy. On-site 3D visualization might improve decision making during cardiac interventions. In contrast to DSCT, rotational CSA does not demonstrate the anatomy of the mitral annulus or the course of the left circumflex artery.

  11. Pendulum as a model system for driven rotation in molecular nanoscale machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Nordén, B.

    2000-01-01

    We suggest a ratchet mechanism of rotatory (or translatory) motion of a Brownian rotator (or a particle) in a spatially symmetric periodic potential. The asymmetry that drives the ratchet motion is due to a special sequence of activation of catalytic sites arranged in space circularly and periodi...

  12. Transformation of heat into mechanical energy by means of rotating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mešina Marian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available All heat engines need two different temperatures for their work, T1rotation around a given axis. The heat introduced and removed can not only lead to a change in the parameters of temperature, pressure, and volume, which are considered in conventional thermodynamics, but also to a change in the state of rotation. The rotational speed must also be taken into account in all phases of the cycle for all efficiency calculations. In many cases, this leads to a surprisingly different result from the results of conventional thermodynamics, that the efficiency of the cycle can exceed the Carnot limit. The efficiency values depend not only on temperatures and rotational speeds, but also on the material data. The proposed new type of heat engine makes it possible to better utilise very small temperature differences and under certain conditions, in combination with an ideal heat pump, to extract ambient heat and convert it into mechanical energy. The calculated results were presented for simple geometry and can easily be verified experimentally. In combination with an ideal heat pump, the proposed heat engine facilitates the surroundings to withdraw heat and convert it into mechanical work.

  13. The relativistic rotation of spin and asymptotic behaviour of the form factor of the composite system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubnikov, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    The relativistic rotation of nucleon spin in addition to deuteron spin leads to the appearance of the new term in the deuteron charge form factor (DCFF). This term is absent in the traditional approaches and essentially influences the asymptotic behaviour of DCFF. General formulae are obtained for the DCFF asymptotics in the relativistic and nonrelativistic impulse approximation

  14. Effect of no-tillage crop rotation systems on nutrient status of a rhodic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study the effects of no-tillage and eight crop rotations (established in 1985) on chemical properties of a Rhodic Ferralsol (Typic Haplorthox, Soil Taxonomy) and on nutrient uptake by maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) leaves were assessed in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, using a randomized ...

  15. Electromagnetic synchronisation of clocks with finite separation in a rotating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.M.; Moses, H.E.; Rosenblum, A.; Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA

    1984-01-01

    For clocks on the vertices of a triangle, it is shown that clock synchronisation using electromagnetic signals between finitely spaced clocks in a rotating frame leads to the same synchronisation error as a closely spaced band of clocks along the same light path. In addition, the above result is generalised to n equally spaced clocks. (author)

  16. Displacement, distance, and shape measurements of fast-rotating rough objects by two mutually tilted interference fringe systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Philipp; Kuschmierz, Robert; Pfister, Thorsten; Czarske, Jürgen W

    2013-05-01

    The precise distance measurement of fast-moving rough surfaces is important in several applications such as lathe monitoring. A nonincremental interferometer based on two mutually tilted interference fringe systems has been realized for this task. The distance is coded in the phase difference between the generated interference signals corresponding to the fringe systems. Large tilting angles between the interference fringe systems are necessary for a high sensitivity. However, due to the speckle effect at rough surfaces, different envelopes and phase jumps of the interference signals occur. At large tilting angles, these signals become dissimilar, resulting in a small correlation coefficient and a high measurement uncertainty. Based on a matching of illumination and receiving optics, the correlation coefficient and the phase difference estimation have been improved significantly. For axial displacement measurements of recurring rough surfaces, laterally moving with velocities of 5 m/s, an uncertainty of 110 nm has been attained. For nonrecurring surfaces, a distance measurement uncertainty of 830 nm has been achieved. Incorporating the additionally measured lateral velocity and the rotational speed, the two-dimensional shape of rotating objects results. Since the measurement uncertainty of the displacement, distance, and shape is nearly independent of the lateral surface velocity, this technique is predestined for fast-rotating objects, such as crankshafts, camshafts, vacuum pump shafts, or turning parts of lathes.

  17. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  18. Rotation, Stability and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, J. W.

    2007-07-01

    Tokamak plasmas can frequently exhibit high levels of rotation and rotation shear. This can usually be attributed to various sources: injection of momentum, e.g. through neutral beams, flows driven by plasma gradients or torques resulting from non-ambipolar particle loss; however, the source sometimes remains a mystery, such as the spontaneous rotation observed in Ohmic plasmas. The equilibrium rotation profile is given by the balance of these sources with transport and other losses; the edge boundary conditions can play an important role in determining this profile . Such plasma rotation, particularly sheared rotation, is predicted theoretically to have a significant influence on plasma behaviour. In the first place, sonic flows can significantly affect tokamak equilibria and neoclassical transport losses. However, the influence of rotation on plasma stability and turbulence is more profound. At the macroscopic level it affects the behaviour of the gross MHD modes that influence plasma operational limits. This includes sawteeth, the seeding of neoclassical tearing modes, resistive wall modes and the onset of disruptions through error fields, mode locking and reconnection. At the microscopic level it has a major effect on the stability of ballooning modes, both ideal MHD and drift wave instabilities such as ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes. In the non-linear state, as unstable drift waves evolve into turbulent structures, sheared rotation also tears apart eddies, thereby reducing the resulting transport. There is considerable experimental evidence for these effects on both MHD stability and plasma confinement. In particular, the appearance of improved confinement modes with transport barriers, such as edge H-mode barriers and internal transport barriers (ITBs) appears to correlate well with the presence of sheared plasma rotation. This talk will describe the theory underlying some of these phenomena involving plasma rotation, on both macroscopic and microscopic

  19. Evolving Procurement Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bals, Lydia; Laine, Jari; Mugurusi, Godfrey

    Procurement has to find further levers and advance its contribution to corporate goals continuously. This places pressure on its organization in order to facilitate its performance. Therefore, procurement organizations constantly have to evolve in order to match these demands. A conceptual model...... and external contingency factors and having a more detailed look at the structural dimensions chosen, beyond the well-known characteristics of centralization, formalization, participation, specialization, standardization and size. From a theoretical perspective, it opens up insights that can be leveraged...

  20. Symbiotic Composition and Evolvability

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Richard A.; Pollack, Jordan B.

    2001-01-01

    Several of the Major Transitions in natural evolution, such as the symbiogenic origin of eukaryotes from prokaryotes, share the feature that existing entities became the components of composite entities at a higher level of organisation. This composition of pre-adapted extant entities into a new whole is a fundamentally different source of variation from the gradual accumulation of small random variations, and it has some interesting consequences for issues of evolvability. In this paper we p...

  1. Triple system HD 201433 with a SPB star component seen by BRITE - Constellation: Pulsation, differential rotation, and angular momentum transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallinger, T.; Weiss, W. W.; Beck, P. G.; Pigulski, A.; Kuschnig, R.; Tkachenko, A.; Pakhomov, Y.; Ryabchikova, T.; Lüftinger, T.; Palle, , P. L.; Semenko, E.; Handler, G.; Koudelka, O.; Matthews, J. M.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Pablo, H.; Popowicz, A.; Rucinski, S.; Wade, G. A.; Zwintz, K.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Stellar rotation affects the transport of chemical elements and angular momentum and is therefore a key process during stellar evolution, which is still not fully understood. This is especially true for massive OB-type stars, which are important for the chemical enrichment of the Universe. It is therefore important to constrain the physical parameters and internal angular momentum distribution of massive OB-type stars to calibrate stellar structure and evolution models. Stellar internal rotation can be probed through asteroseismic studies of rotationally split non radial oscillations but such results are still quite rare, especially for stars more massive than the Sun. The slowly pulsating B9V star HD 201433 is known to be part of a single-lined spectroscopic triple system, with two low-mass companions orbiting with periods of about 3.3 and 154 days. Aims: Our goal is to measure the internal rotation profile of HD 201433 and investigate the tidal interaction with the close companion. Methods: We used probabilistic methods to analyse the BRITE - Constellation photometry and radial velocity measurements, to identify a representative stellar model, and to determine the internal rotation profile of the star. Results: Our results are based on photometric observations made by BRITE - Constellation and the Solar Mass Ejection Imager on board the Coriolis satellite, high-resolution spectroscopy, and more than 96 yr of radial velocity measurements. We identify a sequence of nine frequency doublets in the photometric time series, consistent with rotationally split dipole modes with a period spacing of about 5030 s. We establish that HD 201433 is in principle a solid-body rotator with a very slow rotation period of 297 ± 76 days. Tidal interaction with the inner companion has, however, significantly accelerated the spin of the surface layers by a factor of approximately one hundred. The angular momentum transfer onto the surface of HD 201433 is also reflected by the

  2. Evolved H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchwell, E.

    1975-01-01

    A probable evolutionary sequence of H II regions based on six distinct types of observed objects is suggested. Two examples which may deviate from this idealized sequence, are discussed. Even though a size-mean density relation of H II regions can be used as a rough indication of whether a nebula is very young or evolved, it is argued that such a relation is not likely to be useful for the quantitative assignment of ages to H II regions. Evolved H II regions appear to fit into one of four structural types: rings, core-halos, smooth structures, and irregular or filamentary structures. Examples of each type are given with their derived physical parameters. The energy balance in these nebulae is considered. The mass of ionized gas in evolved H II regions is in general too large to trace the nebula back to single compact H II regions. Finally, the morphological type of the Galaxy is considered from its H II region content. 2 tables, 2 figs., 29 refs

  3. Characterizing exo-ring systems around fast-rotating stars using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Watson, Christopher A.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.

    2017-12-01

    Planetary rings produce a distinct shape distortion in transit light curves. However, to accurately model such light curves the observations need to cover the entire transit, especially ingress and egress, as well as an out-of-transit baseline. Such observations can be challenging for long period planets, where the transits may last for over a day. Planetary rings will also impact the shape of absorption lines in the stellar spectrum, as the planet and rings cover different parts of the rotating star (the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect). These line-profile distortions depend on the size, structure, opacity, obliquity and sky-projected angle of the ring system. For slow-rotating stars, this mainly impacts the amplitude of the induced velocity shift; however, for fast-rotating stars the large velocity gradient across the star allows the line distortion to be resolved, enabling direct determination of the ring parameters. We demonstrate that by modelling these distortions we can recover ring system parameters (sky-projected angle, obliquity and size) using only a small part of the transit. Substructure in the rings, e.g. gaps, can be recovered if the width of the features (δW) relative to the size of the star is similar to the intrinsic velocity resolution (set by the width of the local stellar profile, γ) relative to the stellar rotation velocity (v sini, i.e. δW/R* ≳ vsini/γ). This opens up a new way to study the ring systems around planets with long orbital periods, where observations of the full transit, covering the ingress and egress, are not always feasible.

  4. Ranking in evolving complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Many popular ranking algorithms (such as Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of significant nodes.

  5. Marshal: Maintaining Evolving Models, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SIFT proposes to design and develop the Marshal system, a mixed-initiative tool for maintaining task models over the course of evolving missions. Marshal-enabled...

  6. State and regional systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials cooperation between international, regional and states safeguards organizations: An evolving issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández Moreno, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Cooperation between the IAEA, States and regional organizations is increasingly important to ensure effective accountancy and control of nuclear material in peaceful uses. The IAEA, SAGSI2 and institutions such INMM3 and ESARDA4 have recognized the relevance and the evolving role that SSAC5 and regional organizations play to this aim. In this context, it is important to take steps to ensure the effectiveness of the system and the optimal level of relationship between these organizations so as to maximize the benefits for each party, particularly in those cases where well developed systems exist. Moreover, expansion of nuclear energy requires concerted efforts towards building competence in safeguards in all relevant States. This is also important with respect to other aspects of nonproliferation. In this scenario there is agreement on the need to have effective state organizations that fulfill international safeguards and other security obligations. However, the roles and duties of SSAC and the possible scope of cooperation between the IAEA and SSAC are still under evolution. This paper discusses possible ways and means to build competence in safeguards and how the international community could be more proactive in establishing a framework including the various dimensions of the cooperation in safeguards and other security matters between all parties concerned. The establishment of a forum and a network of interested parties under the auspice of interested organizations could be one mechanism to exchange best practices and experiences. (authors)

  7. Transparency and other State-specific factors: exploration of Ideas for evolving the system of State-evaluations and safeguards implementation of IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everton, C.; Leslie, R.; Bayer, S.; East, M. [Craig Everton, Russell Leslie, Stephan Bayer, Michael East, Australia (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    In November 2010 the IAEA Department of Safeguards launched its Long Term Strategic Plan at the IAEA Symposium on International Safeguards: 'Preparing for Future Verification Challenges'. A key element of the Long Term Strategic Plan is the further evolution of the State-level approach for safeguards implementation away from criteria driven safeguards approaches focussed at the facility level, to a safeguards system that is objectives-based and fully information-driven. The State-level approach is a holistic approach to safeguards implementation, applicable to all States, incorporating comprehensive State evaluations and safeguards implementation approaches that make use of all information available to the IAEA. In further evolving the State-level concept State-specific factors and acquisition path analysis will become increasingly important in State evaluations and in the determination of safeguards approaches for each State. It will be important to determine objective modalities for incorporating these factors. Consideration of State-specific factors in determining safeguards approaches is not new - in fact, paragraph 81 of INFCIRC/153 (concluded June 1972) enumerates several such factors that can be considered. This paper will explore some ideas for State-specific factors that could be used in State-evaluations, and how these factors could be used for determining State-by-State safeguards approaches. Ideas for State-specific factors will include effectiveness of State Systems of Accountancy and Control (SSAC), transparency of States in their dealings with the IAEA, and characteristics of a nuclear fuel cycle of a State.

  8. Transparency and other State-specific factors: exploration of Ideas for evolving the system of State-evaluations and safeguards implementation of IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everton, C.; Leslie, R.; Bayer, S.; East, M.

    2011-01-01

    In November 2010 the IAEA Department of Safeguards launched its Long Term Strategic Plan at the IAEA Symposium on International Safeguards: 'Preparing for Future Verification Challenges'. A key element of the Long Term Strategic Plan is the further evolution of the State-level approach for safeguards implementation away from criteria driven safeguards approaches focussed at the facility level, to a safeguards system that is objectives-based and fully information-driven. The State-level approach is a holistic approach to safeguards implementation, applicable to all States, incorporating comprehensive State evaluations and safeguards implementation approaches that make use of all information available to the IAEA. In further evolving the State-level concept State-specific factors and acquisition path analysis will become increasingly important in State evaluations and in the determination of safeguards approaches for each State. It will be important to determine objective modalities for incorporating these factors. Consideration of State-specific factors in determining safeguards approaches is not new - in fact, paragraph 81 of INFCIRC/153 (concluded June 1972) enumerates several such factors that can be considered. This paper will explore some ideas for State-specific factors that could be used in State-evaluations, and how these factors could be used for determining State-by-State safeguards approaches. Ideas for State-specific factors will include effectiveness of State Systems of Accountancy and Control (SSAC), transparency of States in their dealings with the IAEA, and characteristics of a nuclear fuel cycle of a State.

  9. Hierarchical Modulation with Vector Rotation for E-MBMS Transmission in LTE Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced Multimedia Broadcast and Multicast Service (E-MBMS is considered of key importance for the proliferation of Long-Term Evolution (LTE network in mobile market. Hierarchical modulation (HM, which involves a “base-layer” (BL and an “enhancement-layer” (EL bit streams, is a simple technique for achieving tradeoff between service quality and radio coverage. Therefore, it is appealing for MBMS. Generally, HM suffers from the severe performance degradation of the less protected EL stream. In this paper, HM with vector rotation operation introduced to EL stream is proposed, in order to improve EL's performance. With the proper interleaving in frequency domain, this operation can exploit the inherent diversity gain from the multipath channel. In this way, HM with vector rotation can effectively enhance multimedia broadcasting on quality video and coverage. The simulation results with scalable video coding (SVC as source show the significant benefits in comparison with the conventional HM and alternative schemes.

  10. Rotaphone, a mechanical seismic sensor system for field rotation rate measurements and its in situ calibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brokešová, J.; Málek, Jiří; Kolínský, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 4 (2012), s. 603-621 ISSN 1383-4649 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/0925 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010008 Program:LM Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : rotational seismology * sensor * six-degree-of-freedom Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.388, year: 2012

  11. Magneto-optical polarization rotation in a ladder-type atomic system for tunable offset locking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parniak, Michał, E-mail: michal.parniak@fuw.edu.pl; Leszczyński, Adam; Wasilewski, Wojciech [Institute of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-04-18

    We demonstrate an easily tunable locking scheme for stabilizing frequency-sum of two lasers on a two-photon ladder transition based on polarization rotation in warm rubidium vapors induced by magnetic field and circularly polarized drive field. Unprecedented tunability of the two-photon offset frequency is due to strong splitting and shifting of magnetic states in external field. In our experimental setup, we achieve two-photon detuning of up to 700 MHz.

  12. Regression Test on the Rotational Speed between Two Loads as the Preparation for Braking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purwanti, B S R; Yusivar, F; Garniwa M K, I

    2013-01-01

    This paper is preparing the mathematic model of braking control, continuously of determination the error (e), delta error (de) of speed reduction [9]. Load-1 and Load-2 are driven by an electric motor located on the same shaft. Both loads are driven clock wise (CW), counter clock wise (CCW) by an asynchronous three-phase motor (M3). The mass of each load is also differentiated to simulate slip phenomena. Rotational speed of M3 is equal to Load-1, detected by Sensor-1, while speed rotation of Load-2 is detected by Sensor-2. The rotation for Load-1 and Load-2 can be adjusted on several position H j (j = 1, 2, 3). Once Load-1 and Load-2 reach a constant speed, current source will be disconnected. Speed reduction from (ω±1475 rpm) to stagnant (ω=0 rpm) on Load-1 and Load-2 is considered time function. Data collected from both load (ω (t)) known as e, de; on each position of H j . It uses covariance analysis to make sure that both loads are concurrent with each other against time difference. The objective of this research is to determine slip phenomena of speed reduction of each load. The expectations are to generate smoother braking and minimize the time needed when implemented with ANFIS.

  13. Time-odd mean fields in covariant density functional theory: Rotating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Abusara, H.

    2010-01-01

    Time-odd mean fields (nuclear magnetism) and their impact on physical observables in rotating nuclei are studied in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). It is shown that they have profound effect on the dynamic and kinematic moments of inertia. Particle number, configuration, and rotational frequency dependencies of their impact on the moments of inertia have been analyzed in a systematic way. Nuclear magnetism can also considerably modify the band crossing features such as crossing frequencies and the properties of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia in the band crossing region. The impact of time-odd mean fields on the moments of inertia in the regions away from band crossing only weakly depends on the relativistic mean-field parametrization, reflecting good localization of the properties of time-odd mean fields in CDFT. The moments of inertia of normal-deformed nuclei considerably deviate from the rigid-body value. On the contrary, superdeformed and hyperdeformed nuclei have the moments of inertia which are close to rigid-body value. The structure of the currents in rotating frame, their microscopic origin, and the relations to the moments of inertia have been systematically analyzed. The phenomenon of signature separation in odd-odd nuclei, induced by time-odd mean fields, has been analyzed in detail.

  14. Evolvability as a Quality Attribute of Software Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciraci, S.; van den Broek, P.M.; Duchien, Laurence; D'Hondt, Maja; Mens, Tom

    We review the definition of evolvability as it appears on the literature. In particular, the concept of software evolvability is compared with other system quality attributes, such as adaptability, maintainability and modifiability.

