WorldWideScience

Sample records for evolving radiological features

  1. An Evolved System of Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, M.

    2004-01-01

    The current system of radiological protection based on the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) hypothesis has greatly contributed to the minimization of doses received by workers and members of the public. However, it has brought about r adiophobia a mong people and waste of resources due to over-regulation, because the LNT implies that radiation is harmful no matter how small the dose is. The author reviewed the results of research on health effects of radiation including major epidemiological studies on radiation workers and found no clear evidence of deleterious health effects from radiation exposures below the current maximum dose limits (50 mSv/y for workers and 5 mSv/y for members of the public), which have been adopted worldwide in the second half of the 20th century. Now that the existence of bio-defensive mechanisms such as DNA repair, apoptosis and adaptive response are well recognized, the linearity assumption cannot be said to be s cientific . Evidences increasingly imply that there are threshold effects in risk of radiation. A concept of practical thresholds or virtually safe doses will have to be introduced into the new system of radiological protection in order to resolve the low dose issues. Practical thresholds may be defined as dose levels below which induction of detectable radiogenic cancers or hereditary effects are not expected. If any workers and members of the public do not gain benefits from being exposed, excepting intentional irradiation for medical purposes, their radiation exposures should be kept below practical thresholds. On the assumption that the current dose limits are below practical thresholds and with no radiation detriments, there is no need of justification and optimization (ALARA) principles for occupational and public exposures. Then the ethical issue of justification to allow benefit to society to offset radiation detriments to individuals can be resolved. And also the ethical issue of optimization to exchange health or safety for

  2. Radiologic features in histiocytosis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sung Mo; Cho, Byung Jae; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1980-01-01

    Histiocytosis syndrome is not rare disease of unknown etiology, characterized by development of granulomatous lesions with histiocytic proliferation. Authors analyzed 22 cases, which had been confirmed as histiocytosis syndrome from 1971 to Feb. 1980 with special attention to 15 cases showing positive findings on radiological examinations. The results are as follows. 1. Overall male to female ratio was about 2:1. The majority were between 1 and 7 years of age. 2. Skeletal system was involved in orders as follows: skull, pelvis, femur, rib, spine. 3. Four cases of pulmonary involvement were experienced. All cases had interstitial involvement with reticulonodular densities on roentgenograms. 4. We had experienced a pituitary tumor, presumably localized histiocytic mass, in a patient with diabetes insipidus. 5. In long bone involvement, diaphysis or metaphysis was usually involved, but in one patient, lesion were extended into epiphysis. 6. One case of platyspondyly was found, with symmetrical compression

  3. Radiologic features in histiocytosis syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Mo; Cho, Byung Jae; Yeon, Kyung Mo [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    Histiocytosis syndrome is not rare disease of unknown etiology, characterized by development of granulomatous lesions with histiocytic proliferation. Authors analyzed 22 cases, which had been confirmed as histiocytosis syndrome from 1971 to Feb. 1980 with special attention to 15 cases showing positive findings on radiological examinations. The results are as follows. 1. Overall male to female ratio was about 2:1. The majority were between 1 and 7 years of age. 2. Skeletal system was involved in orders as follows: skull, pelvis, femur, rib, spine. 3. Four cases of pulmonary involvement were experienced. All cases had interstitial involvement with reticulonodular densities on roentgenograms. 4. We had experienced a pituitary tumor, presumably localized histiocytic mass, in a patient with diabetes insipidus. 5. In long bone involvement, diaphysis or metaphysis was usually involved, but in one patient, lesion were extended into epiphysis. 6. One case of platyspondyly was found, with symmetrical compression.

  4. Elastofibroma dorsi: typical radiological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haykir, R.; Karakose, S.; Karabacakoglu, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Elastofibroma dorsi is a rare benign and slow-growing fibro-proliferative lesion. It has a characteristic location (periscapular region) and a specific imaging appearance (sonography, CT, MRI) allowing accurate prospective diagnosis. The recognition of this benign lesion avoids unnecessary biopsy and/or surgery. We report two cases of bilateral elastofibroma dorsi illustrating characteristic imaging features on ultrasound, CT and MRI

  5. New nuclear build and evolving radiological protection challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.

    2010-01-01

    Many trends and indicators suggest that the use of nuclear power for generating electricity will increase, perhaps significantly, in the coming 10 to 20 years and beyond. Any such expansion will not take place in a static scientific or social context, but rather in the midst of ongoing changes in many relevant fields, radiological protection, radioactive waste management and nuclear safety to name a few. Regarding radiological protection, this evolution can be characterised in many different ways, but can conveniently be described as having scientific and socially driven aspects. These may well pose challenges to radiological protection (RP) policy, regulation and application in the future

  6. The evolving radiology landscape: the importance of effective leadership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boland, Giles W.L.; Guimaraes, Alexander S.; Mueller, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in technology and imaging techniques have propelled radiology into the centre of diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. However, all this success has come at a price, with radiology departments persistently struggling to keep up with increasing demand. In response, radiologists in many countries are giving up an increasing proportion of their traditional workload, often driven by teleradiology, causing them to become less visible within their organizations. As such, radiologists now risk being viewed as commodities by their peers. The failure to meet the increasing stakeholder expectations is, at least in part, due to lack of radiology leadership. While the drivers for the radiology profession and the organizational structures for radiologists vary from country to country, this article will discuss the characteristics of good leadership and how these can be used to ensure radiologists remain centre stage in the provision of high-quality clinical care in any healthcare environment. (orig.)

  7. The evolving radiology landscape: the importance of effective leadership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, Giles W.L.; Guimaraes, Alexander S.; Mueller, Peter R. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Advances in technology and imaging techniques have propelled radiology into the centre of diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. However, all this success has come at a price, with radiology departments persistently struggling to keep up with increasing demand. In response, radiologists in many countries are giving up an increasing proportion of their traditional workload, often driven by teleradiology, causing them to become less visible within their organizations. As such, radiologists now risk being viewed as commodities by their peers. The failure to meet the increasing stakeholder expectations is, at least in part, due to lack of radiology leadership. While the drivers for the radiology profession and the organizational structures for radiologists vary from country to country, this article will discuss the characteristics of good leadership and how these can be used to ensure radiologists remain centre stage in the provision of high-quality clinical care in any healthcare environment. (orig.)

  8. Lupus mastitis - peculiar radiological and pathological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Hussain, Waleed Mohd; Fatani, Mohamed I; Shakour, Bothaina Abdul

    2009-01-01

    Lupus mastitis is a form of lupus profundus that is seen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. It usually presents as a swelling (or swellings) in the breasts, with or without pain. The condition is recurrent and progresses along with the underlying disease, with fat necrosis, calcification, fibrosis, scarring, and breast atrophy. Lupus mastitis is often confused with malignancy and lymphoma and, in our part of the world, with tuberculosis. Confusion is especially likely when it occurs in an unusual clinical setting. In this article, we present a case that presented with unique radiological, pathological, and clinical features. Awareness of the various manifestations of lupus mastitis is essential if unnecessary interventions such as biopsies and surgeries, and their consequences, are to be avoided

  9. The evolving system of radiological protection: the nuclear industry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coates, R.

    2003-01-01

    . (A set of key examples is listed herein.) In our view, the current system comprising of the dose limit (1 mSv pa) and the ALARA Principle provides the necessary flexibility and tools to regulators for addressing any country specific or site specific settings, and there are already good examples of this. Again, we believe that this matter is best left for discussion and agreement between the local stakeholders rather than at an international level. We strongly support the need to establish an international approach to defining a level of dose below which society may legitimately maintain that an individual is adequately protected., and hence the allocation of further resources to control the source on radiological health grounds would be inappropriate. WNA considers that this dose is not less than a few tens of micro-sieverts. This approach should be supported by guidance on the appropriate level of conservatism within dose assessments, both in the context of exclusion/clearance/exemption and critical groups in general. WNA supports the continued use of the term 'ALARA, economic and social factors being taken into account'. Collective dose is a useful concept in the optimisation of occupational exposure: in addition it needs to be supplemented by the consideration of the number of workers exposed at the higher levels and by wider pragmatic experience. Public collective dose is of very limited utility in decision making, and little if any weight should be given to exposures at long timescales and exceedingly trivial levels of individual exposure. WNA welcomes both the lead taken by ICRP to bring the protection of non-human biota into a coherent overall framework addressing the totality of radiological protection, and the recognition that the current system has in practice provided an appropriate standard of environmental protection. On this basis the development of the future system of protection must not impose a disproportionate burden on operators. The focus for

  10. The radiological features of chronic radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelson, R.M.; Nolan, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The radiological findings, using a single-contrast barium infusion technique, are described in a series of 13 patients with chronic radiation enteritis. The signs include evidence of submucosal thickening, single or multiple stenoses, adhesions and sinus or fistula formation. A combination of these signs characterises the condition. This technique is particularly suited to the investigation of radiation enteritis because of its ability to distend maximally the small intestine. A cause, stenosis and/or adhesions, was demonstrated in the eight of the 13 patients presenting with intermittent small-intestinal obstruction. Three patients had diarrhoea as their predominant complaint and a fistula was demonstrated in two. (author)

  11. Improving Naive Bayes with Online Feature Selection for Quick Adaptation to Evolving Feature Usefulness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-19

    The definition of what makes an article interesting varies from user to user and continually evolves even for a single user. As a result, for news recommendation systems, useless document features can not be determined a priori and all features are usually considered for interestingness classification. Consequently, the presence of currently useless features degrades classification performance [1], particularly over the initial set of news articles being classified. The initial set of document is critical for a user when considering which particular news recommendation system to adopt. To address these problems, we introduce an improved version of the naive Bayes classifier with online feature selection. We use correlation to determine the utility of each feature and take advantage of the conditional independence assumption used by naive Bayes for online feature selection and classification. The augmented naive Bayes classifier performs 28% better than the traditional naive Bayes classifier in recommending news articles from the Yahoo! RSS feeds.

  12. Radiological features of late-onset lymphoedema in Noonan's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jou-Kou; Li, Yiu-Wah

    2003-01-01

    Noonan's syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with diverse manifestations. Lymphatic abnormalities occur in less than 20% of patients. We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with swollen lower limbs and dysmorphic features characteristic of Noonan's syndrome. The radiological features of this unusual case of late-onset lymphoedema in association with Noonan's syndrome are presented. (orig.)

  13. Radiological features of late-onset lymphoedema in Noonan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jou-Kou; Li, Yiu-Wah

    2003-03-01

    Noonan's syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with diverse manifestations. Lymphatic abnormalities occur in less than 20% of patients. We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with swollen lower limbs and dysmorphic features characteristic of Noonan's syndrome. The radiological features of this unusual case of late-onset lymphoedema in association with Noonan's syndrome are presented.

  14. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: understanding key radiological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, S. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Oxford OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom); Benamore, R., E-mail: Rachel.Benamore@orh.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Oxford OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Many radiologists find it challenging to distinguish between the different interstitial idiopathic pneumonias (IIPs). The British Thoracic Society guidelines on interstitial lung disease (2008) recommend the formation of multidisciplinary meetings, with diagnoses made by combined radiological, pathological, and clinical findings. This review focuses on understanding typical and atypical radiological features on high-resolution computed tomography between the different IIPs, to help the radiologist determine when a confident diagnosis can be made and how to deal with uncertainty.

  15. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: understanding key radiological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, S.; Benamore, R.

    2010-01-01

    Many radiologists find it challenging to distinguish between the different interstitial idiopathic pneumonias (IIPs). The British Thoracic Society guidelines on interstitial lung disease (2008) recommend the formation of multidisciplinary meetings, with diagnoses made by combined radiological, pathological, and clinical findings. This review focuses on understanding typical and atypical radiological features on high-resolution computed tomography between the different IIPs, to help the radiologist determine when a confident diagnosis can be made and how to deal with uncertainty.

  16. Radiological features of pulmonary complications in patients with AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebesam, D.; Fuchs, H.F.

    1988-01-01

    Our experience with over 200 AIDS-patients emphasizes the good knowledge in radiological features of pulmonary complications in patients with AIDS for early diagnosis. We show the radiological appearance of the most frequent opportunistic infection of the lung, pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, and the different appearance of the other most frequently seen pulmonary complications as Kaposisarkoma, cytomegaly-virus-pneumonia, non-typical-mycobacteria-infection and tuberculosis. A synopsis over the most important symptoms is made for easier differential diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  17. Radiologic features of gastric leiomyosarcoma and leiomyoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seoung Oh; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan

    1985-01-01

    Smooth muscle tumors of stomach are unusual tumors, accounting for 1-3% of primary gastric malignancies. Diagnosis of these tumors is important because of the more favorable prognosis of this tumor than that of gastric carcinoma. A retrospective study was made in 18 patients who had pathology-proven gastric leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma to identify radiologic characteristics for recent 6 years from Jan. 1978 to July. 1984 at Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1. Age of 13 cases of gastric leiomyosarcoma ranged from 36 to 70 with average of 51 and the male to female ratio was 10 ; 3. Age of 5 cases of gastric leiomyoma ranged from 24 to 67 with average of 44 and the male to female ratio was 3 : 2. 2. Clinically, gastric leiomyosarcoma had epigastric pain in 7 cases, palpable mass in 4 cases, melena in 3 cases, haematemesis in 2 cases, 5 cases of gastric leiomyoma also had above symptoms respectively. 3. Of the 13 cases of gastric leiomyosarcoma studied by upper gastrointestinal examination, 6 cases (32%) involved the fundus, 10 cases (50%) in the body, 3 cases (18%) in the antrum. Of the 5 cases of gastric leiomyoma, 4 cases were confined to the fundus and 1 case in the body. 4. The size of the 13 gastric leiomyosarcoma ranged from 5 to more than 20 cm in diameter. The size of the 5 gastric leiomyomas ranged from 3 to 9 cm in diameter. 5. The growth type of gastric leiomysarcoma was exophytic in 8 cases, endogastric in 1 case and mixed pattern in 4 cases. The growth type of gastric leiomyoma were exophytic in 1 case, endogastric in 2 cases and mixed in 2 cases. 6. Mucosal pattern of gastric leiomyosarcoma were mainly effaced pattern in 10 cases (77%), but 3 cases (23%) showed irregular destruction. 1 case of gastric leiomyoma showed mucosal irregularity. 7. Ulceration was present in 10 cases of gastric leiomyosarcoma either single or multiple. 2 cases of gastric leiomyoma showed small ulcerations. Calciflation

  18. Classical diagnostic radiological features of Von Recklinghausen's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and appropriately guiding management decisions. The patient presented is a 29- year old female who had presented with right orbital and periorbital masses, lisch nodules, multiple scalp and body nodules, cranial bony defect and complex kyphoscoliosis. She had three of the seven classical diagnostic features of NF-1 ...

  19. Radiological features of childhood giant cavernous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgen, Burce; Senocak, Efsun; Oguz, Kader K. [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Soylemezoglu, Figen [Hacettepe University, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Akalan, Nejat [Hacettepe University, Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-04-15

    Giant cavernous malformations (GCM) are very large, low-flow vascular malformations, which usually have atypical imaging features and are commonly misdiagnosed preoperatively as neoplasms or vascular malformations. These lesions have mostly been reported in children. As cavernomas show different features in children compared to adults, we evaluated the imaging features of pediatric GCMs in order to help in the preoperative diagnosis of these malformations. Brain MR studies of nine children (mean age of 4 years; 8 months-9 years) with biopsy-proven GCM were retrospectively evaluated. We defined GCMs as cavernomas of {>=}4 cm. Lesions were evaluated regarding their size, location, signal characteristics, general appearance (uni/multilocular) as well as regarding the presence of mass effect, edema, and fluid-fluid levels and were classified according to the Mottolese classification of pediatric cavernomas. Lesion locations were parietal (n = 5), frontal (n = 2), temporal, and intraventricular. Seven lesions were in the periventricular region (with five in the periatrial region). Six patients had T1 hyperintense multilobulated lesions with ''bubbles of blood'' appearance and three patients had heterogeneous lesions with reticular core. All lesions had mass effect, edema (marked in four cases), and peripheral hemosiderin rim. Fluid-fluid levels were also common (n = 7). Most of our lesions (six of nine) were classified as type IIIA, two as type IIIC, and one as type IA. In children, a GCM should be considered in case of very large hemorrhagic intra-axial mass with ''bubbles of blood'' multicystic appearance, surrounding hemosiderin ring, fluid-fluid levels, and accompanying edema-mass effect, especially in the periatrial location. (orig.)

  20. Solitary pulmonary nodule: radiologic features and diagnostic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Cambronero, Luis Enrique

    2012-01-01

    A literature review is conducted on the solitary pulmonary nodule, to determine the diagnostic methods and specific characteristics. The diagnostic methods used have been: chest radiography, computed tomography, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The radiological features are defined: location, size, definition of contours or edges (margins), densitometric and attenuation characteristics, cavitation, air bronchogram, growth, doubling time, satellite nodules, nutrient vessels [es

  1. Radiologic features of preteus syndrome: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Hwa [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Proteus syndrome is a rare congenital hamartomatous condition that is characterized by a wide range of malformations with overgrowth of various tissues. The author reports the case of a Proteus syndrome in a 14-year-old girl who had the unique features of this syndrome including megaspondylodysplasia with resultant scoliosis, leg discrepancy, macrodactyly, clinodactyly, hyperostosis in external auditory meatus, asymmetric megalencephaly, splenomegaly, cystic lung changes, asymmetric soft tissue fat infiltrations and a long, asymmetric face, with descriptions of the radiological features.

  2. Radiological features of progressive tumoral calcinosis in chronic renal failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodnett, P

    2012-02-03

    We present the case of a young adult patient with chronic renal failure who developed painful subcutaneous nodules after failed renal transplant and recommencing dialysis. These nodules were juxta-articular in location and initially located over both shoulders. Radiological evaluation suggested tumoral calcinosis. The patient was placed on a strict dialysis and dietary regimen but was suboptimally compliant with same. The patient developed progressive disease with an increase in size and number of juxta-articular calcified soft-tissue masses. However, 6 months following a second renal transplant clinical and radiological follow up demonstrated marked resolution both in symptomatology and radiographic findings. We present the plain radiographic, CT and MRI findings which demonstrate the typical radiological features of tumoral calcinosis. We correlate these findings with clinical course and histological findings following surgical excision of one of these masses.

  3. Radiological features of epiploic appendagitis and segmental omental infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, Mark J.; Khalili, Korosh; Sarrazin, Josee; Hanbidge, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis and segmental omental infarction are more frequently encountered with the increased use of abdominal ultrasound and Computed tomography (CT) in the radiological assessment of the patient who presents clinically with acute abdominal pain. Recognition of specific imaging abnormalities enables the radiologist to make the correct diagnosis. This is important, as the appropriate management of both conditions is often conservative. Follow-up imaging features correlate with clinical improvement. McClure, M.J. et al. (2001)

  4. Radiological features of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurley, P.D.; Halliday, K.E.; Somers, J.M.; Al-Daraji, W.I.; Ilyas, M.; Broderick, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the small bowel. The majority of patients with this anomaly will remain asymptomatic; however, several complications may occur, including obstruction, intussusception, perforation, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. These complications may produce a variety of different clinical features and radiological appearances. The purpose of this article is to review the potential imaging manifestations of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques available

  5. Radiological features of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurley, P.D. [Departments of Radiology Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: pthurley@doctors.org.uk; Halliday, K E; Somers, J M [Departments of Radiology Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Al-Daraji, W I; Ilyas, M [Histopathology, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Broderick, N J [Departments of Radiology Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the small bowel. The majority of patients with this anomaly will remain asymptomatic; however, several complications may occur, including obstruction, intussusception, perforation, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. These complications may produce a variety of different clinical features and radiological appearances. The purpose of this article is to review the potential imaging manifestations of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques available.

  6. Radiological features and biomechanical patterns in Perthes disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, B.S.; Hogg, A.D.C.; Burwell, R.G.; Moulton, A.; Worthington, B.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between radiologic features and biomechanical patterns in Perthes disease as shown in finite element models. A two-dimensional finite element model of a child's hip that allowed for movement at the joint line was loaded to simulate normal heel strike. The finite element method is a computer-based technique of mathematical modeling that permits calculation of the magnitude and direction of stresses, deformation, and dynamic behavior of continuous structures. In the normal hip model, maximum compressive stresses occur superolaterally and inferomedially in the femoral head, corresponding to the radiographic features of flattening and increased tear drop distance, attributable to cartilage thickening, seen in Perthes disease

  7. Osteopetrosis: Some unusual radiological features with a short review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolawole, T.M.; Hawass, N.D.; Patel, P.J.; Mahdi, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    The radiological features of 27 cases of osteopetrosis were analysed retrospectively. The common features of generalized sclerosis of bones; with metaphyses showing characteristic widening, multiple transverse striations, cortical thickening and medullary calcifications as well as fractures, are seen in most cases. In addition to these changes, a number of rare features of osteopetrosis are seen, viz: Medial and symmetrical metaphyseal cortical defects in the long bones (5 cases), excessive diaphyseal radiodense periosteal new bone formation (5 cases), bone-in-bone appearances (5 cases), and the presence of intracerebral and meningeal calcifications in 7 cases. The significance of these intracranial calcifications as a component of a particular autosomal recessive syndrome in which renal tubular acidosis and carbonic anhydrase II deficiency may coexist, is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Radiological features of Lemierre's syndrome: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapia-Vine, M. M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, B.; Bustos, A.; Cabello, J.

    2001-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a type of sepsis caused by anaerobes that is secondary to a pharyngotonsillar infection complicated by suppurative thrombophlebitis of ipsilateral jugular vein and septic emboli. Imaging studies are valuable tools for confirming the diagnosis. Chest x-ray reveals poorly defined cavitated, peripheral, nodular lesions. computed tomography (CT) is useful in confirming the pulmonary lesions, which are suggestive of septic emboli. Doppler ultrasound of the neck plays and indispensable role in demonstrating the internal jugular vein thrombosis. We report the case of patient who presented the characteristic clinical and radiological features of Lemierre's syndrome. (Author) 17 refs

  9. EVOLVE

    CERN Document Server

    Deutz, André; Schütze, Oliver; Legrand, Pierrick; Tantar, Emilia; Tantar, Alexandru-Adrian

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises nine selected works on numerical and computational methods for solving multiobjective optimization, game theory, and machine learning problems. It provides extended versions of selected papers from various fields of science such as computer science, mathematics and engineering that were presented at EVOLVE 2013 held in July 2013 at Leiden University in the Netherlands. The internationally peer-reviewed papers include original work on important topics in both theory and applications, such as the role of diversity in optimization, statistical approaches to combinatorial optimization, computational game theory, and cell mapping techniques for numerical landscape exploration. Applications focus on aspects including robustness, handling multiple objectives, and complex search spaces in engineering design and computational biology.

  10. Pictorial essay of radiological features of benign intrathoracic masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahminan Suut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With increased exposure of patients to routine imaging, incidental benign intrathoracic masses are frequently recognized. Most have classical imaging features, which are pathognomonic for their benignity. The aim of this pictorial review is to educate the reader of radiological features of several types of intrathoracic masses. The masses are categorized based on their location/origin and are grouped into parenchymal, pleural, mediastinal, or bronchial. Thoracic wall masses that invade the thorax such as neurofibromas and lipomas are included as they may mimic intrathoracic masses. All examples are illustrated and include pulmonary hamartoma, pleural fibroma, sarcoidosis, bronchial carcinoid, and bronchoceles together with a variety of mediastinal cysts on plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Sometimes a multimodality approach would be needed to confirm the diagnosis in atypical cases. The study would include the incorporation of radionuclide studies and relevant discussion in a multidisciplinary setting.

  11. Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis; Clinical presentation, radiological features and treatmant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldaqal, Saleh M.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the clinical characteristic, clinical presentations and radiological features of diopathic granulomatous mastitis, and the best treatment approaches of this clinical entity. Between 1996 and 2003 the files and histopathology reports of 25 patients with granulomatous mastitis at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital Jeddah, Kindom of Saudi Arabia were reviewed. The data were analyzed and a Medline search was carried out from 1970 to 2003 to review relevant cases. The age of patients ranged from 24-66 years and the mean age was 36.6+-9.43 years. All patients were females. The most common clinical presentation was palpable tender mass. The most common mammographic finding was ill-defined mass. However, mixed hypo- and hyper-echogenic lesions with tubular connections were the common ultrasonic findings. Treatment approaches were conservative or surgical excision or steroid. Conservative treatment associated with the higher rate of complications, while treatment with steroid showed complete remission of disease. Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis is a rare, benign breast disease that is usually underestimated or misdiagnosed. The clinical and radiological features resemble those of infectious mastitis or breast carcinoma. Early recognition and initiation of steroid treatment will result in complete remission of the disease and prevent complications. (author)

  12. Gastric schwannomas: radiological features with endoscopic and pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, H.S. [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemoon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, H.K. [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr; Won, H.J.; Byun, J.H.; Shin, Y.M.; Kim, A.Y.; Kim, P.N.; Lee, M.-G. [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, G.H. [Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M.J. [Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Aim: To describe the radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings of gastric schwannomas in 16 patients. Materials and methods: The radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings of 16 surgically proven cases of gastric schwannoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) and four patients were evaluated with upper gastrointestinal series. Two radiologists reviewed the CT and upper gastrointestinal series images by consensus with regard to tumour size, contour, margin, and growth pattern, the presence or absence of ulcer, cystic change, and the CT enhancement pattern. Endoscopy was performed in eight of these 16 patients. Six patients underwent endoscopic ultrasonography. Pathological specimens were obtained from and reviewed in all 16 patients. Immunohistochemistry was performed for c-kit, CD34, smooth muscle actin, and S-100 protein. Results: On radiographic examination, gastric schwannomas appeared as submucosal tumours with the CT features of well-demarcated, homogeneous, and uncommonly ulcerated masses. Endoscopy with endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated homogeneous, submucosal masses contiguous with the muscularis propria in all six examined cases. On pathological examination, gastric schwannomas appeared as well-circumscribed and homogeneous tumours in the muscularis propria and consisted microscopically of interlacing bundles of spindle cells. Strong positivity for S-100 protein was demonstrated in all 16 cases on immunohistochemistry. Conclusion: Gastric schwannomas appear as submucosal tumours of the stomach and have well-demarcated and homogeneous features on CT, endoscopic ultrasonography, and gross pathology. Immunohistochemistry consistently reveals positivity for S-100 protein in the tumours.

  13. Gastric schwannomas: radiological features with endoscopic and pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, H.S.; Ha, H.K.; Won, H.J.; Byun, J.H.; Shin, Y.M.; Kim, A.Y.; Kim, P.N.; Lee, M.-G.; Lee, G.H.; Kim, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To describe the radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings of gastric schwannomas in 16 patients. Materials and methods: The radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings of 16 surgically proven cases of gastric schwannoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) and four patients were evaluated with upper gastrointestinal series. Two radiologists reviewed the CT and upper gastrointestinal series images by consensus with regard to tumour size, contour, margin, and growth pattern, the presence or absence of ulcer, cystic change, and the CT enhancement pattern. Endoscopy was performed in eight of these 16 patients. Six patients underwent endoscopic ultrasonography. Pathological specimens were obtained from and reviewed in all 16 patients. Immunohistochemistry was performed for c-kit, CD34, smooth muscle actin, and S-100 protein. Results: On radiographic examination, gastric schwannomas appeared as submucosal tumours with the CT features of well-demarcated, homogeneous, and uncommonly ulcerated masses. Endoscopy with endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated homogeneous, submucosal masses contiguous with the muscularis propria in all six examined cases. On pathological examination, gastric schwannomas appeared as well-circumscribed and homogeneous tumours in the muscularis propria and consisted microscopically of interlacing bundles of spindle cells. Strong positivity for S-100 protein was demonstrated in all 16 cases on immunohistochemistry. Conclusion: Gastric schwannomas appear as submucosal tumours of the stomach and have well-demarcated and homogeneous features on CT, endoscopic ultrasonography, and gross pathology. Immunohistochemistry consistently reveals positivity for S-100 protein in the tumours

  14. Pregnancy-associated breast disease: radiologic features and diagnostic dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Eun Ju; Oh, Ki Keun; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2006-02-28

    In this paper, we evaluate the radiological features of pregnancy-associated breast lesions and discuss the difficulties in diagnosis by imaging. We selected patients who were diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast lesions during the previous 5 years. All patients complained of palpable lesions in the breast and underwent ultrasonographic (US) examination, the first choice for examination of pregnancy-related breast lesions. Any suspicious lesions found by the US were recommended for a US-guided core biopsy, US-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA), or surgery. Various breast lesions were detected during pregnancy and lactation, including breast cancer, mastitis and abscesses, lactating adenoma, galactoceles, lobular hyperplasia, and fibroadenomas. The imaging features of pregnancy-associated breast lesions did not differ from the features of non-pregnancy-associated breast lesions; however, some pregnancy-associated benign lesions had suspicious sonographic features. A US-guided core biopsy was necessary for differentiating benign from malignant. In patients with breast cancer, the cancer was often advanced at the time of diagnosis. In conclusion, various pregnancy-related breast lesions were detected and the imaging of these lesions had variable findings. Breast ultrasound could be an excellent imaging modality for diagnosis and differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. However, when the imaging results are suspicious, a biopsy should be performed to obtain a pathologic diagnosis.

  15. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in young children - clinical and radiological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penushliev, T.; Brankov, O.; Georgiev, Tz.; Stoilov, S.; Panov, M.; Totev, M.

    2007-01-01

    Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis is a bacterial infectious disease which mainly affects the paediatrics age group. The incidence seems to decline through the last decade. The authors analyzed the clinical, bacteriological and radiological features of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in 49 young children. Their age ranged from 12 days to 2.9 years (19 new-born and 30 babies). The most affected locus was the femur (46.9 %), followed by the humerus (40.9 %) and tibia (6.2 %). The adjacent joint was involved in 38.8 %. Up to the third day after onset of symptoms were admitted 32 children (65.3 %). A bacteriological diagnosis has been achieved in only 19 cases (38.8 %) which underwent different surgical procedures. Staphylococcus aureus (9 children; 64.3 %) was the most common causative microbe. Radiological characteristic showed mainly widening of joints, destruction of cartilage, bone destruction and osteoporosis. The median duration of antibiotic therapy was 31 days. Nine children underwent needle aspiration while another 10 required locus incision or open surgery with debridement or sequestrectomy. Definitive clinical restoration was observed in 42 cases (85.7%). (authors)

  16. Sex-linked hypophosphatemia in adults: Prevalence of radiologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, D.C.; Reid, I.R.; Whyte, M.P.; Murphy, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors performed a retrospective radiologic review of 38 adults (23 women, 15 men; aged 17-77 years) with clinically proved sex-linked hypophosphatemia to determine the prevalence of certain radiologic features, to compare the findings in men (hemizygotes) with findings in women (heterozygotes), and to elucidate the natural history of the disease by comparing a younger group (n = 12; mean age, 18) with an older group (n = 26; mean age, 43). They found age-related diminished skeletal mass on visual and CT studies and increased numbers of bone reinforcement lines (osteopenia) and Looser zones (osteomalacia). Osteoarthritis developed in many joints (88% of the older group), including the knees (87%) ankles (78%), feet (71%), sacroiliac joints (48%), and wrists (43%). Chondrocalcinosis was uncommon. Enthesopathy was absent in the younger group but present in every member of the older group, and was often accompanied by extra ossicles (48% hands; 37% feet). Phalangeal sclerosis (9%) and spinous process bridging (4%) wre uncommon. Except for traction spurs in the older group (60%), the thoracolumbar spine was unremarkable. There was no lumbar spinal stenosis detected by either radiogrammetric or CT measurement. Curvatures of the lower extremity long bones were common in both age groups. In keeping with the mode of genetic transmission, men were more severely affected than women. The authors noted three other skeletal alterations not previously described: (1) flaring of the iliac wgins (33% of the younger group, 75% of the older group), (2) trapezoidal distal femoral condyles (67% vs. 68%), and (3) thick, flat tali (100% vs. 89%). Our study of a large population of adult subjects with sex-linked hypophosphatemia reveals a variety of progressive skeletal features

  17. Chordoma: review of clinico radiological features and factors affecting survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, M.Y.S.

    2001-01-01

    This study reviews the clinico radiological features of cranial and sacrospinal chordomas and identifies factors affecting survival. Nineteen patients seen between January 1980 and December 2000 with histopathological diagnosis of chordomas were retrospectively reviewed with reference to clinical presentation, imaging features, treatment modalities and post-therapy status. Eight had tumours in the skull base while 11 patients had spinal and sacro-coccygeal lesions. Surgical resection was performed in 16 patients whose subsequent natural history was used to identify clinical indicators that may influence survival. Completeness of resection, age, gender and postoperative irradiation were subjected to analysis using the Cox proportional hazard models. Kaplan-Meir survival curves illustrate the survival distributions. Diplopia and facial pain are prime clinical presentations in cranial lesions, while extremity weakness and a sacrogluteal mass are common complaints in the sacrospinal group. Lesional calcifications are present in 40% while an osteolytic soft tissue mass is detectable by CT in all cases. Heterogeneous signals and internal septations on T 2 -weighted MRI are predominant features. In sacrospinal tumours, complete excision with adjuvant radiotherapy achieves the best results with a disease-free survival of more than 5 years. The clinical and imaging findings in this study are in accordance with those of other series. Except for complete surgical excision followed by radiotherapy in the subset of patients with sacrospinal tumours, none of the other clinical indicators show a statistical significant influence on survival. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Clinical manifestations and pulmonary radiological features in patients with triphosgene poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Caier, Chen Weijian; Wu Enfu; Yang Yunjun; Ye Min; Liu Zaiyi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the clinical manifestations and pulmonary radiological features in patients with triphosgene poisoning. Methods: Clinical manifestations, laboratory tests and CT scans were analyzed retrospectively in 17 patients with triphosgene poisoning. We focused on the severity, development and repair of pulmonary impairment. Results: Plain film and CT scans in five mild cases demonstrated bilateral scattered pulmonary patchy shadows. Of 12 cases with moderate to severe diseases, three showed bilateral multiple pulmonary patchy shadows and nodules with confluence of part of the lesions on plain film and CT scans; bilateral lungs were involved in nine cases with imaging findings of bilateral disseminated pulmonary round or ovary nodules with different size, ill-defined and partly-confluent patchy shadows and thickening of both interlobular septum and the wall of bronchus. Of clinical interests, imaging findings were closely correlated with clinical course and laboratory results. Conclusion: Radiological examinations with plain films and CT scans could reveal the severity, evolvement of pulmonary edema in patients with triphosgene poisoning, and these are of clinical benefit in the early management and prognostic evaluation of patients with triphosgene poisoning. (authors)

  19. Unusual radiological features in Paget's disease of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, T.E.; Kathol, M.H.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Walker, C.W.; Gendall, P.W.; Whitten, C.G.

    1994-01-01

    The radiological diagnosis of Paget's disease of bone is usually straightforward because most cases conform to well-established classic descriptions. Diagnosis becomes more difficult, however, when radiological appearances are not typical or other disease processes mask or alter the behavior of Paget's disease. Examples are presented to illustrate four categories of unusual radiological presentation of Paget's disease; (1) unusual disease progression, (2) massive post-immobilization lysis, (3) metastatic spread to pagetic bone, and (4) vertebral end-plate destruction that mimics infection. (orig.)

  20. Radiologic features of the solitary rectal ulcer syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnone, D.; Ranzi, T.; Velio, P.; Polli, E.E.; Bianchi, P.

    1984-05-01

    A radiologic study of 4 biopsy-proven cases of the solitary rectal ulcer (S.R.U.) syndrome was undertaken. The radiologic findings of S.R.U. were rectal stenosis (one with ulcer), polypoid rectal mass, and multiple sub-mucosal defects with shallow ulcers. The S.R.U., which is benign and requires only dietetic treatment, must be differentiated from other more serious entities such as neoplastic and inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. Extending the MEDAS Feature Dictionary to Support Access to Radiological Images

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufman, Bryan L.; Naeymi-Rad, Frank; Charletta, Dale A.; Kepic, Anna; Trace, David A.; Naeymirad, Shon; Carmony, Lowell; Spigos, Dimitrios; Evens, Martha

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses a method of adding a library of radiological images to MEDAS (the Medical Emergency Decision Assistance System). This library is interfaced with the MEDAS Feature Dictionary [1, 2], a dictionary containing terminology for MEDAS knowledge bases. The connections between the radiological images and the terms in the dictionary are used in two ways: 1) To retrieve the images with free text queries. 2) To help in the evaluation of radiological findings during the diagnostic cyc...

  2. Developmental intrahepatic shunts of childhood: radiological features and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paley, M.R.; Farrant, P.; Kane, P.; Karani, J.B.; Heaton, N.D.; Howard, E.R.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of radiological techniques in the diagnosis and management of developmental intrahepatic shunts. Hepatic vascular fistulae are recognised sequelae of liver trauma and intrahepatic tumours. However, there are rare developmental malformations which may present in childhood or later life and which may carry life-threatening complications. Retrospective analysis of clinical and radiological data was carried out in 24 patients. Anomalies evaluated were: (a) direct communication between hepatic artery and hepatic veins; (b) congenital hepatoportal arteriovenous malformations; and (c) congenital portocaval anastomosis with persistent flow through the ductus venosus. Although rare, the prompt recognition of these vascular anomalies allows early surgical or radiological intervention and reversal of the haemodynamic complications. (orig.)

  3. Developmental intrahepatic shunts of childhood: radiological features and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paley, M.R.; Farrant, P.; Kane, P.; Karani, J.B. [Department of Radiology, King`s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Heaton, N.D.; Howard, E.R. [Department of Paediatric Hepatobiliary Surgery, King`s College Hospital Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of radiological techniques in the diagnosis and management of developmental intrahepatic shunts. Hepatic vascular fistulae are recognised sequelae of liver trauma and intrahepatic tumours. However, there are rare developmental malformations which may present in childhood or later life and which may carry life-threatening complications. Retrospective analysis of clinical and radiological data was carried out in 24 patients. Anomalies evaluated were: (a) direct communication between hepatic artery and hepatic veins; (b) congenital hepatoportal arteriovenous malformations; and (c) congenital portocaval anastomosis with persistent flow through the ductus venosus. Although rare, the prompt recognition of these vascular anomalies allows early surgical or radiological intervention and reversal of the haemodynamic complications. (orig.) With 7 figs., 4 tabs., 22 refs.

  4. Hepatobiliary fascioliasis: a case with unusual radiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşildağ, Ahmet; Senol, Altuğ; Köroğlu, Mert; Koçkar, Cem; Oyar, Orhan; Işler, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    We report a case of hepatobiliary fascioliasis presenting with unusual radiological findings that have not been reported previously. Imaging studies revealed hepatic cystic pouches communicating with intrahepatic bile ducts. Snail-like, oval shaped and conglomerated echogenic particles with no acoustic shadowing, suggesting F. hepatica, were detected in these cystic pouches. In addition, secondary sclerosing cholangitis developed after fascioliasis.

  5. The Diagnostic importance of clinical and radiologic features of the Multiple Cemento-osseous dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, M. R.; Kim, Y. H.; Kang, B. C.

    1998-01-01

    This case was diagnosed as multiple cementoosseous dysplasia on the basis of clinical and radiological features but was diagnosed as ossifying fibroma on the basis of histopathological feature. The histopathologic features of the multiple cementoosseous dysplasia and cementoossifying fibroma have common features of cementum, fibrous network and bone. Multiple cementoosseous dysplasia is reactive lesion and shows restricted lesion size, occurred on anterior and posterior tooth of the mandible and needs no treatment except periodic follow up. But Cementoossifying fibroma is the true neoplasm and grows continuously and needs surgical removal. The final diagnosis of the multiple cementoosseous dysplasia requires good correlation of the clinical histopathological, and radiological features.

  6. Radiological features of AIDS complicated by pulmonary cryptococcosis: Literature review and a report of 10 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yu

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The radiological signs featured AIDS complicated by pulmonary cryptococcosis such as singular or multiple nodules with cavity and “halo sign” can facilitate its diagnosis. But the diagnosis should be made in combination to the clinical history.

  7. Ossified skeletal muscle hemangioma: Radiologic and pathologic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelstad, B L; Gilula, L A [Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (USA); Kynakos, M [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA). Dept. of Surgical Pathology

    1980-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hemangiomas are relatively uncommon tumors in children and young adults. Although the operative management of these lesions may be affected by their vascularity, the correct preoperative diagnosis is often not made. Ossification of these lesions is rare. Two patients are described whose skeletal muscle hemangiomas contained abundant osseous tissue. This was radiologically reflected by the 'swiss cheese' appearance of the tumors. Such an appearance in an ossified soft tissue mass may allow the correct preoperative diagnosis of this condition.

  8. Thoracoabdominal peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors in childhood: radiological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, H.; Laufer, L.; Newman-Heinman, N.; Kurtzbart, E.; Maor, E.; Zirkin, H.

    2000-01-01

    Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) are extremely uncommon, malignant neoplasms affecting mostly children and young adults. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data and radiological studies of four such cases. All cases were pathologically proven. Plain films, US, and CT scans were used. The youngest child had a huge pelvic tumor and two adolescents each had a chest wall (Askin) tumor. The fourth patient had a most unusual location of the PNET in the anterior mediastinum. The CT findings are emphasized. We emphasize that the markedly abnormal CT findings are not specific for PNET. (orig.)

  9. The Advantage of Playing Home in NBA: Microscopic, Team-Specific and Evolving Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Haroldo V; Mukherjee, Satyam; Zeng, Xiao Han T

    2016-01-01

    The idea that the success rate of a team increases when playing home is broadly accepted and documented for a wide variety of sports. Investigations on the so-called "home advantage phenomenon" date back to the 70's and ever since has attracted the attention of scholars and sport enthusiasts. These studies have been mainly focused on identifying the phenomenon and trying to correlate it with external factors such as crowd noise and referee bias. Much less is known about the effects of home advantage in the "microscopic" dynamics of the game (within the game) or possible team-specific and evolving features of this phenomenon. Here we present a detailed study of these previous features in the National Basketball Association (NBA). By analyzing play-by-play events of more than sixteen thousand games that span thirteen NBA seasons, we have found that home advantage affects the microscopic dynamics of the game by increasing the scoring rates and decreasing the time intervals between scores of teams playing home. We verified that these two features are different among the NBA teams, for instance, the scoring rate of the Cleveland Cavaliers team is increased ≈0.16 points per minute (on average the seasons 2004-05 to 2013-14) when playing home, whereas for the New Jersey Nets (now the Brooklyn Nets) this rate increases in only ≈0.04 points per minute. We further observed that these microscopic features have evolved over time in a non-trivial manner when analyzing the results team-by-team. However, after averaging over all teams some regularities emerge; in particular, we noticed that the average differences in the scoring rates and in the characteristic times (related to the time intervals between scores) have slightly decreased over time, suggesting a weakening of the phenomenon. This study thus adds evidence of the home advantage phenomenon and contributes to a deeper understanding of this effect over the course of games.

  10. The Advantage of Playing Home in NBA: Microscopic, Team-Specific and Evolving Features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo V Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The idea that the success rate of a team increases when playing home is broadly accepted and documented for a wide variety of sports. Investigations on the so-called "home advantage phenomenon" date back to the 70's and ever since has attracted the attention of scholars and sport enthusiasts. These studies have been mainly focused on identifying the phenomenon and trying to correlate it with external factors such as crowd noise and referee bias. Much less is known about the effects of home advantage in the "microscopic" dynamics of the game (within the game or possible team-specific and evolving features of this phenomenon. Here we present a detailed study of these previous features in the National Basketball Association (NBA. By analyzing play-by-play events of more than sixteen thousand games that span thirteen NBA seasons, we have found that home advantage affects the microscopic dynamics of the game by increasing the scoring rates and decreasing the time intervals between scores of teams playing home. We verified that these two features are different among the NBA teams, for instance, the scoring rate of the Cleveland Cavaliers team is increased ≈0.16 points per minute (on average the seasons 2004-05 to 2013-14 when playing home, whereas for the New Jersey Nets (now the Brooklyn Nets this rate increases in only ≈0.04 points per minute. We further observed that these microscopic features have evolved over time in a non-trivial manner when analyzing the results team-by-team. However, after averaging over all teams some regularities emerge; in particular, we noticed that the average differences in the scoring rates and in the characteristic times (related to the time intervals between scores have slightly decreased over time, suggesting a weakening of the phenomenon. This study thus adds evidence of the home advantage phenomenon and contributes to a deeper understanding of this effect over the course of games.

  11. Do Online Voting Patterns Reflect Evolved Features of Human Cognition? An Exploratory Empirical Investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Priestley

    Full Text Available Online votes or ratings can assist internet users in evaluating the credibility and appeal of the information which they encounter. For example, aggregator websites such as Reddit allow users to up-vote submitted content to make it more prominent, and down-vote content to make it less prominent. Here we argue that decisions over what to up- or down-vote may be guided by evolved features of human cognition. We predict that internet users should be more likely to up-vote content that others have also up-voted (social influence, content that has been submitted by particularly liked or respected users (model-based bias, content that constitutes evolutionarily salient or relevant information (content bias, and content that follows group norms and, in particular, prosocial norms. 489 respondents from the online social voting community Reddit rated the extent to which they felt different traits influenced their voting. Statistical analyses confirmed that norm-following and prosociality, as well as various content biases such as emotional content and originality, were rated as important motivators of voting. Social influence had a smaller effect than expected, while attitudes towards the submitter had little effect. This exploratory empirical investigation suggests that online voting communities can provide an important test-bed for evolutionary theories of human social information use, and that evolved features of human cognition may guide online behaviour just as it guides behaviour in the offline world.

  12. Do Online Voting Patterns Reflect Evolved Features of Human Cognition? An Exploratory Empirical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Maria; Mesoudi, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Online votes or ratings can assist internet users in evaluating the credibility and appeal of the information which they encounter. For example, aggregator websites such as Reddit allow users to up-vote submitted content to make it more prominent, and down-vote content to make it less prominent. Here we argue that decisions over what to up- or down-vote may be guided by evolved features of human cognition. We predict that internet users should be more likely to up-vote content that others have also up-voted (social influence), content that has been submitted by particularly liked or respected users (model-based bias), content that constitutes evolutionarily salient or relevant information (content bias), and content that follows group norms and, in particular, prosocial norms. 489 respondents from the online social voting community Reddit rated the extent to which they felt different traits influenced their voting. Statistical analyses confirmed that norm-following and prosociality, as well as various content biases such as emotional content and originality, were rated as important motivators of voting. Social influence had a smaller effect than expected, while attitudes towards the submitter had little effect. This exploratory empirical investigation suggests that online voting communities can provide an important test-bed for evolutionary theories of human social information use, and that evolved features of human cognition may guide online behaviour just as it guides behaviour in the offline world.

