WorldWideScience

Sample records for evolving myeloid leukemia

  1. Hematopoietic cell crisis: An early stage of evolving myeloid leukemia following radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Under select radiological conditions, chronic radiation exposure elicits a high incidence of myeloproliferative disease, principally myeloid leukemia (ML), in beagles. Previously we demonstrated that for full ML expression, a four-stage preclinical sequence is required, namely (1) suppression, (2) recovery, (3) accommodation, and (4) preleukemic transition. Within this pathological sequence, a critical early event has been identified as the acquisition of radioresistance by hematopoietic progenitors that serves to mediate a newfound regenerative hematopoietic capacity. As such, this event sets the stage'' for preleukemic progression by initiating progression from preclinical phase 1 to 2. Due to the nature of target cell suppression, the induction of crisis, and the outgrowth of progenitors with altered phenotypes, this preleukemic event resembles the immortalization'' step of the in vitro transformation sequence following induction with either physical and chemical carcinogens. The radiological, temporal, and biological dictates governing this event have been extensively evaluated and will be discussed in light of their role in the induction and progression of chronic radiation leukemia. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around the eyes {{ Nausea and vomiting {{ Muscle cramps {{ Diarrhea {{ Rash {{ Chronic fatigue {{ Possible cardiac effects (see page 22 for ... be seen by a doctor who specializes in pediatric leukemia. See the free LLS ... Myeloid Leukemia I page 33 Fertility, Pregnancy and ...

  3. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Yöntem, Ahmet; Bayram, İbrahim

    2018-01-01

    Acute leukemia is basically divided intoacute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. About 15-20% ofchildhood leukemia is caused by acute myeloid leukemia.AML is classified according to morphological, cytochemical and immunophenotypiccharacteristics. AML patients may present with various clinical signsand symptoms due to leukemic cell infiltration. Age, gender, race, structuralfeatures of the patient and cytogenetic abnormalities are important factorsaffecting prognosis in AML. Th...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Chronic myeloid leukemia Chronic myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Chronic myeloid leukemia is a slow-growing cancer of the blood- ...

  5. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  6. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. [Chronic myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Noriko

    2014-06-01

    More than 10 years have passed since imatinib as a first developed BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) introduced in treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In globally, there are tremendous numbers of patients on imatinib therapy. Based upon randomized trials comparing second generation TKIs such as dasatinib and nilotinib versus imatinib, both TKIs produce faster and deeper response than imatinib and they can be selected as first-line therapy for newly diagnosed chronic phase of CML (CP-CML) as imatinib. Bosutinib is a potent for imatinib resistant/intolerant CP-CML and can be used as second or third-line therapy. Ponatinib is the only clinically available TKI that has activity against the T315 mutation that is resistant to all other TKIs. Currently, a choice among these potent TKIs should take into consideration the drug side effect profiles and the patient's comorbidities.

  8. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  10. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  12. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  13. New Treatment Approved for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 167596.html New Treatment Approved for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Vyxeos combines two previously approved drugs To use ... for certain high-risk types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML is an aggressive blood cancer that ...

  14. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  15. [Acute myeloid Leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braess, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been genetically characterized extensively and can now be subdivided into 9 to 11 pathogenetically different subtypes according to their profile of driver mutations. In clinical practice karyotyping and molecular analysis of NPM1, cEBPa and FLT3-ITD are required for treatment stratification and potentially genotype specific treatment. Some markers such as NPM1 not only offer prognostic information but can also serve as markers of minimal residual disease and thus have the potential to guide therapy in the future.The basis of curative treatment is intensive combination chemotherapy comprizing cytarabine and an anthracycline ("7 + 3" regimen). The prolonged duration of aplasia can be reduced significantly by accelerated therapy ("S-HAM" regimen). Following achievement of a complete remission patients with a low risk of relapse - based on genetic and clinical features - receive chemotherapy based consolidation therapy whereas high risk patients - and potentially also those with an intermediate risk - receive an allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Whereas adding the rather unspecific tyrosinekinase inhibitor sorafenib to standard treatment in unselected AML patients has not improved overall survival (OS), the addition of midostaurin to standard therapy in the selected group FLT3 mutated patients has resulted in a moderate but significant OS benefit.Real world data show that in patients below 50 years a cure rate of ca. 50 % can be achieved. However less than 10 % of patients above the age of 70 will be alive after five years even after intensive treatment. Therefore when curative and intensive treatment is deemed impossible the therapeutic standard in elderly and unfit patients used to be low-dose cytarabine with an average OS of 4 months. This has now been replaced by a new standard of care of hypomethylating agents - azacytidine and decitabine - which both achieve higher remission rates and show strong trends towards a prolonged OS

  16. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  17. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  18. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal acute myeloid leukemia Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  20. High frequency of GATA2 mutations in patients with mild chronic neutropenia evolving to MonoMac syndrome, myelodysplasia, and acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, Marlène; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Tavitian, Suzanne; Prade, Naïs; Beaupain, Blandine; LaRochelle, Olivier; Petit, Arnaud; Rohrlich, Pierre; Ferrand, Christophe; Van Den Neste, Eric; Poirel, Hélène A.; Lamy, Thierry; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Mansat-De Mas, Véronique; Corre, Jill; Récher, Christian; Plat, Geneviève; Bachelerie, Françoise; Donadieu, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Congenital neutropenia is a group of genetic disorders that involve chronic neutropenia and susceptibility to infections. These neutropenias may be isolated or associated with immunologic defects or extra-hematopoietic manifestations. Complications may occur as infectious diseases, but also less frequently as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, the transcription factor GATA2 has been identified as a new predisposing gene for familial AML/MDS. In the present study, we describe the initial identification by exome sequencing of a GATA2 R396Q mutation in a family with a history of chronic mild neutropenia evolving to AML and/or MDS. The subsequent analysis of the French Severe Chronic Neutropenia Registry allowed the identification of 6 additional pedigrees and 10 patients with 6 different and not previously reported GATA2 mutations (R204X, E224X, R330X, A372T, M388V, and a complete deletion of the GATA2 locus). The frequent evolution to MDS and AML in these patients reveals the importance of screening GATA2 in chronic neutropenia associated with monocytopenia because of the frequent hematopoietic transformation, variable clinical expression at onset, and the need for aggressive therapy in patients with poor clinical outcome. PMID:23223431

  1. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Bosutinib for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Binotto, Gianni

    In recent years the availability of several tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in the therapeutic armamentarium for chronic myeloid leukemia has dramatically changed the objectives and expectations of healthcare providers and patients. For many, but not all, patients the forerunner of TKI, imatinib, is still an excellent treatment option. Unfortunately, nearly 30-40% of imatinib-treated patients discontinue therapy in the long-term, because of failure and/or intolerance. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors are more potent drugs which are suitable for treatment of approximately 50% of patents for whom imatinib is unsuitable, and with high success and rapid responses. Bosutinib, an orally bioavailable Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has proved to be effective in vitro against resistant chronic myeloid leukemia cells that do not harbor the T315I or V299L ABL kinase domain mutations. During clinical development the manageable safety profile of bosutinib have become evident for both simple and more advanced treatment. In this review we summarize preclinical and clinical data for bosutinib and discuss its ideal field of action in comparison with other TKI.

  3. Key Data Elements in Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varghese, J.; Holz, C.; Neuhaus, P.; Bernardi, M.; Boehm, A.; Ganser, A.; Gore, S.; Heaney, M.; Hochhaus, A.; Hofmann, W.K.; Krug, U.; Muller-Tidow, C.; Smith, A.; Weltermann, A.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Hehlmann, R.; Dugas, M.

    2016-01-01

    Data standards consisting of key data elements for clinical routine and trial documentation harmonize documentation within and across different health care institutions making documentation more efficient and improving scientific data analysis. This work focusses on the field of myeloid leukemia

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Nair, Sreejith G.; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea.

  5. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  6. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  7. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Idhifa Approved for Some with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Idhifa Approved for Some With Acute Myeloid Leukemia For adults with specific genetic mutation To use ... that leads to relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The mutation in the IDH2 gene can ...

  9. Nucleophosmin 1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Davoudi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin1 is a multifunctional protein that shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm in some subtypes of acute myeloid leukemias. Mutated Nucleophosmin1 expresses aberrantly in the cytoplasm of the cell and transports from nucleolus to the cytoplasm. It is diagnosed by immunohistochemical techniques, flow cytometry assay and mutational analysis.The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Nucleophosmin1 mutation on the clinical presentations, prognosis, diagnosis and the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. Thirteen articles were extracted from PubMed, Google scholar and Scopus in which the Nucleophosmin1 mutation correlated with gingival hyperplasia, high white blood cell count, lymphadenopathy, high platelet count and other signs and symptoms of myelomonocytic and monocytic acute myeloid leukemias. This mutation is a provisional entity in the classification of acute myeloid leukemia, which influences on the prognosis, clinical course and the treatment of some subtypes of acute myeloid leukemias. Nucleophosmin1 mutation has favorable prognostic value in the absence of other concomitant mutations.

  10. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  12. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  13. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant

  15. Chronic myeloid leukemia presented with priapism: Effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-01

    Feb 1, 2015 ... of sexual stimulation, trauma, previous similar episodes, use of medications or any chronic illness. On physical examination, the patient had pallor. The spleen and liver. Chronic myeloid leukemia presented with priapism: Effective management with prompt leukapheresis. H Ergenc, C Varım, C Karacaer, ...

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia in the vascular niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cogle, Christopher R.; Bosse, Raphael C.; Brewer, Takae; Migdady, Yazan; Shirzad, Reza; Kampen, Kim Rosalie; Saki, Najmaldin

    2016-01-01

    The greatest challenge in treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is refractory disease. With approximately 60-80% of AML patients dying of relapsed disease, there is an urgent need to define and target mechanisms of drug resistance. Unfortunately, targeting cell-intrinsic resistance has failed to

  17. Use of second- and third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: an evolving treatment paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias; Kantarjian, Hagop; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Although imatinib remains the gold standard for first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), increasing recognition of imatinib resistance and intolerance has led to the development of additional tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which have demonstrated effectiveness as salvage therapies or alternative first-line treatments. Although additional options represent progress, the availability of 3 second-generation TKIs (dasatinib, nilotinib, and bosutinib) and 1 third-generation TKI (ponatinib) has added complexity to the treatment paradigm for CML, particularly CML in the chronic phase. Two second-generation agents (dasatinib and nilotinib) are approved for use as first-line and subsequent therapy. Thus, the appropriate sequencing of TKIs is a frequent quandary, and is incompletely addressed in clinical guidelines. Here, we review studies that might guide selection of a second- or third-generation TKI after failure of TKI therapy in patients with chronic-phase CML. These studies evaluate prognostic factors such as first-line cytogenetic response and BCR-ABL1 mutation status, which might help physicians identify patients who are likely to respond to second-generation TKIs, and those for whom ponatinib or an investigational agent might be more appropriate. We summarize evidence to date that suggests that use of a second-generation TKI as third-line therapy confers limited value in most CML patients, and we also explore the utility of current event-free survival versus traditional outcomes to predict long-term benefits of sequential TKI use. Finally, we present 3 case studies to illustrate how prognostic factors and other considerations (eg, tolerability) can be used to individualize subsequent therapy in cases of TKI resistance or intolerance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

  19. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Recurrent Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, John J; Park, Tae Sung; Wan, Thomas S K

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of chromosomal abnormality associated with leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is broad and heterogeneous when compared to chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloid neoplasms. Recurrent chromosomal translocations such as t(8;21), t(15;17), and inv(16) are frequently detected, but hundreds of other uncommon chromosomal aberrations from AML also exist. This chapter discusses 22 chromosomal abnormalities that are common structural, numerical aberrations, and other important but infrequent (less than 1 %) translocations emphasized in the WHO classification. Brief morphologic, cytogenetic, and clinical characteristics are summarized, so as to provide a concise reference to cancer cytogenetic laboratories. Morphology based on FAB classification is used together with the current WHO classification due to frequent mentioning in a vast number of reference literatures. Characteristic chromosomal aberrations of other myeloid neoplasms such as myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm will be discussed in separate chapters-except for certain abnormalities such as t(9;22) in de novo AML. Gene mutations detected in normal karyotype AML by cutting edge next generation sequencing technology are also briefly mentioned.

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia: update in diagnosis and treatment in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Helman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify how the Brazilian hematology centerstreated and diagnosed cases of acute myeloid leukemia in 2009.Methods: An epidemiological observational multicenter study of11 listed Brazilian centers that treat acute myeloid leukemia andperform bone marrow transplantation. Data were collected fromclinical charts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia treatedat the said centers between 2005 and 2009. The availability forimmunophenotyping and cytogenetic tests was assessed. Results:During 2009, a total of 345 new cases of acute myeloid leukemiawere diagnosed. Differences were noted in the tests performedbetween patients who initiated treatment at the center and thosereferred for treatment. Of the participating centers, 72% conductedsome type of molecular study in acute myeloid leukemia upondiagnosis. Conclusion: Treatment for acute myeloid leukemia inBrazil shows significantly inferior results when compared to othercenters worldwide.

  10. Extramedullary leukemia in children with acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støve, Heidi Kristine; Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic significance of extramedullary leukemia (EML) in childhood acute myeloid leukemia is not clarified. PROCEDURE: This population-based study included 315 children from the NOPHO-AML 2004 trial. RESULTS: At diagnosis, 73 (23%) patients had EML: 39 (12%) had myeloid sarcoma......, 22 (7%) had central nervous system disease, and 12 (4%) had both. EML was associated with young age (median age: 2.6 years), a high white blood cell count (median: 40 × 109 /l), M5 morphology (40%), and 11q23/MLL (KMT2A) rearrangements (34%). No patient received involved field radiotherapy. Five......-year event-free survival did not differ significantly between the EML and the non-EML patients (54% vs. 45%, P = 0.57), whereas 5-year overall survival (OS) was significantly lower in the EML group (64% vs. 73%, P = 0.04). The risk of induction death was significantly higher for EML patients (8% vs. 1%, P...

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia: advances in diagnosis and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasserjian, R P

    2013-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is an aggressive myeloid neoplasm characterized by ≥20% myeloblasts in the blood or bone marrow. Current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia are based on both patient-related parameters such as age and performance status as well as the intrinsic characteristics of particular disease subtypes. Subtyping of acute myeloid leukemia requires an integration of information from the patient's clinical history (such as any prior preleukemic myeloid neoplasm or cytotoxic potentially leukemogenic therapy), the leukemia morphology, cytogenetic findings, and the mutation status of particular genes (NPM1, FLT3, and CEBPA). In recent years, a barrage of information has become available regarding gene mutations that occur in acute myeloid leukemia and their influence on prognosis. Future therapies for acute myeloid leukemia will increasingly rely on the genetic signatures of individual leukemias and will adjust therapy to the predicted disease aggressiveness as well as employ therapies targeted against particular deregulated genetic pathways. This article reviews current standards for diagnosing and classifying acute myeloid leukemia according to the 2008 WHO Classification. Data that have subsequently accumulated regarding newly characterized gene mutations are also presented. It is anticipated that future leukemia classifications will employ a combination of karyotypic features and the gene mutation pattern to stratify patients to increasingly tailored treatment plans. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S.J.M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and international collaborative efforts have evolved. This overview describes these efforts and includes a summary of the history and contributions of each of the main collaborative pediatric AML groups worldwide. The focus is on translational and clinical research, which includes past, current, and future clinical trials. Separate sections concern acute promyelocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome, and relapsed AML. A plethora of novel antileukemic agents that have emerged, including new classes of drugs, are summarized as well. Finally, an important aspect of the treatment of pediatric AML—supportive care—and late effects are discussed. The future is bright, with a wide range of emerging innovative therapies and with more and more international collaboration that ultimately aim to cure all children with AML, with fewer adverse effects and without late effects. PMID:26304895

  13. Molecular genetics of chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and atypical chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bing; Gale, Robert Peter; Xiao, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    According to the 2008 World Health Organization classification, chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and atypical chronic myeloid leukemia are rare diseases. The remarkable progress in our understanding of the molecular genetics of myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms has made it clear that there are some specific genetic abnormalities in these 3 rare diseases. At the same time, there is considerable overlap among these disord...

  14. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  15. [Molecular characterization of atypical chronic myeloid leukemia and chronic neutrophilic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senín, Alicia; Arenillas, Leonor; Martínez-Avilés, Luz; Fernández-Rodríguez, Concepción; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Florensa, Lourdes; Besses, Carles; Álvarez-Larrán, Alberto

    2015-06-08

    Atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) and chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) display similar clinical and hematological characteristics. The objective of the present study was to determine the mutational status of SETBP1 and CSF3R in these diseases. The mutational status of SETBP1 and CSF3R was studied in 7 patients with aCML (n = 3), CNL (n = 1) and unclassifiable myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN-u) (n = 3). Additionally, mutations in ASXL1, SRSF2, IDH1/2, DNMT3A, and RUNX1 were also analyzed. SETBP1 mutations (G870S and G872R) were detected in 2 patients with MPN-u, and one of them also presented mutations in SRSF2 (P95H) and ASXL1 (E635fs). The CNL case showed mutations in CSFR3 (T618I), SETBP1 (G870S) and SRSF2 (P95H). No patient classified as aCML had mutations in SETBP1 or CSF3R. One of the patients with mutations evolved to acute myeloid leukemia, while the other 2 had disease progression without transformation to overt leukemia. The knowledge of the molecular alterations involved in these rare diseases is useful in the diagnosis and may have an impact on both prognosis and therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. [Myeloid/natural killer cell precursor and myeloid/natural killer cell acute leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ming; Chen, Bao-An

    2014-04-01

    With the popularity of flow cytometry, the classification of leukemia become more detailed. Myeloid/natural killer cell precursor acute leukemia and myeloid/natural killer cell acute leukemias are generally recognized as two kinds of rare leukemias and have poor prognosis. The cells expressed both myeloid and lymphatic antigens in these two leukemia and can not be diagnosed by morphology. The only basis to make a definite diagnosis is their unique Immunophenotyping. The role of CD7 and CD56 in these two leukemia are compelling, in the other hand, as the progress of cell differentiation research, there are many new awareness of NK cell differentiation. In this article, the biological origin, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment and the role of CD7 and CD56 in these two leukemia are briefly summarized.

  19. Epigenetic mechanisms in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Antoine H F M; Schwaller, Juerg

    2011-01-01

    Acute leukemia is characterized by clonal expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with blocked differentiation. Clinical and experimental evidences suggest that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the product of several functionally cooperating genetic alterations including chromosomal translocations leading to expression of leukemogenic fusion proteins. Several AML-associated lesions target chromatin regulators like histone methyltransferases or histone acetyltransferases, including mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) or CREB bindung protein/p300. Molecular and biochemical studies start to provide useful insights into the mechanisms of targeting and mode-of-action of such leukemogenic fusion proteins resulting in aberrant gene expression programs and AML. Chromatin modulating mechanisms are also mediating the transforming activity of key drivers of leukemogenesis by aberrant recruitment of corepressors. Recent large-scale screening efforts demonstrated that both aberrant DNA promoter methylation and aberrantly expressed microRNAs play an important role in the pathogenesis of AML as well. Current efforts to therapeutically exploit the potential reversibility of epigenetic mechanisms are focused on small molecules that inhibit DNA methyltransferases or histone deacetylases. Several phase I/II clinical trials using such compounds have reported promising, but mostly transient, clinical responses. This underscores the need to further dissect the molecular players of epigenetic mechanisms driving induction, maintenance, and potential reversibility of leukemic state to develop efficient and long-lasting targeted therapeutic strategies.

  20. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-24

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... L, Mardis ER, Wilson RK. The origin and evolution of mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. Cell. 2012 ... care or advice. Users with questions about a personal health condition should consult with a qualified healthcare ...

  3. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  4. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P.G. Silva (Fernando); I. Almeida (Inês); B. Morolli (Bruno); G. Brouwer-Mandema (Geeske); H. Wessels (Hans); R. Vossen (Rolf); H. Vrieling (Harry); E.W.A. Marijt (Erik); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); J.C. Kluin-Nelemans (Hanneke); W.R. Sperr (Wolfgang); W.D. Ludwig; M. Giphart-Gassler (Micheline)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when

  5. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Fernando P. G.; Almeida, Ines; Morolli, Bruno; Brouwer-Mandema, Geeske; Wessels, Hans; Vossen, Rolf; Vrieling, Harry; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2009-01-01

    Background Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when other

  6. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-25

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis secondary to chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Murali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nephrotic syndrome (NS is a well documented complication of hematological malignancies. However, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is rarely complicated by the NS, and it occurs usually after allogenic stem cell transplantation or interferon alpha therapy for CML. The NS as a complication of untreated CML is also rare. We report a 31-year-old patient who pre-sented with features of The NS. He was diagnosed to have CML one year ago and was on irre-gular treatment with imatinib mesylate. The renal biopsy and immunofluorescence revealed mem-branoproliferative glomerulonephritis type I. The patient was retreated with imatinib mesylate and the NS resolved gradually over three months. This maybe the third case in literature of mem-branoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with CML.

  8. Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with genetic alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Annually, it is estimated that approximately 150-200 children aged 0-16 years are diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In Japan, clinical studies with ANLL91, AML99, CCLSG-AML9805, and JPLSG-AML05 protocols were performed historically, and the risk stratification with a combination of chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation resulted in the improvement of clinical outcomes. Regarding the onset of pediatric AML at the molecular level, mutations in FLT3-ITD or KIT (Class I mutation) showed a poor prognosis, but the ratio of mutations in Class III-V genes was smaller than that in adult AML. In contrast, several pediatric AML cases are complicated due to chromosome fragility syndrome or congenital bone marrow failure syndrome. To improve the clinical outcomes, clinical application of next generation sequencing may allow for personalized therapy in each patient in the future.

  9. New drugs in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadia, T M; Ravandi, F; Cortes, J; Kantarjian, H

    2016-05-01

    The standard therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not changed meaningfully for the past four decades. Improvements in supportive care and modifications to the dose and schedule of existing agents have led to steady improvements in outcomes. However, developing new therapies for AML has been challenging. Although there have been advances in understanding the biology of AML, translating this knowledge to viable treatments has been slow. Active research is currently ongoing to address this important need and several promising drug candidates are currently in the pipeline. Here, we review some of the most advanced and promising compounds that are currently in clinical trials and may have the potential to be part of our future armamentarium. These drug candidates range from cytotoxic chemotherapies, targeted small-molecule inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Emerging therapies for acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Saygin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is characterized by clinical and biological heterogeneity. Despite the advances in our understanding of its pathobiology, the chemotherapy-directed management has remained largely unchanged in the past 40 years. However, various novel agents have demonstrated clinical activity, either as single agents (e.g., isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH inhibitors, vadastuximab or in combination with standard induction/consolidation at diagnosis and with salvage regimens at relapse. The classes of agents described in this review include novel cytotoxic chemotherapies (CPX-351 and vosaroxin, epigenetic modifiers (guadecitabine, IDH inhibitors, histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, bromodomain and extraterminal (BET inhibitors, FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor 3 (FLT3 inhibitors, and antibody-drug conjugates (vadastuximab, as well as cell cycle inhibitors (volasertib, B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2 inhibitors, and aminopeptidase inhibitors. These agents are actively undergoing clinical investigation alone or in combination with available chemotherapy.