  15. Design and analysis of a 3-DOF planar micromanipulation stage with large rotational displacement for micromanipulation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ding

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Flexure-based mechanisms have been widely used for scanning tunneling microscopy, nanoimprint lithography, fast servo tool system and micro/nano manipulation. In this paper, a novel planar micromanipulation stage with large rotational displacement is proposed. The designed monolithic manipulator has three degrees of freedom (DOF, i.e. two translations along the X and Y axes and one rotation around Z axis. In order to get a large workspace, the lever mechanism is adopted to magnify the stroke of the piezoelectric actuators and also the leaf beam flexure is utilized due to its large rotational scope. Different from conventional pre-tightening mechanism, a modified pre-tightening mechanism, which is less harmful to the stacked actuators, is proposed in this paper. Taking the circular flexure hinges and leaf beam flexures hinges as revolute joints, the forward kinematics and inverse kinematics models of this stage are derived. The workspace of the micromanipulator is finally obtained, which is based on the derived kinematic models.

  16. Diagnostic suite neuro-fuzzy in an advanced alarm monitoring and predictive diagnostic system for rotating machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geruzzi, P.

    1999-01-01

    The 'Foxboro SCADA', former 'Automation Systems Division' of Nuovo Pignone, at the end of eighty years, has been involved in the development of a flexible and powerful Diagnostic System for Rotating Machinery designed and manufactured in other divisions of the Company. This system amalgamates, in a single computer, all the functionality nowadays necessary to correctly manage locally and remotely the Evolutionary Maintenance of rotating machines as well as the relevant plants. It's specially designed to plan preventive and emergency maintenance procedures and to help the maintenance staff/service in preventing the occurrence of failures or severe damage to complete turbo-machinery plant including turbine, compressor and other machines. The system is designed to supervise and to analyze the operating state of one or more turbo- machinery units such as turbo-compressors, turbo-generators and turbo-pumps giving an effective support to plan preventive and breakdown maintenance monitoring the performances of each turbo-group's element and analyzing a large number of thermodynamic and mechanical parameters related to high pressure turbines, low pressure turbines, combustion chambers, axial compressors and load (compressors, generators, and pumps). A brief presentation of the system is provided (author) (ml)

  17. Use of anisotropy of light transmittance in a system to measure the frequency of nanowires' rotation in a viscous liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipiec, Wojciech; Sikora, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Fe nanowires with diameters of ca. 80 nm and lengths ranging from 1 to 3 μm were immersed in a viscous liquid and exposed to a static magnetic field in order to orient them in a specific direction. The nanowire suspension was illuminated with a laser beam. The light intensity was measured at the input and output. It was observed that the light transmittance of the nanowire system was strongly dependent on the nanowires' orientation in relation to the laser beam. The phenomenon was applied to measure the rotation frequency of the nanowires immersed in a liquid with a viscosity of 2 Pa·s. Rotation of the nanowires was enforced by a rotating magnetic field generated by a rotating magnet. On the basis of the obtained results it was observed that the highest frequency of the nanowires' rotation in the applied liquid, in a rotating magnetic field with induction of 46 mT, exceeded 382 Hz. - Highlights: • Measurement method of the light transmittance of the nanowire system was presented. • The light transmittance depends on orientation of the nanowire system. • An application of anisotropy of light transmittance of the nanowire system was shown. • Nanowires suspended in a liquid with a big viscosity were able to rotate

  18. Units of rotational information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Chiribella, Giulio; Hu, Qinheping

    2017-12-01

    Entanglement in angular momentum degrees of freedom is a precious resource for quantum metrology and control. Here we study the conversions of this resource, focusing on Bell pairs of spin-J particles, where one particle is used to probe unknown rotations and the other particle is used as reference. When a large number of pairs are given, we show that every rotated spin-J Bell state can be reversibly converted into an equivalent number of rotated spin one-half Bell states, at a rate determined by the quantum Fisher information. This result provides the foundation for the definition of an elementary unit of information about rotations in space, which we call the Cartesian refbit. In the finite copy scenario, we design machines that approximately break down Bell states of higher spins into Cartesian refbits, as well as machines that approximately implement the inverse process. In addition, we establish a quantitative link between the conversion of Bell states and the simulation of unitary gates, showing that the fidelity of probabilistic state conversion provides upper and lower bounds on the fidelity of deterministic gate simulation. The result holds not only for rotation gates, but also to all sets of gates that form finite-dimensional representations of compact groups. For rotation gates, we show how rotations on a system of given spin can simulate rotations on a system of different spin.

  19. Rapidly rotating single late-type giants: New FK Comae stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekel, Francis C.

    1986-01-01

    A group of rapidly rotating single late-type giants was found from surveys of chromospherically active stars. These stars have V sin I's ranging from 6 to 46 km/sec, modest ultraviolet emission line fluxes, and strong H alpha absorption lines. Although certainly chromospherically active, their characteristics are much less extreme than those of FK Com and one or two other similar systems. One possible explanation for the newly identified systems is that they have evolved from stars similar to FK Com. The chromospheric activity and rotation of single giant stars like FK Com would be expected to decrease with time as they do in single dwarfs. Alternatively, this newly identified group may have evolved from single rapidly rotating A, or early F stars.

  20. Rotating Wavepackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  1. Rotating dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, C.

    1984-01-01

    Products to dry are introduced inside a rotating tube placed in an oven, the cross section of the tube is an arc of spiral. During clockwise rotation of the tube products are maintained inside and mixed, during anticlockwise products are removed. Application is made to drying of radioactive wastes [fr

  2. Evolving Procurement Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bals, Lydia; Laiho, Aki; Laine, Jari

    Procurement has to find further levers and advance its contribution to corporate goals continuously. This places pressure on its organization in order to facilitate its performance. Therefore, Procurement organizations constantly have to evolve in order to match these demands. A conceptual model...... is presented and results of a first case study discussed. The findings highlight the importance of taking a contingency perspective on Procurement organization, understanding the internal and internal contingency factors. From a theoretical perspective, it opens up insights that can be furthermore leveraged...... in future studies in the fields of hybrid procurement organizations, global sourcing organizations as well as international procurement offices (IPOs). From a practical standpoint, an assessment of external and internal contingencies provides the opportunity to consciously match organization to its...

  3. Diffusion between evolving interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juntunen, Janne; Merikoski, Juha

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion in an evolving environment is studied by continuous-time Monte Carlo simulations. Diffusion is modeled by continuous-time random walkers on a lattice, in a dynamic environment provided by bubbles between two one-dimensional interfaces driven symmetrically towards each other. For one-dimensional random walkers constrained by the interfaces, the bubble size distribution dominates diffusion. For two-dimensional random walkers, it is also controlled by the topography and dynamics of the interfaces. The results of the one-dimensional case are recovered in the limit where the interfaces are strongly driven. Even with simple hard-core repulsion between the interfaces and the particles, diffusion is found to depend strongly on the details of the dynamical rules of particles close to the interfaces.

  4. A system for rotatably mounting a vessel to a loading buoy. System for dreibar tilkopling av et flytende farty til en lastebye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breivik, K.; Smedal, A.; Syvertsen, K.

    1994-07-04

    The invention relates to a system for rotatable mounting of a floating vessel to a submerged loading/unloading buoy which is anchored to the sea bed. The buoy is adapted to be introduced into and fastened in a releasable manner in a submerged downwardly open receiving space in the vessel, and is during operation connected to at least one transfer line and forming a transfer connection between this line and a tube system on the vessel. The buoy comprises an outer member which is arranged to be rigidly fastened in the receiving space, and a central inner member which is rotatably mounted in the outer member, so that the vessel is able to turn about the central member when the buoy is fastened in the receiving space. Further, the upper end of the central member is connected to the tube system of the vessel through a swivel means and through at least one flexible joint means respectively. 3 figs.

  5. Does the Berry phase in a quantum optical system originate from the rotating wave approximation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Minghao; Wei, L.F.; Liang, J.Q.

    2015-01-01

    The Berry phase (BP) in a quantized light field demonstrated more than a decade ago (Fuentes-Guridi et al., 2002 [9]) has attracted considerable attention, since it plays an important role in the cavity quantum electrodynamics. However, it is argued in Larson (2012) [15] that such a BP is just due to the rotating wave approximation (RWA) and the relevant BP should vanish beyond this approximation. Based on a consistent analysis we conclude in this letter that the BP in a generic Rabi model actually exists, no matter whether the RWA is applied. The existence of BP is also generalized to a three-level atom in the quantized cavity field. - Highlights: • Non-zero Berry phases for the Rabi model (without rotating wave approximation) are verified. • A general formulation of Berry phases for both the JC model and the Rabi model is presented. • The claim of vanishing Berry phase in the Rabi model is a result of improper semiclassical approximation. • Analytic solutions for the Rabi model is presented in the semiclassical approximation

  6. A Rotational and Axial Motion System Load Frame Insert for In Situ High Energy X-Ray Studies (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-08

    Paul A. Shade, Jay C. Schuren, and Todd J. Turner AFRL/RX Basil Blank PulseRay Peter Kenesei, Kurt Goetze, Ulrich Lienert, and Jonathan Almer...AFRL/RX 2) Basil Blank – PulseRay (continued on page 2) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 4349 5e. TASK NUMBER 0001 5f...2015) A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high energy x-ray studies Paul A. Shade,1,a) Basil Blank,2 Jay C. Schuren,1,b

  7. Analytical Model of Doppler Spectra of Light Backscattered from Rotating Convex Bodies of Revolution in the Global Cartesian Coordinate System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Jun, Gong; Zhen-Sen, Wu; Jia-Ji, Wu

    2009-01-01

    We present an analytical model of Doppler spectra in backscattering from arbitrary rough convex bodies of revolution rotating around their axes in the global Cartesian coordinate system. This analytical model is applied to analyse Doppler spectra in backscatter from two cones and two cylinders, as well as two ellipsoids of revolution. We numerically analyse the influences of attitude and geometry size of objects on Doppler spectra. The analytical model can give contribution of the surface roughness, attitude and geometry size of convex bodies of revolution to Doppler spectra and may contribute to laser Doppler velocimetry as well as ladar applications

  8. ROTATION AND OUTFLOW MOTIONS IN THE VERY LOW-MASS CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR SYSTEM HH 211 AT SUBARCSECOND RESOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.-F.; Hirano, Naomi; Ho, Paul T. P.; Shang, Hsien; Palau, Aina; Bourke, Tyler L.; Zhang Qizhou

    2009-01-01

    HH 211 is a nearby young protostellar system with a highly collimated jet. We have mapped it in 352 GHz continuum, SiO (J = 8 - 7), and HCO + (J = 4 - 3) emission at up to ∼0.''2 resolution with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The continuum source is now resolved into two sources, SMM1 and SMM2, with a separation of ∼ 84 AU. SMM1 is seen at the center of the jet, probably tracing a (inner) dusty disk around the protostar driving the jet. SMM2 is seen to the southwest of SMM1 and may trace an envelope-disk around a small binary companion. A flattened envelope-disk is seen in HCO + around SMM1 with a radius of ∼ 80 AU perpendicular to the jet axis. Its velocity structure is consistent with a rotation motion and can be fitted with a Keplerian law that yields a mass of ∼50 ± 15 M Jup (a mass of a brown dwarf) for the protostar. Thus, the protostar could be the lowest mass source known to have a collimated jet and a rotating flattened envelope-disk. A small-scale (∼200 AU) low-speed (∼2 km s -1 ) outflow is seen in HCO + around the jet axis extending from the envelope-disk. It seems to rotate in the same direction as the envelope-disk and may carry away part of the angular momentum from the envelope-disk. The jet is seen in SiO close to ∼100 AU from SMM1. It is seen with a 'C-shaped' bending. It has a transverse width of ∼ -1 . A possible velocity gradient is seen consistently across its innermost pair of knots, ∼0.5 km s -1 at ∼10 AU, consistent with the sense of rotation of the envelope-disk. If this gradient is an upper limit of the true rotational gradient of the jet, then the jet carries away a very small amount of angular momentum of ∼ -1 and thus must be launched from the very inner edge of the disk near the corotation radius.

  9. Quality assurance system to correct for errors arising from couch rotation in linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezovich, Ivan A.; Pareek, Prem N.; Plott, W. Eugene; Jennelle, Richard L. S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was the development of a quality assurance (QA) system that would provide geographically accurate targeting for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (LBSR). Methods and Materials: The key component of our QA system is a novel device (Alignment Tool) for expedient measurement of gantry and treatment table excursions (wobble) during rotation. The Alignment Tool replaces the familiar pencil-shaped pointers with a ball pointer that is used with the field light of the accelerator to indicate alignment of beam and target. Wobble is measured prior to each patient treatment and analyzed together with the BRW coordinates of the target by a spreadsheet. The corrections required to compensate for any imprecision are identified, and a printout generated indicating the floor stand coordinates for each couch angle used to place the target at isocenter. Results: The Alignment Tool has an inherent accuracy of measurement better than 0.1 mm. The overall targeting error of our QA method, found by evaluating 177 target simulator films of 55 foci in 40 randomly selected patients, was 0.47 ± 0.23 mm. The Alignment Tool was also valuable during installation of the floor stand and a supplemental collimator for the accelerator. Conclusions: The QA procedure described allows accurate targeting in LBSR, even when couch rotation is imprecise. The Alignment Tool can facilitate the installation of any stereotactic irradiation system, and can be useful for annual QA checks as well as in the installation and commissioning of new accelerators

  10. Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles on pre- and postoperative CT arthrography (CTA): is the Goutallier grading system reliable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eugene; Choi, Jung-Ah; Kang, Heung Sik; Oh, Joo Han; Ahn, Soyeon; Hong, Sung Hwan; Chai, Jee Won

    2013-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles on CTA using Goutallier's grading system and quantitative measurements with comparison between pre- and postoperative states. IRB approval was obtained for this study. Two radiologists independently reviewed pre- and postoperative CTAs of 43 patients (24 males and 19 females, mean age, 58.1 years) with 46 shoulders confirmed as full-thickness tears with random distribution. FD of supraspinatus, infraspinatus/teres minor, and subscapularis was assessed using Goutallier's system and by quantitative measurements of Hounsfield units (HUs) on sagittal images. Changes in FD grades and HUs were compared between pre- and postoperative CTAs and analyzed with respect to preoperative tear size and postoperative cuff integrity. The correlations between qualitative grades and quantitative measurements and their inter-observer reliabilities were also assessed. There was statistically significant correlation between FD grades and HU measurements of all muscles on pre- and postoperative CTA (p 0.05). The average dose-length product (DLP, mGy . cm) was 365.2 mGy . cm (range, 323.8-417.2 mGy . cm) and estimated average effective dose was 5.1 mSv. Goutallier grades correlated well with HUs of rotator cuff muscles. Reliability was excellent for both systems, except for FD grade of IST/TM muscles, which may be more reliably assessed using quantitative measurements. (orig.)

  11. Forms of phosphorus in an oxisol under different soil tillage systems and cover plants in rotation with maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arminda Moreira de Carvalho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus fractions play a key role in sustaining the productivity of acid-savanna Oxisols and are influenced by tillage practices. The aim of this study was to quantify different P forms in an Oxisol (Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo from the central savanna region of Brazil under management systems with cover crops in maize rotation. Three cover crops (Canavalia brasiliensis, Cajanus cajan (L., and Raphanus sativus L. were investigated in maize rotation systems. These cover crops were compared to spontaneous vegetation. The inorganic forms NaHCO3-iP and NaOH-iP represented more than half of the total P in the samples collected at the depth of 5-10 cm during the rainy season when the maize was grown. The concentration of inorganic P of greater availability (NaHCO3-iP and NaOH-iP was higher in the soil under no-tillage at the depth of 5-10 cm during the rainy season. Concentrations of organic P were higher during the dry season, when the cover crops were grown. At the dry season, organic P constituted 70 % of the labile P in the soil planted to C. cajan under no-tillage. The cover crops were able to maintain larger fractions of P available to the maize, resulting in reduced P losses to the unavailable pools, mainly in no-tillage systems.

  12. Structural and numerical modeling of fluid flow and evolving stress fields at a transtensional stepover: A Miocene Andean porphyry copper system as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, R. C.; Griffith, W. A.; Mitchell, T. M.; Marquardt, C.; Iturrieta, P. C.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Obliquely convergent subduction orogens show both margin-parallel and margin-oblique fault systems that are spatially and temporally associated with ore deposits and geothermal systems within the volcanic arc. Fault orientation and mechanical interaction among different fault systems influence the stress field in these arrangements, thus playing a first order control on the regional to local-scale fluid migration paths as documented by the spatial distribution of fault-vein arrays. Our selected case study is a Miocene porphyry copper-type system that crops out in the precordillera of the Maule region along the Teno river Valley (ca. 35°S). Several regional to local faults were recognized in the field: (1) Two first-order, N-striking subvertical dextral faults overlapping at a right stepover; (2) Second-order, N60°E-striking steeply-dipping, dextral-normal faults located at the stepover, and (3) N40°-60°W striking subvertical, sinistral faults crossing the stepover zone. The regional and local scale geology is characterized by volcano-sedimentary rocks (Upper Eocene- Lower Miocene), intruded by Miocene granodioritic plutons (U-Pb zircon age of 18.2 ± 0.11 Ma) and coeval dikes. We implement a 2D boundary element displacement discontinuity method (BEM) model to test the mechanical feasibility of kinematic model of the structural development of the porphyry copper-type system in the stepover between N-striking faults. The model yields the stress field within the stepover region and shows slip and potential opening distribution along the N-striking master faults under a regionally imposed stress field. The model shows that σ1 rotates clockwise where the main faults approach each other, becoming EW when they overlap. This, in turn leads to the generation of both NE- and NW-striking faults within the stepover area. Model results are consistent with the structural and kinematic data collected in the field attesting for enhanced permeability and fluid flow transport

  13. Combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems in TKA reduces postoperative outliers of rotational alignment of the tibial component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Shota; Akamatsu, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Kusayama, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Ken; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2018-02-01

    Rotational malpositioning of the tibial component can lead to poor functional outcome in TKA. Although various surgical techniques have been proposed, precise rotational placement of the tibial component was difficult to accomplish even with the use of a navigation system. The purpose of this study is to assess whether combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems replicate accurately the rotational alignment of tibial component that was preoperatively planned on CT, compared with the conventional method. We compared the number of outliers for rotational alignment of the tibial component using combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems (navigated group) with those of conventional method (conventional group). Seventy-two TKAs were performed between May 2012 and December 2014. In the navigated group, the anteroposterior axis was prepared using CT-based navigation system and the tibial component was positioned under control of the navigation. In the conventional group, the tibial component was placed with reference to the Akagi line that was determined visually. Fisher's exact probability test was performed to evaluate the results. There was a significant difference between the two groups with regard to the number of outliers: 3 outliers in the navigated group compared with 12 outliers in the conventional group (P image-free navigation systems decreased the number of rotational outliers of tibial component, and was helpful for the replication of the accurate rotational alignment of the tibial component that was preoperatively planned.

  14. The Path from VLITE to ngLOBO: A Roadmap for Evolving a Low Frequency Commensal System from the JVLA to the ngVLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, Tracy; Giacintucci, Simona; Helmboldt, Joseph; Ray, Paul S.; Peters, Wendy; Polisensky, Emil; hicks, Brian C.; Brisken, Walter; hyman, Scott D.; Deneva, Julia; Kerr, Matthew T.; Taylor, Gregory; Dowell, Jayce; Schinzel, Frank K.