  13. Long term radiological features of radiation-induced lung damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Catarina; Landau, David; McClelland, Jamie R; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Hawkes, David; Janes, Sam M; Devaraj, Anand

    2018-02-01

    To describe the radiological findings of radiation-induced lung damage (RILD) present on CT imaging of lung cancer patients 12 months after radical chemoradiation. Baseline and 12-month CT scans of 33 patients were reviewed from a phase I/II clinical trial of isotoxic chemoradiation (IDEAL CRT). CT findings were scored in three categories derived from eleven sub-categories: (1) parenchymal change, defined as the presence of consolidation, ground-glass opacities (GGOs), traction bronchiectasis and/or reticulation; (2) lung volume reduction, identified through reduction in lung height and/or distortions in fissures, diaphragm, anterior junction line and major airways anatomy, and (3) pleural changes, either thickening and/or effusion. Six patients were excluded from the analysis due to anatomical changes caused by partial lung collapse and abscess. All remaining 27 patients had radiological evidence of lung damage. The three categories, parenchymal change, shrinkage and pleural change were present in 100%, 96% and 82% respectively. All patients had at least two categories of change present and 72% all three. GGOs, reticulation and traction bronchiectasis were present in 44%, 52% and 37% of patients. Parenchymal change, lung shrinkage and pleural change are present in a high proportion of patients and are frequently identified in RILD. GGOs, reticulation and traction bronchiectasis are common at 12 months but not diagnostic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiological features of a fibro-osseous pseudotumor in the digit: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Min Jae; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, Sang Uk; Jun, Sun Young; Lee, An Hi

    2015-01-01

    A fibro-osseous pseudotumor is a rare ossifying soft tissue lesion, which is thought to be a reactive rather than a neoplastic lesion, developing due to repeated trauma. The lesion mostly occurs in the subcutaneous tissue of the proximal phalanx of the digit and predominantly affects young adults, with a slight predominance in females. The clinicopathological features can mimic those of malignant soft tissue lesions, and diagnosis can be difficult. Less is known about the radiological appearance of the lesion, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features, than about histological signs. Here, we report radiological findings, including MRI features, of a fibro-osseous pseudotumor of the digit in a young female

  15. Branchial fistula arising from pyriform fossa: CT diagnosis of a case and discussion of radiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Narvir Singh; Sharma, Yash Paul; Bhagra, Tilak; Sud, Bindu

    2012-01-01

    Anomalies of third or fourth branchial apparatus origin are very uncommon and present as recurrent neck infections or thyroiditis with a predominant left-sided involvement. Radiological diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and is critical for initiation of proper treatment. We describe a case of branchial sinus of pyriform fossa with external fistulization that presented in adulthood and was diagnosed on computed tomographic scan. The radiological features of this rare anomaly are revisited. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Malignant vascular lesions of bone: radiologic and pathologic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenger, D.E. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States); Wold, L.E. [Dept. of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2000-11-01

    The malignant vascular tumors of bone represent an uncommon diverse group of tumors with widely variable clinical and radiographic presentations. Although the radiographic imaging features of the lytic osseous lesions typically seen with this group of tumors are relatively nonspecific, the propensity to develop multifocal disease in an anatomic region is a feature that can be helpful in suggesting the diagnosis of a vascular tumor. The differential diagnosis varies according to the age of the patient and presence of solitary or multifocal disease. The histologic features are variable and range from tumors with vasoformative features to those that mimic mesenchymal neoplasm or metastatic carcinoma. Familiarity with the radiographic and pathologic spectrum of disease is essential for making an accurate diagnosis in this diverse group of neoplasms. This paper will provide a review of the nomenclature for the malignant vascular tumors of bone and discuss the radiographic and pathologic differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. Benign vascular lesions of bone: radiologic and pathologic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenger, D.E.; Wold, L.E. [Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2000-02-01

    The benign vascular tumors of bone represent a diverse group of tumors that can present with a broad spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. They can also present a significant diagnostic challenge due to their widely variable radiographic imaging and histologic features. Some of the tumors manifest as clearly benign lesions with tissue-specific diagnostic imaging features, while others have non-specific imaging features that may simulate malignant neoplasm. This article will provide a review of the nomenclature and the characteristic radiographic and pathologic features of the benign vascular lesions of bone. The information will aid in improving our diagnostic accuracy and enhance our understanding of the biologic potential of this diverse group of osseous lesions. (orig.)

  18. Benign vascular lesions of bone: radiologic and pathologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenger, D.E.; Wold, L.E.

    2000-01-01

    The benign vascular tumors of bone represent a diverse group of tumors that can present with a broad spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. They can also present a significant diagnostic challenge due to their widely variable radiographic imaging and histologic features. Some of the tumors manifest as clearly benign lesions with tissue-specific diagnostic imaging features, while others have non-specific imaging features that may simulate malignant neoplasm. This article will provide a review of the nomenclature and the characteristic radiographic and pathologic features of the benign vascular lesions of bone. The information will aid in improving our diagnostic accuracy and enhance our understanding of the biologic potential of this diverse group of osseous lesions. (orig.)

  19. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  20. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma : gross appearance and corresponding pathologic and radiologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Kim, Chang Guhn; Lee, Moon Gyu; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Auh, Yong Ho; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1999-01-01

    To assess the clinical and pathologic features of each type of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, which is divided into three types according to gross appearance, and to determine the efficacy of CT in detecting this tumor. The pathologic and CT features of 53 surgically proven cases of intrahepatic cholangio-carcinoma were reviewed. On the basis of their gross appearance, the tumors were divided into three types, as follows : mass forming (n=33), periductal infiltrating (n=6), and intraductal growth type (n=14). CT scans were analyzed for sensitivity of detection and correlation between a tumors appearance and its histopathology. The most common histopathologic feature of mass forming and periductal infiltrating type was tubular adenocarcinoma, while in the intraductal growth type, papillary adenocarcinoma (100%) was common. With regard to pattern of tumor spread, intrahepatic and lymph node metastasis were more common in the mass forming and periductal infiltrating type than in the intraductal growth type. CT findings including intrahepatic mass, ductal wall thickening or intraductal mass associated with segmental dilatation of intrahepataic bile ducts, corresponded with these morphologic types. This classification according to gross appearance is of considerable value when interpreting the pathologic features of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. CT seems to be a useful modality for the detection of tumors and may be consistent with their gross morphologic findings

  1. Skeletal muscle metastases: primary tumours, prevalence, and radiological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surov, Alexey; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Behrmann, Curd; Hainz, Michael; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen; Arnold, Dirk; Katzer, Michaela; Schmidt, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Although skeletal muscles comprise nearly 50% of the total human body mass and are well vascularised, metastases in the musculature are rare. The reported prevalence of skeletal muscle metastases from post-mortem studies of patients with cancer is inconstant and ranges from 0.03 to 17.5%. Of 5,170 patients with metastasised cancer examined and treated at our institution during the period from January 2000 to December 2007, 61 patients with muscle metastases (80 lesions) were identified on computed tomography (CT). Genital tumours (24.6%) were the most frequent malignancies metastasising into the skeletal musculature, followed by gastrointestinal tumours (21.3%), urological tumours (16.4%), and malignant melanoma (13.1%). Other primary malignancies were rarer, including bronchial carcinoma (8.2%), thyroid gland carcinoma (4.9%), and breast carcinoma (3.3%). In 8.2%, carcinoma of unknown primary was diagnosed. Skeletal muscle metastases (SMM) were located in the iliopsoas muscle (27.5%), paravertebral muscles (25%), gluteal muscles (16.3%), lower extremity muscles (12.5%), abdominal wall muscles (10%), thoracic wall muscles (5%), and upper extremity muscles (3.8%). Most (76.3%) of the 80 SMM were diagnosed incidentally during routine staging CT examinations, while 23.7% were symptomatic. Radiologically, SMM presented with five different types of lesions: focal intramuscular masses (type I, 52.5% of SMM), abscess-like intramuscular lesions (type II, 32.5%), diffuse metastatic muscle infiltration (type III, 8.8%), multifocal intramuscular calcification (type IV, 3.7%) and intramuscular bleeding (type V, 2.5%). (orig.)

  2. Skeletal muscle metastases: primary tumours, prevalence, and radiological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surov, Alexey; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Behrmann, Curd [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiology, Halle (Germany); Hainz, Michael; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Pathology, Halle (Germany); Arnold, Dirk [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Haematology/Oncology, Halle (Germany); Katzer, Michaela [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Urology, Halle (Germany); Schmidt, Joerg [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Medical Statistics and Controlling, Halle (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Although skeletal muscles comprise nearly 50% of the total human body mass and are well vascularised, metastases in the musculature are rare. The reported prevalence of skeletal muscle metastases from post-mortem studies of patients with cancer is inconstant and ranges from 0.03 to 17.5%. Of 5,170 patients with metastasised cancer examined and treated at our institution during the period from January 2000 to December 2007, 61 patients with muscle metastases (80 lesions) were identified on computed tomography (CT). Genital tumours (24.6%) were the most frequent malignancies metastasising into the skeletal musculature, followed by gastrointestinal tumours (21.3%), urological tumours (16.4%), and malignant melanoma (13.1%). Other primary malignancies were rarer, including bronchial carcinoma (8.2%), thyroid gland carcinoma (4.9%), and breast carcinoma (3.3%). In 8.2%, carcinoma of unknown primary was diagnosed. Skeletal muscle metastases (SMM) were located in the iliopsoas muscle (27.5%), paravertebral muscles (25%), gluteal muscles (16.3%), lower extremity muscles (12.5%), abdominal wall muscles (10%), thoracic wall muscles (5%), and upper extremity muscles (3.8%). Most (76.3%) of the 80 SMM were diagnosed incidentally during routine staging CT examinations, while 23.7% were symptomatic. Radiologically, SMM presented with five different types of lesions: focal intramuscular masses (type I, 52.5% of SMM), abscess-like intramuscular lesions (type II, 32.5%), diffuse metastatic muscle infiltration (type III, 8.8%), multifocal intramuscular calcification (type IV, 3.7%) and intramuscular bleeding (type V, 2.5%). (orig.)

  3. A method of evolving novel feature extraction algorithms for detecting buried objects in FLIR imagery using genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paino, A.; Keller, J.; Popescu, M.; Stone, K.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present an approach that uses Genetic Programming (GP) to evolve novel feature extraction algorithms for greyscale images. Our motivation is to create an automated method of building new feature extraction algorithms for images that are competitive with commonly used human-engineered features, such as Local Binary Pattern (LBP) and Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG). The evolved feature extraction algorithms are functions defined over the image space, and each produces a real-valued feature vector of variable length. Each evolved feature extractor breaks up the given image into a set of cells centered on every pixel, performs evolved operations on each cell, and then combines the results of those operations for every cell using an evolved operator. Using this method, the algorithm is flexible enough to reproduce both LBP and HOG features. The dataset we use to train and test our approach consists of a large number of pre-segmented image "chips" taken from a Forward Looking Infrared Imagery (FLIR) camera mounted on the hood of a moving vehicle. The goal is to classify each image chip as either containing or not containing a buried object. To this end, we define the fitness of a candidate solution as the cross-fold validation accuracy of the features generated by said candidate solution when used in conjunction with a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. In order to validate our approach, we compare the classification accuracy of an SVM trained using our evolved features with the accuracy of an SVM trained using mainstream feature extraction algorithms, including LBP and HOG.

  4. Radiologic features of cystic, endocrine and other pancreatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balci, N. Cem; Semelka, Richard C.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents imaging features of cystic, endocrine and other pancreatic neoplasms. Microcystic adenoma which is composed of small cysts ( 2 cm) are accounted for mucinous cystic neoplasms, its variant along pancreatic duct is ductectatic mucinous cystic neoplasm. Endocrine tumors of pancreas are hypervascular and can be depicted on early dynamic enhanced crosssectional imaging modalities or on angiography when they are <1 cm. Pancreatic metastases and lymphomas are rare neoplasms which should also be included in differential diagnosis for pancreatic masses

  5. The clinical and radiological features of Fanconi's anaemia pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Kerviler, E.; Guermazi, A.; Zagdanski, A.-M.; Gluckman, E.; Frija, J.

    2000-01-01

    Fanconi's anaemia is a severe refractory anaemia, associated with congenital malformations in approximately two-thirds of cases. Although these malformations may involve every organ system, suggestive dysmorphic features include growth retardation, radial ray deformities and urinary malformations. These malformations are not specific for Fanconi's anaemia, but should be recognized during pregnancy, or later in childhood, and suggest the possibility of inherited haematopoiesis disorders. De Kerviler, E. (2000)

  6. Medical features of the radiological accident in Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.R. de

    1987-01-01

    The main medical features concerning the recent nuclear accident occurred in Chernobyl power station is summarized. The first measures taken by the Soviet medical authorities to minimize the effects of ionizing radiation on the victims are briefly commented on. The specialized laboratory analyses and therapeutic procedures adopted by the physicians during the course of the acute phase of the major syndromes are also discussed. (author) [pt

  7. Analysis of radiological features relative to pathology in pelvic chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianjun; Ding Jianguo; Wang Jianhua; Zeng Mengsu; Yan Fuhua; Zhou Kangrong; Ji Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To Explore the imaging features relative to pathology of pelvic chondrosarcoma and to evaluate the clinical value. Methods: All 12 cases patients with primary pelvic chondrosarcoma confirmed by pathological examination underwent radiography, spiral CT plain scanning, MR SE-T 1 WI, FSE-T 2 WI and SE-T 1 WI enhancement scanning before operation. The imaging data was reviewed and analyzed retrospectively to compare with surgical and pathological results. Results: Eleven conventional chondrosarcoma and one dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma were located in different parts of pelvis. The diameters of the tumors ranged from 4.7 to 17.0 cm with one case less than 5.0 cm, 6 cases being 5.0-10.0 cm and 5 cases more than 10.0 cm. The CT value of 5 eases was identical or inferior to muscle with mild to moderate 'ring-and-arc' mineralization and soft mass. MR imaging depict the high water content of these lesions as very high signal intensity was detected on T 2 WI. Six cases showed typical 'ting- and-arc' fibrous tissue which enhanced persistently. Aggressive features of deep endosteal scalloping and soft-tissue extension was also found in these cases. Conclusions: Radiographic findings can suggest the diagnosis of pelvic chondrosarcoma when there is typical 'ring-and-arc' fibrous tissue, mineralization, aggressive features of deep endosteal scalloping and large soft-tissue extension. MR imaging reflect directly this pathologic structure, superior to that of CT and radiography. CT is optimal to detect the matrix mineralization, particularly when it is subtle or when the lesion is located in anatomically complex pelvic areas. (authors)

  8. Colonic duplications: Clinical presentation and radiologic features of five cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blickman, J.G.; Rieu, P.H.M.; Buonomo, C.; Hoogeveen, Y.L.; Boetes, C.

    2006-01-01

    Diagnosis of colonic duplication can pose a potential problem even for those familiar with gastro-intestinal tract duplications in general but unaware of the condition due to its rarity and its apparently bimodal clinical presentation. In this report of five cases of surgically proven pediatric colonic duplication, we illustrate how the condition manifests clinically and describe the imaging features in an attempt to illustrate this bimodal presentation of the condition. The possible etiology, associated congenital anomalies and modes of clinical presentation are reviewed based on literature review as well as on our own experience

  9. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Shruthi; Shetty, Shishir Ram

    2012-03-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail.

  10. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, Shruthi; Shetty, Shishir Ram [AB Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Nitte University, Mangalore (India)

    2012-03-15

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail.

  11. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, Shruthi; Shetty, Shishir Ram

    2012-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail.

  12. Radiation protection for children. Special features of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Due to the morphology of the small body and the special feature of athe growing organism children are notably radiation sensitive. It is an aggravating fact that due to missing adaptation of examination parameters the infantile bodies can be exposed to needless high radiation doses. This is especially the fact in case of computerized tomography that has reached increased importance during the last years. Therefore it is recommended to use primarily ultrasonography or MRT. X-ray examinations of children require specific adapted examination protocols targeted to optimized dose reduction. The author discusses the issues physical aspects, anatomic differences, tissue radiation sensitivity, life expectation and genetic risk, critical indication tracking in pediatrics, adaptation of examination parameters to body size and anatomy.

  13. Radiological features of subependymoma with emphasis on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.M.; Kendall, B.E.; Love, S.

    1984-01-01

    The features of 17 symptomatic subependymomas on X-ray computed tomography are described. Thirteen were reviewed from isolated case reports and 4 were original material. Over half were entirely intraventricular, 6 extended into brain substance and 2 into subarachnoidal cisterns. Twelve were isodense, 15 showed diffuse but irregular enhancement, and 5 contained nodular calcification. Large low density cysts, intratumoural haemorrhage and brain oedema were found almost exclusively in lesions extending into brain substance. It is concluded that subependymomas resemble ependymomas too closely on CT to be distinguished radiographically from them as a separate group. However subependymomas contain calcification slightly less frequently, and usually appear as mainly intraventicular lesions even when they occur above the tentorium. (orig.)

  14. Radiological features of endocrine orbitopathy involving lacrimal gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Likhvantseva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available According to orbit computer tomography, lacrimal gland is involved in autoimmune process in 26.8% of patients with Graves’ orbitopathy. A short orbit is a predisposing factor of the lacrimal gland (LG involvement in the autoimmune process. In addition to increasing of the size of the lacrimal gland, formed thickening of the optic nerve in 1 cm from the eye posterior pole (in 60% of cases, the increase in x-ray density of orbital portions of optic nerve, proved «shortening» of length in axial projection with reliable reduc- tion of length to width ratio (with increase in width at the same time up to 5.8±0.2 are roentgenological features of this сlinical form. Change of spatial topography in orbit with reduction of the conversion rate was associated with increased rate of optic neuropathydevelopment.

  15. Clinical and radiological features of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qiu LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the diagnosis and treatment of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. Methods  The clinical and imaging data of 3 cases of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy were summarized and analyzed for the purpose of improving the acumen in diagnosis and treatment. Results All the 3 patients showed relatively mild clinical symptoms, and they were misdiagnosed in different degrees during the treatment, but their clinical symptoms were improved by rapid and effective antihypertensive therapy. Cerebral CT and MRI scans revealed extensive abnormal signals in brain stem, with or without supratentorial lesions and brain stem hemorrhage. The lesions as revealed by imaging were improved significantly after treatment. Conclusions Clinical-radiographic dissociation is the classic feature of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. The clinical symptoms and lesions as shown by imaging could be improved after active treatment. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.06.03

  16. Clinical and radiological features of bronchiolitis obliterans in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yun; Sun Guoqiang; Zeng Jinjin; Ma Daqing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of chest radiograph and thin-section computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis bronchiolitis obliterans in children, and to determine clinical view of obliterative bronchiolitis in children. Methods: We identified 12 infants, 10 boys, and 2 girls (age range, 5 month to 11 years) with clinical confirmation of bronchiolitis obliterans. Three cases were after Steven-Johnson syndrome, 8 were post-infection (2 adenovirus, 2 measles and 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, 3 cases were unknown etiology infection); The symptoms lasted for at least 6 weeks. One case had lung ventilation nuclear scan. We evaluated individual bronchoscopy, pulmonary function test, chest radiograph and thin- section CT features and their characteristic appearance. Results: All cases had typical clinical characteristics and pulmonary function testing results that were consistent with nonreversible small airways obstruction. One case had lung ventilation nuclear scan illustrated absent and reduced ventilation of the right lower lobe. Nine cases who underwent bronchoscopy were chronic endobronchial inflammation. Three children had transbronchial biopsy and 1 patient who underwent open pulmonary biopsies were uncertain of histological diagnosis. Chest radiography showed hyperinflation in 8 cases; peribronchial thickening in 6 cases; consolidation/atelectasia in 6 cases; unilateral hyperlucency of a small/normal-sized lung in 4 cases. Thin-section CT/HRCT features included: mosaic perfusion pattern, decreased lung attenuation in 11 cases, pulmonary vascular attenuation in 10 cases; bronchial dilatation in 7 cases; bronchial wall thickening in 9 cases; unilateral hyperlucency of a small/normal-sized lung in 5 cases; consolidation in 6 cases; nodular in 3 cases; mucoid impaction in 5 cases. Conclusions: In our study, correct diagnoses of bronchiolitis obliterans in children were made more special with thin-section CT than with chest radiographs. The diagnosis of BO in

  17. Evolving radiological features of hypothalamo-pituitary lesions in adult patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makras, P.; Samara, C.; Antoniou, M.; Nikolakopoulou, Z.; Zetos, A.; Papadogias, D.; Piaditis, G.; Kaltsas, G.A.; Toloumis, G.; Andreakos, E.; Kontogeorgos, G.

    2006-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare, systemic disease caused by monoclonal expansion of dendritic cells that shows a particular predilection for the hypothalamic-pituitary system (HPS). We studied the function (anterior and posterior pituitary hormonal secretion) and morphology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the HPS in 17 adult patients (seven males, median age 35 years, range 18-59 years) with multisystem LCH. We also evaluated the evolution of structural HPS abnormalities in relation to pituitary function and response to treatment in 12 of these patients during a median follow-up period of 3.75 years (range 1.5-10 years). Of the 17 patients, 14 (82%) had abnormal HPS imaging, and 12 (70%) had more than one area involved. Lack of the bright spot of the posterior pituitary lobe was typically found in all patients with the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus (DI). Eight patients (47%) had infundibular enlargement, six (35%) pituitary infiltration, four (24%) partially or completely empty sella, three (18%) hypothalamic involvement, and two (12%) infundibular atrophy. DI was found in 16 patients (94%) and anterior pituitary hormonal deficiency (APHD) in 10 patients (59%); two patients had single (12%) and 8 (47%) multiple APHD. During the follow-up period there was improvement of the initially demonstrated HPS pathology in seven (47%) patients, and five (33%) of them had received at least one form of treatment. APHD and DI persisted in all patients except in one in whom established gonadotrophin deficiency recovered. In summary, DI and APHD are very common in patients with multisystem LCH and are almost always associated with abnormal HPS imaging. (orig.)

  18. Radiological features of late-onset lymphoedema in Noonan's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jou-Kou [Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Li, Yiu-Wah [Department of Radiology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2003-03-01

    Noonan's syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with diverse manifestations. Lymphatic abnormalities occur in less than 20% of patients. We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with swollen lower limbs and dysmorphic features characteristic of Noonan's syndrome. The radiological features of this unusual case of late-onset lymphoedema in association with Noonan's syndrome are presented. (orig.)

  19. Intracranial dermoid cysts: variations of radiological and clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orakcioglu, B.; Halatsch, M.-E.; Unterberg, A.; Fortunati, M.; Yonekawa, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial dermoid cysts are uncommon, and their clinical features as well as surgical management differ from patient to patient. Dermoids are generally benign lesions, but may cause spontaneous complications such as meningitis and/or hydrocephalus due to rupture and epileptic seizures depending on their location. Little has been reported about characteristic imaging findings with resulting therapeutic considerations, and only a few reports exist about associated hydrocephalus. Imaging modalities have changed and can facilitate differential diagnosis and follow-up if applied correctly. In this paper, we attempt to contribute our clinical experience with the management of dermoid cysts. The charts of five men and two women with intracranial dermoid cysts were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were treated between September 1993 and September 2006. Selected patients are presented in detail. Tumour location, size and radiographic characteristics varied in each patient. Clinical presentations comprised focal neurological deficits as well as epileptic seizures, persistent headache, mental changes and psycho-organic syndromes. One patient underwent delayed ventriculo-peritoneal shunting after ruptured fatty particles caused obstructive hydrocephalus. Despite dermoid rupture into the subarachnoid space, three patients never developed hydrocephalus. Diffuse vascular supra-tentorial lesions were seen in one patient as a result of aseptic meningitis. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity in dermoids is related to decrease of water proton diffusion and should be used for both the diagnosis and follow-up of this lesion. Although dermoid cysts are known to be benign entities per se, their rupture can cause a wide range of symptoms including aseptic meningitis and/or hydrocephalus. This may be due to intraventricular obstruction and/or paraventricular compression. While rupture does not necessarily bring about hydrocephalus, radical removal of the tumor and

  20. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  1. Osteoblastoma of body of the talus--Report of a rare case with atypical radiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Naseer Ahmed; Baba, Asif Nazir; Maajid, Saheel; Badoo, Abdul Rashid; Mir, Ghulam Rasool

    2010-06-01

    Osteoblastoma is a benign bone tumour found commonly in the spine and long tubular bones. Involvement of the talus is uncommon, and when present, is found in the neck of the talus. Osteoblastoma of the body of talus is a very rare entity. We report a young male, presenting as chronic ankle pain, with a radiolucent lesion with a thick periosteal shell in the body of the talus. Analysis of clinical, radiological and histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of osteoblastoma. The case is reported for the rarity of the site and atypical radiological features that osteoblastoma can present with. Copyright 2009 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. VX2 Carcinoma in rabbit liver: Different radiologic features according to innoculation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Chung, Jin Wook; Choi, Guk Myeong; Kim, Chong Jai; Kim, Se Hyung; Choi, Joon Il; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Seung Hyup; Park, Jae Hyung

    2000-01-01

    To investigate radiologic features about hepatic VX2 carcinoma induced by two methods, direct intraparenchymal innoculation vs transpotal approach, focus on enhancement pattern and comparison of each imaging modalities and innoculation methods. VX2 carcinomas were induced in 11 rabbit livers by direct inoculation (n=7) or infusion into mesenteric vein (n=4). After two weeks, spiral CT, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), intravenous contrast-enhanced power Doppler sonography, intraarterial CO 2 sonography were done. The enhancement patterns were assessed independently and correlated with histopathologic features. With direct intraprenchymal innoculation, localized hepatic VX2 tumors were developed. Considering all imaging modalities, six of 7 tumors appeared peripheral hypervascularity, one hypovascularity. On pathologic and radiologic correlations, the enhancing portions of 4 tumors corresponded to viable tumor and pseudo-capsule portion, the other enhancing portions of 2 tumors corresponded to sinusoidal vascular spaces. With the transportal approaches, diffuse hepatic tumors were developed. Spiral CT and DSA revealed these tumors as marked peripheral hypervascular tumors with multiple A-P shunts. On pathologic findings, multiple thin walled sinusoidal spaces were seen at periphery of nodule. Spiral CT was superior to the other modalities in evaluation of enhancement characteristics. VX2 carcinomas in rabbit livers showed different radiologic and histopathologic features according to the innoculation methods.

  3. Clinico-radiological features of subarachnoid hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images in patients with meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, T.; Sakurai, K.; Hara, M.; Muto, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Tohyama, J.; Oguri, T.; Mitake, S.; Maeda, M.; Matsukawa, N.; Ojika, K.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and radiological features of meningitis with subarachnoid diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity. Materials and methods: The clinical features, laboratory data, and radiological findings, including the number and distribution of subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions and other radiological abnormalities, of 18 patients seen at five institutions were evaluated. Results: The patients consisted of eight males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 4 months to 82 years (median 65 years). Causative organisms were bacteria in 15 patients, including Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Listeria monocytogenes. The remaining three were fungal meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions were multiple in 16 of the 18 cases (89%) and predominantly distributed around the frontal lobe in 16 of the 18 cases (89%). In addition to subarachnoid abnormality, subdural empyema, cerebral infarction, and intraventricular empyema were found in 50, 39, and 39%, respectively. Compared with paediatric patients, adult patients with bacterial meningitis tended to have poor prognoses (7/10 versus 1/5; p = 0.1). Conclusion: Both bacterial and fungal meningitis could cause subarachnoid hyperintensity on DWI, predominantly around the frontal lobe. This finding is often associated with poor prognosis in adult bacterial meningitis.

  4. Radiological features of lower respiratory infection by respiratory syncytial virus in infants and young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Jang, Seong Hee; Lee, Hoan Jong

    1992-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus is the most common cause of lower respiratory infection (bronchiolitis and pneumonia) of infancy and early childhood. We analyzed clinical and radiological features of 76 patients with lower respiratory infections by respiratory syncytial virus, which were diagnosed by indirect immunofluorescent test or culture of nasal aspirate in Hep-2-cell monolayer, during the period of January- December, 1991. There were peaks of incidences in March-May and November- December, accounting for 87% of eases. Sixty-two cases (82%) were under 1 year of age. Fifty cases (66%) had underlying diseases. Major radiographical findings were overaeration (83%), parahilar peribronchial infiltrates (67%), segmental or subsegmental atelectasis (32%), and segmental or lobar consolidation (16%). In 15 cases (20%), overaeration was the only radiological findings. There was no evidence of pleural effusion or lymph node enlargement in all cases. By considering clinical features (symptoms, age, underlying diseases, epidemic seasons) in addition to the radiological findings, radiologists would be familiar with lower respiratory infection by respiratory syncytial virus. Air space consolidation, which is generally thought to represent bacterial pneumonia, is also observed not infrequently in respiratory syncytial virus infection

  5. Clinico-radiological features of subarachnoid hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images in patients with meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, T., E-mail: madarafuebuki@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Sakurai, K.; Hara, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Muto, M. [Department of Radiology, Okazaki City Hospital, Okazaki, Aichi (Japan); Nakagawa, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Tohyama, J. [Department of Radiology, Toyota-kai Medical Corporation Kariya Toyota General Hospital, Kariya, Aichi (Japan); Oguri, T. [Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Mitake, S. [Department of Neurology, Tosei General Hospital, Seto-shi, Aichi (Japan); Maeda, M. [Department of Radiology, Mie University School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie (Japan); Matsukawa, N.; Ojika, K. [Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Shibamoto, Y. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and radiological features of meningitis with subarachnoid diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity. Materials and methods: The clinical features, laboratory data, and radiological findings, including the number and distribution of subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions and other radiological abnormalities, of 18 patients seen at five institutions were evaluated. Results: The patients consisted of eight males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 4 months to 82 years (median 65 years). Causative organisms were bacteria in 15 patients, including Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Listeria monocytogenes. The remaining three were fungal meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions were multiple in 16 of the 18 cases (89%) and predominantly distributed around the frontal lobe in 16 of the 18 cases (89%). In addition to subarachnoid abnormality, subdural empyema, cerebral infarction, and intraventricular empyema were found in 50, 39, and 39%, respectively. Compared with paediatric patients, adult patients with bacterial meningitis tended to have poor prognoses (7/10 versus 1/5; p = 0.1). Conclusion: Both bacterial and fungal meningitis could cause subarachnoid hyperintensity on DWI, predominantly around the frontal lobe. This finding is often associated with poor prognosis in adult bacterial meningitis.

  6. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  7. Geometry and Gesture-Based Features from Saccadic Eye-Movement as a Biometric in Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, Tracy [Texas A& M University, College Station; Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL; Yoon, Hong-Jun [ORNL; Alamudun, Folami T. [ORNL

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel application of sketch gesture recognition on eye-movement for biometric identification and estimating task expertise. The study was performed for the task of mammographic screening with simultaneous viewing of four coordinated breast views as typically done in clinical practice. Eye-tracking data and diagnostic decisions collected for 100 mammographic cases (25 normal, 25 benign, 50 malignant) and 10 readers (three board certified radiologists and seven radiology residents), formed the corpus for this study. Sketch gesture recognition techniques were employed to extract geometric and gesture-based features from saccadic eye-movements. Our results show that saccadic eye-movement, characterized using sketch-based features, result in more accurate models for predicting individual identity and level of expertise than more traditional eye-tracking features.

  8. Unusual fan shaped ossification in a female fetus with radiological features of boomerang dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odent, S.; Loget, P.; Le Marec, B.; Delezoide, A.; Maroteaux, P.

    1999-01-01

    We report on a female fetus of 24 weeks whose clinical and radiological findings were compatible with boomerang dysplasia (BD). However, histopathology was unusual with a lateral fan shaped diaphyseal ossification. This has never been described either in typical atelosteogenesis I (AT-I) or in BD. The purpose of this report is to find out if this condition is a separate lethal bone dysplasia or another histological feature of the nosological group of AT-I and BD. 


Keywords: boomerang dysplasia; atelosteogenesis; lethal chondrodysplasia; lethal dwarfism PMID:10227404

  9. Radiologic features of injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing at three hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Goralnick, Eric; Velmahos, George; Biddinger, Paul D; Gates, Jonathan; Sodickson, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the radiologic imaging findings of primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries in patients injured in the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15, 2013. A total of 43 patients presenting to three acute care hospitals and undergoing radiologic investigation within 7 hours of the time of the bombing on April 15, 2013, were included in this study. The radiographic and CT features of these patients were evaluated for imaging findings consistent with primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury. There were no pulmonary or gastrointestinal manifestations of the primary blast wave on imaging. Secondary blast injuries identified on imaging included a total of 189 shrapnel fragments identified in 32 of the 43 patients. The shrapnel was identified most often in the soft tissues of the leg (36.5%), thigh (31.2%), and pelvis (13.2%). Imaging identified 125 ball bearings, 10 nails, one screw, 44 metal fragments, and nine other (gravel, glass, etc.) foreign bodies. Injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing were predominantly from the secondary blast wave and resulted in traumatic injuries predominantly of the lower extremities. The most common shrapnel found on radiologic evaluation was the ball bearing.

  10. An autopsy study of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: correlations among clinical, radiological, and pathological features

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical evaluation to differentiate the characteristic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema is often difficult in patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE), but diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis is important for evaluating treatment options and the risk of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia of such patients. As far as we know, it is the first report describing a correlation among clinical, radiological, and whole-lung pathological features in an autopsy cases of CPFE patients. Methods Experts retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts and examined chest computed tomography (CT) images and pathological findings of an autopsy series of 22 CPFE patients, and compared these with findings from 8 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients and 17 emphysema-alone patients. Results All patients had a history of heavy smoking. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%) was significantly lower in the emphysema-alone group than the CPFE and IPF-alone groups. The percent predicted diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO%) was significantly lower in the CPFE group than the IPF- and emphysema-alone groups. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern was observed radiologically in 15 (68.2%) CPFE and 8 (100%) IPF-alone patients and was pathologically observed in all patients from both groups. Pathologically thick-cystic lesions involving one or more acini with dense wall fibrosis and occasional fibroblastic foci surrounded by honeycombing and normal alveoli were confirmed by post-mortem observation as thick-walled cystic lesions (TWCLs). Emphysematous destruction and enlargement of membranous and respiratory bronchioles with fibrosis were observed in the TWCLs. The cystic lesions were always larger than the cysts of honeycombing. The prevalence of both radiological and pathological TWCLs was 72.7% among CPFE patients, but no such lesions were observed in patients with IPF or emphysema

  11. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on disease processes originating within the alimentary tract, may extend through the extraperitoneal spaces, and abnormalities primarily arising within other extraperitoneal sites may significantly affect the bowel. Symptoms and signs may be obscure, delayed, or nonspecific, and the area is generally not accessible to auscultation, palpation, or percussion. Radiologic evaluation thus plays a critical role

  12. Radiologic features of all-trans-retinoic acid syndrome (ATRAS) - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarzewska, J.; Bianek-Bodzak, A.; Szatkowski, D.; Szarmach, D.

    2007-01-01

    ATRA Syndrome appears as a side effect of acute promyelocytic leukemia treatment with ATRA, vitamin A derivative. The etiopathogenesis of the syndrome remains unclear. Fever, generalized edema, pleural or pericardial effusion, respiratory distress, coagulation disorders and sometimes renal failure are the most common clinical symptoms of ATRAS. Radiological features of the syndrome are very diverse. Early diagnosis followed by introduction of appropriate treatment (corticosteroids) prevents worsening of the patients' condition and significantly reduces the risk of death. Although clinical symptomatology of ATRAS has been widely described, there are still few descriptions of its radiological manifestation. A 53-year-old female was referred to the Hematology Department for further detailed diagnostics and appropriate therapy from the district hospital, where she had been primarily admitted due to weakness, easy fatigue, loss of appetite and blood extravasations on the skin of the extremities. The patient's general condition on admission was assessed as quite good. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML M3 according to FAB classification) was diagnosed. The introduced treatment included ATRA. On the second day of treatment, the patient developed fever, dyspnea, generalized edema, and coagulation disorders increased. Chest X-ray findings reminded ARDS. The diagnosis of ATRAS was established, which resulted in ATRA withdrawal. After administration of corticosteroids, the patient's condition improved gradually within a few days. ATRA was reintroduced then, since the signs of leukemia had intensified. The patient remains in charge of the Hematology Department. Changes of chest X-ray pictures in AML patients treated with ATRA should be interpreted in clinical context due to lack of radiological features specific for ATRAS. (author)

  13. Aortic intramural hematoma : assessment of clinical and radiological features in comparison to acute aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Hwang, Jae Cheol; Lee, Jin Seong; Kang, Duk Hyun; Song, Jae Kwan; Song, Koun Sik; Lim, Tae Hwan

    1996-01-01

    To compare the clinical and radiological features of aortic intramural hematoma(IMH) to those of acute aortic dissection(AD). We analyzed the clinical and radiological features of 12 patients with aortic IMH and 43 patients with acute AD. In aortic IMH, the diagnoses were made by means of both CT and transesophageal echocardiography(TEE) and included two surgically proven cases. In acute AD, the diagnoses were made by means of CT and TEE and included 21 surgically proven cases. We compared patients ages, etiologies, the extent of the disease, the presence or absence of aortic branch involvement, complications, and outcomes. Aortic IMH tended to develop in older patients (67.8±7.9 vs. 50.4±13.4, P .05). In aortic IMH, there was no involvement of aortic branches, whereas in acute AD, 14(33%) patients showed involvement of one or more aortic branches. Complications of aortic IMH included pericardial effusion (n=2) and pleural effusion (n=4);in acute AD, pericardial effusion (n=7), pleural effusion (n=4), aortic insufficiency (n=8), cerebral infarction (n=3), renal infarction (n=4) and spinal infarction (n=1) were seen. There was one (8%) death due to aortic IMH and ten (23%) deaths due to acute AD (p<.01). Aortic IMH is characterized by its occurrence in older patients with hypertension, a less frequent incidence of complications, and a more favorable outcome than acute AD

  14. Features and limitations of mobile tablet devices for viewing radiological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, J H

    2015-03-01

    Mobile radiological image display systems are becoming increasingly common, necessitating a comparison of the features of these systems, specifically the operating system employed, connection to stationary PACS, data security and rang of image display and image analysis functions. In the fall of 2013, a total of 17 PACS suppliers were surveyed regarding the technical features of 18 mobile radiological image display systems using a standardized questionnaire. The study also examined to what extent the technical specifications of the mobile image display systems satisfy the provisions of the Germany Medical Devices Act as well as the provisions of the German X-ray ordinance (RöV). There are clear differences in terms of how the mobile systems connected to the stationary PACS. Web-based solutions allow the mobile image display systems to function independently of their operating systems. The examined systems differed very little in terms of image display and image analysis functions. Mobile image display systems complement stationary PACS and can be used to view images. The impacts of the new quality assurance guidelines (QS-RL) as well as the upcoming new standard DIN 6868 - 157 on the acceptance testing of mobile image display units for the purpose of image evaluation are discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Analysis of radiological features relative to histopathology in 42 skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamir, M. Necmettin; Ozduman, Koray

    2006-01-01

    Chordomas and chondrosarcomas are malignant tumors that are reported to have similar clinical presentations and radiological features but different behaviors and outcomes. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether specific radiological features of skull-base chordomas or chondrosarcomas are correlated with histopathology, and thus allow preoperative diagnosis. The study involved 32 classic chordomas, 6 chondroid chordomas and 4 chondrosarcomas (42 tumors total). For each case, tumor size and extent, the detailed anatomy involved, and magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography findings were analyzed. Tumor extent was assessed using a novel method that assessed presence/absence in 18 defined skull-base zones. The chondrosarcomas presented significantly earlier in life than the chordomas (means, 20.5 years versus 36 years, respectively). At time of diagnosis, the median tumor volume was 23 cm 3 (range, 1.2-78.8 cm 3 ) and the mean tumor extent was 6.7 ± 2.9 zones. There were no differences between chordomas and chondrosarcomas, or between the two chordoma subgroups, with respect to lesion volume or extent. Comparison of other imaging findings revealed no features that were diagnostic for either chordoma or chondrosarcoma. The data support previous claims that chondrosarcomas present earlier in life than chordomas, but this finding is not diagnostic. There is wide variation in the extent of skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, and in the specific anatomical structures these tumors involve. None of the MRI or CT features of these tumors appear to be useful for differentiating chordomas from chondrosarcomas preoperatively. For surgical planning, specific, area-oriented definition of tumor extent might provide more useful information than tumor-type classification schemes

  16. Analysis of radiological features relative to histopathology in 42 skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamir, M. Necmettin [Marmara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: koray.ozduman@yale.edu; Ozduman, Koray [Marmara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-06-15

    Chordomas and chondrosarcomas are malignant tumors that are reported to have similar clinical presentations and radiological features but different behaviors and outcomes. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether specific radiological features of skull-base chordomas or chondrosarcomas are correlated with histopathology, and thus allow preoperative diagnosis. The study involved 32 classic chordomas, 6 chondroid chordomas and 4 chondrosarcomas (42 tumors total). For each case, tumor size and extent, the detailed anatomy involved, and magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography findings were analyzed. Tumor extent was assessed using a novel method that assessed presence/absence in 18 defined skull-base zones. The chondrosarcomas presented significantly earlier in life than the chordomas (means, 20.5 years versus 36 years, respectively). At time of diagnosis, the median tumor volume was 23 cm{sup 3} (range, 1.2-78.8 cm{sup 3}) and the mean tumor extent was 6.7 {+-} 2.9 zones. There were no differences between chordomas and chondrosarcomas, or between the two chordoma subgroups, with respect to lesion volume or extent. Comparison of other imaging findings revealed no features that were diagnostic for either chordoma or chondrosarcoma. The data support previous claims that chondrosarcomas present earlier in life than chordomas, but this finding is not diagnostic. There is wide variation in the extent of skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, and in the specific anatomical structures these tumors involve. None of the MRI or CT features of these tumors appear to be useful for differentiating chordomas from chondrosarcomas preoperatively. For surgical planning, specific, area-oriented definition of tumor extent might provide more useful information than tumor-type classification schemes.

  17. Clinical and radiological features of pituitary stalk lesions in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Chul Yoon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe diagnosis of pituitary stalk lesion has been based on clinical feature, radiologic assessment for its critical location and role. This study aimed to investigate clinical symptoms, endocrine disturbance, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of pituitary stalk lesions in children and adolescents and to evaluate differences between neoplastic lesions with the others.MethodsWe performed a retrospective review of patients under 18 years old with pituitary stalk lesions diagnosed at the Seoul National University Children's Hospital between 2000 and 2013, by a text search for head MRI reports by using 'pituitary stalk', 'infundibulum', and 'infundibular stalk', as keywords.ResultsFor the 76 patients, sixteen patients (21.1% had congenital lesions, and 52 (68.4% had neoplasms. No inflammatory lesions were found. Diabetes insipidus (DI was the most common endocrine defect, diagnosed in 38 patients (50%. There was male predominance especially in neoplastic group. Thickened pituitary stalk was, but enhancement of lesion was not, associated with neoplasm. DI was more prevalent in neoplastic stalk lesions. Anterior pituitary dysfunction such as growth hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiencies were less prevalent in neoplastic lesions of pituitary stalk.ConclusionIn conclusion, the etiology of pituitary stalk lesions in children and adolescents is diverse and different from that in adults. Neoplastic pituitary stalk lesions can be differentiated from nonneoplastic lesions by systemic evaluation of clinical, hormonal, radiological findings.

  18. Neuroblastoma originating from soft tissue at the crus and its radiological feature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Shozo; Hanaguri, Katsuro; Hase, Mamoru; Sako, Masao.

    1984-01-01

    A very rare case of neuroblastoma originated from soft tissue at the crus in an adult man was reported especially about its radiological feature. Plain X-ray film of the leg showed slight distension of the distance between the tibia and fibula at the proximal portion of the crus. Bone scintigram using sup(99m)Tc-MDP revealed abnormal accumulation at the right upper crus. CT showed a low density mass with smooth margin being at the right upper crus. In femoral angiography, irregular arterial encasement, hypervascular fine tumor vessels, inhomogeneous tumor stain and venous obstruction were shown. Radiological findings made sure the mass to be a primary malignant soft tissue tumor at the right upper crus. Operative finding corroborated the mass to be a malignant one and the tumor extent to correspond to the angiographic diagnosis. The mass was microscopically diagnosed as neuroblastoma. It has been noted that neuroblastoma in childhood had shown extraosseous accumulation of bone seeking agent in a high frequency. Even if in an adult patient, extraosseous accumulation of bone seeking agent in soft tissue tumor, shown in this case, would suggest a mass to be indicative of neuroblastoma. Angiographically, neuroblastoma was said not to show a constant pattern. In the presented case, angiography was very significant in diagnosis of malignancy and tumor extent. (author)

  19. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis following dental extraction. Radiological features and surgical treatment considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Raúl; Risco-Rojas, Roberto; Román-Romero, Leticia; Moreno-García, Carlos; López García, Cipriano

    2011-07-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) following dental extraction is an extremely serious infection with a high mortality rate. Oral infection may rapidly descend into the mediastinum across the retropharyngeal and retrovisceral spaces. Once established, mediastinitis is rapidly followed by sepsis and death. If DNM is suspected cervical and thoracic CT must be carried out urgently. After this, prompt control of the upper airway with tracheostomy, aggressive surgical debridement of the deep cervical spaces and mediastinum, and intravenous broad spectrum antibiotic therapy are mandatory. The present paper reports two new cases of DNM following dental extraction, and focuses on radiological features of abscess progression through the cervical spaces down into the mediastinum. 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Solitary pulmonary nodule: radiologic features and diagnostic approach; Nodulo pulmonar solitario: caracteristicas radiologicas y abordaje diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Cambronero, Luis Enrique

    2012-07-01

    A literature review is conducted on the solitary pulmonary nodule, to determine the diagnostic methods and specific characteristics. The diagnostic methods used have been: chest radiography, computed tomography, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The radiological features are defined: location, size, definition of contours or edges (margins), densitometric and attenuation characteristics, cavitation, air bronchogram, growth, doubling time, satellite nodules, nutrient vessels [Spanish] Una revision bibliografica es realizada sobre el nodulo pulmonar solitario, para determinar los metodos de diagnostico y caracteristicas especificas. Los metodos de diagnostico utilizados han sido: la radiografia de torax, tomografia computarizada, tomografia por emision de positrones y resonancia magnetica. Las caracteristicas radiologicas son definidas: localizacion, tamano, definicion de los bordes o contornos (margenes), caracteristicas densitometricas y de atenuacion, cavitacion, broncograma aereo, crecimiento, tiempo de duplicacion, nodulos satelite, vasos nutrientes.

  1. Congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula: clinical and radiologic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Shin, Su-Mi; Kim, In-One; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yoo, So-Young [Seoul National University College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Park, Kwi-Won; Jung, Sung-Eun [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) can be associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF). Because there are a variety of degrees of obstruction and symptoms of CES, it is frequently difficult to make a pre- and post-operative diagnosis of the distal CES associated with EA/TEF. To evaluate the clinical and radiologic features of congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula. We retrospectively reviewed postoperative esophagograms and medical records of 187 children (107 boys, 80 girls) who had primary repair of EA/TEF from 1992 to 2009 at our institution. We evaluated the incidence of CES, clinical findings, radiologic features and management of CES in these children. CES was diagnosed in 22 of 187 EA/TEF children (12%); one child had double CES lesions, for a total of 23 lesions. Ten of those 22 children (45%) had presented with significant symptoms of esophageal obstruction. The diagnosis of CES was delayed in 10 children (45%) until 1-10 years of age. On esophagogram, CES (n = 23) was located in the distal esophagus (n = 20, 87%) or mid-esophagus (n = 3, 13%). The degree of stenosis was severe (n = 6, 26%), moderate (n = 10, 43%), or mild (n = 7, 30%). Eight children, including two with unsuccessful esophageal balloon dilatation of CES, were treated surgically. Histologic examination revealed tracheobronchial remnant (n = 7) or fibromuscular hyperplasia (n = 1). One child with surgically treated CES developed achalasia at the age of 3 years 9 months. Esophagography after EA/TEF repair should be performed with a high index of suspicion for the presence of distal CES, because the diagnosis and adequate management of CES can often be delayed. (orig.)