  11. Current Management of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E

    2017-02-01

    The outcome for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has improved significantly over the past 30 years, with complete remission and overall survival rates exceeding 90 and 60%, respectively, in recent clinical trials. However, these improvements have not been achieved by the introduction of new agents. Instead, intensification of standard chemotherapy, more precise risk classification, improvements in supportive care, and the use of minimal residual disease to monitor response to therapy have all contributed to this success. Nevertheless, novel therapies are needed, as the cure rates for many subtypes of childhood AML remain unacceptably low. Here, we briefly review advances in our understanding of the biology and genetics of AML, the results of recent clinical trials, and current recommendations for the treatment of children with AML.

  12. Genetics of therapy-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Andersen, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are heterogeneous, closely associated diseases arising de novo or following chemotherapy with alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors, or after radiotherapy. Whereas de novo MDS and AML are almost always subclassified according to cytog......Myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are heterogeneous, closely associated diseases arising de novo or following chemotherapy with alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors, or after radiotherapy. Whereas de novo MDS and AML are almost always subclassified according...

  13. Blocking the APRIL circuit enhances acute myeloid leukemia cell chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonci, Désirée; Musumeci, Maria; Coppola, Valeria; Addario, Antonio; Conticello, Concetta; Hahne, Michael; Gulisano, Massimo; Grignani, Francesco; De Maria, Ruggero

    2008-12-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy-induced cell death represents a major obstacle in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. APRIL (A Proliferation Inducing Ligand) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that plays a key role in normal B-cell development, while promoting survival and proliferation of malignant B cells. We investigated APRIL expression and activity in acute myeloid leukemia. We found that APRIL mRNA and protein, including the secreted form, are expressed in leukemic cells of patients with M0, M2 and M4 acute myeloid leukemia subtypes but not in normal hematopoietic progenitors. Retrovirus-mediated APRIL expression in normal hematopoietic progenitors confers resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs-induced apoptosis. Conversely, blocking APRIL function by recombinant soluble APRIL receptors increased chemotherapeutic drugs-induced cell adeath in acute myeloid leukemia cells. These results indicate that APRIL acts in an autocrine fashion to protect acute myeloid leukemia cells from drug-induced death and foresee a therapeutic potential of APRIL antagonists in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  14. Translational Studies in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Holt (Bronno)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe production of blood cells (hematopoiesis) takes place in the bone marrow. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clonal disease, which is characterized by an increase in the number of myeloid cells in the bone marrow and an arrest in their maturation. This frequently results in a severe

  15. Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia a Liquid Tumor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohanian, Maro; Faderl, Stefan; Ravandi, Farhad; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary manifestations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were described as early as the 19th century. However, the incidence, clinical significance, and pathobiology of extramedullary AML remain ill defined. We reviewed case reports, retrospective case series, pilot studies, and imaging studies of extramedullary leukemia (EML) to determine its frequency, characteristics, clinical presentation, and significance. EML precedes or accompanies development of AML and occurs during or following treatment, even during remission. Although imaging studies are rarely conducted and the true incidence of EML has yet to be verified, authors have reported several estimates based on retrospective and autopsy studies. The incidence of EML in patients with AML of all ages is estimated to be about 9% and EML in children with AML was detected in 40% of patients at diagnosis. The combination of positron emission tomography and computed tomography were the most sensitive and reliable techniques of detecting and monitoring EML. Based on our literature review, the frequency of EML is likely underreported. The well-documented nature of EML in AML patients suggests that AML can manifest as a solid tumor. The extent to which EML accompanies AML and whether EML is derived from bone marrow are unknown. Furthermore, questions remain regarding the role of the microenvironment, which may or may not facilitate the survival and proliferation of EML, and the implications of these interactions with regard to minimal residual disease, tumor cell quiescence, and relapse. Therefore, prospective studies of detection and characterization of EML in AML patients are warranted. PMID:23280377

  16. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri Rauenzahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis in leukemic patients is uncommon but associated with increased mortality. Additionally, leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is extremely rare. While appendectomy is the treatment of choice for these patients, diagnosis and management of leukemia have a greater impact on remission and survival. A 59-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the surgical service with acute right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and anorexia. She was noted to have leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Abdominal imaging demonstrated appendicitis with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymphadenopathy for which she underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. Peripheral smear, bone marrow biopsy, and surgical pathology of the appendix demonstrated acute myeloid leukemia (AML with nonsuppurative appendicitis. In the setting of AML, prior cases described the development of appendicitis with active chemotherapy. Of these cases, less than ten patients had leukemic infiltration of the appendix, leading to leukostasis and nonsuppurative appendicitis. Acute appendicitis with leukemic infiltration as the initial manifestation of AML has only been described in two other cases in the literature with an average associated morbidity of 32.6 days. The prompt management in this case of appendicitis and AML resulted in an overall survival of 185 days.

  17. Molecular Genetic Markers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Yohe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetics play an increasingly important role in the risk stratification and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients. Traditionally, AML classification and risk stratification relied on cytogenetic studies; however, molecular detection of gene mutations is playing an increasingly important role in classification, risk stratification, and management of AML. Molecular testing does not take the place of cytogenetic testing results, but plays a complementary role to help refine prognosis, especially within specific AML subgroups. With the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML therapy is not targeted but the intensity of therapy is driven by the prognostic subgroup. Many prognostic scoring systems classify patients into favorable, poor, or intermediate prognostic subgroups based on clinical and genetic features. Current standard of care combines cytogenetic results with targeted testing for mutations in FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and KIT to determine the prognostic subgroup. Other gene mutations have also been demonstrated to predict prognosis and may play a role in future risk stratification, although some of these have not been confirmed in multiple studies or established as standard of care. This paper will review the contribution of cytogenetic results to prognosis in AML and then will focus on molecular mutations that have a prognostic or possible therapeutic impact.

  18. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  19. Cutaneous vasculitis as a presenting manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, Nambiar Veettil; Thomas, Joe; Chandrasekhara, Pradeep Kumar Shenoy; Kanchinadham, Suresh; Kadel, Jugal Kishore; Narsimulu, Gumdal

    2009-04-01

    One of the rare causes of secondary vasculitides is malignancy. Hematological malignancies produce secondary vasculitis more frequently than solid malignancies. Here in we report a case of acute myeloid leukemia presenting with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis. This case highlights the importance of looking for underlying malignancies, especially leukemias in patients presenting with features of systemic vasculitides.

  20. The role of natural killer cells in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carolyna Araújo Danier

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasia resulting from a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 producing the BCR-ABL hybrid known as the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph. In chronic myeloid leukemia a proliferation of malignant myeloid cells occurs in the bone marrow due to excessive tyrosine kinase activity. In order to maintain homeostasis, natural killer cells, by means of receptors, identify the major histocompatibility complex on the surface of tumor cells and subsequently induce apoptosis. The NKG2D receptor in the natural killer cells recognizes the transmembrane proteins related to major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB, and it is by the interaction between NKG2D and MICA that natural killer cells exert cytotoxic activity against chronic myeloid leukemia tumor cells. However, in the case of chronic exposure of the NKG2D receptor, the MICA ligand releases soluble proteins called sMICA from the tumor cell surface, which negatively modulate NKG2D and enable the tumor cells to avoid lysis mediated by the natural killer cells. Blocking the formation of sMICA may be an important antitumor strategy. Treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors induces modulation of NKG2DL expression, which could favor the activity of the natural killer cells. However this mechanism has not been fully described in chronic myeloid leukemia. In the present study, we analyze the role of natural killer cells to reduce proliferation and in the cellular death of tumor cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

  1. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma: natural history and biology of an uncommon manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, M Yadira; Ghahramani, Grant K; Frisch, Stephanie; Armbrecht, Eric S; Lind, Anne C; Nguyen, Tudung T; Hassan, Anjum; Kreisel, Friederike H; Frater, John L

    2013-05-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of patients with cutaneous myeloid sarcoma, from 2 tertiary care institutions. Eighty-three patients presented, with a mean age of 52 years. Diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma in the skin was difficult due to the low frequency of myeloperoxidase and/or CD34+ cases (56% and 19% of tested cases, respectively). Seventy-one of the 83 patients (86%) had ≥ 1 bone marrow biopsy. Twenty-eight (39%) had acute myeloid leukemia with monocytic differentiation. Twenty-three had other de novo acute myeloid leukemia subtypes. Thirteen patients had other myeloid neoplasms, of which 4 ultimately progressed to an acute myeloid leukemia. Seven had no bone marrow malignancy. Ninety-eight percent of the patients received chemotherapy, and approximately 89% died of causes related to their disease. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma in most cases represents an aggressive manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Diagnosis can be challenging due to lack of myeloblast-associated antigen expression in many cases, and difficulty in distinguishing monocyte-lineage blasts from neoplastic and non-neoplastic mature monocytes.

  2. Dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly G Aguilera

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dolly G Aguilera1, Apostolia M Tsimberidou21Department of Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Children’s Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas USAAbstract: Deregulated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TK activity is the molecular marker for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, which provides an identifiable target for developing therapeutic agents. Imatinib mesylate, a BCR-ABL TK inhibitor, is the frontline therapy for CML. Despite the stunning efficacy of this agent, a small number of patients develop a suboptimal response or resistance to imatinib. In newly diagnosed patients with chronic phase CML, the rate of resistance to imatinib at 4 years was up to 20%, increasing to 70% to 90% for patients in the accelerated/blastic phase. Resistance to imatinib led to the development of novel TK inhibitors such as dasatinib. Several clinical trials have reported more durable complete hematologic and cytogenetic responses with this agent in patients who are resistant or intolerant to imatinib. Dasatinib is well tolerated and has broad efficacy, resulting in durable responses in patients with any BCR-ABL mutation except for T3151 and mutations in codon 317 – most commonly F317L – including mutations that were highly resistant to imatinib, such as L248, Y253, E255, F359, and H396. Dasatinib is recommended for CML in chronic, blastic or accelerated phase that is resistant or intolerant to imatinib. Dasatinib was approved by the FDA at 100 mg once daily as the starting dose in patients with chronic phase CML and at 70 mg twice daily in patients with accelerated or blastic phase CML. Various clinical trial results provided evidence that resistance to one TK inhibitor can be reversed with the use of a different TK inhibitor (TKI. Other second-generation TKIs with activity in CML include nilotinib, bosutinib and

  3. Additional chromosome abnormalities in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Hua Hsiao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia (Ph chromosome and/or Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson leukemia virus oncogene transcript are unique markers for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. However, CML demonstrates heterogeneous presentations and outcomes. We analyzed the cytogenetic and molecular results of CML patients to evaluate their correlation with clinical presentations and outcome. A total of 84 newly diagnosed CML patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were treated according to disease status. Bone marrow samples were obtained to perform cytogenetic and molecular studies. Clinical presentations, treatment courses, and survival were reviewed retrospectively. Among 84 patients, 72 had chronic phase and 12 had accelerated phase CML. Cytogenetic study showed 69 (82.1% with the classic Ph chromosome, 6 (7.2% with a variant Ph chromosome, and 9 (10.7% with additional chromosome abnormalities. Fifty-four (64.3% cases harbored b3a2 transcripts, 29 (34.5% had b2a2 transcript, and 1 had e19a2 transcript. There was no difference in clinical presentations between different cytogenetic and molecular groups; however, additional chromosome abnormalities were significantly associated with the accelerated phase. Imatinib therapy was an effective treatment, as measured by cytogenetic response, when administered as first- and second-line therapy in chronic phase patients. Survival analysis showed that old age, additional chromosome abnormalities, high Sokal score, and no cytogenetic response in second-line therapy had a significant poor impact (p<0.05. In conclusion, we presented the cytogenetic and molecular pattern of CML patients and demonstrated that the additional chromosome abnormality was associated with poor outcome.

  4. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-06

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. MicroRNA profiling can classify acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage as either acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, David C; van den Ancker, Willemijn; Denkers, Fedor; de Menezes, Renée X; Westers, Theresia M; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Smit, Linda

    2013-04-15

    Classification of acute leukemia is based on the commitment of leukemic cells to the myeloid or the lymphoid lineage. However, a small percentage of acute leukemia cases lack straightforward immunophenotypical lineage commitment. These leukemias of ambiguous lineage represent a heterogeneous category of acute leukemia that cannot be classified as either acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The lack of clear classification of acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage as either AML or ALL is a hurdle in treatment choice for these patients. Here, we compared the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of 17 cases with acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage and 16 cases of AML, B-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (B-ALL), and T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (T-ALL). We show that leukemias of ambiguous lineage do not segregate as a separate entity but exhibit miRNA expression profiles similar to AML, B-ALL, or T-ALL. We show that by using only 5 of the most lineage-discriminative miRNAs, we are able to define acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage as either AML or ALL. Our results indicate the presence of a myeloid or lymphoid lineage-specific genotype, as reflected by miRNA expression, in these acute leukemias despite their ambiguous immunophenotype. miRNA-based classification of acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage might be of additional value in therapeutic decision making.

  6. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Ever-advancing chronic myeloid leukemia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shinya; Ando, Toshihiko; Kojima, Kensuke

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been drastically changed by the emergence of the ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), imatinib mesylate. However, resistance and intolerance have frequently been reported, particularly in patients with advanced-stage disease. Point mutations within the ABL kinase domain that interfere with imatinib binding are the most critical cause of imatinib resistance. To overcome this resistance, four second-generation ATP competitive ABL TKIs, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib and bafetinib, have been developed. Dasatinib and nilotinib also demonstrated higher efficacy than imatinib in previously untreated CML patients in chronic phase. Despite promising clinical results, the frequently observed mutant T315I is not effectively targeted by any of the second-generation ABL TKIs. Thus, a third-generation ABL TKI, ponatinib, was developed to inhibit all mutated BCR-ABL and showed clinical efficacy in CML cells harbouring T315I. CML treatment is rapidly progressing and further evolution is surely expected. Moreover, it was recently reported that some CML patients who achieved sustained complete molecular response could stop TKI. CML may become the first human cancer to be conquered solely with oral medicines.

  8. Targeted therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias; Cortes, Jorge E; Ghanem, Hady; O'Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by the formation of the Philadelphia chromosome and oncogenic signaling by the resulting Bcr-Abl fusion protein. Understanding the molecular basis of CML has led to the development of highly effective targeted therapies that block Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase activity. Imatinib, the current first-line therapy for CML, induces durable treatment responses in most patients. However, patients may develop imatinib resistance, which is often due to BCR-ABL mutations. With the availability of second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, an effective therapeutic option other than stem cell transplantation is available following imatinib failure. Randomized trial data suggest that dasatinib treatment is superior to imatinib dose escalation in patients with imatinib resistance. Nilotinib, a recently approved analogue of imatinib, has also demonstrated encouraging treatment responses in patients with imatinib-resistant CML. Other agents (including bosutinib and INNO-406) are in clinical development. With the potential availability of multiple treatment options for patients with CML, it may be possible to tailor treatment according to individual patient or disease characteristics, for example, BCR-ABL mutations. Future CML treatment may involve combination strategies. Overall, targeted agents have significantly improved the prognosis of patients diagnosed with CML.

  9. The Epigenetic Landscape of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Conway O’Brien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a genetically heterogeneous disease. Certain cytogenetic and molecular genetic mutations are recognized to have an impact on prognosis, leading to their inclusion in some prognostic stratification systems. Recently, the advent of high-throughput whole genome or exome sequencing has led to the identification of several novel recurrent mutations in AML, a number of which have been found to involve genes concerned with epigenetic regulation. These genes include in particular DNMT3A, TET2, and IDH1/2, involved with regulation of DNA methylation, and EZH2 and ASXL-1, which are implicated in regulation of histones. However, the precise mechanisms linking these genes to AML pathogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated as has their respective prognostic relevance. As massively parallel DNA sequencing becomes increasingly accessible for patients, there is a need for clarification of the clinical implications of these mutations. This review examines the literature surrounding the biology of these epigenetic modifying genes with regard to leukemogenesis and their clinical and prognostic relevance in AML when mutated.

  10. Optimized Treatment Schedules for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qie He

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, several targeted therapies (e.g. imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib have been developed to treat Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML. Despite an initial response to therapy, drug resistance remains a problem for some CML patients. Recent studies have shown that resistance mutations that preexist treatment can be detected in a substantial number of patients, and that this may be associated with eventual treatment failure. One proposed method to extend treatment efficacy is to use a combination of multiple targeted therapies. However, the design of such combination therapies (timing, sequence, etc. remains an open challenge. In this work we mathematically model the dynamics of CML response to combination therapy and analyze the impact of combination treatment schedules on treatment efficacy in patients with preexisting resistance. We then propose an optimization problem to find the best schedule of multiple therapies based on the evolution of CML according to our ordinary differential equation model. This resulting optimization problem is nontrivial due to the presence of ordinary different equation constraints and integer variables. Our model also incorporates drug toxicity constraints by tracking the dynamics of patient neutrophil counts in response to therapy. We determine optimal combination strategies that maximize time until treatment failure on hypothetical patients, using parameters estimated from clinical data in the literature.

  11. Novel therapeutic options in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Medinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a biologically complex and molecularly and clinically heterogeneous disease, and its incidence is increasing as the population ages. Cytogenetic anomalies and mutation testing remain important prognostic tools for tailoring treatment after induction therapy. Despite major advances in understanding the genetic landscape of AML and its impact on the pathophysiology and biology of the disease, as well as the rapid development of new drugs, standard treatment options have not experienced major changes during the past three decades. Especially for patients with intermediate or high-risk AML, which often show relapse. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains the best chance for cure. Here we review the state of the art therapy of AML, with special focus on new developments in immunotherapies and cellular therapies including HSCT and particularly discuss the impact of new conditioning and haplo-identical donor regimens for HSCT, post-transplant strategies for preventing and treating relapse, and emerging novel therapeutic options.

  12. Unfavorable-risk acute myeloid leukemia dissected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Stephen A; Mohan, Sanjay R; Savona, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an immensely heterogeneous disease based on the presence of varying combinations of morphologic, immunophenotypic, genetic, and molecular characteristics identified among those diagnosed with this disease. Although current therapeutic strategies provide a reasonable likelihood of achieving a complete remission for the majority of patients, relapse rates and subsequent disease-related mortality remain unacceptably high. Improved methods of risk stratification are needed to better identify patients at considerable risk of relapse in hopes of allowing for early therapeutic intervention and/or intensification that may lead to a higher likelihood of cure. The current status of risk stratification of AML and emerging technologies with potential to improve prognostic classification and outcomes are summarized in this review. Refinement of our understanding of the impact of current pretreatment AML cytogenetic, immunophenotypic, and molecular aberrations to predict outcomes and guide therapeutic decision-making is ongoing. Emerging data suggest that incorporation of the degree of posttreatment response and/or the detection of minimal residual disease can improve the accuracy of risk stratification for individual patients. Although pretreatment disease characteristics remain the hallmark of prognostication for AML patients, posttreatment parameters such as minimal residual disease assessment and degree of response to therapy possess the ability to further refine our identification of patients with unfavorable disease and thereby influence decisions regarding therapeutic planning.

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  20. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Suspected Sepsis after Caesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Hwa Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of acute leukemia during pregnancy is extremely rare, and often it is not easy to differentiate it from other diseases associated with pregnancy such as sepsis or hemorrhage. Pregnancy itself is not known to affect the natural course of leukemia; however, complications of leukemia like anemia, infections, and coagulopathy can adversely influence both the fetus and the mother. In this case, a pregnant patient misdiagnosed with septic shock and severe leukocytosis was correctly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia after surgical delivery.

  1. Reproducibility and prognostic significance of morphologic dysplasia in de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Olga K; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Campigotto, Federico; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Neuberg, Donna; Hasserjian, Robert P

    2015-07-01

    The 2008 WHO classification of acute myeloid leukemia includes a category of acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes; however, the significance of multilineage dysplasia alone is controversial and its reproducibility has not been evaluated in acute myeloid leukemia. We performed an in-depth analysis of morphologic dysplasia in 159 de novo acute myeloid leukemia cases lacking myelodysplasia-related cytogenetic abnormalities. Using the 2008 WHO criteria, there were 89 acute myeloid leukemia-not otherwise specified (56%) and 43 acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (27%), while 27 cases were ambiguous as to myelodysplasia-related changes status due to limited maturing cells (acute myeloid leukemia-not evaluable, 17%). On multivariable analysis, neither acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes nor acute myeloid leukemia-not evaluable showed significantly different event-free survival compared with acute myeloid leukemia-not otherwise specified in the 137 patients treated with induction chemotherapy. When individual dysplastic features were analyzed, only micromegakaryocytes and hypogranulated myeloid cells emerged as factors significantly associated with shorter event-free survival in a multivariable analysis that included the other significant covariates of age, white blood count, platelet count, abnormal karyotype and stem-cell transplantation. Our findings indicate that the current 2008 WHO definition of multilineage dysplasia in acute myeloid leukemia in its current form is not optimal, and that the use of a more restricted definition of morphologic dysplasia results in more relevant risk stratification that is independent of other conventional prognostic factors.

  2. Nilotinib versus imatinib for newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saglio, Giuseppe; Kim, Dong-Wook; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2010-01-01

    Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase.......Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase....

  3. TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Baccarani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The first treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML included spleen x-radiation and conventional drugs, mainly Busulfan and Hydroxyurea. This therapy improved the quality of life during the chronic phase of the disease, without preventing nor significantly delaying the progression towards advanced phases. The introduction of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT marked the first important breakthrough in the evolution of CML treatment, because about 50% of the eligible patients were cured. The second breakthrough was the introduction of human recombinant interferon-alfa, able to achieve a complete cytogenetic remission in 15% to 30% of patients, with a significant survival advantage over conventional chemotherapy. At the end of the last century, about 15 years ago, all these treatments were quickly replaced by a class of small molecules targeting the tyrosine kinases (TK, which were able to induce a major molecular remission in most of the patients, without remarkable side effects, and a very prolonged life-span. The first approved TK inhibitor (TKI was Imatinib Mesylate (Glivec or Gleevec, Novartis. Rapidly, other TKIs were developed tested and commercialized, namely Dasatinib (Sprycel, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Nilotinib (Tasigna, Novartis, Bosutinib (Busulif, Pfizer and Ponatinib (Iclusig, Ariad. Not all these compounds are available worldwide; some of them are approved only for second line treatment, and the high prices are a problem that can limit their use. A frequent update of treatment recommendations is necessary. The current treatment goals include not only the prevention of the transformation to the advanced phases and the prolongation of survival, but also a length of survival and of a quality of life comparable to that of non-leukemic individuals. In some patient the next ambitious step is to move towards a treatment-free remission. The CML therapy, the role of alloSCT and the promising experimental strategies are reviewed in

  4. Dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Dolly G; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M

    2009-04-01

    Deregulated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TK) activity is the molecular marker for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which provides an identifiable target for developing therapeutic agents. Imatinib mesylate, a BCR-ABL TK inhibitor, is the frontline therapy for CML. Despite the stunning efficacy of this agent, a small number of patients develop a suboptimal response or resistance to imatinib. In newly diagnosed patients with chronic phase CML, the rate of resistance to imatinib at 4 years was up to 20%, increasing to 70% to 90% for patients in the accelerated/blastic phase. Resistance to imatinib led to the development of novel TK inhibitors such as dasatinib. Several clinical trials have reported more durable complete hematologic and cytogenetic responses with this agent in patients who are resistant or intolerant to imatinib. Dasatinib is well tolerated and has broad efficacy, resulting in durable responses in patients with any BCR-ABL mutation except for T3151 and mutations in codon 317 - most commonly F317L - including mutations that were highly resistant to imatinib, such as L248, Y253, E255, F359, and H396. Dasatinib is recommended for CML in chronic, blastic or accelerated phase that is resistant or intolerant to imatinib. Dasatinib was approved by the FDA at 100 mg once daily as the starting dose in patients with chronic phase CML and at 70 mg twice daily in patients with accelerated or blastic phase CML. Various clinical trial results provided evidence that resistance to one TK inhibitor can be reversed with the use of a different TK inhibitor (TKI). Other second-generation TKIs with activity in CML include nilotinib, bosutinib and INNO 406. New molecules, such as the inhibitor of Aurora family serine-threonine kinases, MK0457, which has antileukemic activity in CML associated with a T315I mutation, are being investigated. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains an option for selected patients.