    2018-01-01

    The VLA Low-band Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE, ) is a commensal observing system on the NRAO Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). The separate optical path of the prime-focus sub-GHz dipole feeds and the Cassegrain-focus GHz feeds provided an opportunity to expand the simultaneous frequency operation of the VLA through joint observations across both systems. 16 VLA antennas are outfitted with dedicated samplers and use spare fibers to transport the 320-384 MHz band to the VLITE CPU-based correlator. Initial goals included exploring the scientific potential of a commensal low frequency system for ionospheric remote sensing, astrophysics and transients. VLITE operates at nearly 70% wall time with roughly 6200 hours of VLA time recorded each year.Several papers at this meeting review VLITE science and early results. Here we consider how the project could evolve in the future. Over the next 10 years, a straightforward evolutionary path calls for an expansion of VLITE to all 27 VLA antennas and to the maximum available low band receiver bandwidth (224-480 MHz). The GPU-based correlator for this LOw Band Observatory (LOBO) would also incorporate lower frequency signals from the new VLA 74 MHz system, including from VLA dishes (60-80 MHz) and standalone Long Wavelength Array (LWA) aperture array stations (20-80 MHz).In the longer term, we look towards leveraging the vast infrastructure of the ngVLA to include a commensal low frequency capability, called ngLOBO. As described in our community white paper (Taylor et al. 2018; arXiv:1708.00090), ngLOBO has three primary scientific missions: (1) Radio Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (Radio-LSST): one naturally wide beam, commensal with ngVLA, will conduct a continuous synoptic survey of large swaths of the sky for both slow and fast transients; (2) This same commensal beam will provide complementary low frequency images of all ngVLA targets when such data enhances their value. (3) Independent beams from the ng

  15. Cover crop rotations in no-till system: short-term CO2 emissions and soybean yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Gonsiorkiewicz Rigon

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In addition to improving sustainability in cropping systems, the use of a spring and winter crop rotation system may be a viable option for mitigating soil CO2 emissions (ECO2. This study aimed to determine short-term ECO2 as affected by crop rotations and soil management over one soybean cycle in two no-till experiments, and to assess the soybean yields with the lowest ECO2. Two experiments were carried out in fall-winter as follows: i triticale and sunflower were grown in Typic Rhodudalf (TR, and ii ruzigrass, grain sorghum, and ruzigrass + grain sorghum were grown in Rhodic Hapludox (RH. In the spring, pearl millet, sunn hemp, and forage sorghum were grown in both experiments. In addition, in TR a fallow treatment was also applied in the spring. Soybean was grown every year in the summer, and ECO2 were recorded during the growing period. The average ECO2 was 0.58 and 0.84 g m2 h–1 with accumulated ECO2 of 5,268 and 7,813 kg ha–1 C-CO2 in TR and RH, respectively. Sunn hemp, when compared to pearl millet, resulted in lower ECO2 by up to 12 % and an increase in soybean yield of 9% in TR. In RH, under the winter crop Ruzigrazz+Sorghum, ECO2 were lower by 17%, although with the same soybean yield. Soil moisture and N content of crop residues are the main drivers of ECO2 and soil clay content seems to play an important role in ECO2 that is worthy of further studies. In conclusion, sunn hemp in crop rotation may be utilized to mitigate ECO2 and improve soybean yield.

  16. SU-E-T-540: Volumetric Modulated Total Body Irradiation Using a Rotational Lazy Susan-Like Immobilization System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, X; Hrycushko, B; Lee, H; Lamphier, R; Jiang, S; Abdulrahman, R; Timmerman, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Traditional extended SSD total body irradiation (TBI) techniques can be problematic in terms of patient comfort and/or dose uniformity. This work aims to develop a comfortable TBI technique that achieves a uniform dose distribution to the total body while reducing the dose to organs at risk for complications. Methods: To maximize patient comfort, a lazy Susan-like couch top immobilization system which rotates about a pivot point was developed. During CT simulation, a patient is immobilized by a Vac-Lok bag within the body frame. The patient is scanned head-first and then feet-first following 180° rotation of the frame. The two scans are imported into the Pinnacle treatment planning system and concatenated to give a full-body CT dataset. Treatment planning matches multiple isocenter volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) fields of the upper body and multiple isocenter parallel-opposed fields of the lower body. VMAT fields of the torso are optimized to satisfy lung dose constraints while achieving a therapeutic dose to the torso. The multiple isocenter VMAT fields are delivered with an indexed couch, followed by body frame rotation about the pivot point to treat the lower body isocenters. The treatment workflow was simulated with a Rando phantom, and the plan was mapped to a solid water slab phantom for point- and film-dose measurements at multiple locations. Results: The treatment plan of 12Gy over 8 fractions achieved 80.2% coverage of the total body volume within ±10% of the prescription dose. The mean lung dose was 8.1 Gy. All ion chamber measurements were within ±1.7% compared to the calculated point doses. All relative film dosimetry showed at least a 98.0% gamma passing rate using a 3mm/3% passing criteria. Conclusion: The proposed patient comfort-oriented TBI technique provides for a uniform dose distribution within the total body while reducing the dose to the lungs

  17. Carbon stocks quantification in agricultural systems employing succession and rotation of crops in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Michele K. C.; Marinho, Mara de A.; Denardin, José E.; Zullo, Jurandir, Jr.; Paz-González, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Soil and vegetation constitute respectively the third and the fourth terrestrial reservoirs of Carbon (C) on Earth. C sequestration in these reservoirs includes the capture of the CO2 from the atmosphere by photosynthesis and its storage as organic C. Consequently, changes in land use and agricultural practices affect directly the emissions of the greenhouse gases and the C sequestration. Several studies have already demonstrated that conservation agriculture, and particularly zero tillage (ZT), has a positive effect on soil C sequestration. The Brazilian federal program ABC (Agriculture of Low Carbon Emission) was conceived to promote agricultural production with environmental protection and represents an instrument to achieve voluntary targets to mitigate emissions or NAMAS (National Appropriated Mitigation Actions). With financial resources of about US 1.0 billion until 2020 the ABC Program has a target of expand ZT in 8 million hectares of land, with reduction of 16 to 20 million of CO2eq. Our objective was to quantify the C stocks in soil, plants and litter of representative grain crops systems under ZT in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Two treatments of a long term experimental essay (> 20 years) were evaluated: 1) Crop succession with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)/soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merril); 2) Crop rotation with wheat/soybean (1st year), vetch (Vicia sativa L.)/soybean (2nd year), and white oat (Avena sativa L.)/sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) (3rd year). C quantification in plants and in litter was performed using the direct method of biomass quantification. The soil type evaluated was a Humic Rhodic Hapludox, and C quantification was executed employing the method referred by "C mass by unit area". Results showed that soybean plants under crop succession presented greater C stock (4.31MgC ha-1) comparing with soybean plants cultivated under crop rotation (3.59 MgC ha-1). For wheat, however, greater C stock was quantified in plants under rotation

  18. Real-time Monitoring System for Rotating Machinery with IoT-based Cloud Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Haedong; Kim, Suhyun; Woo, Sunhee; Kim, Songhyun; Lee, Seungchul [Ulsan Nat’l Institute Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The objective of this research is to improve the efficiency of data collection from many machine components on smart factory floors using IoT(Internet of things) techniques and cloud platform, and to make it easy to update outdated diagnostic schemes through online deployment methods from cloud resources. The short-term analysis is implemented by a micro-controller, and it includes machine-learning algorithms for inferring snapshot information of the machine components. For long-term analysis, time-series and high-dimension data are used for root cause analysis by combining a cloud platform and multivariate analysis techniques. The diagnostic results are visualized in a webbased display dashboard for an unconstrained user access. The implementation is demonstrated to identify its performance in data acquisition and analysis for rotating machinery.

  19. Real-time Monitoring System for Rotating Machinery with IoT-based Cloud Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Haedong; Kim, Suhyun; Woo, Sunhee; Kim, Songhyun; Lee, Seungchul

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research is to improve the efficiency of data collection from many machine components on smart factory floors using IoT(Internet of things) techniques and cloud platform, and to make it easy to update outdated diagnostic schemes through online deployment methods from cloud resources. The short-term analysis is implemented by a micro-controller, and it includes machine-learning algorithms for inferring snapshot information of the machine components. For long-term analysis, time-series and high-dimension data are used for root cause analysis by combining a cloud platform and multivariate analysis techniques. The diagnostic results are visualized in a webbased display dashboard for an unconstrained user access. The implementation is demonstrated to identify its performance in data acquisition and analysis for rotating machinery.

  20. Environmental T4-Family Bacteriophages Evolve to Escape Abortive Infection via Multiple Routes in a Bacterial Host Employing "Altruistic Suicide" through Type III Toxin-Antitoxin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bihe; Akusobi, Chidiebere; Fang, Xinzhe; Salmond, George P C

    2017-01-01

    Abortive infection is an anti-phage mechanism employed by a bacterium to initiate its own death upon phage infection. This reduces, or eliminates, production of viral progeny and protects clonal siblings in the bacterial population by an act akin to an "altruistic suicide." Abortive infection can be mediated by a Type III toxin-antitoxin system called ToxIN Pa consisting of an endoribonuclease toxin and RNA antitoxin. ToxIN Pa is a heterohexameric quaternary complex in which pseudoknotted RNA inhibits the toxicity of the toxin until infection by certain phages causes destabilization of ToxIN Pa , leading to bacteriostasis and, eventually, lethality. However, it is still unknown why only certain phages are able to activate ToxIN Pa . To try to address this issue we first introduced ToxIN Pa into the Gram-negative enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 ( S 39006) and then isolated new environmental S 39006 phages that were scored for activation of ToxIN Pa and abortive infection capacity. We isolated three T4-like phages from a sewage treatment outflow point into the River Cam, each phage being isolated at least a year apart. These phages were susceptible to ToxIN Pa -mediated abortive infection but produced spontaneous "escape" mutants that were insensitive to ToxIN Pa . Analysis of these resistant mutants revealed three different routes of escaping ToxIN Pa , namely by mutating asiA (the product of which is a phage transcriptional co-activator); by mutating a conserved, yet functionally unknown, orf84 ; or by deleting a 6.5-10 kb region of the phage genome. Analysis of these evolved escape mutants may help uncover the nature of the corresponding phage product(s) involved in activation of ToxIN Pa .

  1. Lack of S-RNase-Based Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility in Orchids Suggests That This System Evolved after the Monocot-Eudicot Split

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ce Niu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (SI is found in approximately 40% of flowering plant species and at least 100 families. Although orchids belong to the largest angiosperm family, only 10% of orchid species present SI and have gametophytic SI (GSI. Furthermore, a majority (72% of Dendrobium species, which constitute one of the largest Orchidaceae genera, show SI and have GSI. However, nothing is known about the molecular mechanism of GSI. The S-determinants of GSI have been well characterized at the molecular level in Solanaceae, Rosaceae, and Plantaginaceae, which use an S-ribonuclease (S-RNase-based system. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that Orchidaceae uses a similar S-RNase to those described in Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Plantaginaceae SI species. In this study, two SI species (Dendrobium longicornu and D. chrysanthum were identified using fluorescence microscopy. Then, the S-RNase- and SLF-interacting SKP1-like1 (SSK1-like genes present in their transcriptomes and the genomes of Phalaenopsis equestris, D. catenatum, Vanilla shenzhenica, and Apostasia shenzhenica were investigated. Sequence, phylogenetic, and tissue-specific expression analyses revealed that none of the genes identified was an S-determinant, suggesting that Orchidaceae might have a novel SI mechanism. The results also suggested that RNase-based GSI might have evolved after the split of monocotyledons (monocots and dicotyledons (dicots but before the split of Asteridae and Rosidae. This is also the first study to investigate S-RNase-based GSI in monocots. However, studies on gene identification, differential expression, and segregation analyses in controlled crosses are needed to further evaluate the genes with high expression levels in GSI tissues.

  2. Why did heterospory evolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kurt B; Burd, Martin

    2017-08-01

    The primitive land plant life cycle featured the production of spores of unimodal size, a condition called homospory. The evolution of bimodal size distributions with small male spores and large female spores, known as heterospory, was an innovation that occurred repeatedly in the history of land plants. The importance of desiccation-resistant spores for colonization of the land is well known, but the adaptive value of heterospory has never been well established. It was an addition to a sexual life cycle that already involved male and female gametes. Its role as a precursor to the evolution of seeds has received much attention, but this is an evolutionary consequence of heterospory that cannot explain the transition from homospory to heterospory (and the lack of evolutionary reversal from heterospory to homospory). Enforced outcrossing of gametophytes has often been mentioned in connection to heterospory, but we review the shortcomings of this argument as an explanation of the selective advantage of heterospory. Few alternative arguments concerning the selective forces favouring heterospory have been proposed, a paucity of attention that is surprising given the importance of this innovation in land plant evolution. In this review we highlight two ideas that may lead us to a better understanding of why heterospory evolved. First, models of optimal resource allocation - an approach that has been used for decades in evolutionary ecology to help understand parental investment and other life-history patterns - suggest that an evolutionary increase in spore size could reach a threshold at which small spores yielding small, sperm-producing gametophytes would return greater fitness per unit of resource investment than would large spores and bisexual gametophytes. With the advent of such microspores, megaspores would evolve under frequency-dependent selection. This argument can account for the appearance of heterospory in the Devonian, when increasingly tall and complex

  3. Mechanism of lumen gain with a novel rotational aspiration atherectomy system for peripheral arterial disease: examination by intravascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ali H M; Ako, Junya; Waseda, Katsuhisa; Honda, Yasuhiro; Zeller, Thomas; Leon, Martin B; Fitzgerald, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of luminal gain with a novel atheroablation system (Pathway PV) for the treatment of peripheral artery disease using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). The atherectomy system is a rotational atherectomy device, which employs expandable rotating blades with ports that allow flushing and aspiration of the plaque material or thrombus. In this first-in-man clinical study, IVUS analysis was available in 6 patients with lower limb ischemia treated with this device. The treatment results were assessed using IVUS at pre and post atherectomy. Lumen beyond burr size (LBB) was defined as lumen gain divided by the estimated burr area determined by the burr-size. IVUS analysis was available in six patients (superficial femoral artery n=3, popliteal artery n=2, posterior tibial artery n=1). Atheroablation achieved a significant increase in lumen area (LA) (preintervention 3.9+/-0.4, postatheroablation 8.0+/-1.7 mm(2), Patherectomy device achieved significant luminal gain by debulking in the absence of vessel stretching. The LA was greater than burr-sized lumen expectancy at cross-sections along the treated segments, suggesting a complimentary role of aspiration in luminal gain in atherosclerotic peripheral artery lesions.

  4. Fat: an evolving issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Speakman

    2012-09-01

    Work on obesity is evolving, and obesity is a consequence of our evolutionary history. In the space of 50 years, we have become an obese species. The reasons why can be addressed at a number of different levels. These include separating between whether the primary cause lies on the food intake or energy expenditure side of the energy balance equation, and determining how genetic and environmental effects contribute to weight variation between individuals. Opinion on whether increased food intake or decreased energy expenditure drives the obesity epidemic is still divided, but recent evidence favours the idea that food intake, rather than altered expenditure, is most important. There is more of a consensus that genetics explains most (probably around 65% of weight variation between individuals. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have identified many polymorphisms that are linked to obesity, yet much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. Finding the causes of this unexplained variation will be an impetus of genetic and epigenetic research on obesity over the next decade. Many environmental factors – including gut microbiota, stress and endocrine disruptors – have been linked to the risk of developing obesity. A better understanding of gene-by-environment interactions will also be key to understanding obesity in the years to come.

  5. Communicability across evolving networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Peter; Parsons, Mark C; Higham, Desmond J; Estrada, Ernesto

    2011-04-01

    Many natural and technological applications generate time-ordered sequences of networks, defined over a fixed set of nodes; for example, time-stamped information about "who phoned who" or "who came into contact with who" arise naturally in studies of communication and the spread of disease. Concepts and algorithms for static networks do not immediately carry through to this dynamic setting. For example, suppose A and B interact in the morning, and then B and C interact in the afternoon. Information, or disease, may then pass from A to C, but not vice versa. This subtlety is lost if we simply summarize using the daily aggregate network given by the chain A-B-C. However, using a natural definition of a walk on an evolving network, we show that classic centrality measures from the static setting can be extended in a computationally convenient manner. In particular, communicability indices can be computed to summarize the ability of each node to broadcast and receive information. The computations involve basic operations in linear algebra, and the asymmetry caused by time's arrow is captured naturally through the noncommutativity of matrix-matrix multiplication. Illustrative examples are given for both synthetic and real-world communication data sets. We also discuss the use of the new centrality measures for real-time monitoring and prediction.

  6. Evolving Concepts of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions. PMID:26161792

  7. UKAEA'S evolving contract philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) has gone through fundamental change over the last ten years. At the heart of this change has been UKAEA's relationship with the contracting and supply market. This paper describes the way in which UKAEA actively developed the market to support the decommissioning programme, and how the approach to contracting has evolved as external pressures and demands have changed. UKAEA's pro-active approach to industry has greatly assisted the development of a healthy, competitive market for services supporting decommissioning in the UK. There have been difficult changes and many challenges along the way, and some retrenchment was necessary to meet regulatory requirements. Nevertheless, UKAEA has sustained a high level of competition - now measured in terms of competed spend as a proportion of competable spend - with annual out-turns consistently over 80%. The prime responsibility for market development will pass to the new Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in 2005, as the owner, on behalf of the Government, of the UK's civil nuclear liabilities. The preparatory work for the NDA indicates that the principles established by UKAEA will be carried forward. (author)

  8. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (∼2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves

  9. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko, E-mail: nori@phys-h.keio.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kouhoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (∼2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves.

  10. Experimental shift work studies of permanent night, and rapidly rotating, shift systems. Pt. 1. Behaviour of various characteristics of sleep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauth, P.; Rutenfranz, J.; Romberg, H.P.; Decoster, F.; Kiesswetter, E. (Dortmund Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Arbeitsphysiologie); Schulz, H. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Psychiatrie, Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Klinisches Inst.)

    1980-06-01

    In connection with experimental shift work 20 volunteers were examined while working on different rapidly or slowly rotating shift systems. Sleep was analyzed over a total of 112 days. Sleep was disturbed by children's noise or traffic noise. Sleep duration and sleep quality were particularly badly affected by noise with a high information value (children's noise). The ultradian rhythmicity of sleep did not appear to be disrupted by the change from day to night work. There were no significant differences between morning sleep and afternoon sleep after night work. In the laboratory experiments with fixed sleep durations, no separate effects on sleep quality could be established for different shift systems.

  11. Species composition and density of weeds in a wheat crop depending on the soil tillage system in crop rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yankov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The investigation was carried out in the trial field of Dobrudzha Agricultural Institute, General Toshevo on slightly leached chernozem soil type. For the purposes of this investigation, variants from a stationary field experiment initiated in 1987 and based on various soil tillage tools and operations were analyzed. The species composition and density of weeds were followed in a wheat crop grown after grain maize using the following soil tillage systems: plowing at 24 – 26 cm (for maize – disking at 10 – 12 cm (for wheat; cutting at 24 – 26 cm (for maize – cutting at 8 – 10 cm (for wheat; disking at 10 – 12 cm (for maize – disking at 10 – 12 cm (for wheat; no-tillage (for maize – no-tillage (for wheat.Weed infestation was read at the fourth rotation since the initiation of the trial. The observations were made in spring before treatment of the crop with herbicides. The soil tillage system had a significant effect on the species composition and density of weeds in the field with wheat grown after previous crop maize. The long-term alternation of plowing with disking in parallel with the usage of chemicals for weed control lead to lower weed infestation of the weed crop. The lower weed density after this soil tillage system was not related to changes in the species composition and the relative percent of the individual species in the total weed infestation. The long-term application in crop rotation of systems without turning of the soil layer and of minimal and no-tillage increased the amount of weeds. The reason is the greater variability of weed species which typically occur after shallow soil tillage.