  2. Medical students' preferences in radiology education a comparison between the Socratic and didactic methods utilizing powerpoint features in radiology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lily; King, Alexander; Soman, Salil; Lischuk, Andrew; Schneider, Benjamin; Walor, David; Bramwit, Mark; Amorosa, Judith K

    2011-02-01

    The Socratic method has long been a traditional teaching method in medicine and law. It is currently accepted as the standard of teaching in clinical wards, while the didactic teaching method is widely used during the first 2 years of medical school. There are arguments in support of both styles of teaching. After attending a radiology conference demonstrating different teaching methods, third-year and fourth-year medical students were invited to participate in an online anonymous survey. Of the 74 students who responded, 72% preferred to learn radiology in an active context. They preferred being given adequate time to find abnormalities on images, with feedback afterward from instructors, and they thought the best approach was a volunteer-based system of answering questions using the Socratic method in the small group. They desired to be asked questions in a way that was constructive and not belittling, to realize their knowledge deficits and to have daily pressure to come prepared. The respondents thought that pimping was an effective teaching tool, supporting previous studies. When teaching radiology, instructors should use the Socratic method to a greater extent. Combining Socratic teaching with gentle questioning by an instructor through the use of PowerPoint is a preferred method among medical students. This information is useful to improve medical education in the future, especially in radiology education. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissner, J.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.) [de

  4. Radiologic and clinical features of idiopathic granulomatous lobular mastitis mimicking advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jei Hee; Oh, Ki Keun; Kim, Eun-kyung; Kwack, Kyu Sung; Jung, Woo Hee; Lee, Han Kyung

    2006-02-28

    Idiopathic granulomatous lobular mastitis (IGLM), also known as idiopathic granulomatous mastitis, is a rare chronic inflammatory lesion of the breast that can clinically and radiographically mimic breast carcinoma. The aim of this study was to describe the radiological imaging and clinical features of IGLM in order to better differentiate this disorder from breast cancer. We performed a retrospective analysis of the clinical and radiographic features of 11 women with a total of 12 IGLM lesions. The ages of these women ranged between 29 and 42 years, with a mean age of 34.8 years. Ten patients were examined by both mammography and sonography and one by sonography alone. The sites that were the most frequently involved were the peripheral (6/12), diffuse, (3/12), and subareolar (3/12) regions of the breast. The patient mammograms showed irregular ill-defined masses (7/11), diffuse increased densities (3/11), and one oval obscured mass. In addition, patient sonograms showed irregular tubular lesions (7/12) or lobulated masses with minimal parenchymal distortion (2/12), parenchymal distortion without definite mass lesions (2/12), and one oval mass. Subcutaneous fat obliteration (12/12) and skin thickening (11/12) were also observed in these patients. Contrary to previous reports, skin changes and subareolar involvement were not rare occurrences in IGLM. In conclusion, the sonographic features of IGLM show irregular or tubular hypoechoic masses with minimal parenchymal distortion. Both clinical information and the description of radiographic features of IGLM may aid in the differentiation between IGLM and breast cancer, however histological confirmation is still required for the proper diagnosis and treatment of the disorder.

  5. Breast Cancer Arising Adjacent to an Involuting Fibroadenoma: Serial Changes in Radiologic Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chae Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Woo, Ha Young; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Fibroadenoma is a common benign breast lesion and its malignant transformation is rare. There have been several case reports and studies that retrospectively reviewed breast cancers that arose within fibroadenomas; however, none of these studies reported serial changes in radiologic features of the cancer, including findings from mammography and ultrasound (US). We report a case of breast cancer arising adjacent to an involuting fibro adenoma in a 39-year-old woman who was undergoing serial follow-up after her fibroadenoma was diagnosed. Seven years after her diagnosis, the lesion showed evidence of coarse calcifications, a typical sign of involution. Four years later, US revealed a newly developed hypoechoic lesion with irregular margins and peripherally located calcifications adjacent to the fibroadenoma. A core biopsy was performed, and histopathological examination resulted in a diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma. When new suspicious features are observed in a fibroadenoma, radiologists should raise the concern for breast cancer and proceed with diagnosis and treatment accordingly. PMID:26472981

  6. The presence of radiological features on chest radiographs: How well do clinicians agree?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, M. [Department of Child Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Lawson, Z. [Department of Child Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Morris, S.; Evans, A.; Harrison, S.; Isaac, R. [Department of Paediatric Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crocker, J. [Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Powell, C., E-mail: powellc7@cardiff.ac.uk [Department of Child Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Aim: To compare levels of agreement amongst paediatric clinicians with those amongst consultant paediatric radiologists when interpreting chest radiographs (CXRs). Materials and methods: Four paediatric radiologists used picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workstations to evaluate the presence of five radiological features of infection, independently in each of 30 CXRs. The radiographs were obtained over 1 year (2008) from children with fever and signs of respiratory distress, aged 6 months to <16 years. The same CXRs were interpreted a second time by the paediatric radiologists and by 21 clinicians with varying experience levels, using the Web 1000 viewing system and a projector. Intra- and interobserver agreement within groups, split by grade and specialty, were analysed using free-marginal multi-rater kappa. Results: Normal CXRs were identified consistently amongst all 25 participants. The four paediatric radiologists showed high levels of intraobserver agreement between methods (kappa scores between 0.53 and 1.00) and interobserver agreement for each method (kappa scores between 0.67 and 0.96 for PACS assessment). The 21 clinicians showed varying levels of agreement from 0.21 to 0.89. Conclusion: Paediatric radiologists showed high levels of agreement for all features. In general, the clinicians had lower levels of agreement than the radiologists. This study highlights the need for improved training in interpreting CXRs for clinicians and the timely reporting of CXRs by radiologists to allow appropriate patient management.

  7. Radiological features of superomedial iliac insufficiency fractures: a possible mimicker of metastatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, Andrea; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Rafii, Mahvash; Lax, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Pelvic insufficiency fractures are common in elderly patients. Because both osteoporosis and metastatic disease occur in similar patient populations, insufficiency fractures may be mistaken for metastatic foci. Although the ilium is not an uncommon location for metastases, insufficiency fractures rarely involve the ilium. The radiological features of insufficiency fractures adjacent to the sacroiliac joint (superomedial ilium) have not been well described. We describe the computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging findings of these rare fractures. Six patients (five female, one male; mean age 66 years, age range 47-83 years) with iliac insufficiency fractures adjacent to the sacroiliac joint were identified following retrospective review of a clinical database. Imaging studies, including CT (n = 4), MR (n = 3), and PET (n = 2) were reviewed by two radiologists. Tissue biopsy result was available in one patient. CT demonstrated subtle fracture lucency (n = 2) or linear sclerosis (n = 3) adjacent to the sacroiliac joint; MR marrow changes adjacent to the sacroiliac joint demonstrated a low T1, high T2 signal intensity line (n = 2), or a low T1 and low T2 signal intensity line (n = 1). Fractures were fluorodeoxyglucose avid (n = 2) with average SUV max 2.2. Iliac fractures were bilateral in three patients; additional pelvic insufficiency fractures were present in one patient. In one patient, CT-guided biopsy showed no evidence of malignancy. Recognition of the radiological characteristics of iliac insufficiency fractures is important in order to distinguish them from malignancy. The presence of additional pelvic fractures in characteristic locations in the setting of osteoporosis may help to confirm the diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. Radiological features of superomedial iliac insufficiency fractures: a possible mimicker of metastatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, Andrea; Schweitzer, Mark E. [NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States); Rafii, Mahvash [New York, NY (United States); Lax, Allison [Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Pelvic insufficiency fractures are common in elderly patients. Because both osteoporosis and metastatic disease occur in similar patient populations, insufficiency fractures may be mistaken for metastatic foci. Although the ilium is not an uncommon location for metastases, insufficiency fractures rarely involve the ilium. The radiological features of insufficiency fractures adjacent to the sacroiliac joint (superomedial ilium) have not been well described. We describe the computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging findings of these rare fractures. Six patients (five female, one male; mean age 66 years, age range 47-83 years) with iliac insufficiency fractures adjacent to the sacroiliac joint were identified following retrospective review of a clinical database. Imaging studies, including CT (n = 4), MR (n = 3), and PET (n = 2) were reviewed by two radiologists. Tissue biopsy result was available in one patient. CT demonstrated subtle fracture lucency (n = 2) or linear sclerosis (n = 3) adjacent to the sacroiliac joint; MR marrow changes adjacent to the sacroiliac joint demonstrated a low T1, high T2 signal intensity line (n = 2), or a low T1 and low T2 signal intensity line (n = 1). Fractures were fluorodeoxyglucose avid (n = 2) with average SUV{sub max} 2.2. Iliac fractures were bilateral in three patients; additional pelvic insufficiency fractures were present in one patient. In one patient, CT-guided biopsy showed no evidence of malignancy. Recognition of the radiological characteristics of iliac insufficiency fractures is important in order to distinguish them from malignancy. The presence of additional pelvic fractures in characteristic locations in the setting of osteoporosis may help to confirm the diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of Clinico-Radiological Features between Congenital Cystic Neuroblastoma and Neonatal Adrenal Hemorrhagic Pseudocyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eo, Hong; Kim, Ji Hye; Jang, Kyung Mi; Yoo, So Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Gye Yeon [St. Mary' s Hospital Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung Joon [Severance Hospital Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ok Hwa [Ajou University Hospital, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the radiological and clinical findings of congenital cystic neuroblastomas as compared with those of the cystic presentation of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. We analyzed the US (n = 52), CT (n = 24), and MR (n = 4) images as well as the medical records of 28 patients harboring congenital cystic neuroblastomas (n = 16) and neonatal adrenal hemorrhagic pseudocysts (n = 14). The history of prenatal detection, location, size, presence of outer wall enhancement, internal septations, solid portion, calcification, turbidity, vascular flow on a Doppler examination, and evolution patterns were compared in two groups of cystic lesions, by Fischer's exact test. All (100%) neuroblastomas and three (21%) of the 14 hemorrhagic pseudocysts were detected prenatally. Both groups of cystic lesions occurred more frequently on the right side; 11 of 16 (69%) for neuroblastomas and 11 of 14 (79%) for hemorrhagic pseudocysts. The size, presence of solid portion, septum, enhancement, and turbidity did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) between the two groups of cystic lesions. However, tiny calcifications (n = 3) and vascular flow on color Doppler US (n = 3) were noted in only neuroblastomas. The cystic neuroblastomas became complex solid and cystic masses, and did not disappear for up to 90 days in the three following cases, whereas 11 of the 14 (79%) hemorrhagic pseudocysts disappeared completely and the three remaining (27%) evolved to calcifications only. Although the imaging findings of two groups of cystic lesions were similar, prenatal detection, the presence of calcification on initial images, vascularity on color Doppler US, and evolution to a more complex mass may all favor neuroblastomas

  10. Comparison of Clinico-Radiological Features between Congenital Cystic Neuroblastoma and Neonatal Adrenal Hemorrhagic Pseudocyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eo, Hong; Kim, Ji Hye; Jang, Kyung Mi; Yoo, So Young; Lim, Gye Yeon; Kim, Myung Joon; Kim, Ok Hwa

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the radiological and clinical findings of congenital cystic neuroblastomas as compared with those of the cystic presentation of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. We analyzed the US (n = 52), CT (n = 24), and MR (n = 4) images as well as the medical records of 28 patients harboring congenital cystic neuroblastomas (n = 16) and neonatal adrenal hemorrhagic pseudocysts (n = 14). The history of prenatal detection, location, size, presence of outer wall enhancement, internal septations, solid portion, calcification, turbidity, vascular flow on a Doppler examination, and evolution patterns were compared in two groups of cystic lesions, by Fischer's exact test. All (100%) neuroblastomas and three (21%) of the 14 hemorrhagic pseudocysts were detected prenatally. Both groups of cystic lesions occurred more frequently on the right side; 11 of 16 (69%) for neuroblastomas and 11 of 14 (79%) for hemorrhagic pseudocysts. The size, presence of solid portion, septum, enhancement, and turbidity did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) between the two groups of cystic lesions. However, tiny calcifications (n = 3) and vascular flow on color Doppler US (n = 3) were noted in only neuroblastomas. The cystic neuroblastomas became complex solid and cystic masses, and did not disappear for up to 90 days in the three following cases, whereas 11 of the 14 (79%) hemorrhagic pseudocysts disappeared completely and the three remaining (27%) evolved to calcifications only. Although the imaging findings of two groups of cystic lesions were similar, prenatal detection, the presence of calcification on initial images, vascularity on color Doppler US, and evolution to a more complex mass may all favor neuroblastomas

  11. Radiological features of Paget disease of bone associated with VCP myopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farpour, Farzin [University of California, Department of Radiology, VA Long Beach Health Care, Irvine, CA (United States); Queens Hospital Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiology, VA Long Beach Health Care, Irvine, CA (United States); Donkervoort, Sandra; Vanjara, Pari [University of California, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Irvine, CA (United States); Smith, Charles [University of Kentucky, Department of Neurology and Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Lexington, KY (United States); Martin, Barbara [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Osann, Kathryn [University of California, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimonis, Virginia E. [University of California, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Orange, CA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Mutations in the Valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene cause a unique disorder characterized by classic Paget disease of bone (PDB), inclusion body myopathy, and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Our objective was to analyze the radiographic features of PDB associated with VCP mutations since there is a dearth of literature on the PDB component of VCP disease. Radiographic bone surveys were examined in 23 individuals with VCP mutation and compared with their unaffected relatives. Laboratory testing relevant for VCP disease was performed in all individuals. Of the 17 affected individuals with clinical manifestations of VCP disease, 16 of whom had myopathy, radiographic analysis revealed classic PDB in 11 individuals (65%). The mean age of diagnosis for myopathy was 43.8 years and for PDB was 38.1 years of age. Radiological evidence of PDB was seen in one individual (16%) amongst six clinically asymptomatic VCP mutation carriers. Alkaline phosphatase was a useful marker for diagnosing PDB in VCP disease. Radiographic findings of classic PDB are seen in 52% of individuals carrying VCP mutations at a significantly younger age than conventional PDB. Screening for PDB is warranted in at-risk individuals because of the benefit of early treatment with the new powerful bisphosphonates that hold the potential for prevention of disease. (orig.)

  12. The Odontogenic Keratocysts: A Consideration of the Clinical and Radiologic Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Yensei (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    To determine whether the significant relationship exists between radiographic appearance, whether it is unilocular or multilocular, and its corresponding clinical and histologic features by examining the odontogenic keratocyst clinically, radiologically and histologically. This study was conducted on 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst from the files of Dental Hospital, Yonsei University for the years 1982 through 1995. The mean age of patients was 30.5 years in the unilocular group and 35.5 years in the multilocular group. The male to female ratio was 1:1.06 in the unilocular group and 1:1.75 in the multilocular group. The chief complaint was swelling in both groups (unilocular 35.1%, multilocular 54.5%). In the occurrence site, the border of the lesion, the displacement and external root resorption of the adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant difference between the unilocular group and multilocular group, but in the border type, there was statistically significant difference (x{sup 2}-test, p<0.05). Two recurred cases were observed among 11 cases of odontogenic keratocyst. One was unilocular case and the other was multilocular case.

  13. The relationship between radiological features and clinical manifestation and dental expenses of keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Hyun; Huh, Kyung Heo; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun; Bae, Kwang Hak; Choi, Jin Woo

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to identify correlations between keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) data from CT sections, and data on the KCOT clinical manifestation and resulting dental expenses. Following local Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, a seven-years of retrospective study was performed regarding patients with KCOTs treated at the Seoul National University Dental Hospital. A total of 180 KCOT were included in this study. The following information was collected: age, gender, location and size of the lesion, radiological features, surgical treatment provided and dental expenses. There was no significant association between the size of the KCOT and age, gender, and presenting preoperative symptoms. In both jaws, it was unusual to find KCOTs under 10 mm. The correlation between the number of teeth removed and the size of the KCOT in the tooth bearing area was statistically significant in the mandible, whereas in the maxilla, no significant relationship was found. Dental expenses compared with the size of the KCOT were found to be significant in both jaws. The size of KCOT was associated with a significant increase in dental expenses for both jaws and the number of teeth removed from the mandible. These findings emphasize the importance of routine examinations and early detection of lesions, which in turn helps preserving anatomical structures and reducing dental expenses.

  14. The Odontogenic Keratocysts: A Consideration of the Clinical and Radiologic Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether the significant relationship exists between radiographic appearance, whether it is unilocular or multilocular, and its corresponding clinical and histologic features by examining the odontogenic keratocyst clinically, radiologically and histologically. This study was conducted on 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst from the files of Dental Hospital, Yonsei University for the years 1982 through 1995. The mean age of patients was 30.5 years in the unilocular group and 35.5 years in the multilocular group. The male to female ratio was 1:1.06 in the unilocular group and 1:1.75 in the multilocular group. The chief complaint was swelling in both groups (unilocular 35.1%, multilocular 54.5%). In the occurrence site, the border of the lesion, the displacement and external root resorption of the adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant difference between the unilocular group and multilocular group, but in the border type, there was statistically significant difference (x 2 -test, p<0.05). Two recurred cases were observed among 11 cases of odontogenic keratocyst. One was unilocular case and the other was multilocular case.

  15. [Clinical and radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis manifested as interstitial lung diseases.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ju-Hong; Feng, Rui-E; Tian, Xin-Lun; Xu, Wen-Bing; Xu, Zuo-Jun; Liu, Hong-Rui; Zhu, Yuan-Jue

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the clinical and radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as interstitial lung diseases (ILD). We analyzed the data of cases suspected of diffuse parenchyma lung diseases at this hospital between October 2003 and October 2007. The diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis was based on epithelioid granuloma or positive acid-fast bacilli in lung biopsy and changes on serial radiographs obtained during treatment. The data of a series of 230 consecutive patients with suspected ILD were retrospectively analyzed. The diagnosis was confirmed by lung biopsy. Twelve patients were confirmed to have pulmonary tuberculosis. There were 5 males and 7 females with a mean age of 38 +/- 11 years (range, 17 - 68). The median course of disease in these patients was 3 months (range, 0.5 - 18 months). Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presented with fever (11/12), cough (9/12), weight loss (7/12), dyspnea (7/12), lymphadenopathy (4/12), and splenohepatomegaly (2/12). On chest CT scan, ground-glass attenuation was identified in 4, bilateral patchy infiltration in 5, tree-in-bud appearance 1, and centrilobular lesions in 2 of the 12 patients. During the follow-up period (median, 9 month, range from 3 to 12 month), 11 patients improved, but 1 died of diabetic ketoacidosis. The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis should be considered in suspected ILD patients presenting with fever, splenohepatomegaly and lymphadenopathy.

  16. The relationship between radiological features and clinical manifestation and dental expenses of keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Hyun; Huh, Kyung Heo; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun; Bae, Kwang Hak [Dept. of School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study was performed to identify correlations between keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) data from CT sections, and data on the KCOT clinical manifestation and resulting dental expenses. Following local Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, a seven-years of retrospective study was performed regarding patients with KCOTs treated at the Seoul National University Dental Hospital. A total of 180 KCOT were included in this study. The following information was collected: age, gender, location and size of the lesion, radiological features, surgical treatment provided and dental expenses. There was no significant association between the size of the KCOT and age, gender, and presenting preoperative symptoms. In both jaws, it was unusual to find KCOTs under 10 mm. The correlation between the number of teeth removed and the size of the KCOT in the tooth bearing area was statistically significant in the mandible, whereas in the maxilla, no significant relationship was found. Dental expenses compared with the size of the KCOT were found to be significant in both jaws. The size of KCOT was associated with a significant increase in dental expenses for both jaws and the number of teeth removed from the mandible. These findings emphasize the importance of routine examinations and early detection of lesions, which in turn helps preserving anatomical structures and reducing dental expenses.

  17. Radiologic and histologic features of hyaline membrane diseases of the newbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeong Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup

    1984-01-01

    This study represents the radiologic, histologic features and clinical analysis of hyaline membrane diseases in 47 newbone infants who were delivered in Ewha Womans Univ. Hospital and expired caused by respiratory distress and confirmed by autopsy, during Jan. 1981 to June. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. Classification of radiographic stage (by Wolfson's criteria); Stage III (34.1%) was the most frequent. 2. Male to female ratio was 2.4 : 1. 3. Method of delivery; Cesarean section (44.7%) was the highest frequency, compared with percent of cesarean section to total delivery (29.0%) 4. Distribution of birth weight; 1.0-2.0 kg (48.9%) was the most frequent. 5. Distribution of gestational period; 32-36 weeks (29.8%) was the most frequent. 6. Complication; pulmonary hemorrhage (31.9%) was the most frequent, in order, subarachnoid hemorrhage and pneumothorax were followed. 7. Final diagnosis of hyaline membrane diseases was based on histo-pathologic diagnosis.

  18. Radiologic and histologic features of hyaline membrane diseases of the newbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeong Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    This study represents the radiologic, histologic features and clinical analysis of hyaline membrane diseases in 47 newbone infants who were delivered in Ewha Womans Univ. Hospital and expired caused by respiratory distress and confirmed by autopsy, during Jan. 1981 to June. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. Classification of radiographic stage (by Wolfson's criteria); Stage III (34.1%) was the most frequent. 2. Male to female ratio was 2.4 : 1. 3. Method of delivery; Cesarean section (44.7%) was the highest frequency, compared with percent of cesarean section to total delivery (29.0%) 4. Distribution of birth weight; 1.0-2.0 kg (48.9%) was the most frequent. 5. Distribution of gestational period; 32-36 weeks (29.8%) was the most frequent. 6. Complication; pulmonary hemorrhage (31.9%) was the most frequent, in order, subarachnoid hemorrhage and pneumothorax were followed. 7. Final diagnosis of hyaline membrane diseases was based on histo-pathologic diagnosis.

  19. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) of the kidney: a rare renal tumour in adolescents with seemingly characteristic radiological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Winnie C.; Reznikov, Boris; Lee, Edward Y.; Grant, Ronald M.; Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Babyn, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNETs) constitute a family of neoplasms of presumed neuroectodermal origin that predominantly present as bone or soft-tissue masses in adolescents and young adults. PNET arising in the kidney is rare. To describe the radiological features in three patients with primary renal PNET. The radiological features of primary renal PNET in three adolescent patients (age 10, 14 and 16 years) are described. Tumour thrombus extending into the renal vein and inferior vena cava was noted in all three patients. In addition, further tumour extension into the atrium was seen in two patients with extension into a pulmonary artery in one patient. Neural foraminal and intraspinal extension close to the origin of the tumour was identified in two patients. Liver, bone and lung metastases were identified. While rare, one should consider the diagnosis of PNET when encountering a renal mass with aggressive features such as inferior vena cava tumour thrombus, direct intraspinal invasion and distant metastasis. (orig.)

  20. Diagnostic and radiological management of cystic pancreatic lesions: Important features for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerke, B.; Domagk, D.; Heindel, W.; Wessling, J.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic pancreatic neoplasms are often an incidental finding, the frequency of which is increasing. The understanding of such lesions has increased in recent years, but the numerous types of lesions involved can hinder differential diagnosis. They include, in particular, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN), serous cystic neoplasms (SCN), and mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN). Knowledge of their histological and radiological structure, as well as distribution in terms of localization, age, and sex, helps to differentiate such tumours from common pancreatic pseudocysts. Several types of cystic pancreatic neoplasms can undergo malignant transformation and, therefore, require differentiated radiological management. This review aims to develop a broader understanding of the pathological and radiological characteristics of cystic pancreatic neoplasms, and provide a guideline for everyday practice based on current concepts in the radiological management of the given lesions.

  1. Radiological diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy with reference to clinical features in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebsch, P.; Trattnig, S.; Barton, P.; Seidl, G.

    1989-01-01

    Pathophysiological, histological and radiological findings in renal osteodystrophy are described. Special emphasis is laid on secondary hyperparathyroidism. Preliminary results of the authors' investigations show a good correlation between radiological findings in the phalanges of the hand and the concentration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in 14 patients. The concentration of the hormone in the blood was measured by a new 'two-site' immunoradiometric assay, which is specific for the intact, biologically active hormone. Patients with high concentrations of PTH in the blood tended to have more severe radiological changes. In 4 patients for whom radiographs of the hands revealed no pathologic findings, normal PTH concentrations in the blood were measured by this method, whereas the conventional assay gave elevated hormone concentrations for the same patients. This is due to the lack of specificity of the conventional method for the intact, biologically active hormone. Nevertheless, further investigations are needed to confirm these findings. (orig.) [de

  2. Transcriptional profiles of pilocytic astrocytoma are related to their three different locations, but not to radiological tumor features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewski, Krzysztof; Jarząb, Michał; Pfeifer, Aleksandra; Oczko-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Jarząb, Barbara; Liberski, Paweł P.; Zakrzewska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma is the most common type of brain tumor in the pediatric population, with a generally favorable prognosis, although recurrences or leptomeningeal dissemination are sometimes also observed. For tumors originating in the supra-or infratentorial location, a different molecular background was suggested, but plausible correlations between the transcriptional profile and radiological features and/or clinical course are still undefined. The purpose of this study was to identify gene expression profiles related to the most frequent locations of this tumor, subtypes based on various radiological features, and the clinical pattern of the disease. Eighty six children (55 males and 31 females) with histologically verified pilocytic astrocytoma were included in this study. Their age at the time of diagnosis ranged from fourteen months to seventeen years, with a mean age of seven years. There were 40 cerebellar, 23 optic tract/hypothalamic, 21 cerebral hemispheric, and two brainstem tumors. According to the radiological features presented on MRI, all cases were divided into four subtypes: cystic tumor with a non-enhancing cyst wall; cystic tumor with an enhancing cyst wall; solid tumor with central necrosis; and solid or mainly solid tumor. In 81 cases primary surgical resection was the only and curative treatment, and in five cases progression of the disease was observed. In 47 cases the analysis was done by using high density oligonucleotide microarrays (Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0) with subsequent bioinformatic analyses and confirmation of the results by independent RT-qPCR (on 39 samples). Bioinformatic analyses showed that the gene expression profile of pilocytic astrocytoma is highly dependent on the tumor location. The most prominent differences were noted for IRX2, PAX3, CXCL14, LHX2, SIX6, CNTN1 and SIX1 genes expression even within different compartments of the supratentorial region. Analysis of the genes potentially associated with radiological

  3. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, Lars J., E-mail: Lars.grimm@duke.edu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Kuzmiak, Cherie M. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 2006 Old Clinic, CB No. 7510, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Mazurowski, Maciej A. [Duke University Medical Center, Box 2731 Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  4. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Lars J; Ghate, Sujata V; Yoon, Sora C; Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Kim, Connie; Mazurowski, Maciej A

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502-0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543-0.680,p errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  5. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, Lars J.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees

  6. Radiological features of bilateral hereditary micro-epiphyseal dysplasia - a distinct entity in the skeletal dysplasias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morstert, AK; Dijkstra, PF; van Horn, [No Value; Jansen, BRH; Heutink, P; Lindhout, D

    Aim: To prove that bilateral hereditary micro-epiphyseal dysplasia (BHMED), first described by Elsbach in 1959 [1], is a distinct disorder radiologically as well as clinically, compared with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). Material and Methods: We used the data of the revised pedigree with 84

  7. Granular cell tumour of the neurohypophysis: a rare sellar tumour with specific radiological and operative features.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aquilina, K

    2012-02-03

    Symptomatic granular cell tumours of the neurohypophysis are rare sellar lesions. Preoperative prediction of the diagnosis on the basis of radiological appearance is useful as these tumours carry specific surgical difficulties. This is possible when the tumour arises from the pituitary stalk, rostral to a normal pituitary gland. This has not been emphasized previously.

  8. The radiological features, diagnosis and management of screen-detected lobular neoplasia of the breast: Findings from the Sloane Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Anthony J; Clements, Karen; Dodwell, David J; Evans, Andrew J; Francis, Adele; Hussain, Monuwar; Morris, Julie; Pinder, Sarah E; Sawyer, Elinor J; Thomas, Jeremy; Thompson, Alastair

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the radiological features, diagnosis and management of screen-detected lobular neoplasia (LN) of the breast. 392 women with pure LN alone were identified within the prospective UK cohort study of screen-detected non-invasive breast neoplasia (the Sloane Project). Demography, radiological features and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analysed. Non-pleomorphic LN (369/392) was most frequently diagnosed among women aged 50-54 and in 53.5% was at the first screen. It occurred most commonly on the left (58.0%; p = 0.003), in the upper outer quadrant and confined to one site (single quadrant or retroareolar region). No bilateral cases were found. The predominant radiological feature was microcalcification (most commonly granular) which increased in frequency with increasing breast density. Casting microcalcification as a predominant feature had a significantly higher lesion size compared to granular and punctate patterns (p = 0.034). 326/369 (88.3%) women underwent surgery, including 17 who underwent >1 operation, six who had mastectomy and six who had axillary surgery. Two patients had radiotherapy and 15 had endocrine treatment. Pleomorphic lobular carcinoma in situ (23/392) presented as granular microcalcification in 12; four women had mastectomy and six had radiotherapy. Screen-detected LN occurs in relatively young women and is predominantly non-pleomorphic and unilateral. It is typically associated with granular or punctate microcalcification in the left upper outer quadrant. Management, including surgical resection, is highly variable and requires evidence-based guideline development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of clinico-radiological features of patients with positive cultures of nontuberculous mycobacteria and patients with tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ba-Hammam, Ahmed; Sharif, Yasir; Masood, Mohammad; Isnani, Arthur; Youssef, Ismael; Kambal, Abdelmageed; Shaikh, Shaffi

    2005-01-01

    To identify the clinico-radiological features of patients with positive cultures for nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and compare those to a sample of patients with tuberculosis (MTB). A laboratory database was used to retrieve all specimens submitted to King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, mycobacteriology laboratory for mycobacterial smears and cultures during the period from October 1999-April 2002. Using this database, the original records of the mycobacteriology laboratory and a review of the patient's health records, a standard proforma was completed that included demographic, clinical, radiological and laboratory information on patients included in this study. The patients were divided into 2 groups; the NTM group, which included patients with positive cultures for NTM and the MTB group, which included a sample of patients with documented tuberculosis. During the study period, 286 patients had positive mycobacterial cultures. Seventy patients (24.5%) grew NTM and 216 (75.5%) grew MTB. For patients with MTB, 54 patients were included as per the selection protocol of the study. There was no difference between the 2 groups in all measured demographic variables. The presence of weight loss and fever was significantly more in the MTB group. Radiologically, the presence of hilar adenopathy was more significant among patients with MTB than those with NTM (17% versus 4%, p=0.02). However, bronchiectatic changes were seen significantly more among NTM patients compared to patients with MTB (26% versus 11%, p=0.03). The isolation of NTM in the mycobacteriology laboratory is high. The clinico-radiological features were not sufficiently specific to differentiate patients with NTM from patients with MTB. Local studies are needed to explore NTM disease in various developing countries and identify the NTM species causing infections in non-immunosuppressed patients in each locality. (author)

  10. Radiological features of bilateral hereditary micro-epiphyseal dysplasia - a distinct entity in the skeletal dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostert, A.K. [Isala Clinics, Location Weezenlanden, Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Zwolle (Netherlands); Dijkstra, P.F. [Jan van Breemen Inst., Dept. of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Horn, J.R. van [Univ. Hospital Groningen, Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); Jansen, B.R.H. [Reinier de Graaf Hospital, Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Delft (Netherlands); Heutink, P. [Erasmus MCRotterdam, Dept. of Clinical Genetics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lindhout, D. [Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht, Dept. of Medical Genetics, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    Aim: To prove that bilateral hereditary micro-epiphyseal dysplasia (BHMED), first described by Elsbach in 1959, is a distinct disorder radiologically as well as clinically, compared with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). Material and Methods: We used the data of the revised pedigree with 84 family members, performed a medical history, physical examination and made a radiological evaluation for defining a clinical and radiological phenotype of BHMED family members. We used blood samples for genetic analysis. Results: Although there is a clear clinical picture of the dysplasia, the radiological signs are more reliable for making the diagnosis. Especially the typical deformity of the hip and knee joint are diagnostic for BHMED. By linkage analysis we excluded linkage with the three known MED-loci (EDM1, EDM2 and EDM3). Conclusion: BHMED is indeed an entity that is distinct from common multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED), clinically, as well as radiologically and genetically. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Es sollte dargelegt werden, dass sich eine vererbliche, laterale Mikro-Epiphysendysplasie (BHMED), Erstbeschreibung durch Elsbach 1959, klinisch, radiologisch und genetisch von einer mutiplen Epiphysendysplasie (MED) unterscheidet. Material und Methode: Anhand der Daten eines ueberarbeiteten Stammbaumes mit 84 Familienmitgliedern wurde der medizinische Werdegang rekonstruiert. Es erfolgte eine physische Untersuchung der Familienmitglieder. Schliesslich wurde eine radiologische Auswertung durchgefuehrt, um einen klinischen und radiologischen Phaenotyp der von BHMED betroffenen Familienmitglieder zu definieren. Fuer eine genetische Analyse wurden Blutproben entnommen. Ergebnisse: Obwohl es ein deutliches klinisches Bild einer Dysplasie gibt, sind die radiologischen Kennzeichen fuer die Diagnose zuverlaessiger. Insbesondere die typische Deformation der Huefte und des Kniegelenks ist diagnostisch fuer BHMED. Durch Linkage-Analyse konnte eine Verbindung zu den drei bekannten

  11. Clinical, Endoscopic, and Radiologic Features of Three Subtypes of Achalasia, Classified Using High-Resolution Manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed Q.; AlQaraawi, Abdullah; Al-Sohaibani, Fahad; Al-Kahtani, Khalid; Al-Ashgar, Hamad I.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: High-resolution manometry (HRM) has improved the accuracy of manometry in detecting achalasia and determining its subtypes. However, the correlation of achalasia subtypes with clinical, endoscopic, and radiologic findings has not been assessed. We aimed to evaluate and compare the clinical, endoscopic, and fluoroscopy findings associated with three subtypes of achalasia using HRM. Patients and Methods: The retrospective clinical data, HRM, endoscopy, and radiologic findings were obtained from the medical records of untreated achalasia patients. Results: From 2011 to 2013, 374 patients underwent HRM. Fifty-two patients (14%) were diagnosed with achalasia, but only 32 (8.5%) of these patients had not received treatment and were therefore included in this study. The endoscopy results were normal in 28% of the patients, and a barium swallow was inconclusive in 31% of the achalasia patients. Ten patients (31%) were classified as having type I achalasia, 17 (53%) were classified as type II, and 5 (16%) were classified as type III. Among the three subtypes, type I patients were on average the youngest and had the longest history of dysphagia, mildest chest pain, most significant weight loss, and most dilated esophagus with residual food. Chest pain was most common in type III patients, and frequently had normal fluoroscopic and endoscopic results. Conclusion: The clinical, radiologic, and endoscopic findings were not significantly different between patients with type I and type II untreated achalasia. Type III patients had the most severe symptoms and were the most difficult to diagnose based on varied clinical, radiologic, and endoscopic findings. PMID:26021774

  12. Study of the clinical features and radiological findings for thoracic communicating arachnoid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masashi; Hanakita, Junya; Suwa, Hideyuki

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed retrospectively, the usefulness of the radiological examinations for 15 cases of communicating arachnoid cysts in thoracic lesions experienced by our department over the last 12 years. Severn men and eight women (age range 32-71 years, mean age 53.8 years) were analyzed. Their symptoms on admission were sensory disturbance of the legs (13 cases), leg weakness (4 cases), back pain (4 cases), and truncal abnormal sensations (2 cases), etc. We performed myelography in 12 patients, and an additional 5 patients were diagnosed by this examination. CT-myelography showed deformity of the spinal cord, deviation of the spinal cord and enlargement of the subarachnoid space in all 12 patients. The axial view in 1.0 T weighted MRI showed the same findings as CT-myelography. However, the cine 1.0 T weighted MRI seemed to be insufficient to detect any spinal arachnoid cysts. As the results of their operations, 13 patients improved, 2 patients remained unchanged, and no cases become worse. The clinical and radiological diagnosis for communicating arachnoid cysts is not easy. Neurological examinations and radiological examinations with detailed readings are essential to obtain a correct diagnosis, when considering the possibility of the disease. (author)

  13. Combination of radiological and gray level co-occurrence matrix textural features used to distinguish solitary pulmonary nodules by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haifeng; Sun, Tao; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Xia; Wang, Wei; Huo, Da; Lv, Pingxin; He, Wen; Wang, Keyang; Guo, Xiuhua

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the method of the combination of radiological and textural features for the differentiation of malignant from benign solitary pulmonary nodules by computed tomography. Features including 13 gray level co-occurrence matrix textural features and 12 radiological features were extracted from 2,117 CT slices, which came from 202 (116 malignant and 86 benign) patients. Lasso-type regularization to a nonlinear regression model was applied to select predictive features and a BP artificial neural network was used to build the diagnostic model. Eight radiological and two textural features were obtained after the Lasso-type regularization procedure. Twelve radiological features alone could reach an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.84 in differentiating between malignant and benign lesions. The 10 selected characters improved the AUC to 0.91. The evaluation results showed that the method of selecting radiological and textural features appears to yield more effective in the distinction of malignant from benign solitary pulmonary nodules by computed tomography.

  14. Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis: radiological features in two families containing five members with asymptomatic and uncomplicated disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia; Kiriakou, Vera; Tsitouridis, Ioannis [Papageorgiou Hospital, Radiology Department, Thessaloniki (Greece); Arvaniti, Maria [Genimatas Hospital, Radiology Department, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2009-10-15

    In this study we analysed the imaging patterns in two families containing five members with asymptomatic and uncomplicated autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO II), and we report new and uncommon radiological manifestations. These findings might be useful in the context of reducing the incidence of fractures and other orthopaedic complications. Diffuse pelvic sclerosis on radiographs was observed incidentally in two patients. Both cases were asymptomatic, and the patients had never suffered a fracture. The suggestion of ADO II was raised. A detailed medical history, an imaging survey, and a haematological study were obtained so that other rare causes of osteosclerosis could be ruled out. No genetic study was conducted. All their first-degree relatives were also examined. Bony sclerosis was observed in five patients, and the radiological findings were analysed. A not previously reported thickening of the skull base without cranial nerve palsy or optic nerve atrophy was revealed in all patients. Scoliosis was present in three of them. This has been reported previously only once in ADO II. No lower limb deformity was detected. This study provided information on the pattern of radiological features in familial asymptomatic ADO II. These data on new and rare imaging findings will increase the diagnostic awareness of physicians and will guide a thorough investigation of the entire family. This might result in a consequent decrease in the incidence of fractures and other orthopaedic complications. (orig.)

  15. Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis: radiological features in two families containing five members with asymptomatic and uncomplicated disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia; Kiriakou, Vera; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Arvaniti, Maria

    2009-01-01

    In this study we analysed the imaging patterns in two families containing five members with asymptomatic and uncomplicated autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO II), and we report new and uncommon radiological manifestations. These findings might be useful in the context of reducing the incidence of fractures and other orthopaedic complications. Diffuse pelvic sclerosis on radiographs was observed incidentally in two patients. Both cases were asymptomatic, and the patients had never suffered a fracture. The suggestion of ADO II was raised. A detailed medical history, an imaging survey, and a haematological study were obtained so that other rare causes of osteosclerosis could be ruled out. No genetic study was conducted. All their first-degree relatives were also examined. Bony sclerosis was observed in five patients, and the radiological findings were analysed. A not previously reported thickening of the skull base without cranial nerve palsy or optic nerve atrophy was revealed in all patients. Scoliosis was present in three of them. This has been reported previously only once in ADO II. No lower limb deformity was detected. This study provided information on the pattern of radiological features in familial asymptomatic ADO II. These data on new and rare imaging findings will increase the diagnostic awareness of physicians and will guide a thorough investigation of the entire family. This might result in a consequent decrease in the incidence of fractures and other orthopaedic complications. (orig.)

  16. Radiologic features of pyogenic pulmonary infection in AIDS patients and HIV-infected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtycha-Kwasnica, B.; Leszczynski, S.; Mian, M.; Mydlowska, A.

    1994-01-01

    400 HIV-infected patients were examined by chest radiographs and CT examinations. The radiological diagnosis of pyogenic bacterial pneumonia was confirmed by clinical examinations, laboratory tests and in cases by autopsy. Lobar consolidation often, bilateral, with abscesses and atelectasis, pleural effusions, diffuse interstitial infiltrates were noted mostly in the bacterial pneumonia group. In spite of immunodeficiency in these patients lobar consolidation and abscesses regressed after therapy. The relapse of pyogenic pulmonary infection, often in the same localization, which also regressed during treatment were observed. (author)

  17. Scapular bone destruction: A case report of skeletal tuberculosis with a series of dynamic radiologic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Lan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an extremely common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive patients. Pulmonary TB is the most common manifestation while skeletal TB, especially with an involvement of flat bone like scapula, is quite rare. We report the first case scapular TB in an advanced AIDS individual who was initially considered as lymphoma because of the faulty interpretation of the positivity of PET/CT scan. In this article, we present a series of dynamic radiologic data and emphasize the differential diagnostic of skeletal TB.

  18. Radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: correlation with the blood CD4 cell count

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isusi, M.; Eguidazu, J.; Oleaga, L.; Grande, D.

    2000-01-01

    To describe the radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and its correlation with the blood CD4 cell count. We present 44 HIV+patients, 24 with CD4 cell counts of less than 200 cells/mm''3 (group A) and 20 in whom the CD4 counts surpassed this level (group B). We also assessed the chest x-ray images to determine whether or not there was any correlation with the blood CD4 cell counts. Fisher's exact test was used for the statistical study of the differences in the radiological findings in the two groups. The incidence of atypical features was significantly greater in the patients with CD4 cell counts of less than 200 cells/mm''3 (group A) than in those with CD4 counts of over 200 cells/mm''3 (group B). Among HIV+patients, those with a more intact immune status were more likely to present lung x-ray images typical of post-primary TB, with cavitary lesions in upper lobes. The group of patients in whom the immune deficiency was more marked showed a greater incidence of atypical pulmonary findings, more characteristics of primary TB. (Author)

  19. Choroid plexus carcinoma: clinical and radiological features of four cases and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogacheski, Enio; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Nascimento, Alessandra Bettega; Jacob, Graciela Vanessa Vicelli; Delle, Linei Augusta Brolini; Liu, Christian Bark; Belggi-Torres, Luis Fernando

    1998-01-01

    Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is rare central nervous system (CNS) tumor that accounts for nearly 0.06% of all intracranial neoplasms, most frequently occurring in patients less than 3 years of age. The authors present a clinical and radiological study of four patients with the diagnosis of CPC. The research was undertaken in the archives of radiology in the University Hospital of Curitiba, Parana State, Brazil, in the period from 1990 to 1997. The exams related to the CNS were catalogued and the CPC cases were looked into. Three of the patients were male and the mean age was 13.7 months. The clinical symptoms reported were due to intracranial hypertension, and the most common location was the lateral ventricles. Computed tomography scans show hydrocephalus and a mass hyperdense to the brain parenchyma, with marked enhancement post-contrast. Surgical resection was attempted in all patients. One of them died during the procedures. All of the other underwent relapse and died within an average of 7 months after the diagnosis. (author)

  20. Radiological characteristics, histological features and clinical outcomes of lung cancer patients with coexistent idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, K A; Kennedy, M P; Moore, E; Crush, L; Prendeville, S; Maher, M M; Burke, L; Henry, M T

    2015-02-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and management, the outcomes for both lung cancer and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are still unfavourable. The pathophysiology and outcomes for patients with concomitant lung cancer and IPF remains unclear. A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients presenting with concomitant IPF and lung cancer to our centre over a 3-year period. Patients with connective tissue disease, asbestos exposure, sarcoidosis, previous thoracic radiation, radiological evidence of fibrosis but no histological confirmation of lung cancer, or the use of medications known to cause pulmonary fibrosis were excluded. We describe clinical, radiological and pathological characteristics of this group. We also report the response to standardized lung cancer therapy in this cohort. Of 637 lung cancer patients, 34 were identified with concomitant IPF (5.3 %) and all were smokers. 85 % had non-small cell lung cancer, 41 % were squamous cell cancers. The majority of tumours were located in the lower lobes, peripheral and present in an area of honeycombing. Despite the fact that approximately 2/3rds of the patients had localised or locally advanced lung cancer, the outcome of therapy for lung cancer was extremely poor regardless of tumour stage or severity of IPF. At our centre, 1/20 patients with lung cancer have concomitant IPF. The majority of these tumours are small in size, peripheral in location and squamous cell carcinoma; in an area of honey combing. The outcome for concomitant lung cancer and IPF regardless of stage or therapy is poor.

  1. Fundamental features and main problems of nuclear power and radiological safety law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, B.

    1981-01-01

    This report deals on a general basis with the legal spheres affected by the utilisation of nuclear energy and protection from ionising radiation. Following a historical survey of the development both in the field of national legisation in Austria and internationally, the five principal legal spheres are discussed in detail. These are administrative law, liability and insurance law, criminal law, constitutional law and international law. In the foreground of discussion is administrative law, which is mainly of a preventive nature. This also comprises radiological safety law. Next in importance is liability and insurance law, which, in contrast to the former, aims at compensation for damage. Criminal law is also intended to have a preventive effect. Finally, the author discusses the peaceful use of nuclear energy in relation to the constitutional law and the international law in force. (Auth.)

  2. Iniencephaly: Radiological and pathological features of a series of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panduranga Chikkannaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iniencephaly is a rare form of neural tube defect with an incidence of 0.1-10 in 10,000 pregnancies. It is characterized by the presence of occipital bone defects at foramen magnum, fixed retroflexion of head, spinal dysmorphism, and lordosis of cervicothoracic vertebrae. It is usually associated with central nervous system, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular anomalies. We present radiological and autopsy findings in a series of 3 cases of iniencephaly (gestational ages 29.3, 23, and 24 weeks first fetus in addition showed omphalocele, pulmonary hypoplasia, two lobes in right lung, accessory spleen, atrial septal defect, bilateral clubfoot, ambiguous genitalia, and single umbilical artery. Second fetus was a classical case of iniencephaly apertus with spina bifida. Third fetus had colpocephaly and bifid spine.

  3. Radiologic features of a pyrophosphate-like arthropathy associated with long-term dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Martel, W.; Menerey, K.; Fox, I.H.; Swartz, R.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of 28 long-term dialysis patients with musculoskeletal complaints, the radiologic findings in six cases resembled those occurring in the arthropathy of idiopathic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition (CPPD) disease. These findings included osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and cartilage loss in the metacarpophalangeal joints, patellofemoral joints, wrists, and shoulders. Chondrocalcinosis was present in three of the six cases. There were no significant differences in renal function or levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, iron, ferritin, aluminum, or parathormone between these patients and a control group matched for sex and age. Long-term dialysis may be associated with a metabolic arthritis similar to the arthritis which occurs in CPPD deposition disease. The etiology may include deposition of CPPD crystals, hydroxyapatite, or other calcium-containing substances in joints, or it may be related to a number of dialysis-induced metabolic abnormalities. (orig.)

  4. Radiologic features of a pyrophosphate-like arthropathy associated with long-term dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Martel, W.; Menerey, K.; Fox, I.H.; Swartz, R.

    1987-08-01

    In a series of 28 long-term dialysis patients with musculoskeletal complaints, the radiologic findings in six cases resembled those occurring in the arthropathy of idiopathic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition (CPPD) disease. These findings included osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and cartilage loss in the metacarpophalangeal joints, patellofemoral joints, wrists, and shoulders. Chondrocalcinosis was present in three of the six cases. There were no significant differences in renal function or levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, iron, ferritin, aluminum, or parathormone between these patients and a control group matched for sex and age. Long-term dialysis may be associated with a metabolic arthritis similar to the arthritis which occurs in CPPD deposition disease. The etiology may include deposition of CPPD crystals, hydroxyapatite, or other calcium-containing substances in joints, or it may be related to a number of dialysis-induced metabolic abnormalities.