  5. Stages of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  6. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  7. Occupational exposure to solvents and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Lehtinen-Jacks, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to assess the relation between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). METHODS: Altogether, this study comprises 15 332 incident cases of AML diagnosed in Finland, Norway, Sweden and Iceland from 1961-2005 and 76...

  8. Interferon alpha for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with interferon-alpha (IFN-α) was introduced in the early 1980s. Several clinical trials showed a survival advantage for patients treated with IFN-α compared to conventional chemotherapy. Some patients achieved longstanding complete cytogenetic remissions...

  9. Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, L S G; Nørgaard, J.M; Sengeløv, H

    2015-01-01

    As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and World Health Organization Performance Status (PS...

  10. Interferon alpha for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with interferon-alpha (IFN-a) was introduced in the early 1980s. Several clinical trials showed a survival advantage for patients treated with IFN-a compared to conventional chemotherapy. Some patients achieved longstanding complete cytogenetic remissions...

  11. Nilotinib versus imatinib for newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saglio, Giuseppe; Kim, Dong-Wook; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2010-01-01

    Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase....

  12. Diagnostic work-up of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Olga K; Sohani, Aliyah R; Bhargava, Parul; Nardi, Valentina

    2017-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by a clonal expansion of undifferentiated myeloid precursors resulting in impaired hematopoiesis and bone marrow failure. In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) published revisions to the classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemias. Similar to the 2008 classification, the updated classification incorporates clinical features, morphology, immunophenotyping, and cytogenetics, with greater emphasis on molecular genetics, to define disease entities. This brief review addresses the various components of pathologic assessment to establish a diagnosis of AML and to help risk stratify patients, with an emphasis on newer techniques used in the detection of mutations with prognostic significance, as well as assays employed in the evaluation of minimal residual disease following treatment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Testicular myeloid sarcoma: a rare manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Christine N; Collie, Angela M B; Flagg, Aron; Rhee, Audrey

    2014-10-01

    Myeloid sarcoma manifesting in the testis is rare and may occur concomitantly with bone marrow disease or as a separate entity. We describe our experience with a 6-month-old boy who presented with painless scrotal swelling and was found to have bilateral testicular masses on ultrasonography. The patient underwent unilateral radical inguinal orchiectomy. Surgical pathology revealed myeloid sarcoma of the testicle. He developed peripheral blood involvement 1 week postoperatively. Bone marrow biopsy showed acute myeloid leukemia. He is in remission after 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy, local radiation therapy, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in myeloid leukemia patients from Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynara Gomes Barbosa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR: EC 1.5.1.20 polymorphisms are associated to acute lymphoid leukemia in different populations. We used the polymerase chain reaction and the restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP to investigate MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphism frequencies in 67 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, 27 with acute myeloid leukemia FAB subtype M3 (AML-M3 and 100 apparently healthy controls. The MTHFR mutant allele frequencies were as follows: CML = 17.2% for C677T, 21.6% for A1298C; AML-M3 = 22.2% for C677T, 24.1% for A1298C; and controls = 20.5% for C677T, 21% for A1298C. Taken together, our results provide evidence that MTHFR polymorphisms have no influence on the development of CML or AML-M3.

  15. A reevaluation of erythroid predominance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia using the updated WHO 2016 Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolskee, Elizabeth; Mikita, Geoff; Rea, Bryan; Bagg, Adam; Zuo, Zhuang; Sun, Yi; Goswami, Maitrayee; Wang, Sa A; Oak, Jean; Arber, Daniel A; Allen, M Brandon; George, Tracy I; Rogers, Heesun J; Hsi, Eric; Hasserjian, Robert P; Orazi, Attilio

    2018-02-05

    The 2016 WHO update changed the diagnostic criteria for myeloid neoplasms with erythroid predominance, limiting the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia to cases with ≥20% blasts in the bone marrow or peripheral blood. Although acute myeloid leukemia with ≥50% erythroid cells has historically been presumed to represent acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes, this hypothesis has never been systematically examined. We sought to investigate the clinicopathologic, cytogenetic, and molecular features of acute myeloid leukemia with erythroid predominance to subclassify cases as defined by the 2016 WHO. We retrospectively identified patients with ≥50% erythroid precursors and either ≥20% bone marrow blasts or ≥20% peripheral blood blasts at the time of initial diagnosis at seven major academic centers. Laboratory and clinical data were obtained. Patients were then reclassified according to 2016 WHO guidelines. A matched control group was also obtained. We identified 146 patients with acute myeloid leukemia with erythroid predominance (62% M, average age: 62 y, range: 5-93 y). Of these, 91 were acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes, 20 (14%) were therapy-related myeloid neoplasm, 23 (16%) acute myeloid leukemia, not otherwise specified, and ten acute myeloid leukemia with recurrent cytogenetic/molecular abnormalities. The bone marrow blast count ranged from 9-41%. There was no difference in survival for patients with erythroid predominance compared to patients with acute myeloid leukemia without erythroid proliferations. In a multivariable analysis, cytogenetic risk was the only significant predictor of survival. We find a significantly lower rate of FLT3 and RAS pathway alterations in acute myeloid leukemia with erythroid predominance compared to controls. Our study is one of the first to apply the 2016 WHO guidelines for classification of acute myeloid leukemia. We find acute myeloid leukemia with erythroid

  16. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Bilateral Acute Proptosis as Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Chi; Wang, Shih-Chung; Chen, San-Ni; Jou, Jieh-Ren

    2015-01-01

    The myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary finding of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and orbital leukemic tumors occur most commonly during the first decade of life. To our knowledge, we report the youngest patient with bilateral proptosis of both eyes as an initial manifestation of AML. This case highlights the need for peripheral blood smear and neuro-image work-up for acute proptosis in infancy. AML should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an orbital mass, even in the absence of typical leukemic symptoms.

  18. Bilateral orbital myeloid sarcoma as initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmidi, Kamel; Zaouali, Sonia; Messaoud, Riadh; Mahjoub, Bahri; Ammari, Wafa; Bacha, Leila; Laatiri, Adnene; Jenzeri, Salah; Khairallah, Moncef

    2007-12-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is a rare orbital complication of acute leukemia. It concerns primarily children under 10 years of age suffering from primitive acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis is made by clinical examination, computed tomography and confirmed by haematological investigations. The treatment approach is based on chemotherapy associated with intravenous steroid therapy. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl who presented with bilateral proptosis revealing acute myeloid leukemia. The patient was treated by a combination of chemotherapeutic drugs in two phases, associated with intravenous steroids. After a follow-up period of 24 months, the patient was in complete remission. The diagnosis of granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in any orbital mass of uncertain origin, particularly if it is bilateral. Special stains and immunohistochemistry play an important role in the diagnosis.

  19. Alantolactone selectively ablates acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor outcomes for patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are largely attributed to leukemia stem cells (LSCs which are difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and responsible for relapse. Thus, new therapeutic strategies which could selectively target LSCs in clinical leukemia treatment and avoid drug resistance are urgently needed. However, only a few small molecules have been reported to show anti-LSCs activity. Methods The aim of the present study was to identify alantolactone as novel agent that can ablate acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells from AML patient specimens and evaluate the anticancer activity of alantolactone in vitro and in vivo. Results The present study is the first to demonstrate that alantolactone, a prominent eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, could specifically ablate LSCs from AML patient specimens. Furthermore, in comparison to the conventional chemotherapy drug, cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, alantolactone showed superior effects of leukemia cytotoxicity while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Alantolactone induced apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner by suppression of NF-kB and its downstream target proteins. DMA-alantolactone, a water-soluble prodrug of alantolactone, could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Based on these results, we propose that alantolactone may represent a novel LSCs-targeted therapy and eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones offer a new scaffold for drug discovery towards anti-LSCs agents.

  20. Genomics in acute myeloid leukemia: from identification to personalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James M; Winer, Eric S

    2015-11-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive bone marrow malignancy that is fatal if left untreated. Previous classification was strictly based on morphology, which gave little information in terms of prognosis or guide to treatment. Recent research has provided vital information into the chromosomal and molecular pathogenesis of leukemia development. The discovery of these abnormalities via proteomics and genomics have provided two key insights. First, these novel discoveries provide prognostic significance into the predictive result of chemotherapy. Second, these chromosomal and protein abnormalities have provided potential drug targets for new treatment modalities. This article will elaborate on many of these new molecular findings and discuss their implications on the treatment of AML.

  1. Ploidy and clinical characteristics of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large series (n = 596) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) focusing on modal numbers (MN) from the population-based NOPHO-AML trials. Abnormal karyotypes were present in 452 cases (76%) and numerical aberrations were present in 40% (n = 237) of all pediatric AML. Among...... with early onset (median age 2 years), female sex (57%), and a dominance of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) (29%). Hypodiploidy constituted 8% of all AML and was associated with older age (median age 9 years), male predominance (60%), FAB M2 (56%), and t(8;21)(q22;q22) (56%) with loss of sex...

  2. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lopes, Roberto Iglesias [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant' Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall' Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel [Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associated with right hydronephrosis. Due to the risk of germ-cell tumor in undescended testicle, the patient underwent radical right orchiectomy. The pathological examination showed recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in the testis. He was referred to oncology for adjuvant therapy. Our literature review found no similar cases described.

  3. Monitoring imatinib plasma concentrations in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlize Hübner Martins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib has proved to be effective in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia, but plasma levels above 1,000 ng/mL must be achieved to optimize activity. Therapeutic drug monitoring of imatinib is useful for patients that do not present clinical response. There are several analytical methods to measure imatinib in biosamples, which are mainly based on liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric or diode array spectrophotometric detection. The former is preferred due to its lower cost and wider availability. The present manuscript presents a review of the clinical and analytical aspects of the therapeutic drug monitoring of imatinib in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. The review includes references published over the last 10 years. There is evidence that the monitoring of plasmatic levels of imatinib is an useful alternative, especially considering the wide pharmacokinetic variability of this drug.

  4. Critical appraisal of nilotinib in frontline treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L DeRemer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available David L DeRemer1,2, Katerina Katsanevas1,2, Celalettin Ustun31Department of Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 2Medical College of Georgia Health inc, Augusta, GA, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: The development of imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Follow-up analysis of IRIS trial participants continues to demonstrate durable responses for imatinib at 400 mg/day. However, 10%–15% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia will become imatinib-resistant or intolerant of adverse events. Phase II studies have shown that most of these patients will respond to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as nilotinib, dasatinib, and bosutinib. Both nilotinib and dasatinib have recently demonstrated clinical efficacy as frontline therapy in Phase III studies. In the ENESTnd trial, nilotinib 600–800 mg/day produced significantly higher major molecular rates and complete cytogenetic response rates in comparison with imatinib at 12 months. Recently, 18-month follow-up analysis of this trial continues to demonstrate superiority for nilotinib. It is unknown whether this will ultimately translate into improved long-term outcomes, such as event-free survival or overall survival. Nilotinib continues to be generally well tolerated and tends to produce less Grade 3/4 toxicity in frontline therapy when compared with its use following imatinib failure. With three tyrosine kinase inhibitors for potential frontline therapy and an active drug discovery pipeline, treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia is still subject to change with time as clinical algorithms continue to evolve.Keywords: nilotinib, frontline therapy, chronic myeloid leukemia, adverse events

  5. Role of Setbp1 in Myeloid Leukemia Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-05

    inhibitors entinostat and vorinostat. Moreover, treatment with these inhibitors caused efficient differentiation of Setbp1-induced myeloid leukemia cells...population by either repressing genes involved in senescence or by inducing telomerase to prevent shortening of telomere (58). Induction of telomerase by...cells. It regulates self- renewal through suppression of cyclin dependent inhibitors (CDK), P16ink4a and p19Arf (68). Besides, in Bmi1-/- mice AML is

  6. Acute pediatric leg compartment syndrome in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Eric; Truntzer, Jeremy; Trunzter, Jeremy; Klinge, Steve; Schwartz, Kevin; Schiller, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is an orthopedic surgical emergency and may result in devastating complications in the setting of delayed or missed diagnosis. Compartment syndrome has a variety of causes, including posttraumatic or postoperative swelling, external compression, burns, bleeding disorders, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Rare cases of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in the setting of acute myeloid leukemia and, even less commonly, chronic myeloid leukemia have been reported. The authors report the first known case of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in a patient without a previously known diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. On initial examination, an 11-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of progressive left calf pain and swelling after playing soccer. Magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a hematoma in the left superficial posterior compartment. The patient had unrelenting pain, intermittent lateral foot parethesias, and inability to bear weight. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with acute compartment syndrome and underwent fasciotomy and evacuation of a hematoma. Laboratory results showed an abnormal white blood cell count of 440×10(9)/L (normal, 4.4-11×10(9)) and international normalized ratio of 1.3 (normal, 0.8-1.2). Further testing included the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene located on the Philadelphia chromosome, leading to a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. Monotherapy with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) was initiated. This report adds another unique case to the growing literature on compartment syndrome in the pediatric population and reinforces the need to consider compartment syndrome, even in unlikely clinical scenarios. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. New Fusion Transcripts Identified in Normal Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxiu Wen; Yongjin Li; Malek, Sami N.; Kim, Yeong C.; Jia Xu; Peixian Chen; Fengxia Xiao; Xin Huang; Xianzheng Zhou; Zhenyu Xuan; Shiva Mankala; Guihua Hou; Rowley, Janet D.; Zhang, Michael Q.; San Ming Wang

    2012-01-01

    Genetic aberrations contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, half of AML cases do not contain the well-known aberrations detectable mostly by cytogenetic analysis, and these cases are classified as normal karyotype AML. Different outcomes of normal karyotype AML suggest that this subgroup of AML could be genetically heterogeneous. But lack of genetic markers makes it difficult to further study this subgroup of AML. Using paired-end RNAseq method, we performed a transcriptome analy...

  8. Acute myeloid leukemia with non-specific cutaneous manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotokey, R K; Potsangham, T; Das, R

    2008-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is not uncommon in upper Assam. Primary skin manifestation in AML though very rare, may be found. The skin manifestation may be the first presentation in AML. Here such a case has been discussed which presented with primarily skin manifestation, subsequently diagnosed as AML. Therefore routine investigations are mandatory in all patients before going for a sophisticated investigation so that the diagnosis is not missed.

  9. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  10. Azacitidine as salvage therapy for acute myeloid leukemia in a severely ill patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Ross Powers

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a hematological malignancy of myeloid progenitor cells that disrupt normal hematopoiesis. Current chemotherapy regimens result in complete remission in many cases; however, there exists no standard efficacious therapy for refractory acute myeloid leukemia. The hypomethylating agent, azacitidine, is effective in a limited number of such cases. We present a 57-year-old Filipino male with acute myeloid leukemia who was refractory to two induction chemotherapy regimens; however, he achieved complete remission after palliative therapy with azacitidine. We report this case to demonstrate the efficacy of azacitidine in refractory acute myeloid leukemia. Although the effectiveness of azacitidine in improving overall survival has been shown, this case demonstrates the effect on remission induction in high risk AML. Further studies are needed to delineate subsets of acute myeloid leukemia in which azacitidine will serve as effective therapy and to identify other targeted agents that may potentiate its effects.

  11. Novel transforming genes in murine myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.S. Joosten (Marieke)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractLeukemia is characterised by an accumulation in the bone marrow of non-functional blood cells arrested at a particular stage of differentiation. In the process of normal hematopoiesis, errors may occur as the result of mutations in the DNA of hematopoietic precursor cells. These genetic

  12. STING Pathway Activation Stimulates Potent Immunity against Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Curran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferon (IFN, essential for spontaneous T cell priming against solid tumors, is generated through recognition of tumor DNA by STING. Interestingly, we observe that type I IFN is not elicited in animals with disseminated acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Further, survival of leukemia-bearing animals is not diminished in the absence of type I IFN signaling, suggesting that STING may not be triggered by AML. However, the STING agonist, DMXAA, induces expression of IFN-β and other inflammatory cytokines, promotes dendritic cell (DC maturation, and results in the striking expansion of leukemia-specific T cells. Systemic DMXAA administration significantly extends survival in two AML models. The therapeutic effect of DMXAA is only partially dependent on host type I IFN signaling, suggesting that other cytokines are important. A synthetic cyclic dinucleotide that also activates human STING provided a similar anti-leukemic effect. These data demonstrate that STING is a promising immunotherapeutic target in AML.

  13. Dynamics of myeloid cell populations during relapse-preventive immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydström, Anna; Hallner, Alexander; Aurelius, Johan; Sander, Frida Ewald; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Thoren, Fredrik Bergh; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Martner, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Relapse of leukemia in the postchemotherapy phase contributes to the poor prognosis and survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In an international phase IV trial (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01347996), 84 patients with AML in first complete remission who had not undergone transplantation received immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose IL-2 with the aim of preventing relapse. The dynamics of myeloid cell counts and expression of activation markers was assessed before and after cycles of immunotherapy and correlated with clinical outcome in terms of relapse risk and survival. During cycles, a pronounced increase in blood eosinophil counts was observed along with a reduction in monocyte and neutrophil counts. A strong reduction of blood monocyte counts during the first HDC/IL-2 treatment cycle predicted leukemia-free survival. The HDC component of the immunotherapy exerts agonist activity at histamine type 2 receptors (H2Rs) that are expressed by myeloid cells. It was observed that the density of H2 R expression in blood monocytes increased during cycles of immunotherapy and that high monocyte H2R expression implied reduced relapse risk and improved overall survival. Several other activation markers, including HLA-DR, CD86, and CD40, were induced in monocytes and dendritic cells during immunotherapy but did not predict clinical outcome. In addition, expression of HLA-ABC increased in all myeloid populations during therapy. A low expression of HLA-ABC was associated with reduced relapse risk. These results suggest that aspects of myeloid cell biology may impact clinical benefit of relapse-preventive immunotherapy in AML. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  14. Response-guided induction therapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with excellent remission rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Heldrup, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course.......To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course....

  15. Effect of age and body weight on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhmann, Ditte J A; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is very toxic and the association between outcome and age and Body Mass Index is unclear. We investigated effect of age and Body Mass Index on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. We studied all patients who completed first...

  16. Secondary Leukemia in a non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patient Presenting as Myeloid Sarcoma of the Breast

    OpenAIRE

    Pitini, Vincenzo; Arrigo, Carmela; Sauta, Maria Grazia; Altavilla, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    As defined by the World Health Organization classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue, myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a tumor mass of myeloblasts or immature myeloid cells that can arise before, concurrent with, or following acute myeloid leukaemia. We describe a case of secondary leukemia presenting itself as MS of the breast in a patient previously treated for a non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

  17. Complexity on Acute Myeloid Leukemia mRNA Transcript Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sequence analysis of acute myeloid leukemia mRNA. Six transcript variants of mlf1 mRNA, with more than 2000 bps, are analyzed by focusing on the autocorrelation of each distribution. Through the correlation matrix, some patches and similarities are singled out and commented, with respect to similar distributions. The comparison of Kolmogorov fractal dimension will be also given in order to classify the six variants. The existence of a fractal shape, patterns, and symmetries are discussed as well.

  18. Acute myeloid leukemia: conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and moleculocentric methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Bagg, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex group of hematologic neoplasms characterized by distinctive morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic abnormalities. However, it has become evident that genetic aberrations are central to the genesis of AML and have assumed an increasingly relevant role in the classification of AML. Here we discuss hallmark recurrent translocations that define specific World Health Organization (WHO) entities and other frequently encountered genetic aberrations that do not (yet) define specific entities. Additionally, we discuss emerging technologies and their application to the discovery of new abnormalities and to their potential role in the future diagnosis and classification of AML.

  19. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  20. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  1. Angiogenesis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Opportunities for Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Trujillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML arises from neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and relapsed disease remains one of the greater challenges in treating this hematologic malignancy. This paper focuses on angiogenic aspects of AML including the significance and prognostic value of bone marrow microvessel density and circulating cytokine levels. We show three general mechanisms whereby AML exploits angiogenic pathways, including direct induction of angiogenesis, paracrine regulation, and autocrine stimulation. We also present early evidence that leukemia cells contribute directly to vascular endothelia. Novel treatment strategies are proposed, and a review of relevant antiangiogenic clinical trials is presented. By understanding how blood vessels can serve as a reservoir for refractory and relapsed AML, new diagnostics and promising treatment strategies can be developed.

  2. INCIDENCE OF ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA AFTER BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Giovanna Valentini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women and the leading cause of death among middle-aged women. Early detection by mammography screening and improvement of therapeutic options have increased breast cancer survival rates, with the consequence that late side effects of cancer treatment become increasingly important. In particular, patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, commonly including alkylating agents and anthracyclines, are at increased risk of developing leukemia, further enhanced by the use of radiotherapy. In the last few years also the use of growth factors seems to increase the risk of secondary leukemia. The purpose of this review is to update epidemiology of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms occurring in breast cancer patients

  3. INCIDENCE OF ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA AFTER BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morena Caira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women and the leading cause of death among middle-aged women. Early detection by mammography screening and improvement of therapeutic options have increased breast cancer survival rates, with the consequence that late side effects of cancer treatment become increasingly important. In particular, patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, commonly including alkylating agents and anthracyclines, are at increased risk of developing leukemia, further enhanced by the use of radiotherapy. In the last few years also the use of growth factors seems to increase the risk of secondary leukemia. The purpose of this review is to update epidemiology of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms occurring in breast cancer patients

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia cells polarize macrophages towards a leukemia supporting state in a Growth factor independence 1 dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Matary, Yahya S; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Opalka, Bertram; Hönes, Judith M; Lams, Robert F; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Schütte, Judith; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Schroeder, Thomas; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-10-01

    The growth of malignant cells is not only driven by cell-intrinsic factors, but also by the surrounding stroma. Monocytes/Macrophages play an important role in the onset and progression of solid cancers. However, little is known about their role in the development of acute myeloid leukemia, a malignant disease characterized by an aberrant development of the myeloid compartment of the hematopoietic system. It is also unclear which factors are responsible for changing the status of macrophage polarization, thus supporting the growth of malignant cells instead of inhibiting it. We report herein that acute myeloid leukemia leads to the invasion of acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages into the bone marrow and spleen of leukemic patients and mice. In different leukemic mouse models, these macrophages support the in vitro expansion of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines better than macrophages from non-leukemic mice. The grade of macrophage infiltration correlates in vivo with the survival of the mice. We found that the transcriptional repressor Growth factor independence 1 is crucial in the process of macrophage polarization, since its absence impedes macrophage polarization towards a leukemia supporting state and favors an anti-tumor state both in vitro and in vivo These results not only suggest that acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages play an important role in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, but also implicate Growth factor independence 1 as a pivotal factor in macrophage polarization. These data may provide new insights and opportunities for novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  5. Isolated intracranial myeloid sarcoma occurring as relapse in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Narayanan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma (MS or chloroma is a rare extramedullary tumor composed of extramedullary proliferation of blasts of granulocytic, monocytic, erythroid, or megakaryocytic lineage occurring at sites outside the bone marrow. MS occurs in 2%–8% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, sometimes it occurs as the presenting manifestation of relapse in a patient in remission. We describe the case of a young male with AML in remission for 6 years presenting with central nervous system symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-axial altered intensity lesion in the parasagittal parietal region, infiltrating anterosuperiorly into anterior falx, and posterosuperior aspect of the superior sagittal sinus. A biopsy from the lesion was diagnostic of MS which was positive for myeloperoxidase. He did not have any other sites of disease. He has received chemotherapy with FLAG ( Fludarabine, Cytosine arabinoside followed by cranial irradiation and is in complete remission.