  12. The Role of the Peripheral and Central Nervous Systems in Rotator Cuff Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachasson, Damien; Singh, Anshuman; Shah, Sameer; Lane, John G.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) disease is an extremely common condition associated with shoulder pain, reduced functional capacities and impaired quality of life. It primarily involves alterations in tendon health and mechanical properties that can ultimately lead to tendon failure. RC tendon tears induce progressive muscular changes that negatively impact surgical reparability of the RC tendons and clinical outcomes. At the same time, a significant base of clinical data suggests a relatively weak relationship between RC integrity and clinical presentation, emphasizing the multifactorial aspects of RC disease. This review aims to summarize the potential contribution of peripheral, spinal and supraspinal neural factors that may: (i) exacerbate structural and functional muscle changes induced by tendon tear, (ii) compromise the reversal of these changes during surgery and rehabilitation, (iii) contribute to pain generation and persistence of pain, iv) impair shoulder function through reduced proprioception, kinematics and muscle recruitment, and iv) help to explain interindividual differences and response to treatment. Given the current clinical and scientific interest in peripheral nerve injury in the context of RC disease and surgery, we carefully reviewed this body of literature with a particular emphasis for suprascapular neuropathy that has generated a large number of studies in the past decade. Within this process, we highlight the gaps in current knowledge and suggest research avenues for scientists and clinicians. PMID:26189809

  13. Relationships among rotational and conventional grazing systems, stream channels, and macroinvertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, K.L.; Vondracek, B.

    2011-01-01

    Cattle grazing in riparian areas can reduce water quality, alter stream channel characteristics, and alter fish and macroinvertebrate assemblage structure. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Services has recommended Rotational Grazing (RG) as an alternative management method on livestock and dairy operations to protect riparian areas and water quality. We evaluated 13 stream channel characteristics, benthic macroinvertebrate larvae (BML), and chironomid pupal exuviae (CPE) from 18 sites in the Upper Midwest of the United States in relation to RG and conventional grazing (CG). A Biotic Composite Score comprised of several macroinvertebrate metrics was developed for both the BML assemblage and the CPE assemblage. Multi-Response Permutation Procedures (MRPP) indicated a significant difference in stream channel characteristics between RG and CG. Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling indicated that RG sites were associated with more stable stream banks, higher quality aquatic habitat, lower soil compaction, and larger particles in the streambed. However, neither MRPP nor Mann-Whitney U tests demonstrated a difference in Biotic Composite Scores for BML or CPE along RG and CG sites. The BML and CPE metrics were significantly correlated, indicating that they were likely responding to similar variables among the study sites. Although stream channel characteristics appeared to respond to grazing management, BML and CPE may have responded to land use throughout the watershed, as well as local land use. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. (outside the USA).

  14. TH-AB-202-11: Spatial and Rotational Quality Assurance of 6DOF Patient Tracking Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcher, AH; Liu, X; Grelewicz, Z; Wiersma, R [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: External tracking systems used for patient positioning and motion monitoring during radiotherapy are now capable of detecting both translations and rotations (6DOF). In this work, we develop a novel technique to evaluate the 6DOF performance of external motion tracking systems. We apply this methodology to an infrared (IR) marker tracking system and two 3D optical surface mapping systems in a common tumor 6DOF workspace. Methods: An in-house designed and built 6DOF parallel kinematics robotic motion phantom was used to follow input trajectories with sub-millimeter and sub-degree accuracy. The 6DOF positions of the robotic system were then tracked and recorded independently by three optical camera systems. A calibration methodology which associates the motion phantom and camera coordinate frames was first employed, followed by a comprehensive 6DOF trajectory evaluation, which spanned a full range of positions and orientations in a 20×20×16 mm and 5×5×5 degree workspace. The intended input motions were compared to the calibrated 6DOF measured points. Results: The technique found the accuracy of the IR marker tracking system to have maximal root mean square error (RMSE) values of 0.25 mm translationally and 0.09 degrees rotationally, in any one axis, comparing intended 6DOF positions to positions measured by the IR camera. The 6DOF RSME discrepancy for the first 3D optical surface tracking unit yielded maximal values of 0.60 mm and 0.11 degrees over the same 6DOF volume. An earlier generation 3D optical surface tracker was observed to have worse tracking capabilities than both the IR camera unit and the newer 3D surface tracking system with maximal RMSE of 0.74 mm and 0.28 degrees within the same 6DOF evaluation space. Conclusion: The proposed technique was effective at evaluating the performance of 6DOF patient tracking systems. All systems examined exhibited tracking capabilities at the sub-millimeter and sub-degree level within a 6DOF workspace.

  15. The non-flagellar type III secretion system evolved from the bacterial flagellum and diversified into host-cell adapted systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie S Abby

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Type 3 secretion systems (T3SSs are essential components of two complex bacterial machineries: the flagellum, which drives cell motility, and the non-flagellar T3SS (NF-T3SS, which delivers effectors into eukaryotic cells. Yet the origin, specialization, and diversification of these machineries remained unclear. We developed computational tools to identify homologous components of the two systems and to discriminate between them. Our analysis of >1,000 genomes identified 921 T3SSs, including 222 NF-T3SSs. Phylogenomic and comparative analyses of these systems argue that the NF-T3SS arose from an exaptation of the flagellum, i.e. the recruitment of part of the flagellum structure for the evolution of the new protein delivery function. This reconstructed chronology of the exaptation process proceeded in at least two steps. An intermediate ancestral form of NF-T3SS, whose descendants still exist in Myxococcales, lacked elements that are essential for motility and included a subset of NF-T3SS features. We argue that this ancestral version was involved in protein translocation. A second major step in the evolution of NF-T3SSs occurred via recruitment of secretins to the NF-T3SS, an event that occurred at least three times from different systems. In rhizobiales, a partial homologous gene replacement of the secretin resulted in two genes of complementary function. Acquisition of a secretin was followed by the rapid adaptation of the resulting NF-T3SSs to multiple, distinct eukaryotic cell envelopes where they became key in parasitic and mutualistic associations between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Our work elucidates major steps of the evolutionary scenario leading to extant NF-T3SSs. It demonstrates how molecular evolution can convert one complex molecular machine into a second, equally complex machine by successive deletions, innovations, and recruitment from other molecular systems.

  16. Insulation diagnosis of rotating machines for elevators by an expert system based on fuzzy inference. Fuzzy suiron wo donyushita expert system ni yoru shokokiyo kaitenki no zetsuen shindan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, K.; Oshima, H. (Tokai Univ., Tokyo (Japan)); Yamada, N.; Iijima, T. (Mitsubishi Electric Building Techno-Service Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-11-20

    Using the data measured with the insulation deterioration diagnostic system for rotating machines for elevators, which is newly developed utilizing the past experience, an expert system which enables insulation deterioration diagnosis even by field maintenance engineers to some extent. In this system, the knowledge and experience of specialists are loaded in a personal computer as the rule for insulation deterioration diagnosis to perform insulation deterioration diagnosis by fuzzy inference and 'hypothesis-verification' type backward reasoning inference. The structured expert system is outlined. The result of insulation diagnosis by this system s compared with that made by specialists to evaluate the effectiveness of the diagnosed result of this system, and shows 84% agreement with the results obtained by specialists. It is, therefore, considered to be a highly practical expert system. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Investigation of the equality constraint effect on the reduction of the rotational ambiguity in three-component system using a novel grid search method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyramysoltan, Samira; Rajkó, Róbert; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2013-08-12

    The obtained results by soft modeling multivariate curve resolution methods often are not unique and are questionable because of rotational ambiguity. It means a range of feasible solutions equally fit experimental data and fulfill the constraints. Regarding to chemometric literature, a survey of useful constraints for the reduction of the rotational ambiguity is a big challenge for chemometrician. It is worth to study the effects of applying constraints on the reduction of rotational ambiguity, since it can help us to choose the useful constraints in order to impose in multivariate curve resolution methods for analyzing data sets. In this work, we have investigated the effect of equality constraint on decreasing of the rotational ambiguity. For calculation of all feasible solutions corresponding with known spectrum, a novel systematic grid search method based on Species-based Particle Swarm Optimization is proposed in a three-component system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pneumatic sample-transfer system for use with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory rotating target neutron source (RTNS-I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-07-01

    A pneumatic sample-transfer system is needed to be able to rapidly retrieve samples irradiated with 14-MeV neutrons at the Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I). The rabbit system, already in place for many years, has been refurbished with modern system components controlled by an LSI-11 minicomputer. Samples can now be counted three seconds after an irradiation. There are many uses for this expanded 14-MeV neutron activation capability. Several fission products difficult to isolate from mixed fission fragments can be produced instead through (n,p) or (n,α) reactions with stable isotopes. Mass-separated samples of Nd, Mo, and Se, for example, can be irradiated to produce Pr, Nb, and As radionuclides sufficient for decay scheme studies. The system may also be used for multielement fast-neutron activation analysis because the neutron flux is greater than 2 x 10 11 n/cm 2 -sec. Single element analyses of Si and O are also possible. Finally, measurements of fast-neutron cross sections producing short-lived activation products can be performed with this system. A description of the rabbit system and instructions for its use are presented in this report

  19. Rotating preventers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangedahl, M.J.; Stone, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that recent changes in the oil and gas industry and ongoing developments in horizontal and underbalanced drilling necessitated development of a better rotating head. A new device called the rotating blowout preventer (RBOP) was developed by Seal-Tech. It is designed to replace the conventional rotating control head on top of BOP stacks and allows drilling operations to continue even on live (underbalanced) wells. Its low wear characteristics and high working pressure (1,500 psi) allow drilling rig crews to drill safely in slightly underbalanced conditions or handle severe well control problems during the time required to actuate other BOPs in the stack. Drilling with a RBOP allows wellbores to be completely closed in tat the drill floor rather than open as with conventional BOPs

  20. Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  1. Vibrations of rotating machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Osami; Kanki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Keogh, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This book opens with an explanation of the vibrations of a single degree-of-freedom (dof) system for all beginners. Subsequently, vibration analysis of multi-dof systems is explained by modal analysis. Mode synthesis modeling is then introduced for system reduction, which aids understanding in a simplified manner of how complicated rotors behave. Rotor balancing techniques are offered for rigid and flexible rotors through several examples. Consideration of gyroscopic influences on the rotordynamics is then provided and vibration evaluation of a rotor-bearing system is emphasized in terms of forward and backward whirl rotor motions through eigenvalue (natural frequency and damping ratio) analysis. In addition to these rotordynamics concerning rotating shaft vibration measured in a stationary reference frame, blade vibrations are analyzed with Coriolis forces expressed in a rotating reference frame. Other phenomena that may be assessed in stationary and rotating reference frames include stability characteristic...

  2. (Pseudo-Goldstone boson interaction in D=2+1 systems with a spontaneously broken internal rotation symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph P. Hofmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The low-temperature properties of systems characterized by a spontaneously broken internal rotation symmetry, O(N→O(N−1, are governed by Goldstone bosons and can be derived systematically within effective Lagrangian field theory. In the present study we consider systems living in two spatial dimensions, and evaluate their partition function at low temperatures and weak external fields up to three-loop order. Although our results are valid for any such system, here we use magnetic terminology, i.e., we refer to quantum spin systems. We discuss the sign of the (pseudo-Goldstone boson interaction in the pressure, staggered magnetization, and susceptibility as a function of an external staggered field for general N. As it turns out, the d=2+1 quantum XY model (N=2 and the d=2+1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet (N=3, are rather special, as they represent the only cases where the spin-wave interaction in the pressure is repulsive in the whole parameter regime where the effective expansion applies. Remarkably, the d=2+1 XY model is the only system where the interaction contribution in the staggered magnetization (susceptibility tends to positive (negative values at low temperatures and weak external field.

  3. A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high energy x-ray studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shade, Paul A., E-mail: paul.shade.1@us.af.mil; Schuren, Jay C.; Turner, Todd J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Blank, Basil [PulseRay, Beaver Dams, New York 14812 (United States); Kenesei, Peter; Goetze, Kurt; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Suter, Robert M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Bernier, Joel V.; Li, Shiu Fai [Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lind, Jonathan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    High energy x-ray characterization methods hold great potential for gaining insight into the behavior of materials and providing comparison datasets for the validation and development of mesoscale modeling tools. A suite of techniques have been developed by the x-ray community for characterizing the 3D structure and micromechanical state of polycrystalline materials; however, combining these techniques with in situ mechanical testing under well characterized and controlled boundary conditions has been challenging due to experimental design requirements, which demand new high-precision hardware as well as access to high-energy x-ray beamlines. We describe the design and performance of a load frame insert with a rotational and axial motion system that has been developed to meet these requirements. An example dataset from a deforming titanium alloy demonstrates the new capability.

  4. Influences of the guide bearing stiffness on the critical speed of rotation in the main shaft system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, B; Zhang, L X; Zhao, L

    2012-01-01

    An analysis is carried out on the natural vibration characteristics of the main shaft system of a hydro-turbine generating set. The critical speed of rotation in different orders are calculated based on simplified real parameters and the influences of different guide bearing stiffness on the critical speed are analyzed. The results show that the up guide bearing has little influence on the critical speed; however, the down and the water guide bearings strongly affect the critical speed and to a certain extent the 'saturation' phenomenon happens; as all of these three bearings stiffness become larger at the same time, the critical speed also increases significantly. So it is necessary to consider the effect of the bearing stiffness when doing an estimation of the critical speed.

  5. The Response to P-Derived from Phosphate Rock and TSP by Crops Grown in a Simulated Crop Rotation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisworo, Elsye L; Sisworo, Widjang H; Havid-Rasjid; Syamsul-Rizal; Komarudin-Idris

    2002-01-01

    A green house experiment was carried out on a simulated crop rotation system of upland rice-soybean-mungbean to determine the effect of P-derived from different phosphate rock (PR) sources and TSP using 32 P. The data obtained reveal that all the P-sources has a significant effect on the growth of all the three crops, expressed in dry weight, % P-total and total P-uptake (mg P pot -1 ). For the P-source it was shown that % P-derived from PR/TSP and their uptake (mg P pot -1 ) was quite high, showing that the PR s applied were of good reactivity. The residue of the PR s has also still a good effect on plant growth than that of TSP. The efficiency of PR s was far below that of TSP. This apparently was due to the high rate of application, ten times the rate of TSP. (author)

  6. A quality evaluation of stabilization of rotation frequency of gas-diesel engines when using an adaptive automatic control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilenkov, A. A.; Efremov, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    A possibility of quality improvement of stabilization of rotation frequency of the gas-diesels used as prime mover of generator set in the multigenerator units working for abruptly variable load of large power is considered. An evaluation is made on the condition of fuzzy controller use developed and described by the authors in a number of articles. An evaluation has shown that theoretically, the revolution range of a gas-diesel engine may be reduced 25-30 times in case of optimal settings of the controller in the whole power range. The results of modelling showing a considerable quality improvement of transient processes in the investigated system during a sharp change of loading are presented in this article.

  7. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  8. Millimeter wave radar system on a rotating platform for combined search and track functionality with SAR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulenbacher, Uwe; Rech, Klaus; Sedlmeier, Johannes; Pratisto, Hans; Wellig, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Ground based millimeter wave radar sensors offer the potential for a weather-independent automatic ground surveillance at day and night, e.g. for camp protection applications. The basic principle and the experimental verification of a radar system concept is described, which by means of an extreme off-axis positioning of the antenna(s) combines azimuthal mechanical beam steering with the formation of a circular-arc shaped synthetic aperture (SA). In automatic ground surveillance the function of search and detection of moving ground targets is performed by means of the conventional mechanical scan mode. The rotated antenna structure designed as a small array with two or more RX antenna elements with simultaneous receiver chains allows to instantaneous track multiple moving targets (monopulse principle). The simultaneously operated SAR mode yields areal images of the distribution of stationary scatterers. For ground surveillance application this SAR mode is best suited for identifying possible threats by means of change detection. The feasibility of this concept was tested by means of an experimental radar system comprising of a 94 GHz (W band) FM-CW module with 1 GHz bandwidth and two RX antennas with parallel receiver channels, placed off-axis at a rotating platform. SAR mode and search/track mode were tested during an outdoor measurement campaign. The scenery of two persons walking along a road and partially through forest served as test for the capability to track multiple moving targets. For SAR mode verification an image of the area composed of roads, grassland, woodland and several man-made objects was reconstructed from the measured data.

  9. Modeling impacts of water and fertilizer management on the ecosystem service of rice rotated cropping system in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Yu, C.; Li, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable agricultural intensification demand optimum resource managements of agro-ecosystems. Detailed information on the impacts of water use and nutrient application on agro-ecosystem services including crop yields, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and nitrogen (N) loss is the key to guide field managements. In this study, we use the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model to simulate the biogeochemical processes for rice rotated cropping systems in China. We set varied scenarios of water use in more than 1600 counties, and derived optimal rates of N application for each county in accordance to water use scenarios. Our results suggest that 0.88 ± 0.33 Tg per year (mean ± standard deviation) of synthetic N could be reduced without reducing rice yields, which accounts for 15.7 ± 5.9% of current N application in China. Field managements with shallow flooding and optimal N applications could enhance ecosystem services on a national scale, leading to 34.3% reduction of GHG emissions (CH4, N2O, and CO2), 2.8% reduction of overall N loss (NH3 volatilization, denitrification and N leaching) and 1.7% increase of rice yields, as compared to current management conditions. Among provinces with major rice production, Jiangsu, Yunnan, Guizhou, and Hubei could achieve more than 40% reduction of GHG emissions under appropriate water managements, while Zhejiang, Guangdong, and Fujian could reduce more than 30% N loss with optimal N applications. Our modeling efforts suggest that China is likely to benefit from reforming water and fertilization managements for rice rotated cropping system in terms of sustainable crop yields, GHG emission mitigation and N loss reduction, and the reformation should be prioritized in the above-mentioned provinces. Keywords: water regime, nitrogen fertilization, sustainable management, ecological modeling, DNDC

  10. Development of research activity support system. 3. Automatic link generation/maintenance on self-evolving database; Kenkyu katsudo shien system no kaihatsu. 3. Jiko zoshokugata database deno bunsho link no jido sakusei/shufuku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, T.; Futakata, A. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    For a coordinated task to be accomplished in an organization, documents, charts, and data produced by plural workers need to be shared by the plural workers. This information sharing setup will function more effectively when the meanings and purposes of documents, etc., are arranged in good order relative to the other documents and when they are managed as a group of documents organically linked with each other and properly updated as the task approaches completion. In the self-evolving databases proposed so far, five types of document links representing the relations between documents are automatically generated and the documents are unifiedly managed for the documents yielded by coordinated work to be arranged in a proper order. A procedure for automatically generating document links are established on the basis of information received from the document retrieval system and Lotus Notes application. In a self-evolving database, the document on either side of a link is apt to be lost due to users` moving or deleting documents. An automatic procedure is developed in this report which will enable such document links to correctly restore themselves without loss of semantic relations. 12 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Disgust: Evolved function and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tybur, J.M.; Lieberman, D.; Kurzban, R.; DeScioli, P.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in and research on disgust has surged over the past few decades. The field, however, still lacks a coherent theoretical framework for understanding the evolved function or functions of disgust. Here we present such a framework, emphasizing 2 levels of analysis: that of evolved function and

  12. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  13. Lenses; systems; sensitive; leadership; models; integral; spiritual; images; evolve; states; stages; consciousness; power; force; determinants; mind; genius; belief systems; evolution; spiritual growth; rationality; attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus C. van der Merwe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Lenses on spirituality and being church; the road ahead for the Netherdutch Reformed Church of Africa (NRCA. At this point of time the Netherdutch Reformed Church of Africa (NRCA is facing the seemingly unsolvable dilemma of not being able to handle diversity in a positive manner. By applying three lenses to the current impasse with regards to the church’s struggle with diversity, this article aims at providing an answer to the question of how to proceed. The first lens addresses the challenge to maintain spiritual health and harmony in the midst of differences and tension in the church. The theory behind systems sensitive leadership as lens serves as the guideline to achieve the necessary spiritual health that the church needs in such challenging times. The second lens explores the inner Christian spiritual path in a both developmental and comprehensive way. Drawing on the work of Paul Smith this lens sets forth the developmental framework by which Christians grow inwardly in their understanding of Jesus and his teachings. The third lens is a view on a practice whereby the validity of intellectual positions, statements, or ideologies could be appraised as an innate quality in any subject. This lens opens a unique perspective which provides not only a new understanding of humanity’s journey in the universe, but also serves as a guide to were we and the whole cosmos are on our personal journeys to become who we could be. The vision that is provided by these three lenses has the capacity not only to serve as guidelines, but also to provide the tools to handle the challenges the church has to face on the road a head.