  5. PACS for surgery and interventional radiology: Features of a Therapy Imaging and Model Management System (TIMMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, Heinz U.; Berliner, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate use of information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronic (MT) systems is viewed by many experts as a means to improve workflow and quality of care in the operating room (OR). This will require a suitable information technology (IT) infrastructure, as well as communication and interface standards, such as specialized extensions of DICOM, to allow data interchange between surgical system components in the OR. A design of such an infrastructure, sometimes referred to as surgical PACS, but better defined as a Therapy Imaging and Model Management System (TIMMS), will be introduced in this article. A TIMMS should support the essential functions that enable and advance image guided therapy, and in the future, a more comprehensive form of patient-model guided therapy. Within this concept, the 'image-centric world view' of the classical PACS technology is complemented by an IT 'model-centric world view'. Such a view is founded in the special patient modelling needs of an increasing number of modern surgical interventions as compared to the imaging intensive working mode of diagnostic radiology, for which PACS was originally conceptualised and developed. The modelling aspects refer to both patient information and workflow modelling. Standards for creating and integrating information about patients, equipment, and procedures are vitally needed when planning for an efficient OR. The DICOM Working Group 24 (WG-24) has been established to develop DICOM objects and services related to image and model guided surgery. To determine these standards, it is important to define step-by-step surgical workflow practices and create interventional workflow models per procedures or per variable cases. As the boundaries between radiation therapy, surgery and interventional radiology are becoming less well-defined, precise patient models will become the greatest common denominator for all therapeutic disciplines. In addition to imaging, the focus of WG-24 is to serve

  6. PACS for surgery and interventional radiology: features of a Therapy Imaging and Model Management System (TIMMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Heinz U; Berliner, Leonard

    2011-05-01

    Appropriate use of information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronic (MT) systems is viewed by many experts as a means to improve workflow and quality of care in the operating room (OR). This will require a suitable information technology (IT) infrastructure, as well as communication and interface standards, such as specialized extensions of DICOM, to allow data interchange between surgical system components in the OR. A design of such an infrastructure, sometimes referred to as surgical PACS, but better defined as a Therapy Imaging and Model Management System (TIMMS), will be introduced in this article. A TIMMS should support the essential functions that enable and advance image guided therapy, and in the future, a more comprehensive form of patient-model guided therapy. Within this concept, the "image-centric world view" of the classical PACS technology is complemented by an IT "model-centric world view". Such a view is founded in the special patient modelling needs of an increasing number of modern surgical interventions as compared to the imaging intensive working mode of diagnostic radiology, for which PACS was originally conceptualised and developed. The modelling aspects refer to both patient information and workflow modelling. Standards for creating and integrating information about patients, equipment, and procedures are vitally needed when planning for an efficient OR. The DICOM Working Group 24 (WG-24) has been established to develop DICOM objects and services related to image and model guided surgery. To determine these standards, it is important to define step-by-step surgical workflow practices and create interventional workflow models per procedures or per variable cases. As the boundaries between radiation therapy, surgery and interventional radiology are becoming less well-defined, precise patient models will become the greatest common denominator for all therapeutic disciplines. In addition to imaging, the focus of WG-24 is to serve

  7. REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: Updated Review of the Core Features, the RBD-Neurodegenerative Disease Association, Evolving Concepts, Controversies, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeve, Bradley F.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia manifested by vivid, often frightening dreams associated with simple or complex motor behavior during REM sleep. Patients appear to “act out their dreams,” in which the exhibited behaviors mirror the content of the dreams, and the dream content often involves a chasing or attacking theme. The polysomnographic features of RBD include increased electromyographic tone +/- dream enactment behavior during REM sleep. Management with counseling and pharmacologic measures is usually straight-forward and effective. In this review, the terminology, clinical and polysomnographic features, demographic and epidemiologic features, diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, and management strategies are discussed. Recent data on the suspected pathophysiologic mechanisms of RBD are also reviewed. The literature and our institutional experience on RBD are next discussed, with an emphasis on the RBD-neurodegenerative disease association and particularly the RBD-synucleinopathy association. Several issues relating to evolving concepts, controversies, and future directions are then reviewed, with an emphasis on idiopathic RBD representing an early feature of a neurodegenerative disease and particularly an evolving synucleinopathy. Planning for future therapies that impact patients with idiopathic RBD is reviewed in detail. PMID:20146689

  8. A study of radiological features of healing in long bone fractures among infants less than a year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Christopher; Miller, Angie; Weinman, Jason; Fadell, Michael [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Maguire, Sabine; Trefan, Laszlo [Cardiff University, Institute of Primary Care and Child Health, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    To create a timetable for dating long bone fractures in infants aged less than 1 year using previously defined radiographic signs of fracture healing. A retrospective cross-sectional time series of long bone fractures in infants aged less than 1 year was conducted from 2006 to 2013. After exclusion criteria were applied 59 digital image series were available for review from 40 infants. Utilizing published criteria for dating fractures, the presence or absence of four pre-defined features of healing was scored: periosteal reaction, callus, bridging, and remodeling. Three radiologists independently scored radiographs with a 3-point scale, marking each feature as present, absent, or equivocal. The times in days when features were first seen, peaked (feature agreed present in >40% of images), and last seen were noted. Statistical analysis using free marginal kappa was conducted. The level of agreement among the three radiologists was high (0.64-0.85). The sequence in which the features were seen was: periosteal reaction range 7-130 (present in the majority of cases between 9 and 49 days); callus range 9-130 (present in the majority of cases between days 9-26); bridging range 15-130 (seen in the majority of cases between 15 and 67 days); remodeling range 51-247 days. This study provides a timetable of radiological features of long bone healing among young infants for the first time. Dating of incomplete long bone fractures is challenging, beyond the presence of periosteal reaction, but a consistent sequence of changes is present in complete fractures. (orig.)

  9. The Radiologic Features of Cystic versus Noncystic Glioblastoma Multiforme as Significant Prognostic Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Hwang, Hee Young; Kim, Na Rae; Lee, Sheen Woo; Kim, Jeong Ho; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the preoperative radiological characteristic and survival differences of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with and without cysts. Twenty-one GBMs were collected retrospectively; these tumors were pathologic confirmed as GBM. Based on the preoperative MR imaging, we compared the cystic GBMs with the noncystic GBMs according to the the tumor size, the tumor interface, the tumor wall thickness and peritumoral edema. Seven cases were classified as cystic GBMs and fourteen were noncystic GBMs. The cystic GBMs had a well-defined tumor interface, a less than 2 cm thickness of the tumor wall and less than 40 cm 3 thick peritumoral edema as compared to that of the noncystic GBMs. There was a statistically significant difference in age between the patients with cystic tumors and those with noncystic tumors. For the patients with cystic GBMs and noncystic GBMs, median survival time after surgery was 43.8 months and 12.5 months, respectively. The cystic GBMs had a well-defined tumor interface, a thin wall and minimal edema, as compared with that of the noncystic GBMs. The patients with cystic GBMs were significantly younger and they had more favorable survival outcomes than did the patients with noncystic GBMs

  10. Work Productivity in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Relationship with Clinical and Radiological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Chaparro del Moral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the relationship between work productivity with disease activity, functional capacity, life quality and radiological damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods. The study included consecutive employed patients with RA (ACR'87, aged over 18. Demographic, disease-related, and work-related variables were determined. The reduction of work productivity was assessed by WPAI-RA. Results. 90 patients were evaluated, 71% women. Age average is 50 years old, DAS28 4, and RAQoL 12. Median SENS is 18 and HAQ-A 0.87. Mean absenteeism was of 14%, presenting an average of 6.30 work hours wasted weekly. The reduction in performance at work or assistance was of 38.4% and the waste of productivity was of 45%. Assistance correlated with DAS28 (r = 0.446; P 18 showed lower work productivity than those with SENS < 18 (50 versus 34; P=0.04. In multiple regression analysis, variables associated with reduction of total work productivity were HAQ-A and RAQoL. Conclusion. RA patients with higher disease severity showed higher work productivity compromise.

  11. Work productivity in rheumatoid arthritis: relationship with clinical and radiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro Del Moral, Rafael; Rillo, Oscar Luis; Casalla, Luciana; Morón, Carolina Bru; Citera, Gustavo; Cocco, José A Maldonado; Correa, María de Los Ángeles; Buschiazzo, Emilio; Tamborenea, Natalia; Mysler, Eduardo; Tate, Guillermo; Baños, Andrea; Herscovich, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess the relationship between work productivity with disease activity, functional capacity, life quality and radiological damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. The study included consecutive employed patients with RA (ACR'87), aged over 18. Demographic, disease-related, and work-related variables were determined. The reduction of work productivity was assessed by WPAI-RA. Results. 90 patients were evaluated, 71% women. Age average is 50 years old, DAS28 4, and RAQoL 12. Median SENS is 18 and HAQ-A 0.87. Mean absenteeism was of 14%, presenting an average of 6.30 work hours wasted weekly. The reduction in performance at work or assistance was of 38.4% and the waste of productivity was of 45%. Assistance correlated with DAS28 (r = 0.446; P productivity was noticed in higher levels of activity and functional disability. Patients with SENS > 18 showed lower work productivity than those with SENS work productivity were HAQ-A and RAQoL. Conclusion. RA patients with higher disease severity showed higher work productivity compromise.

  12. Polyarteritis nodosa presenting with clinical and radiologic features suggestive of polymyositis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-02-18

    We report a patient who presented with clinical and MRI findings suggestive of polymyositis but, in whom, muscle biopsy disclosed a strikingly different diagnosis. A 65-year-old woman presented with 3-week history of bilateral proximal muscle pain and weakness. Laboratory investigations showed markedly elevated inflammatory markers and mildly elevated muscle enzymes. MRI scans of lower limbs showed features suggestive of polymyositis. However, muscle biopsy showed features of a polyarteritis-type vasculitis affecting an intramuscular blood vessel. Our reports highlight the critical role of muscle biopsy in establishing the correct diagnosis in patients with suspected myositis.

  13. Pituitary stalk transection syndrome: Comparison of clinico-radiological features in adults and children with review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, Chinmay; Moorthy, Srikanth; Pullara, Sreekumar K; Rajeshkannan, R; Unnikrishnan, Ambika G

    2012-01-01

    Hypo-pituitarism results from impaired production of one or more of anterior pituitary trophic hormones. A rare cause of hypo-pituitarism is pituitary stalk transection syndrome. The MRI features of this condition in children and its association with hormonal deficiencies have been reported earlier. Reports on adults with this disorder are scarce, with only one small case series published in the recent literature. We studied the hormonal deficiency pattern and MRI findings of 12 patients with pituitary stalk transection syndrome who presented to our department between 2004 and 2011. Six patients were children and six were adults (≥18 years). This article compares the adult clinico-radiological phenotype of pituitary transection syndrome with the pediatric group of patients with same condition

  14. Influences of dehydration on clinical features of radiological pneumonia in children attending an urban diarrhoea treatment centre in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisti, M J; Salam, M A; Bardhan, P K; Ahad, R; La Vincente, S; Duke, T

    2010-01-01

    As the signs of dehydration often overlap with those of pneumonia, it may be difficult for health workers in resource-poor settings to make a clinical diagnosis of pneumonia in children with dehydration. This issue has received very little attention. To compare the clinical features of pneumonia in children with and without dehydration caused by diarrhoea. All children aged 2-59 months with diarrhoea and radiologically confirmed pneumonia admitted to the Special Care Ward (SCW) of Dhaka Hospital, ICDDR,B between September and December 2007 were enrolled for the study. Children with dehydration (67 cases) and those without (101 controls) were compared. Cases presented less frequently with fast breathing (60% vs 88%, pchildren with dehydration, especially when there is severe malnutrition.

  15. Clinicopathologic and radiologic features of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma: a retrospective study of 40 Chinese cases with literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Rui; Lao, I Weng; Wang, Lei; Yu, Lin; Wang, Jian; Fan, Qinhe

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the clinicopathologic and radiologic features of 40 cases of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) from China. There were 25 males and 15 females (sex ratio, 1.7:1). Apart from an adolescent, all patients were adults with a median age of 49years. Twenty-four tumors (60%) occurred in the lower limb and limb girdles, especially the thigh, followed by the upper limb and limb girdles (20%) and trunk (10%). Other less commonly involved locations included the head and neck, sacrococcygeal region, and perineum. Tumors ranged in size from 1.5 to 19cm (mean, 7cm). By radiology, they appeared as hypoattenuated or isoattenuated masses on computed tomography with hyperintense signal on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Intralesional hypointense septa were present in most cases. Of the 40 tumors, 30 belonged to the classic subtype, whereas 9 cases were cellular, and 1 case had a rhabdoid phenotype. Tumor cells showed variable expression of synaptophysin (36%), S-100 protein (29%), epithelial membrane antigen (11%), and neuron-specific enolase (7%). Ki-67 index was remarkably higher in the cellular variant (mean, 30%). EWSR1-related rearrangement was detected in 12 of 14 cases tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization using break-apart probes. The overall 5- and 7-year survival was 71% and 60%, respectively. Awareness of the imaging features may help pathologists in the diagnosis of EMC. Fluorescence in situ hybridization also serves as a useful diagnostic tool for EMC, especially in the distinction from its mimics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Recurrent Wernicke s Encephalopathy in a 16-Year-Old Girl with Atypical Clinical and Radiological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lamdhade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy (WE is a clinical diagnosis with serious neurological consequences. Its occurrence is underestimated in nonalcoholics and is uncommon in adolescents. We aim to draw the attention to a rare case, which had additional clinical and radiological features. Case. A 16-year-old girl presented with three-week history of vomiting secondary to intestinal obstruction. She developed diplopia soon after hospitalization. Neurological evaluation revealed restriction of bilateral lateral recti with horizontal nystagmus, and bilateral limb dysmetria. Brain MRI was normal. She had prompt improvement to thiamine. Four months later, she presented with headache, bilateral severe deafness, and tinnitus. Clinically, she had severe sensorineural hearing loss, bilateral lateral recti paresis, and gait ataxia. CT head showed bilateral caudate nucleus hypodensities. MRI brain revealed gadolinium enhancement of mamillary bodies and vermis. She had significant improvement after IV thiamine. Headache completely resolved while the ocular movements, hearing, and tinnitus improved partially in 72 hours. Conclusions. Recurrent WE in adolescence is uncommon. Headache, tinnitus, and deafness are rare clinical features. Although MRI study shows typical features of WE, the presence of bilateral caudate nuclei hypodensities on CT scan is uncommon. Prompt treatment with thiamine is warranted in suspected cases to prevent permanent neurological sequelae.

  17. A Clinical Decision Support System Using Ultrasound Textures and Radiologic Features to Distinguish Metastasis From Tumor-Free Cervical Lymph Nodes in Patients With Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian Ardakani, Ali; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Afshin

    2018-03-30

    This study investigated the potential of a clinical decision support approach for the classification of metastatic and tumor-free cervical lymph nodes (LNs) in papillary thyroid carcinoma on the basis of radiologic and textural analysis through ultrasound (US) imaging. In this research, 170 metastatic and 170 tumor-free LNs were examined by the proposed clinical decision support method. To discover the difference between the groups, US imaging was used for the extraction of radiologic and textural features. The radiologic features in the B-mode scans included the echogenicity, margin, shape, and presence of microcalcification. To extract the textural features, a wavelet transform was applied. A support vector machine classifier was used to classify the LNs. In the training set data, a combination of radiologic and textural features represented the best performance with sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under the curve (AUC) values of 97.14%, 98.57%, 97.86%, and 0.994, respectively, whereas the classification based on radiologic and textural features alone yielded lower performance, with AUCs of 0.964 and 0.922. On testing the data set, the proposed model could classify the tumor-free and metastatic LNs with an AUC of 0.952, which corresponded to sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 93.33%, 96.66%, and 95.00%. The clinical decision support method based on textural and radiologic features has the potential to characterize LNs via 2-dimensional US. Therefore, it can be used as a supplementary technique in daily clinical practice to improve radiologists' understanding of conventional US imaging for characterizing LNs. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  18. Immunohistochemical features of giant cell ependymoma of the filum terminale with unusual clinical and radiological presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candanedo-Gonzalez, Fernando; Ortiz-Arce, Cindy Sharon; Rosales-Perez, Samuel; Remirez-Castellanos, Ana Lilia; Cordova-Uscanga, Candelaria; Gamboa-Dominguez, Armando

    2017-01-14

    Giant cell ependymoma of the filum terminale is a rare variant, generally manifested as a well-circunscribed intradural mass with an indolent biological behavior. We describe the case of a 48-year-old Mexican female who non-relevant past medical history, that developed a GCE of the filum terminale. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed the presence of an intra-axial tumor extending from L3 to L5 with extra-medullary invasion. Therefore the tumor was considered unresectable and only incisional biopsy was obtained, establishing the tentative diagnosis of a poorly differentiated neoplasia. A second evaluation of the case revealed the presence of numerous non-cohesive pleomorphic giant cells with intranuclear inclusions and broad eosinophilic cytoplasm, alternating with intermediate size cells with round, hyperchromatic nuclei and forming a perivascular pseudo-rosettes pattern. The ependymal phenotype was supported by light microscopy and corroborated by immunohistochemistry analysis. The patient was subsequently treated with radiotherapy 54Gy. She is alive after a 27-month follow-up, with residual disease, difficulty ambulating and pain. GCE of filum terminale may have an atypical clinical and radiological presentation, albeit with invasive characteristics and anaplasia on histologic analysis. However, its biological behavior is indolent and associated to longer survival. Due to the presence of giant cells, the differential diagnosis of other primary neoplasias at that site were considered, including paraganglioma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors as well as metastatic malignant melanoma, adrenal carcinoma, thyroid gland carcinoma and urothelial carcinoma, that may all harbor giant cells.

  19. The clinical and radiological features of Fanconi's anaemia pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Kerviler, E.; Guermazi, A.; Zagdanski, A.-M.; Gluckman, E.; Frija, J

    2000-05-01

    Fanconi's anaemia is a severe refractory anaemia, associated with congenital malformations in approximately two-thirds of cases. Although these malformations may involve every organ system, suggestive dysmorphic features include growth retardation, radial ray deformities and urinary malformations. These malformations are not specific for Fanconi's anaemia, but should be recognized during pregnancy, or later in childhood, and suggest the possibility of inherited haematopoiesis disorders. De Kerviler, E. (2000)

  20. Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma: Radiological features, prognostic factors and survival statistics in 23 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenglei; Xi, Yan; Li, Mei; Jiao, Qiong; Zhang, Huizhen; Yang, Qingcheng; Yao, Weiwu

    2017-01-01

    Background Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma is a rare, highly malignant tumor with a poor survival. There are many confusing issues concerning the imaging feature that can facilitate early diagnosis and the factors that might be related to outcomes. Methods Twenty-three patients with dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma confirmed by pathology were retrospectively reviewed from 2008 to 2015. The patients’ clinical information, images from radiographs (n = 17), CT (n = 19), and MRI (n = 17), histological features, treatment and prognosis were analyzed. Results There were 12 males and 11 females, and the mean age was 50.39 years old. Fourteen cases affected the axial bone (pelvis, spine), and 9 cases involved the appendicular bone. Seven (41.17%), 9 (47.36), and 12 (66.66%) lesions showed a biphasic nature on radiograph, CT and MRI, respectively. Of the lesions, 17.39% (4/23) were accompanied by pathological fractures. Histologically, the cartilage component was considered histological Grade1 in 12 patients and Grade 2 in 11 patients. The dedifferentiated component showed features of osteosarcoma in 8 cases, malignant fibrous histiocytoma in3 cases, myofibroblastic sarcoma in 1 case and spindle cell sarcoma in 11cases. Twenty-two cases were treated with surgical resection, and 17 cases achieved adequate (wide or radical) surgical margin. In 8 cases, surgery was combined with adjuvant chemotherapy. The overall median survival time was nine months; 17.4% of patients survived to five years. Conclusion Axial bone location, lung metastasis at diagnosis, inadequate surgical margin, incorrect diagnosis before surgery and pathological fractures was related to poorer outcome. Pre- or postoperative chemotherapy had no definitively effect on improved survival. PMID:28301537

  1. Mucolipidosis II: Correlation between radiological features and histopathology of the bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazzaglia, U.E.; Beluffi, G.; Campbell, J.B.; Bianchi, E.; Marchi, A.; Colavita, N.; Diard, F.; Gugliantini, P.; Hirche, U.; Kozlowski, K.

    1989-07-01

    Twelve cases of Mucolipidosis II (I-cell disease) with a wide range of severity of skeletal involvement were studied. Pathological findings in two cases provided helpful information in understanding the radiographic features of dysostosis multiplex. Inhibition of the growth plate cartilage calcification and rickets-like lesions were observed in the metahphyses. Enhanced subperiosteal remodelling and paratrabecular fibrosis were also evident in the diaphyses. High levels of parathormone were found in one case. This finding supports the hyporthesis that bone lesions may be secondary, at least in part to damage in such viscera as the kidney and/or the liver and that they are mediated by vitamin D and parathormone. (orig.).

  2. Mucolipidosis II: Correlation between radiological features and histopathology of the bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazzaglia, U.E.; Bianchi, E.; Marchi, A.; Gugliantini, P.; Kozlowski, K.; Nayanar, V.; Pagani, P.

    1989-01-01

    Twelve cases of Mucolipidosis II (I-cell disease) with a wide range of severity of skeletal involvement were studied. Pathological findings in two cases provided helpful information in understanding the radiographic features of dysostosis multiplex. Inhibition of the growth plate cartilage calcification and rickets-like lesions were observed in the metahphyses. Enhanced subperiosteal remodelling and paratrabecular fibrosis were also evident in the diaphyses. High levels of parathormone were found in one case. This finding supports the hyporthesis that bone lesions may be secondary, at least in part to damage in such viscera as the kidney and/or the liver and that they are mediated by vitamin D and parathormone. (orig.)

  3. Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma of the larynx: Radiological, gross, microscopic and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliocca, Kelly R; Edgar, Mark A; Corey, Amanda; Villari, Craig R

    2017-10-01

    Laryngeal chondrosarcoma is an uncommon malignancy with a predilection for the cricoid cartilage of adult male patients. Although rare, identification of aggressive chondrosarcoma variants, such as dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma (DDCS) may influence preoperative patient counseling, definitive surgical management, potential implementation of post-operative adjuvant therapy and prognosis. Herein we describe clinical and imaging features of laryngeal DDCS, the unique perspective of fresh and formalin fixed macroscopic examination, a spectrum of histopathologic findings, and detail the full course of the patient's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acinar Cell Cyst adenoma (Acinar Cystic Transformation) of the Pancreas: the Radiologic-Pathologic Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumus, Mehmet; Algin, Oktay; Gundogdu, Haldun [Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Ugras, Serdar [Selcuk University, Selcuklu Medical Faculty, Konya (Turkmenistan)

    2011-02-15

    Acinar cystic transformation of the pancreas is also known as acinar cell cystadenoma (ACC), and this is an extremely rare benign lesion that was first described in April 2002. We report here on a case of a previously asymptomatic patient with pancreatic ACC and this was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report concerning the CT or MRI features of ACC in the medical literature. We present here the CT, MRI and pathological findings of pancreatic ACC

  5. Acinar Cell Cyst adenoma (Acinar Cystic Transformation) of the Pancreas: the Radiologic-Pathologic Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumus, Mehmet; Algin, Oktay; Gundogdu, Haldun; Ugras, Serdar

    2011-01-01

    Acinar cystic transformation of the pancreas is also known as acinar cell cystadenoma (ACC), and this is an extremely rare benign lesion that was first described in April 2002. We report here on a case of a previously asymptomatic patient with pancreatic ACC and this was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report concerning the CT or MRI features of ACC in the medical literature. We present here the CT, MRI and pathological findings of pancreatic ACC

  6. Geometrical features assessment of liver's tumor with application of artificial neural network evolved by imperialist competitive algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, M; Mojra, A

    2015-05-01

    Geometrical features of a cancerous tumor embedded in biological soft tissue, including tumor size and depth, are a necessity in the follow-up procedure and making suitable therapeutic decisions. In this paper, a new socio-politically motivated global search strategy which is called imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA) is implemented to train a feed forward neural network (FFNN) to estimate the tumor's geometrical characteristics (FFNNICA). First, a viscoelastic model of liver tissue is constructed by using a series of in vitro uniaxial and relaxation test data. Then, 163 samples of the tissue including a tumor with different depths and diameters are generated by making use of PYTHON programming to link the ABAQUS and MATLAB together. Next, the samples are divided into 123 samples as training dataset and 40 samples as testing dataset. Training inputs of the network are mechanical parameters extracted from palpation of the tissue through a developing noninvasive technology called artificial tactile sensing (ATS). Last, to evaluate the FFNNICA performance, outputs of the network including tumor's depth and diameter are compared with desired values for both training and testing datasets. Deviations of the outputs from desired values are calculated by a regression analysis. Statistical analysis is also performed by measuring Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and Efficiency (E). RMSE in diameter and depth estimations are 0.50 mm and 1.49, respectively, for the testing dataset. Results affirm that the proposed optimization algorithm for training neural network can be useful to characterize soft tissue tumors accurately by employing an artificial palpation approach. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Myxomatous fibroadenoma of the breast: correlation with clinicopathologic and radiologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Rin; Tanaka, Maki; Mizushima, Yasuko; Hirai, Yoshitake; Yamaguchi, Miki; Kaneko, Yuko; Terasaki, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Toshiro; Nonaka, Yasuhide; Yano, Hirohisa

    2011-03-01

    Fibroadenoma is a frequently encountered benign tumor that must be differentiated from carcinoma. Fibroadenomas often exhibit myxedematous changes (myxomatous fibroadenoma). We focused on myxomatous fibroadenomas and evaluated their diagnostic imaging and clinicopathologic findings. We examined the (1) clinicopathologic findings of myxomatous fibroadenomas out of 113 fibroadenomas among 592 needle biopsy cases and (2) clinical findings of 27 patients with fibroadenoma who underwent surgical resection. One hundred thirteen (19%) of 592 cases were fibroadenoma, of which 45 cases (40%) were myxomatous fibroadenoma. Based on ultrasonography findings, the depth to width ratio was significantly higher in the myxomatous fibroadenoma group (0.79 ± 0.26) compared with the non-myxomatous fibroadenoma group (0.64 ± 0.26) (P fibroadenoma from carcinomas based on ultrasonography and clinical findings, of which 13 cases (31%) were myxomatous fibroadenoma. These lesions showed a relatively round shape and increased posterior echo enhancement with internal hyperechogenicity on ultrasonography. Among 17 resected cases suspected of malignancy that showed rapid growth and/or size greater than 3 cm, 16 cases were myxomatous fibroadenoma. Tumors showing rapid growth and a relatively large size, a high depth to width ratio, a relatively round shape, and posterior echo enhancement with internal hyperechogenicity on ultrasonography require differentiation from (mucinous) carcinoma but are histologically more likely to be myxomatous fibroadenoma. Understanding the histologic features and combining the ultrasonography findings of myxomatous fibroadenomas may permit reduction in the number of unnecessary needle biopsies for tumor-forming lesions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunisch-Hoppe, M.; Rauber, K.; Rau, W.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Justus Liebig Univ., Giessen (Germany); Hoppe, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Popella, C. [Dept. of ENT, Justus Liebig University, Giessen (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard. (orig.)

  9. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunisch-Hoppe, M.; Rauber, K.; Rau, W.S.; Hoppe, M.; Popella, C.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard. (orig.)

  10. Clinical and radiologic features and their relationships with neurofunctional scores in patients with acute cerebellar infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Huseyin Kozak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebellar infarct is a rare condition with very nonspecific clinical features. The aim of this study was to assess the full spectrum of the clinical characteristics, neuroimaging findings and neurofunctional analyses of cerebellar infarction, and the relationship between them. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from 59 patients admitted to our department during an 8-year period. We retrospectively analyzed the relationship between demographic characteristics, clinical symptomatology, etiological factors, functional condition, vascular distribution, frequency of subcortical white matter lesions (WMLs, and concomitant lesion outside the cerebellum in patients with acute cerebellar infarct (ACI at time of admission. Results: The mean age in our series was 65.2 years, with most being male (57.6%. The posterior inferior cerebellar (PICA artery was the most commonly affected territory at 62.7%. There was concomitant lesion outside the cerebellum in 45.7%. The main etiology in PICA was cardioembolism. While mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission was 2.08 ± 1.67 in study group, modified Rankin Scale (mRS on admission was detected to be mRS1 (n: 44, 74.5% and mRS2 (n: 12, 20.3% most frequently. Fourteen (35% patients were detected to be in Fazekas stage 0; 11 (27.5% patients in Fazekas stage 1; 6 (15% patients in Fazekas stage 2; and 9 (22.5% patients in Fazekas stage 3. Conclusion: Cerebellar infarct is very heterogeneous. The other cerebral area infarcts which accompany ACI negatively affect neurologic functional scores. Although it is difficult to detect the relationship between WMLs and neurologic functional severity, timely detection of risk factors and their modulation may be associated with prevention and treatability of WMLs, and this may be one of the important points for prevention of stroke-related disability.

  11. Clinical and radiological features of rheumatoid arthritis in British black Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Vinod; Seah, May-Ai; Elias, David A; Choy, Ernest H; Scott, David L; Gordon, Patrick A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether radiographic damage is different in British black African patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared to Caucasian patients. Data on demographics, disease- and disability-related variables were obtained from all black African patients and their age-, gender- and disease-duration-matched Caucasian controls. After all features identifying the patients were concealed, X-rays of hands and feet were scored by using the Sharp/van der Heijde method. Data were analysed using Mann-Whitney U test, t test and chi (2) test. Sixty-four patients (32 in each ethnic group) were studied. The median age was 52 years and median disease duration 6 years. Seventy-two percent of patients were female. Black Africans and Caucasians did not differ significantly in rheumatoid factor positivity, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biological treatment use. British black African patients had significantly more tender joints and disability. Joint space narrowing was significantly greater in Caucasian patients [48 (27-85) vs 56 (34-107), p = 0.01]. Caucasian patients had more number of erosions (172 vs 220) and higher erosion score; however, the difference in the erosion scores was not statistically significant [2 (0-48) vs 4.5 (0-46), p = 0.17]. Radiographic damage was less severe in black African patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared to their age-, gender- and disease-duration-matched Caucasian controls. A large prospective study is required to confirm the findings of this study and to establish the factors which might be accountable for any differences in the expression of rheumatoid arthritis in this ethnic group.

  12. Inter-observer variability in diagnosing radiological features of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage; a preliminary single centre study comparing observers from different specialties and levels of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Usman T; Khan, Anjum F; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad; Hamid, Rana Shoaib; Alam, Muhammad Mehboob; Emaduddin, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    the radiological features of aSAH, there is still considerable IOV in the interpretation of most features among physicians belonging to different levels of training and different specialties. Whether these might affect management or outcome is unclear.

  13. Microbial landscape features in patients with generalized periodontitis at pre-clinical and radiological stage of its development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatamanyuk N.V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a comparative study of microbial landscape features in patients with generalized periodontitis at pre-clinical and radiological stage of its development in 42 patients. The purpose of the study is a comparative study of the composition of microbiocenosis of periodontal tissues in patients with chronic catarrhal gingivitis (CCG and chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP at an early stage of development and development studies of microbiological criteria for early emergence of the destructive process in periodontal structures. We found that the microflora isolated from dento-gingival grooves is of importance in diagnostics to identify the etiology of chronic generalized catarrhal gingivitis (CGCG and chronic generalized periodontitis in the early stages of its development. It was established that the presence of two or more types of fixed parodonto-pathogenic microorganisms in microbial association increases the likelihood of inflammatory and destructive events in periodontal tissues in patients with GCCG and is one of the reasons of is becoming CGP.

  14. The study on spatial distribution features of radiological plume discharged from Nuclear Power Plant based on C4ISRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunfeng; Shen, Yue; Feng, Bairun; Yang, Fan; Li, Qiangqiang; Du, Boying; Bian, Yushan; Hu, Qiongqong; Wang, Qi; Hu, Xiaomin; Yin, Hang

    2018-02-01

    When the nuclear emergency accident occurs, it is very important to estimate three-dimensional space feature of the radioactive plume discharged from the source term for the emergency organization, as well as for better understanding of atmospheric dispersion processes. So, taking the Hongyanhe Nuclear Power Plant for example, the study for three-dimensional space feature of the radioactive plume is accomplished by applying atmospheric transport model (coupling of WRF-HYSPLIT) driven by FNL meteorological data of NCEP (04/01/2014-04/02/2014) based on the C4ISRE (Command, Control, Communications, Computer, Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance, Environmental Impact Assessment).The results show that the whole shape of three-dimensional plume was about irregular cloth influenced by wind; In the spatial domain (height > 16000m),the distribution of radiological plume, which looked more like horseshoe-shaped, presented irregular polygons of which the total length was 2258.7km, where covered the area of 39151km2; In the airspace from 4000m to 16000m, the plume, covered the area of 116269 km2, showed a triangle and the perimeter of that was 2280.4km; The shape of the plume was more like irregular quadrilateral, its perimeter was 2941.8km and coverage area of the plume was 131534km2;The overall distribution of the wind field showed a rectangular shape; Within the area along the horizontal direction 400m from origin to east and under height (lower than 2000m),the closer the distance coordinate (0,0), the denser the plume particles; Within the area of horizontal distance(500m-1000m) and height (4000m- 16000m), the particle density were relatively sparse and the spread extent of the plume particles from west to East was relatively large and the plume particles were mainly in the suspended state without obvious dry sedimentation; Within the area of horizontal distance (800m-1100m) and height (>16000m), there were relatively gentle horizontal diffusion of plume particles

  15. Correlation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -3, and -9 expressions with demographic and radiological features in primary lumbar intervertebral disc disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaran, Recep; Senol, Mehmet; Ozkanli, Seyma; Efendioglu, Mustafa; Kaner, Tuncay

    2017-07-01

    Degeneration of IVD is a progressive and irreversible process and can be evaluated with immunohistochemical examination or radiological grading. MMPs are a family of proteolytic enzymes and involved in the degradation of the matrix components of the IVD. We aimed to compare MMP-1, -2, -3, and -9 expressions with demographic features, visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and radiological (MRI) grades. The study involved 60 participants. We recorded data about age, complaint, radiological imaging, expression levels of MMP-1, -2, -3, and -9, ODI and VAS for back pain retrospectively. Intervertebral disc degeneration was graded on a 0-5 scale according to the Pfirrmann classification. As a result of the study, the median age was 52.09±12.74years. There were statistical significances between age and MMP-1, and MMP-2. There was a close correlation between grade and MMP-9. We found correlation between the VAS and the MMP-9 expression. In addition, there was relationship between expression of MMP-2 and MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9. In conclusion, the expressions of MMP-1 and -2 are increased with aging. There was no relationship between radiological evaluation of IVDD and aging. Increased expression of MMPs affected IVDD positively. The relationship with MMPs is not explained. This study adds to our understanding of the interaction between MMPs and IVDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The feasibility and radiological features of sacral alar iliac fixation in an adult population: a 3D imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Min Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical treatments for adult spinal deformities often include pelvic fixation, and the feasibility of sacral-2 alar iliac (S2AI screw fixation has been shown previously. However, sometimes S2AI screw fixation cannot be applied due to the presence of an osteolytic lesion or trauma or because the biomechanical properties of only an S2AI screw is insufficient. Therefore, we questioned the feasibility of using sacral AI screws in other segments and determined whether S3AI and S4AI screws have the potential to be used for sacral fractures. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and radiological features of sacral AI fixation in S1–S4 in an adult population using 3D imaging techniques. Methods: Computed tomography (CT scans were taken of 45 patients and were imported into Mimics (Version 10.01, Materialise, Belgium software to reconstruct the 3D digital images. Next, a cylinder (radius of 3.5 mm was drawn to imitate the screw trajectory of a S1–4 AI screw, and every imitated screw in each segment was adjusted to a maximum upward and downward angle to acquire the feasible region. The parameters of the S1–4AI screw trajectories were measured. Results: Sacral AI screws could be successfully imitated using 3D digital imaging. The S4AI screw trajectory could be obtained in 19 of 45 patient images (42.2%, while the feasibility rates of S1AI, S2AI, and S3AI screw fixation were 100%, 100%, and 91.1% (41/45, respectively. The feasible regions of S1AI, S2AI, and S3AI screw trajectories were wide enough, while the adjustable angle of S4AI screws was very small. Conclusion: It is feasible to place S1–2AI screws in the entire adult population and S3–4AI screws in some of the adult population. Furthermore, our study suggested that 3D digital images are suitable to study the feasibility of new screw fixation.

  17. Breast Abscessed Cancer in Nonlactating Women in Tropical Environment: Radiological, Bacteriological, and Anatomopathological Features about 3 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazamaesso Tchaou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of breast cancer and abscess is rare in daily practice. The authors report a short series of 3 cases of cancer of the breast in nonlactating women presented as breast abscess, reviewing aspects in radiology (ultrasound and mammography, correlating them with the histopathology findings and the bacteriological profile of the isolated germs.

  18. A study of the clinical and radiological features in a cohort of 93 patients with a COL2A1 mutation causing spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita or a related phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terhal, Paulien A.; Nievelstein, Rutger Jan A. J.; Verver, Eva J. J.; Topsakal, Vedat; van Dommelen, Paula; Hoornaert, Kristien; Le Merrer, Martine; Zankl, Andreas; Simon, Marleen E. H.; Smithson, Sarah F.; Marcelis, Carlo; Kerr, Bronwyn; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kinning, Esther; Mansour, Sahar; Elmslie, Frances; Goodwin, Linda; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E.; Herkert, Johanna C.; Lund, Allan M.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Mégarbané, André; Lees, Melissa M.; Wilson, Louise C.; Male, Alison; Hurst, Jane; Alanay, Yasemin; Annerén, Göran; Betz, Regina C.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Dieux, Anne; David, Albert; Elting, Mariet W.; van den Ende, Jenneke; Green, Andrew; van Hagen, Johanna M.; Hertel, Niels Thomas; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; den Hollander, Nicolette; Homfray, Tessa; Hove, Hanne D.; Price, Susan; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Rohrbach, Marianne; Schroeter, Barbara; Suri, Mohnish; Thompson, Elizabeth M.; Tobias, Edward S.; Toutain, Annick; Vreeburg, Maaike; Wakeling, Emma; Knoers, Nine V.; Coucke, Paul; Mortier, Geert R.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 collagen disorders encompass a diverse group of skeletal dysplasias that are commonly associated with orthopedic, ocular, and hearing problems. However, the frequency of many clinical features has never been determined. We retrospectively investigated the clinical, radiological, and genotypic

  19. A Study of the Clinical and Radiological Features in a Cohort of 93 Patients with a COL2A1 Mutation Causing Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Congenita or a Related Phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terhal, Paulien A.; Nievelstein, Rutger Jan A. J.; Verver, Eva J. J.; Topsakal, Vedat; van Dommelen, Paula; Hoornaert, Kristien; Le Merrer, Martine; Zankl, Andreas; Simon, Marleen E. H.; Smithson, Sarah F.; Marcelis, Carlo; Kerr, Bronwyn; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kinning, Esther; Mansour, Sahar; Elmslie, Frances; Goodwin, Linda; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E.; Herkert, Johanna C.; Lund, Allan M.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Megarbane, Andre; Lees, Melissa M.; Wilson, Louise C.; Male, Alison; Hurst, Jane; Alanay, Yasemin; Anneren, Goeran; Betz, Regina C.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Dieux, Anne; David, Albert; Elting, Mariet W.; van den Ende, Jenneke; Green, Andrew; van Hagen, Johanna M.; Hertel, Niels Thomas; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; den Hollander, Nicolette; Homfray, Tessa; Hove, Hanne D.; Price, Susan; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Rohrbach, Marianne; Schroeter, Barbara; Suri, Mohnish; Thompson, Elizabeth M.; Tobias, Edward S.; Toutain, Annick; Vreeburg, Maaike; Wakeling, Emma; Knoers, Nine V.; Coucke, Paul; Mortier, Geert R.

    Type 2 collagen disorders encompass a diverse group of skeletal dysplasias that are commonly associated with orthopedic, ocular, and hearing problems. However, the frequency of many clinical features has never been determined. We retrospectively investigated the clinical, radiological, and genotypic

  20. Radiological features of Lemierre's syndrome: A case report; Manifestaciones radiologicas del sindrome de Lemierre: a proposito de un caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapia-Vine, M. M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, B.; Bustos, A.; Cabello, J. [Hospital Clinico San Carlos. Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a type of sepsis caused by anaerobes that is secondary to a pharyngotonsillar infection complicated by suppurative thrombophlebitis of ipsilateral jugular vein and septic emboli. Imaging studies are valuable tools for confirming the diagnosis. Chest x-ray reveals poorly defined cavitated, peripheral, nodular lesions. computed tomography (CT) is useful in confirming the pulmonary lesions, which are suggestive of septic emboli. Doppler ultrasound of the neck plays and indispensable role in demonstrating the internal jugular vein thrombosis. We report the case of patient who presented the characteristic clinical and radiological features of Lemierre's syndrome. (Author) 17 refs.

  1. Post-infective transverse myelitis following Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis with radiological features of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-infectious autoimmune demyelination of the central nervous system is a rare neurological disorder typically associated with exanthematous viral infections. We report an unusual presentation of the condition and a previously undocumented association with Streptococcus pneumonia meningitis. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our facility with an acute myelopathy three days after discharge following acute Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis. Imaging studies of the spine ruled out an infective focus and no other lesions were seen within the cord. Diffuse, bilateral white matter lesions were seen within the cerebral hemispheres, and our patient was diagnosed as having a post-infective demyelination syndrome that met the diagnostic criteria for an acute transverse myelitis. Our patient clinically and radiologically improved following treatment with steroids. Conclusions The novel association of a Streptococcus pneumoniae infection with post-infectious autoimmune central nervous system demyelination should alert the reader to the potentially causative role of this common organism, and gives insights into the pathogenesis. The unusual dissociation between the clinical presentation and the location of the radiological lesions should also highlight the potential for the condition to mimic the presentation of others, and stimulates debate on the definitions of acute transverse myelitis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and their potential overlap.

  2. Development of an online radiology case review system featuring interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Boh Kyoung; Jung, Ju Hyun; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Woo, Hyun Soo; Jo, Jae Min; Lee, Min Hee

    2015-01-01

    To develop an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques. Our Institutional Review Board approved the use of the patient data and waived the need for informed consent. We determined the following system requirements: volumetric navigation, accessibility, scalability, undemanding case management, trainee encouragement, and simulation of a busy practice. The system comprised a case registry server, client case review program, and commercially available cloud-based image viewing system. In the pilot test, we used 30 cases of low-dose abdomen computed tomography for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. In each case, a trainee was required to navigate through the images and submit answers to the case questions. The trainee was then given the correct answers and key images, as well as the image dataset with annotations on the appendix. After evaluation of all cases, the system displayed the diagnostic accuracy and average review time, and the trainee was asked to reassess the failed cases. The pilot system was deployed successfully in a hands-on workshop course. We developed an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques

  3. Development of an online radiology case review system featuring interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Boh Kyoung; Jung, Ju Hyun; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Hyun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jae Min [Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    To develop an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques. Our Institutional Review Board approved the use of the patient data and waived the need for informed consent. We determined the following system requirements: volumetric navigation, accessibility, scalability, undemanding case management, trainee encouragement, and simulation of a busy practice. The system comprised a case registry server, client case review program, and commercially available cloud-based image viewing system. In the pilot test, we used 30 cases of low-dose abdomen computed tomography for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. In each case, a trainee was required to navigate through the images and submit answers to the case questions. The trainee was then given the correct answers and key images, as well as the image dataset with annotations on the appendix. After evaluation of all cases, the system displayed the diagnostic accuracy and average review time, and the trainee was asked to reassess the failed cases. The pilot system was deployed successfully in a hands-on workshop course. We developed an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques.

  4. Classification of radiological errors in chest radiographs, using support vector machine on the spatial frequency features of false- negative and false-positive regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Donovan, Tim; Brennan, Patrick C.; Dix, Alan; Manning, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To optimize automated classification of radiological errors during lung nodule detection from chest radiographs (CxR) using a support vector machine (SVM) run on the spatial frequency features extracted from the local background of selected regions. Background: The majority of the unreported pulmonary nodules are visually detected but not recognized; shown by the prolonged dwell time values at false-negative regions. Similarly, overestimated nodule locations are capturing substantial amounts of foveal attention. Spatial frequency properties of selected local backgrounds are correlated with human observer responses either in terms of accuracy in indicating abnormality position or in the precision of visual sampling the medical images. Methods: Seven radiologists participated in the eye tracking experiments conducted under conditions of pulmonary nodule detection from a set of 20 postero-anterior CxR. The most dwelled locations have been identified and subjected to spatial frequency (SF) analysis. The image-based features of selected ROI were extracted with un-decimated Wavelet Packet Transform. An analysis of variance was run to select SF features and a SVM schema was implemented to classify False-Negative and False-Positive from all ROI. Results: A relative high overall accuracy was obtained for each individually developed Wavelet-SVM algorithm, with over 90% average correct ratio for errors recognition from all prolonged dwell locations. Conclusion: The preliminary results show that combined eye-tracking and image-based features can be used for automated detection of radiological error with SVM. The work is still in progress and not all analytical procedures have been completed, which might have an effect on the specificity of the algorithm.

  5. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppelt, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  6. Maintaining evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, James F

    2008-12-01

    Although molecular methods, such as QTL mapping, have revealed a number of loci with large effects, it is still likely that the bulk of quantitative variability is due to multiple factors, each with small effect. Typically, these have a large additive component. Conventional wisdom argues that selection, natural or artificial, uses up additive variance and thus depletes its supply. Over time, the variance should be reduced, and at equilibrium be near zero. This is especially expected for fitness and traits highly correlated with it. Yet, populations typically have a great deal of additive variance, and do not seem to run out of genetic variability even after many generations of directional selection. Long-term selection experiments show that populations continue to retain seemingly undiminished additive variance despite large changes in the mean value. I propose that there are several reasons for this. (i) The environment is continually changing so that what was formerly most fit no longer is. (ii) There is an input of genetic variance from mutation, and sometimes from migration. (iii) As intermediate-frequency alleles increase in frequency towards one, producing less variance (as p --> 1, p(1 - p) --> 0), others that were originally near zero become more common and increase the variance. Thus, a roughly constant variance is maintained. (iv) There is always selection for fitness and for characters closely related to it. To the extent that the trait is heritable, later generations inherit a disproportionate number of genes acting additively on the trait, thus increasing genetic variance. For these reasons a selected population retains its ability to evolve. Of course, genes with large effect are also important. Conspicuous examples are the small number of loci that changed teosinte to maize, and major phylogenetic changes in the animal kingdom. The relative importance of these along with duplications, chromosome rearrangements, horizontal transmission and polyploidy

  7. Medical liability and patient law in Germany. Main features with particular focus on treatments in the field of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, S.A.; Geissler, R.; Stampfl, U.; Radeleff, B.A.; Kauczor, H.U.; Sommer, Christof M.; Richter, G.M.; Pereira, P.L.

    2016-01-01

    On February 26th, 2013 the patient law became effective in Germany. Goal of the lawmakers was a most authoritative case law for liability of malpractice and to improve enforcement of the rights of the patients. The following article contains several examples detailing legal situation. By no means should these discourage those persons who treat patients. Rather should they be sensitized to to various aspects of this increasingly important field of law. To identify relevant sources according to judicial standard research was conducted including first- and second selection. Goal was the identification of jurisdiction, literature and other various analyses that all deal with liability of malpractice and patient law within the field of Interventional Radiology - with particular focus on transarterial chemoembolization of the liver and related procedures. In summary, 89 different sources were included and analyzed. The individual who treats a patient is liable for an error in treatment if it causes injury to life, the body or the patient's health. Independent of the error in treatment the individual providing medical care is liable for mistakes made in the context of obtaining informed consent. Prerequisite is the presence of an error made when obtaining informed consent and its causality for the patient's consent for the treatment. Without an effective consent the treatment is considered illegal whether it was free of treatment error or not. The new patient law does not cause material change of the German liability of malpractice law.

  8. Radiological Approach to Forefoot Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Chung Ho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Forefoot pain is a common clinical complaint in orthopaedic practice. In this article, we discuss the anatomy of the forefoot, clinical and radiological approaches to forefoot pain, and common painful forefoot disorders and their associated radiological features.