  6. [Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia -- a single center experience (2007-2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmeczi, Anna; Udvardy, Miklós; Illés, Arpád; Telek, Béla; Kiss, Attila; Batár, Péter; Reményi, Gyula; Szász, Róbert; Ujj, Zsófia; Márton, Adrienn; Ujfalusi, Anikó; Hevessy, Zsuzsanna; Pinczés, László; Bedekovics, Judit; Rejtő, László

    2014-04-27

    Mortality of acute myeloid leukemia is still 60-70% in young (myeloid leukemia. From 2007 to 2013, 173 patients with acute myeloid leukemia were treated. Patients were classified according to the European LeukemiaNet prognostic guideline. Association between mortality and the type of acute myeloid leukemia (secondary or primary), dose of daunoblastin at induction of treatment, and the rate of minimal residual disease were investigated. The 5-year survival probability was 25% in young adults and 2% in the elderly. The survival was significantly influenced by these prognostic factors. The 5-year survival rate was 50% in the young, favorable prognostic group. The 90 mg/m2 daunoblastin dose was found to be beneficial. Addition of bortezomib to the standard induction protocol had an additional beneficial effect. The speed and depth of the response to induction therapy, and the initial white blood cell count had an apparent effect on survival.

  7. Rare cytogenetic abnormalities and alteration of microRNAs in acute myeloid leukemia and response to therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Shahjahani; Elham Khodadi; Mohammad Seghatoleslami; Javad Mohammadi Asl; Neda Golchin; Zeynab Deris Zaieri; Najmaldin Saki

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, which is heterogeneous in terms of morphological, cytogenetic and clinical features. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including karyotype aberrations, gene mutations and gene expression abnormalities are the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosis, classification and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemias. Based on World Health Organization (WHO) classification, acute myeloid leukemias can be divided to four groups. Due to...

  8. Genomics of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosis and Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullinger, Lars; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut

    2017-03-20

    In recent years, our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of myeloid neoplasms, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), has been greatly advanced by genomics discovery studies that use novel high-throughput sequencing techniques. AML, similar to most other cancers, is characterized by multiple somatically acquired mutations that affect genes of different functional categories, a complex clonal architecture, and disease evolution over time. Patterns of mutations seem to follow specific and temporally ordered trajectories. Mutations in genes encoding epigenetic modifiers, such as DNMT3A, ASXL1, TET2, IDH1, and IDH2, are commonly acquired early and are present in the founding clone. The same genes are frequently found to be mutated in elderly individuals along with clonal expansion of hematopoiesis that confers an increased risk for the development of hematologic cancers. Furthermore, such mutations may persist after therapy, lead to clonal expansion during hematologic remission, and eventually lead to relapsed disease. In contrast, mutations involving NPM1 or signaling molecules (eg, FLT3, RAS) typically are secondary events that occur later during leukemogenesis. Genetic data are now being used to inform disease classification, risk stratification, and clinical care of patients. Two new provisional entities, AML with mutated RUNX1 and AML with BCR- ABL1, have been included in the current update of the WHO classification of myeloid neoplasms and AML, and mutations in three genes- RUNX1, ASXL1, and TP53-have been added in the risk stratification of the 2017 European LeukemiaNet recommendations for AML. Integrated evaluation of baseline genetics and assessment of minimal residual disease are expected to further improve risk stratification and selection of postremission therapy. Finally, the identification of disease alleles will guide the development and use of novel molecularly targeted therapies.

  9. Conventional chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia: a Brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Borgia Barbosa Pagnano

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Young patients affected by acute myeloid leukemia (AML achieve complete remission (CR using conventional chemotherapy in about 55-85%. However, 30% of patients fail to achieve CR and the remission duration is often only about 12 months. More intensive treatment after CR seems to be necessary in order to maintain CR and obtain a definitive cure. In Brazil, few reports have been published on this important subject. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe a Brazilian experience in the treatment of "de novo" acute myeloid leukemia (AML in younger adult patients (age < 60 years. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: University Hospital, Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, State University of Campinas, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: Newly diagnosed cases of "de novo" AML in the period from January 1994 to December 1998 were evaluated retrospectively, in relation to response to treatment, overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. Cases with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL were also included in this analysis. RESULTS: On the basis of an intention to treat, 78 cases of AML, including 17 cases of APL, were evaluated. The overall median follow-up was 272 days. The complete remission (CR rate was 63.6% in the AML group (excluding APL and 78% in the APL group. The 5-year estimated disease-free survival (DFS was 80% for the APL group and 34% for the AML group (P = 0.02. The 5-year estimated overall survival (OS was 52% for the APL group and 20.5% for the AML group, respectively (P = NS. Relapse was observed in 12/39 (30.7% patients with AML and 1/11 (9% with APL. CONCLUSIONS: These results are similar to those reported in the literature. However, relapse and mortality rates remain high, and a search for more aggressive strategies in order to prevent relapse is recommended.

  10. CD117 expression on blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryainova N.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to analyze the frequency of CD117 (c-KIT antigen expression on the blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, evaluation of the presence of the relationship between the expression of the c-KIT and leukemia according to the FAB classification and definition of co-expression of the antigen CD117, antigens CD33 and CD34. The data of 47 patients with AML were diagnosed. M0 AML variant was established in 3 (6% patients, M1 – in 2 (4%, M2 – in 9 (20%, M4 – in 22 (47% and M5 – in 11 (23%. For immunophenotypic stu¬dies monoclonal antibodies (mAb that detect antigens of anti-CD34, anti-CD33 and anti-CD117 (Becton Dickinson, USA were used. The presence of the antigen CD117 was detected in 39 people, accounting for 83% of all surveyed. Antigen c-KIT was present in 48.117.0% cells on average: in all 3 cases – AML M0, in2 cases of AML M1, in 6 cases – AML M2, 20 of 22 cases – AML M4 and in 8 of 11 AML M5 cases. Average levels of CD117 in investigated leukemia cases statistically differed significantly (p=0.0067. Among 39 CD117- positive patients in 25 (53% co-expression of CD117+/CD34+ was revealed. Expression of CD117+/CD34- was observed in 14 cases (30%, CD117-/CD34+ – in 4 cases (8,5%, CD117-/CD34- – in 4 cases (8.5%. CD34 had of 64% of cells of myeloid origin. A high positive cor¬relation between expression of CD117 and CD34 (r=+0,5169 was determined, being statistically significant (p0,0067.

  11. Leukemia Associated Antigens: Their Dual Role as Biomarkers and Immunotherapeutic Targets for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schmitt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX and mass spectrometry (MS. In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease.Abbreviations: AML: acute myeloid leukemia; APL: acute promyelocytic leukemia; ATRA: all-trans-retinoic acid; B-CLL: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; CT: cancer-testis; CTL: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte; FAB: French-American-British; HI: hypusination inhibitors; HSP: heat shock protein; ITD: internal tandem duplication; LAA: leukemia associated antigen; MDS: myelodysplastic syndrome; MGEA6: meningioma antigen 6; MPD: myeloproliferative disease; MS: mass spectrometry; NK: natural killer; PRAME: preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma; PRTN3: proteinase 3; RAGE-1: renal antigen 1; RHAMM: receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility; RQ-PCR: real-time PCR; SAGE: serial analysis of gene expression; SCT: stem cell transplant; SEREX: serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries; SNPs: single nucleotide polymorphisms; UPD

  12. Targeted treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: role of imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ila Tamascar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ila Tamascar, Jeyanthi RamanarayananDepartment of Medical Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY, USAAbstract: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by clonal expansion of pleuripotent hematopoetic stem cells. The incidence of CML is 1 to 2 cases per 100,000 people per year; in the Western Hemisphere, CML accounts for 15% of leukemias in adults. Discovery of the specific karyotypic abnormality of the Philadelphia (Ph chromosome in the pathogenesis of CML has led to a better understanding of the disease and hence to an advancement of targeted therapeutics. Availability of imatinib as an accepted targeted therapy in newly diagnosed patients has changed the treatment paradigm in CML. The majority of CML patients in chronic phase achieve excellent and durable responses with standard-dose imatinib. Mechanisms of primary and secondary resistance to imatinib in CML have been extensively studied and newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors are now being evaluated for clinical use. It is important that at any time the CML treatment and response remain optimal and thus patients on imatinib require continuous monitoring for early detection of resistance. This review will discuss the treatment and guidelines for monitoring CML patients in the imatinib era.Keywords: BCR-ABL, imatinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, leukemia, CML

  13. Targeting FLT3 Signaling in Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Amy N. Sexauer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the second most common leukemia of childhood and is associated with high rates of chemotherapy resistance and relapse. Clinical outcomes for children with AML treated with maximally intensive multi-agent chemotherapy lag far behind those of children with the more common acute lymphoblastic leukemia, demonstrating continued need for new therapeutic approaches to decrease relapse risk and improve long-term survival. Mutations in the FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 receptor gene (FLT3 occur in approximately 25% of children and adults with AML and are associated with particularly poor prognoses. Identification and development of targeted FLT3 inhibitors represents a major precision medicine paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with AML. While further development of many first-generation FLT3 inhibitors was hampered by limited potency and significant toxicity due to effects upon other kinases, the more selective second- and third-generation FLT3 inhibitors have demonstrated excellent tolerability and remarkable efficacy in the relapsed/refractory and now de novo FLT3-mutated AML settings. While these newest and most promising inhibitors have largely been studied in the adult population, pediatric investigation of FLT3 inhibitors with chemotherapy is relatively recently ongoing or planned. Successful development of FLT3 inhibitor-based therapies will be essential to improve outcomes in children with this high-risk subtype of AML.

  14. STING Pathway Activation Stimulates Potent Immunity against Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Emily; Chen, Xiufen; Corrales, Leticia; Kline, Douglas E; Dubensky, Thomas W; Duttagupta, Priyanka; Kortylewski, Marcin; Kline, Justin

    2016-06-14

    Type I interferon (IFN), essential for spontaneous T cell priming against solid tumors, is generated through recognition of tumor DNA by STING. Interestingly, we observe that type I IFN is not elicited in animals with disseminated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Further, survival of leukemia-bearing animals is not diminished in the absence of type I IFN signaling, suggesting that STING may not be triggered by AML. However, the STING agonist, DMXAA, induces expression of IFN-β and other inflammatory cytokines, promotes dendritic cell (DC) maturation, and results in the striking expansion of leukemia-specific T cells. Systemic DMXAA administration significantly extends survival in two AML models. The therapeutic effect of DMXAA is only partially dependent on host type I IFN signaling, suggesting that other cytokines are important. A synthetic cyclic dinucleotide that also activates human STING provided a similar anti-leukemic effect. These data demonstrate that STING is a promising immunotherapeutic target in AML. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral manifestations as first clinical sign of acute myeloid leukemia: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Ester; Brethauer, Ursula; Fernández, Eduardo; Cortés, Gabriel; Mardones, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common malignancy in children younger than 15 years old. Acute myeloid leukemia frequently presents with early oral manifestations. The purpose of this study was to report the case of a 6-year-old male patient who showed persistent and severe hemorrhage after a tooth extraction and generalized gingival enlargement over a short period of time. Referral to the Oncohematology Service confirmed the diagnosis of an acute myeloid leukemia. This emphasizes the need for a dentist who can provide an opportunity for timely diagnosis, early referral, and proper treatment of an underlying leukemia to be aware of early oral signs and symptoms.

  16. Cardiac function in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarfelt, Marianne; Andersen, Niels Holmark; Glosli, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We report cardiac function of patients treated for Childhood acute myeloid leukemia with chemotherapy only according to three consecutive Nordic protocols. METHODS: Ninety-eight of 138 eligible patients accepted examination with standardized echocardiography. Results were compared...

  17. Incidence and clinical epidemiology of streptococcal septicemia during treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lelie, H.; van Ketel, R. J.; von dem Borne, A. E.; van Oers, R. H.; Thomas, B. L.; Goudsmit, R.

    1991-01-01

    The incidence and outcome of streptococcal septicemia was analyzed in 76 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. They received 215 courses of remission induction or intensive consolidation treatment. There were 31 different episodes of streptococcal septicemia

  18. Diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia from acute intracerebral hemorrhage: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakroun-Walha Olfa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is frequent pathology in emergency departments. Coagulopathies leading to ICH are rare. We describe here the case of diagnosis of a chronic myeloid leukemia from ICH in emergencies.

  19. Digitalization of a non-irradiated acute myeloid leukemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rudong; Cheng, Hui; Cheng, Tao; Liu, Lei

    2016-08-26

    Computer-aided, interdisciplinary researches for biomedicine have valuable prospects, as digitalization of experimental subjects provide opportunities for saving the economic costs of researches, as well as promoting the acquisition of knowledge. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is intensively studied over long periods of time. Till nowaday, most of the studies primarily focus on the leukemic cells rather than how normal hematopoietic cells are affected by the leukemic environment. Accordingly, the conventional animal models for AML are mostly myeloablated as leukemia can be induced with short latency and complete penetrance. Meanwhile, most previous computational models focus on modeling the leukemic cells but not the multi-tissue leukemic body resided by both leukemic and normal blood cells. Recently, a non-irradiated AML mouse model has been established; therefore, normal hematopoietic cells can be investigated during leukemia development. Experiments based on the non-irradiated animal model have monitored the kinetics of leukemic and (intact) hematopoietic cells in multiple tissues simultaneously; and thus a systematic computational model for the multi-tissue hematopoiesis under leukemia has become possible. In the present work, we adopted the modeling methods in previous works, but aimed to model the tri-tissue (peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow) dynamics of hematopoiesis under leukemia. The cell kinetics generated from the non-irradiated experimental model were used as the reference data for modeling. All mathematical formulas were systematically enumerated, and model parameters were estimated via numerical optimization. Multiple validations by additional experimental data were then conducted for the established computational model. In the results, we illustrated that the important fact of functional depression of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/HPC) in leukemic bone marrow (BM), which must require additional experiments to be established, could

  20. Clinical activity of alvocidib (flavopiridol) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Joshua F; Karp, Judith E

    2015-12-01

    There have been minimal therapeutic advancements in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) over the past 4 decades and outcomes remain unsatisfactory. Alvocidib (formerly flavopiridol) is a multi-serine threonine cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with demonstrable in vitro and clinical activity in AML when combined in a timed sequential chemotherapy regimen, FLAM (alvocidib followed by cytarabine continuous infusion and mitoxantrone). FLAM has been evaluated in sequential phase 1 and phase 2 studies in 149 and 256 relapsed/refractory and newly diagnosed non-favorable risk AML patients, respectively, with encouraging findings in both patient populations warranting further investigation. This review highlights the mechanism of action of alvocidib, pre-clinical studies of alvocidib in AML, and the clinical trials evaluating alvocidib alone and in combination with cytotoxic agents (FLAM) in AML. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biology and relevance of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-23

    Evidence of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (AML LSCs) was first reported nearly 2 decades ago through the identification of rare subpopulations of engrafting cells in xenotransplantation assays. These AML LSCs were shown to reside at the apex of a cellular hierarchy that initiates and maintains the disease, exhibiting properties of self-renewal, cell cycle quiescence, and chemoresistance. This cancer stem cell model offers an explanation for chemotherapy resistance and disease relapse and implies that approaches to treatment must eradicate LSCs for cure. More recently, a number of studies have both refined and expanded our understanding of LSCs and intrapatient heterogeneity in AML using improved xenotransplant models, genome-scale analyses, and experimental manipulation of primary patient cells. Here, we review these studies with a focus on the immunophenotype, biological properties, epigenetics, genetics, and clinical associations of human AML LSCs and discuss critical questions that need to be addressed in future research. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Current Management of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim C. Haznedaroğlu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical outcomes and survival of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI-treated patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML have been significantly improved. The aim of this editorial is to outline critical steps of TKI administration practices during the long-term clinical course of CML based on data obtained from randomized clinical trials and international recommendations. The efficacy of TKI treatment, TKI side effects, off-target complications, and long-term morbidities due to both the disease and the drug are common arguments in the management of CML. Complete hematological response, early complete cytogenetic response, faster major molecular response, and deeper, more durable molecular responses (MR4, MR4.5, MR5 are the ultimate goals for TKI-receiving patients with CML.

  3. Current management of chronic myeloid leukemia with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haznedaroğlu, Ibrahim C

    2013-09-01

    The clinical outcomes and survival of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-treated patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have been significantly improved. The aim of this editorial is to outline critical steps of TKI administration practices during the long-term clinical course of CML based on data obtained from randomized clinical trials and international recommendations. The efficacy of TKI treatment, TKI side effects, off-target complications, and long-term morbidities due to both the disease and the drug are common arguments in the management of CML. Complete hematological response, early complete cytogenetic response, faster major molecular response, and deeper, more durable molecular responses (MR4, MR4.5, MR5) are the ultimate goals for TKI-receiving patients with CML. None declared.

  4. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepin, Heidi D.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia are hematologic diseases that frequently affect older adults. Treatment is challenging due the morbidity of the disease and toxicity of associated treatments with strategies ranging from best supportive care to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Management of older adults with MDS and AML needs to be individualized accounting for both the heterogeneity of disease biology and patient characteristics which can influence life expectancy and treatment tolerance. While treatment options continue to expand for older adults, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and physiologic changes of aging are needed to define optimal standards of care. Incorporating outcomes addressing quality of life, symptoms, maintenance of independence, and health care utilization is necessary to inform patient-centered decision-making. This review highlights key evidence related to management of older adults with MDS and AML and highlights future directions for research. PMID:26614866

  5. Relapsing acute myeloid leukemia presenting as hypopyon uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna P Hegde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior segment infiltration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML presenting as hypopyon uveitis is very rare. We report this case as an uncommon presentation in a patient on remission after bone marrow transplant for AML. In addition to the hypopyon, the patient presented with "red eye" caused by ocular surface disease due to concurrent graft-versus-host disease and glaucoma. The classical manifestations of masquerade syndrome due to AML were altered by concurrent pathologies. Media opacities further confounded the differential diagnosis. We highlight the investigations used to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. In uveitis, there is a need to maintain a high index of clinical suspicion, as early diagnosis in ocular malignancy can save sight and life.

  6. Molecular Detection of BCR-ABL in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ya-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    All chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients have the BCR-ABL fusion gene. The constitutively activated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase is a critical pathogenetic event in CML. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib, are synthesized small molecules that primarily target BCR-ABL tyrosine kinases and have become a first-line treatment for CML. Detection of BCR-ABL transcript level by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) is a clinical routine for evaluating TKI treatment efficacy and predicting long-term response. Furthermore, because they are a main TKI resistance mechanism, the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) point mutations that are detected by Sanger sequencing can help clinicians make decisions on subsequent treatment selections. Here, we present protocols for the two abovementioned molecular methods for CML analysis.

  7. The origin and evolution of mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, John S.; Ley, Timothy J.; Link, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Larson, David E.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wartman, Lukas D.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Liu, Fulu; Xia, Jun; Kandoth, Cyriac; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Dooling, David J.; Wallis, John W.; Chen, Ken; Harris, Christopher C.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle M.; Lu, Charles; Zhang, Qunyuan; Lin, Ling; O’Laughlin, Michelle D.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Magrini, Vincent J.; McGrath, Sean D.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Hundal, Jasreet; Cook, Lisa L.; Swift, Gary W.; Reed, Jerry P.; Alldredge, Patricia A.; Wylie, Todd N.; Walker, Jason R.; Watson, Mark A.; Heath, Sharon E.; Shannon, William D.; Varghese, Nobish; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Baty, Jack D.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Klco, Jeffery M.; Tomasson, Michael H.; Westervelt, Peter; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Most mutations in cancer genomes are thought to be acquired after the initiating event, which may cause genomic instability, driving clonal evolution. However, for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), normal karyotypes are common, and genomic instability is unusual. To better understand clonal evolution in AML, we sequenced the genomes of AML samples with a known initiating event (PML-RARA) vs. normal karyotype AML samples, and the exomes of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from healthy people. Collectively, the data suggest that most of the mutations found in AML genomes are actually random events that occurred in HSPCs before they acquired the initiating mutation; the mutational history of that cell is “captured” as the clone expands. In many cases, only one or two additional, cooperating mutations are needed to generate the malignant founding clone. Cells from the founding clone can acquire additional cooperating mutations, yielding subclones that can contribute to disease progression and/or relapse. PMID:22817890

  8. [Diagnostics, classification and prognostic criteria of acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmeier, Bernhard; Buske, Christian; Spiekermann, Karsten; Bohlander, Stefan; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Braess, Jan

    2007-04-15

    The continuously growing knowledge about criteria important for biology, pathogenesis, prognosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) necessitates a broad spectrum of diagnostic methods for first diagnosis and for the further course of the disease. Relevant diagnostic techniques (cytomorphology with cytochemistry, immunophenotyping, cytogenetics and molecular genetics, DNA array) are described - with a focus on their mode of operation as well on their clinical significance. Due to the high clinical relevance and growing complexity, AML diagnostics should be performed in specialized laboratories. Compared to the FAB classification which is based primarily on morphological criteria, the classification recommended in 2001 by the WHO additionally takes cytogenetics, molecular genetics and further clinical factors into consideration. Both classifications are described. A wide range of prognostic criteria of AML is discussed on the basis of currently available clinical data. The most important criteria are the karyotype of the leukemic clone and the patient's age.

  9. Myeloperoxidase index and subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eivazi-Ziaei, Jamal

    2009-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) should be classified into subtypes according to the French-American-British (FAB) or, preferably, the newer World Health Organization (WHO) classification schemes. FAB is purely a morphological classification. It does not determine treatment (except M3) or prognosis for the patient which requires cytogenetics. Haematological analyzer had been used for classification of leukaemia in several studies. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity (MPXI) can be performed by Technicon H1 (Bayer) automated cell counter. The aim of this study was the statement of myeloperoxidase index and subgroups of AML. In the study of medical records of 72 patients with AML from 2006-7, we found that MPXI was negative in M4 and M5 while 75% of M3 cases had high MPXI values. MPXI level may help to differentiate subtypes of AML.