  14. A polar-region-adaptable systematic bias collaborative measurement method for shipboard redundant rotational inertial navigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Wu, Wenqi; Wei, Guo; Lian, Junxiang; Yu, Ruihang

    2018-05-01

    The shipboard redundant rotational inertial navigation system (RINS) configuration, including a dual-axis RINS and a single-axis RINS, can satisfy the demand of marine INSs of especially high reliability as well as achieving trade-off between position accuracy and cost. Generally, the dual-axis RINS is the master INS, and the single-axis RINS is the hot backup INS for high reliability purposes. An integrity monitoring system performs a fault detection function to ensure sailing safety. However, improving the accuracy of the backup INS in case of master INS failure has not been given enough attention. Without the aid of any external information, a systematic bias collaborative measurement method based on an augmented Kalman filter is proposed for the redundant RINSs. Estimates of inertial sensor biases can be used by the built-in integrity monitoring system to monitor the RINS running condition. On the other hand, a position error prediction model is designed for the single-axis RINS to estimate the systematic error caused by its azimuth gyro bias. After position error compensation, the position information provided by the single-axis RINS still remains highly accurate, even if the integrity monitoring system detects a dual-axis RINS fault. Moreover, use of a grid frame as a navigation frame makes the proposed method applicable in any area, including the polar regions. Semi-physical simulation and experiments including sea trials verify the validity of the method.

  15. Numerical study of slip system activity and crystal lattice rotation under wedge nanoindents in tungsten single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, T.; Schwaiger, R.; Wang, J.; Weygand, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    Tungsten is a promising material for plasma facing components in future nuclear fusion reactors. In the present work, we numerically investigate the deformation behavior of unirradiated tungsten (a body-centered cubic (bcc) single crystal) underneath nanoindents. A finite element (FE) model is presented to simulate wedge indentation. Crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) simulations were performed for face-centered and body-centered single crystals accounting for the slip system family {110} in the bcc crystal system and the {111} slip family in the fcc system. The 90° wedge indenter was aligned parallel to the [1 ¯01 ]-direction and indented the crystal in the [0 1 ¯0 ]-direction up to a maximum indentation depth of 2 µm. In both, the fcc and bcc single crystals, the activity of slip systems was investigated and compared. Good agreement with the results from former investigations on fcc single crystals was observed. Furthermore, the in-plane lattice rotation in the material underneath an indent was determined and compared for the fcc and bcc single crystals.

  16. One common structural peculiarity of the Solar system bodies including the star, planets, satellites and resulting from their globes rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    be less dense diminishing its angular momentum. A crosscutting wave rippling producing chains of square craters here is also clearly visible. Sun presents a special case because its equatorial region rotates faster than the higher latitudes. It could be attributed to an important loss of angular momentum by this region during formation of planets (significant transfer of momentum to the planetary system) and its compensation according to the Le Chatelier rule by the faster rotation. But, in turn, this faster rotation causes an intensive destruction of this region in tendency to keep " status quo". The photosphere is "perforated" by darker colder spots deep up to 300 (maybe more?) km - famous solar spots long to 200000 km and smaller pores (Fig. 7). In the chromosphere there is a remarkable loss of "heavy" Ca ion from this region (compare with the loss of methane from the equatorial region of Saturn). Under more close inspection of other planetary bodies this uniform separation of tropical and extra-tropical zones should be discovered.

  17. Nitrogen cycling in organic farming systems with rotational grass-clover and arable crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Jørgen; Grant, Ruth; Olesen, Jørgen E.

    2006-01-01

    Organic farming is considered an effective means of reducing nitrogen losses compared with more intensive conventional farming systems. However, under certain conditions, organic farming may also be susceptible to large nitrogen (N) losses. This i especially the case for organic .....

  18. Evolving Information Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Bansler, Jørgen P.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter examines how people in organizations appropriate new computer-based media, that is, how they adopt, reconfigure, and integrate advanced communication technologies such as groupware or desktop conferencing systems into their work practice. The chapter presents and analyzes findings from...

  19. SU-E-T-335: Dosimetric Investigation of An Advanced Rotating Gamma Ray System for Imaged Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C; Eldib, A; Chibani, O; Li, J; Chen, L; Li, C; Mora, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Co-60 beams have unique dosimetric properties for cranial treatments and thoracic cancers. The conventional concern about the high surface dose is overcome by modern system designs with rotational treatment techniques. This work investigates a novel rotational Gamma ray system for image-guided, external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The CybeRT system (Cyber Medical Corp., China) consists of a ring gantry with either one or two treatment heads containing a Gamma source and a multileaf collimator (MLC). The MLC has 60 paired leaves, and the maximum field size is either 40cmx40cm (40 pairs of 0.5cm central leaves, 20 pairs of 1cm outer leaves), or 22cmx40cm (32 pairs of 0.25cm central leaves, 28 pairs of 0.5cm outer leaves). The treatment head(s) can swing 35° superiorly and 8° inferiorly, allowing a total of 43° non-coplanar beam incident. The treatment couch provides 6-degrees-of-freedom motion compensation and the kV cone-beam CT system has a spatial resolution of 0.4mm. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose distributions and compare with measurements. A retrospective study of 98 previously treated patients was performed to compare CybeRT with existing RT systems. Results: Monte Carlo results confirmed the CybeRT design parameters including output factors and 3D dose distributions. Its beam penumbra/dose gradient was similar to or better than that of 6MV photon beams and its isocenter accuracy is 0.3mm. Co-60 beams produce lower-energy secondary electrons that exhibit better dose properties in low-density lung tissues. Because of their rapid depth dose falloff, Co-60 beams are favorable for peripheral lung tumors with half-arc arrangements to spare the opposite lung and critical structures. Superior dose distributions were obtained for head and neck, breast, spine and lung tumors. Conclusion: Because of its accurate dose delivery and unique dosimetric properties of C-60 sources, CybeRT is ideally suited for advanced SBRT as well as

  20. SU-E-T-335: Dosimetric Investigation of An Advanced Rotating Gamma Ray System for Imaged Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Eldib, A; Chibani, O; Li, J; Chen, L [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li, C [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Co-60 beams have unique dosimetric properties for cranial treatments and thoracic cancers. The conventional concern about the high surface dose is overcome by modern system designs with rotational treatment techniques. This work investigates a novel rotational Gamma ray system for image-guided, external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The CybeRT system (Cyber Medical Corp., China) consists of a ring gantry with either one or two treatment heads containing a Gamma source and a multileaf collimator (MLC). The MLC has 60 paired leaves, and the maximum field size is either 40cmx40cm (40 pairs of 0.5cm central leaves, 20 pairs of 1cm outer leaves), or 22cmx40cm (32 pairs of 0.25cm central leaves, 28 pairs of 0.5cm outer leaves). The treatment head(s) can swing 35° superiorly and 8° inferiorly, allowing a total of 43° non-coplanar beam incident. The treatment couch provides 6-degrees-of-freedom motion compensation and the kV cone-beam CT system has a spatial resolution of 0.4mm. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose distributions and compare with measurements. A retrospective study of 98 previously treated patients was performed to compare CybeRT with existing RT systems. Results: Monte Carlo results confirmed the CybeRT design parameters including output factors and 3D dose distributions. Its beam penumbra/dose gradient was similar to or better than that of 6MV photon beams and its isocenter accuracy is 0.3mm. Co-60 beams produce lower-energy secondary electrons that exhibit better dose properties in low-density lung tissues. Because of their rapid depth dose falloff, Co-60 beams are favorable for peripheral lung tumors with half-arc arrangements to spare the opposite lung and critical structures. Superior dose distributions were obtained for head and neck, breast, spine and lung tumors. Conclusion: Because of its accurate dose delivery and unique dosimetric properties of C-60 sources, CybeRT is ideally suited for advanced SBRT as well as

  1. EVOLVE : International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Deutz, Andre; Schuetze, Oliver; Bäck, Thomas; Tantar, Emilia; Tantar, Alexandru-Adrian; Moral, Pierre; Legrand, Pierrick; Bouvry, Pascal; Coello, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Numerical and computational methods are nowadays used in a wide range of contexts in complex systems research, biology, physics, and engineering.  Over the last decades different methodological schools have emerged with emphasis on different aspects of computation, such as nature-inspired algorithms, set oriented numerics, probabilistic systems and Monte Carlo methods. Due to the use of different terminologies and emphasis on different aspects of algorithmic performance there is a strong need for a more integrated view and opportunities for cross-fertilization across particular disciplines. These proceedings feature 20 original publications from distinguished authors in the cross-section of computational sciences, such as machine learning algorithms and probabilistic models, complex networks and fitness landscape analysis, set oriented numerics and cell mapping, evolutionary multiobjective optimization, diversity-oriented search, and the foundations of genetic programming algorithms. By presenting cutting ed...

  2. Mass transfer studies in miniature Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) with 30% TBP/nitric acid biphasic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramonian, S.; Sivakumar, D.; Kumar, Shekhar; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-01-01

    The rotating disc contactor is the widely used liquid-liquid extraction equipment for its high throughput and efficiency. In this work mass transfer performance of the miniature RDC column for the 30% TBP/nitric acid biphasic system was studied in terms of the operating variables such as rotor speed and flow rate of the aqueous and organic phase. The RDC column used in the experiments was shown. The column shell is made up of thick glass having diameter of 10.5 cm and height 100 cm. The rotor diameter is 5.3 cm and stator opening diameter is 6.3 cm. Totally 25 number of rotor discs were welded in the rotating shaft. This shaft was aligned in such a way that each rotor was placed in the centre of the compartment formed in between the two stator rings. The experiments were carried out to study the effect of rotor speed and superficial velocity of the dispersed and continuous phase on mass transfer efficiency. The organic solvent was made as the continuous phase and O/A ratio was set as 4 in both the continuous to dispersed phase(c-d) and dispersed to continuous phase (d-c) mass transfer experiments. The Number of Transfer Units (NTU) was estimated based on the solvent phase. The graphical representation of NTU was shown. The NTU value was observed as 4 and 3 respectively for extraction and stripping at the combined through put of 60 L/h and the rotor speed of 1000 rpm. This corresponds to the Height of Transfer Unit (HTU) value of 15 cm and 20 cm respectively for d-c and c-d mass transfer. The estimated overall mass transfer coefficient was increasing with rotor speed and superficial velocity of the liquid phases. The overall mass transfer coefficient also increases with increase in hold up

  3. Modeling impacts of water and fertilizer management on ecosystem services from rice rotated crop systems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han; Yu, Chaoqing; Li, Changsheng; Huang, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Yue, Yali; Huang, Guorui

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable intensification in agriculture has stressed the need for management practices that could increase crop yields while simultaneously reducing environmental impacts. It is well recognized that water and nutrient management hold great promise to address these goals. This study uses the DNDC biogeochemical model to stimulate the impacts of water regime and nitrogen fertilizer management interactions on ecosystem services of rice rotated crop systems in China. County-level optimal nitrogen fertilizer application rates under various water management practices were captured and then multiple scenarios of water and nitrogen fertilizer management were set to more than 1600 counties with rice rotations in China. Results indicate that an national average of 15.7±5.9% (the mean value and standard deviation derive from variability of three water management practices) reduction of nitrogen fertilizer inputs can be achieved without significantly sacrificing rice yields. On a national scale, shallow flooding with optimal N application rates appear most potential to enhance ecosystem services, which led to 10.6% reduction of nitrogen fertilizer inputs, 34.3% decrease of total GHG emissions, 2.8% less of overall N loss (NH3 volatilization, denitrification and N leaching) and a 1.7% increase of rice yields compared to the baseline scenario. Regional GHG emissions mitigation derived from water regime change vary with soil properties and the multiple crop index. Among the main production regions of rice in China, the highest reduction happened in Jiangxu, Yunnan, Guizhou and Hubei (more than 40% reduction) with high SOC, high multiple crop index and low clay fraction. The highest reduction of GHG emissions derived from reducing current N application rate to optimal rate appeared in Zhejiang, Guangdong, Jiangsu where the serious over-application of mineral N exit. It was concluded that process models like DNDC would act an essential tool to identify sustainable agricultural

  4. Recommendation in evolving online networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Recommender system is an effective tool to find the most relevant information for online users. By analyzing the historical selection records of users, recommender system predicts the most likely future links in the user-item network and accordingly constructs a personalized recommendation list for each user. So far, the recommendation process is mostly investigated in static user-item networks. In this paper, we propose a model which allows us to examine the performance of the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in evolving networks. We find that the recommendation accuracy in general decreases with time if the evolution of the online network fully depends on the recommendation. Interestingly, some randomness in users' choice can significantly improve the long-term accuracy of the recommendation algorithm. When a hybrid recommendation algorithm is applied, we find that the optimal parameter gradually shifts towards the diversity-favoring recommendation algorithm, indicating that recommendation diversity is essential to keep a high long-term recommendation accuracy. Finally, we confirm our conclusions by studying the recommendation on networks with the real evolution data.

  5. Evolving Capabilities for Virtual Globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, A.

    2006-12-01

    Though thin-client spatial visualization software like Google Earth and NASA World Wind enjoy widespread popularity, a common criticism is their general lack of analytical functionality. This concern, however, is rapidly being addressed; standard and advanced geographic information system (GIS) capabilities are being developed for virtual globes--though not centralized into a single implementation or software package. The innovation is mostly originating from the user community. Three such capabilities relevant to the earth science, education, and emergency management communities are modeling dynamic spatial phenomena, real-time data collection and visualization, and multi-input collaborative databases. Modeling dynamic spatial phenomena has been facilitated through joining virtual globe geometry definitions--like KML--to relational databases. Real-time data collection uses short scripts to transform user-contributed data into a format usable by virtual globe software. Similarly, collaborative data collection for virtual globes has become possible by dynamically referencing online, multi-person spreadsheets. Examples of these functions include mapping flows within a karst watershed, real-time disaster assessment and visualization, and a collaborative geyser eruption spatial decision support system. Virtual globe applications will continue to evolve further analytical capabilities, more temporal data handling, and from nano to intergalactic scales. This progression opens education and research avenues in all scientific disciplines.

  6. Arthroscopic Double-Row Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair with a Knotless Self-Reinforcing Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, William R; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Millett, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder morbidity. Surgical techniques for repair have evolved to optimize the biologic and mechanical variables critical to tendon healing. Double-row repairs have demonstrated superior biomechanical advantages to a single-row. The preferred technique for rotator cuff repair of the senior author was reviewed and described in a step by step fashion. The final construct is a knotless double row transosseous equivalent construct. The described technique includes the advantages of a double-row construct while also offering self reinforcement, decreased risk of suture cut through, decreased risk of medial row overtensioning and tissue strangulation, improved vascularity, the efficiency of a knotless system, and no increased risk for subacromial impingement from the burden of suture knots. Arthroscopic knotless double row rotator cuff repair is a safe and effective method to repair rotator cuff tears.

  7. SU-F-T-529: Dosimetric Investigation of a Rotating Gamma Ray System for ImagedGuided Modulated Arc Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Chibani, O; Eldib, A; Chen, L [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li, J [Cyber Medical Inc, Xian (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Because of their effectiveness and efficiency, rotational arc radiotherapy (MAT) techniques have been developed on both specialty machines such as Tomotherapy and conventional linear accelerators. This work investigates a new rotating Gamma therapy system for image guided MAT and SBRT of intra/extracranial tumors. Methods: The CyberMAT system (Cyber Medical Corp., China) consists of a ring gantry with a gamma source (effective source size 1cm and 1.7cm respectively), a 120-leaf MLC, a kV CBCT and an EPID. The treatment couch provides 6-degrees-of-freedom motion compensation and the kV CBCT system has a spatial resolution of 0.4mm for target localization. The maximum dose rate is >4.0 Gy/min and the maximum field size is 40cm × 40cm. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose distributions and compare with measurements. A retrospective study of 125 previously treated SBRT patients was performed to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of CyberMAT in comparison with existing VMAT systems. Results: Monte Carlo results confirmed the CyberMAT design parameters including output factors and 3D dose distributions. Its beam penumbra is 5mm to 10mm for field sizes 1cm to 10cm, respectively and its isocenter accuracy is <0.5mm. Compared to the 6 MV photons of Tomotherapy and conventional linacs, Cobalt beams produce lower-energy secondary electrons that exhibit better dose properties in low-density lung tissues. Cobalt beams are ideal for peripheral lung tumors with half-arc arrangements to spare the opposite lung and other critical structures. Superior dose distributions have been obtained for brain, head and neck, breast, spine and lung tumors with half/full arc arrangements. Conclusion: Because of the unique dosimetric properties of Cobalt sources and its accurate stereotaxy/dose delivery CyberMAT is ideally suited for image guided MAT and SBRT. Full-arc arrangements are superior for brain and H&N treatments while half-arc arrangements produce best dose

  8. Optimisation of the performance of a novel rotationally asymmetrical optical concentrator design for building integrated photovoltaic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Bakar, Siti Hawa; Muhammad-Sukki, Firdaus; Freier, Daria; Ramirez-Iniguez, Roberto; Mallick, Tapas Kumar; Munir, Abu Bakar; Mohd Yasin, Siti Hajar; Abubakar Mas'ud, Abdullahi; Md Yunus, Norhidayah

    2015-01-01

    Solar energy is one of the renewable energy sources that has shown promising potential in addressing the world's energy needs, particularly via the solar PV (photovoltaic) technology. However, the high cost of installation is still being considered as the main obstacle to the widespread adoption of solar PV system. The use of solar concentrators is one of the solutions that could help to produce lower cost solar PV systems. One of the existing concentrator designs is known as the RADTIRC (rotationally asymmetrical dielectric totally internally reflecting concentrator) which was developed in GCU (Glasgow Caledonian University) since 2010. This paper aims at optimising the existing RADTIRC prototype by increasing its electrical output whilst keeping the cost of the system at minimum. This is achieved by adopting a better material and a different technique to fabricate the concentrator. The optimised RADTIRC prototype was fabricated from PMMA (polymethyl-methacrylate) using injection moulding. It was found that the optimised RADTIRC-PV prototype generated an opto-electronic gain of 4.48 when compared with the bare cell under STC (standard test conditions). A comparison with the old prototype showed that the optimised RADTIRC-PV prototype increased the short circuit current by 13.57% under STC. - Highlights: • An optimisation of the performance of the RADTIRC was presented. • The optimised prototype was fabricated from PMMA using injection moulding. • The electrical and optical performances were investigated. • The optimised prototype generated an opto-electronic gain of 4.48x

  9. Effects on a Landau-type system for a neutral particle with no permanent electric dipole moment subject to the Kratzer potential in a rotating frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Abinael B; Bakke, Knut

    2016-06-01

    The behaviour of a neutral particle (atom, molecule) with an induced electric dipole moment in a region with a uniform effective magnetic field under the influence of the Kratzer potential (Kratzer 1920 Z. Phys. 3 , 289-307. (doi:10.1007/BF01327754)), and rotating effects is analysed. It is shown that the degeneracy of the Landau-type levels is broken and the angular frequency of the system acquires a new contribution that stems from the rotation effects. Moreover, in the search for bound state solutions, it is shown that the possible values of this angular frequency of the system are determined by the quantum numbers associated with the radial modes and the angular momentum, the angular velocity of the rotating frame and by the parameters associated with the Kratzer potential.