  9. Medical Liability and Patient Law in Germany: Main Features with Particular Focus on Treatments in the Field of Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S A; Geissler, R; Stampfl, U; Wolf, M B; Radeleff, B A; Richter, G M; Kauczor, H-U; Pereira, P L; Sommer, C M

    2016-04-01

    On February 26th, 2013 the patient law became effective in Germany. Goal of the lawmakers was a most authoritative case law for liability of malpractice and to improve enforcement of the rights of the patients. The following article contains several examples detailing legal situation. By no means should these discourage those persons who treat patients. Rather should they be sensitized to to various aspects of this increasingly important field of law. To identify relevant sources according to judicial standard research was conducted including first- and second selection. Goal was the identification of jurisdiction, literature and other various analyses that all deal with liability of malpractice and patient law within the field of Interventional Radiology--with particular focus on transarterial chemoembolization of the liver and related procedures. In summary, 89 different sources were included and analyzed. The individual who treats a patient is liable for an error in treatment if it causes injury to life, the body or the patient's health. Independent of the error in treatment the individual providing medical care is liable for mistakes made in the context of obtaining informed consent. Prerequisite is the presence of an error made when obtaining informed consent and its causality for the patient's consent for the treatment. Without an effective consent the treatment is considered illegal whether it was free of treatment error or not. The new patient law does not cause material change of the German liablity of malpractice law. •On February 26th, 2013 the new patient law came into effect. Materially, there was no fundamental remodeling of the German liability for medical malpractice. •Regarding a physician's liability for medical malpractice two different elements of an offence come into consideration: for one the liability for malpractice and, in turn, liability for errors made during medical consultation in the process of obtaining informed consent.

  10. Atypical MRI features in soft-tissue arteriovenous malformation: a novel imaging appearance with radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Anand S. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California, San Francisco, Department of Interventional Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Schulman, Joshua M.; Ruben, Beth S. [University of California, San Francisco, Departments of Pathology and Dermatology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hoffman, William Y. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Plastic Surgery, Birthmarks and Vascular Anomalies Clinic, San Francisco, CA (United States); Dowd, Christopher F. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Birthmarks and Vascular Anomalies Clinic, San Francisco, CA (United States); Frieden, Ilona J. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Dermatology, Birthmarks and Vascular Anomalies Clinic, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hess, Christopher P. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neuroradiology, Birthmarks and Vascular Anomalies Clinic, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The absence of a discrete mass, surrounding signal abnormality and solid enhancement are imaging features that have traditionally been used to differentiate soft-tissue arteriovenous malformations from vascular tumors on MRI. We have observed that these findings are not uncommon in arteriovenous malformations, which may lead to misdiagnosis or inappropriate treatment. To estimate the frequency of atypical MRI features in soft-tissue arteriovenous malformations and assess their relationship to lesion size, location, tissue type involved and vascular architecture. Medical records, MRI and histopathology were reviewed in consecutive patients with soft-tissue arteriovenous malformations in a multidisciplinary vascular anomalies clinic. Arteriovenous malformations were divided into those with and without atypical MRI findings (perilesional T2 signal abnormality, enhancement and/or a soft-tissue mass). Lesion location, size, tissue involved and vascular architecture were also compared between groups. Tissue stains were reviewed in available biopsy or resection specimens to assess relationships between MRI findings and histopathology. Thirty patients with treatment-naive arteriovenous malformations were included. Fifteen lesions demonstrated atypical MRI. There was no difference in age, gender, lesion size or involved body part between the groups. However, more than half of the atypical lesions demonstrated multicompartmental involvement, and tiny intralesional flow voids were more common in atypical arteriovenous malformations. Histopathology also differed in atypical cases, showing densely packed endothelial cells with connective tissue architectural distortion and edema. Arteriovenous malformations may exhibit features of a vascular tumor on MRI, particularly when multicompartmental and/or containing tiny internal vessels. These features are important to consider in suspected fast-flow vascular malformations and may have implications with respect to their treatment

  11. Symbiotic Composition and Evolvability

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Richard A.; Pollack, Jordan B.

    2001-01-01

    Several of the Major Transitions in natural evolution, such as the symbiogenic origin of eukaryotes from prokaryotes, share the feature that existing entities became the components of composite entities at a higher level of organisation. This composition of pre-adapted extant entities into a new whole is a fundamentally different source of variation from the gradual accumulation of small random variations, and it has some interesting consequences for issues of evolvability. In this paper we p...

  12. Interstellar Chemistry Special Feature: The chemistry in circumstellar envelopes of evolved stars: Following the origin of the elements to the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2006-08-01

    Mass loss from evolved stars results in the formation of unusual chemical laboratories: circumstellar envelopes. Such envelopes are found around carbon- and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants. As the gaseous material of the envelope flows from the star, the resulting temperature and density gradients create a complex chemical environment involving hot, thermodynamically controlled synthesis, molecule "freeze-out," shock-initiated reactions, and photochemistry governed by radical mechanisms. In the circumstellar envelope of the carbon-rich star IRC+10216, >50 different chemical compounds have been identified, including such exotic species as C8H, C3S, SiC3, and AlNC. The chemistry here is dominated by molecules containing long carbon chains, silicon, and metals such as magnesium, sodium, and aluminum, which makes it quite distinct from that found in molecular clouds. The molecular composition of the oxygen-rich counterparts is not nearly as well explored, although recent studies of VY Canis Majoris have resulted in the identification of HCO+, SO2, and even NaCl in this object, suggesting chemical complexity here as well. As these envelopes evolve into planetary nebulae with a hot, exposed central star, synthesis of molecular ions becomes important, as indicated by studies of NGC 7027. Numerous species such as HCO+, HCN, and CCH are found in old planetary nebulae such as the Helix. This "survivor" molecular material may be linked to the variety of compounds found recently in diffuse clouds. Organic molecules in dense interstellar clouds may ultimately be traced back to carbon-rich fragments originally formed in circumstellar shells.

  13. A TALE OF THREE MYSTERIOUS SPECTRAL FEATURES IN CARBON-RICH EVOLVED STARS: THE 21 μm, 30 μm, AND “UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED” EMISSION FEATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Ajay; Li, Aigen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Jiang, B. W., E-mail: amishra@mail.missouri.edu, E-mail: lia@missouri.edu, E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2015-03-20

    The mysterious “21 μm” emission feature seen almost exclusively in the short-lived protoplanetary nebula (PPN) phase of stellar evolution remains unidentified since its discovery two decades ago. This feature is always accompanied by the equally mysterious, unidentified “30 μm” feature and the so-called “unidentified infrared” (UIR) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm which are generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. The 30 μm feature is commonly observed in all stages of stellar evolution from the asymptotic giant branch through PPN to the planetary nebula phase. We explore the interrelations among the mysterious 21, 30 μm, and UIR features of the 21 μm sources. We derive the fluxes emitted in the observed UIR, 21, and 30 μm features from published Infrared Space Observatory or Spitzer/IRS spectra. We find that none of these spectral features correlate with each other. This argues against a common carrier (e.g., thiourea) for both the 21 μm feature and the 30 μm feature. This also does not support large PAH clusters as a possible carrier for the 21 μm feature.

  14. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Lo, Joseph Y; Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Ghate, Sujata V; Yoon, Sora C; Mazurowski, Maciej A

    2014-09-01

    Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. The authors' algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different from 0.5 (perror

  15. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jing; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. Methods: The authors’ algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. Results: The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different

  16. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing, E-mail: jing.zhang2@duke.edu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C. [Department of Radiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Department of Radiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kuzmiak, Cherie M. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Mazurowski, Maciej A. [Department of Radiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. Methods: The authors’ algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. Results: The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different

  17. Radiology today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, M.W.; Heuck, F.H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The book encompasses the proceedings of a postgraduate course held in Salzburg in June 1980. 230 radiologists from 17 countries discussed here the important and practical advances of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and ultrasound as they contribute to gastrointestinal, urologic, skeletal, cardiovascular, pediatric, and neuroradiology. The book contains 55 single contributions of different authors to the following main themes: Cardiovascular, Radiology, pulmonary radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, urinary tract radiology, skeletal radiology, mammography, lymphography, ultrasound, ENT radiology, and neuroradiology. (orig./MG)

  18. Clinical features and radiological findings of adenovirus pneumonia associated with progression to acute respiratory distress syndrome: A single center study in 19 adult patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Min Jae; Chong, Semin [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; KIm, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Han, Jung Ho [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To describe radiologic findings of adenovirus pneumonia and to understand clinico-radiological features associated with progression to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients with adenovirus pneumonia. This study included 19 patients diagnosed with adenovirus pneumonia at a tertiary referral center, in the period between March 2003 and April 2015. Clinical findings were reviewed, and two radiologists assessed imaging findings by consensus. Chi-square, Fisher's exact, and Student's t tests were used for comparing patients with and without subsequent development of ARDS. Of 19 patients, nine were immunocompromised, and 10 were immunocompetent. Twelve patients (63%) progressed to ARDS, six of whom (32%) eventually died from the disease. The average time for progression to ARDS from symptom onset was 9.6 days. Initial chest radiographic findings were normal (n = 2), focal opacity (n = 9), or multifocal or diffuse opacity (n = 8). Computed tomography (CT) findings included bilateral (n = 17) or unilateral (n = 2) ground-glass opacity with consolidation (n = 14) or pleural effusion (n = 11). Patients having subsequent ARDS had a higher probability of pleural effusion and a higher total CT extent compared with the non-ARDS group (p = 0.010 and 0.007, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in clinical variables such as patient age and premorbid condition. Adenovirus pneumonia demonstrates high rates of ARDS and mortality, regardless of patient age and premorbid conditions, in the tertiary care setting. Large disease extent and presence of pleural effusion on CT are factors suggestive of progression to ARDS.

  19. Radiological imaging features and clinicopathological correlation of hemosiderotic fibrolipomatous tumor: experience in a single tertiary cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Driscoll, Dearbhail; Athanasian, Edward; Hameed, Meera; Hwang, Sinchun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    To determine the imaging features of hemosiderotic fibrolipomatous tumor (HFLT), which has a propensity towards local recurrence and the potential to transform into myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma (MIFS). The study included 8 patients with a diagnosis of HFLT and imaging at a tertiary cancer center. Imaging studies included radiographs (n = 2), ultrasound (n = 3), and MRI (n = 16). Imaging features were evaluated including location, calcification, sonographic echogenicity, vascular flow, size, border, signal characteristics, contrast enhancement, and blooming on MRI. The HFLT was located in the ankle/foot in 4 out of 8 and was subcutaneous in 8 out of 8, ranging in size from 2 to 18 cm. Histology at initial diagnosis was HFLT in 5 out of 8 and HFLT with MIFS in 3 out of 8. None was calcified on radiography. On ultrasound 2 out of 3 were heterogeneously echogenic with ≥10 foci of vascular flow. Two out of 8 patients had MRI only at local recurrence. The tumor border was infiltrative in 4 out of 6 at initial diagnosis and in 2 patients with MRI at recurrence only. Fat and septae were present in 7 out of 8 at initial diagnosis and at recurrence. Signal intensity was iso-/hypointense to muscle on T1-weighted sequences in more than two thirds of the tumor in 4 out of 7 and hyperintense to muscle in at least one third of the tumor on fluid-sensitive sequences in 6 out of 8. Contrast enhancement was heterogeneous in 7 out of 7; blooming in two thirds of the tumor on gradient-echo sequence MRI indicated hemorrhage. The HFLT commonly presents as a mass with an infiltrative border, interspersed fat and septations at initial diagnosis and local recurrence on MRI regardless of histology of HFLT alone or with MIFS. Hemosiderin deposits may be detected as blooming on gradient-echo sequences. (orig.)

  20. C++ evolves!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumann, Axel

    2014-01-01

    C++ is used throughout High Energy Physics. CERN participates in the development of its standard. There has been a major shift in standardization procedures that will be visible starting 2014 with an increase rate of new standardized features. Already the current C++11 has major improvements, also for coding novices, related to simplicity, expressiveness, performance and robustness. Other major improvements are in the area of concurrency, where C++ is now on par with most other high level languages. To benefit from these language improvements and from the massive improvements in compiler technology for instance in usability, access to current compilers is crucial. Use of current C++ compiled with current compilers can considerably improve C++ for the HEP physicist community.

  1. Colour Doppler evaluation of extracranial carotid artery in patients presenting with features of cerebrovascular disease: A clinical and radiological correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Sehrawat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the morphological and hemodynamic changes that take place in carotid arteries by colour Doppler in patients presenting with features of stroke. Background and Objectives: Cerebrovascular accidents constitute a major cause of adult mortality. The principal indication for cerebrovascular Doppler examination is stroke prevention. Colour Doppler sonography is a sensitive method for detection of atherosclerotic plaque and provides considerable information about the extent and severity of plaque as well as the resulting diminution of arterial lumen. The main strengths of sonography of carotid arteries are patient comfort, lack of risk and accuracy in detecting carotid stenosis. Material and Methods: A prospective study of Colour Doppler in carotid arteries was carried out for 12 months from 1 st July 2009 to 1 st July 2010. The study was carried out on 40 individuals, suspected of cerebrovascular insufficiency and having one or the other risk factors for cerebrovascular disease. A detailed clinical history, CNS examination findings and evidence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia and ischemic heart disease were noted. Carotid Doppler evaluation was done by using Siemens Antares Ultrasound system. The data gathered were grey scale and Doppler findings of common carotid artery, internal carotid artery and external carotid arteries. Doppler findings were correlated with clinical features and risk factors. Results: In our study of 40 patients, the commonest lesion found was the atherosclerotic plaque. Highest incidence of plaque was seen in males 41% in the age group of 60-70 years and in females 37% in age group of 70-80 years. Cigarette smoking was the most common risk factor (60% associated with stroke/ Transient Ischaemic Attacks (TIA. Hemiparesis was the most common presenting symptom (35% among the symptomatic cases. Atheromatous plaque was most commonly found in the right carotid system (60%. Most common site for

  2. Nitrate and Moisture Content of Broad Permafrost Landscape Features in the Barrow Peninsula: Predicting Evolving NO3 Concentrations in a Changing Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, C. A.; Heikoop, J. M.; Newman, B. D.; Wales, N. A.; McCaully, R. E.; Wilson, C. J.; Wullschleger, S.

    2017-12-01

    The geochemical evolution of Arctic regions as permafrost degrades, significantly impacts nutrient availability. The release of nitrogen compounds from permafrost degradation fertilizes both microbial decomposition and plant productivity. Arctic warming promotes permafrost degradation, causing geomorphic and hydrologic transitions that have the potential to convert saturated zones to unsaturated zones and subsequently alter the nitrate production capacity of permafrost regions. Changes in Nitrate (NO3-) content associated with shifting moisture regimes are a primary factor determining Arctic fertilization and subsequent primary productivity, and have direct feedbacks to carbon cycling. We have documented a broad survey of co-located soil moisture and nitrate concentration measurements in shallow active layer regions across a variety of topographic features in the expansive continuous permafrost region encompassing the Barrow Peninsula of Alaska. Topographic features of interest are slightly higher relative to surrounding landscapes with drier soils and elevated nitrate, including the rims of low centered polygons, the centers of flat and high centered polygons, the rims of young, old and ancient drain thaw lake basins and drainage slopes that exist across the landscape. With this information, we model the nitrate inventory of the Barrow Peninsula using multiple geospatial approaches to estimate total area cover by unsaturated features of interest and further predict how various drying scenarios increase the magnitude of nitrate produced in degrading permafrost regions across the Arctic. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, NGEE-Arctic.

  3. On the Benefits of Divergent Search for Evolved Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel; Risi, Sebastian; Stanley, Kenneth O

    2012-01-01

    Evolved representations in evolutionary computation are often fragile, which can impede representation-dependent mechanisms such as self-adaptation. In contrast, evolved representations in nature are robust, evolvable, and creatively exploit available representational features. This paper provide...

  4. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  5. Syllabus for postgraduate diplomas and degrees in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajraj, Arcot; Nedungadi, T.M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of preparation of a suitable syllabus of radiological physics for postgraduate courses in radiology is discussed. In the earlier years there was a stress on pure Physics, but now this has shifted to applied physics required for the practice of radiology. Guidelines evolved to draw up a suitable syllabus for medical radiology students are presented. (M.G.B.)

  6. Clinical and radiological features of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus infection manifesting as acute febrile respiratory illness at their initial presentations: comparison with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Tae Jin; Park, Chang Min; Choi, Seung Hong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Goo, Jin Mo; Kwon, Gu Jin; Woo, Sung Koo; Park, Seung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Background Since the first outbreak caused by the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza in Mexico, the virus has spread widely across the world with meaningful morbidity and mortality. However, there are few data on the comparative investigations to assess the clinical and radiological features between the H1N1 patient and non-H1N1 patients. Purpose To assess the clinical and radiological features of patients infected by the pandemic H1N1 2009 flu virus at their initial presentation and to compare them with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients with acute febrile respiratory illness. Material and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the ethics committee of the Armed Forces Medical Command, South Korea. From August to September 2009, 337 consecutive patients presented with an acute febrile respiratory illness in a tertiary military hospital. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain-reaction tests were performed in 62 of these patients under the impression of H1N1 infection. Clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation were described for the H1N1 group (n = 35) and non-H1N1 group (n = 27) and compared between the two groups. Results Increased C-reactive protein level (97%) without leukocytosis (9%) or increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (0%) was common in the H1N1 group at their initial presentation. On chest radiographs, 12 of 35 (34%) H1N1 patients had abnormal findings; nodules in 10 patients (83%) and consolidations in two (17%). Of the 28 H1N1 patients who underwent thin-section CT 16 patients (57%) showed abnormal findings; ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in 15 (94%), and nodules in 13 (81%). However, there were no significant differences between the H1N1 group and non-H1N1 group in terms of symptoms, laboratory results, or radiological findings (P > 0.05). Conclusion Patients with H1N1 infection show consistent clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation, however, clinical and radiological features of the H1N1 group are

  7. Clinical and radiological features of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus infection manifesting as acute febrile respiratory illness at their initial presentations: comparison with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Tae Jin (Dept. of Radiology, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Park, Chang Min; Choi, Seung Hong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Goo, Jin Mo (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)), email: cmpark@radiol.snu.ac.kr; Kwon, Gu Jin (Dept. of Family Medicine, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Family Medicine, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)); Woo, Sung Koo (Dept. of Radiology, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)); Park, Seung Hoon (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-05-15

    Background Since the first outbreak caused by the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza in Mexico, the virus has spread widely across the world with meaningful morbidity and mortality. However, there are few data on the comparative investigations to assess the clinical and radiological features between the H1N1 patient and non-H1N1 patients. Purpose To assess the clinical and radiological features of patients infected by the pandemic H1N1 2009 flu virus at their initial presentation and to compare them with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients with acute febrile respiratory illness. Material and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the ethics committee of the Armed Forces Medical Command, South Korea. From August to September 2009, 337 consecutive patients presented with an acute febrile respiratory illness in a tertiary military hospital. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain-reaction tests were performed in 62 of these patients under the impression of H1N1 infection. Clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation were described for the H1N1 group (n = 35) and non-H1N1 group (n = 27) and compared between the two groups. Results Increased C-reactive protein level (97%) without leukocytosis (9%) or increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (0%) was common in the H1N1 group at their initial presentation. On chest radiographs, 12 of 35 (34%) H1N1 patients had abnormal findings; nodules in 10 patients (83%) and consolidations in two (17%). Of the 28 H1N1 patients who underwent thin-section CT 16 patients (57%) showed abnormal findings; ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in 15 (94%), and nodules in 13 (81%). However, there were no significant differences between the H1N1 group and non-H1N1 group in terms of symptoms, laboratory results, or radiological findings (P > 0.05). Conclusion Patients with H1N1 infection show consistent clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation, however, clinical and radiological features of the H1N1 group are

  8. Long-term outcome after whiplash injury. A 2-year follow-up considering features of injury mechanism and somatic, radiologic, and psychosocial findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radanov, B P; Sturzenegger, M; Di Stefano, G

    1995-09-01

    With the increased incidence of whiplash injury following the introduction of compulsory car seat belts, a large number of reports have dealt with the aftermath of this condition. Previous studies, however, focused on somatic symptoms on the one hand or considered only psychological or neuropsychological variables on the other hand, often in loosely defined or selected groups of patients. No study so far has analyzed the long-term outcome in a nonselected group of patients using a clear injury definition considering patient history; somatic, radiologic, and neuropsychological findings; and features of the injury mechanisms assessed soon after trauma and during follow-up. the present investigation was designed to assess these combined factors. According to a strict definition of whiplash injury, we assessed a consecutive nonselected sample of 117 patients with recent injury who had similar sociocultural and educational backgrounds. The patients had been in automobile crashes and were all equally covered by accident insurance according to the country-wide scheme. Initial examination was performed 7.2 +/- 4.2 days after trauma, and follow-up examinations 3, 6, 12, and 24 months later. At baseline, features of injury mechanism, subjective complaints, and different aspects of patient history were documented and cervical spine X rays performed. At all examinations patients underwent neurologic examination and cognitive and psychosocial factor assessment. At 2 years, patients were divided into symptomatic and asymptomatic groups and then compared with regard to the initial findings. In addition, symptomatic patients who were disabled at the 2-year follow-up examination and symptomatic patients not disabled (that is, they were able to work at the pretraumatic level) were compared regarding initial and 2-year findings. At 2 years, 18% of patients still had injury-related symptoms. With regard to baseline findings the following significant differences were found: Symptomatic

  9. A study of the clinical and radiological features in a cohort of 93 patients with a COL2A1 mutation causing spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita or a related phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terhal, Paulien A; Nievelstein, Rutger Jan A J; Verver, Eva J J

    2015-01-01

    -like dysplasia (n = 2). The remaining 13 patients had normal stature with mild SED, Stickler-like syndrome or multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. Over 50% of the patients had undergone orthopedic surgery, usually for scoliosis, femoral osteotomy or hip replacement. Odontoid hypoplasia was present in 56% (95% CI 38......Type 2 collagen disorders encompass a diverse group of skeletal dysplasias that are commonly associated with orthopedic, ocular, and hearing problems. However, the frequency of many clinical features has never been determined. We retrospectively investigated the clinical, radiological......, and genotypic data in a group of 93 patients with molecularly confirmed SEDC or a related disorder. The majority of the patients (80/93) had short stature, with radiological features of SEDC (n = 64), others having SEMD (n = 5), Kniest dysplasia (n = 7), spondyloperipheral dysplasia (n = 2), or Torrance...

  10. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  11. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP and signi......Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP...... and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...

  12. Radiological English

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribes, R. [Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba (Spain). Servicio de Radiologia; Ros, P.R. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Div. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  13. Radiological English

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribes, R.; Ros, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  14. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  15. Radiology system evolution in the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauert, R C

    2001-01-01

    For many decades the practice of radiology grew slowly in America and was largely a secondary function under the control of hospitals. In more recent times it has vastly expanded its array of diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic abilities. There is increasing consumer logic for direct access. Motivations have grown to create large independent entities with broadly diverse capabilities in order to succeed in the new millennium. Most regional markets are evolving rapidly in terms of managed care penetration, health system formation, physician practice consolidation and aggressive purchaser behavior by employers and consumers. To understand the enormity of healthcare evolution, it is useful to look at the industry's paradigm shifts in recent decades. Virtually every aspect of organizational infrastructure, delivery approaches, and the business environment has evolved markedly during the past fifty years. These changes will accelerate. To succeed financially, radiology groups must strengthen their market positions, technical capabilities, continuums of care and geographic dominance. Equally important is the wisdom of diversifying incomes into related services and businesses that provide additional related revenues. Key factors for successful development include facility market growth, full coverage of managed care contracts, high efficiency and aggressive diversification. A fully evolved system generates significant revenues and profitability by protecting and strengthening its financial position in this environment. That is accomplished through the development of strategically located radiology groups, aggressive alliances with medical practices in allied disciplines, and managed radiology departments and facilities for partner health systems. Organizational success ultimately depends on the ability to accept capitated payments under risk-bearing arrangements. The strategic business plan should be organized with the appropriate levels of detail needed to

  16. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  17. RSVP radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirks, D.R.; Chaffee, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops a relative scale of value for pediatric radiology (RSVPR). Neither the HCFA/ACA Relative Value Scale nor the Workload Measurement System developed by Health and Welfare Canada specifically addressed pediatric radiologic examinations. Technical and professional charges for examinations at Children's Hospital Medical Center were reviewed and compared with time and cost analysis. A scale was developed with chest radiography (PA and lateral views) assigned a value of 1. After review by pediatric radiologic technologists, radiologic administrators, pediatric radiologists, and chairs of departments of children's hospitals, this proposed scale was modified to reflect more accurately relative value components of pediatric radiologic and imaging examinations

  18. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  19. Radiologic Findings of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Arising Within a Juvenile Fibroadenoma: Mammographic, Sonographic and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI Features

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Song, Sung Eun; Bae, Jeong Won

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile fibroadenoma is an uncommon histologic variant of fibroadenoma that frequently shows a remarkable and rapid growth. The development of a carcinoma within a fibroadenoma, either in situ or invasive, is a rare condition. We encountered a 36-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast. The radiologic findings were indicative of a fibroadenoma in the breast. Sonographic guided biopsy using a 14G core needle revealed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the j...

  20. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  1. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  2. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Bücker, Arno; Hohl, Christian; Berlis, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    Purpose  Scope and clinical importance of interventional radiology markedly evolved over the last decades. Consequently it was acknowledged as independent subspecialty by the "European Union of Medical Specialists" (UEMS). Based on radiological imaging techniques Interventional Radiology is an integral part of Radiology. Materials und Methods  In 2009 the German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a structured training in Interventional Radiology. In cooperation with the German Society of Neuroradiology (DGNR) this training was extended to also cover Interventional Neuroradiology in 2012. Tailored for this training in Interventional Radiology a structured curriculum was developed, covering the scope of this modular training. Results  The curriculum is based on the DeGIR/DGNR modular training concept in Interventional Radiology. There is also an European Curriculum and Syllabus for Interventional Radiology developed by the "Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe" (CIRSE). The presented curriculum in Interventional Radiology is designed to provide a uniform base for the training in Interventional Radiology in Germany, based on the competencies obtained during residency. Conclusion  This curriculum can be used as a basis for training in Interventional Radiology by all training sites. Key Points: · Interventional Radiology is an integral part of clinical radiology. · The German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a curriculum in Interventional Radiology. · This curriculum is an integrative basis for the training in interventional. Citation Format · Mahnken AH, Bücker A, Hohl C et al. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 309 - 311. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Radiology of spinal curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book offers the only comprehensive, concise summary of both the clinical and radiologic features of thoracic and lumbar spine deformity. Emphasis is placed on idiopathic scoliosis, which represents 85% of all patients with scoliosis, but less common areas of secondary scoliosis, kyphosis and lordosis are also covered

  4. Diagnostic and interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J. [Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Reith, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Rummeny, Ernst J. (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2016-08-01

    This exceptional book covers all aspects of diagnostic and interventional radiology within one volume, at a level appropriate for the specialist. From the basics through diagnosis to intervention: the reader will find a complete overview of all areas of radiology. The clear, uniform structure, with chapters organized according to organ system, facilitates the rapid retrieval of information. Features include: Presentation of the normal radiological anatomy Classification of the different imaging procedures according to their diagnostic relevance Imaging diagnosis with many reference images Precise description of the interventional options The inclusion of many instructive aids will be of particular value to novices in decision making: Important take home messages and summaries of key radiological findings smooth the path through the jungle of facts Numerous tables on differential diagnosis and typical findings in the most common diseases offer a rapid overview and orientation Diagnostic flow charts outline the sequence of diagnostic evaluation All standard procedures within the field of interventional radiology are presented in a clinically relevant and readily understandable way, with an abundance of illustrations. This is a textbook, atlas, and reference in one: with more than 2500 images for comparison with the reader's own findings. This comprehensive and totally up-to-date book provides a superb overview of everything that the radiology specialist of today needs to know.

  5. Dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    The book presents the radiological manifestations of the maxillodental region in a suitable manner for fast detection and correct diagnosing of diseases of the teeth, soft tissue, and jaws. Classification therefore is made according to the radiological manifestations of the diseases and not according to etiology. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Radiologic Findings of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Arising Within a Juvenile Fibroadenoma: Mammographic, Sonographic and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Song, Sung Eun; Bae, Jeong Won

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile fibroadenoma is an uncommon histologic variant of fibroadenoma that frequently shows a remarkable and rapid growth. The development of a carcinoma within a fibroadenoma, either in situ or invasive, is a rare condition. We encountered a 36-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast. The radiologic findings were indicative of a fibroadenoma in the breast. Sonographic guided biopsy using a 14G core needle revealed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the juvenile fibroadenoma. Focal excision was performed and the patient underwent radiation therapy in the right breast after surgery

  7. Coincidence of needs in radiological and toxicological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    Research needs for radiological protection and research programs that have evolved to meet these needs parallel closely those in the chemical toxicology field. The similarity of these needs is described as perceived from the radiological side. Further, the frame work for radiologically-related research, out lines of the research programs, and the development of the facilities at Chalk River Nuclear Labs were presented

  8. Cortical fibrous defects and non-ossifying fibromas in children and young adults: The analysis of radiological features in 28 cases and a review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Błaż, Marcin; Palczewski, Piotr; Świątkowski, Jan; Gołębiowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    To assess and describe the variability of radiological presentations of fibrous cortical defects and non-ossifying fibromas in children and young adults. Medical records of 28 patients (15 males, 13 females, mean age of 17 years) with a radiological diagnosis of cortical fibrous defect or non-ossifying fibroma were reviewed retrospectively. The presentation of the lesion, its location and morphology according to Ritschl’s classification, as well as the number and types of imaging studies performed in the study group were assessed. Almost all lesions constituted an incidental finding discovered on plain films performed due to trauma. One lesion presented with a pathological fracture. There were 4 patients (mean age of 11 years) with stage A lesion, 9 patients (mean age of 16 years) with stage B lesion, 10 patients (mean age of 18 years) with stage C lesion, and 5 patients (mean age of 23 years) with stage D lesion. The lesions were located mostly in bones around the knee joint. In more than a half of the patients, further imaging was performed apart from plain films. Four lesions were biopsied (1 of stage B and 3 of stage C). A considerable morphological variability of cortical fibrous defects and non-ossifying fibromas, especially of stage C, seems to be the main cause of unnecessary additional imaging and invasive diagnostic procedures in patients with this benign pathology. The knowledge of their age-related evolution and typical skeletal distribution should help in making a correct diagnosis

  9. Handbook of radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedgcock, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is organized around radiologic procedures with each discussed from the points of view of: indications, contraindications, materials, method of procedures and complications. Covered in this book are: emergency radiology chest radiology, bone radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, GU radiology, pediatric radiology, computerized tomography, neuroradiology, visceral and peripheral angiography, cardiovascular radiology, nuclear medicine, lymphangiography, and mammography

  10. Why did heterospory evolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kurt B; Burd, Martin

    2017-08-01

    The primitive land plant life cycle featured the production of spores of unimodal size, a condition called homospory. The evolution of bimodal size distributions with small male spores and large female spores, known as heterospory, was an innovation that occurred repeatedly in the history of land plants. The importance of desiccation-resistant spores for colonization of the land is well known, but the adaptive value of heterospory has never been well established. It was an addition to a sexual life cycle that already involved male and female gametes. Its role as a precursor to the evolution of seeds has received much attention, but this is an evolutionary consequence of heterospory that cannot explain the transition from homospory to heterospory (and the lack of evolutionary reversal from heterospory to homospory). Enforced outcrossing of gametophytes has often been mentioned in connection to heterospory, but we review the shortcomings of this argument as an explanation of the selective advantage of heterospory. Few alternative arguments concerning the selective forces favouring heterospory have been proposed, a paucity of attention that is surprising given the importance of this innovation in land plant evolution. In this review we highlight two ideas that may lead us to a better understanding of why heterospory evolved. First, models of optimal resource allocation - an approach that has been used for decades in evolutionary ecology to help understand parental investment and other life-history patterns - suggest that an evolutionary increase in spore size could reach a threshold at which small spores yielding small, sperm-producing gametophytes would return greater fitness per unit of resource investment than would large spores and bisexual gametophytes. With the advent of such microspores, megaspores would evolve under frequency-dependent selection. This argument can account for the appearance of heterospory in the Devonian, when increasingly tall and complex

  11. Angiography and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The decrease in angiographic procedures as a result of less invasive imaging modalities has been counterbalanced by the rise in interventional radiological techniques. Because the interventional radiologist behaves somewhat like a surgeon, his legal responsibilities also approach those of his surgical colleagues. The basic concerns of negligent malpractice are amplified by the issues of informed consent and vicarious liability. Also, damages resulting from these procedures are costly because of the severity of the injuries. The angiographer must become versed in medicolegal issues of this rapidly evolving specialty

  12. Evolving phenotypic networks in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Evolved gene networks are constrained by natural selection. Their structures and functions are consequently far from being random, as exemplified by the multiple instances of parallel/convergent evolution. One can thus ask if features of actual gene networks can be recovered from evolutionary first principles. I review a method for in silico evolution of small models of gene networks aiming at performing predefined biological functions. I summarize the current implementation of the algorithm, insisting on the construction of a proper "fitness" function. I illustrate the approach on three examples: biochemical adaptation, ligand discrimination and vertebrate segmentation (somitogenesis). While the structure of the evolved networks is variable, dynamics of our evolved networks are usually constrained and present many similar features to actual gene networks, including properties that were not explicitly selected for. In silico evolution can thus be used to predict biological behaviours without a detailed knowledge of the mapping between genotype and phenotype. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiological optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    1998-01-01

    Radiological optimization is one of the basic principles in each radiation-protection system and it is a basic requirement in the safety standards for radiation protection in the European Communities. The objectives of the research, performed in this field at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, are: (1) to implement the ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for optimization techniques in decision-aiding; (3) to optimize radiological assessment models by validation and intercomparison; (4) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (5) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (6) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (7) to investigate existing software programmes in the domain of multi criteria analysis. The main achievements for 1997 are given

  14. MEMO radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner-Manslau, C.

    1989-01-01

    This radiology volume is a concise handbook of imaging techniques, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy, albeit that the main emphasis is on classic radiology. It offers, for instance, a survey of radiological findings for the most frequent pathological conditions, many overviews of differential diagnosis, a glossary of the technical bases of radiology and so forth. The contents are divided into the following chapters: Physical and biological bases; skeleton; thorax with the subdivisions lungs, heart, mediastinum, and pleura; gastrointestinal tract with the subsections esophagus, small and large intestine; liver; biliary tract; pancreas; retroperitoneal space; kidney; suprarenal glands; bladder; blood vessels, lymph nodes, spleen; mammary glands; female genitals; prostate and scrotum, epididymis and seminal vesicle. (orig./MG) With 23 figs [de

  15. Radiological hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.

    1984-01-01

    The work of the (United Kingdom) National Radiological Protection Board is discussed. The following topics are mentioned: relative contributions to genetically significant doses of radiation from various sources; radon gas in non-coal mines and in dwelling houses; effects of radiation accidents; radioactive waste disposal; radiological protection of the patient in medicine; microwaves, infrared radiation and cataracts; guidance notes for use with forthcoming Ionising Radiations Regulations; training courses; personal dosimetry service; work related to European Communities. (U.K.)

  16. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Azorin V, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  17. Metallic ureteral stents in malignant ureteral obstruction: short-term results and radiological features predicting stent failure in patients with non-urological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Po-Ming; Hsu, Jui-Shan; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Yu, Hong-Jheng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Liu, Kao-Lang

    2014-06-01

    To provide short-term result of the metallic ureteral stent in patients with malignant ureteral obstruction and identify radiological findings predicting stent failure. The records of all patients with non-urological malignant diseases who have received metallic ureteral stents from July 2009 to March 2012 for ureteral obstruction were reviewed. Stent failure was detected by clinical symptoms and imaging studies. Survival analysis was used to estimate patency rates and factors predicting stent failure. A total of 74 patients with 130 attempts of stent insertion were included. A total of 113 (86.9 %) stents were inserted successfully and 103 (91.2 %) achieved primary patency. After excluding cases without sufficient imaging data, 94 stents were included in the survival analysis. The median functional duration of the 94 stents was 6.2 months (range 3-476 days). Obstruction in abdominal ureter (p = 0.0279) and lymphatic metastasis around ureter (p = 0.0398) were risk factors for stent failure. The median functional durations of the stents for abdominal and pelvic obstructions were 4.5 months (range 3-263 days) and 6.5 months (range 4-476 days), respectively. The median durations of the stents with and without lymphatic metastasis were 5.3 months (range 4-398 days) and 7.8 months (range 31-476 days), respectively. Metallic ureteral stents are effective and safe in relieving ureteral obstructions resulting from non-urological malignancies, and abdominal ureteral obstruction and lymphatic metastasis around ureter were associated with shorter functional duration.

  18. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  19. Emergency radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the German, translated version of the original published in 1984 in the U.S.A., entitled 'Emergency Radiology'. The publication for the most part is made up as an atlas of the radiological images presenting the findings required for assessment of the emergency cases and their first treatment. The test parts' function is to explain the images and give the necessary information. The material is arranged in seven sections dealing with the skull, the facial part of the skull, the spine, thorax, abdominal region, the pelvis and the hip, and the limbs. With 690 figs [de

  20. Postoperative radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhenne, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of postoperative radiology. Most surgical procedures on the alimentary tract are successful, but postoperative complications remain a common occurrence. The radiologist must be familiar with a large variety of possible surgical complications, because it is this specialty that is most commonly called on to render a definitive diagnosis. The decision for reoperation, for instance, is usually based on results from radiologic imaging techniques. These now include ultrasonography, CT scanning, needle biopsy, and interventional techniques in addition to contrast studies and nuclear medicine investigation

  1. Radiological protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) reduces the need for many traditional interventions, particularly surgery, so reducing the discomfort and risk for patients compared with traditional systems. IR procedures are frequently performed by non-radiologist physicians, often without the proper radiological equipment and sufficient knowledge of radiation protection. Levels of doses to patients and staff in IR vary enormously. A poor correlation exists between patient and staff dose, and large variations of dose are reported for the same procedure. The occurrence of deterministic effects in patients is another peculiar aspect of IR owing to the potentially high skin doses of some procedures. The paper reviews the use of IR and the radiological protection of patients and staff, and examines the need for new standards for IR equipment and the training of personnel. (author)

  2. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Pediatric radiology is an important subsection of diagnostic radiology involving specific difficulties, but unfortunately is quite too often neglected as a subject of further education and training. The book therefore is not intended for specialists in the field, but for radiologists wishing to plunge deeper into the matter of pediatric radiology and to acquire a sound, basic knowledge and information about well-proven modalities, the resulting diagnostic images, and interpretation of results. The book is a compact guide and a helpful source of reference and information required for every-day work, or in special cases. With patients who are babies or children, the challenges are different. The book offers all the information needed, including important experience from pediatric hospital units that may be helpful in diagnostic evaluation, information about specific dissimilarities in anatomy and physiology which affect the imaging results, hints for radiology planning and performance, as well as information about the various techniques and their indication and achievements. The book presents a wide spectrum of informative and annotated images. (orig./CB) [de

  3. Radiologic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, L.O.

    1987-01-01

    An increasing variety of imaging modalities as well as refinements of interventional techniques have led to a resurgence of radiologic interest and participation in urolithiasis management. Judicious selection of the diagnostic examination, close monitoring during the procedure, consultation with urologic colleagues, and a careful regard for radiation safety guidelines define the role of the radiologist in renal stone disease

  4. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs

  5. Mentoring: An Evolving Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle; Florczak, Kristine L

    2017-04-01

    The column concerns itself with mentoring as an evolving relationship between mentor and mentee. The collegiate mentoring model, the transformational transcendence model, and the humanbecoming mentoring model are considered in light of a dialogue with mentors at a Midwest university and conclusions are drawn.

  6. Methods Evolved by Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Montessori's idea of the child's nature and the teacher's perceptiveness begins with amazing simplicity, and when she speaks of "methods evolved," she is unveiling a methodological system for observation. She begins with the early childhood explosion into writing, which is a familiar child phenomenon that Montessori has written about…

  7. Radiological diagnosis of fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlay, D.B.L.; Allen, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book is about radiology of fractures. While it contains sections of clinical features it is not intended that readers should rely entirely upon these for the diagnosis and management of the injured patient. As in the diagnosis and treatment of all medical problems, fracture management must be carried out in a logical step-by-step fashion - namely, history, examination, investigation, differential diagnosis, diagnosis and then treatment. Each section deals with a specific anatomical area and begins with line drawings of the normal radiographs demonstrating the anatomy. Accessory views that may be requested, and the indications for these, are included. Any radiological pitfalls for the area in general are then described. The fractures in adults are then examined in turn, their radiological features described, and any pitfalls in their diagnosis discussed. A brief note of important clinical findings is included. A brief mention is made of pediatric fractures which are of significance and their differences to the adult pattern indicated. Although fractures can be classified into types with different characteristics, in life every fracture is individual. Fractures by and large follow common patterns, but many have variations

  8. Radiology research in mainland China in the past 10 years: a survey of original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yun Fei; Yang, Zhen Lu; Schoepf, U Joseph; Xu, Jiaqian; Lu, Guang Ming; Li, Enzhong

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the features and trends of Radiology research in Mainland China through bibliometric analysis of the original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology (ER) between 2006 and 2015. We reviewed the original articles published in Radiology and ER between 2006 and 2015. The following information was abstracted: imaging subspecialty, imaging technique(s) used, research type, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study results, funding declarations, international collaborations, number of authors, department and province of the first author. All variables were examined longitudinally over time. Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase in original research articles published, especially in the last 5 years (P Radiology research, neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology were the most productive fields; MR imaging was the most used modality, and a distinct geographic provenience was observed for articles published in Radiology and ER. Radiology research in Mainland China has seen substantial growth in the past 5 years with neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology as the most productive fields. MR imaging is the most used modality. Article provenience shows a distinct geographical pattern. • Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase. • Neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology are the most productive fields. • MRI is the most used modality in Mainland China's Radiology research. • Guangdong, Shanghai, and Beijing are the most productive provinces.

  9. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  10. Evolving expectations from international organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Lopez, C.

    2008-01-01

    The author stated that implementation of the geological disposal concept requires a strategy that provides national decision makers with sufficient confidence in the level of long-term safety and protection ultimately achieved. The concept of protection against harm has a broader meaning than radiological protection in terms of risk and dose. It includes the protection of the environment and socio-economic interests of communities. She recognised that a number of countries have established regulatory criteria already, and others are now discussing what constitutes a proper regulatory test and suitable time frame for judging the safety of long-term disposal. Each regulatory programme seeks to define reasonable tests of repository performance, using protection criteria and safety approaches consistent with the culture, values and expectations of the citizens of the country concerned. This means that there are differences in how protection and safety are addressed in national approaches to regulation and in the bases used for that. However, as was recognised in the Cordoba Workshop, it would be important to reach a minimum level of consistency and be able to explain the differences. C. Ruiz-Lopez presented an overview of the development of international guidance from ICRP, IAEA and NEA from the Cordoba workshop up to now, and positions of independent National Advisory Bodies. The evolution of these guidelines over time demonstrates an evolving understanding of long-term implications, with the recognition that dose and risk constraints should not be seen as measures of detriment beyond a few hundred years, the emphasis on sound engineering practices, and the introduction of new concepts and approaches which take into account social and economical aspects (e.g. constrained optimisation, BAT, managerial principles). In its new recommendations, ICRP (draft 2006) recognizes. in particular, that decision making processes may depend on other societal concerns and considers

  11. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  12. Evolving Procurement Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bals, Lydia; Laine, Jari; Mugurusi, Godfrey

    Procurement has to find further levers and advance its contribution to corporate goals continuously. This places pressure on its organization in order to facilitate its performance. Therefore, procurement organizations constantly have to evolve in order to match these demands. A conceptual model...... and external contingency factors and having a more detailed look at the structural dimensions chosen, beyond the well-known characteristics of centralization, formalization, participation, specialization, standardization and size. From a theoretical perspective, it opens up insights that can be leveraged...

  13. Evolved H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchwell, E.

    1975-01-01

    A probable evolutionary sequence of H II regions based on six distinct types of observed objects is suggested. Two examples which may deviate from this idealized sequence, are discussed. Even though a size-mean density relation of H II regions can be used as a rough indication of whether a nebula is very young or evolved, it is argued that such a relation is not likely to be useful for the quantitative assignment of ages to H II regions. Evolved H II regions appear to fit into one of four structural types: rings, core-halos, smooth structures, and irregular or filamentary structures. Examples of each type are given with their derived physical parameters. The energy balance in these nebulae is considered. The mass of ionized gas in evolved H II regions is in general too large to trace the nebula back to single compact H II regions. Finally, the morphological type of the Galaxy is considered from its H II region content. 2 tables, 2 figs., 29 refs

  14. EVOLVING AN EMPIRICAL METHODOLOGY DOR DETERMINING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The uniqueness of this approach, is that it can be applied to any forest or dynamic feature on the earth, and can enjoy universal application as well. KEY WORDS: Evolving empirical methodology, innovative mathematical model, appropriate interval, remote sensing, forest environment planning and management. Global Jnl ...

  15. Did Language Evolve Like the Vertebrate Eye?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, Rudolf P.

    2002-01-01

    Offers a critical appraisal of the way in which the idea that human language or some of its features evolved like the vertebrate eye by natural selection is articulated in Pinker and Bloom's (1990) selectionist account of language evolution. Argues that this account is less than insightful because it fails to draw some of the conceptual…

  16. Infrared spectroscopy of evolved objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.K.; Roche, P.F.

    1984-01-01

    In this review, the authors are concerned with spectroscopic observations of evolved objects made in the wavelength range 1-300μm. Spectroscopic observations can conveniently be divided into studies of narrow lines, bands and broader continua. The vibrational frequencies of molecular groups fall mainly in this spectral region and appear as vibration-rotation bands from the gas phase, and as less structured, but often broader, features from the solid state. Many ionic lines, including recombination lines of abundant species and fine structure lines of astrophysically important ions also appear in this region. The continuum can arise from a number of mechanisms - photospheric emission, radiation from dust, free-free transitions in ionized gas and non-thermal processes. (Auth.)

  17. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  18. Cardiothoracic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    A wealth of cardiothoracic websites exist on the internet. What follows is a list of the higher quality resources currently available which should save you time searching them out for yourself. Many of the sites listed cater for undergraduates and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, nevertheless these may also be of interest to specialists in thoracic radiology, particularly for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (April 2005)

  19. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton

  20. Radiological design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Andersen, B.V.; Carter, L.A.; Waite, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Many new nuclear facilities are unsatisfactory from a radiation protection point of view, particularly when striving to maintain occupational exposure as low as practicable 'ALAP'. Radiation protection is achieved through physical protective features supplemented by administrative controls. Adequate physical protective feature should be achieved during construction so that supplemental administrative controls may be kept simple and workable. Many nuclear facilities fall short of adequate physical protective features, thus, remedial and sometimes awkward administrative procedures are required to safely conduct work. In reviewing the various handbooks, reports and regulations which deal with radiation protection, it may be noted that there is minimal radiological design guidance for application to nuclear facilities. A set of criteria or codes covering functional areas rather than specific nuclear facility types is badly needed. The following are suggested as functional areas to be considered: characterization of the Facility; siting and access; design exposure limits; layout (people and materials flow); ventilation and effluent control; radiation protection facilities and systems. The application of such radiological design criteria early in the design process would provide some assurance that nuclear facilities will be safe, flexible, and efficient with a minimum of costly retrofitting or administrative restrictions. Criteria which we have found helpful in these functional areas is discussed together with justification for adoption of such criteria and identification of problems which still require solution

  1. The clinical and radiological study of near drowning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, K.

    1982-01-01

    A survey is given of the literature on near drowning, discussing the aspects for all disciplines emphasising the radiological features. The radological pictures are demonstrated and case descriptions containing radiological features are cited extensively out of the literature. This survey should be of great value for the clinician in therapy and control of course. The correlation of the clinical and radiological features should promote a better interpretation of pathogenetic mechanisms. (orig.) [de

  2. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP and signi...... is cyclic: exacerbations relieved by asymptomatic periods. New imaging modalities, including the combination of MR imaging and multiplanar 3-D CT scans, have broadened our awareness of possible pain-generating degenerative processes of the lumbar spine other than disc degeneration....