  10. Genetic Testing in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Valentina; Hasserjian, Robert P

    2016-03-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is essential for disease diagnosis, classification, prognostic stratification, and treatment guidance. Molecular genetic analysis of CEBPA, NPM1, and FLT3 is already standard of care in patients with AML, and mutations in several additional genes are assuming increasing importance. Mutational analysis of certain genes, such as SF3B1, is also becoming an important tool to distinguish subsets of MDS that have different biologic behaviors. It is still uncertain how to optimally combine karyotype with mutation data in diagnosis and risk-stratification of AML and MDS, particularly in cases with multiple mutations and/or several mutationally distinct subclones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced immune thrombocytopenia in chronic myeloid leukemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital F. Barak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The outcome and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients has remarkably changed with the treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Currently, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is considered mainly as a third line salvage therapy in cases of TKIs resistance or intolerance. Here we describe a patient with chronic phase CML who developed both resistance and late occurrence of s severe thrombocytopenia on first and second generation TKIs and eventually underwent HSCT. Although the mechanism of the myelosuppression is not fully understood, we showed for the first time the development of dose dependent platelet antibodies in the presence of TKIs, suggesting the possibility of TKIs induced thrombocytopenia. Our case emphasizes that late development of severe myelosuppression during imatinib treatment is probably an important indication for consideration of early HSCT.

  12. Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Mediated Targeting and Responses to Myeloid Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    problem in our aging population. Although treatment of these leukemias has advanced considerably over the past couple of decades, most of these myeloid...Collaborating Organizations……………10 1. Introduction: Myeloid leukemias represent a growing problem in our aging population. In military personnel the...characteristics, including increased output and purity, likely a consequence of the higher stability found in VHH engagers when compared to scFvs

  13. Genetic Tests To Evaluate Prognosis and Predict Therapeutic Response in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gulley, Margaret L; Shea, Thomas C.; Fedoriw, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    Management of patients with acute myeloid leukemia relies on genetic tests that inform diagnosis and prognosis, predict response to therapy, and measure minimal residual disease. The value of genetics is reinforced in the revised 2008 World Health Organization acute myeloid leukemia classification scheme. The various analytic procedures—karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, and microarray technology—each have advantages...

  14. Clinical impact of leukemic blast heterogeneity at diagnosis in cytogenetic intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Marianne Hutchings; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Boegsted, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact.......Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact....

  15. Dasatinib in the treatment of imatinib refractory chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Ramchandren

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Radhakrishnan Ramchandren, Charles A SchifferDivision of Hematology/Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: The development of imatinib for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML has proven to be an example of medical success in the era of targeted therapy. However, imatinib resistance or intolerance occurs in a substantial number of patients. Additionally, patients who have progressed beyond the chronic phase of CML do relatively poorly with imatinib therapy. Mechanisms of imatinib resistance include BCR-ABL point mutations resulting in decreased imatinib binding, as well as mutation-independent causes of resistance such as SRC family kinase dysregulation, BCR-ABL gene amplification, drug influx/efflux mechanisms and other poorly understood processes. The options for therapy in these patients include stem cell transplantation, imatinib dose escalation as well as the use of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Dasatinib is a second-generation multi-kinase inhibitor with several theoretical and mechanistic advantages over imatinib. Moreover, several studies have evaluated dasatinib in patients who have progressed on imatinib therapy with encouraging results. Other novel agents such as mTOR inhibitors, bosutinib and INNO 406 have also shown promise in this setting. Although treatment options have increased, the choice of second-line therapy in patients with CML is influenced by concerns surrounding the duration of response as well as toxicity. Consequently, there is no agreed upon optimal second-line agent. This paper reviews the current data and attempts to address these issues. Keywords: chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, dasatinib, imatinib, resistance (imatinib resistance, nilotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitor

  16. Current diagnosis and treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex disease caused by chromosomal aberrations, mutations, epigenetic modifications, and the deregulated expression of genes, leading to increased myeloid cell proliferation and decreased hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation. Although most of these aberrations are correlated with prognosis, accurate risk stratification remains a challenge even after incorporating these molecular markers. Currently, some genetic mutations that allow risk stratification have been identified in adult AML, including DNMT3A and IDH1/2. However, these mutations are rare in pediatric AML cases, indicating that a different pathogenesis may exist between adult and pediatric AML. To reveal further details of pediatric AML pathogenesis, the authors performed whole-exome sequencing and whole-transcriptome analysis using massively parallel sequencing technologies in addition to gene expression array. We found that PRDM16 and EVI1-overexpressing patients had significantly worse overall survival and event-free survival, and these overexpressed genes were useful for stratifying patients with FLT3-ITD positive and/or normal karyotype. In order to further this work and establish more appropriate risk classification and molecular target drug development, target validation clinical studies are needed and expected.

  17. RhoA: A therapeutic target for chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molli Poonam R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is a malignant pluripotent stem cells disorder of myeloid cells. In CML patients, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL the terminally differentiated cells of myeloid series exhibit defects in several actin dependent functions such as adhesion, motility, chemotaxis, agglutination, phagocytosis and microbicidal activities. A definite and global abnormality was observed in stimulation of actin polymerization in CML PMNL. Signalling molecules ras and rhoGTPases regulate spatial and temporal polymerization of actin and thus, a broad range of physiological processes. Therefore, status of these GTPases as well as actin was studied in resting and fMLP stimulated normal and CML PMNL. Methods To study expression of GTPases and actin, Western blotting and flow cytometry analysis were done, while spatial expression and colocalization of these proteins were studied by using laser confocal microscopy. To study effect of inhibitors on cell proliferation CCK-8 assay was done. Significance of differences in expression of proteins within the samples and between normal and CML was tested by using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Bivariate and partial correlation analyses were done to study relationship between all the parameters. Results In CML PMNL, actin expression and its architecture were altered and stimulation of actin polymerization was absent. Differences were also observed in expression, organization or stimulation of all the three GTPases in normal and CML PMNL. In normal PMNL, ras was the critical GTPase regulating expression of rhoGTPases and actin and actin polymerization. But in CML PMNL, rhoA took a central place. In accordance with these, treatment with rho/ROCK pathway inhibitors resulted in specific growth inhibition of CML cell lines. Conclusions RhoA has emerged as the key molecule responsible for functional defects in CML PMNL and therefore can be used as a

  18. In vivo RNAi screening for the identification of oncogenes and tumor suppressors in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Ying

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy characterized by uncontrolled expansion of immature myeloid cells in the hematopoietic tissues. Alternative splicing and epigenetic regulation are two mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of AML. In order to identify the essential spli...

  19. Acquired mutations in ASXL1 in acute myeloid leukemia: Prevalence and prognostic value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pratcorona (Marta); S. Abbas (Saman); M.A. Sanders (Mathijs); J.E. Koenders (Jasper); F.G. Kavelaars (François); C.A.J. Erpelinck-Verschueren (C. A J); A. Zeilemakers (Annelieke); B. Löwenberg (Bob); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSomatic mutations in the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene have been described in various types of myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia. Analysis of novel markers, such as ASXL1 mutations, in independent clinical trials is indispensable before considering them for

  20. VSTM-v1, a potential myeloid differentiation antigen that is downregulated in bone marrow cells from myeloid leukemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Min; Li, Ting; Li, Ning; Li, Jinlan; Yao, Qiumei; Han, Wenling; Ruan, Guorui

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte differentiation antigens often represent important markers for the diagnosis, classification, prognosis, and therapeutic targeting of myeloid leukemia. Herein, we report a potential leukocyte differentiation antigen gene VSTM1 (V-set and transmembrane domain-containing 1) that was downregulated in bone marrow cells from leukemia patients and exhibited a higher degree of promoter methylation. The expression level of its predominant encoded product, VSTM1-v1, was positively correlated...

  1. CUX1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 7 frequently inactivated in acute myeloid leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McNerney, Megan E; Brown, Christopher D; Wang, Xiaoyue; Bartom, Elizabeth T; Karmakar, Subhradip; Bandlamudi, Chaitanya; Yu, Shan; Ko, Jinkyung; Sandall, Barry P; Stricker, Thomas; Anastasi, John; Grossman, Robert L; Cunningham, John M; Le Beau, Michelle M; White, Kevin P

    2013-01-01

    Loss of chromosome 7 and del(7q) [-7/del(7q)] are recurring cytogenetic abnormalities in hematologic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia and therapy-related myeloid neoplasms, and associated with an adverse prognosis...

  2. Secondary Leukemia in a non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patient Presenting as Myeloid Sarcoma of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Pitini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As defined by the World Health Organization classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue, myeloid sarcoma (MS is a tumor mass of myeloblasts or immature myeloid cells that can arise before, concurrent with, or following acute myeloid leukaemia. We describe a case of secondary leukemia presenting itself as MS of the breast in a patient previously treated for a non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

  3. Development and targeted use of nilotinib in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Fava

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Carmen Fava, Hagop Kantarjian, Jorge Cortes, Elias JabbourDepartment of Leukemia, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAAbstract: The development of imatinib has resulted in sustained hematologic and cytogenetic remissions in all phases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Despite the high efficacy, relapses have been observed and are much more prevalent in patients with advanced disease. The most common mechanism of acquired resistance has been traced to Bcr-Abl kinase domain mutations. Several strategies have been developed to overcome the problem of imatinib resistance, including imatinib dose escalation, novel targeted agents and combination treatments. A second generation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors was developed, which displays increased potency towards Bcr-Abl and is able to target the majority of CML mutant clones. Nilotinib (Tasigna®, AMN107, Novartis is a close analog of imatinib with approximately 20-fold higher potency for BCR-ABL kinase inhibition. Preclinical and clinical investigations demonstrate that nilotinib effectively overcomes imatinib resistance, and has induced high rates of hematologic and cytogenetic responses in CML post imatinib failure, with a good tolerance. Nilotinib has been approved for CML patients in chronic and accelerated phases, post imatinib failure.Keywords: nilotinib, imatinib-resistance, imatinib-intolerance, CML

  4. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Sarah K Tasian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, primary chemorefractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic agents is not feasible given the potential for significant toxicity to normal tissues with conventional chemotherapy and the risk for long-term end-organ dysfunction. Significant emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML via phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remains a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who will otherwise fail standard therapy.

  5. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Clinical Spectrum of 125 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Sadia; Zaheer, Hasan Abbas; Irfan, Syed Mohammed; Ashar, Sana

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is an acquired clonal heterogeneous stem cell disorder. Hence, various parameters are sought out to categorize this disease into subtypes, so that as a consequence specific treatment modalities can be offered. Conventionally, the practically used method for classification utilizes French American British (FAB) criteria based on morphology and cytochemistry. The aim of present study was to determine the current spectrum of AML sub types in patients in Karachi. This single centre cross sectional study was conducted at Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, extending from January 2010 to December 2014. Data were retrieved from archives were analyzed with SPSS version 22. A total of 125 patients were diagnosed at our institution with de novo AML during five years period, 76 males and 49 females. Median age was 34.5 years. AML-M1 was the predominant FAB subtype (23.2%) followed by M2 (18.4%), M3 and M4 (16% each), M0 (14.4%), M5 (7.2%), M6 (3.2%) and M7 (1.6%). AML in Pakistani patients is seen in a relatively young population. The most common FAB subtype observed in our study was acute myeloblastic leukemia, without maturation (M1).

  6. Karyotype complexity and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stölzel, F; Mohr, B; Kramer, M; Oelschlägel, U; Bochtler, T; Berdel, W E; Kaufmann, M; Baldus, C D; Schäfer-Eckart, K; Stuhlmann, R; Einsele, H; Krause, S W; Serve, H; Hänel, M; Herbst, R; Neubauer, A; Sohlbach, K; Mayer, J; Middeke, J M; Platzbecker, U; Schaich, M; Krämer, A; Röllig, C; Schetelig, J; Bornhäuser, M; Ehninger, G

    2016-01-15

    A complex aberrant karyotype consisting of multiple unrelated cytogenetic abnormalities is associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The European Leukemia Net classification and the UK Medical Research Council recommendation provide prognostic categories that differ in the definition of unbalanced aberrations as well as the number of single aberrations. The aim of this study on 3526 AML patients was to redefine and validate a cutoff for karyotype complexity in AML with regard to adverse prognosis. Our study demonstrated that (1) patients with a pure hyperdiploid karyotype have an adverse risk irrespective of the number of chromosomal gains, (2) patients with translocation t(9;11)(p21∼22;q23) have an intermediate risk independent of the number of additional aberrations, (3) patients with ⩾4 abnormalities have an adverse risk per se and (4) patients with three aberrations in the absence of abnormalities of strong influence (hyperdiploid karyotype, t(9;11)(p21∼22;q23), CBF-AML, unique adverse-risk aberrations) have borderline intermediate/adverse risk with a reduced overall survival compared with patients with a normal karyotype.

  7. Role of chromosomal aberrations in clonal diversity and progression of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochtler, T; Fröhling, S; Krämer, A

    2015-06-01

    Genetic abnormalities are a hallmark of cancer. Hereby, cytogenetic aberrations and small-scale abnormalities, such as single-nucleotide variations and insertion/deletion mutations, have emerged as two alternative modes of genetic diversification. Both mechanisms are at work in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), in which conventional karyotyping and molecular studies demonstrate that gene mutations occur predominantly in cytogenetically normal AML, whereas chromosomal changes are a driving force of development and progression of disease in aberrant karyotype AML. All steps of disease evolution in AML, ranging from the transformation of preleukemic clones into overt leukemia to the expansion and recurrence of malignant clones, are paralleled by clonal evolution at either the gene mutation or chromosome aberration level. Preleukemic conditions, such as Fanconi anemia and Bloom syndrome, demonstrate that the acquisition of chromosomal aberrations can contribute to leukemic transformation. Similar to what has been shown at the mutational level, expansion and recurrence of AML clones goes along with increasing genetic diversification. Hereby, cytogenetically more evolved subclones are at a proliferative advantage and outgrow ancestor clones or have evolved toward a more aggressive behavior with additional newly acquired aberrations as compared with the initial leukemic clone, respectively.

  8. New treatment strategies in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia : Hypomethylating agents and proteasome inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, Lidia Henrieke

    2016-01-01

    New treatment strategies in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging, especially in the large group of patients older than 60 years. In these patients, results of standard chemotherapy are often disappointing

  9. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia in a dental hospital; report of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) are aggressive hematopoietic neoplasms that, if untreated, can lead to death within days. Owing to its high morbidity rate, early diagnosis and appropriate medical therapy is essential. Oral lesions may be the presenting feature of acute leukemias and are, therefore, important diagnostic ...

  10. Acute myeloid leukemia with oral manifestations: Case report and brief overview

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    Kruthika S Guttal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many systemic diseases do manifest in the oral cavity. Leukemia is one such hematological disorder presenting with varied clinical and oral manifestations. Presented here is a case of gingival hyperplasia heralding the presence of acute myeloid leukemia and brief overview of the condition.

  11. Establishing long-term cultures with self-renewing acute myeloid leukemia stem/progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gosliga, Djoke; Schepers, Hein; Rizo, Aleksandra; van der Kolk, Dorina; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Objective. With the emergence of the concept of the leukemia stem cell, assays to study them remain pivotal in understanding (leukemic) stem cell biology. Methods. We have cultured acute myeloid leukemia CD34(+) cells on bone marrow stroma. Long-term expansion was monitored and self-renewal was

  12. A comparison of surface marker analysis and FAB classification in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Reijden, H. J.; van Rhenen, D. J.; Lansdorp, P. M.; van't Veer, M. B.; Langenhuijsen, M. M.; Engelfriet, C. P.; von dem Borne, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    Surface marker analysis with rosette tests and a large panel of xenoantisera and monoclonal antibodies was done on the malignant cells of 55 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The diagnosis was made on morphological and cytochemical grounds, and the leukemias were classified according to

  13. Cotylenin A--a plant growth regulator as a differentiation-inducing agent against myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Yoshio

    2002-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the arrest of differentiation leading to the accumulation of immature cells. This maturation arrest can be reversed by certain agents. Although differentiation therapy for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been established, the clinical response of AML patients other than those with APL to ATRA is limited. We must consider novel therapeutic drugs against other forms of AML for the development of a differentiation therapy for leukemia. Regulators that play an important role in the differentiation and development of plants or invertebrates may also affect the differentiation of human leukemia cells through a common signal transduction system, and might be clinically useful for treating AML. Cotylenin A, a plant growth regulator, is a potent and novel inducer of the monocytic differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cell lines and leukemia cells freshly isolated from AML patients.

  14. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Modeling of C/EBPalpha mutant acute myeloid leukemia reveals a common expression signature of committed myeloid leukemia-initiating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Schuster, Mikkel B; Bereshchenko, Oksana

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the CEBPA gene are present in 7%-10% of human patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no genetic models exist that demonstrate their etiological relevance. To mimic the most common mutations affecting CEBPA-that is, those leading to loss of the 42 kDa C/EBPalpha isoform ...

  16. Treatments for chronic myeloid leukemia: a qualitative systematic review

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    Ferdin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Roxanne Ferdinand,1 Stephen A Mitchell,2 Sarah Batson,2 Indra Tumur11Pfizer, Tadworth, UK; 2Abacus International, Bicester, UKBackground: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative disorder of blood stem cells. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI imatinib was the first targeted therapy licensed for patients with chronic-phase CML, and its introduction was associated with substantial improvements in response and survival compared with previous therapies. Clinical trial data are now available for the second-generation TKIs (nilotinib, dasatinib, and bosutinib in the first-, second-, and third-line settings. A qualitative systematic review was conducted to qualitatively compare the clinical effectiveness, safety, and effect on quality of life of TKIs for the management of chronic-, accelerated-, or blast-phase CML patients.Methods: Included studies were identified through a search of electronic databases in September 2011, relevant conference proceedings and the grey literature.Results: In the first-line setting, the long-term efficacy (up to 8 years of imatinib has been confirmed in a single randomized controlled trial (International Randomized Study of Interferon [IRIS]. All second-generation TKIs reported lower rates of transformation, and comparable or superior complete cytogenetic response (CCyR, major molecular response (MMR, and complete molecular response rates compared with imatinib by 2-year follow-up. Each of the second-generation TKIs was associated with a distinct adverse-event profile. Bosutinib was the only second-generation TKI to report quality-of-life data (no significant difference compared with imatinib treatment. Data in the second- and third-line setting confirmed the efficacy of the second-generation TKIs in either imatinib-resistant or -intolerant patients, as measured by CCyR and MMR rates.Conclusion: Data from first-line randomized controlled trials reporting up to 2-year follow-up indicate superior response

  17. [Clinical and cytogenetical study on subacute myeloid leukemia in myelodysplastic syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing-ying; Zhang, Yan; Lu, Dao-pei; Lai, Yue-yun; He, Qi; Shi, Yan

    2005-06-01

    To discuss from the clinical and cytogenetic aspect that part of patients now diagnosed as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) could be diagnosed early as leukemia and be classified as subacute myeloid leukemia (Sub-AML). Totally 173 patients diagnosed as MDS according to FAB or WHO criteria with complete clinical and cytogenetical data were included in this research. Among them 42 had +8 chromosome aberration, 16 had -7/7q-, and 55 had normal karyotypes and more than 0.10 blast cells in the bone marrow. Short term culture and G-banding techniques and in some specimens fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method were used to do chromosome analysis. Among the detected chromosome aberrations, +8 was the most frequent (42.8%) and then -7/7q-(15.0%); 42 patients with +8 had median blast cell count of 0.08, within a median of 18 months follow-up period 40.0% of the patients evolved to frank leukemia (FL) and the median overall survival was 20 months. 16 patients with -7/7q- had higher blast cell count of 0.135; 43.8% of them developed into FL and the median overall survival was only 10 months within a 20-month follow-up period. 55 patients had normal karyotype but a median blast cell count of 0.148; 52.7% of them patients evolved to FL and the median overall survival was 34 months. Both the +8 and -7/7q- groups have malignant leukemic cell clone, and run a subacute and progressive clinical course; it is suggested they might be classified into Sub-AML. We should keep close watch on the patients who have normal karyotype yet more than 0.10 blast cells, part of whom might suffer from early Sub-AML.

  18. Recent advances in pediatric acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi

    2003-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common form of childhood cancer and is the primary cause of cancer-related mortality in children. In the United approximately 3250 cases are diagnosed annually in children and adolescents younger than 20 years, of whom 2400 have acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Treatment results in childhood ALL continue to improve, and the expected current cure rates approach 75 to 80% of all children with ALL, including T-ALL and mature B-cell ALL, the two variants that, not too long ago, had a considerably poorer prognosis compared with the common form of BpALL. The most significant new development in the past 2 years has been the development of further evidence for fetal origin of childhood leukemias, and additional evidence to support the notion that postnatal events modulating the events of immune-mediated elimination of these leukemic clones play a major role in the eventual development of clinical disease. Other epidemiologic developments include (1) increased appreciation of the role of drug-metabolizing enzymes, both in determining the predisposition to leukemia and response to therapy; and (2) both clinical observations and gene expression studies seeming to identify a new approach to the evaluation and treatment of children with MLL (11q23) rearrangements. A most remarkable new development in the induction therapy of childhood leukemia and lymphoma in the United States is the use of urate oxidase for prevention of tumor lysis syndrome and the associated uric acid nephropathy. Drug resistance, determined either on leukemic blast cells in vitro or by studies of MRD, is being looked at critically in an effort to improve the treatment results further. Consolidation with HDMTX has gained wider popularity with the realization that effective CNS prophylaxis can be achieved with intrathecal therapy plus HDMTX for consolidation. In contrast to ALL, the progress in the therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) lags behind, with cure rates of

  19. A Case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (FAB M2 with Inversion 16 Who Presented with Pelvic Myeloid Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Çakan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemias are the most common childhood cancer in all age groups. Acute myeloid leukemias (AML constitute about 15–20% of acute leukemias. Fatigability, pallor, fever, and bleeding are the most common presenting symptoms of AML. Hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy are commonly encountered during physical examination. In rare instances eruptions due to skin involvement and localized tumor masses (myeloid sarcoma may be found. Myeloid sarcoma is especially seen in AML-M2 subtype. By cytogenetic analysis, in AML-M2 subtype t(8;21 is often seen and it is more probable to find inversion 16 in AML-M4Eos subtype. Herein, we present a 15-year-old girl whose initial symptom was abdominal pain for three days and her pathological sign was a large abdominal mass which was verified by imaging studies and diagnosed as myeloid sarcoma by biopsy. On bone marrow examination, she had diagnosis of AML-M2 and by cytogenetic analysis inversion 16 was positive. She was treated with AML-BFM 2004 protocol and she is being followed up in remission on her ninth month of the maintenance therapy.