  10. Rotation-type input-output relationships for Wigner distribution moments in fractional Fourier transform systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, M.J.; Alieva, T.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown how all global Wigner distribution moments of arbitrary order in the output plane of a (generally anamorphic) two-dimensional fractional Fourier transform system can be expressed in terms of the moments in the input plane. This general input-output relationship is then broken down into a

  11. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Fortuna

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms from a vast space of 10141 genotypes (instruction sequences, which can form 512 different phenotypes. These phenotypes are distinguished by different Boolean logic functions they can compute, as well as by the complexity of these functions. We observe several properties with parallels in natural systems, such as connected genotype networks and asymmetric phenotypic transitions. The likely common cause is robustness to genotypic change. We describe an intriguing tension between phenotypic complexity and evolvability that may have implications for biological evolution. On the one hand, genotypic change is more likely to yield novel phenotypes in more complex organisms. On the other hand, the total number of novel phenotypes reachable through genotypic change is highest for organisms with simple phenotypes. Artificial evolving systems can help us study aspects of biological evolvability that are not accessible in vastly more complex natural systems. They can also help identify properties, such as robustness, that are required for both human-designed artificial systems and synthetic biological systems to be evolvable.

  12. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Miguel A; Zaman, Luis; Ofria, Charles; Wagner, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms from a vast space of 10141 genotypes (instruction sequences), which can form 512 different phenotypes. These phenotypes are distinguished by different Boolean logic functions they can compute, as well as by the complexity of these functions. We observe several properties with parallels in natural systems, such as connected genotype networks and asymmetric phenotypic transitions. The likely common cause is robustness to genotypic change. We describe an intriguing tension between phenotypic complexity and evolvability that may have implications for biological evolution. On the one hand, genotypic change is more likely to yield novel phenotypes in more complex organisms. On the other hand, the total number of novel phenotypes reachable through genotypic change is highest for organisms with simple phenotypes. Artificial evolving systems can help us study aspects of biological evolvability that are not accessible in vastly more complex natural systems. They can also help identify properties, such as robustness, that are required for both human-designed artificial systems and synthetic biological systems to be evolvable.

  13. Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles on pre- and postoperative CT arthrography (CTA): is the Goutallier grading system reliable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eugene; Choi, Jung-Ah; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeongi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 28 Yeongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Joo Han [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seongnam-si, Gyeongi-do (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Soyeon [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Medical Research Collaborating Center, Seongnam-si, Gyeongi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Hwan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 28 Yeongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jee Won [SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 425 Shindaebang-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    To retrospectively evaluate fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles on CTA using Goutallier's grading system and quantitative measurements with comparison between pre- and postoperative states. IRB approval was obtained for this study. Two radiologists independently reviewed pre- and postoperative CTAs of 43 patients (24 males and 19 females, mean age, 58.1 years) with 46 shoulders confirmed as full-thickness tears with random distribution. FD of supraspinatus, infraspinatus/teres minor, and subscapularis was assessed using Goutallier's system and by quantitative measurements of Hounsfield units (HUs) on sagittal images. Changes in FD grades and HUs were compared between pre- and postoperative CTAs and analyzed with respect to preoperative tear size and postoperative cuff integrity. The correlations between qualitative grades and quantitative measurements and their inter-observer reliabilities were also assessed. There was statistically significant correlation between FD grades and HU measurements of all muscles on pre- and postoperative CTA (p < 0.05). Inter-observer reliability of fatty degeneration grades were excellent to substantial on both pre- and postoperative CTA in supraspinatus (0.8685 and 0.8535) and subscapularis muscles (0.7777 and 0.7972), but fair in infraspinatus/teres minor muscles (0.5791 and 0.5740); however, quantitative Hounsfield units measurements showed excellent reliability for all muscles (ICC: 0.7950 and 0.9346 for SST, 0.7922 and 0.8492 for SSC, and 0.9254 and 0.9052 for IST/TM). No muscle showed improvement of fatty degeneration after surgical repair on qualitative and quantitative assessments; there was no difference in changes of fatty degeneration after surgical repair according to preoperative tear size and post-operative cuff integrity (p > 0.05). The average dose-length product (DLP, mGy . cm) was 365.2 mGy . cm (range, 323.8-417.2 mGy . cm) and estimated average effective dose was 5.1 mSv. Goutallier grades

  14. Is the Role of Physicians Really Evolving Due to Non-physician Clinicians Predominance in Staff Makeup in Sub-Saharan African Health Systems?; Comment on “Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin M. Sidat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Health workforce shortages in Sub-Saharan Africa are widely recognized, particularly of physicians, leading the training and deployment of Non-physician clinicians (NPCs. The paper by Eyal et al provides interesting and legitimate viewpoints on evolving role of physicians in context of decisive increase of NPCss in Sub-Saharan Africa. Certainly, in short or mid-term, NPCs will continue to be a proxy solution and a valuable alternative to overcome physicians’ shortages in sub-Saharan Africa. Indeed, NPCs have an important role at primary healthcare (PHC level. Physicians at PHC level can certainly have all different roles that were suggested by Eyal et al, including those not directly related to healthcare provision. However, at secondary and higher levels of healthcare, physicians would assume other roles that are mainly related to patient clinical care. Thus, attempting to generalize the role of physicians without taking into account the context where they will work would be not entirely appropriate. It is true that often physicians start the professional carriers at PHC level and progress to other levels of healthcare particularly after clinical post-graduation training. Nevertheless, the training programs offered by medical institutions in sub-Saharan Africa need to be periodically reviewed and take into account professional and occupational roles physicians would take in context of evolving health systems in sub-Saharan Africa.

  15. Synchronisation and general dynamic symmetry of a vibrating system with two exciters rotating in opposite directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun-Yu, Zhao; Yi-Min, Zhang; Bang-Chun, Wen

    2010-01-01

    We derive the non-dimensional coupling equation of two exciters, including inertia coupling, stiffness coupling and load coupling. The concept of general dynamic symmetry is proposed to physically explain the synchronisation of the two exciters, which stems from the load coupling that produces the torque of general dynamic symmetry to force the phase difference between the two exciters close to the angle of general dynamic symmetry. The condition of implementing synchronisation is that the torque of general dynamic symmetry is greater than the asymmetric torque of the two motors. A general Lyapunov function is constructed to derive the stability condition of synchronisation that the non-dimensional inertia coupling matrix is positive definite and all its elements are positive. Numeric results show that the structure of the vibrating system can guarantee the stability of synchronisation of the two exciters, and that the greater the distances between the installation positions of the two exciters and the mass centre of the vibrating system are, the stronger the ability of general dynamic symmetry is

  16. Validity of eyeball estimation for range of motion during the cervical flexion rotation test compared to an ultrasound-based movement analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Axel; Lüdtke, Kerstin; Breuel, Franziska; Gerloff, Nikolas; Knust, Maren; Kollitsch, Christian; Laukart, Alex; Matej, Laura; Müller, Antje; Schöttker-Königer, Thomas; Hall, Toby

    2018-08-01

    Headache is a common and costly health problem. Although pathogenesis of headache is heterogeneous, one reported contributing factor is dysfunction of the upper cervical spine. The flexion rotation test (FRT) is a commonly used diagnostic test to detect upper cervical movement impairment. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate concurrent validity of detecting high cervical ROM impairment during the FRT by comparing measurements established by an ultrasound-based system (gold standard) with eyeball estimation. Secondary aim was to investigate intra-rater reliability of FRT ROM eyeball estimation. The examiner (6 years experience) was blinded to the data from the ultrasound-based device and to the symptoms of the patients. FRT test result (positive or negative) was based on visual estimation of range of rotation less than 34° to either side. Concurrently, range of rotation was evaluated using the ultrasound-based device. A total of 43 subjects with headache (79% female), mean age of 35.05 years (SD 13.26) were included. According to the International Headache Society Classification 23 subjects had migraine, 4 tension type headache, and 16 multiple headache forms. Sensitivity and specificity were 0.96 and 0.89 for combined rotation, indicating good concurrent reliability. The area under the ROC curve was 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98) for rotation to both sides. Intra-rater reliability for eyeball estimation was excellent with Fleiss Kappa 0.79 for right rotation and left rotation. The results of this study indicate that the FRT is a valid and reliable test to detect impairment of upper cervical ROM in patients with headache.

  17. Spacetimes containing slowly evolving horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, William; Booth, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Slowly evolving horizons are trapping horizons that are ''almost'' isolated horizons. This paper reviews their definition and discusses several spacetimes containing such structures. These include certain Vaidya and Tolman-Bondi solutions as well as (perturbatively) tidally distorted black holes. Taking into account the mass scales and orders of magnitude that arise in these calculations, we conjecture that slowly evolving horizons are the norm rather than the exception in astrophysical processes that involve stellar-scale black holes

  18. On the phenomenon of mixed dynamics in Pikovsky-Topaj system of coupled rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchenko, A. S.; Gonchenko, S. V.; Kazakov, A. O.; Turaev, D. V.

    2017-07-01

    A one-parameter family of time-reversible systems on three-dimensional torus is considered. It is shown that the dynamics is not conservative, namely the attractor and repeller intersect but not coincide. We explain this as the manifestation of the so-called mixed dynamics phenomenon which corresponds to a persistent intersection of the closure of the stable periodic orbits and the closure of the completely unstable periodic orbits. We search for the stable and unstable periodic orbits indirectly, by finding non-conservative saddle periodic orbits and heteroclinic connections between them. In this way, we are able to claim the existence of mixed dynamics for a large range of parameter values. We investigate local and global bifurcations that can be used for the detection of mixed dynamics.

  19. Research of working pulsation in closed angle based on rotating-sleeve distributing-flow system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Hongxin; Zhao, Qinghai; Jiang, Xiaotian; Cheng, Qianchang

    2017-08-01

    In order to reduce negative effects including hydraulic impact, noise and mechanical vibration, compression and expansion of piston pump in closed volume are used to optimize the angle between valve port and chamber. In addition, the mathematical model about pressurization and depressurization in pump chamber are analyzed based on distributing-flow characteristic, and it is necessary to use simulation software Fluent to simulate the distributing-flow fluid model so as to select the most suitable closed angle. As a result, when compression angle is 3°, the angle is closest to theoretical analysis and has the minimum influence on flow and pump pressure characteristic. Meanwhile, cavitation phenomenon appears in pump chamber in different closed angle on different degrees. Besides the flow pulsation is increasingly smaller with increasing expansion angle. Thus when expansion angle is 2°, the angle is more suitable for distributing-flow system.

  20. A treatment planning comparison between a novel rotating gamma system and robotic linear accelerator based intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Muhammad M.; Eldib, Ahmed; Weiss, Stephanie E.; Hayes, Shelly B.; Li, Jinsheng; C-M Ma, Charlie

    2018-02-01

    To compare the dosimetric parameters of a novel rotating gamma ray system (RGS) with well-established CyberKnife system (CK) for treating malignant brain lesions. RGS has a treatment head of 16 cobalt-60 sources focused to the isocenter, which can rotate 360° on the ring gantry and swing 35° in the superior direction. We compared several dosimetric parameters in 10 patients undergoing brain stereotactic radiosurgery including plan normalization, number of beams and nodes for CK and shots for RGS, collimators used, estimated treatment time, D 2 cm and conformity index (CI) among two modalities. The median plan normalization for RGS was 56.7% versus 68.5% (p  =  0.002) for CK plans. The median number of shots from RGS was 7.5 whereas the median number of beams and nodes for CK was 79.5 and 46. The median collimator’s diameter used was 3.5 mm for RGS as compared to 5 mm for CK (p  =  0.26). Mean D 2 cm was 5.57 Gy for CyberKnife whereas it was 3.11 Gy for RGS (p  =  0.99). For RGS plans, the median CI was 1.4 compared to 1.3 for the CK treatment plans (p  =  0.98). The average minimum and maximum doses to optic chiasm were 21 and 93 cGy for RGS as compared to 32 and 209 cGy for CK whereas these were 0.5 and 364 cGy by RGS and 18 and 399 cGy by CK to brainstem. The mean V12 Gy for brain predicting for radionecrosis with RGS was 3.75 cm3 as compared to 4.09 cm3 with the CK (p  =  0.41). The dosimetric parameters of a novel RGS with a ring type gantry are comparable with CyberKnife, allowing its use for intracranial lesions and is worth exploring in a clinical setting.

  1. The evolving integrated vascular surgery residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brigitte K; Greenberg, Jacob A; Mitchell, Erica L

    2014-10-01

    Since their introduction several years ago, integrated (0 + 5) vascular surgery residency programs are being increasingly developed across the country. To date, however, there is no defined "universal" curriculum for these programs and each program is responsible for creating its own curriculum. The aim of this study was to review the experiences of current 0 + 5 program directors (PDs) to determine what factors contributed to the curricular development within their institution. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 0 + 5 PDs to explore their experiences with program development, factors influencing the latter, and rationale for current curricula. The interview script was loosely structured to explore several factors including time of incoming residents' first exposure to the vascular surgical service, timing and rationale behind the timing of core surgical rotations throughout the 5 year program, educational value of nonsurgical rotations, opportunities for leadership and scholarly activity, and influence the general surgery program and institutional climate had on curricular structure. All interviews were conducted by a single interviewer. All interviews were qualitatively analyzed using emergent theme analysis. Twenty-six 0 + 5 PDs participated in the study. A total of 69% believed establishing professional identity early reduces resident attrition and recommend starting incoming trainees on vascular surgical services. Sixty-two percent spread core surgical rotations over the first 3 years to optimize general surgical exposure and most of the programs have eliminated specific rotations, as they were not considered valuable to the goals of training. Factors considered most important by PDs in curricular development include building on existing institutional opportunities (96%), avoiding rotations considered unsuccessful by "experienced" programs (92%), and maintaining a good working relationship with general surgery (77%). Fifty-eight percent of

  2. On the Critical Role of Divergent Selection in Evolvability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Lehman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An ambitious goal in evolutionary robotics is to evolve increasingly complex robotic behaviors with minimal human design effort. Reaching this goal requires evolutionary algorithms that can unlock from genetic encodings their latent potential for evolvability. One issue clouding this goal is conceptual confusion about evolvability, which often obscures the aspects of evolvability that are important or desirable. The danger from such confusion is that it may establish unrealistic goals for evolvability that prove unproductive in practice. An important issue separate from conceptual confusion is the common misalignment between selection and evolvability in evolutionary robotics. While more expressive encodings can represent higher-level adaptations (e.g. sexual reproduction or developmental systems that increase long-term evolutionary potential (i.e. evolvability, realizing such potential requires gradients of fitness and evolvability to align. In other words, selection is often a critical factor limiting increasing evolvability. Thus, drawing from a series of recent papers, this article seeks to both (1 clarify and focus the ways in which the term evolvability is used within artificial evolution, and (2 argue for the importance of one type of selection, i.e. divergent selection, for enabling evolvability. The main argument is that there is a fundamental connection between divergent selection and evolvability (on both the individual and population level that does not hold for typical goal-oriented selection. The conclusion is that selection pressure plays a critical role in realizing the potential for evolvability, and that divergent selection in particular provides a principled mechanism for encouraging evolvability in artificial evolution.

  3. Stability analysis of a power system made up of an intermittent renewable energy source directly tied to a conventional rotating power generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coiante, D.

    1997-02-01

    A simple power system made up of a conventional rotating power generator in direct connection to an intermittent renewable energy source (with energy or photovoltaic) is modelled on the base of respective functional schemes. The relative variations of the voltage frequency are calculated as an output to an abrupt variation of intermittent tied power and in function of electro-mechanical parameters of the rotating generator (dumping coefficient and inertial rotor coefficient). The stability conditions and the tolerance allowed on the frequency variations are considered in relation to toad service requires. As a consequence, the maximum intermittent power amount, which can be accepted in direct connection, is obtained. For usual conventional rotating machines, the resulting limit is placed in the range of (12-19)% of nominal capacity of power generator

  4. Lunar Rotation, Orientation and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Ratcliff, J. T.; Boggs, D. H.

    2004-12-01

    The Moon is the most familiar example of the many satellites that exhibit synchronous rotation. For the Moon there is Lunar Laser Ranging measurements of tides and three-dimensional rotation variations plus supporting theoretical understanding of both effects. Compared to uniform rotation and precession the lunar rotational variations are up to 1 km, while tidal variations are about 0.1 m. Analysis of the lunar variations in pole direction and rotation about the pole gives moment of inertia differences, third-degree gravity harmonics, tidal Love number k2, tidal dissipation Q vs. frequency, dissipation at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and emerging evidence for an oblate boundary. The last two indicate a fluid core, but a solid inner core is not ruled out. Four retroreflectors provide very accurate positions on the Moon. The experience with the Moon is a starting point for exploring the tides, rotation and orientation of the other synchronous bodies of the solar system.

  5. Robustness to Faults Promotes Evolvability: Insights from Evolving Digital Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Nicola; Nolfi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how the need to cope with operational faults enables evolving circuits to find more fit solutions. The analysis of the results obtained in different experimental conditions indicates that, in absence of faults, evolution tends to select circuits that are small and have low phenotypic variability and evolvability. The need to face operation faults, instead, drives evolution toward the selection of larger circuits that are truly robust with respect to genetic variations and that have a greater level of phenotypic variability and evolvability. Overall our results indicate that the need to cope with operation faults leads to the selection of circuits that have a greater probability to generate better circuits as a result of genetic variation with respect to a control condition in which circuits are not subjected to faults.

  6. Evolvability Is an Evolved Ability: The Coding Concept as the Arch-Unit of Natural Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Srdja; Ćirković, Milan M

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes that characterize living matter are qualitatively distinct in that they involve encoding and transfer of specific types of information. Such information plays an active part in the control of events that are ultimately linked to the capacity of the system to persist and multiply. This algorithmicity of life is a key prerequisite for its Darwinian evolution, driven by natural selection acting upon stochastically arising variations of the encoded information. The concept of evolvability attempts to define the total capacity of a system to evolve new encoded traits under appropriate conditions, i.e., the accessible section of total morphological space. Since this is dependent on previously evolved regulatory networks that govern information flow in the system, evolvability itself may be regarded as an evolved ability. The way information is physically written, read and modified in living cells (the "coding concept") has not changed substantially during the whole history of the Earth's biosphere. This biosphere, be it alone or one of many, is, accordingly, itself a product of natural selection, since the overall evolvability conferred by its coding concept (nucleic acids as information carriers with the "rulebook of meanings" provided by codons, as well as all the subsystems that regulate various conditional information-reading modes) certainly played a key role in enabling this biosphere to survive up to the present, through alterations of planetary conditions, including at least five catastrophic events linked to major mass extinctions. We submit that, whatever the actual prebiotic physical and chemical processes may have been on our home planet, or may, in principle, occur at some time and place in the Universe, a particular coding concept, with its respective potential to give rise to a biosphere, or class of biospheres, of a certain evolvability, may itself be regarded as a unit (indeed the arch-unit) of natural selection.