  3. Radiological manifestations of melioidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, K.S.; Chong, V.H.

    2010-01-01

    Melioidosis is a serious infection that is associated with high mortality. It is due to a Gram-negative bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei which is an environmental saprophyte found in wet soils. Melioidosis is endemic to northern Australia and the Southeast Asia. However, there is now increasing number of reports of imported cases to regions where this infection has not been previously encountered. Almost any organ can be affected. Like many other conditions, radiological imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic workup of melioidosis. Awareness of the various radiological manifestations can help direct appropriate investigations to achieve early diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate treatment. Generally, there are no known characteristic features on imaging that can specifically differentiate melioidosis from other infections. However, the 'honeycomb' appearance has been described to be characteristic for large melioidosis liver abscesses. Simultaneous involvement of various organs is also characteristics. To date, there are few data available on the radiological manifestations of melioidosis. The present pictorial essay describes melioidosis affecting the various organs.

  4. Radiological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental monitoring in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant has been shown the radiation dose to the public from plant operation to be quite small. Calculations from the reported release rates yield 0.2 mrem whole body dose and 0.6 mrem skin dose for the calendar quarter of maximum release. Radioactivity discharges to the Chesapeake Bay have resulted in detectable concentrations of /sup 110m/Ag, 58 Co, and 60 Co in sediments and shellfish. The area yielding samples with detectable concentrations of plant effluents extends for roughly six miles up and down the western shore, with maximum values found at the plant discharge area. The radiation dose to an individual eating 29 doz oysters and 15 doz crabs (5 kg of each) taken from the plant discharge area would be about 4/1000 mrem whole body dose and 0.2 mrem gastrointestinal tract dose (about 0.007% and 0.5% of the applicable guidelines, respectively.) Comparison of these power plant-induced doses with the fluctuations in natural radiation dose already experienced by the public indicates that the power plant effects are insignificant. The natural variations are tens of times greater than the maximum doses resulting from Calvert Cliffs Power Plant. Although operations to date provide an insufficient basis to predict radiological impact of the Calvert Cliffs Plant over its operational lifetime, available data indicate that the plant should continue to operate with insignificant radiological impact, well within all applicable guidelines

  5. Radiological malpractice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.

    1987-01-01

    As medico-legal statistics show, compared with other branches of medicine, cases of liability of the radiologist or his assistants are relatively rare. The duty to exercise due care as set out in Paragraph 6 of the Austrian penal code or Paragraph 276 of the German civil code, respectively, provide a basic rule of law also for radiology. Due to the risk inherent in the investigation method, incidents in angiography cannot be totally excluded. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that all steps be taken with regard to staff, equipment and drugs to be able to deal with any complications and incidents that may arise. The courts of law require the employer to produce strongest exonerating evidence to prove that the duty to exercise due care in the selection and supervision of the assistants has been duly fulfilled. For the practical execution of radiological investigations of the digestive tract, also the RTA is responsible; her liability when performing an irrigoscopy is particularly great, as perforation of the intestine is often lethal. The introduction of the rectal tube into the vagina by mistake, with resultant injury or death of the patient, will regularly lead to conviction under penal law. (orig.) [de

  6. American Society of Radiologic Technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 30 p.m. Mountain time, Monday-Friday Advertising Advertising Earn and Track CE ASRT Directed Reading Quizzes Track CE Credits ASRT Store Events and Conferences Featured CE Courses My Learning News and Research ASRT Journals and Magazines ASRT Newsletters Radiologic Technology ...

  7. Radiological dose and metadata management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, M.; Madsack, B.; Kolodziej, M.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the features of management systems currently available in Germany for extraction, registration and evaluation of metadata from radiological examinations, particularly in the digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) environment. In addition, the probable relevant developments in this area concerning radiation protection legislation, terminology, standardization and information technology are presented. (orig.) [de

  8. THE RADIOLOGICAL MANAGEMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS *O ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    *Department of Radiology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital,. Benin City, Nigeria ... system, bones and joints may be involved collectively denoted ... delineate lesions. The findings in these ... present with features of primary TB which are ...

  9. Evolving Intelligent Systems Methodology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Angelov, Plamen; Kasabov, Nik

    2010-01-01

    From theory to techniques, the first all-in-one resource for EIS. There is a clear demand in advanced process industries, defense, and Internet and communication (VoIP) applications for intelligent yet adaptive/evolving systems. Evolving Intelligent Systems is the first self- contained volume that covers this newly established concept in its entirety, from a systematic methodology to case studies to industrial applications. Featuring chapters written by leading world experts, it addresses the progress, trends, and major achievements in this emerging research field, with a strong emphasis on th

  10. Procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, T.; Hare, W.S.C.; Thomson, K.; Tess, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book outlines the various procedures necessary for the successful practice of diagnostic radiology. Topics covered are: general principles, imaging of the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, vascular radiology, arthrography, and miscellaneous diagnostic radiologic procedures

  11. Infantile fibrosarcoma: radiological and clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinnicombe, S.J.; Hall, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of infantile fibrosarcoma are described. This rare childhood malignancy of mesodermal origin usually affects the lower limbs, as it did in both of our cases. Previously, the only treatment option available involved some form of radical and often mutilating surgery. More recently, combination chemotherapy has given good results, with the effect that various imaging modalities have become important in assessing both the initial extent of disease and the response to treatment. Computed tomography has the advantage of demonstrating the amount of osseous involvement, but at the expense of a considerable dose of ionizing radiation. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging, with its multiplanar capacity, gives superior demonstration of breaching of tissue planes, which has important implications for planning of surgery. However, as in other soft tissue tumours, changes in signal characteristics with treatment have proved less specific than was originally anticipated. (orig.)

  12. Radiological features of a symptomatic splenic hamartoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.E.; Walsh, E.A.; Cramer, B.C.; Pushpanathan, C.C.; Hollett, P.; Ingram, L.; Price, D.

    1996-01-01

    Symptomatic splenic hamartomas are rare in the pediatric age group, with only four previous reports in the literature. Splenic hamartoma has been reported as a solid homogeneous mass without calcification on CT and ultrasound (US), and only one previous report of the findings on MRI has been published. We report a case of a large symptomatic splenic hamartoma in a 14-year-old girl who presented with splenomegaly, pancytopenia and growth retardation. A solid mass with multiple punctate foci resembling calcifications was seen on US. The mass was heterogeneous and better demarcated on enhanced CT. Radiocolloid scintigraphy demonstrated uptake within the lesion, but less than that of normal spleen. The mass was isointense relative to normal splenic tissue on T1-weighted MRI (0.5 T) and of increased intensity with T2 weighting. At splenectomy, a red pulp hamartoma was identified, which contained nodules of hyalinization and necrosis thought to account for the punctate foci seen on US. (orig.). With 4 figs

  13. Radiological features of 24 periosteal chondrosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanel, D.; De Paolis, M.; Mercuri, M.; Monti, C.; Picci, P.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To report the imaging findings of 24 periosteal chondrosarcomas diagnosed, staged, treated and followed in a single institution, to analyze and define their pattern, and discuss their practical consequences.Design and patients. Plain films, 16 CT examinations and four MRI examinations were reviewed, and compared with the histological evaluation.Results. There were 20 men and four women, aged from 17 to 65 years. Twelve lesions involved the distal femoral metaphyses (8 posteriorly), five the proximal humerus, two the proximal metaphyses of the femur and two of the tibia, two the humeral shafts and one the iliac wing. Size varied from 4 to 11 cm. The cortex was always involved (thick, 15; thin, 13). Typical cartilaginous calcifications and cartilaginous lobules were very frequent. Radial thick periosteal bone formations (n=6) indicated calcifications between the lobules of cartilage. Medullary involvement was rare (n=2). All patients are alive and free of disease.Conclusions. Recognizing periosteal chondrosarcoma is of paramount importance because the prognosis is excellent after adequate local surgery alone. The patterns of other surface tumors of bone are usually different. (orig.)

  14. Hepatobiliary Fascioliasis: Clinical and Radiological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Aghazade

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Fascioliasis is a worldwide but unevenly distributed zoonosis caused by the trematode Fasciola hepatica that infects do­mesti­cated herbivores. Fasciolosis also occurs accidentally in humans by ingestion of metacercaria-laden freshwater or water plants. Human infections are common in developing countries and are not rare in Europe. The clinical course has been con­ventionally described in two phases: an acute phase of hepatic parenchymal invasion of an immature worm larva (parenchy­mal phase and a stationary phase after residence in the bile duct and production of eggs (ductal phase. We report a 34 years old woman from Ilam, western Iran with hepatic disorder, RUQ pain, and jaundice. The diagnosis was made by sonography, CT scan and serologic studies. Serologic exam (ELISA was positive & CT findings were compatible with fascioliasis.

  15. Radiological features of a symptomatic splenic hamartoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.E. [Department of Radiology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, Janeway Place, St. John`s, NF A1A 1R8 (Canada); Walsh, E.A. [Department of Radiology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, Janeway Place, St. John`s, NF A1A 1R8 (Canada); Cramer, B.C. [Department of Radiology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, Janeway Place, St. John`s, NF A1A 1R8 (Canada); Pushpanathan, C.C. [Department of Pathology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada); Hollett, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Health Sciences Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada); Ingram, L. [Department of Pediatrics, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada); Price, D. [Department of Surgery, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada)

    1996-09-01

    Symptomatic splenic hamartomas are rare in the pediatric age group, with only four previous reports in the literature. Splenic hamartoma has been reported as a solid homogeneous mass without calcification on CT and ultrasound (US), and only one previous report of the findings on MRI has been published. We report a case of a large symptomatic splenic hamartoma in a 14-year-old girl who presented with splenomegaly, pancytopenia and growth retardation. A solid mass with multiple punctate foci resembling calcifications was seen on US. The mass was heterogeneous and better demarcated on enhanced CT. Radiocolloid scintigraphy demonstrated uptake within the lesion, but less than that of normal spleen. The mass was isointense relative to normal splenic tissue on T1-weighted MRI (0.5 T) and of increased intensity with T2 weighting. At splenectomy, a red pulp hamartoma was identified, which contained nodules of hyalinization and necrosis thought to account for the punctate foci seen on US. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  16. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed

  17. The Society for Radiological Protection - 40 years on from 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H John

    2003-01-01

    The Society for Radiological Protection was created in 1963 at a time when the structure of radiological protection in the United Kingdom was already well established. From its creation 40 years ago to the present, most of the features of British radiological protection stem from the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. This review of the development of radiological protection has been produced to celebrate the 40 years of the Society's support of radiological protection, both in the United Kingdom and internationally. (review)

  18. Radiological protection: a summary handbook of ICRP publications and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaratnam, A.

    1995-01-01

    The biological effects of radiation and potential risks therefrom far exceeds the knowledge of any other hazardous agent, whether in the industrial field, or in the general environment affecting members of the public. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has been playing a pioneering role for decades in this direction. The extensive database that has been established over the decades by the ICRP, the methodologies, techniques and the organizational structures that have been developed to control radiation hazards, and, above all, the philosophy of risk evaluation and management that has been evolved by ICRP, would serve as valuable guides not only to those concerned with radiological protection but to scientist, technologist and administrators involved in all facets of occupational and industrial safety, as well as those concerned with environmental protection. From 1959 to the end of 1993 ICRP has brought out 64 publications running to around 9000 pages. It is important that everyone connected with the uses of ionizing radiations should be familiar with at least the basic features of the thinking of ICRP as embodied in these publications. The present handbook attempts to give in a concise, consolidated and codified form the salient features of all the relevant information contained in the voluminous ICRP publications. The material has been presented in 7 parts, each dealing with one major aspect of the recommendations, and summarizing the various publications connected with it. A separate note following the preface gives a brief summary of the way the contents of the handbook have been arranged. refs., tabs., figs

  19. Digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallas, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiology is vital to the life-saving efforts of surgeons and other physicians, but precious time can be lost generating the images and transferring them to and from the operating room. Furthermore, hospitals are straining under the task of storing and managing the deluge of diagnostic films produced every year. A 300-bed hospital generates about 1 gigabyte (8 x 10 9 bits) of picture information every day and is legally bound to hold it for three to seven years--30 years in the case of silicosis or black lung disease, illnesses that may have relevance to future lawsuits. Consequently, hospital warehouses are filling with x-ray film and written reports that are important for analysis of patient histories, for comparison between patients, and for analyzing the progress of disease. Yet only a fraction of the information's potential is being used because access is so complicated. What is more, films are easily lost, erasing valuable medical histories

  20. Radiological Protection Science and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, Augustin; ); Mossman, Ken; Morgan, Bill

    2016-01-01

    importance of stakeholder involvement and individual and societal values in radiological protection decision making, Chapter 2 of this report addresses the societal aspects of radiological protection decision making. Chapter 3 addresses the application-related aspects of radiological protection. These include existing exposure situations, planned exposure situations, emergency exposure situations and environmental radiological protection. Chapter 4 of the report addresses international standards and Chapter 5 provides CRPPH views on overall ways forward. Annex A provides a more detailed overview of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) system of radiological protection, its interpretation in the International Basic Safety Standards (IBSS) and in the Euratom Basic Safety Standards (Euratom BSS). It demonstrates how the ICRP system may be influenced by both an evolving science and society, and in particular by the increasing focus on addressing protection in the context of prevailing circumstances. Each chapter of this report was prepared by experts on the topic, and an attempt has been made to follow a common framework. Having a common framework for chapters addressing science and those addressing implementation proved to be particularly difficult. As a consequence, the report's structure is constructed in such a way so as to address the state of the art in each area, while attempting to present aspects under broadly common headlines. (authors)

  1. Evolving Procurement Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bals, Lydia; Laiho, Aki; Laine, Jari

    Procurement has to find further levers and advance its contribution to corporate goals continuously. This places pressure on its organization in order to facilitate its performance. Therefore, Procurement organizations constantly have to evolve in order to match these demands. A conceptual model...... is presented and results of a first case study discussed. The findings highlight the importance of taking a contingency perspective on Procurement organization, understanding the internal and internal contingency factors. From a theoretical perspective, it opens up insights that can be furthermore leveraged...... in future studies in the fields of hybrid procurement organizations, global sourcing organizations as well as international procurement offices (IPOs). From a practical standpoint, an assessment of external and internal contingencies provides the opportunity to consciously match organization to its...

  2. Diffusion between evolving interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juntunen, Janne; Merikoski, Juha

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion in an evolving environment is studied by continuous-time Monte Carlo simulations. Diffusion is modeled by continuous-time random walkers on a lattice, in a dynamic environment provided by bubbles between two one-dimensional interfaces driven symmetrically towards each other. For one-dimensional random walkers constrained by the interfaces, the bubble size distribution dominates diffusion. For two-dimensional random walkers, it is also controlled by the topography and dynamics of the interfaces. The results of the one-dimensional case are recovered in the limit where the interfaces are strongly driven. Even with simple hard-core repulsion between the interfaces and the particles, diffusion is found to depend strongly on the details of the dynamical rules of particles close to the interfaces.

  3. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis. Radiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, R.; Sar, V.; Cabrera, J.J.; Diaz, L.; Hernandez, B.; Valeron, P.; Baez, O.; Rodriguez, M.

    1993-01-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology, very few cases of which have been reported in the literature. It presents similarities to other fibromatosys, but has its particular radiological features which differentiate it from them. The clinical findings consist of several, slow growing, subcutaneous nodules, flexion contractures of the joints which can lead to disability, gingival hypertrophy and muscular atrophy. The suspected radiological diagnosis is confirmed by electron microscopy study of the nodules, although light microscopy can also reveal suggestive images. Author (9 refs.)

  4. Radiology illustrated. Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Kyonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Kwon, Jong Won [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Offers a practical approach to image interpretation for spinal disorders. Includes numerous high-quality radiographic images and schematic illustrations. Will serve as a self-learning book covering daily routine cases from the basic to the advanced. Radiology Illustrated: Spine is an up-to-date, superbly illustrated reference in the style of a teaching file that has been designed specifically to be of value in clinical practice. Common, critical, and rare but distinctive spinal disorders are described succinctly with the aid of images highlighting important features and informative schematic illustrations. The first part of the book, on common spinal disorders, is for radiology residents and other clinicians who are embarking on the interpretation of spinal images. A range of key disorders are then presented, including infectious spondylitis, cervical trauma, spinal cord disorders, spinal tumors, congenital disorders, uncommon degenerative disorders, inflammatory arthritides, and vascular malformations. The third part is devoted to rare but clinically significant spinal disorders with characteristic imaging features, and the book closes by presenting practical tips that will assist in the interpretation of confusing cases.

  5. Radiologic protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Jimenez, R.E.; Bermudez Jimenez, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    With this work and employing the radioprotection criterion, the authors pretend to minimize the risks associated to this practice; without losing the quality of the radiologic image. Odontology should perform the following criterions: 1. Justification: all operation of practice that implies exposition to radiations, should be reweighed, through an analysis of risks versus benefits, with the purpose to assure, that the total detriment will be small, compared to resultant benefit of this activity. 2. Optimization: all of the exposures should be maintained as low as reasonable possible, considering the social and economic factors. 3. Dose limit: any dose limit system should be considered as a top condition, nota as an admissible level. (S. Grainger)

  6. Radiologic spectrum of rectal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, Y.; Hayakawa, K.; Nishimura, K.

    2000-01-01

    Rectal stenosis is a common condition caused by a wide variety of diseases, including both intrinsic and extrinsic disorders, as well as both malignant and benign pathologies. Barium enema, CT, and MRI are the primary modalities for the evaluation of the disease, and careful observation of the characteristic radiologic features usually leads to correct diagnosis. However, some of the lesions looks very similar and are difficult to differentiate from each other. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on diseases that cause rectal stenosis, to clarify the characteristics of radiologic features, and to suggest the limitations in differential diagnosis. Deliberate analysis of these imaging features and correlation with clinical manifestations can facilitate a more specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Radiologic spectrum of rectal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, Y. [Department of Radiology, Fukui Medical University School of Medicine, Matsuoka-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui (Japan); Hayakawa, K.; Nishimura, K. [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    Rectal stenosis is a common condition caused by a wide variety of diseases, including both intrinsic and extrinsic disorders, as well as both malignant and benign pathologies. Barium enema, CT, and MRI are the primary modalities for the evaluation of the disease, and careful observation of the characteristic radiologic features usually leads to correct diagnosis. However, some of the lesions looks very similar and are difficult to differentiate from each other. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on diseases that cause rectal stenosis, to clarify the characteristics of radiologic features, and to suggest the limitations in differential diagnosis. Deliberate analysis of these imaging features and correlation with clinical manifestations can facilitate a more specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Takuro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles. The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis - the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy - and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  9. Fat: an evolving issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Speakman

    2012-09-01

    Work on obesity is evolving, and obesity is a consequence of our evolutionary history. In the space of 50 years, we have become an obese species. The reasons why can be addressed at a number of different levels. These include separating between whether the primary cause lies on the food intake or energy expenditure side of the energy balance equation, and determining how genetic and environmental effects contribute to weight variation between individuals. Opinion on whether increased food intake or decreased energy expenditure drives the obesity epidemic is still divided, but recent evidence favours the idea that food intake, rather than altered expenditure, is most important. There is more of a consensus that genetics explains most (probably around 65% of weight variation between individuals. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have identified many polymorphisms that are linked to obesity, yet much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. Finding the causes of this unexplained variation will be an impetus of genetic and epigenetic research on obesity over the next decade. Many environmental factors – including gut microbiota, stress and endocrine disruptors – have been linked to the risk of developing obesity. A better understanding of gene-by-environment interactions will also be key to understanding obesity in the years to come.

  10. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takuro; Archibald, John M

    2012-04-24

    The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles.The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis--the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy--and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  11. Communicability across evolving networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Peter; Parsons, Mark C; Higham, Desmond J; Estrada, Ernesto

    2011-04-01

    Many natural and technological applications generate time-ordered sequences of networks, defined over a fixed set of nodes; for example, time-stamped information about "who phoned who" or "who came into contact with who" arise naturally in studies of communication and the spread of disease. Concepts and algorithms for static networks do not immediately carry through to this dynamic setting. For example, suppose A and B interact in the morning, and then B and C interact in the afternoon. Information, or disease, may then pass from A to C, but not vice versa. This subtlety is lost if we simply summarize using the daily aggregate network given by the chain A-B-C. However, using a natural definition of a walk on an evolving network, we show that classic centrality measures from the static setting can be extended in a computationally convenient manner. In particular, communicability indices can be computed to summarize the ability of each node to broadcast and receive information. The computations involve basic operations in linear algebra, and the asymmetry caused by time's arrow is captured naturally through the noncommutativity of matrix-matrix multiplication. Illustrative examples are given for both synthetic and real-world communication data sets. We also discuss the use of the new centrality measures for real-time monitoring and prediction.

  12. Evolving Concepts of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions. PMID:26161792

  13. UKAEA'S evolving contract philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) has gone through fundamental change over the last ten years. At the heart of this change has been UKAEA's relationship with the contracting and supply market. This paper describes the way in which UKAEA actively developed the market to support the decommissioning programme, and how the approach to contracting has evolved as external pressures and demands have changed. UKAEA's pro-active approach to industry has greatly assisted the development of a healthy, competitive market for services supporting decommissioning in the UK. There have been difficult changes and many challenges along the way, and some retrenchment was necessary to meet regulatory requirements. Nevertheless, UKAEA has sustained a high level of competition - now measured in terms of competed spend as a proportion of competable spend - with annual out-turns consistently over 80%. The prime responsibility for market development will pass to the new Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in 2005, as the owner, on behalf of the Government, of the UK's civil nuclear liabilities. The preparatory work for the NDA indicates that the principles established by UKAEA will be carried forward. (author)

  14. Current radiology. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular

  15. Pulmonary Sporotrichosis: An Evolving Clinical Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Ar K; Spelman, Denis W; Thompson, Philip J

    2015-10-01

    In recent decades, sporotrichosis, caused by thermally dimorphic fungi Sporothrix schenckii complex, has become an emerging infection in many parts of the world. Pulmonary infection with S. schenckii still remains relatively uncommon, possibly due to underrecognition. Pulmonary sporotrichosis presents with distinct clinical and radiological patterns in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts and can often result in significant morbidity and mortality despite treatment. Current understanding regarding S. schenckii biology, epidemiology, immunopathology, clinical diagnostics, and treatment options has been evolving in the recent years with increased availability of molecular sequencing techniques. However, this changing knowledge has not yet been fully translated into a better understanding of the clinical aspects of pulmonary sporotrichosis, as such current management guidelines remain unsupported by high-level clinical evidence. This article examines recent advances in the knowledge of sporotrichosis and its application to the difficult challenges of managing pulmonary sporotrichosis. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  17. Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records

  18. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzen, K.K. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Langsted, J.M. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  19. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzen, K.K.

    1998-01-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets

  20. Evolving PSTN to NGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang T.

    2004-04-01

    The concept of Next Generation Network (NGN) was conceived around 1998 as an integrated solution to combine the quality and features of the PSTN with the low cost and routing flexibility of the Internet to provide a single infrastructure for the future public network. This carrier grade Internet solution calls for the creation of a consolidated, packet transport and switching infrastructure and the development of a flexible, open, software switch (softswitch) to handle voice telephony as well as multimedia services. Almost all the telecom equipment manufacturers as well as some Internet equipment vendors immediately subscribed to this vision and joined the race to create convergent products for the NGN market.

  1. Bronchopulmonary foregut malformations: embryology, radiology and quandary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, N.A.; Pilling, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary foregut malformations (BPFM) are a heterogeneous group of pulmonary developmental anomalies that present at varying ages and with overlapping symptoms, signs and radiology. This article discusses the embryology of these lesions with reference to possible common origins and the link between aetiology and radiological appearance. The radiology of each lesion, both antenatally and postnatally, is described and illustrated. A number of quandaries exist in the prediction of prognosis and subsequent treatment of BPFM. We discuss the radiological features that may help to elucidate an individual prognosis and aid in the planning of treatment. The treatment options available for BPFM are briefly discussed. Finally, the link between BPFM, in particular cystic adenomatoid malformations and malignancy, is discussed. We aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the embryology, radiology, prognosis and treatment highlighting contentious issues of BPFM. (orig.)

  2. Radiology of the spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, F.; Leander, P.; Ekberg, O.

    2001-01-01

    The spleen is generally not considered a challenge to the radiologist. Most often it poses a problem by anomalies or an irregular but normal contrast enhancement; however, a variety of inflammatory, infectious and neoplastic diseases may involve the spleen. CT and ultrasonography are screening modalities for the spleen. For problem solving, MR imaging can be helpful, especially due to its free choice of the imaging plane and because of the high resolution in contrast MR imaging. Splenic angiography as a diagnostic tool has generally been replaced by CT, ultrasound, or MR and is now used as an interventional method, e.g., in non-surgical management of patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenia or in patients with splenic trauma. This article reviews the radiology of the spleen, including anatomy, embryology, splenomegaly, splenic injury, infarction, cysts, tumors, abscesses, sarcoidosis, and AIDS. Knowledge about the use of different imaging modalities and underlying gross and microscopic pathologic features leads to a better understanding of the radiologic findings. (orig.)

  3. EVOLVE : International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Deutz, Andre; Schuetze, Oliver; Bäck, Thomas; Tantar, Emilia; Tantar, Alexandru-Adrian; Moral, Pierre; Legrand, Pierrick; Bouvry, Pascal; Coello, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Numerical and computational methods are nowadays used in a wide range of contexts in complex systems research, biology, physics, and engineering.  Over the last decades different methodological schools have emerged with emphasis on different aspects of computation, such as nature-inspired algorithms, set oriented numerics, probabilistic systems and Monte Carlo methods. Due to the use of different terminologies and emphasis on different aspects of algorithmic performance there is a strong need for a more integrated view and opportunities for cross-fertilization across particular disciplines. These proceedings feature 20 original publications from distinguished authors in the cross-section of computational sciences, such as machine learning algorithms and probabilistic models, complex networks and fitness landscape analysis, set oriented numerics and cell mapping, evolutionary multiobjective optimization, diversity-oriented search, and the foundations of genetic programming algorithms. By presenting cutting ed...

  4. Nuclear and radiological regulation in Moldova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzdugan, Artur

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear security and safety legal framework in Moldova has changed significantly over the last 6 years. This has mainly been the result of implementation of IAEA nuclear safety and nuclear security standards, European directives, which are based on new data and evolving concepts at the international level, on adopted in May 2006 of the Law no. 111 On safe deployment of nuclear and radiological activities and establishing on established on March 2007 of a sole regulatory authority - the National Agency for the Regulation of Nuclear and Radiological Activities. (author)

  5. Radiological evaluation of failed total hip replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raspa, V.; Aldrovandi, S.; Pompei, G.

    1988-01-01

    The retrospective study of 50 operated cases of cemented total hip replacement and a review of the literature enabled the authors to define the radiological features of the above-mentioned condition. These features include one or more of the following signs: calcar reabsorption, lacunar erosions, modified relatioships between the prosthesis components, sepsis and loosening, periarticular calcifications dislocation and fracture of prosthesis components. Careful evaluation of these radiological features is extremely important for both an early diagnosis of failed total hip replacement and the choice of an adequate surgical treatment

  6. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  7. Radiology research in mainland China in the past 10 years: a survey of original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yun Fei; Yang, Zhen Lu; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Xu, Jiaqian [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Li, Enzhong [National Natural Science Foundation of China, Department of Medical Science, Beijing (China)

    2017-10-15

    To evaluate the features and trends of Radiology research in Mainland China through bibliometric analysis of the original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology (ER) between 2006 and 2015. We reviewed the original articles published in Radiology and ER between 2006 and 2015. The following information was abstracted: imaging subspecialty, imaging technique(s) used, research type, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study results, funding declarations, international collaborations, number of authors, department and province of the first author. All variables were examined longitudinally over time. Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase in original research articles published, especially in the last 5 years (P < 0.001). Within Mainland China's Radiology research, neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology were the most productive fields; MR imaging was the most used modality, and a distinct geographic provenience was observed for articles published in Radiology and ER. Radiology research in Mainland China has seen substantial growth in the past 5 years with neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology as the most productive fields. MR imaging is the most used modality. Article provenience shows a distinct geographical pattern. (orig.)

  8. Radiology research in mainland China in the past 10 years: a survey of original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yun Fei; Yang, Zhen Lu; Lu, Guang Ming; Schoepf, U.J.; Xu, Jiaqian; Li, Enzhong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the features and trends of Radiology research in Mainland China through bibliometric analysis of the original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology (ER) between 2006 and 2015. We reviewed the original articles published in Radiology and ER between 2006 and 2015. The following information was abstracted: imaging subspecialty, imaging technique(s) used, research type, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study results, funding declarations, international collaborations, number of authors, department and province of the first author. All variables were examined longitudinally over time. Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase in original research articles published, especially in the last 5 years (P < 0.001). Within Mainland China's Radiology research, neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology were the most productive fields; MR imaging was the most used modality, and a distinct geographic provenience was observed for articles published in Radiology and ER. Radiology research in Mainland China has seen substantial growth in the past 5 years with neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology as the most productive fields. MR imaging is the most used modality. Article provenience shows a distinct geographical pattern. (orig.)

  9. Benign chondroblastoma - malignant radiological appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, K.; Treugut, H.; Mueller, G.E.

    1980-04-01

    The very rare benign chondroblastoma occasionally invades soft tissues and may grow beyond the epiphysis into the metaphysis. In the present case such a tumour did not show the typical radiological appearances, but presented malignant features both on plain films and on the angiogram. The importance of biopsy of tumours which cannot be identified with certainty must be stressed before radical surgery is carried out.

  10. Disgust: Evolved function and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tybur, J.M.; Lieberman, D.; Kurzban, R.; DeScioli, P.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in and research on disgust has surged over the past few decades. The field, however, still lacks a coherent theoretical framework for understanding the evolved function or functions of disgust. Here we present such a framework, emphasizing 2 levels of analysis: that of evolved function and

  11. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  12. Comments on radiology of the 'seronegative spondylarthritides'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schacherl, M.; Stollenwerk, R.

    1981-01-01

    Besides the common factors characterizing the diseases in the group of the seronegative spondylarthritides, a further radiological feature, namely, inflammatory enthesiopathy, is described. The article points to the problems connected with the radiological visualisation of the sacroiliac joints. An explanation of the radiological 'stepwise diagnosis' of the sacroiliac joints is given. The classification of the types of ankylosing spondylitis after Schilling is demonstrated. Comments are made on the chronic Reiter's syndrome (Reiter's disease), on spondylitis psoriatica, enteropathies, and on Behcet's syndrome. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Devil's Slide: An evolving feature of California's coastal landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M.; Loague, K.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal landslides in the United States remain a persistent threat to human life and urban development. The focus of this study is a landslide-prone section of the central California coastline, approximately 20 km south of San Francisco, known as Devil's Slide. This investigation employs an extensive aerial image inventory, digital elevation models (DEMs), and a water balance / limit-equilibrium approach to better understand the spatial and temporal characteristics of deep-seated bedrock slides at the site. Photographic surveys of the area reveal nearly three kilometers of headscarp and a complex network of slope failures that respond to hydrologic, seismic, and anthropogenic perturbations. DEM analysis suggests that, for a 145-year period (1866 to 2010), the study area experienced an average coastal retreat rate of 0.14 m yr-1 and an average volumetric loss of 11,216 m3 yr-1. At least 38% of the landscape evolution in the steep coastal terrain has been driven by slope failure events. A loosely coupled water balance / limit-equilibrium analysis quantitatively illustrates the precarious nature of the active landslide zone at the site. The slope is shown to be unstable for a large suite of equally-likely scenarios. The analyses presented herein suggest that future work should include a rigorous characterization of pore-water pressure development, driven by comprehensive simulations of subsurface hydrologic response, to improve our understanding of slope failure initiation at the Devil's Slide site.

  14. AGE-DEPENDENT FEATURES OF EVOLVING HUMORAL IMMUNITY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Toptygina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Age dynamics of humoral immunity was studied in healthy children, i.e., 11 newborns, 33 infants of 4 to 8 months, 32 children of 1 to 2 years old,, 17 children of 4 to 5 years old, 25 children of 6 to 8 years old, 15 children of 9 to 11 years old, and 28 adolescents of 14 to 16 years old. Evaluation of membrane receptors on B cells was performed by means of three-colour fluorescent label and allowed of characterizing B1 subpopulations (CD19+CD5+CD27-, naпve B2 cells (CD19+CD5-CD27-, and B2 memory cells (CD19+CD5-CD27+. B1 cells have been shown to dominate in blood of newborns and younger children (up to 5 years old. By the contrary, B2 memory cells were nearly undetectable in newborns, and exceeded 20% in adolescents (by 15 years old. Meanwhile, it has been revealed that the amounts of IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses did progressively increase with age, whereas IgG2 remained decreased to 50% of adult values for a long time, and reached them by 11 years and later. We suggest that the age dynamics of IgG subclasses is connected with age-dependent changes in B cell subpopulations.

  15. Radiological accidents, scenarios, planning and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis Delgado, Alexander.

    2008-01-01

    Radiological accidents, scenarios and the importance of a good planning to prevent and control these types of accidents are presented. The radiation can be only one of the risks in an accident, most of dominant radiological risks are not radiological (fire, toxic gases, etc.). The common causes of radiological accidents, potential risks such as external irradiation, internal contamination and the environment pollution are highlighted. In addition, why accidents happen and how they evolve is explained. It describes some incidents with the radiation occurred in Costa Rica from 1993 to 2007. The coordination of emergency management in Costa Rica in relation to a radiological accident, and some mechanisms of action that have practiced in other places are focuses. Among the final considerations are the need to finalize the national plan for radiological emergencies as a tool of empowerment for the teams of emergency care and the availability of information. Likewise the processes of communication, coordination and cooperation to avoid chaos, confusion and crisis are also highlighted [es

  16. Evolution of the system of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    One of the main challenges facing radiological protection experts is how to integrate radiological protection within modern concepts of and approaches to risk governance. It is within this context that the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) decided to develop new general recommendations to replace its Publication 60 recommendations of 1990. In the process of developing these new recommendations, the views of the ICRP have evolved significantly, largely due to stakeholder involvement that has been actively solicited by the ICRP. In this regard, it was upheld during the First Asian Regional Conference organised by the NEA in October 2002 that the implementation of the new system must allow for regional, societal and cultural differences. In order to ensure appropriate consideration of these differences, the NEA organised the Second Asian Regional Conference on the Evolution of the System of Radiological Protection. Held in Tokyo on 28-29 July 2004, the conference included presentations by the ICRP Chair as well as by radiological experts from Australia, China, Japan and Korea. Within their specific cultural and socio-political milieu, Asia-Pacific and western ways of thought on how to improve the current system of radiological protection were presented and discussed. These ways of thinking, along with a summary of the conference results, are described in these proceedings. (author)

  17. Radiology trainer. Musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Erlt-Wagner, B.

    2006-01-01

    This book enables students to simulate examinations. The Radiology Trainer series comprises the whole knowledge of radiology in the form of case studies for self-testing. It is based on the best-sorted German-language collection of radiological examinations of all organ regions. Step by step, radiological knowledge is trained in order to make diagnoses more efficient. The book series ensures optimal preparation for the final medical examinations and is also a valuable tool for practical training. (orig.)

  18. Radiological diagnostics in hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moedder, U.; Kuhn, F.P.; Gruetzner, G.

    1991-01-01

    The most important radiologically detectable effects of the primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism of the skeletal system and the periarticular soft tissue structures are presented. In the following sensitivity and specificity of radiological imaging - sonography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, arteriography and selective venous sampling - in the preoperative diagnostic of the parathyroid adenomas are discussed. Therefore, radiological imaging can be omitted before primary surgery. It was only in secondary surgery that radiological process proved useful and a guide during surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  19. Radiological and nuclear safety- evolution, standards and similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soman, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    With the realisation of potential for severe health affects after the discovery of x-rays and radioactivity, the radiation protection aspect became focus of interest for medical users from the beginning of this century. With the activities of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the standards evolved during all these years based on epidemiological data and radio-biological research. The current standards are the ICRP recommendations of 1990. Based on these, internationally harmonised standards for protection against ionising radiation and safety of radioactive sources were brought out by IAEA in 1994. The nuclear safety (implies safety of nuclear power plants) came into prominence when large scale units were designed and operated since mid 1950s. The philosophy in nuclear safety has evolved in past 2-3 decades taking into account the lessons learned from accidents, mainly Three Mile Island (1979) and Chernobyl-4 (1986). These current nuclear safety standards are incorporated in INSAG reports, particularly INSAG-3. This paper brings out salient features of these evolutions, current standards and similarity of radiation and nuclear safety standards in their present form. (author). 7 refs., 10 tabs

  20. Radiology systems architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibel, S R; Greenes, R A

    1996-05-01

    This article focuses on the software requirements for enterprise integration in radiology. The needs of a future radiology systems architecture are examined, both at a concrete functional level and at an abstract system-properties level. A component-based approach to software development is described and is validated in the context of each of the abstract system requirements for future radiology computing environments.

  1. Radiologic studies in two outbreaks of isolated vasculitis in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, H.J.; Perez, M.; Tilton, A.H.; Garcia, C.; McGarry, P.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis is only occasionally diagnosed with angiography. Two outbreaks of isolated central nervous system vasculitis permitted a comparison of the accuracy of diagnostic radiologic studies. Two new radiologic features and methods of diagnosis are discussed

  2. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  3. Spacetimes containing slowly evolving horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, William; Booth, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Slowly evolving horizons are trapping horizons that are ''almost'' isolated horizons. This paper reviews their definition and discusses several spacetimes containing such structures. These include certain Vaidya and Tolman-Bondi solutions as well as (perturbatively) tidally distorted black holes. Taking into account the mass scales and orders of magnitude that arise in these calculations, we conjecture that slowly evolving horizons are the norm rather than the exception in astrophysical processes that involve stellar-scale black holes

  4. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  5. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Graves

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish

  6. Radiology and fine art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Slobodan; Stošić-Opinćal, Tatjana; Tomić, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    The radiologic aesthetics of some body parts and internal organs have inspired certain artists to create specific works of art. Our aim was to describe the link between radiology and fine art. We explored 13,625 artworks in the literature produced by 2049 artists and found several thousand photographs in an online image search. The examination revealed 271 radiologic artworks (1.99%) created by 59 artists (2.88%) who mainly applied radiography, sonography, CT, and MRI. Some authors produced radiologic artistic photographs, and others used radiologic images to create artful compositions, specific sculptures, or digital works. Many radiologic artworks have symbolic, metaphoric, or conceptual connotations. Radiology is clearly becoming an original and important field of modern art.

  7. Radiological manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreu, J. E-mail: andreuj@hg.vhebron.es; Caceres, J.; Pallisa, E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M

    2004-08-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is a common worldwide lung infection. The radiological features show considerable variation, but in most cases they are characteristic enough to suggest the diagnosis. Classically, tuberculosis is divided into primary, common in childhood, and postprimary, usually presenting in adults. The most characteristic radiological feature in primary tuberculosis is lymphadenopathy. On enhanced CT, hilar and mediastinal nodes with a central hypodense area suggest the diagnosis. Cavitation is the hallmark of postprimary tuberculosis and appears in around half of patients. Patchy, poorly defined consolidation in the apical and posterior segments of the upper lobes, and in the superior segment of the lower lobe is also commonly observed. Several complications are associated with tuberculous infection, such as hematogenous dissemination (miliary tuberculosis) or extension to the pleura, resulting in pleural effusion. Late complications of tuberculosis comprise a heterogeneous group of processes including tuberculoma, bronchial stenosis bronchiectasis, broncholithiasis, aspergilloma, bronchoesophageal fistula and fibrosing mediastinitis. Radiology provides essential information for the management and follow up of these patients and is extremely valuable for monitoring complications.

  8. Radiological Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valetin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This report was prepared to underpin the Commission's 2007 Recommendations with regard to the medical exposure of patients, including their comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research. It addresses the proper application of the fundamental principles (justification, optimisation of protection, and application of dose limits) of the Commission's 2007 Recommendations to these individuals. With regard to medical exposure of patients, it is not appropriate to apply dose limits or dose constraints, because such limits would often do more harm than good. Often, there are concurrent chronic, severe, or even life-threatening medical conditions that are more critical than the radiation exposure. The emphasis is then on justification of the medical procedures and on the optimisation of radiological protection. In diagnostic and interventional procedures, justification of procedures (for a defined purpose and for an individual patient), and management of the patient dose commensurate with the medical task, are the appropriate mechanisms to avoid unnecessary or unproductive radiation exposure. Equipment features that facilitate patient dose management, and diagnostic reference levels derived at the appropriate national, regional, or local level, are likely to be the most effective approaches. In radiation therapy, the avoidance of accidents is a predominant issue. With regard to comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research, dose constraints are appropriate. Over the last decade, the Commission has published a number of documents that provided detailed advice related to radiological protection and safety in the medical applications of ionising radiation. Each of the publications addressed a specific topic defined by the type of radiation source and the medical discipline in which the source is applied, and was written with the intent of communicating directly with the relevant medical practitioners and supporting medical staff. This report

  9. Evidence-based radiology: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Hunink, Myriam G.; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2010-01-01

    To provide an overview of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in relation to radiology and to define a policy for adoption of this principle in the European radiological community. Starting from Sackett's definition of EBM we illustrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches to EBM as well as EBM's limitations. Delayed diffusion and peculiar features of evidence-based radiology (EBR) are defined with emphasis on the need to shift from the demonstration of the increasing ability to see more and better, to the demonstration of a significant change in treatment planning or, at best, of a significant gain in patient outcome. The ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle is thought as a dimension of EBR while EBR is proposed as part of the core curriculum of radiology residency. Moreover, we describe the process of health technology assessment in radiology with reference to the six-level scale of hierarchy of studies on diagnostic tests, the main sources of bias in studies on diagnostic performance, and levels of evidence and degrees of recommendations according to the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (Oxford, UK) as well as the approach proposed by the GRADE working group. Problems and opportunities offered by evidence-based guidelines in radiology are considered. Finally, we suggest nine points to be actioned by the ESR in order to promote EBR. Radiology will benefit greatly from the improvement in practice that will result from adopting this more rigorous approach to all aspects of our work. (orig.)

  10. Occupational radiological protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: occupational expossure (the ALARA principle, dose-equivalent limit, ICRP justification); radiological protection planning (general aspects, barrier estimation) and determination of the occupational expossures (individual monitoring). (M.A.) [pt

  11. Mission and activities of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, C.H.

    2018-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), formed in 1928, develops the System of Radiological Protection for the public benefit. The objective of the recommendations is to contribute to an appropriate level of protection for people and the environment against the harmful effects of radiation exposure without unduly limiting the individual or societal benefits of activities involving radiation. In developing its recommendations, ICRP considers advances in scientific knowledge, evolving social values, and practical experience. These recommendations are the basis of radiological protection standards and practice worldwide

  12. Robustness to Faults Promotes Evolvability: Insights from Evolving Digital Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Nicola; Nolfi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how the need to cope with operational faults enables evolving circuits to find more fit solutions. The analysis of the results obtained in different experimental conditions indicates that, in absence of faults, evolution tends to select circuits that are small and have low phenotypic variability and evolvability. The need to face operation faults, instead, drives evolution toward the selection of larger circuits that are truly robust with respect to genetic variations and that have a greater level of phenotypic variability and evolvability. Overall our results indicate that the need to cope with operation faults leads to the selection of circuits that have a greater probability to generate better circuits as a result of genetic variation with respect to a control condition in which circuits are not subjected to faults.

  13. Computational radiology for orthopaedic interventions

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a cohesive overview of the current technological advances in computational radiology, and their applications in orthopaedic interventions. Contributed by the leading researchers in the field, this volume covers not only basic computational radiology techniques such as statistical shape modeling, CT/MRI segmentation, augmented reality and micro-CT image processing, but also the applications of these techniques to various orthopaedic interventional tasks. Details about following important state-of-the-art development are featured: 3D preoperative planning and patient-specific instrumentation for surgical treatment of long-bone deformities, computer assisted diagnosis and planning of periacetabular osteotomy and femoroacetabular impingement, 2D-3D reconstruction-based planning of total hip arthroplasty, image fusion for  computer-assisted bone tumor surgery, intra-operative three-dimensional imaging in fracture treatment, augmented reality based orthopaedic interventions and education, medica...

  14. The Generalised Ecosystem Modelling Approach in Radiological Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, Richard

    2008-03-01

    An independent modelling capability is required by SSI in order to evaluate dose assessments carried out in Sweden by, amongst others, SKB. The main focus is the evaluation of the long-term radiological safety of radioactive waste repositories for both spent fuel and low-level radioactive waste. To meet the requirement for an independent modelling tool for use in biosphere dose assessments, SSI through its modelling team CLIMB commissioned the development of a new model in 2004, a project to produce an integrated model of radionuclides in the landscape. The generalised ecosystem modelling approach (GEMA) is the result. GEMA is a modular system of compartments representing the surface environment. It can be configured, through water and solid material fluxes, to represent local details in the range of ecosystem types found in the past, present and future Swedish landscapes. The approach is generic but fine tuning can be carried out using local details of the surface drainage system. The modular nature of the modelling approach means that GEMA modules can be linked to represent large scale surface drainage features over an extended domain in the landscape. System change can also be managed in GEMA, allowing a flexible and comprehensive model of the evolving landscape to be constructed. Environmental concentrations of radionuclides can be calculated and the GEMA dose pathway model provides a means of evaluating the radiological impact of radionuclide release to the surface environment. This document sets out the philosophy and details of GEMA and illustrates the functioning of the model with a range of examples featuring the recent CLIMB review of SKB's SR-Can assessment

  15. The Generalised Ecosystem Modelling Approach in Radiological Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klos, Richard

    2008-03-15

    An independent modelling capability is required by SSI in order to evaluate dose assessments carried out in Sweden by, amongst others, SKB. The main focus is the evaluation of the long-term radiological safety of radioactive waste repositories for both spent fuel and low-level radioactive waste. To meet the requirement for an independent modelling tool for use in biosphere dose assessments, SSI through its modelling team CLIMB commissioned the development of a new model in 2004, a project to produce an integrated model of radionuclides in the landscape. The generalised ecosystem modelling approach (GEMA) is the result. GEMA is a modular system of compartments representing the surface environment. It can be configured, through water and solid material fluxes, to represent local details in the range of ecosystem types found in the past, present and future Swedish landscapes. The approach is generic but fine tuning can be carried out using local details of the surface drainage system. The modular nature of the modelling approach means that GEMA modules can be linked to represent large scale surface drainage features over an extended domain in the landscape. System change can also be managed in GEMA, allowing a flexible and comprehensive model of the evolving landscape to be constructed. Environmental concentrations of radionuclides can be calculated and the GEMA dose pathway model provides a means of evaluating the radiological impact of radionuclide release to the surface environment. This document sets out the philosophy and details of GEMA and illustrates the functioning of the model with a range of examples featuring the recent CLIMB review of SKB's SR-Can assessment

  16. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board...... of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology....

  17. A neighbourhood evolving network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.J.; Wang, G.Z.; Jiang, Q.Y.; Han, Z.X.