  20. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Ligands and Their Role in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Therapeutic Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Bahman; Samadi, Nasser; Baradaran, Behzad; Shafiei-Irannejad, Vahid; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2016-07-01

    Imatinib therapy remains the gold standard for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia; however, the acquired resistance to this therapeutic agent in patients has urged the scientists to devise modalities for overcoming this chemoresistance. For this purpose, initially therapeutic agents with higher tyrosine kinase activity were introduced, which had the potential for inhibiting even mutant forms of Bcr-Abl. Furthermore, coupling imatinib with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands also showed beneficial effects in chronic myeloid leukemia cell proliferation. These combination protocols inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis as well as differentiation in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands increased imatinib uptake by upregulating the expression of human organic cation transporter 1. Taken together, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands are currently being considered as novel promising therapeutic candidates for chronic myeloid leukemia treatment, because they can synergistically enhance the efficacy of imatinib. In this article, we reviewed the potential of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands for use in chronic myeloid leukemia treatment. The mechanism of action of these therapeutics modalities are also presented in detail. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. A Case with Neurofibromatosis and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blastic Crisis Treated with Imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Abdul Hamid

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old female presented with complaints of fever, general weakness and hepatosplenomegaly. She had a history of nonfamilial peripheral neurofibromatosis diagnosed as von Recklinghausen's disease since 30 years previous. Physical examination was remarkable for skin colored cutaneous circumscribed nodules which appeared soft to the touch in both arms, the upper part of her abdomen, back, and posterior thigh. The liver was palpable 10 cm below the inferior border of the costal margin and she had evidence of significant splenomegaly. Laboratory results were as follows: hemoglobin 7.9 g/dl; ESR142 mm/hour; leukocytes 22400x109/L; neutrophils 35%; eosinophils 3%; basophils 4%; myelocytes40%; myeloblasts 14%; promyelocytes 2%; and band form 2%. The bone marrow picture was chronic myeloid leukemia in blastic form. Chest CT scan showed the presence of numerous cutaneous nodules (neurofibromatosis. A biopsy of the tissue fragment from the nodules confirmed the presence of diffuse neurofibromatosis. Bone marrow cytology that included cytogenetic and immunophenotyping confirmed the presence of chronic myeloid leukemia with a positive Philadelphia chromosome and diploidy female clone in a blastic form (acute myeloid leukemia. Addition of 600 mg oral imatinib mesylate daily for one month and reduced to 400 mg daily yields complete hematological remission and complete cytogenetic responses. This case illustrated an association between chronic myeloid leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia and neurofibromatosis in an adult.

  2. Functional inhibition of mesenchymal stromal cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyh, S; Rodríguez-Paredes, M; Jäger, P; Khandanpour, C; Cadeddu, R-P; Gutekunst, J; Wilk, C M; Fenk, R; Zilkens, C; Hermsen, D; Germing, U; Kobbe, G; Lyko, F; Haas, R; Schroeder, T

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic insufficiency is the hallmark of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and predisposes patients to life-threatening complications such as bleeding and infections. Addressing the contribution of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to AML-induced hematopoietic failure we show that MSC from AML patients (n=64) exhibit significant growth deficiency and impaired osteogenic differentiation capacity. This was molecularly reflected by a specific methylation signature affecting pathways involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and skeletal development. In addition, we found distinct alterations of hematopoiesis-regulating factors such as Kit-ligand and Jagged1 accompanied by a significantly diminished ability to support CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) assays. This deficient osteogenic differentiation and insufficient stromal support was reversible and correlated with disease status as indicated by Osteocalcin serum levels and LTC-IC frequencies returning to normal values at remission. In line with this, cultivation of healthy MSC in conditioned medium from four AML cell lines resulted in decreased proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, AML-derived MSC are molecularly and functionally altered and contribute to hematopoietic insufficiency. Inverse correlation with disease status and adoption of an AML-like phenotype after exposure to leukemic conditions suggests an instructive role of leukemic cells on bone marrow microenvironment.

  3. Combined venetoclax and alvocidib in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenberger, James; Whatcott, Clifford; Hansen, Nanna; Delman, Devora; Shi, Chang-Xin; Kim, Wontak; Haws, Hillary; Soh, Katherine; Lee, Ye Sol; Peterson, Peter; Siddiqui-Jain, Adam; Weitman, Steven; Stewart, Keith; Bearss, David; Mesa, Ruben; Warner, Steven; Tibes, Raoul

    2017-12-05

    More effective treatment options for elderly acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients are needed as only 25-50% of patients respond to standard-of-care therapies, response duration is typically short, and disease progression is inevitable even with some novel therapies and ongoing clinical trials. Anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family inhibitors, such as venetoclax, are promising therapies for AML. Nonetheless, resistance is emerging. We demonstrate that venetoclax combined with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor alvocidib is potently synergistic in venetoclax-sensitive and -resistant AML models in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Alvocidib decreased MCL-1, and/or increased pro-apoptotic proteins such as BIM or NOXA, often synergistically with venetoclax. Over-expression of BCL-XL diminished synergy, while knock-down of BIM almost entirely abrogated synergy, demonstrating that the synergistic interaction between alvocidib and venetoclax is primarily dependent on intrinsic apoptosis. CDK9 inhibition predominantly mediated venetoclax sensitization, while CDK4/6 inhibition with palbociclib did not potentiate venetoclax activity. Combined, venetoclax and alvocidib modulate the balance of BCL-2 family proteins through complementary, yet variable mechanisms favoring apoptosis, highlighting this combination as a promising therapy for AML or high-risk MDS with the capacity to overcome intrinsic apoptosis mechanisms of resistance. These results support clinical testing of combined venetoclax and alvocidib for the treatment of AML and advanced MDS.

  4. Recurrent SETBP1 mutations in atypical chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Rocco; Valletta, Simona; Winkelmann, Nils; Redaelli, Sara; Spinelli, Roberta; Pirola, Alessandra; Antolini, Laura; Mologni, Luca; Donadoni, Carla; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Schnittger, Susanne; Kim, Dong-Wook; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Rossi, Fabio; Gaipa, Giuseppe; De Martini, Greta P; di Celle, Paola Francia; Jang, Hyun Gyung; Fantin, Valeria; Bignell, Graham R; Magistroni, Vera; Haferlach, Torsten; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Campbell, Peter J; Chase, Andrew J; Tapper, William J; Cross, Nicholas C P; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) shares clinical and laboratory features with CML, but it lacks the BCR-ABL1 fusion. We performed exome sequencing of eight aCMLs and identified somatic alterations of SETBP1 (encoding a p.Gly870Ser alteration) in two cases. Targeted resequencing of 70 aCMLs, 574 diverse hematological malignancies and 344 cancer cell lines identified SETBP1 mutations in 24 cases, including 17 of 70 aCMLs (24.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 16–35%). Most mutations (92%) were located between codons 858 and 871 and were identical to changes seen in individuals with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Individuals with mutations had higher white blood cell counts (P = 0.008) and worse prognosis (P = 0.01). The p.Gly870Ser alteration abrogated a site for ubiquitination, and cells exogenously expressing this mutant exhibited higher amounts of SETBP1 and SET protein, lower PP2A activity and higher proliferation rates relative to those expressing the wild-type protein. In summary, mutated SETBP1 represents a newly discovered oncogene present in aCML and closely related diseases. PMID:23222956

  5. Pharmacogenetics of BCR/ABL Inhibitors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marialuisa Polillo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia was the first haematological neoplasia that benefited from a targeted therapy with imatinib nearly 15 years ago. Since then, several studies have investigated the role of genes, their variants (i.e., polymorphisms and their encoded proteins in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase activity inhibitors (TKIs. Transmembrane transporters seem to influence in a significant manner the disposition of TKIs, especially that of imatinib at both cellular and systemic levels. In particular, members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC family (namely ABCB1 and ABCG2 together with solute carrier (SLC transporters (i.e., SLC22A1 are responsible for the differences in drug pharmacokinetics. In the case of the newer TKIs, such as nilotinib and dasatinib, the substrate affinity of these drugs for transporters is variable but lower than that measured for imatinib. In this scenario, the investigation of genetic variants as possible predictive markers has led to some discordant results. With the partial exception of imatinib, these discrepancies seem to limit the application of discovered biomarkers in the clinical settings. In order to overcome these issues, larger prospective confirmative trials are needed.

  6. Cardiovascular Complications of Targeted Therapies for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Fradley, Michael G

    2017-04-01

    The development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) dramatically changed the treatment landscape for many different cancers including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). With the introduction of imatinib, the first TKI developed and approved to effectively treat CML, patient survival has increased dramatically and, in some cases, this fatal cancer can be managed as a chronic disease. Since the approval of imatinib in 2002, four additional TKIs have been developed to treat this disease including the second-generation TKIs nilotinib, dasatinib, and bosutinib and the third-generation TKI ponatinib. Despite their significant impact on the progression of CML, there is increasing recognition of cardiovascular toxicities which can limit their long-term use and impact patient morbidity and mortality. The majority of the cardiotoxicities are associated with the second- and third-generation TKIs, the most concerning of which are vascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral arterial disease. In addition, QT prolongation, pleural effusions, and both systemic and pulmonary hypertension are also observed. It is essential for both cardiologists and oncologists to possess knowledge of these issues in order to develop appropriate monitoring and risk mitigation strategies to prevent these toxicities and avoid premature cessation of the drug.

  7. Update on emerging treatments for chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Carmen; Morotti, Alessandro; Dogliotti, Irene; Saglio, Giuseppe; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna

    2015-06-01

    As survival of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is dramatically improved over time, the prevalence of the disease is steadily increasing. At this moment, five different tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) (imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib and ponatinib) are approved for the treatment of CML. Medical and patients needs nowadays are attention to quality of life (QoL) and drug side effects; overcoming suboptimal responses; preventing progression and possibly discontinuing the drugs. Monitoring is essential to improve on treatment and on the possibility of cure, because it allows patient adapted therapies, according to patients morbidities and early responses. This review focuses on clinical results of imatinib and second- and third-generation TKIs that have been tested in the setting of second-line and front-line treatments. The most promising new drugs in course of clinical investigations are also reported. The scientific community is focusing on the optimization of the use of the drugs already available, to be also used in association with other experimental drugs directed to several signaling transduction pathways of BCR-ABL, in order to improve the efficacy on resistant cases, and on leukemic stem cells, keeping in mind the issues of long-term safety, QoL and the need for treatment - free remission.

  8. Lipidomic approach for stratification of acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Stefanko

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis and progression of many tumors, including hematologic malignancies is highly dependent on enhanced lipogenesis. De novo fatty-acid synthesis permits accelerated proliferation of tumor cells by providing membrane components but these may also alter physicochemical properties of lipid bilayers, which can impact signaling or even increase drug resistance in cancer cells. Cancer type-specific lipid profiles would permit us to monitor and interpret actual effects of lipid changes, potential fingerprints of individual tumors to be explored as diagnostic markers. We have used the shotgun MS approach to identify lipid patterns in different types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients that either show no karyotype change or belong to t(8;21 or inv16 types. Differences in lipidomes of t(8;21 and inv(16 patients, as compared to AML patients without karyotype change, presented mostly as substantial modulation of ceramide/sphingolipid synthesis. Furthermore, between the t(8;21 and all other patients we observed significant changes in physicochemical membrane properties. These were related to a marked alteration in lipid saturation levels. The discovered differences in lipid profiles of various AML types improve our understanding of the pathobiochemical pathways involved and may serve in the development of diagnostic tools.

  9. Poor Prognosis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Monosomal Karyotype

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    Junqing Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of monosomal karyotypes (MKs in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data for 498 patients with AML, of whom 233 (46.8% had an abnormal karyotype, including 42 with MKs (8.4% and 70 with a complex karyotype (CK (14.1%. Results: Patients with MKs were older (median age 62.5 vs. 52 years, p=0.003 and had lower median hemoglobin levels (62.5 vs. 77 g/L, p=0.009 and lower white blood cell counts (7.0×109/L vs. 11.7×109/L, p=0.008. Univariate analysis showed that patients with MKs or CKs had shorter overall survival than patients without these karyotypes (median survival time 7.3 vs. 26.3 months for MK, p<0.001, and 14.8 vs. 26.3 months for CK, p<0.001. In multivariable analysis for overall survival, MK and National Comprehensive Cancer Network prognostic group were the only significant factors. Conclusion: MK is an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in AML patients.

  10. Glioblastoma and acute myeloid leukemia: malignancies with striking similarities.

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    Goethe, Eric; Carter, Bing Z; Rao, Ganesh; Pemmaraju, Naveen

    2017-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and glioblastoma (GB) are two malignancies associated with high incidence of treatment refractoriness and generally, uniformly poor survival outcomes. While the former is a hematologic (i.e. a "liquid") malignancy and the latter a solid tumor, the two diseases share both clinical and biochemical characteristics. Both diseases exist predominantly in primary (de novo) forms, with only a small subset of each progressing from precursor disease states like the myelodysplastic syndromes or diffuse glioma. More importantly, the primary and secondary forms of each disease are characterized by common sets of mutations and gene expression abnormalities. The primary versions of AML and GB are characterized by aberrant RAS pathway, matrix metalloproteinase 9, and Bcl-2 expression, and their secondary counterparts share abnormalities in TP53, isocitrate dehydrogenase, ATRX, inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, and survivin that both influence the course of the diseases themselves and their progression from precursor disease. An understanding of these shared features is important, as it can be used to guide both the research about and treatment of each.

  11. Advances in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

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    Morley Kimberly

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although imatinib is firmly established as an effective therapy for newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, the field continues to advance on several fronts. In this minireview we cover recent results of second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in newly diagnosed patients, investigate the state of strategies to discontinue therapy and report on new small molecule inhibitors to tackle resistant disease, focusing on agents that target the T315I mutant of BCR-ABL. As a result of these advances, standard of care in frontline therapy has started to gravitate toward dasatinib and nilotinib, although more observation is needed to fully support this. Stopping therapy altogether remains a matter of clinical trials, and more must be learned about the mechanisms underlying the persistence of leukemic cells with treatment. However, there is good news for patients with the T315I mutation, as effective drugs such as ponatinib are on their way to regulatory approval. Despite these promising data, accelerated or blastic phase disease remains a challenge, possibly due to BCR-ABL-independent resistance.

  12. Pharmacogenetics of BCR/ABL Inhibitors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

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    Polillo, Marialuisa; Galimberti, Sara; Baratè, Claudia; Petrini, Mario; Danesi, Romano; Di Paolo, Antonello

    2015-09-21

    Chronic myeloid leukemia was the first haematological neoplasia that benefited from a targeted therapy with imatinib nearly 15 years ago. Since then, several studies have investigated the role of genes, their variants (i.e., polymorphisms) and their encoded proteins in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase activity inhibitors (TKIs). Transmembrane transporters seem to influence in a significant manner the disposition of TKIs, especially that of imatinib at both cellular and systemic levels. In particular, members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family (namely ABCB1 and ABCG2) together with solute carrier (SLC) transporters (i.e., SLC22A1) are responsible for the differences in drug pharmacokinetics. In the case of the newer TKIs, such as nilotinib and dasatinib, the substrate affinity of these drugs for transporters is variable but lower than that measured for imatinib. In this scenario, the investigation of genetic variants as possible predictive markers has led to some discordant results. With the partial exception of imatinib, these discrepancies seem to limit the application of discovered biomarkers in the clinical settings. In order to overcome these issues, larger prospective confirmative trials are needed.

  13. New fusion transcripts identified in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Hongxiu Wen

    Full Text Available Genetic aberrations contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, half of AML cases do not contain the well-known aberrations detectable mostly by cytogenetic analysis, and these cases are classified as normal karyotype AML. Different outcomes of normal karyotype AML suggest that this subgroup of AML could be genetically heterogeneous. But lack of genetic markers makes it difficult to further study this subgroup of AML. Using paired-end RNAseq method, we performed a transcriptome analysis in 45 AML cases including 29 normal karyotype AML, 8 abnormal karyotype AML and 8 AML without karyotype informaiton. Our study identified 134 fusion transcripts, all of which were formed between the partner genes adjacent in the same chromosome and distributed at different frequencies in the AML cases. Seven fusions are exclusively present in normal karyotype AML, and the rest fusions are shared between the normal karyotype AML and abnormal karyotype AML. CIITA, a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression and truncated in B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin disease, is found to fuse with DEXI in 48% of normal karyotype AML cases. The fusion transcripts formed between adjacent genes highlight the possibility that certain such fusions could be involved in oncological process in AML, and provide a new source to identify genetic markers for normal karyotype AML.

  14. New fusion transcripts identified in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hongxiu; Li, Yongjin; Malek, Sami N; Kim, Yeong C; Xu, Jia; Chen, Peixian; Xiao, Fengxia; Huang, Xin; Zhou, Xianzheng; Xuan, Zhenyu; Mankala, Shiva; Hou, Guihua; Rowley, Janet D; Zhang, Michael Q; Wang, San Ming

    2012-01-01

    Genetic aberrations contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, half of AML cases do not contain the well-known aberrations detectable mostly by cytogenetic analysis, and these cases are classified as normal karyotype AML. Different outcomes of normal karyotype AML suggest that this subgroup of AML could be genetically heterogeneous. But lack of genetic markers makes it difficult to further study this subgroup of AML. Using paired-end RNAseq method, we performed a transcriptome analysis in 45 AML cases including 29 normal karyotype AML, 8 abnormal karyotype AML and 8 AML without karyotype informaiton. Our study identified 134 fusion transcripts, all of which were formed between the partner genes adjacent in the same chromosome and distributed at different frequencies in the AML cases. Seven fusions are exclusively present in normal karyotype AML, and the rest fusions are shared between the normal karyotype AML and abnormal karyotype AML. CIITA, a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression and truncated in B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin disease, is found to fuse with DEXI in 48% of normal karyotype AML cases. The fusion transcripts formed between adjacent genes highlight the possibility that certain such fusions could be involved in oncological process in AML, and provide a new source to identify genetic markers for normal karyotype AML.

  15. Hemostasis in acute myeloid leukemia patients during disease manifestation

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    S. G. Vladimirova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was assessment of blood coagulation parameters in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients during disease manifestation.Coagulation and fibrinolysis parameters, physiological anticoagulants levels and intravascular coagulation markers were detected. 44 patients with newly diagnosed AML (FAB: M0, M1, M2, M4, M5, m/f = 20/24, aged 20–76 years (median – 49.5 years were included in the study. 18 patients without infectious complications were classified as a group 1; 26 patients with infectious complication – as a group 2. Hemorrhages were observed in 15 patients (57.7 % from group 2 and only in 2 patients (11 % from group 1. The patients showed elevated levels of soluble fibrin monomer complexes and D-dimer levels, decreased protein C activity, inhibition of Hageman-dependent fibrinolysis, which indicates the hypercoagulation. Infection in AML patients accompanied by increased intravascular coagulation that confirmed by positive correlation of CRP with D-dimer levels and von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag and by negative correlation with prothrombin tests results. Thus, infection and high leucocytes count in patients with newly diagnosed AML should be considered as significant risk factors for thrombohemorrhagic complications as well as thrombocytopenia.

  16. Hemostasis in acute myeloid leukemia patients during disease manifestation

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    S. G. Vladimirova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was assessment of blood coagulation parameters in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients during disease manifestation.Coagulation and fibrinolysis parameters, physiological anticoagulants levels and intravascular coagulation markers were detected. 44 patients with newly diagnosed AML (FAB: M0, M1, M2, M4, M5, m/f = 20/24, aged 20–76 years (median – 49.5 years were included in the study. 18 patients without infectious complications were classified as a group 1; 26 patients with infectious complication – as a group 2. Hemorrhages were observed in 15 patients (57.7 % from group 2 and only in 2 patients (11 % from group 1. The patients showed elevated levels of soluble fibrin monomer complexes and D-dimer levels, decreased protein C activity, inhibition of Hageman-dependent fibrinolysis, which indicates the hypercoagulation. Infection in AML patients accompanied by increased intravascular coagulation that confirmed by positive correlation of CRP with D-dimer levels and von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag and by negative correlation with prothrombin tests results. Thus, infection and high leucocytes count in patients with newly diagnosed AML should be considered as significant risk factors for thrombohemorrhagic complications as well as thrombocytopenia.

  17. Maxillo-orbital granulocytic sarcoma in acute myeloid leukemia

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    Chandana Chakraborti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytic sarcoma or chloroma, a manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a rare cause of childhood proptosis. A 14-year-old boy presented with progressively increasing unilateral proptosis and swelling of lower eyelid and face on the right side. Contrast enhanced computed tomographic images revealed enhancing infiltrates occupying the right orbit, maxillary antrum, and infratemporal fossa. Incisional biopsy from the orbital swelling and the bone marrow aspirate showing leukemic blast cells confirmed the diagnosis of AML. The peripheral smear was normal initially, but high total leukocytic count with immature blast cells was evident after 1-month of presentation. Chemotherapy brought about the remission of the disease. However, the delay in diagnosis because of negative peripheral blood smear examination and inconclusive fine-needle aspiration biopsy led to the loss of vision in right eye. Diagnosis of such case can be made by a combination of good clinical examination and relevant investigations. This case of maxillo-orbital granulocytic sarcoma is reported because of its rarity and to emphasize the clinical and cyto-histological features and problems concerning differential diagnosis.

  18. Induction of Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Idarubicin, Cytarabine and Cladribine.

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    Wiedower, Eric; Jamy, Omer; Martin, Michael G

    2015-11-01

    Daunorubicin and cytarabine has been the standard-of-care for induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Adding cladribine to daunorubicin (60 mg/m(2)) and cytarabine has increased complete remission (CR) rates and median overall survival (OS). However, the efficacy of adding cladribine to 7+3 with other anthracyclines is unknown. We retrospectively evaluated patients with AML receiving induction with idarubicin, cytarabine and cladribine (ICC) between 1/1/2010 and 06/30/2015 at the Methodist University Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for the study. Patient, disease characteristics and outcomes were analyzed with GraphPad Prism, Microsoft Excel and SPSSv19.0 software. Twenty-four patients induced with ICC for AML were identified. Thirteen (54.2%) had at least one high-risk feature. Hypoplastic marrow was achieved in all by day 14; 19 (79.2%) achieved CR. Thirty-day mortality was 8.3%; 33-month OS and disease-free survival were 56% and 36%, respectively. Induction of AML with ICC was associated with a high CR rate and OS in our high-risk population. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Isolated central nervous system relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Fuchs Mary

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This case report highlights the relevance of quantifying the BCR-ABL gene in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with suspected relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia in the central nervous system. Case presentation We report on a female patient with isolated central nervous system relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML during peripheral remission after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The patient showed a progressive cognitive decline as the main symptom. MRI revealed a hydrocephalus and an increase in cell count in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF with around 50% immature blasts in the differential count. A highly elevated BCR-ABL/ ABL ratio was detected in the CSF, whilst the ratio for peripheral blood and bone marrow was not altered. On treatment of the malresorptive hydrocephalus with shunt surgery, the patient showed an initial cognitive improvement, followed by a secondary deterioration. At this time, the cranial MRI showed leukemic infiltration of lateral ventricles walls. Hence, intrathecal administration of cytarabine, methotrexate, and dexamethasone was initiated, which caused a significant decrease of cells in the CSF. Soon after, the patient demonstrated significant cognitive improvement with a good participation in daily activities. At a later time point, after the patient had lost the major molecular response of CML, therapy with dasatinib was initiated. In a further follow-up, the patient was neurologically and hematologically stable. Conclusions In patients with treated CML, the rare case of an isolated CNS blast crisis has to be taken into account if neurological symptoms evolve. The analysis of BCR-ABL in the CSF is a further option for the reliable detection of primary isolated relapse of CML in these patients.