  7. Performance Improvement of Space Shift Keying MIMO Systems with Orthogonal Codebook-Based Phase-Rotation Precoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Ansi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers codebook-based precoding for Space Shift Keying (SSK modulation MIMO system. Codebook-based precoding avoids the necessity for full knowledge of Channel State Information (CSI at the transmitter and alleviates the complexity of generating a CSI-optimized precoder. The receiver selects the codeword that maximizes the Minimum Euclidean Distance (MED of the received constellation and feeds back its index to the transmitter. In this paper, we first develop a new accurate closed-form Bit Error Rate (BER for SSK without precoding. Then, we investigate several phase-rotation codebooks with quantized set of phases and systematic structure. Namely, we investigate the Full-Combination, Walsh-Hadamard, Quasi-Orthogonal Sequences, and Orthogonal Array Testing codebooks. In addition, since the size of the Full-Combination codebook may be large, we develop an iterative search method for fast selection of its best codeword. The proposed codebooks significantly improve the BER performance in Rayleigh and Nakagami fading channels, even at high spatial correlation among transmit antennas and CSI estimation error. Moreover, we show that only four phases {+1,+j,-1,-j} are sufficient and further phase granularity does yield significant gain. This avoids hardware multiplication during searching the codebook and applying the codeword.

  8. Year-Round Irrigation Schedule for a Tomato–Maize Rotation System in Reservoir-Based Irrigation Schemes in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephraim Sekyi-Annan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Improving irrigation management in semi-arid regions of Sub-Saharan Africa is crucial to respond to increasing variability in rainfall and overcome deficits in current irrigation schemes. In small-scale and medium-scale reservoir-based irrigation schemes in the Upper East region of Ghana, we explored options for improving the traditional, dry season irrigation practices and assessed the potential for supplemental irrigation in the rainy season. The AquaCrop model was used to (i assess current water management in the typical tomato-maize rotational system; (ii develop an improved irrigation schedule for dry season cultivation of tomato; and (iii determine the requirement for supplemental irrigation of maize in the rainy season under different climate scenarios. The improved irrigation schedule for dry season tomato cultivation would result in a water saving of 130–1325 mm compared to traditional irrigation practices, accompanied by approximately a 4–14% increase in tomato yield. The supplemental irrigation of maize would require 107–126 mm of water in periods of low rainfall and frequent dry spells, and 88–105 mm in periods of high rainfall and rare dry spells. Therefore, year-round irrigated crop production may be feasible, using water saved during dry season tomato cultivation for supplemental irrigation of maize in the rainy season.

  9. A faster ordered-subset convex algorithm for iterative reconstruction in a rotation-free micro-CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, E; Lalush, D S

    2009-01-01

    We present a faster iterative reconstruction algorithm based on the ordered-subset convex (OSC) algorithm for transmission CT. The OSC algorithm was modified such that it calculates the normalization term before the iterative process in order to save computational cost. The modified version requires only one backprojection per iteration as compared to two required for the original OSC. We applied the modified OSC (MOSC) algorithm to a rotation-free micro-CT system that we proposed previously, observed its performance, and compared with the OSC algorithm for 3D cone-beam reconstruction. Measurements on the reconstructed images as well as the point spread functions show that MOSC is quite similar to OSC; in noise-resolution trade-off, MOSC is comparable with OSC in a regular-noise situation and it is slightly worse than OSC in an extremely high-noise situation. The timing record shows that MOSC saves 25-30% CPU time, depending on the number of iterations used. We conclude that the MOSC algorithm is more efficient than OSC and provides comparable images.

  10. Treatment of the femoropopliteal arteries with a novel rotational atherectomy system: early single-center experience with the Pathway PV trademark Atherectomy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissgott, C.; Kamusella, P.; Richter, A.; Steinkamp, H.J.; Schink, T.; Klein-Weigel, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The main problem when treating the superficial femoral and popliteal artery with PTA or stent implantation is the relatively high restenosis rate. Several ablative systems are available as an alternative. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the safety and performance of a novel rotational and aspirating atherectomy system. Materials and Methods: From June to December 2006, we treated 23 patients, median age 70.3 years (58 - 91), with the rotational atherectomy system. All patients had de-novo lesions of the SFA or PA with a minimum stenosis of 70%. According to the Rutherford classification, 39% of the patients were in category 2 and 61% in category 3. The median lesion length was 26.3 mm (5 - 100 mm). 26% of the patients had occlusions. Results: The technical success rate was 100%. In 14 cases (61%) additional balloon dilatation was applied, in two cases stent implantation were performed. The median treatment duration with the device was 187.7 ± 106.1 s (59 - 391 s). The aspirated volume was 116.5 ± 72.0 ml. The ankle brachial index improved from preinterventional 0.60 ± 0.16 to postinterventional 0.85 ± 0.13 and after 6 month 0.80 ± 0.13. During follow-up, two (8%) restenosis occurred. There were two complications, one dissection and one distal embolization. Follow-up could not be performed for two patients (8%). Conclusion: Atherectomy of femoropopliteal lesions with the Pathway PV trademark Atherectomy System is very safe and effective. The low restenosis rate of 8% is promising, but there is still a lack of long-term results

  11. Optical isolation by Faraday rotator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Takeshi; Matsushima, Isao; Nemoto, Fusashi; Yano, Masaaki

    1984-01-01

    Three Faraday rotators designed as optical isolators in a high power glass laser system are described. The spatial fluctuation of applied magnetic field is less than 1% throughout the Faraday glass rod. The Faraday rotators transmit more than 80% of the forward-going laser light and reject more than 96% of the backward-going light. (author)

  12. In-flight measurements of propeller blade deformation on a VUT100 cobra aeroplane using a co-rotating camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, F.; Stasicki, B.; Szypuła, M.; Ružička, P.; Tvrdik, Z.; Ludwikowski, K.

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of propeller or rotor blade behaviour under real operating conditions is crucial for optimizing the performance of a propeller or rotor system. A team of researchers, technicians and engineers from Avia Propeller, DLR, EVEKTOR and HARDsoft developed a rotating stereo camera system dedicated to in-flight blade deformation measurements. The whole system, co-rotating with the propeller at its full speed and hence exposed to high centrifugal forces and strong vibration, had been successfully tested on an EVEKTOR VUT 100 COBRA aeroplane in Kunovice (CZ) within the project AIM2—advanced in-flight measurement techniques funded by the European Commission (contract no. 266107). This paper will describe the work, starting from drawing the first sketch of the system up to performing the successful flight test. Apart from a description of the measurement hardware and the applied IPCT method, the paper will give some impressions of the flight test activities and discuss the results obtained from the measurements.

  13. FY 1998 annual summary report on 6-axis, high-precision non-rotating machining systems (first year); 1998 nendo 6 jiku koseido heru kako system no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Daiichinendo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This R and D program is aimed at development of high-precision systems, based on non-rotating machining, in order to improve precision of machining of curved surfaces, e.g., mold, and members of complex shapes, e.g., those for aircraft. For non-rotating machining of curved surfaces, it is necessary to continuously control attitude and sending speed of the tool, and hence to simultaneously control 6 axes of a high-speed, high-precision tool machine. New techniques, e.g., high-precision non-rotating machining, 6-axis CAM/CAE systems and high-speed, high-precision NC systems, are being developed, in order to realize the above objectives. The total systems combining these techniques are also being developed. The 6-axis, high-precision, non-rotating tool machine will be made on a trial basis, to demonstrate its practicality. The major FY 1998 results are development of a non-rotating machining tool for deep grooves (under the theme of machining techniques), development of software for cutter path generation for 6-axis non-rotating machining to confirm its validity by the tests with a commercial machine (CAD/CAM), and modification of NC for early-stage cutting tests (NC). (NEDO)

  14. Flow Visualization of a Rotating Detonation Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The rotating detonation engine ( RDE ) is a propulsion system that obtains thrust using continuously existing...2014 – 12/4/2015 Summary: The rotating detonation engine ( RDE ) is a propulsion system that obtains thrust using continuously existing detonation...structure. Studies have been conducted on rotating detonation engines ( RDE ) that obtain thrust from the continuously propagating detonation waves in the

  15. Anomalies in the Spectra of the Uncorrelated Components of the Electric Field of the Earth at Frequencies that are Multiples of the Frequencies of Rotation of Relativistic Binary Star Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunskaya, L. V.; Isakevich, V. V.; Isakevich, D. V.

    2018-05-01

    A system is constructed, which, on the basis of extensive experimental material and the use of eigenoscopy, has allowed us to detect anomalies in the spectra of uncorrelated components localized near the rotation frequencies and twice the rotation frequencies of relativistic binary star systems with vanishingly low probability of false alarm, not exceeding 10-17.

  16. Free energy landscapes of electron transfer system in dipolar environment below and above the rotational freezing temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yohichi; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2007-01-01

    Electron transfer reaction in a polar solvent is modeled by a solute dipole surrounded by dipolar molecules with simple rotational dynamics posted on the three-dimensional distorted lattice sites. The interaction energy between the solute and solvent dipoles as a reaction coordinate is adopted and free energy landscapes are calculated by generating all possible states for a 26 dipolar system and by employing Wang-Landau sampling algorithm for a 92 dipolar system. For temperatures higher than the energy scale of dipole-dipole interactions, the free energy landscapes for the small reaction coordinate region have quadratic shape as predicted by Marcus [Rev. Mod. Phys. 65, 599 (1993)] whereas for the large reaction coordinate region, the landscapes exhibit a nonquadratic shape. When the temperature drops, small notched structures appear on the free energy profiles because of the frustrated interactions among dipoles. The formation of notched structure is analyzed with statistical approach and it is shown that the amplitude of notched structure depend upon the segment size of the reaction coordinate and is characterized by the interaction energy among the dipoles. Using simulated free energy landscapes, the authors calculate the reaction rates as a function of the energy gap for various temperatures. At high temperature, the reactions rates follow a bell shaped (inverted parabolic) energy gap law in the small energy gap regions, while it becomes steeper than the parabolic shape in a large energy gap regions due to the nonquadratic shape of the free energy landscape. The peak position of parabola also changes as the function of temperature. At low temperature, the profile of the reaction rates is no longer smooth because of the many local minima of the free energy landscape

  17. Effects of sewage sludge on the yield of plants in the rotation system of wheat-white head cabbage-tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Arif Özyazıcı

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried to determine the effects of sewage sludge applications on the yield and yield components of plants under crop rotation system. The field experiments were conducted in the Bafra Plain, located in the north region of Turkey. In this research, the “wheat-white head cabbage-tomato” crop rotation systems have been examined and the same crop rotation has been repeated in two separate years and field trials have been established. Seven treatments were compared: a control without application of sludge nor nitrogen fertilization, a treatment without sludge, but nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization, applied at before sowing of wheat and five treatments where, respectively 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 tons sludge ha-1. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with three replications. The results showed that all the yield components of wheat and yield of white head cabbage and tomato increased significantly with increasing rates of sewage sludge as compared to control. As a result, 20 t ha-1 of sewage sludge application could be recommended the suitable dose for the rotation of wheat-white head cabbage-tomato in soil and climatic conditions of Bafra Plain.

  18. Is the Role of Physicians Really Evolving Due to Non-physician Clinicians Predominance in Staff Makeup in Sub-Saharan African Health Systems? Comment on "Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidat, Mohsin M

    2016-07-02

    Health workforce shortages in Sub-Saharan Africa are widely recognized, particularly of physicians, leading the training and deployment of Non-physician clinicians (NPCs). The paper by Eyal et al provides interesting and legitimate viewpoints on evolving role of physicians in context of decisive increase of NPCss in Sub-Saharan Africa. Certainly, in short or mid-term, NPCs will continue to be a proxy solution and a valuable alternative to overcome physicians' shortages in sub-Saharan Africa. Indeed, NPCs have an important role at primary healthcare (PHC) level. Physicians at PHC level can certainly have all different roles that were suggested by Eyal et al, including those not directly related to healthcare provision. However, at secondary and higher levels of healthcare, physicians would assume other roles that are mainly related to patient clinical care. Thus, attempting to generalize the role of physicians without taking into account the context where they will work would be not entirely appropriate. It is true that often physicians start the professional carriers at PHC level and progress to other levels of healthcare particularly after clinical post-graduation training. Nevertheless, the training programs offered by medical institutions in sub-Saharan Africa need to be periodically reviewed and take into account professional and occupational roles physicians would take in context of evolving health systems in sub-Saharan Africa. © 2016 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  19. Modelling hourly dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) using dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy inference system (DENFIS)-based approach: case study of Klamath River at Miller Island Boat Ramp, OR, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddam, Salim

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present application of an artificial intelligence (AI) technique model called dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy inference system (DENFIS) based on an evolving clustering method (ECM), for modelling dissolved oxygen concentration in a river. To demonstrate the forecasting capability of DENFIS, a one year period from 1 January 2009 to 30 December 2009, of hourly experimental water quality data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS Station No: 420853121505500) station at Klamath River at Miller Island Boat Ramp, OR, USA, were used for model development. Two DENFIS-based models are presented and compared. The two DENFIS systems are: (1) offline-based system named DENFIS-OF, and (2) online-based system, named DENFIS-ON. The input variables used for the two models are water pH, temperature, specific conductance, and sensor depth. The performances of the models are evaluated using root mean square errors (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), Willmott index of agreement (d) and correlation coefficient (CC) statistics. The lowest root mean square error and highest correlation coefficient values were obtained with the DENFIS-ON method. The results obtained with DENFIS models are compared with linear (multiple linear regression, MLR) and nonlinear (multi-layer perceptron neural networks, MLPNN) methods. This study demonstrates that DENFIS-ON investigated herein outperforms all the proposed techniques for DO modelling.

  20. Rotational dynamics with Tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eadkhong, T; Danworaphong, S; Rajsadorn, R; Jannual, P

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia (I) of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction (b) for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive I for a cylindrical plate rotated around its central axis from the other two experiments based on the relation between torque and angular acceleration of rotational motion and conservation of energy. Movies of the rotating plate and hung masses are recorded. As a result, we have the deviation of I from its theoretical value of 0.4% and 3.3%, respectively. Our setup is completely constructed from locally available inexpensive materials and the experimental results indicate that the system is highly reliable. This work should pave the way for those who prefer to build a similar setup from scratch at relatively low cost compared to commercial units. (paper)

  1. The interplay of evolved seawater and magmatic-hydrothermal fluids in the 3.24 Ga panorama volcanic-hosted massive sulfide hydrothermal system, North Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieberg, Susan L.; Hagemann, Steffen G.; Huston, David L.; Landis, Gary; Ryan, Chris G.; Van Achterbergh, Esmé; Vennemann, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    The ~3240 Ma Panorama volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) district is unusual for its high degree of exposure and low degree of postdepositional modification. In addition to typical seafloor VHMS deposits, this district contains greisen- and vein-hosted Mo-Cu-Zn-Sn mineral occurrences that are contemporaneous with VHMS orebodies and are hosted by the Strelley granite complex, which also drove VHMS circulation. Hence the Panorama district is a natural laboratory to investigate the role of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids in VHMS hydrothermal systems. Regional and proximal high-temperature alteration zones in volcanic rocks underlying the VHMS deposits are dominated by chlorite-quartz ± albite assemblages, with lesser low-temperature sericite-quartz ± K-feldspar assemblages. These assemblages are typical of VHMS hydrothermal systems. In contrast, the alteration assemblages associated with granite-hosted greisens and veins include quartz-topaz-muscovite-fluorite and quartz-muscovite (sericite)-chlorite-ankerite. These vein systems generally do not extend into the overlying volcanic pile. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies suggest that the greisens were produced by high-temperature (~590°C), high-salinity (38–56 wt % NaCl equiv) fluids with high densities (>1.3 g/cm3) and high δ18O (9.3 ± 0.6‰). These fluids are compatible with the measured characteristics of magmatic fluids evolved from the Strelley granite complex. In contrast, fluids in the volcanic pile (including the VHMS ore-forming fluids) were of lower temperature (90°–270°C), lower salinity (5.0–11.2 wt % NaCl equiv), with lower densities (0.88–1.01 g/cm3) and lower δ18O (−0.8 ± 2.6‰). These fluids are compatible with evolved Paleoarchean seawater. Fluids that formed the quartz-chalcopyrite-sphalerite-cassiterite veins, which are present within the granite complex near the contact with the volcanic pile, were intermediate in temperature and isotopic composition between the greisen

  2. Large-scale block rotations from Late Tortonian to Present in the Gibraltar Arc System: input into the Messinian salinity crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Comas, Menchu; Balanyá, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We propose a reconstruction of one of the tightest orogenic arcs on Earth: the Gibraltar Arc System (GAS), which closes the Alpine-Mediterranean orogenic system to the west. This reconstruction, which includes onshore and offshore data, is completed for approximately 9 Ma, a few Ma before the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC). By that time a change in the direction of the Africa-Iberia convergence took place, the main shortening in the external wedge was accomplished, most of the low-angle normal fault systems that contribute to crustal-scale extension in the GAS ceased, and a significant emersion along the Africa and Iberia continental margins occurred, due to an overall contractive reorganization in the GAS. Our paleotectonic reconstruction is based on a review in terms of structures and age of the superposed deformational events that took place during the Miocene within the GAS, with special attention to the external zones of its northern branch. Our review and new structural data permit to constrain the timing of vertical axis-rotations evidenced by previously published paleomagnetic data, and to identify homogeneous domains in terms of relationships between timing of deformation events and block rotations. Block-rotations as high as 53° took place from 9 Ma to Present, which represents around 6°/Ma. The size of the rotated blocks reach 150 to 200 km long (measured along-strike). It implies that the rotations were accommodated by relatively rigid large-scale domains instead of smaller segments rotated progressively, which favors a model of vertical-axis block-rotations on top of crustal-scale decoupling levels. These rotations accommodated tightening and lengthening of the GAS and drastically altered its onshore and offshore geometry from 9 Ma onwards. In the back-arc Alboran Basin, this post-Miocene tightening produced inversion on Middle Miocene normal faults, wrench tectonics, the reactivation of shale diapirism and volcanism, and the uplift of the margins

  3. Maintaining yields and reducing nitrogen loss in rice–wheat rotation system in Taihu Lake region with proper fertilizer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Lihong; Yu, Yingliang; Yang, Linzhang

    2014-01-01

    In the Tailake region of China, heavy nitrogen (N) loss of rice–wheat rotation systems, due to high fertilizer-N input with low N use efficiency (NUE), was widely reported. To alleviate the detrimental impacts caused by N loss, it is necessary to improve the fertilizer management practices. Therefore, a 3 yr field experiments with different N managements including organic combined chemical N treatment (OCN, 390 kg N ha −1 yr −1 , 20% organic fertilizer), control–released urea treatment (CRU, 390 kg N ha −1 yr −1 , 70% resin-coated urea), reduced chemical N treatment (RCN, 390 kg N ha −1 yr −1 , all common chemical fertilizer), and site-specific N management (SSNM, 333 kg N ha −1 yr −1 , all common chemical fertilizer) were conducted in the Taihu Lake region with the ‘farmer’s N’ treatment (FN, 510 kg N ha −1 yr −1 , all common chemical fertilizer) as a control. Grain yield, plant N uptake (PNU), NUE, and N losses via runoff, leaching, and ammonia volatilization were assessed. In the rice season, the FN treatment had the highest N loss and lowest NUE, which can be attributed to an excessive rate of N application. Treatments of OCN and RCN with a 22% reduced N rate from FN had no significant effect on PNU nor the yield of rice in the 3 yr; however, the NUE was improved and N loss was reduced 20–32%. OCN treatment achieved the highest yield, while SSNM has the lowest N loss and highest NUE due to the lowest N rate. In wheat season, N loss decreased about 28–48% with the continuous reduction of N input, but the yield also declined, with the exception of OCN treatment. N loss through runoff, leaching and ammonia volatilization was positively correlated with the N input rate. When compared with the pure chemical fertilizer treatment of RCN under the same N input, OCN treatment has better NUE, better yield, and lower N loss. 70% of the urea replaced with resin-coated urea had no significant effect on yield and NUE improvement, but

  4. Effects of resolved boundary layer turbulence on near-ground rotation in simulated quasi-linear convective systems (QLCSs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotarski, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Though most strong to violent tornadoes are associated with supercell thunderstorms, quasi-linear convective systems (QLCSs) pose a risk of tornadoes, often at times and locations where supercell tornadoes are less common. Because QLCS low-level mesocyclones and tornado signatures tend to be less coherent, forecasting such tornadoes remains particularly difficult. The majority of simulations of such storms rely on horizontally homogeneous base states lacking resolved boundary layer turbulence and surface fluxes. Previous work has suggested that heterogeneities associated with boundary layer turbulence in the form of horizontal convective rolls can influence the evolution and characteristics of low-level mesocyclones in supercell thunderstorms. This study extends methods for generating boundary layer convection to idealized simulations of QLCSs. QLCS simulations with resolved boundary layer turbulence will be compared against a control simulation with a laminar boundary layer. Effects of turbulence, the resultant heterogeneity in the near-storm environment, and surface friction on bulk storm characteristics and the intensity, morphology, and evolution of low-level rotation will be presented. Although maximum surface vertical vorticity values are similar, when boundary layer turbulence is included, a greater number of miso- and meso-scale vortices develop along the QLCS gust front. The source of this vorticity is analyzed using Eulerian decomposition of vorticity tendency terms and trajectory analysis to delineate the relative importance of surface friction and baroclinicity in generating QLCS vortices. The role of anvil shading in suppressing boundary layer turbulence in the near-storm environment and subsequent effects on QLCS vortices will also be presented. Finally, implications of the results regarding inclusion of more realistic boundary layers in future idealized simulations of deep convection will be discussed.