    2006-01-01

    Many social, technological, biological and economical systems are best described by evolved network models. In this short Letter, we propose and study a new evolving network model. The model is based on the new concept of neighbourhood connectivity, which exists in many physical complex networks. The statistical properties and dynamics of the proposed model is analytically studied and compared with those of Barabasi-Albert scale-free model. Numerical simulations indicate that this network model yields a transition between power-law and exponential scaling, while the Barabasi-Albert scale-free model is only one of its special (limiting) cases. Particularly, this model can be used to enhance the evolving mechanism of complex networks in the real world, such as some social networks development

  18. Non-accidental injury: a review of the radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carty, H.

    1997-01-01

    There have been many descriptions of the radiological features of non-accidental injury since John Caffey introduced the concept of inflicted injury and initially described some of the patterns of injury. Since then, our understanding of the radiologically detectable injuries has increased. This article provides a review of our current understanding of the lesions. (orig.)

  19. Clinical, radiological and sonographic correlation in secondary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuseppetti, G.M.; Giovannoni, A.; Baldelli, S.; Bordoni, E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of US study on parathyroid glands, performed in 75 hemodialysed patients are reported. The correlation between morphological feature of the glands, biochemical and radiological pattern of secondary hyperparathyroidism is stressed. The results show a significant link between gland volume and hematic level of PTH: less interesting appears the correlation with radiological pattern of uremic osteodystrophy

  20. Socioeconomic trends in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    For radiology the socioeconomic environment is a topic of increasing importance. In addition to the well-known important scientific developments in radiology such as interventional MRI, several other major trends can be recognized: (1) changes in the delivery of health care, in which all kinds of managed care are developing and will influence the practice of radiology, and (2) the process of computerization and digitization. The socioeconomic environment of radiology will be transformed by the developments in managed care, teleradiology and the integration of information systems. If radiologists want to manage future radiology departments they must have an understanding of the changes in the fields of economics and politics that are taking place and that will increasingly influence radiology. Some important and recognizable aspects of these changes will be described here. (orig.)

  1. Radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: correlation with the blood CD4 cell count; Patrones radiologicos de la tuberculosis pulmonar en pacientes con infeccion VIH: correlacion con el indice de linfocitos CD4 en sangre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isusi, M.; Eguidazu, J.; Oleaga, L.; Grande, D. [Hospital de Basurto. Bilbao (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    To describe the radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and its correlation with the blood CD4 cell count. We present 44 HIV+patients, 24 with CD4 cell counts of less than 200 cells/mm''3 (group A) and 20 in whom the CD4 counts surpassed this level (group B). We also assessed the chest x-ray images to determine whether or not there was any correlation with the blood CD4 cell counts. Fisher's exact test was used for the statistical study of the differences in the radiological findings in the two groups. The incidence of atypical features was significantly greater in the patients with CD4 cell counts of less than 200 cells/mm''3 (group A) than in those with CD4 counts of over 200 cells/mm''3 (group B). Among HIV+patients, those with a more intact immune status were more likely to present lung x-ray images typical of post-primary TB, with cavitary lesions in upper lobes. The group of patients in whom the immune deficiency was more marked showed a greater incidence of atypical pulmonary findings, more characteristics of primary TB. (Author)

  2. Radiation protection and quality assurance in dental radiology: II. Panoramic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodar-Porlan, S.; Alcaraz, M.; Martinez-Beneyto, Y.; Saura-Iniesta, A.M.; Velasco-Hidalgo, E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies 278 official reports on quality assurance in dental radiology in the context of the first revision of these dental clinics, as a result of the entry into force of the regulations establishing the duties for these types of facilities. In the results section we present a quantitative analysis of the facilities equipped with an panoramic radiology apparatus, making a special reference to the brands they have available, as well as their physical features (kV, mA, filtration) and the deviations detected in their operation. Some of their features in the process of obtaining radiological images at those facilities (film control, development time, liquid renewal) are determined, and the average dose of ionising radiation used in order to obtain the same tooth radiological image is presented. This paper shows, in a quantitative way, the characteristic features of panoramic radiology in our medium. The study is intended to be continued during the next years, which would allow the assessment of the prospective improvement in dental radiological performances as a result of the newly established regulations. (author)

  3. Feature Binding in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Neri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Binding operations are primarily ascribed to cortex or similarly complex avian structures. My experiments show that the zebrafish, a lower vertebrate lacking cortex, supports visual feature binding of form and motion for the purpose of social behavior. These results challenge the notion that feature binding may require highly evolved neural structures and demonstrate that the nervous system of lower vertebrates can afford unexpectedly complex computations.

  4. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  5. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  6. Machine Learning and Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  7. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint

  8. Machine learning and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Advanced radiology information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolovou, L; Vatousi, M; Lymperopoulos, D; Koukias, M

    2005-01-01

    The innovative features of an advanced Radiology Information System (RIS) are presented in this paper. The interoperability of RIS with the other Intra-hospital Information Systems that interacts with, dealing with the compatibility and open architecture issues, are accomplished by two novel mechanisms [1]. The first one is the particular message handling system that is applied for the exchange of information, according to the Health Level Seven (HL7) protocol's specifications and serves the transfer of medical and administrative data among the RIS applications and data store unit. The same mechanism allows the secure and HL7-compatible interactions with the Hospital Information System (HIS) too. The second one implements the translation of information between the formats that HL7 and Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) protocols specify, providing the communication between RIS and Picture and Archive Communication System (PACS). The whole structure ensures the automation of the every-day procedures that the ;medical protocol' specifies and provides its services through a friendly and easy to manage graphical user interface.

  10. Epilepsy and radiological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomberg, T.

    2005-01-01

    Epilepsy is a heterogenous group of disorders with multiple causes. Clinical management of epilepsy patients requires knowledge of seizure syndromes, causes, and imaging features. The aim of radiological investigations is to recognize the underlying cause of epilepsy. The main indications for neuroimaging studies are partial and secondarily generalized seizures, patients with neurological signs and intractable seizures, and patients with focal signs on EEG. Partial seizures of any type are more likely to be associated with a focus that may be identified on neuroimaging. MRI is the method of choice for evaluating structural abnormalities of the brain. High resolution MRI and dedicated imaging technique are needed for detection of subtle pathological changes as cortical dysplasias and temporal medial sclerosis. Other lesions that may be detected include neoplasms, vascular malformations, destructive lesions following brain injury, stroke, infection, etc. CT continues to be the technique for the investigation of patients with seizures under certain conditions. New techniques such as functional MRI, MR spectroscopy, SPECT, receptor PET and magnetic source imaging are becoming clinical tools for improving diagnosis [et

  11. Morquio syndrome: A radiological diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhanandham Shrinuvasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS are a family of inherited metabolic diseases that results from the deficiency of lysosomal enzymes involved in the degradation of the glycosaminoglycans (MPS. We report here a 7-year-old female child who presented with complaints of short stature, skeletal deformities, and difficulty in walking with normal intelligence. A clinical diagnosis with differential diagnosis of achondroplasia/rickets was considered. Skeletal survey showed radiological features characteristic of Morquio syndrome (MPS IV which lead to diagnosis in this case.

  12. The radiological manifestation of hypophosphatasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haisong; Li Xiaofei; Han Yan; Cao Qingxuan; Xu Wenjian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the radiological features of hypophosphatasia. Methods: Five cases of hypophosphatasia were definitely diagnosed, which included 3 males and 2 females aged from 5 months to 23 years. The laboratory assays were analyzed, radiological appearances of bone were determined and differential diagnoses were made. Results: The alkaline phosphatase in blood serum of five patients decreased, which were 8, 20, 13, 21, and 18 U/L respectively. Phosphoethanolamine increased in blood serum of the five patients, which were 16.5, 13.5, 21.6, 18.7, and 28.9 μmol/L respectively. Phosphoethanolamine also increased in urine,which were 2350, 9120, 3520, 5280, and 1820 μmol/L respectively. Calcium in blood serum increased, which were 4.2, 5.6, 4.9, 6.1, and 3.5 mmol/L respectively. X-ray images displayed that the density of bone decreased in 5 cases, the metaphyses exhibited widening and cupping in 4 cases, the provisional calcification zone of the metaphysis became thinning or disappearing in 4 cases, long bone bended in 4 cases and pathologically fractured in 1 case. Conclusion: Hypophosphatasia can be indicated by its relatively special radiological appearance, and it can be diagnosed and differentiated from rickets, osteomalacia and osteogenesis imperfect by the laboratory examination combined with its clinical presentation. (authors)

  13. Report writing in skeletal radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, L.J.; Yochum, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation of reports in clinical practice is a standard method of documentation of a patient's history, examination findings, therapeutic regime, and prognosis, as well as other important features. In the practice of producing and interpreting diagnostic radiographs, report writing also serves a number of important roles, which include providing an accurate means of recording findings in instances of 1) medicolegal circumstances; 2) a standard for comparison with previous or later examinations; 3) a permanent record if the radiographs are lost or not immediately available for perusal; 4) communication with other practitioners and health professionals; and 5) expediating the treatment regime by providing a resume of important indications and contraindictions for therapy. In the radiological literature there is a distinct lack of material on report writing and very little as to what would be considered a standard style. Consequently, radiological reporting has increasingly become a subjective, personalized procedure, with each individual modifying the report according to previous training, experience, and needs. It is the purpose of this chapter to provide basic guidelines on the mechanisms of formulating adequate standardized reports in radiological examinations of the skeletal system

  14. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Goldhagen, P.

    1988-07-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generated a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the U.S. Department of Energy. As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the RRL are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. Facilities and services are provided to users, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. RARAF was located at BNL from 1967 until 1980, when it was dismantled and moved to the Nevis Laboratories of Columbia University, where it was then reassembled and put back into operation. Data obtained from experiment using RARAF have been of pragmatic value to radiation protection and to neutron therapy. At a more fundamental level, the research at RARAF has provided insight into the biological action of radiation and especially its relation to energy distribution in the cell. High-LET radiations are an agent of special importance because they can cause measurable cellular effects by single particles, eliminating some of the complexities of multievent action and more clearly disclosing basic features. This applies particularly to radiation carcinogenesis. Facilities are available at RARAF for exposing objects to different radiations having a wide range of linear energy transfers (LETs)

  15. Radiological aspects of sprained ankle syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandij, E.S.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis addresses several problems related to sprained ankle syndrome. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the imaging features of sprained ankles, found on new radiological modalities, and to assess the additional diagnostic understanding and treatment planning of helical CT as well as

  16. A word book in radiology with anatomic plates and tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloane, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    The author offers this spelling aid for the complex and rapidly expanding radiology vocabulary. An entire section is devoted to the vocabulary of anatomy, which is conveyed by both plates and tables. Fully cross-referenced; features appendices

  17. The Role of Current Emergency Radiology Practice: A prospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Which imaging modality best evaluates specific clinical emergencies has evolved and ... department of radiology at the duty hours and accounted for 40.9% of all cases. ... (21.6%), blunt abdominal trauma (5.7%) and pulmonary edema (4.7%).

  18. Radiologic findings of struma ovarii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Chul [Chungnam National Univ. School of Medicine, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyun Ja [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyup [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Young [Catholic Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    Struma ovarii is ovarian tumor composed solely or predominantly of thyroid tissue or tumor in which hyperthyroidism results from ovarian thyroid tissue, and usually occurs in tandem with cystic teratoma. Ovarian cystic teratoma is radiologically easily diagnosed due to calcification or fat, for example, but the preoperative diagnosis of struma ovarii is often difficult due to rare characteristic features of thyroid tissue. Our purpose was to determine whether there were specific findings of struma ovarii which distinguished it from other ovarian tumors, and this involved analysis of its radiologic findings. Using ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, preoperative radiologic findings of pathologically-proven struma ovarii in eleven patients were retrospectively evaluated for site, margin, nature (cystic, solid, mixed), contrast enhancement, septa, mural nodule, calcification, fat, and metastasis. These findings were compared with pathologic findings. All eleven tumors were unilateral, ten had smooth tumor margins, seven were mixed cystic and solid tumors (more than 70% of solid components in one tumor), and nine had regular septa. Three of four cystic masses (one unilocular, one bilocular and two multilocular cysts) had mural nodules. Calcifications were found in two tumors, and fat in one. Malignant change or metastasis was not found in any tumor. In one patient with hyperthyroidism due to struma ovarii, symptoms and signs of this subsided after removal of the tumor on salpingo-oophorectomy. Most cases of struma ovarii occurred unilaterally within ovarian teratomas in premenopausal women, and were mixed cystic and solid masses with smooth margins that are commonly enhanced on contrast enhanced scans. In one patient, hyperthyroidism was caused by struma ovarii. There were, however, no specific radiologic findings that were sufficiently typical to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis of struma ovarii.

  19. Radiologic findings of struma ovarii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Shin, Hyun Ja; Kim, Seung Hyup; Byun, Jae Young

    1997-01-01

    Struma ovarii is ovarian tumor composed solely or predominantly of thyroid tissue or tumor in which hyperthyroidism results from ovarian thyroid tissue, and usually occurs in tandem with cystic teratoma. Ovarian cystic teratoma is radiologically easily diagnosed due to calcification or fat, for example, but the preoperative diagnosis of struma ovarii is often difficult due to rare characteristic features of thyroid tissue. Our purpose was to determine whether there were specific findings of struma ovarii which distinguished it from other ovarian tumors, and this involved analysis of its radiologic findings. Using ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, preoperative radiologic findings of pathologically-proven struma ovarii in eleven patients were retrospectively evaluated for site, margin, nature (cystic, solid, mixed), contrast enhancement, septa, mural nodule, calcification, fat, and metastasis. These findings were compared with pathologic findings. All eleven tumors were unilateral, ten had smooth tumor margins, seven were mixed cystic and solid tumors (more than 70% of solid components in one tumor), and nine had regular septa. Three of four cystic masses (one unilocular, one bilocular and two multilocular cysts) had mural nodules. Calcifications were found in two tumors, and fat in one. Malignant change or metastasis was not found in any tumor. In one patient with hyperthyroidism due to struma ovarii, symptoms and signs of this subsided after removal of the tumor on salpingo-oophorectomy. Most cases of struma ovarii occurred unilaterally within ovarian teratomas in premenopausal women, and were mixed cystic and solid masses with smooth margins that are commonly enhanced on contrast enhanced scans. In one patient, hyperthyroidism was caused by struma ovarii. There were, however, no specific radiologic findings that were sufficiently typical to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis of struma ovarii

  20. [Instruction in dental radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Kreulen, C.M.; Berkhout, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive

  1. Medical Ethics in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Park, Jae Hyung; Yoon, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    According to the recent developments in radiological techniques, the role of radiology in the clinical management of patients is ever increasing and in turn, so is the importance of radiology in patient management. Thus far, there have been few open discussions about medical ethics related to radiology in Korea. Hence, concern about medical ethics as an essential field of radiology should be part of an improved resident training program and patient management. The categories of medical ethics related with radiology are ethics in the radiological management of patient, the relationship of radiologists with other medical professionals or companies, the hazard level of radiation for patients and radiologists, quality assurance of image products and modalities, research ethics, and other ethics issues related to teleradiology and fusion imaging. In order to achieve the goal of respectful progress in radiology as well as minimizing any adverse reaction from other medical professions or society, we should establish a strong basis of medical ethics through the continuous concern and self education

  2. Physics of Radiology

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Harold Elford

    1983-01-01

    Authority, comprehensivity and a consummate manner of presentation have been hallmarks of The Physics of Radiology since it first saw publication some three decades past. This Fourth Edition adheres to that tradition but again updates the context. It thoroughly integrates ideas recently advanced and practices lately effected. Students and professionals alike will continue to view it, in essence, as the bible of radiological physics.

  3. Gout. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Pena Cortes, Mario; Rondon Herrera, Federico; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Calvo Paramo, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed the clinical and radiological aspects of gout, showing the most frequent radiological findings that can guide to the correct diagnosis of the disease. The cases that we presented here have been analyzed for many years in our rheumatology service, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Hospital San Juan de Dios, Bogota

  4. Strengthening the scientific basis of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The overarching objective of the radiological protection system is to contribute to an appropriate level of protection against the harmful effects of radiation exposure, without unjustifiably limiting the desired results from the human activity causing exposure. Such a balance is achieved by understanding as best as possible the scientific characteristics of radiation exposure and the related health effects, and by taking this knowledge into consideration when judging which protection decisions will ensure the best balance between social and economic aspects and risks. In general, the existing radiological protection system, on which national regulations are built in virtually every country in the world, works well and does not underestimate protection needs for either individuals or exposed populations as a whole. The latest International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations, which define this protection system, were formed after a long and open dialogue with the public, where expert views were actively collected and discussed at national, regional and international levels. Although the radiological protection system is very effective, and there is no current need for a prompt revision, it is important nonetheless to keep a watchful eye on the latest scientific results, and to work to ensure that the entire radiological protection community is kept up to date on evolving and emerging scientific issues. In this way, potential or actual scientific changes can be appropriately identified and in turn can stimulate reflection on changes that might be needed in the protection system, in policy, in regulation and in practice. Such reflection should benefit from the input of other scientific disciplines and interested stakeholders. To contribute to this process, the NEA Committee on Radiological Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has periodically reviewed and released reports on the state of the art in radiological protection science (see NEA

  5. Ranking in evolving complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Many popular ranking algorithms (such as Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of significant nodes.

  6. Degree distribution of a new model for evolving networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on intuitive but realistic consideration that nodes are added to the network with both preferential and random attachments. The degree distribution of the model is between a power-law and an exponential decay. Motivated by the features of network evolution, we introduce a new model of evolving networks, incorporating the ...

  7. Evolution of the clinical review station for enterprise-wide multimedia radiology reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, William B.; Valtchinov, Vladimir I.; Davis, Scott D.; Lester, James; Khorasani, Ramin; Carrino, John A.; Benfield, Andrew

    2000-05-01

    Efforts to develop Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) for the last ten years have concentrated mainly on developing systems for primary interpretation of digital radiological images. Much less attention has been paid to the clinical aspects of the radiology process. Clinical radiology services are an important component of the overall care delivery process, providing information and consultation services to referring physicians, the customers of radiology, in a timely fashion to aid in care decisions. Information management systems (IMS) are playing an increasingly central role in the care delivery process. No suitable commercial PACS or IMS products were available that could effectively provide for the requirements of the clinicians. We endeavored to fill this void at our institution by developing a system to deliver images and text reports electronically on-demand to the referring physicians. This system has evolved substantially since initial deployment eight years ago. As new technologies become available they are evaluated and integrated as appropriate to improve system performance and manageability. Not surprisingly, the internet and World Wide Web (WWW) technology has had the greatest impact on system design in recent years. Additional features have been added over time to provide services for teleradiology, teaching, and research needs. We also discovered that these value-added services give us a competitive edge in attracting new business to our department. Commercial web-based products are now becoming available which do a satisfactory job of providing many of these clinical services. These products are evaluated for integration into our system as they mature. The result is a system that impacts positively on patient care.

  8. An Evolving Worldview: Making Open Source Easy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Z.

    2017-12-01

    NASA Worldview is an interactive interface for browsing full-resolution, global satellite imagery. Worldview supports an open data policy so that academia, private industries and the general public can use NASA's satellite data to address Earth science related issues. Worldview was open sourced in 2014. By shifting to an open source approach, the Worldview application has evolved to better serve end-users. Project developers are able to have discussions with end-users and community developers to understand issues and develop new features. Community developers are able to track upcoming features, collaborate on them and make their own contributions. Developers who discover issues are able to address those issues and submit a fix. This reduces the time it takes for a project developer to reproduce an issue or develop a new feature. Getting new developers to contribute to the project has been one of the most important and difficult aspects of open sourcing Worldview. After witnessing potential outside contributors struggle, a focus has been made on making the installation of Worldview simple to reduce the initial learning curve and make contributing code easy. One way we have addressed this is through a simplified setup process. Our setup documentation includes a set of prerequisites and a set of straightforward commands to clone, configure, install and run. This presentation will emphasize our focus to simplify and standardize Worldview's open source code so that more people are able to contribute. The more people who contribute, the better the application will become over time.

  9. Radiology of disorders of the sacroiliac joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnik, C.S.; Resnick, D.

    1985-01-01

    Many disorders can lead to radiological abnormalities of the sacroiliac joints. Some present a characteristic appearance, while others may be diagnosed by analyzing both the appearance and the distribution of findings. Computed tomography provides excellent visualization of the sacroiliac joints and can be helpful in the evaluation of articular disorders as well as pelvic trauma and neoplasms. Radionuclide scanning of bone can also be used to evaluate the sacroiliac joints, particularly if the two sides are compared with the assistance of computer-generated activity counts. This article describes the radiological features of these various disorders that often allow an exact diagnosis to be made

  10. Digital image information systems in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greinacher, C.F.C.; Luetke, B.; Seufert, G.

    1987-01-01

    About 25% of all patient examinations are performed digitally in a today's radiological department. A computerized system is described that supports generation, transport, interpretation and archiving of digital radiological images (Picture Archiving and Communication System PACS). The technical features concerning image communication via local area networks, image storage on magnetic and optical media and digital workstations for image display and manipulation are described. A structured system architecture is introduced. It allows flexible adaption to individual organizations and minimizes the requirements of the communication network. (orig.) [de

  11. Radiology and Enterprise Medical Imaging Extensions (REMIX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, Barbaros S; Prevedello, Luciano M; Qian, Songyue; Demirer, Mutlu; Little, Kevin; Ryu, John; O'Donnell, Thomas; White, Richard D

    2018-02-01

    Radiology and Enterprise Medical Imaging Extensions (REMIX) is a platform originally designed to both support the medical imaging-driven clinical and clinical research operational needs of Department of Radiology of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. REMIX accommodates the storage and handling of "big imaging data," as needed for large multi-disciplinary cancer-focused programs. The evolving REMIX platform contains an array of integrated tools/software packages for the following: (1) server and storage management; (2) image reconstruction; (3) digital pathology; (4) de-identification; (5) business intelligence; (6) texture analysis; and (7) artificial intelligence. These capabilities, along with documentation and guidance, explaining how to interact with a commercial system (e.g., PACS, EHR, commercial database) that currently exists in clinical environments, are to be made freely available.

  12. Recent perspectives on optimisation of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, J.D.; Croft, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The ALARA principle as a requirement in radiological protection has evolved from its theoretical roots. Based on several years work, this paper provides a backdrop to practical approaches to ALARA for the 1990s. The key step, developing ALARA thinking so that it becomes an integral part of radiological protection programmes, is discussed using examples from the UK and France, as is the role of tools to help standardise judgements for decision-making. In its latest recommendations, ICRP have suggested that the optimisation of protection should be constrained by restrictions on the doses to individuals. This paper also considers the function of such restrictions for occupational, public and medical exposure, and in the design process. (author)

  13. Medical liability and patient law in Germany. Main features with particular focus on treatments in the field of interventional radiology; Arzthaftung und Patientenrechtegesetz in Deutschland. Die Grundzuege unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung von Behandlungen auf dem Gebiet der Interventionellen Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, S.A.; Geissler, R. [Kapp and Geissler Lawyers, Stuttgart (Germany); Stampfl, U.; Radeleff, B.A.; Kauczor, H.U.; Sommer, Christof M. [Univ. Hospital Heidelberg (Germany). Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Wolf, M.B. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Radiology (E010); Richter, G.M. [Klinikum Stuttgart (Germany). Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Pereira, P.L. [SLK Kliniken, Heilbronn (Germany). Radiology, Minimally-invasive Therapies and Nuclearmedicine

    2016-04-15

    On February 26th, 2013 the patient law became effective in Germany. Goal of the lawmakers was a most authoritative case law for liability of malpractice and to improve enforcement of the rights of the patients. The following article contains several examples detailing legal situation. By no means should these discourage those persons who treat patients. Rather should they be sensitized to to various aspects of this increasingly important field of law. To identify relevant sources according to judicial standard research was conducted including first- and second selection. Goal was the identification of jurisdiction, literature and other various analyses that all deal with liability of malpractice and patient law within the field of Interventional Radiology - with particular focus on transarterial chemoembolization of the liver and related procedures. In summary, 89 different sources were included and analyzed. The individual who treats a patient is liable for an error in treatment if it causes injury to life, the body or the patient's health. Independent of the error in treatment the individual providing medical care is liable for mistakes made in the context of obtaining informed consent. Prerequisite is the presence of an error made when obtaining informed consent and its causality for the patient's consent for the treatment. Without an effective consent the treatment is considered illegal whether it was free of treatment error or not. The new patient law does not cause material change of the German liability of malpractice law.

  14. Referral expectations of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.L.; Altmaier, E.; Berberoglu, L.; Morris, K.

    1989-01-01

    The expectation of the referring physician are key to developing a successful practice in radiology. Structured interviews with 17 clinicians in both community care and academic practice documented that accuracy of the radiologic report was the single most important factor in clinician satisfaction. Data intercorrelation showed that accuracy of report correlated with frequency of referral (r = .49). Overall satisfaction of the referring physician with radiology correlated with accuracy (r = .69), patient satisfaction (r = .36), and efficiency in archiving (r = .42). These data may be weighted by departmental managers to allocate resources for improving referring physician satisfaction

  15. Marketing a Radiology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David C; Rao, Vijay M; Flanders, Adam E; Sundaram, Baskaran; Colarossi, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In addition to being a profession, the practice of radiology is a business, and marketing is an important part of that business. There are many facets to marketing a radiology practice. The authors present a number of ideas on how to go about doing this. Some marketing methods can be directed to both patients and referring physicians. Others should be directed just to patients, while still others should be directed just to referring physicians. Aside from marketing, many of them provide value to both target audiences. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Guidelines for radiological interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    The German Radiological Society, in cooperation with other German professional bodies, set up draft Guidelines for Radiological Interventions and submitted them to the professional community for discussion. The Guidelines are meant to assess the potential of radiological interventions as treatment alternatives to surgery or aggressive therapy such as chemotherapy. In fact, technical practicability on its own is insufficient to warrant intervention. The Guidelines are systematically compiled notions and recommendations whose aim it is to provide support to physicians and patients in choosing suitable medical care provisions (prevention, diagnosis, therapy, aftertreatment) in specific circumstances. A complete Czech translation of the Guidelines is given. (P.A.)

  17. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  18. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  19. Radiological risk comparison guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallinan, E.J.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Brown, L.F.; Yoder, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    An important aspect of DOE safety analyses is estimating potential accident risk. The estimates are used to: determine if additional controls are needed, identify Safety Class Items, and demonstrate adequate risk reduction. Thus, guidelines are needed to measure comparative risks. The Westinghouse M ampersand O Nuclear Facility Safety Committee and the Safety Envelope Working Group have developed radiological risk guidelines for comparing the risks from individual accident analyses. These guidelines were prepared under contract with the US Department of Energy. These guidelines are based on historical DOE guidelines and current requirements, and satisfy DOE and technical community proposals. for goals that demonstrate acceptable risk. The guidelines consist of a frequency versus consequence curve for credible accidents. Offsite and onsite guidelines are presented. The offsite risk acceptance guidelines are presented in Figure 1. The guidelines are nearly isorisk for anticipated events where impacts are chronic, and provide additional reduction for unlikely events where impacts may be acute and risk uncertainties may be significant. The guidelines are applied to individual release accident scenarios where a discrete frequency and consequence has been estimated. The guideline curves are not to be used for total risk assessments. Common cause events are taken into consideration only for an individual facility. Frequencies outside the guideline range are considered to be local site option (analyst judgement) as far as assessments of risk acceptance are concerned. If the curve is exceeded, then options include either a more detailed analysis or imposing additional preventive or mitigative features. Another presentation discusses implementation in detail. Additional work is needed to provide risk comparison guidelines for releases from multiple facilities and for toxic releases

  20. The 'E' factor -- evolving endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, M J

    2013-03-01

    Endodontics is a constantly developing field, with new instruments, preparation techniques and sealants competing with trusted and traditional approaches to tooth restoration. Thus general dental practitioners must question and understand the significance of these developments before adopting new practices. In view of this, the aim of this article, and the associated presentation at the 2013 British Dental Conference & Exhibition, is to provide an overview of endodontic methods and constantly evolving best practice. The presentation will review current preparation techniques, comparing rotary versus reciprocation, and question current trends in restoration of the endodontically treated tooth.

  1. Radiology of the pancreas. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baert, A.L.; Van Hoe, L.; Delorme, G.

    1999-01-01

    Radiology of the Pancreas discusses the diagnostic role of the various imaging modalities currently available for the assessment of pancreatic anatomy and disease. In comparison with the first edition, new technical developments (helical CT, ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging, color Doppler ultrasound, laparoscopic ultrasound), have been included, and several chapters have been significantly expanded. With the aid of numerous illustrations, the normal radiological anatomy, anatomical variants, the typical and atypical radiological features of both common and uncommon diseases, and potential pitfalls are considered in depth. All of the chapters have been written by recognized experts in the field, and the book should be of value to all radiologists and other specialists who treat patients with pancreatic disease or who have an interest in the subject. (orig.)

  2. Radiological assessment and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.; Sohier, A.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological assessment and optimization are (1) to implement ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for radiological optimization in decision-aiding; (3) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (4) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (5) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (6) to investigate computer codes in the area of multi criteria analysis; (7) to organise courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in these areas for 1997 are summarised

  3. Diagnostic radiology: I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter describes the historic development of diagnostic equipment for radiology. The problems associated with fluoroscope design are detailed and the current uses of updated technology, particularly digitization, are considered. Numerous historical photographs are included. 13 refs

  4. Ergonomics in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, N. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nimitgoyal@doctors.org.uk; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations.

  5. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 1 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Ergonomics in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, N.; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V.

    2009-01-01

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations

  8. Society of Interventional Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Picture yourself in L.A. Register now SIR Essentials Purchase/register Search SIR's entire catalog for educational ... Quality Improvement Clinical practice MACRA Matters Health Policy, Economics, Coding Toolkits Society of Interventional Radiology 3975 Fair ...

  9. Radiology Architecture Project Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Raymond W; Hogan, Laurie; Teshima, Satoshi; Davidson, Scott

    2017-12-19

    The rapid pace of technologic advancement and increasing expectations for patient- and family-friendly environments make it common for radiology leaders to be involved in imaging remodel and construction projects. Most radiologists and business directors lack formal training in architectural and construction processes but are expected to play significant and often leading roles in all phases of an imaging construction project. Avoidable mistakes can result in significant increased costs and scheduling delays; knowledgeable participation and communication can result in a final product that enhances staff workflow and morale and improves patient care and experience. This article presents practical guidelines for preparing for and leading a new imaging architectural and construction project. We share principles derived from the radiology and nonradiology literature and our own experience over the past decade completely remodeling a large pediatric radiology department and building a full-service outpatient imaging center. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiology and the law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Law of Medical Malpractice: An Overview; The Radiologist as Defendant; The Radiologist as an Expert Witness; The Missed Diagnosis; Legalities of the Radiograph; and Angiography and Interventional Radiology

  11. Radiological clerkships as a critical curriculum component in radiology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Valcke, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore the perceived value of clinical clerkships in the radiology curriculum as well as the impact of radiology clerkship on students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole and as a career. Methods: This study is a sequel to a previous survey in which student perceptions about radiology curriculum components were investigated. The present study focuses on a further analysis of a subsection in this study, based on 14 statements about radiology clerkship and two statements about radiology as a career. Results: Perceived usefulness of the aspects of radiology clerkship as 'radiology examination', 'skills development' and 'diagnosis focus' were awarded the highest scores. The predict value of the subscale 'radiology examination' on the level of performance was very high (adjusted R 2 = 0.19, p < .001). Conclusion: Students expressed highly favorable evaluation of clerkship as a learning environment to learn to order and to interpret imaging studies as well as an unique possibility to attend various radiological examinations and to access to specific radiology software systems, as well as to get a better view on radiology and to improve image interpretation skills. This positive attitude towards clerkship is closely tied to students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole. These aspects of dedicated radiology clerkship are crucial for effective and high-quality education as well as for the choice of radiology as a career.

  12. Radiologic science for technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides in-depth coverage of physics, biology and protection for the radiologic technology student. It presents a significant portion of all of the science required of radiologic technology students under one cover. Chapter content reflects a readable and practical organization with outlines listed on the first page of each chapter and sample problems at the end. New to this edition are: new and expanded sections on radiation techniques, digital imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound

  13. Hygiene in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp-Schwoerer, A.; Daschner, F.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the hygienic management in radiological departments with special regard to the handling of injections and infusions. It includes prevention of bacterial as well as viral infections. In radiological departments disinfection of X-ray tables is necessary only in exceptional cases. A special proposal for disinfection is added. A safe method of sterilisation of flexible catheders is included, which proved to prevent bacterial infection. (orig.) [de

  14. Radiological protection act, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Act provides for the establishment of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and dissolves An Bord Fuinnimh Nuicleigh (the Board), transferring its assets and liabilities to the Institute. It sets out a range of radiation protection measures to be taken by various Ministers in the event of a radiological emergency and gives effect at national level to the Assistance Convention, the Early Notification Convention and the Physical Protection Convention. The Institute is the competent Irish authority for the three Conventions. (NEA) [fr

  15. Textbook of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, C.E.; Ravin, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book is presented in two volumes, standard textbook of imaging, conclusive and totally up-to-date. This provides information organized by major topics covering the state-of-the-art for all imaging procedures. The volume 1 presents radiologic physics and technology by discussing roentgenography, ultrasound, CT, nuclear medicine, MRI, and positron emission tomography. The volume 2 studies pulmonary radiology, imaging of the skeletal and central nervous systems, uroradiology, abdominal and cardiac imaging, and imaging of the pelvis

  16. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...... is cyclic: exacerbations relieved by asymptomatic periods. New imaging modalities, including the combination of MR imaging and multiplanar 3-D CT scans, have broadened our awareness of possible pain-generating degenerative processes of the lumbar spine other than disc degeneration....

  17. Patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: X-ray examinations remain an essential and widely used diagnostic tool in medicine and hence the most significant source of exposure to man-made radiation for populations. Patterns of practice in diagnostic radiology continue to evolve, with overall growth in the numbers of procedures worldwide and, particularly in developed countries, increasing importance for complex procedures such as computed tomography (CT) and interventional techniques. In order to maximise the benefits from x-rays relative to the associated radiation risks, there is a need to ensure the prior justification of all examinations and the optimisation of patient protection such that doses are as low as reasonably practicable to meet specific clinical requirements. Accordingly, patient dosimetry is a fundamental requirement in diagnostic radiology. Detailed measurements for the assessment of risks or comparison of different types of procedure require the estimation of organ and effective doses. Such comprehensive dosimetry necessarily involves the simulation of clinical practice using anthropomorphic phantoms, with either measurements in a physical phantom or calculations utilising a mathematical phantom. Simpler measurements for the routine monitoring of dose in x-ray departments can be based on practical quantities such as entrance surface dose, dose-area product and, for CT, weighted CT dose index and dose-length product. Widescale surveys reveal significant variations between departments in the typical doses for a given type of procedure and potential scope for dose reductions. In order to promote improvements in practice, the results of periodic dose surveys in departments should be compared with appropriate standards, such as diagnostic reference levels for adult and paediatric patients, that are set nationally or locally for the purposes of promoting critical review of the equipment and techniques in use. Patient dosimetry should form an essential element of routine quality

  18. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: Part I. Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the field of medicine. In this article, the first of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to neoplasms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Minority games, evolving capitals and replicator dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galla, Tobias; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a simple version of the minority game (MG) in which agents hold only one strategy each, but in which their capitals evolve dynamically according to their success and in which the total trading volume varies in time accordingly. This feature is known to be crucial for MGs to reproduce stylized facts of real market data. The stationary states and phase diagram of the model can be computed, and we show that the ergodicity breaking phase transition common for MGs, and marked by a divergence of the integrated response, is present also in this simplified model. An analogous majority game turns out to be relatively void of interesting features, and the total capital is found to diverge in time. Introducing a restraining force leads to a model akin to the replicator dynamics of evolutionary game theory, and we demonstrate that here a different type of phase transition is observed. Finally we briefly discuss the relation of this model with one strategy per player to more sophisticated minority games with dynamical capitals and several trading strategies per agent

  20. Internal medicine. An illustrated radiological guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Tubaikh, Jarrah Ali; Sabah Hospital, Kuwait

    2010-01-01

    This book explains how radiology can be a powerful tool for establishing the diagnosis of many internal medicine diseases that are usually diagnosed on the basis of their laboratory or clinical presentation. It is organized in the classic fashion for internal medicine books, with eleven chapters covering the different internal medicine specialties. Within these chapters, more than 450 diseases are considered, some of which are rarely encountered but are nonetheless significant. For each disease, radiological and clinical features are displayed in images and high-quality digital medical illustrations, and those differential diagnoses are identified that can be ruled out by imaging alone. In addition, the pathophysiology underlying the radiological features is described, enabling the reader to understand why a particular sign is seen on MR images, CT scans, or plain radiographs. The book will serve as an excellent radiological atlas for internal medicine practitioners and family physicians, showing disease presentations that may be hard to find in standard medical textbooks and explaining which imaging modalities are likely to be most informative in particular patients. (orig.)

  1. Peripartum hysterectomy: an evolving picture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Turner, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Peripartum hysterectomy (PH) is one of the obstetric catastrophes. Evidence is emerging that the role of PH in modern obstetrics is evolving. Improving management of postpartum hemorrhage and newer surgical techniques should decrease PH for uterine atony. Rising levels of repeat elective cesarean deliveries should decrease PH following uterine scar rupture in labor. Increasing cesarean rates, however, have led to an increase in the number of PHs for morbidly adherent placenta. In the case of uterine atony or rupture where PH is required, a subtotal PH is often sufficient. In the case of pathological placental localization involving the cervix, however, a total hysterectomy is required. Furthermore, the involvement of other pelvic structures may prospectively make the diagnosis difficult and the surgery challenging. If resources permit, PH for pathological placental localization merits a multidisciplinary approach. Despite advances in clinical practice, it is likely that peripartum hysterectomy will be more challenging for obstetricians in the future.

  2. Congenital diseases and syndromes. An illustrated radiological guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Tubaikh, Jarrah Ali [Universitaetsklinikum Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Sabah Hospital (Kuwait). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2009-07-01

    Congenital Diseases and Syndromes - An Illustrated Radiological Guide is designed to serve the radiologist as an easy-to-use visual guide that illustrates the typical diagnostic radiological features of the most common congenital diseases and syndromes. The book is organised according to body system, with chapters focusing on the CNS, the head and neck, the chest and heart, the abdomen and pelvis, and the musculoskeletal system. A final chapter is devoted to phakomatosis. Each syndrome or disease is illustrated by multiple images as well as by high-quality digital medical illustrations depicting those radiological signs that are difficult to detect. The reader is thereby familiarised with the various congenital anomalies from the radiological point of view. In addition, etiology, diagnostic criteria, and main symptoms are described, and potential differential diagnoses highlighted. This book will be immensely useful for junior radiologists, radiology students, and doctors in any specialty who are interested in congenital malformations and syndromes. (orig.)

  3. Congenital diseases and syndromes. An illustrated radiological guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Tubaikh, Jarrah Ali; Sabah Hospital; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital Diseases and Syndromes - An Illustrated Radiological Guide is designed to serve the radiologist as an easy-to-use visual guide that illustrates the typical diagnostic radiological features of the most common congenital diseases and syndromes. The book is organised according to body system, with chapters focusing on the CNS, the head and neck, the chest and heart, the abdomen and pelvis, and the musculoskeletal system. A final chapter is devoted to phakomatosis. Each syndrome or disease is illustrated by multiple images as well as by high-quality digital medical illustrations depicting those radiological signs that are difficult to detect. The reader is thereby familiarised with the various congenital anomalies from the radiological point of view. In addition, etiology, diagnostic criteria, and main symptoms are described, and potential differential diagnoses highlighted. This book will be immensely useful for junior radiologists, radiology students, and doctors in any specialty who are interested in congenital malformations and syndromes. (orig.)

  4. Somatoparaphrenia: evolving theories and concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Todd E; Venneri, Annalena

    2014-12-01

    Somatoparaphrenia, a syndrome that involves at a minimum unawareness of ownership of a body part, in addition involves productive features including delusional misidentification and confabulation. In this review we describe some of the clinical and neuroanatomical features of somatoparaphrenia highlighting its delusional and confabulatory aspects. Possible theoretical frameworks are reviewed taking into account cognitive, psychodynamic, and philosophical views. We suggest that future studies should approach this syndrome through investigations of structural and functional connectivity and focus on the possible interplay between alterations in major functional networks of the brain, such as the default mode and salience networks, but also take into account motivational variables. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Future of Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Margulis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been my good fortune to live and practice radiology during a long period of momentous change – to see the transformation of the discipline from a supportive service into a mainstream, essential branch of clinical medicine. I remember wearing red goggles to adapt my vision before performing fluoroscopy; observing the horrible, now thankfully obsolete, practice of ventriculography, which was considered advanced neuroradiology; and performing other, now rarely prescribed procedures, such as double-contrast barium enemas and intravenous pyelography. Witnessing the beginnings of interventional radiology, I suggested its name in an editorial. I also had the good fortune to see the introduction of computed tomography (CT and a technology first known as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Together with fellow members of a committee of the American College of Radiology and editors of prestigious radiological journals, I took part in changing the name of the latter modality to MRI, freeing it from threatening implications. Looking back on these experiences, one lesson stands out above all: Innovation and transformation never cease. Looking forward, it is clear that radiology, along with the rest of medicine, is now undergoing further momentous changes that will affect the future of all those already practicing as well as those yet to start their careers.

  6. Overview of the radiology of connective tissue disorders in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlon, R.; King, S

    2000-02-01

    This review article describes the imaging finding of the connective tissue disorders in children. The radiological features of the following conditions are described; the spondyloarthropathics, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, scleroderma, the vasculitides, Kawasaki disease, synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO), and focal myositis. The features on several integrated imaging techniques are described.

  7. Overview of the radiology of connective tissue disorders in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, R.; King, S.

    2000-01-01

    This review article describes the imaging finding of the connective tissue disorders in children. The radiological features of the following conditions are described; the spondyloarthropathics, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, scleroderma, the vasculitides, Kawasaki disease, synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO), and focal myositis. The features on several integrated imaging techniques are described

  8. Radiology of chest diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, S.; Stark, P.

    1990-01-01

    This book is divided into three parts: The first part - 'Technology and normal findings' - explains current radiological diagnostic methods. The indications for particular examinations are given, with the techniques and possible errors. The second part of the book - 'Diseases of the lung' - gives a systematic description of basic knowledge needed for diagnosis. Each chapter begins with a definition of the disease and a discussion of the diagnostic information that can be expected from the various radiological methods. This is followed by the pathological morphology and pathological physiology and the clinical symptoms. The third part of the book - 'Radiological signs and differential diagnosis' - deals with image patterns, such as segmental opacities, calcification, localized hyperlucency, etc. It begins where the diagnostician must begin - immediate confrontation with the radiograph, analysis of the details, recognition of structures and understanding the image. (orig./DGD) With 381 figs., 42 tabs

  9. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  10. Organizational decentralization in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2006-01-01

    At present, most hospitals have a department of radiology where images are captured and interpreted. Decentralization is the opposite of centralization and means 'away from the centre'. With a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and broadband communications, transmitting radiology images between sites will be far easier than before. Qualitative interviews of 26 resource persons were performed in Norway. There was a response rate of 90%. Decentralization of radiology interpretations seems less relevant than centralization, but several forms of decentralization have a role to play. The respondents mentioned several advantages, including exploitation of capacity and competence. They also mentioned several disadvantages, including splitting professional communities and reduced contact between radiologists and clinicians. With the new technology decentralization and centralization of image interpretation are important possibilities in organizational change. This will be important for the future of teleradiology.

  11. canEvolve: a web portal for integrative oncogenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kemal Samur

    analysis and ability to query gene lists/pathways are distinctive features of canEvolve. canEvolve will facilitate integrative and meta-analysis of oncogenomics datasets. AVAILABILITY: The canEvolve web portal is available at http://www.canevolve.org/.

  12. Radiology education: a radiology curriculum for all medical students?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, Laura; Kok, E.M.; van der Gijp, Anouk

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic errors in radiology are frequent and can cause severe patient harm. Despite large performance differences between radiologists and non-radiology physicians, the latter often interpret medical images because electronic health records make images available throughout the hospital. Some

  13. Radiological emergency response - a functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, P.

    1998-01-01

    The state of Louisiana's radiological emergency response programme is based on the federal guidance 'Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants' (NUREG-0654, FEMA-REP-1 Rev. 1). Over the past 14 years, the planning and implementation of response capabilities became more organized and efficient; the training programme has strengthened considerably; co-ordination with all participating agencies has assumed a more co-operative role, and as a result, a fairly well integrated response planning has evolved. Recently, a more 'functional' approach is being adopted to maximize the programme's efficiency not only for nuclear power plant emergency response, but radiological emergency response as a whole. First, several broad-based 'components' are identified; clusters of 'nodes' are generated for each component; these 'nodes' may be divided into 'sub-nodes' which will contain some 'attributes'; 'relational bonds' among the 'attributes' will exist. When executed, the process begins and continues with the 'nodes' assuming a functional and dynamic role based on the nature and characteristics of the 'attributes'. The typical response based on stand-alone elements is thus eliminated, the overlapping of functions is avoided, and a well structured and efficient organization is produced, that is essential for today's complex nature of emergency response. (author)

  14. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  15. Radiology's value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  16. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Ramon; Khong, Pek-Lan; Ringertz, Hans

    2013-01-01

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  17. Radiology illustrated. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ihn

    2014-01-01

    Clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. A wealth of carefully selected and categorized illustrations. Highlighted key points to facilitate rapid review. Aid to differential diagnosis. Radiology Illustrated: Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Radiology is the first of two volumes that will serve as a clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. This volume, devoted to diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen, covers congenital disorders, vascular diseases, benign and malignant tumors, and infectious conditions. Liver transplantation, evaluation of the therapeutic response of hepatocellular carcinoma, trauma, and post-treatment complications are also addressed. The book presents approximately 560 cases with more than 2100 carefully selected and categorized illustrations, along with key text messages and tables, that will allow the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis. At the end of each text message, key points are summarized to facilitate rapid review and learning. In addition, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by both common and uncommon case studies that illustrate the role of different imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, radiography, CT, and MRI.

  18. Radiology illustrated. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ihn (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. Hospital (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. A wealth of carefully selected and categorized illustrations. Highlighted key points to facilitate rapid review. Aid to differential diagnosis. Radiology Illustrated: Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Radiology is the first of two volumes that will serve as a clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. This volume, devoted to diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen, covers congenital disorders, vascular diseases, benign and malignant tumors, and infectious conditions. Liver transplantation, evaluation of the therapeutic response of hepatocellular carcinoma, trauma, and post-treatment complications are also addressed. The book presents approximately 560 cases with more than 2100 carefully selected and categorized illustrations, along with key text messages and tables, that will allow the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis. At the end of each text message, key points are summarized to facilitate rapid review and learning. In addition, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by both common and uncommon case studies that illustrate the role of different imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, radiography, CT, and MRI.

  19. Gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fifth in the series of short reviews of internet-based radiological learning resources and will focus on gastrointestinal (GI) and hepatobiliary radiology. Below are details of a few of the higher quality resources currently available. Most of the sites cater for medical students and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may be also be of interest to specialists, especially for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (May 2006)

  20. Genitourinary and breast radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriss, R.W.; Graham, R.N.J.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    This is the sixth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological learning resources and will focus on genitourinary (GU) and breast radiology. Below are details of a few of the higher quality resources currently available. Most of the sites cater for medical students and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may be also be of interest to specialists, especially for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (July 2006)

  1. Practical interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, J.; Schreyer, H.

    1991-01-01

    The book is intended as a practical guide and manual for interventional radiology applications. Main emphasis is placed on the performance of the various techniques, with explanations of the various steps to be taken, illustrated by drawings or pictures. Indications, contra-indications and clinical achievements are given in brief. There is one chapter each for the following techniques: angioplasty - intra-arterial fibrinolysis - vascular stents - neuroembolisation - embolisation of other vessels - biliary interventions - abscess drainage - nephrostomy and ureteral manipulations -percutaneous fine-needle biopsy - vena cava filters - interventional radiology in infants. (orig.)