  20. Re-emergence of interferon-α in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpaz, M; Hehlmann, R; Quintás-Cardama, A; Mercer, J; Cortes, J

    2013-01-01

    Treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has evolved from chemotherapy (busulfan, hydroxyurea) to interferon-α (IFNα), and finally to tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib. Although imatinib has profoundly improved outcomes for patients with CML, it has limitations. Most significantly, imatinib cannot eradicate CML primitive progenitors, which likely accounts for the high relapse rate when imatinib is discontinued. IFNα, unlike imatinib, preferentially targets CML stem cells. Early studies with IFNα in CML demonstrated its ability to induce cytogenetic remission. Moreover, a small percentage of patients treated with IFNα were able to sustain durable remissions after discontinuing therapy and were probably cured. The mechanisms by which IFNα exerts its antitumor activity in CML are not well understood; however, activation of leukemia-specific immunity may have a role. Some clinical studies have demonstrated that the combination of imatinib and IFNα is superior to either therapy alone, perhaps because of their different mechanisms of action. Nonetheless, the side effects of IFNα often impede its administration, especially in combination therapy. Here, we review the role of IFNα in CML treatment and the recent developments that have renewed interest in this once standard therapy for patients with CML. PMID:23238589

  1. Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia as classified using 2008 WHO criteria: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kara L; Marina, Neyssa; Arber, Daniel A; Ma, Lisa; Cherry, Athena; Dahl, Gary V; Heerema-McKenney, Amy

    2013-06-01

    The classification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has evolved to the most recent World Health Organization (WHO) schema, which integrates genetic, morphologic, and prognostic data into a single system. However, this system was devised using adult data and how this system applies to a pediatric cohort is unknown. Performing a retrospective chart review, we examined our single-center experience with AML in 115 children and classified their leukemia using the WHO 2008 schema. We examined patient samples for mutations of FLT3, NPM1, and CEBPA. Overall survival was calculated within categories. In our pediatric population, most cases of AML had recurrent genetic abnormalities of favorable prognosis. More than 10% of patients in our series were categorized as AML, with myelodysplasia-related changes, an entity not well-described in pediatric patients. In addition, a large proportion of patients were categorized with secondary, therapy-related AML. To our knowledge, this is the first application of the WHO 2008 classification to a pediatric cohort. In comparison to adult studies, AML in the pediatric population shows a distinct distribution within the WHO 2008 classification.

  2. Fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptidis, John; Aloizos, Stavros; Chlorokostas, Panagiotis; Gourgiotis, Stavros

    2014-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a hemopoietic myeloid stem cell neoplasm. It is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults,and its incidence increases with age. Acute myeloid leukemia is characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. As the leukemic cells keep filling the bone marrow, symptoms of the disease started to appear: fatigue, bleeding, increased frequency of infections, and shortness of breath. Cardiac tamponade or pericardial tamponade is an acute medical condition in which the accumulation of pericardial fluid prevents the function of the heart. Signs and symptoms include Beck triad (hypotension, distended neck veins, and muffled heart sounds), paradoxus pulses, tachycardia, tachypnea, and breathlessness. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade are rare and severe complications of leukemia; they often develop during the radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or infections in the course of leukemia. This study sought to assess the fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found no reports in the literature linking these 2 clinical entities. Although the patient had no signs or diagnosis of AML previously, this case was remarkable for the rapidly progressive symptoms and the fatal outcome. The pericardial effusion reaccumulated rapidly after its initial drainage; it is a possible explanation that the leukemic cells interfered with cardiac activity or that they decreased their contractility myocytes secreting a toxic essence.

  3. Bosutinib: a SRC–ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

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    El Rassi F

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fuad El Rassi, Hanna Jean KhouryDivision of Hematology, Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USAAbstract: Bosutinib is one of five tyrosine kinase inhibitors commercially available in the United States for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. This review of bosutinib summarizes the mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety data, as well as the patient-focused perspective through quality-of-life data. Bosutinib has shown considerable and sustained efficacy in chronic myeloid leukemia, especially in the chronic phase, with resistance or intolerance to prior tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Bosutinib has distinct but manageable adverse events. In the absence of T315I and V299L mutations, there are no absolute contraindications for the use of bosutinib in this patient population.Keywords: bosutinib, chronic myeloid leukemia, treatment, review, SRC-ABL kinase inhibitor, clinical activity

  4. A case of pathologic splenic rupture as the initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia M2.

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    Han, Ji-Sun; Oh, Sung Yong; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kwon, Hyuk-Chan; Hong, Sook Hee; Han, Jin Yeong; Park, Ki-Jae; Kim, Hyo-Jin

    2010-01-01

    A pathologic splenic rupture refers to a rupture without trauma. A splenic rupture as the initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia is extremely rare. In this study, we described a rare case of acute myeloid leukemia presenting principally as an acute abdomen due to a pathologic splenic rupture in a 35-year old male patient. We can assert that a pathologic splenic rupture in hematologic diseases is a potentially life-threatening complication, which necessitates immediate operative intervention. Any such patient complaining about left upper abdominal tenderness should be closely observed, and further diagnostic investigations (ultrasonograph of the abdomen, abdominal CT scan) should be initiated in order to rule out a splenic rupture. The oncologist should be aware of this rare initial presentation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) M2, as the condition generally necessitates a prompt splenectomy.

  5. [Acute myeloid leukemia originating from the same leukemia clone after the complete remission of acute lymphoid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Isao; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Amaya, Hiroshi; Kiyosaki, Masanobu; Kawakami, Keiichiro; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Akihiro; Hino, Ken-ichiro; Tomoyasu, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    A 22-year-old female was diagnosed as having acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in February 1995, from the findings of peroxidase negative, CD10+, CD19+, TdT+ and rearrangement of IgH and TCR beta. AdVP (doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) therapy achieved a complete remission (CR). Bone marrow transplantation had to be abandoned because of the lack of an HLA-identical donor. Intensification therapy was thus carried out repeatedly. In June 1998, myeloblast with Auer rods, peroxidase positive, CD13+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+, appeared. The patient was diagnosed as having lineage switch acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from ALL. Though A-DMP (cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine) therapy was resistant, AdVP therapy led to a CR. The patient died of cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines in February 1999. From the results of the Ramasamy method using the clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain gene locus, the origin of the pathological cells of ALL and AML was indicated to be the same leukemia clone.

  6. Diagnosis of chronic myeloid and acute lymphocytic leukemias by detection of leukemia-specific mRNA sequences amplified in vitro

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    Kawasaki, E.S.; Clark, S.S.; Coyne, M.Y.; Smith, S.D.; Champlin, R.; Witte, O.N.; McCormick, F.P. (Cetus Corp., Emeryville, CA (USA))

    1988-08-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome is present in more than 95% of chronic myeloid leukemia patients and 13% of acute lymphocytic leukemia patients. The Philadelphia translocation, t(9;22), fuses the BCR and ABL genes resulting in the expression of leukemia-specific, chimeric BCR-ABL messenger RNAs. To facilitate diagnosis of these leukemias, the authors have developed a method of amplifying and detecting only the unique mRNA sequences, using an extension of the polymerase chain reaction technique. Diagnosis of chronic myeloid and acute lymphocytic leukemias by this procedure is rapid, much more sensitive than existing protocols, and independent of the presence or absence of an identifiable Philadelphia chromosome.

  7. Bosutinib: a SRC-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassi, Fuad El; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2013-08-05

    Bosutinib is one of five tyrosine kinase inhibitors commercially available in the United States for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. This review of bosutinib summarizes the mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety data, as well as the patient-focused perspective through quality-of-life data. Bosutinib has shown considerable and sustained efficacy in chronic myeloid leukemia, especially in the chronic phase, with resistance or intolerance to prior tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Bosutinib has distinct but manageable adverse events. In the absence of T315I and V299L mutations, there are no absolute contraindications for the use of bosutinib in this patient population.

  8. Orbital tumour as initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia: granulocytic sarcoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maka, Erika; Lukáts, Olga; Tóth, Jeannette; Fekete, Sándor

    2008-06-01

    We report orbital involvement as an initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia in a 57-year-old woman. The patient presented with painful proptosis and limited ocular motility. Orbital computed tomography revealed bilateral homogeneous masses. Orbital biopsy was performed on the right side; and histopathology disclosed a myelocytic tumour. Despite treatment using irradiation and chemotherapy, the patient died eleven months after presentation. There appear to be only a few previous reports of acute myeloid leukemia cases presenting with orbital involvement, and most cases occurred in children. This very rare condition has a poor survival prognosis, even with radiation treatment and chemotherapy.

  9. Myeloid (granulocytic) sarcoma of epididymis as rare manifestation of recurrent acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvis, Jamey A; Auge, Brian K

    2009-05-01

    Myeloid sarcoma involving the genitourinary system is a rare complication associated with acute myelogenous leukemia or other myeloproliferative disorders. The diagnosis is made by pathologic findings of diffuse infiltration of intermediate-size neoplastic cells and fibrosis of the affected organ. Immunohistochemically, the cells stain positive for myeloperoxidase, CD45, and CD117 but negative for CD34. Treatment involves local surgical extirpation, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. We report the second known case of myeloid sarcoma involving the epididymis in a patient with a history of acute myelogenous leukemia.

  10. Molecular and cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia: review and case studies

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    Velloso,Elvira Deolinda Rodrigues Pereira; Motta,Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira da; Furtado,Juliana Braga; Bacal,Nydia Strachman; Silveira,Paulo Augusto Achucarro; Moyses,Cynthia Bachir; Sitnik,Roberta; Pinho,João Renato Rebello

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of mutations that may lead to a good or bad prognosis, as well as their relation with the karyotype and immunophenotype in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Methods: Thirty samples of patients with acute myeloid leukemia were studied, in which FLT3-ITD, FLT3-TKD and NPM1 mutations were investigated. All samples were submitted to immunophenotyping and 25 to karyotyping. Results: An occurrence of 33.3% NPM1 mutation and an equal number of FLT3-ITD mutatio...

  11. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Mayur D. Mody MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

  12. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Mayur D.; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S.; Kota, Vamsi K.

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28203579

  13. General Information about Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... General information about clinical trials is also available. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia may include the ... information about clinical trials is also available. Recurrent Acute Promyelocytic ... of recurrent acute promyelocytic leukemia may include ...

  14. Recurring Mutations Found by Sequencing an Acute Myeloid Leukemia Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardis, Elaine R.; Ding, Li; Dooling, David J.; Larson, David E.; McLellan, Michael D.; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Fulton, Robert S.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; McGrath, Sean D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Locke, Devin P.; Magrini, Vincent J.; Abbott, Rachel M.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Reed, Jerry S.; Robinson, Jody S.; Wylie, Todd; Smith, Scott M.; Carmichael, Lynn; Eldred, James M.; Harris, Christopher C.; Walker, Jason; Peck, Joshua B.; Du, Feiyu; Dukes, Adam F.; Sanderson, Gabriel E.; Brummett, Anthony M.; Clark, Eric; McMichael, Joshua F.; Meyer, Rick J.; Schindler, Jonathan K.; Pohl, Craig S.; Wallis, John W.; Shi, Xiaoqi; Lin, Ling; Schmidt, Heather; Tang, Yuzhu; Haipek, Carrie; Wiechert, Madeline E.; Ivy, Jolynda V.; Kalicki, Joelle; Elliott, Glendoria; Ries, Rhonda E.; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Westervelt, Peter; Tomasson, Michael H.; Watson, Mark A.; Baty, Jack; Heath, Sharon; Shannon, William D.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The full complement of DNA mutations that are responsible for the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is not yet known. METHODS We used massively parallel DNA sequencing to obtain a very high level of coverage (approximately 98%) of a primary, cytogenetically normal, de novo genome for AML with minimal maturation (AML-M1) and a matched normal skin genome. RESULTS We identified 12 acquired (somatic) mutations within the coding sequences of genes and 52 somatic point mutations in conserved or regulatory portions of the genome. All mutations appeared to be heterozygous and present in nearly all cells in the tumor sample. Four of the 64 mutations occurred in at least 1 additional AML sample in 188 samples that were tested. Mutations in NRAS and NPM1 had been identified previously in patients with AML, but two other mutations had not been identified. One of these mutations, in the IDH1 gene, was present in 15 of 187 additional AML genomes tested and was strongly associated with normal cytogenetic status; it was present in 13 of 80 cytogenetically normal samples (16%). The other was a nongenic mutation in a genomic region with regulatory potential and conservation in higher mammals; we detected it in one additional AML tumor. The AML genome that we sequenced contains approximately 750 point mutations, of which only a small fraction are likely to be relevant to pathogenesis. CONCLUSIONS By comparing the sequences of tumor and skin genomes of a patient with AML-M1, we have identified recurring mutations that may be relevant for pathogenesis. PMID:19657110

  15. Bosutinib for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Vi; Wang, Alice; Prescott, Hillary

    2015-03-15

    The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) bosutinib in the management of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are reviewed. Although clinical outcomes are favorable in patients wth Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive CML who receive first-line TKI therapy with imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, disease progression or relapse may occur. Thus, effective second-line agents are crucial. Bosutinib (Bosulif, Pfizer Inc.) is a second-generation TKI approved for the treatment of patients with Ph-positive chronic-, accelerated-, or blast-phase CML who are intolerant or resistant to other TKIs. Bosutinib inhibits a tyrosine kinase oncogene and Src kinases responsible for CML pathogenesis. Bosutinib is primarily metabolized by cytochrome P-450 (CYP) isoenzyme 3A4; therefore, concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors and inducers should be avoided. Bosutinib is effective in cases involving most imatinib-resistant mutations (not including the T315I and V299L mutations). Clinical trials demonstrated bosutinib's efficacy in inducing durable hematologic and cytogenetic responses, as well as high rates of progression-free and overall survival, in patients with CML who had developed resistance or intolerance to other TKIs. However, bosutinib was not found to be superior to imatinib for inducing cytogenetic responses in cases of newly diagnosed CML and is thus not indicated for use in TKI-naive patients. The most common adverse events among bosutinib-treated patients in clinical trials were diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, which were generally transient and self-limited. Bosutinib is a safe and effective second-line treatment option for select patients with Ph-positive CML who were intolerant or resistant to prior TKI therapy. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatments for chronic myeloid leukemia: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinand, Roxanne; Mitchell, Stephen A; Batson, Sarah; Tumur, Indra

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder of blood stem cells. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib was the first targeted therapy licensed for patients with chronic-phase CML, and its introduction was associated with substantial improvements in response and survival compared with previous therapies. Clinical trial data are now available for the second-generation TKIs (nilotinib, dasatinib, and bosutinib) in the first-, second-, and third-line settings. A qualitative systematic review was conducted to qualitatively compare the clinical effectiveness, safety, and effect on quality of life of TKIs for the management of chronic-, accelerated-, or blast-phase CML patients. Included studies were identified through a search of electronic databases in September 2011, relevant conference proceedings and the grey literature. In the first-line setting, the long-term efficacy (up to 8 years) of imatinib has been confirmed in a single randomized controlled trial (International Randomized Study of Interferon [IRIS]). All second-generation TKIs reported lower rates of transformation, and comparable or superior complete cytogenetic response (CCyR), major molecular response (MMR), and complete molecular response rates compared with imatinib by 2-year follow-up. Each of the second-generation TKIs was associated with a distinct adverse-event profile. Bosutinib was the only second-generation TKI to report quality-of-life data (no significant difference compared with imatinib treatment). Data in the second- and third-line setting confirmed the efficacy of the second-generation TKIs in either imatinib-resistant or -intolerant patients, as measured by CCyR and MMR rates. Data from first-line randomized controlled trials reporting up to 2-year follow-up indicate superior response rates of the second-generation TKIs compared with imatinib. Current evidence from single-arm studies in the second-line setting confirm that nilotinib, dasatinib, and bosutinib are

  17. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: analysis of epidemiological profile and survival rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Mariana Cardoso; da Silva, Denise Bousfield; Freund, Ana Paula Ferreira; Dacoregio, Juliana Shmitz; Costa, Tatiana El Jaick Bonifácio; Costa, Imaruí; Faraco, Daniel; Silva, Maurício Laerte

    2016-01-01

    To describe the epidemiological profile and the survival rate of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a state reference pediatric hospital. Clinical-epidemiological, observational, retrospective, descriptive study. The study included new cases of patients with AML, diagnosed between 2004 and 2012, younger than 15 years. Of the 51 patients studied, 84% were white; 45% were females and 55%, males. Regarding age, 8% were younger than 1 year, 47% were aged between 1 and 10 years, and 45% were older than 10 years. The main signs/symptoms were fever (41.1%), asthenia/lack of appetite (35.2%), and hemorrhagic manifestations (27.4%). The most affected extra-medullary site was the central nervous system (14%). In 47% of patients, the white blood cell (WBC) count was below 10,000/mm(3) at diagnosis. The minimal residual disease (MRD) was less than 0.1%, on the 15th day of treatment in 16% of the sample. Medullary relapse occurred in 14% of cases. When comparing the bone marrow MRD with the vital status, it was observed that 71.42% of the patients with type M3 AML were alive, as were 54.05% of those with non-M3 AML. The death rate was 43% and the main proximate cause was septic shock (63.6%). In this study, the majority of patients were male, white, and older than 1 year. Most patients with WBC count <10,000/mm(3) at diagnosis lived. Overall survival was higher in patients with MRD <0.1%. The prognosis was better in patients with AML-M3. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Methylation status of DDIT3 gene in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhao-hui

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3, a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG, has been found involved in the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation. The epigenetic changes of TSGs are recently recognized as an abnormal mechanism contributing to the development of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. The aim of this study was to investigate the methylation status of DDIT3 gene in CML patients. Methods The methylation status of DDIT3 promoter was detected in the bone marrow mononuclear cells from 53 patients with CML using methylation-specific PCR (MSP. The expression levels of DDIT3 and bcr/abl transcript were determined by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR. Clinical data of these patients were collected and analyzed. Results The aberrant methylation of DDIT3 gene promoter was found in 35 of 53 (66% CML cases. Correlation was not found between DDIT3 promoter hypermethylation and the age, sex, hemoglobin concentration, platelet counts, chromosomal abnormalities, bcr/abl transcript, and staging of CML patients (P > 0.05, but found between DDIT3 promoter hypermethylation and WBC counts of CML cases (R = 0.781, P DDIT3 transcript in CML patients was significantly lower than that in controls (median 3.28 vs 19.69, P DDIT3 transcript between methylation-positive CML cases (0.05-65.32, median 2.13 and methylation- negative CML cases (0.12-126.04, median 3.92 (P > 0.05. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that aberrant methylation of DDIT3 occurs in CML frequently.

  19. [Prognostic significance of monosomal karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Yanyan; Xu, Junqing; Huang, Baohua; Liu, Xiaoqian; Liu, Yinghui; Chen, Liming; Chu, Xiaoxia

    2015-04-01

    To explore the prognostic significance of monosomal karyotype (MK) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The clinical data of 498 AML patients were analyzed retrospectively. Of the 498 patients, 233 (46.8%) cases had an abnormal karyotype. 42 patients fulfilled the criteria for MK, which were 8.4% of all cases and 18.0% of patients with abnormal karyotype, respectively. The most frequent autosomal monosomies were -7 and -17. 70 patients had complex karyotype (CK), in all patients and patients with abnormal karyotype accounted for 14.1% and 30.0%, respectively. Patients with MK were associated with significantly older (median age 62.5 vs 52 years, P=0.003), and lower HGB concentrations (62.5 vs 77 g/L, P=0.009) and lower WBC counts (7.0×10⁹/L vs 11.7×10⁹/L, P=0.008). Among MK cases, the most frequent chromosome abnormalities were complex karyotype, -7, -5, 7q-, and 5q-. In univariate analysis, MK patients had worse survival than those without MK (7.3 months vs 26.3 months, P<0.001). CK patients also had poorer outcomes than patients without CK (14.8 months vs 26.3 months, P<0.001). In CK patients, survival was worse in MK patients than patients without MK (7.4 months vs 19.2 months, P=0.007). By COX analysis, MK was an independent prognostic factor, beyond NCCN criteria and CK [HR=2.610 (1.632-4.175), P<0.001]. MK was an independent adverse prognostic factor in AML patients.

  20. Genomic Classification and Prognosis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gerstung, Moritz; Bullinger, Lars; Gaidzik, Verena I; Paschka, Peter; Roberts, Nicola D; Potter, Nicola E; Heuser, Michael; Thol, Felicitas; Bolli, Niccolo; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Martincorena, Inigo; Ganly, Peter; Mudie, Laura; McLaren, Stuart; O'Meara, Sarah; Raine, Keiran; Jones, David R; Teague, Jon W; Butler, Adam P; Greaves, Mel F; Ganser, Arnold; Döhner, Konstanze; Schlenk, Richard F; Döhner, Hartmut; Campbell, Peter J

    2016-06-09

    Recent studies have provided a detailed census of genes that are mutated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our next challenge is to understand how this genetic diversity defines the pathophysiology of AML and informs clinical practice. We enrolled a total of 1540 patients in three prospective trials of intensive therapy. Combining driver mutations in 111 cancer genes with cytogenetic and clinical data, we defined AML genomic subgroups and their relevance to clinical outcomes. We identified 5234 driver mutations across 76 genes or genomic regions, with 2 or more drivers identified in 86% of the patients. Patterns of co-mutation compartmentalized the cohort into 11 classes, each with distinct diagnostic features and clinical outcomes. In addition to currently defined AML subgroups, three heterogeneous genomic categories emerged: AML with mutations in genes encoding chromatin, RNA-splicing regulators, or both (in 18% of patients); AML with TP53 mutations, chromosomal aneuploidies, or both (in 13%); and, provisionally, AML with IDH2(R172) mutations (in 1%). Patients with chromatin-spliceosome and TP53-aneuploidy AML had poor outcomes, with the various class-defining mutations contributing independently and additively to the outcome. In addition to class-defining lesions, other co-occurring driver mutations also had a substantial effect on overall survival. The prognostic effects of individual mutations were often significantly altered by the presence or absence of other driver mutations. Such gene-gene interactions were especially pronounced for NPM1-mutated AML, in which patterns of co-mutation identified groups with a favorable or adverse prognosis. These predictions require validation in prospective clinical trials. The driver landscape in AML reveals distinct molecular subgroups that reflect discrete paths in the evolution of AML, informing disease classification and prognostic stratification. (Funded by the Wellcome Trust and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT

  1. Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guldane Cengiz Seval

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review were to discuss standard and investigational treatment strategies for adolescent and young adult with acute myeloid leukemia, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs may need a different type of therapy than those currently used in children and older patients. As soon as AML is diagnosed, AYA patient should be offered to participate in well-designed clinical trials. The standard treatment approach for AYAs with AML is remission induction chemotherapy with an anthracycline/cytarabine combination, followed by either consolidation chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation, depending on the ability of the patient to tolerate intensive treatment and cytogenetic features. Presently, continuing progress of novel drugs targeting specific pathways in acute leukemia may bring AML treatment into a new era.

  2. Expression of CD71 by flow cytometry in acute leukemias: More often seen in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Pande

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: CD71 is a marker that has been usually used for identifying dysplasia in the erythroid series. We have tried to evaluate the expression of CD71 in various types of acute leukemias. Materials and Methods: We studied 48 patients of acute leukemia, of which 25 were acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 13 were precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, 8 were T-ALL, and 2 were mixed phenotype acute leukemia (T/myeloid as per the WHO classification. Results: We found that the expression of CD71 was most prevalent in AMLs (84%, followed by T-ALL (50% and least in B-ALL (30%. Conclusion: This finding clearly shows the higher expression of CD71 in AMLs compared to other common type of leukemias, such as B- and T-ALL. We suggest that the high expression of CD71 in AMLs could be used as a diagnostic marker and may also be used for minimal residual disease analysis after further studies in posttreatment scenario. This study is the first of its kind in the South Asian population.