  5. EFFECTS OF ROTATIONALLY INDUCED MIXING IN COMPACT BINARY SYSTEMS WITH LOW-MASS SECONDARIES AND IN SINGLE SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Robinson, Edward L.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Many population synthesis and stellar evolution studies have addressed the evolution of close binary systems in which the primary is a compact remnant and the secondary is filling its Roche lobe, thus triggering mass transfer. Although tidal locking is expected in such systems, most studies have neglected the rotationally induced mixing that may occur. Here we study the possible effects of mixing in mass-losing stars for a range of secondary star masses and metallicities. We find that tidal locking can induce rotational mixing prior to contact and thus affect the evolution of the secondary star if the effects of the Spruit-Tayler dynamo are included both for angular momentum and chemical transport. Once contact is made, the effect of mass transfer tends to be more rapid than the evolutionary timescale, so the effects of mixing are no longer directly important, but the mass-transfer strips matter to inner layers that may have been affected by the mixing. These effects are enhanced for secondaries of 1-1.2 M ☉ and for lower metallicities. We discuss the possible implications for the paucity of carbon in the secondaries of the cataclysmic variable SS Cyg and the black hole candidate XTE J1118+480 and for the progenitor evolution of Type Ia supernovae. We also address the issue of the origin of blue straggler stars in globular and open clusters. We find that for models that include rotation consistent with that observed for some blue straggler stars, evolution is chemically homogeneous. This leads to tracks in the H-R diagram that are brighter and bluer than the non-rotating main-sequence turn-off point. Rotational mixing could thus be one of the factors that contribute to the formation of blue stragglers.

  6. Free convective heat transfer with hall effects, heat absorption and chemical reaction over an accelerated moving plate in a rotating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, S.M., E-mail: hussain.modassir@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, OP Jindal University, Raigarh 496109 (India); Jain, J., E-mail: jj.28481@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, OP Jindal University, Raigarh 496109 (India); Seth, G.S., E-mail: gsseth_ism@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Mathematics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826004 (India); Rashidi, M.M., E-mail: mm_rashidi@yahoo.com [Shanghai Key Lab of Vehicle Aerodynamics and Vehicle Thermal Management System, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2017-01-15

    The unsteady MHD free convective heat and mass transfer flow of an electrically conducting, viscous and incompressible fluid over an accelerated moving vertical plate in the presence of heat absorption and chemical reaction with ramped temperature and ramped surface concentration through a porous medium in a rotating system is studied, taking Hall effects into account. The governing equations are solved analytically with the help of Laplace transform technique. The unified closed-form expressions are obtained for fluid velocity, fluid temperature, species concentration, skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood numbers. The effects of various parameters on fluid velocity, fluid temperature and species concentration are discussed by graphs whereas numerical values of skin friction, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are presented in tabular form for different values of pertinent flow parameters. The numerical results are also compared with free convective flow near ramped temperature plate with ramped surface concentration with the corresponding flow near isothermal plate with uniform surface concentration. - Highlights: • Magnetic field, Hall current, rotation and chemical reaction play vital role on flow field. • Hall current tends to accelerate secondary fluid velocity in the boundary layer region. • Rotation tends to retard primary fluid velocity throughout the boundary layer region. • Rotation and chemical reaction tend to enhance primary skin friction. • Solutal buoyancy force and permeability of medium reduce primary skin friction.

  7. Effects of ditch-buried straw return on water percolation, nitrogen leaching and crop yields in a rice-wheat rotation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haishui; Xu, Mingmin; Koide, Roger T; Liu, Qian; Dai, Yajun; Liu, Ling; Bian, Xinmin

    2016-03-15

    Crop residue management and nitrogen loss are two important environmental problems in the rice-wheat rotation system in China. This study investigated the effects of burial of straw on water percolation, nitrogen loss by leaching, crop growth and yield. Greenhouse mesocosm experiments were conducted over the course of three simulated cropping seasons in a rice1-wheat-rice2 rotation. Greater amounts of straw resulted in more water percolation, irrespective of crop season. Burial at 20 and 35 cm significantly reduced, but burial at 50 cm increased nitrogen leaching. Straw at 500 kg ha(-1) reduced, but at 1000 kg ha(-1) and at 1500 kg ha(-1) straw increased nitrogen leaching in three consecutive crop rotations. In addition, straw at 500 kg ha(-1) buried at 35 cm significantly increased yield and its components for both crops. This study suggests that N losses via leaching from the rice-wheat rotation may be reduced by the burial of the appropriate amount of straw at the appropriate depth. Greater amounts of buried straw, however, may promote nitrogen leaching and negatively affect crop growth and yields. Complementary field experiments must be performed to make specific agronomic recommendations. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Revisiting Robustness and Evolvability: Evolution in Weighted Genotype Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partha, Raghavendran; Raman, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Robustness and evolvability are highly intertwined properties of biological systems. The relationship between these properties determines how biological systems are able to withstand mutations and show variation in response to them. Computational studies have explored the relationship between these two properties using neutral networks of RNA sequences (genotype) and their secondary structures (phenotype) as a model system. However, these studies have assumed every mutation to a sequence to be equally likely; the differences in the likelihood of the occurrence of various mutations, and the consequence of probabilistic nature of the mutations in such a system have previously been ignored. Associating probabilities to mutations essentially results in the weighting of genotype space. We here perform a comparative analysis of weighted and unweighted neutral networks of RNA sequences, and subsequently explore the relationship between robustness and evolvability. We show that assuming an equal likelihood for all mutations (as in an unweighted network), underestimates robustness and overestimates evolvability of a system. In spite of discarding this assumption, we observe that a negative correlation between sequence (genotype) robustness and sequence evolvability persists, and also that structure (phenotype) robustness promotes structure evolvability, as observed in earlier studies using unweighted networks. We also study the effects of base composition bias on robustness and evolvability. Particularly, we explore the association between robustness and evolvability in a sequence space that is AU-rich – sequences with an AU content of 80% or higher, compared to a normal (unbiased) sequence space. We find that evolvability of both sequences and structures in an AU-rich space is lesser compared to the normal space, and robustness higher. We also observe that AU-rich populations evolving on neutral networks of phenotypes, can access less phenotypic variation compared to

  9. Chinese Milk Vetch Improves Plant Growth, Development and 15N Recovery in the Rice-Based Rotation System of South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhijian; He, Yaqin; Tu, Shuxin; Xu, Changxu; Liu, Guangrong; Wang, Huimin; Cao, Weidong; Liu, Hui

    2017-06-15

    Chinese milk vetch (CMV) is vital for agriculture and environment in China. A pot experiment combined with 15 N labeling (including three treatments: control, no fertilizer N and CMV; 15 N-labeled urea alone, 15 NU; substituting partial 15 NU with CMV, 15 NU-M) was conducted to evaluate the impact of CMV on plant growth, development and 15 NU recovery in rice-based rotation system. The 15 NU-M mitigated oxidative damage by increasing antioxidant enzymes activities and chlorophyll content while decreased malondialdehyde content in rice root and shoot, increased the biomass, total N and 15 N uptake of plant shoots by 8%, 12% and 39% respectively, thus inducing a noticeable increase of annual 15 N recovery by 77% versus 15 NU alone. Remarkable increases in soil NH 4 + and populations of bacteria, actinomycetes and azotobacter were obtained in legume-rice rotation system while an adverse result was observed in soil NO 3 - content versus fallow-rice. CMV as green manure significantly increased the fungal population which was decreased with cultivating CMV as cover crop. Therefore, including legume cover crop in rice-based rotation system improves plant growth and development, annual N conservation and recovery probably by altering soil nitrogen forms plus ameliorating soil microbial communities and antioxidant system which alleviates oxidative damages in plants.

  10. Effect of crop rotations and fertilization on energy balance in typical production systems on the Canadian Prairies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zentner, R.P.; Stumborg, M.A.; Campbell, C.A.

    1989-03-01

    Non-renewable energy inputs (both direct and indirect), metabolizable energy output and energy efficiency of 10 spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rotations were examined over 18 years on a loam soil in the Brown soil zone of the Canadian Prairies. The rotations, which were managed using conventional tillage, included a range of crops, cropping intensities, crop sequences and fertilizer practices. Results showed that the total energy input per unit of land was lowest for the traditional fallow-wheat (F-W) rotation (3482 MJ ha/sup -1/), intermediate (4470 MJ ha/sup -1/) for N- and P-fertilized fallow-wheat-wheat (F-W-W) and highest for N- and P-fertilized continuous wheat (7100 MJ ha/sup -1/). Substituting flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) or rye (Secale cereale L.) for wheat in the rotations reduced total energy input by 3 to 8%, while withholding the application of either N or P fertilizer reduced total energy input by 16-37%. Liquid fuel for field operations and local product transport, and fertilizer (primarily N) were the major energy inputs; both increased with cropping intensity. Fuel accounted for 30-50% of the total energy input of the rotations. Fertilizer represented 15-49% of the total energy input and was more important than fuel for the continuous crop rotations. Despite the high energy content in pesticides, they accounted for only 4-11% of the total energy input of the rotations. Metabolizable energy output displayed similar response patterns as total energy input reflecting the higher total annual grain yields as cropping intensity increased. The average energy output to input ratio for F-W was 3.6, or 262 kg of wheat GJ/sup -1/ of energy input, while those for F-W-W and continuous wheat were 3.3 and 2.6, or 240 and 191 kg of wheat GJ/sup -1/ of energy input, respectively. Rotations that included flax or cereal forage crops had the lowest energy efficiencies. 2 figs., 31 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Friction, Free Axes of Rotation and Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kazachkov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction forces acting on rotators may promote their alignment and therefore eliminate degrees of freedom in their movement. The alignment of rotators by friction force was shown by experiments performed with different spinners, demonstrating how friction generates negentropy in a system of rotators. A gas of rigid rotators influenced by friction force is considered. The orientational negentropy generated by a friction force was estimated with the Sackur-Tetrode equation. The minimal change in total entropy of a system of rotators, corresponding to their eventual alignment, decreases with temperature. The reported effect may be of primary importance for the phase equilibrium and motion of ubiquitous colloidal and granular systems.

  12. Can planetary nebulae rotate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinin, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the inclination of spectral lines observed in a number of planetary nebulae when the spectrograph slit is placed along the major axis, which is presently ascribed to nonuniform expansion of the shells, actually may be due to rotation of the nebulae about their minor axes, as Campbell and Moore have suggested in their reports. It is assumed that the rotation of the central star (or, if the core is a binary system, circular motions of gas along quasi-Keplerian orbits) serves as the source of the original rotation of a protoplanetary nebula. The mechanism providing for strengthening of the original rotation in the process of expansion of the shell is the tangential pressure of L/sub α/ radiation due to the anisotropic properties of the medium and radiation field. The dynamic effect produced by them is evidently greatest in the epoch when the optical depth of the nebula in the L/sub c/ continuum becomes on the order of unity in the course of its expansion

  13. Rotational superradiance in fluid laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Vitor; Richartz, Mauricio; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Rotational superradiance has been predicted theoretically decades ago, and is the chief responsible for a number of important effects and phenomenology in black hole physics. However, rotational superradiance has never been observed experimentally. Here, with the aim of probing superradiance in the lab, we investigate the behaviour of sound and surface waves in fluids resting in a circular basin at the center of which a rotating cylinder is placed. We show that with a suitable choice for the material of the cylinder, surface and sound waves are amplified. By confining the superradiant modes near the rotating cylinder, an instability sets in. Our findings are experimentally testable in existing fluid laboratories and hence offer experimental exploration and comparison of dynamical instabilities arising from rapidly rotating boundary layers in astrophysical as well as in fluid dynamical systems.

  14. Advances in Rotational Seismic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Robert [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Laughlin, Darren [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brune, Robert [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Rotational motion is increasingly understood to be a significant part of seismic wave motion. Rotations can be important in earthquake strong motion and in Induced Seismicity Monitoring. Rotational seismic data can also enable shear selectivity and improve wavefield sampling for vertical geophones in 3D surveys, among other applications. However, sensor technology has been a limiting factor to date. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and Applied Technology Associates (ATA) are funding a multi-year project that is now entering Phase 2 to develop and deploy a new generation of rotational sensors for validation of rotational seismic applications. Initial focus is on induced seismicity monitoring, particularly for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with fracturing. The sensors employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles with broadband response, improved noise floors, robustness, and repeatability. This paper presents a summary of Phase 1 results and Phase 2 status.

  15. Evaluation of optical performance of 4 aspheric toric intraocular lenses using an optical bench system: Influence of pupil size, decentration, and rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ji; Yoo, Young-Sik; Joo, Choun-Ki; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of pupil size, degree of intraocular lens (IOL) decentration, and rotation of 4 aspheric toric IOLs on the image quality. Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. Experimental study. Four aspheric toric intraocular lenses (IOLs)-the Precizon (transitional conic toric IOL), AT Torbi 709M (bitoric IOL), SN6AT4 (posterior toric surface IOL), and ZCT225 (anterior toric surface IOL)-were evaluated using the optical bench metrology system. Measurements included changes in spherical aberrations, relative spherical equivalent (SE), and image quality at different pupil diameters and image quality degradation due to decentration and rotation of the IOLs. Change in relative SE with pupil size in aberration-free toric IOLs (transitional conic toric and bitoric IOLs) was greater than in negatively aspheric toric IOLs (posterior toric surface and anterior toric surface IOLs). In contrast, the aberration-free IOLs showed higher contrast than the negatively aspheric IOLs. When IOLs were decentered by 1.0 mm, the contrast reduction rates at 17.6 cycles per degree for the transitional conic toric IOL, bitoric IOL, posterior toric surface IOL, and anterior toric surface IOL were 5.1%, 3.1%, 12.2%, and 15.8%, respectively. Rotation-induced deterioration of contrast to 0.5 required a much higher rotation for the transitional conic toric IOL than for the other 3 IOLs. The transitional conic toric IOL and bitoric IOL provided superior image quality despite pupil size changes and the presence of decentration. The transitional conic toric IOL demonstrated maximum rotation tolerance compared with the other IOLs. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Water erosion during a 17-year period under two crop rotations in four soil management systems on a Southbrazilian Inceptisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, Ildegardis; Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Soil erosion still remains a persistent issue in the world, and this in spite of the efforts to ameliorate soil management systems taken into account the point of view of environmental protection against soil losses. In South Brazil water erosion is mainly associated to rainfall events with a great volume and high intensity, which are more or less evenly distributed all over the year. Nowadays, direct drilling is the most widely soil management system used for the main crops of the region. However, some crops still are grown on conventionally tilled soils, which means mainly ploughing and harrowing and less frequently chisel ploughing. In Lages-Santa Catarina State, Brazil, a plot experiment under natural rain was started in 1992 on an Inceptisol with the aim of quantifying soil and water losses. Treatments included bare and vegetated plots. The crop succession was: oats (Avena strigosa), soybean (Glycine max), vetch (Vicia sativa), maize (Zea mays), fodder radish (Raphanus sativus) and beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Soil tillage systems investigated in this study were: i) conventional tillage (CT), ii) reduced tillage (MT), iii) no tillage (NT) under crop rotation and iv) conventional tillage on bare soil (BS). Treatments CT and BS involved ploughing plus twice harrowing, whereas MT involved chisel ploughing plus harrowing. Rainfall erosivity from January 1 1992 to December 31 2009 was calculated. Soil losses from the BS treatment along the 17 year study period were higher than 1200 Mg ha-1. Crop cover significantly reduced erosion, so that under some crops soil losses in the CT treatment were 80% lower than in the BS treatment. In turn soil losses in the MT treatment, where tillage was performed by chiselling and harrowing, were on average about 50% lower than in the CT treatment. No tillage was the most efficient soil management system in reducing soil erosion, so that soil losses in the NT treatment were about 98% lower than in the BS treatment. The three

  17. How different farming systems respond to the continuously evolving European dairy market – a comparative case study of four different EU countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsøe, Martin Hvarregaard; Noe, Egon; Aubert, Pierre-Marie

    2017-01-01

    This Paper analyses how five different Eu-ropean farming systems have been influenced by the increasingly volatile milk market and the strategic re-sponse that has been adopted by farmers and the dairy sector.......This Paper analyses how five different Eu-ropean farming systems have been influenced by the increasingly volatile milk market and the strategic re-sponse that has been adopted by farmers and the dairy sector....

  18. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Bennett, N Robert; Pelc, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-02-01

    Using hybrid x-ray∕MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors' assembly were also evaluated to determine

  19. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Pelc, Norbert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Shin Mihye [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bennett, N. Robert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Qualcomm MEMS Technologies, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors' assembly were also

  20. Effect of ultrasonic, sonic and rotating-oscillating powered toothbrushing systems on surface roughness and wear of white spot lesions and sound enamel: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandé-Gatón, Patrícia; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Silva, Léa Assed Bezerra da; Faraoni, Juliana Jendiroba; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Lucisano, Marília Pacífico; Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra da; Nelson Filho, Paulo

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of ultrasonic, sonic and rotating-oscillating powered toothbrushing systems on surface roughness and wear of white spot lesions and sound enamel. 40 tooth segments obtained from third molar crowns had the enamel surface divided into thirds, one of which was not subjected to toothbrushing. In the other two thirds, sound enamel and enamel with artificially induced white spot lesions were randomly assigned to four groups (n=10) : UT: ultrasonic toothbrush (Emmi-dental); ST1: sonic toothbrush (Colgate ProClinical Omron); ST2: sonic toothbrush (Sonicare Philips); and ROT: rotating-oscillating toothbrush (control) (Oral-B Professional Care Triumph 5000 with SmartGuide). The specimens were analyzed by confocal laser microscopy for surface roughness and wear. Data were analyzed statistically by paired t-tests, Kruskal-Wallis, two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-test (α= 0.05). The different powered toothbrushing systems did not cause a significant increase in the surface roughness of sound enamel (P> 0.05). In the ROT group, the roughness of white spot lesion surface increased significantly after toothbrushing and differed from the UT group (Pspot lesion compared with sound enamel, and this group differed significantly from the ST1 group (Pspot lesion increased surface roughness and wear. None of the powered toothbrushing systems (ultrasonic, sonic and rotating-oscillating) tested caused significant alterations on sound dental enamel. However, conventional rotating-oscillating toothbrushing on enamel with white spot lesion increased surface roughness and wear. Copyright©American Journal of Dentistry.