  2. Dosimetry in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andisco, D.; Blanco, S.; Buzzi, A.E

    2014-01-01

    The steady growth in the use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging requires to maintain a proper management of patient’s dose. Dosimetry in Radiology is a difficult topic to address, but vital for proper estimation of the dose the patient is receiving. The awareness that every day is perceived in our country on these issues is the appropriate response to this problem. This article describes the main dosimetric units used and easily exemplifies doses in radiology through internationally known reference values. (authors) [es

  3. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste

  4. Synopsis of radiologic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschan, I.

    1987-01-01

    The book is a compact version of earlier publications that appeared in 1975 as a one- and a two-volume issue under the title 'Atlas of Radiologic Anatomy'. A chapter on computed tomography has been added as this novel technique requires a new approach to radiologic anatomy. The radiologist will find all the information on the anatomic conditions he needs for analysing radiographs and CT pictures. More than 600 radiographs and CT pictures are given that illustrate typical and rare findings. The book also is useful as a source of reference for making good radiographs and evaluating the quality of radiographs or CT pictures. With 1413 figs., 18 tabs [de

  5. Radiological worker training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  6. Radiological sciences dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Dowsett, David

    2009-01-01

    The Radiological Sciences Dictionary is a rapid reference guide for all hospital staff employed in diagnostic imaging, providing definitions of over 3000 keywords as applied to the technology of diagnostic radiology.Written in a concise and easy to digest form, the dictionary covers a wide variety of subject matter, including:· radiation legislation and measurement · computing and digital imaging terminology· nuclear medicine radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals· radiographic contrast agents (x-ray, MRI and ultrasound)· definitions used in ultrasound and MRI technology· statistical exp

  7. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, S.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Brown, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilcox, D.P. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  8. Radiological worker training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance

  9. Radiology of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.

    1987-01-01

    This course provides an overview of the radiologic manifestations of trauma to the chest. The basic mechanisms of injury are discussed. The effect of trauma on the chest wall, the lung parenchyma, and the pleural space is described. Rib fractures, sternal fractures, lung contusion, lung hematoma, lung laceration, post-traumatic atelectasis, hemothorax, chylothorax, pneumothorax, and adult respiratory distress syndrome are discussed and illustrated. Injuries to the tracheobronchial tree, the aorta and brachiocephalic vessels, the esophagus, the diaphragm, and the heart are also presented. The purpose of the lecture is to familiarize the audience with common and unusual radiologic presentations of traumatic injury to the thorax

  10. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  11. CERN internal communication is evolving

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CERN news will now be regularly updated on the CERN People page (see here).      Dear readers, All over the world, communication is becoming increasingly instantaneous, with news published in real time on websites and social networks. In order to keep pace with these changes, CERN's internal communication is evolving too. From now on, you will be informed of what’s happening at CERN more often via the “CERN people” page, which will frequently be updated with news. The Bulletin is following this trend too: twice a month, we will compile the most important articles published on the CERN site, with a brand-new layout. You will receive an e-mail every two weeks as soon as this new form of the Bulletin is available. If you have interesting news or stories to share, tell us about them through the form at: https://communications.web.cern.ch/got-story-cern-website​. You can also find out about news from CERN in real time...

  12. Economies Evolve by Energy Dispersal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Salthe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Economic activity can be regarded as an evolutionary process governed by the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The universal law, when formulated locally as an equation of motion, reveals that a growing economy develops functional machinery and organizes hierarchically in such a way as to tend to equalize energy density differences within the economy and in respect to the surroundings it is open to. Diverse economic activities result in flows of energy that will preferentially channel along the most steeply descending paths, leveling a non-Euclidean free energy landscape. This principle of 'maximal energy dispersal‘, equivalent to the maximal rate of entropy production, gives rise to economic laws and regularities. The law of diminishing returns follows from the diminishing free energy while the relation between supply and demand displays a quest for a balance among interdependent energy densities. Economic evolution is dissipative motion where the driving forces and energy flows are inseparable from each other. When there are multiple degrees of freedom, economic growth and decline are inherently impossible to forecast in detail. Namely, trajectories of an evolving economy are non-integrable, i.e. unpredictable in detail because a decision by a player will affect also future decisions of other players. We propose that decision making is ultimately about choosing from various actions those that would reduce most effectively subjectively perceived energy gradients.

  13. Recommendation in evolving online networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Recommender system is an effective tool to find the most relevant information for online users. By analyzing the historical selection records of users, recommender system predicts the most likely future links in the user-item network and accordingly constructs a personalized recommendation list for each user. So far, the recommendation process is mostly investigated in static user-item networks. In this paper, we propose a model which allows us to examine the performance of the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in evolving networks. We find that the recommendation accuracy in general decreases with time if the evolution of the online network fully depends on the recommendation. Interestingly, some randomness in users' choice can significantly improve the long-term accuracy of the recommendation algorithm. When a hybrid recommendation algorithm is applied, we find that the optimal parameter gradually shifts towards the diversity-favoring recommendation algorithm, indicating that recommendation diversity is essential to keep a high long-term recommendation accuracy. Finally, we confirm our conclusions by studying the recommendation on networks with the real evolution data.

  14. Evolving Capabilities for Virtual Globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, A.

    2006-12-01

    Though thin-client spatial visualization software like Google Earth and NASA World Wind enjoy widespread popularity, a common criticism is their general lack of analytical functionality. This concern, however, is rapidly being addressed; standard and advanced geographic information system (GIS) capabilities are being developed for virtual globes--though not centralized into a single implementation or software package. The innovation is mostly originating from the user community. Three such capabilities relevant to the earth science, education, and emergency management communities are modeling dynamic spatial phenomena, real-time data collection and visualization, and multi-input collaborative databases. Modeling dynamic spatial phenomena has been facilitated through joining virtual globe geometry definitions--like KML--to relational databases. Real-time data collection uses short scripts to transform user-contributed data into a format usable by virtual globe software. Similarly, collaborative data collection for virtual globes has become possible by dynamically referencing online, multi-person spreadsheets. Examples of these functions include mapping flows within a karst watershed, real-time disaster assessment and visualization, and a collaborative geyser eruption spatial decision support system. Virtual globe applications will continue to evolve further analytical capabilities, more temporal data handling, and from nano to intergalactic scales. This progression opens education and research avenues in all scientific disciplines.

  15. Sampling on radiological protection training in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.

    2001-01-01

    Radiological security aspects were evaluated in radiology departments from Mexico City. The study was carried out in two stages, the first one evaluated 40 departments just before the implementation of the new Official Mexican Standards related to Radiological Security and Quality Control in Radiology; in the second stage 33 departments were evaluated 2 years after those standards were implanted, showing a favorable impact of the training programs for the type of answers obtained [es

  16. Evolving molecular era of childhood medulloblastoma: time to revisit therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatua, Soumen

    2016-01-01

    Currently medulloblastoma is treated with a uniform therapeutic approach based on histopathology and clinico-radiological risk stratification, resulting in unpredictable treatment failure and relapses. Improved understanding of the biological, molecular and genetic make-up of these tumors now clearly identifies it as a compendium of four distinct subtypes (WNT, SHH, group 3 and 4). Advances in utilization of the genomic and epigenomic machinery have now delineated genetic aberrations and epigenetic perturbations in each subgroup as potential druggable targets. This has resulted in endeavors to profile targeted therapy. The challenge and future of medulloblastoma therapeutics will be to keep pace with the evolving novel biological insights and translating them into optimal targeted treatment regimens.

  17. Introduction of radiological protection; Pengenalan kepada perlindungan radiologi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-31

    The chapter briefly discussed the following subjects: basic principles of radiological protection , dose limit which was suggested, stochastic and nonstochastic effects, equivalent dose and alternative of it`s calculation, limit for the publics, ICRP (International Commission for Radiological Protection) recommendations, and the principles of radiological protection. Dangerous radiation sources also briefly summarized i.e. x-ray generators, reactor nucleus.

  18. Guidelines for a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This manual presents guidelines for hospitals on a radiology quality assurance and dose measurement audit program and a system of planned actions that monitor and record the performance and effectiveness of the radiological service

  19. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  20. Radiological controls integrated into design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindred, G.W. [Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co., Perry, OH (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiological controls are required by law in the design of commercial nuclear power reactor facilities. These controls can be relatively minor or significant, relative to cost. To ensure that radiological controls are designed into a project, the health physicist (radiological engineer) must be involved from the beginning. This is especially true regarding keeping costs down. For every radiological engineer at a nuclear power plant there must be fifty engineers of other disciplines. The radiological engineer cannot be an expert on every discipline of engineering. However, he must be knowledgeable to the degree of how a design will impact the facility from a radiological perspective. This paper will address how to effectively perform radiological analyses with the goal of radiological controls integrated into the design package.

  1. Program of environmental radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirement of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01, 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', as expressed in the section 5.14, related to the Program of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (PMRA)

  2. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: evolving concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jay H; Moua, Teng; Daniels, Craig E; Hartman, Thomas E; Yi, Eunhee S; Utz, James P; Limper, Andrew H

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) occurs predominantly in middle-aged and older adults and accounts for 20% to 30% of interstitial lung diseases. It is usually progressive, resulting in respiratory failure and death. Diagnostic criteria for IPF have evolved over the years, and IPF is currently defined as a disease characterized by the histopathologic pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia occurring in the absence of an identifiable cause of lung injury. Understanding of the pathogenesis of IPF has shifted away from chronic inflammation and toward dysregulated fibroproliferative repair in response to alveolar epithelial injury. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is likely a heterogeneous disorder caused by various interactions between genetic components and environmental exposures. High-resolution computed tomography can be diagnostic in the presence of typical findings such as bilateral reticular opacities associated with traction bronchiectasis/bronchiolectasis in a predominantly basal and subpleural distribution, along with subpleural honeycombing. In other circumstances, a surgical lung biopsy may be needed. The clinical course of IPF can be unpredictable and may be punctuated by acute deteriorations (acute exacerbation). Although progress continues in unraveling the mechanisms of IPF, effective therapy has remained elusive. Thus, clinicians and patients need to reach informed decisions regarding management options including lung transplant. The findings in this review were based on a literature search of PubMed using the search terms idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and usual interstitial pneumonia, limited to human studies in the English language published from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2013, and supplemented by key references published before the year 2000. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Evolving Classification of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshat, Michelle; Boroumand, Nahal

    2017-05-01

    - An explosion of information on pulmonary hypertension has occurred during the past few decades. The perception of this disease has shifted from purely clinical to incorporate new knowledge of the underlying pathology. This transfer has occurred in light of advancements in pathophysiology, histology, and molecular medical diagnostics. - To update readers about the evolving understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension and to demonstrate how pathology has shaped the current classification. - Information presented at the 5 World Symposia on pulmonary hypertension held since 1973, with the last meeting occurring in 2013, was used in this review. - Pulmonary hypertension represents a heterogeneous group of disorders that are differentiated based on differences in clinical, hemodynamic, and histopathologic features. Early concepts of pulmonary hypertension were largely influenced by pharmacotherapy, hemodynamic function, and clinical presentation of the disease. The initial nomenclature for pulmonary hypertension segregated the clinical classifications from pathologic subtypes. Major restructuring of this disease classification occurred between the first and second symposia, which was the first to unite clinical and pathologic information in the categorization scheme. Additional changes were introduced in subsequent meetings, particularly between the third and fourth World Symposia meetings, when additional pathophysiologic information was gained. Discoveries in molecular diagnostics significantly progressed the understanding of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Continued advancements in imaging modalities, mechanistic pathogenicity, and molecular biomarkers will enable physicians to define pulmonary hypertension phenotypes based on the pathobiology and allow for treatment customization.

  4. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiology examination as a diagnostic aid in presentations with wide differential diagnoses: Case report of new Hodgkin's lymphoma on a background of poorly controlled HIV · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Rachel Hubbard, Jalpa Kotecha, Thomas ...

  5. Classification of radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A classification for departments in Danish hospitals which use radiological procedures. The classification codes consist of 4 digits, where the first 2 are the codes for the main groups. The first digit represents the procedure's topographical object and the second the techniques. The last 2 digits describe individual procedures. (CLS)

  6. Radiology of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baert, A.L.; Delorme, G.

    1994-01-01

    This book, written by internationally recognized experts, fully illustrates the diagnosis of both common and rarer diseases of the pancreas, the latest technical developments in relevant imaging modalities are thoroughly discussed and appraised with respect to the pancreas. The book will appeal to both clinicians and researchers in radiology and oncology. (orig.)

  7. ERC Radiological Glovebag Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1997-07-01

    This document establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the standardized methods for installation, use, and dismantlement of glovebags within the Hanford Site Environmental Contractor Radiological Glovebag Program. This document addresses the following topics: Containment selection and fabrication, Glovebag fabrication, Containment installation and inspection, General glovebag containment work practices, Emergency situations, and Containment removal

  8. German radiological congress 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubitz, B.; Stender, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    The publication contains the abstracts of the 261 papers read at the meeting and the 82 further papers announced, and 37 brief descriptions of the contributions to the scientific exhibition. The papers were on the subjects of radiology, nuclear medicine and to a certain extent, also radiobiology. (MG) [de

  9. Medical radiology terminology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Standardization achievements in the field of radiology induced the IEC to compile the terminology used in its safety and application standards and present it in publication 788 (1984 issue), entitled 'Medical radiology terminology'. The objective pursued is to foster the use of standard terminology in the radiology standards. The value of publication 788 lies in the fact that it presents definitions of terms used in the French and English versions of IEC standards in the field of radiology, and thus facilitates adequate translation of these terms into other languages. In the glossary in hand, German-language definitions have been adopted from the DIN standards in cases where the French or English versions of definitions are identical with the German wording or meaning. The numbers of DIN standards or sections are then given without brackets, ahead of the text of the definition. In cases where correspondance of the various texts is not so good, or reference should be made to a term in a DIN standard, the numbers are given in brackets. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Collaborative Radiological Response Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    DOE and EPA national laboratories .55 Additionally, the GAO conducted a survey of emergency management officials in cities, states and federal...for Biosecurity of UPMC, (2012). After fukushima: Managing the consequences of a radiological release. Retrieved from : http://issuu.com

  11. Radiological protective screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaugnatti, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    A radiological screen for placing on a patient's skin is discussed, comprising a flat jacket containing a fine particulate filler and a settable resin binder, the fine particulate filler being of a material which absorbs medical radiation, and the jacket including a window to transmit such radiation through the flat jacket. 16 claims, 4 drawing figures

  12. Radiological safety by design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundaker, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    Under the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act enacted by the U.S. Congress in 1968, the Food and Drug Administration's Bureau of Radiological Health may prescribe performance standards for products that emit radiation. A description is given of the development of these standards and outlines the administrative procedures by which they are enforced. (author)

  13. Radiology in emergency medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.; Barsan, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a discussion of radiologic modalities currently being used in emergency situations. Radiographs, echocardiographs, radionuclide scans and CT scans are systematically analyzed and evaluated to provide a step-by-step diagnostic process for emergency physicians to follow when a radiologist is not present

  14. Cardiovascular and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.I. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A symposium of eight short but complete papers giving an overview of interventional radiology is presented. Organized by Dr. William Casarella, this symposium is certainly the most current review of the subject available. This year's cardiovascular section is again heavily weighted toward interventional radiology. Abrams and Doubilet's article on the underutilization of angioplasty is important because it describes the cost effectiveness of this method. Most health planners, right or wrong, have complained about overutilization of diagnostic radiology procedures. In general, the opposite is true for interventional procedures - they are underutilized. If the authors draw the attention of their hospital administrators to these approaches and also produce the data on long-term follow-up for our medical colleagues, interventional radiology may realize its full potential. Articles on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are beginning to appear and this technique seems to have great potential. An important article, which is the first prospective study comparing lung scintigraphy and pulmonary angiography in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, supports the increased use of pulmonary angiography. Finally, an article on complications of percutaneous biliary drainage provokes some discussion of its value for routine preoperative use

  15. The radiological technologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiologists rely upon the talents of the technologists with whom they work. Indeed, a good technologist will only enhance the radiologist's performance. Radiological technologists no longer solely take radiographs, but are involved in many more detailed areas of imaging, such as computered tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear radiology, ultrasound, angiography, and special procedures. They are also required to make decisions that affect the radiological examination. Besides the degree in radiological technology (RT), advanced degrees in nuclear medicine technology (NMT) and diagnostic medical sonography (RDMS) are attainable. The liability of the technologist is not the same as the radiologist involved, but the liability is potentially real and governed by a subdivision of jurisprudence known as agency law. Since plaintiffs and attorneys are constantly searching for new frontiers of medical liability, it is wise for the radiologist and technologist to be aware of the legalities governing their working relationship and to behave accordingly. The legal principles that apply to this working relationship are discussed in this chapter, followed by a presentation of some relevant and interesting cases that have been litigated

  16. Sophisticated fuel handling system evolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The control systems at Sellafield fuel handling plant are described. The requirements called for built-in diagnostic features as well as the ability to handle a large sequencing application. Speed was also important; responses better than 50ms were required. The control systems are used to automate operations within each of the three main process caves - two Magnox fuel decanners and an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel dismantler. The fuel route within the fuel handling plant is illustrated and described. ASPIC (Automated Sequence Package for Industrial Control) which was developed as a controller for the plant processes is described. (U.K.)

  17. Understanding Legacy Features with Featureous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olszak, Andrzej; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    Java programs called Featureous that addresses this issue. Featureous allows a programmer to easily establish feature-code traceability links and to analyze their characteristics using a number of visualizations. Featureous is an extension to the NetBeans IDE, and can itself be extended by third...

  18. Radiologic technology educators and andragogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, M W; Simon-Galbraith, J A

    1984-01-01

    Radiologic technology educators are in constant contact with adult learners. However, the theoretical framework that radiologic educators use to guide their instruction may not be appropriate for adults. This article examines the assumptions of the standard instructional theory and the most modern approach to adult education-- andragogy . It also shows how these assumptions affect the adult learner in a radiologic education setting.

  19. Recent trend of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.Y.; Kim, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    Present status and recent trend of diagnostic radiology have been reviewed. The interrelationships and Characteristics of various fields of radiology such as computed tomography, X-ray radiology, and nuclear medicine were discussed. The mevit of computed tomography and the promising use of short lived, accelerator produced radionuclides, and radiotherapy in nuclear medicine were emphasized. (author)

  20. Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, N; Bergamaschi, A

    2009-10-01

    One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice made by radiologists in moral dilemmas is inspired by an adherence to moral principles, which in Italy and elsewhere refer to the Judaeo-Christian tradition or to neo-Darwinian relativism. Whatever the choice, the radiologist is bound to adhere to that choice and to provide the patient with all the relevant information regarding his or her state of health.

  1. Radiological Worker Training: Radiological Worker 2 study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this training course, the participant will have the knowledge to work safely in areas controlled for radiological purposes using proper radiological practices. Radiological Worker H Training, for the worker whose job assignment involves entry into Radiological Buffer Areas and all types of Radiation Contamination and Airborne Radioactivity Areas. This course is designed to prepare the worker to work safely in and around radiological areas and present methods to use to ensure individual radiation exposure is maintained As Low As Reasonably Achievable

  2. Lessons learned in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodenough, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reviews aspects of the history of radiology with the goal of identifying lessons learned, particularly in the area of radiological protection of the patient in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. It is pointed out that since the days of Roentgen there has been a need not only to control and quantify the amount of radiation reaching the patient but also to optimize the imaging process to offer the greatest diagnostic benefit within allowable levels of patient dose. To this end, in diagnostic radiology, one finds the development of better films, X rays tubes, grids, screens and processing techniques, while in fluoroscopy, one sees the increased luminance of calcium tungstate. In interventional radiology, one finds an improvement in catheterization techniques and contrast agents. In nuclear medicine, the development of tracer techniques into modern cameras and isotopes such as technetium can be followed. In radiotherapy, one sees the early superficial X rays and radium sources gradually replaced with radon seeds, supervoltage, 60 Co and today's linear accelerators. Along with the incredible advances in imaging and therapeutic technologies comes the growing realization of the potential danger of radiation and the need to protect the patient (as well as physicians, ancillary personnel and the general population) from unnecessary radiation. The important lesson learned is that we must walk a tightrope, balancing the benefits and risks of any technology utilizing radiation to produce the greatest benefits at the lowest acceptable risk. The alternative techniques using non-ionizing radiation will have to be considered as part of the general armamentarium for medical imaging whenever radiation consequences are unacceptable. (author)

  3. Radiological protection criteria risk assessments for waste disposal options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Radiological protection criteria for waste disposal options are currently being developed at the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), and, in parallel, methodologies to be used in assessing the radiological impact of these options are being evolved. The criteria and methodologies under development are intended to apply to all solid radioactive wastes, including the high-level waste arising from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (because this waste will be solidified prior to disposal) and gaseous or liquid wastes which have been converted to solid form. It is envisaged that the same criteria will be applied to all solid waste disposal options, including shallow land burial, emplacement on the ocean bed (sea dumping), geological disposal on land and sub-seabed disposal

  4. Advanced Research Workshop on Preparedness for Nuclear and Radiological Threats

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, David; Nuclear Threats and Security Challenges

    2015-01-01

    With the dissolution of the Soviet Union the nuclear threats facing the world are constantly evolving and have grown more complex since the end of the Cold War. The diversion of complete weapon systems or nuclear material to rogue nations and terrorist organizations has increased. The events of the past years have proved the necessity to reevaluate these threats on a level never before considered.  In recognition that no single country possesses all of the answers to the critical scientific, institutional and legal questions associated with combating nuclear and radiological terrorism, the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on “Preparedness for Nuclear and Radiological Threats” and this proceeding was structured to promote wide-ranging, multi-national exploration of critical technology needs and underlying scientific challenges to reducing the threat of nuclear/radiological terrorism; to illustrate through country-specific presentations how resulting technologies were used in national programs; and to outli...

  5. How could language have evolved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Johan J; Tattersall, Ian; Chomsky, Noam; Berwick, Robert C

    2014-08-01

    The evolution of the faculty of language largely remains an enigma. In this essay, we ask why. Language's evolutionary analysis is complicated because it has no equivalent in any nonhuman species. There is also no consensus regarding the essential nature of the language "phenotype." According to the "Strong Minimalist Thesis," the key distinguishing feature of language (and what evolutionary theory must explain) is hierarchical syntactic structure. The faculty of language is likely to have emerged quite recently in evolutionary terms, some 70,000-100,000 years ago, and does not seem to have undergone modification since then, though individual languages do of course change over time, operating within this basic framework. The recent emergence of language and its stability are both consistent with the Strong Minimalist Thesis, which has at its core a single repeatable operation that takes exactly two syntactic elements a and b and assembles them to form the set {a, b}.

  6. How could language have evolved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan J Bolhuis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the faculty of language largely remains an enigma. In this essay, we ask why. Language's evolutionary analysis is complicated because it has no equivalent in any nonhuman species. There is also no consensus regarding the essential nature of the language "phenotype." According to the "Strong Minimalist Thesis," the key distinguishing feature of language (and what evolutionary theory must explain is hierarchical syntactic structure. The faculty of language is likely to have emerged quite recently in evolutionary terms, some 70,000-100,000 years ago, and does not seem to have undergone modification since then, though individual languages do of course change over time, operating within this basic framework. The recent emergence of language and its stability are both consistent with the Strong Minimalist Thesis, which has at its core a single repeatable operation that takes exactly two syntactic elements a and b and assembles them to form the set {a, b}.

  7. Feature Article

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Feature Article. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 80-85 Feature Article. What's New in Computers Windows 95 · Vijnan Shastri · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 86-89 Feature ...

  8. Radiologic evaluation of malignant histiocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Soon; Lee, Sun Wha; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Wook; Ahn, Chi Yul

    1987-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma is a new malignant tumor entity of histiocytic origin which arises as a primary tumor of the bone as well as the soft tissue. Radiologic features of 12 cases of pathologically proven intra-and extraosseous malignant fibrous histiocytoma were analyzed. The results were as follows : 1. Seven cases were of soft tissue origin and 5 cases were of primary bone origin. 2. Seven were male and 5 were female: Eight cases were beyond 5th decades. 3. The clinical presentations of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the soft tissue origin were a mass with rapid growth or high rate of local recurrence. The roentgen evidence of soft tissue density mass was demonstrated in 7 cases and scintigraphic evidence of cortical invasion was suggested in 2 cases. 4. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma arising from bones had ill defined moth-eaten osteolytic lesion with cortical destruction, periosteal reaction and soft tissue extension. 5. Among 12 cases, there were 2 cases of pulmonary metastases and 2 cases of osseous metastases. 6. In the presence of soft tissue mass with locally aggressive behavior and/or nonspecific roentgen features of malignant bone tumor, one should consider the possibility of malignant fibrous histiocytoma

  9. Cryptococcus gattii fungemia: report of a case with lung and brain lesions mimicking radiological features of malignancy Fungemia por Cryptococcus gattii: relato de um caso com lesões cerebrais e pulmonares nos achados radiológicos mimetizando câncer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio de Mattos Oliveira

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old apparently immunocompetent white man developed lung and brain lesions of disseminated cryptococcosis. The radiologic features mimicked those of lung cancer metastatic to the central nervous system. C. gattii was recovered from cultures of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, brain biopsy, and blood. The same fungus was recovered from pulmonary and brain specimens at autopsy. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcal antigen tests were diagnostic in our case and should be included in the diagnostic evaluation of unexplained pulmonary and cerebral lesions. A literature search showed few reports of fungemia by this species of Cryptococcus, contrasting to C. neoformans.Homem branco de 64 anos, aparentemente imunocompetente, desenvolveu lesões pulmonares e cerebrais por criptococose disseminada. Os achados radiológicos foram similares àqueles encontrados em pacientes com câncer de pulmão e metástase no sistema nervoso central. C. gattii foi isolado de cultivos de lavado broncoalveolar, biópsia cerebral e sangue. O mesmo fungo foi encontrado em fragmentos pulmonares e cerebrais obtidos da autópsia. Testes de antígeno no soro e no líquido cefalorraquidiano foram diagnóstico no nosso caso e devem ser incluídos na avaliação diagnóstica de lesões pulmonares e cerebrais indefinidas. Pesquisa na literatura mostrou poucos relatos de fungemia por esta espécie de Cryptococcus, contrastando com C. neoformans.

  10. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    The escalating number of radiodiagnostic investigations has, as a consequence, an increase in medical irradiation of patients and of cost of radiological services. Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme in this direction which has issued four technical reports which give practical recommendations on how to rationalize the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations

  11. Radiological diagnosis in traumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frahm, R.

    2001-01-01

    This loose-leaf publication covers all radiological problems that may possibly occur in accident surgery. The focus is on conventional radiological diagnosis. The physical and technical fundamentals of diagnostic examination methods are discussed, followed by practical hints on radiation protection, technical equipment and quality assurance, as well as accurate information on the procedure of taking and interpreting standard X-ray pictures. The indications for standard X-raying, tomography, CT and MRT are presented in consideration of the radiation exposure incurred by the patient. The reader is also informed on the dynamics and varying morphology of bone fracture healing, potential disturbances of callus formation and reconstruction, as well as on possible complications. The main section of the book discusses injuries of the skull, spinal cord, pectoral girdle, upper arm, elbow and lower arm, wrist and hands, pelvis, hip joint, knee and upper and lower leg, ankle joint and foot, thorax and abdomen. (orig.)

  12. Radiology for veterinarians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempel, K.

    1983-01-01

    The author has made an attempt to comprise the extensive and heterogenic area of radiological topics in the sense of a studying support for the second part of the veterinary examination and as an introduction to the entire area. Numerous details, exact physical derivations and more extensive radiological tables and graphs had to be left out to achieve the brief and understandable form. On the other hand, in addition to the test subjects, at least a few of the particularly up-to-date problems of this branch had to be emphasized and the data necessary to assess them had to be given. This explains the extensive form of the manuscript and the frequent occurrence of numbers, especially in the chapters radioecology, radiobiology and radiotoxicology. (orig./MG) With 65 figs., 76 tabs [de

  13. Paediatric interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric interventional radiology (PIR) is a rapidly-growing subspecialty, which offers a wide range of procedures applicable to almost all areas of hospital paediatrics. There are many important differences between paediatric and adult practice in interventional radiology, including disease processes and treatment goals, anatomical considerations, periprocedural patient management, radiation exposure optimisation and legal aspects. The use of retrievable or absorbable interventional devices such as stents will probably become more widespread in PIR practice. Recent advances in the technology of imaging equipment have been accompanied by an increase in the complexity of the work done by the radiographer. These developments present challenges and opportunities related to training and maintenance of skills, staffing arrangements, and the potential for advanced practice. It is likely that specialisation in PIR will become a more common role for radiographers in the future

  14. Computer assisted radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, H.U.; Jaffe, C.C.; Felix, R.

    1993-01-01

    The proceedings of the CAR'93 symposium present the 126 oral papers and the 58 posters contributed to the four Technical Sessions entitled: (1) Image Management, (2) Medical Workstations, (3) Digital Image Generation - DIG, and (4) Application Systems - AS. Topics discussed in Session (1) are: picture archiving and communication systems, teleradiology, hospital information systems and radiological information systems, technology assessment and implications, standards, and data bases. Session (2) deals with computer vision, computer graphics, design and application, man computer interaction. Session (3) goes into the details of the diagnostic examination methods such as digital radiography, MRI, CT, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, digital angiography, and multimodality imaging. Session (4) is devoted to computer-assisted techniques, as there are: computer assisted radiological diagnosis, knowledge based systems, computer assisted radiation therapy and computer assisted surgical planning. (UWA). 266 figs [de

  15. Radiology and Ethics Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Aline; Liu, Li; Yousem, David M

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess medical ethics knowledge among trainees and practicing radiologists through an online survey that included questions about the American College of Radiology Code of Ethics and the American Medical Association Code of Medical Ethics. Most survey respondents reported that they had never read the American Medical Association Code of Medical Ethics or the American College of Radiology Code of Ethics (77.2% and 67.4% of respondents, respectively). With regard to ethics education during medical school and residency, 57.3% and 70.0% of respondents, respectively, found such education to be insufficient. Medical ethics training should be highlighted during residency, at specialty society meetings, and in journals and online resources for radiologists.

  16. Safeness of radiological machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shun

    1979-01-01

    The human factors affecting the safeness of radiological machinery, which are often very big and complicated machines, are described from the stand point of handling. 20 to 50% of the troubles on equipments seem to be caused by men. This percentage will become even higher in highly developed equipments. Human factors have a great influence on the safeness of radiological equipments. As the human factors, there are sensory factors and knowledge factors as well as psychological factors, and the combination of these factors causes mishandling and danger. Medical services at present are divided in various areas, and consist of the teamwork of the people in various professions. Good human relationship, education and control are highly required to secure the safeness. (Kobatake, H.)

  17. Artificial intelligence in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Ahmed; Parmar, Chintan; Quackenbush, John; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Aerts, Hugo J W L

    2018-05-17

    Artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms, particularly deep learning, have demonstrated remarkable progress in image-recognition tasks. Methods ranging from convolutional neural networks to variational autoencoders have found myriad applications in the medical image analysis field, propelling it forward at a rapid pace. Historically, in radiology practice, trained physicians visually assessed medical images for the detection, characterization and monitoring of diseases. AI methods excel at automatically recognizing complex patterns in imaging data and providing quantitative, rather than qualitative, assessments of radiographic characteristics. In this Opinion article, we establish a general understanding of AI methods, particularly those pertaining to image-based tasks. We explore how these methods could impact multiple facets of radiology, with a general focus on applications in oncology, and demonstrate ways in which these methods are advancing the field. Finally, we discuss the challenges facing clinical implementation and provide our perspective on how the domain could be advanced.

  18. Radiological control implementation guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamley, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    A manual is being developed to explain to line managers how radiological controls are designed and implemented. The manual also fills a gap in the Health Physics literature between textbooks and on-the-floor procedures. It may be helpful to new Health Physicists with little practical experience and to those wishing to improve self-assessment, audit, and appraisal processes. Many audits, appraisals, and evaluations have indicated a need for cultural change, increased vigor and example, and more effective oversight by line management. Inadequate work controls are a frequent and recurring problem identified in occurrence reports and accident investigations. Closer study frequently indicates that many line managers are willing to change and want to achieve excellence, but no effective guidance exists that will enable them to understand and implement a modern radiological control program

  19. Management of Radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo, J. C.; Gil, E.; San Nicolas, J.; Lazuen, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Spain has a system of planning and response to emergency situations that is structured and coordinated by the General Directorship of civil Defense of the Ministry of the Interior and in which all levels of the Public Administration. state, autonomous and municipal-and owners of potentially hazardous activities participate. Activities involving a nuclear or radiological risk have specific emergency plans whose general principles are based on the general emergency system and whose technical bases are consistent with international practices and recommendations. The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear actively participates in the design, implementation and activation of these plans, and for this purpose has an organization superimposed on its ordinary working organization that is activated in the event of an accident, as well as an Emergency Room specifically designed to deal with nuclear and radiological emergencies. (Author)

  20. Water radiological surveillance (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pablo San Martin de, M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the characteristics of the Environmental Surveillance Radiological Networks (ESRN) currently operating in CEDEX. In the first part, the Spanish Continental Waters ESRN has been presented. This second one describes Spanish Costal Waters ESRN and the High Sensitivity Networks in Continental and Marine Waters. It also presents the Radiological Surveillance of Drinking Waters that CEDEX carries out in waters of public consumption management by the Canal de Isabel II (CYII) and by the Mancomunity of Canals Taibilla (M.C.T.). The legislation applicable in each case is reviewed as well. Due to its extension the article has been divided into two parts. As Spanish Continental Waters ESRN has been reviewed in the first part, the others ESRN are discussed in this second one. (Author) 10 refs

  1. Digital radiology and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd-Pokropek, A.

    1991-01-01

    With the access to digital methods for handling and processing images in general, many medical imaging methods are becoming more effectively handled digitally. This applies in particular to basically digital techniques such as CT and MR but also now includes Nuclear Medicine (NM), Ultrasound (US) and a variety of radiological procedures such as Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) and Fluoroscopy (DF). The access to conventional projection images by stimulatable plates (CR) or by digitization of film makes all of radiology potentially accessible, and the management of such images by a network is the basic aim of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS). However, it is suggested that in order for such systems to be of greater value, that way in which such images are treated needs to change, that is, digital images can be used to derive additional clinical value by appropriate processing

  2. Data mining in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-01-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining

  3. Radiological evaluation of swallowing and clinical patterns of systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montesi, A.; Pesaresi, A.; Cavalli, M.L.; Serri, L.; Salmistraro, D.; Candela, M.; Gabrielli, A.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) were studied by means of videofluoroscopy in order to evaluate the abnormalities in the oral-pharyngeal and esophageal phases of deglutition and to correlate the radiological patterns with the clinical features of the disease. Thirteen patients (25.5%) exhibited swallowing disorders such as oral leakage, retention, penetration, mild or moderate aspiration and abnormal upper esophageal sphincter behavior. These dysfunctions were more evident in patients with esophageal motility abnormalities. A normal radiological pattern in the esophagus was not associated with swallowing alterations. Remarkably, patients with oral-pharyngeal disorders had a higher incidence of lung diseases. Forty-five patients (88%) exhibited disorders of the esophageal phase of deglutition, such as mild or severe motility abnormalities or hiatal hernia, gastro-esophageal reflux, reflux esophagitis, and stricture. Radiological findings in the esophagus can be abnormal in the early stages of the disease. On the other hand, the radiological pattern of esophageal motility can be occasionally negative in advanced or extensive disease. This indicates a discrepancy between clinical symptoms and radiological picture of the esophagus. The radiological examination of the oral-pharyngeal and esophageal phases of deglutition is important in patients with scleroderma in order to evaluate visceral involvement, motility disorders, and risk of aspiration. Such radiological information can be useful in preventing esophagitis and pulmonary complications

  4. How Could Language Have Evolved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Johan J.; Tattersall, Ian; Chomsky, Noam; Berwick, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the faculty of language largely remains an enigma. In this essay, we ask why. Language's evolutionary analysis is complicated because it has no equivalent in any nonhuman species. There is also no consensus regarding the essential nature of the language “phenotype.” According to the “Strong Minimalist Thesis,” the key distinguishing feature of language (and what evolutionary theory must explain) is hierarchical syntactic structure. The faculty of language is likely to have emerged quite recently in evolutionary terms, some 70,000–100,000 years ago, and does not seem to have undergone modification since then, though individual languages do of course change over time, operating within this basic framework. The recent emergence of language and its stability are both consistent with the Strong Minimalist Thesis, which has at its core a single repeatable operation that takes exactly two syntactic elements a and b and assembles them to form the set {a, b}. PMID:25157536

  5. Evolving Technologies: A View to Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarkin, Molly; Rodrigo, Shelley

    2011-01-01

    Technology leaders must participate in strategy creation as well as operational delivery within higher education institutions. The future of higher education--the view to tomorrow--is irrevocably integrated and intertwined with evolving technologies. This article focuses on two specific evolving technologies: (1) alternative IT sourcing; and (2)…

  6. Radiological safety and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang Hee; Kim, Ki Sub

    1995-01-01

    The practical objective of radiological safety control is intended for achievement and maintenance of appropreately safe condition in environmental control for activities involving exposure from the use of radiation. In order to establish these objectives, we should be to prevent deterministic effects and to limit the occurrence stochastic effects to level deemed to be acceptable by the application of general principles of radiation protection and systems of dose limitation based on ICRP recommendations. 34 tabs., 19 figs., 11 refs. (Author) .new

  7. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how the staff experience care expressed during the brief encounter with the patients in a diagnostic imaging department. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological and hermeneutical frame of reference. The data were collected using field observation...... was electronically forwarded. And, care expressed in between was perceived as care in the traditional sense and termed as “patient care in radiology.”...

  8. Fundamentals of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.; Mill, A.J.; Charles, M.W.

    1978-05-01

    The basic processes of living cells which are relevant to an understanding of the interaction of ionizing radiation with man are described. Particular reference is made to cell death, cancer induction and genetic effects. This is the second of a series of reports which present the fundamentals necessary for an understanding of the bases of regulatory criteria such as those recommended by the International Commision on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Others consider basic radiation physics and the biological effects of ionizing radiation. (author)

  9. Radiological containment handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to be used as a reference text. It is meant to be used by the working personnel as a guide for using temporary radiological containments. The installing group and health physics group may vary among organizations but responsibilities and duties will not change. It covers installation and inspection containments; working and operating guidelines; operating requirement; emergency procedures; and removal of containments

  10. Microcephaly: a radiological review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrant, Ailbhe; Garel, Catherine; Germanaud, David; Lenoir, Marion; Pointe, Hubert Ducou le [Universite Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie, Radiology Department, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Villemeur, Thierry Billette de; Mignot, Cyril [Universite Paris V Rene Descartes, CNRS (UMR 8104), Inserm, U567, Institut Cochin, Paris (France); Universite Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie, Paediatric Neurology Department, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France)

    2009-08-15

    Microcephaly results from inadequate brain growth during development. It may develop in utero, and therefore be present at birth, or may develop later as a result of perinatal events or postnatal conditions. The aetiology of microcephaly may be congenital (secondary to cerebral malformations or metabolic abnormalities) or acquired, most frequently following an ischaemic insult. This distinct radiological and pathological entity is reviewed with a specific focus on aetiology. (orig.)

  11. Training in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina G, E.

    2014-08-01

    In the Peru, according to the current regulations, people that work with ionizing radiations should have an authorization (individual license), which is granted by the Technical Office of the National Authority that is the technical body of the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) manager of the control of ionizing radiations in the country. The individual license is obtained after the applicant fulfills the requested requirements, as having safety knowledge and radiological protection. Since its founding in 1972, the Centro Superior de Estudios Nucleares (CSEN) of the IPEN has carried out diverse training courses in order to that people can work in a safe way with ionizing radiations in medicine, industry and research, until the year 2013 have been organized 2231 courses that have allowed the training of 26213 people. The courses are organized according to the specific work that is carried out with radiations (medical radio-diagnostic, dental radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, industrial radiography, nuclear meters, logging while drilling, etc.). In their majority the courses are directed to people that will make use of radiations for first time, but refresher courses are also granted in the topic. The CSEN also carries out the Master degree programs highlighting the Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection carried out from the year 2004 with the support of the National University of Engineering. To the present has been carried out 2 programs and there is other being developed. In this work is shown the historical evolution of the radiological protection courses as well as the important thing that they are to work in a safe way in the country. (Author)

  12. Radiologic findings of dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, M. S.; Oh, K. K.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, D. H. [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D. H. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-06-15

    The stature of human is very important factor in human-being, especially in childhood. The stature depends on various different conditions, such as familial factor, constitutional factor, chromosomal anomalies, skeletal disorders, or endocrinopathies. The early diagnosis of dwarfism is very important problem, because if appropriate treatment is delayed, the complication or sequales are more increased. The survey of familial history or patient's past history, detail check up of physical examination, radiological evaluation, and other laboratory examinations are essentially needed for the accurate diagnosis of dwarfism. Among the patients admitted to Yonsei University college of Medicine, Severance Hospital since 1963, with chief complaint of short stature or other associated diseases, an analysis of radiological findings were made for the 72 cases of chromosomal anomalies, skeletal dysplasia, and cretinism in which radiologic evaluation was available. The conclusions are as follows; 1. The cause of short stature are chromosomal anomalies (48 cases), skeletal dysplasia (14 cases) and cretinism (10 cases). 2. in chromosomal anomalies, 43 cases of mongolism and 5 cease of Turner's syndrome are noted. In mongolism, 18 cases among the 30 cases below 1 year old are distributed below the 10 percentile of height. On radiologic findings, 11 paired ribs (22/43), congenital heart disease (14/43), decreased iliac index (8/12), and associated anomalies or diseases, such as pneumonia (14 cases), C1-C2 dislocation (1 case), imperforated anus (1 case), Morgagni's hernia (1 case) and leukemia with sepsis (1 case). In Turner's syndrome, decreased bone density (5/5), positive metacarpal sign (2/5), positive carpal sign (1/5), change of knee joint (3/5), hypoplasia of (1/3), and increased carrying angle of elbows (1/3) are noted.

  13. Radiologic findings of dwarfism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, M. S.; Oh, K. K.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The stature of human is very important factor in human-being, especially in childhood. The stature depends on various different conditions, such as familial factor, constitutional factor, chromosomal anomalies, skeletal disorders, or endocrinopathies. The early diagnosis of dwarfism is very important problem, because if appropriate treatment is delayed, the complication or sequales are more increased. The survey of familial history or patient's past history, detail check up of physical examination, radiological evaluation, and other laboratory examinations are essentially needed for the accurate diagnosis of dwarfism. Among the patients admitted to Yonsei University college of Medicine, Severance Hospital since 1963, with chief complaint of short stature or other associated diseases, an analysis of radiological findings were made for the 72 cases of chromosomal anomalies, skeletal dysplasia, and cretinism in which radiologic evaluation was available. The conclusions are as follows; 1. The cause of short stature are chromosomal anomalies (48 cases), skeletal dysplasia (14 cases) and cretinism (10 cases). 2. in chromosomal anomalies, 43 cases of mongolism and 5 cease of Turner's syndrome are noted. In mongolism, 18 cases among the 30 cases below 1 year old are distributed below the 10 percentile of height. On radiologic findings, 11 paired ribs (22/43), congenital heart disease (14/43), decreased iliac index (8/12), and associated anomalies or diseases, such as pneumonia (14 cases), C1-C2 dislocation (1 case), imperforated anus (1 case), Morgagni's hernia (1 case) and leukemia with sepsis (1 case). In Turner's syndrome, decreased bone density (5/5), positive metacarpal sign (2/5), positive carpal sign (1/5), change of knee joint (3/5), hypoplasia of (1/3), and increased carrying angle of elbows (1/3) are noted

  14. Radiological safety and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sea Young; Yoo, Y S; Lee, J C; Lee, T Y; Lee, J L; Kim, B W; Lee, B J; Chung, K K; Chung, R I; Kim, J S; Lee, H S; Han, Y D; Lee, J I; Lee, K C; Yoon, J H; Sul, C W; Kim, C K; Yoon, K S; Seo, K W; Yoon, Y C [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of radiological safety and control program of 1995. This program consists of working area monitoring including HANARO, personnel radiation monitoring, education for radiation protection. As a result, the objectives of radiation protection have been achieved satisfactorily through the activities mentioned above. Also, the calibration services were provided to insure accurate radiation measurement in the radiation working places. 21 figs., 39 tabs., 5 refs. (Author) .new.

  15. Radiological physics in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstam, Rune

    1980-01-01

    Development of radiological or radiation physics as a separate discipline in Sweden is outlined. Growth in number of hospital physicists is compared with that of some other countries for the period 1950-1975. The main duties of hospital physicists are described. Undergraduate and postgraduate courses in radiation physics in Sweden are discussed. A microtron and a multi-source cobalt-60 unit are described. (M.G.B.)

  16. Computer-assisted radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, H.U.

    1988-01-01

    New digital imaging modalities and more sophisticated image processing systems will have a profound effect on those areas of medicine concerned with imaging. This mainly means computer-assisted radiology (CAR) and implies a transition from analog film systems to digital imaging systems, integration of digital imaging modalities through picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and the graduated employment of image-oriented medical work stations (MWS) for computer-assisted representation, communication, diagnosis, and therapy planning. (orig.) [de

  17. Fundamentals of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, A.J.; Charles, M.W.; Wells, J.

    1978-04-01

    A review is presented of basic radiation physics with particular relevance to radiological protection. The processes leading to the production and absorption of ionising radiation are outlined, and the important dosimetric quantities and their units of measurements. The review is the first of a series of reports presenting the fundamentals necessary for an understanding of the basis of regulatory criteria such as those recommended by the ICRP. (author)

  18. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G. (ed.) [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital (Singapore). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  19. Deep Learning in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Morgan P; Awan, Omer A; Colucci, Andrew T; Ghobadi, Comeron W; Kadom, Nadja; Kansagra, Akash P; Tridandapani, Srini; Auffermann, William F

    2018-03-29

    As radiology is inherently a data-driven specialty, it is especially conducive to utilizing data processing techniques. One such technique, deep learning (DL), has become a remarkably powerful tool for image processing in recent years. In this work, the Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on Deep Learning provides an overview of DL for the radiologist. This article aims to present an overview of DL in a manner that is understandable to radiologists; to examine past, present, and future applications; as well as to evaluate how radiologists may benefit from this remarkable new tool. We describe several areas within radiology in which DL techniques are having the most significant impact: lesion or disease detection, classification, quantification, and segmentation. The legal and ethical hurdles to implementation are also discussed. By taking advantage of this powerful tool, radiologists can become increasingly more accurate in their interpretations with fewer errors and spend more time to focus on patient care. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Safety aspects in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, D.C. da.

    1991-05-01

    The development of a program for the evaluation of the physical installations and operational procedures in diagnostic radiology with respect to radiation-safety is described. In addition, a proposal for the quality analysis of X-ray equipment and film-processing is presented. The purpose is both to ensure quality and safety of the radiology service, as well as to aid in the initial and in-service training of the staff. Interviews with patients, staff practicing radiology at a wide range of levels and the controlling authorities were carried out in the State of Rio de Janeiro in order to investigate the existence and the effective use of personal radioprotection equipment as well as user's and staff's concern for radiation safety. Additionally physical measurements were carried out in University Hospitals in Rio de Janeiro to assess the quality of equipment in day-to-day use. It was found that in the locations which did not have routine maintenance the equipment was generally in a poor state which lead to a high incidence of repetition of examinations and the consequent financial loss. (author)