  3. Expression of CD71 by flow cytometry in acute leukemias: More often seen in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Amit; Dorwal, Pranav; Jain, Dharmendra; Tyagi, Neetu; Mehra, Simmi; Sachdev, Ritesh; Raina, Vimarsh

    2016-01-01

    CD71 is a marker that has been usually used for identifying dysplasia in the erythroid series. We have tried to evaluate the expression of CD71 in various types of acute leukemias. We studied 48 patients of acute leukemia, of which 25 were acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 13 were precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), 8 were T-ALL, and 2 were mixed phenotype acute leukemia (T/myeloid) as per the WHO classification. We found that the expression of CD71 was most prevalent in AMLs (84%), followed by T-ALL (50%) and least in B-ALL (30%). This finding clearly shows the higher expression of CD71 in AMLs compared to other common type of leukemias, such as B- and T-ALL. We suggest that the high expression of CD71 in AMLs could be used as a diagnostic marker and may also be used for minimal residual disease analysis after further studies in posttreatment scenario. This study is the first of its kind in the South Asian population.

  4. Priapism – A Rare Presentation in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra B. Nerli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Priapism is a complication rarely seen in leukemia. We report a 19-year-old man presented with persistent painful erection of penis for over 24 hours at home. The patient had underwent immediate irrigation and decompression of priapism by urologist at emergency services of the hospital. This approach resulted in a flaccid penis later. During hospitalization, peripheral blood smear and bone marrow aspiration confirmed the diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia.

  5. Chloroma of the testis in a patient with a history of acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Sanei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloroma, or granulocytic sarcoma, is a rare extramedullary solid hematologic cancer, found concomitant with acute myeloid leukemia. It is infrequently associated with other myeloproliferative disorders or chronic myelogenous leukemia. Chloroma of the testis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is particularly sparsely represented in the literature. It is suggested that an appropriate panel of marker studies be performed along with clinical correlation and circumspection to avoid misleading conclusions. We report an interesting case of a 32-year-old male with a clinical history of acute myelogenous leukemia, postallogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation that was found to have chloroma of the right testis.

  6. A near tetraploid clone in acute myeloid leukemia with CD56 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Devi Gundimeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by specific morphology, immunophenotype and genetic rearrangements. Multiple recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic analysis, which are now widely recognized as one of the most important diagnostic and prognostic determinants in AML. Here, we present a case with unusual cytogenetics, which has been described in very few patients.

  7. Characterization of myeloid leukemia by monoclonal antibodies, with an emphasis on antibodies against myeloperoxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, C. E.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Tetteroo, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Since the last workshop on human leukocyte differentiation antigens, there are 14 well defined cluster-designated (CD) antigens which characterize myelomonocytic cells. Of these, 5 are potentially useful for myeloid leukemia typing (i.e. CD13, CD14, CD15, CD33, CD36) because they are cell

  8. Central diabetes insipidus preceding acute myeloid leukemia with t(3;12)(q26;p12)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, P; Vellenga, E; Adriaanse, R; van de Loosdrecht, AA

    A 52-year-old woman presented with polyuria and polydipsia. ii diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus (DI) was made, which turned out to be the first sign of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Cytogenetic analysis revealed a balanced translocation between chromosome 3 and 12 t(3;12)(q26;p12). The

  9. Monosomal karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia: A better indicator of poor prognosis than a complex karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breems, Dimitri A.; van Putten, Wim L. J.; de Greef, Georgine E.; van Zelderen-Bhola, Shama L.; Gerssen-Schoorl, Klasien B. J.; Mellink, Clemens H. M.; Nieuwint, Aggie; Jotterand, Martine; Hagemeijer, Anne; Beverloo, H. Berna; Lowenberg, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of various cytogenetic components of a complex karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods Cytogenetics and overall survival (OS) were analyzed in 1,975 AML patients age 15 to 60 years. Results Besides AML with normal cytogenetics (CN)

  10. A study of KIT activating mutations in acute myeloid leukemia M0 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)-M0 is a cancer of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. KIT gene is a receptor tyrosine kinase class III that is expressed on by early hematopoietic progenitor cells and plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Mutations of KIT receptor ...

  11. A study of KIT activating mutations in acute myeloid leukemia M0 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Syed Rizwan Hussain

    2012-03-04

    Mar 4, 2012 ... Abstract Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)-M0 is a cancer of blood-forming cells in the bone mar- row. KIT gene is a receptor tyrosine kinase class III that is expressed on by early hematopoietic progenitor cells and plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, differentiation and survival.

  12. Characterization of acute myeloid leukemia based on levels of global hydroxymethylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, L.; Aslanyan, M.G.; Rooij, A. van; Koorenhof-Scheele, T.N.; Massop, M.; Carell, T.; Boezeman, J.B.; Marie, J.P.; Halkes, C.J.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Huls, G.A.; Suciu, S.; Wevers, R.A.; Reijden, B.A. van der; Jansen, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) frequently harbor mutations in genes involved in the DNA (hydroxy)methylation pathway (DNMT3A, TET2, IDH1, and IDH2). In this study, we measured 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) levels in 206 clinically and molecularly well-characterized younger adult AML

  13. Targeting CDK1 promotes FLT3-activated acute myeloid leukemia differentiation through C/EBPα

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.S. Radomska (Hanna); M. Alberich-Jorda (Meritxell); B. Will (Britta); D. Gonzalez (David); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); D.G. Tenen (Daniel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMutations that activate the fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) receptor are among the most prevalent mutations in acute myeloid leukemias. The oncogenic role of FLT3 mutants has been attributed to the abnormal activation of several downstream signaling pathways, such as STAT3, STAT5,

  14. Regulation of constitutive STAT5 phosphorylation in acute myeloid leukemia blasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birkenkamp, KU; Geugien, M; Lemmink, HH; Kruijer, W; Vellenga, E

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the underlying mechanism, which causes the constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts. Constitutive STAT5 phosphorylation was observed in 18 of 26 (69%) patients with

  15. Homeobox gene expression in acute myeloid leukemia is linked to typical underlying molecular aberrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.S. Kramarzova (Karolina Skvarova); K. Fiser (Karel); E. Mejstříková (Ester); K. Rejlova (Katerina); M. Zaliova (Marketa); M.W.J. Fornerod (Maarten); H.A. Drabkin (Harry); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); J. Stary (Jan); J. Trka (Jan); J. Starkova (Julia)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Although distinct patterns of homeobox (HOX) gene expression have been described in defined cytogenetic and molecular subsets of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it is unknown whether these patterns are the direct result of transcriptional alterations or

  16. Pubertal development and fertility in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molgaard-Hansen, Lene; Skou, Anne-Sofie; Juul, Anders

    2013-01-01

    More than 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) become long-term survivors. Most are cured using chemotherapy without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report on pubertal development and compare self-reported parenthood among AML survivors and their siblings....

  17. Five-year follow-up of patients receiving imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Druker (Brian); F. Guilhot (François); S.G. O'Brien (Stephen); I. Gathmann (Insa); H. Kantarjian (Hagop); N. Gattermann (Norbert); M.W.N. Deininger (Michael W.); R.A. Silver (Angus); J.M. Goldman (John); R. Stone (Richard); F. Cervantes (Francisco); A. Hochhaus (Andreas); B.L. Powell (Bayard); J.L. Gabrilove (Janice); P. Rousselot (Philippe); J. Reiffers (Josy); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); T. Hughes (Timothy); H. Agis (Hermine); T. Fischer (Thomas); G.E.G. Verhoef (Gregor); J. Shepherd (John); G. Saglio; A. Gratwohl (Alois); J.L. Nielsen (Johan); J.P. Radich (Jerald); B. Simonsson (Bengt); K. Taylor (Kent); M. Baccarani (Michele); C. So (Charlene); L. Letvak (Laurie); R.A. Larson (Richard)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The cause of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a constitutively active BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase. Imatinib inhibits this kinase, and in a short-term study was superior to interferon alfa plus cytarabine for newly diagnosed CML in the chronic phase. For 5 years, we followed

  18. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia : An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Jaques, Jenny; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone

  19. Imatinib-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation profiling of Bcr-Abl-positive chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Preisinger, C.; Schwarz, J. P.; Bleijerveld, O. B.; et al.

    2012-01-01

    Bcr-Abl is the major cause and pathogenetic principle of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Bcr-Abl results from a chromosomal translocation that fuses the bcr and abl genes, thereby generating a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, which stimulates several signaling networks required for proliferation and survival.

  20. Efficacy of escalated imatinib combined with cytarabine in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, Wendy; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.; van der Holt, Bronno; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Smit, Willem M.; Kersten, Marie Jose; Daenen, Simon M. G. J.; Verdouck, Leo F.; Ferrant, Augustin; Schattenberg, Anton V. M. B.; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kooy, Marinus van Marwijk; Wittebol, Shulamit; Willemze, Roelof; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Beverloo, H. Berna; Lowenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    Background In order to improve the molecular response rate and prevent resistance to treatment, combination therapy with different dosages of imatinib and cytarabine was studied in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the HOVON-51 study. Design and Methods Having reported

  1. Impact of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in First Complete Remission in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Lund, Jennifer L; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell

    2018-01-01

    To examine the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in first complete remission (CR1) compared to chemotherapy alone in a population-based setting, we identified a cohort of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients aged 15-70 years diagnosed between 2000-2014 in Denmark. Using...

  2. Monosomal karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia : A better indicator of poor prognosis than a complex karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breems, Dimitri A.; Van Putten, Wim L. J.; De Greef, Georgine E.; Van Zelderen-Bhola, Shama L.; Gerssen-Schoorl, Klasien B. J.; Mellink, Clemens H. M.; Nieuwint, Aggie; Jotterand, Martine; Hagemeijer, Anne; Beverloo, H. Berna; Lowenberg, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of various cytogenetic components of a complex karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods Cytogenetics and overall survival (OS) were analyzed in 1,975 AML patients age 15 to 60 years. Results Besides AML with normal cytogenetics (CN)

  3. Sudden blastic crisis and additional chromosomal abnormalities during chronic myeloid leukemia in the imatinib era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ridvan; Ozkalemkas, Fahir; Ozkocaman, Vildan; Yakut, Tahsin; Nazlioglu, Hulya Ozturk; Budak, Ferah; Pekgoz, Murat; Korkmaz, Serhat; Karkucak, Mutlu; Ozcelik, Tulay; Tunali, Ahmet

    2009-12-01

    Imatinib has shown significant clinical and cytogenetic success in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Although resistance has been observed in a proportion of patients, sudden blastic crisis is a rare event during imatinib therapy. We describe a 24-year-old male patient with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase who developed sudden blastic crisis in the 24th month of imatinib therapy, with loss of complete cytogenetic response. At this time, the patient had splenomegaly, severe anemia, thrombocytopenia, and leukocytosis. Bone marrow aspirate revealed the presence of massive blastic infiltration with myeloid morphology. Flow cytometric analysis of the bone marrow cells showed positivity for CD45, CD34, CD13, CD33, CD19, CD41, CD61, and glycophorin-A. Trephine biopsy specimens showed 100% cellular marrow with diffuse infiltrate by blasts. A reticulin stain of the bone marrow biopsy section demonstrated severe diffuse fibrosis. Cytogenetic analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that 92% of the cells were positive for the BCR/ABL fusion signal and had increased copy numbers for chromosomes 8, 13, 19, and 21. The patient's prognosis was unfavorable. In conclusion, chronic myeloid leukemia remains complex and includes unanswered questions. The presented case with a rare event during imatinib therapy highlights the need for the continued monitoring of residual disease and the development of strategies to eliminate residual leukemia cells in patients showing a complete cytogenetic response.

  4. A novel application of furazolidone: anti-leukemic activity in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqing Jiang

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common malignant myeloid disorder of progenitor cells in myeloid hematopoiesis and exemplifies a genetically heterogeneous disease. The patients with AML also show a heterogeneous response to therapy. Although all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA has been successfully introduced to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL, it is rather ineffective in non-APL AML. In our present study, 1200 off-patent marketed drugs and natural compounds that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA were screened for anti-leukemia activity using the retrovirus transduction/transformation assay (RTTA. Furazolidone (FZD was shown to inhibit bone marrow transformation mediated by several leukemia fusion proteins, including AML1-ETO. Furazolidone has been used in the treatment of certain bacterial and protozoan infections in human and animals for more than sixty years. We investigated the anti-leukemic activity of FZD in a series of AML cells. FZD displayed potent antiproliferative properties at submicromolar concentrations and induced apoptosis in AML cell lines. Importantly, FZD treatment of certain AML cells induced myeloid cell differentiation by morphology and flow cytometry for CD11b expression. Furthermore, FZD treatment resulted in increased stability of tumor suppressor p53 protein in AML cells. Our in vitro results suggest furazolidone as a novel therapeutic strategy in AML patients.

  5. Distinct evolution and dynamics of epigenetic and genetic heterogeneity in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, S. (Sheng); F.E. Garrett-Bakelman (Francine); Chung, S.S. (Stephen S.); M.A. Sanders (Mathijs); Hricik, T. (Todd); Rapaport, F. (Franck); J. Patel (Jay); R. Dillon (Richard); Vijay, P. (Priyanka); Brown, A.L. (Anna L.); Perl, A.E. (Alexander E.); Cannon, J. (Joy); L. Bullinger (Lars); Luger, S. (Selina); Becker, M. (Michael); Lewis, I.D. (Ian D.); To, L.B. (Luen Bik); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); B. Löwenberg (Bob); H. Döhner (Hartmut); K. Döhner (Konstanze); Guzman, M.L. (Monica L.); Hassane, D.C. (Duane C.); Roboz, G.J. (Gail J.); D. Grimwade (David); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); D'Andrea, R.J. (Richard J.); M. Carroll (Matthew); Park, C.Y. (Christopher Y.); Neuberg, D. (Donna); R. Levine (Ross); A. Melnick (Ari); C.E. Mason (Christopher)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGenetic heterogeneity contributes to clinical outcome and progression of most tumors, but little is known about allelic diversity for epigenetic compartments, and almost no data exist for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We examined epigenetic heterogeneity as assessed by cytosine

  6. Loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 induces resistance to multiple drugs in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göllner, Stefanie; Oellerich, Thomas; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi

    2017-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), therapy resistance frequently occurs, leading to high mortality among patients. However, the mechanisms that render leukemic cells drug resistant remain largely undefined. Here, we identified loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and subsequent reduction of h...

  7. A case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia masquerading as unilateral exudative detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Sharma

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions and Importance: Acute myeloid leukemia can present as an exudative retinal detachment and can mimic similarly presenting conditions like VKH. Hence, this very important differential diagnosis should be kept in mind and it stresses the importance of simple laboratory investigations like whole and differential blood counts.

  8. Engagement of SIRP alpha Inhibits Growth and Induces Programmed Cell Death in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irandoust, Mahban; Zarate, Julian Alvarez; Hubeek, Isabelle; van Beek, Ellen M.; Schornagel, Karin; Broekhuizen, Aart J. F.; Akyuz, Mercan; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.; Delwel, Ruud; Valk, Peter J.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kearns, Pamela; Creutzig, Ursula; Reinhardt, Dirk; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Coenen, Eva A.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Zwaan, C. Michel; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Cloos, Jacqueline; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent studies show the importance of interactions between CD47 expressed on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and the inhibitory immunoreceptor, signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRP alpha) on macrophages. Although AML cells express SIRP alpha, its function has not been investigated in

  9. CITED2-mediated human hematopoietic stem cell maintenance is critical for acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthuis, P. M.; Berger, G.; Bakker, B.; Rozenyeld-Geugien, M.; Jaques, J.; de Haan, G.; Schuringa, J. J.; Vellenga, E.; Schepers, H.

    As the transcriptional coactivator CITED2 (CBP/p300-interacting-transactivator-with-an ED-rich-tail 2) can be overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, we analyzed the consequences of high CITED2 expression in normal and AML cells. CITED2 overexpression in normal CD34(+) cells resulted in

  10. Classification of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia based on miRNA expression profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Obulkasim (Askar); J.E. Katsman-Kuipers (Jenny); P. Verboon (Peter); M.A. Sanders (Mathijs); I.P. Touw (Ivo); M. Jongen-Lavrencic (Mojca); R. Pieters (Rob); J.-H. Klusmann; C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); M.W.J. Fornerod (Maarten)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with respect to biology as well as outcome. In this study, we investigated whether known biological subgroups of pediatric AML are reflected by a common microRNA (miRNA) expression pattern. We assayed 665 miRNAs on 165

  11. Evaluation of gene expression signatures predictive of cytogenetic and molecular subtypes of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balgobind, Brian V.; Van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; De Menezes, Renee X.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Hollink, Iris H. I. M.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. J. C. M.; van Wering, Elisabeth R.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Cloos, Jacqueline; de Bont, Evelien S. J. M.; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Baruchel, Andre; Meyer, Claus; Marschalek, Rolf; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Beverloo, H. Berna; Pieters, Rob; Zwaan, C. Michel; den Boer, Monique L.

    Background Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease characterized by non-random genetic aberrations related to outcome. The genetic subtype is currently detected by different diagnostic procedures which differ in success rate and/or specificity. Design and Methods We examined the

  12. Evaluation of gene expression signatures predictive of cytogenetic and molecular subtypes of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.V. Balgobind (Brian); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); R.X. de Menezes (Renee); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); I.H.I.M. Hollink (Iris); S.T.C.J.M. Arentsen-Peters (Susan); E.R. van Wering (Elisabeth); G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan); J. Cloos (Jacqueline); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); J.M. Cayuela (Jean Michel); A. Baruchel (André); C. Meyer (Claus); R. Marschalek (Rolf); J. Trka (Jan); J. Stary (Jan); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); R. Pieters (Rob); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); M.L. den Boer (Monique)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease characterized by non-random genetic aberrations related to outcome. The genetic subtype is currently detected by different diagnostic procedures which differ in success rate and/or specificity. Design and Methods We

  13. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. Significance of Neuropilin-1 Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarif H. Sallam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Neuropilin-1 is a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor that acts as a mediator of angiogenesis. Its importance in hematological malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of neuropilin-1 expression in AML patients by both flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR in regard to its diagnostic and prognostic values. Materials and Methods: Bone marrow aspirates of 44 patients with de novo AML and 12 relapsed AML patients were examined in this study. Ten subjects with nonhematological malignancy serving as the control group were also included. Results: Neuropilin-1 expression by flow cytometry showed a highly significant increase in de novo and relapsed AML patients with a mean of 27.1±17.5% and 21.5±16.6%, respectively, compared to control group’s mean of 3.4±1.9%. A cut-off value of 6% was established as differentiating patients from the control group. By real-time PCR, no statistical significance was found in de novo and relapsed AML patients with a mean of 1.9±3.6 IU/L and 0.3±0.2 IU/L, respectively, compared to the control group’s mean of 0.3±0.1 IU/L. Neuropilin-1 surface expression by flow cytometry showed a significant correlation with total leukocyte count and a negative correlation with hemoglobin level in de novo AML patients. In relapsed AML patients, positive significant correlations were found with age, bone marrow blast percentage, and CD14. Neuropilin-1 mRNA level by real-time PCR showed a positive significant correlation with peripheral blood blast percentage and CD117 and a negative correlation with hemoglobin level in de novo AML patients. In relapsed patients, a positive correlation was found with lactate dehydrogenase. Conclusion: Neuropilin-1 can be used as a tool for diagnosis and prognosis in AML patients.

  15. High expression of lnc-CRNDE presents as a biomarker for acute myeloid leukemia and promotes the malignant progression in acute myeloid leukemia cell line U937.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Zhou, Q; Ma, J-J

    2018-02-01

    To detect the expression of long non-coding RNA-CRNDE in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and its effect on proliferation and apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cell line U937. 81 cases of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were enrolled, and 35 non-malignant hematological patients were selected as controls. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to detect the expression of lncRNA-CRNDE in the bone marrow specimens of the subjects, and the difference between the two groups was also compared. The correlation between the expression of lncRNA-CRNDE and the sex, age, classification and total survival of clinical patients was analyzed according to the clinical data. U937 cells and monocytes isolated from normal people were cultured, and the expression of lncRNA-CRNDE in acute myeloid leukemia cell line U937 and normal monocytes was compared. SiRNA-CRNDE and pcDNA-CRNDE were transfected into U937 cells, and cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was performed to detect proliferation of U937 cells, Annexin V/PI flow cytometry was carried out to detect cell apoptosis. Cell cycle was measured by flow cytometry. The expression of lncRNA-CRNDE in patients with AML and U937 cells was significantly higher than that in non-malignant hematological controls. Results of clinical data showed that the expression of lncRNA-CRNDE was associated with the classification and total survival of myeloid leukemia in clinical patients. After transfection of siRNA-CRNDE, the proliferation and cloning ability of U937 cells decreased, while the apoptosis increased (p < 0.01) and cells were arrested in G0-G1 phase. Meanwhile, after transfection of pcDNA-CRNDE, the proliferation ability of U937 cells increased significantly, which indicated that the expression of lncRNA-CRNDE might play an essential role in promoting the proliferation of U937 cells. LncRNA-CRNDE is highly expressed in the bone marrow tissues of AML patients, and the expression level is negatively correlated with the

  16. Molecular and cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia: review and case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Deolinda Rodrigues Pereira Velloso

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the frequency of mutations that maylead to a good or bad prognosis, as well as their relation withthe karyotype and immunophenotype in patients with acutemyeloid leukemia. Methods: Thirty samples of patients withacute myeloid leukemia were studied, in which FLT3-ITD, FLT3-TKD and NPM1 mutations were investigated. All samples weresubmitted to immunophenotyping and 25 to karyotyping. Results:An occurrence of 33.3% NPM1 mutation and an equal numberof FLT3-ITD mutation were observed. When only the cases withnormal karyotype were studied, this figures increased to 50 and40%, respectively. Eight percent of cases with normal karyotypeand genotype NPM1+/FLT3- were included in the group of acutemyeloid leukemia with good prognosis. The typical phenotypeof acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype and mutatedNPM1 (HLA-DR and CD34 negative was not observed in thissmall series. Conclusion: Good prognosis cases were identifiedin this series, emphasizing the need to include new geneticmarkers in the diagnostic routine for the correct classification ofacute myeloid leukemia, to more properly estimate prognosis anddetermine treatment.

  17. Therapy-induced secondary acute myeloid leukemia with t(11;19)(q23;p13.1) in a pediatric patient with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Daniel N; Morris, Heather D; Feusner, James H; Koduru, Prasad; Wilson, Kathleen; Timmons, Charles F; Cavalier, MaryEllen; Luu, Hung S

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is classified based upon recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. The t(15;17)(q24.1;q21.1) abnormality is found in 5% to 8% of de novo acute myeloid leukemia and is diagnostic of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The translocation results in fusion of the retinoic acid receptor-α (RARA) gene at 17q21.1 and the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene at 15q24.1. Standard APL therapy is a combination of all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Anthracycline treatment is associated with secondary clonal chromosomal aberrations that can lead to therapy-related secondary myeloid neoplasms. We present a pediatric case of relapsed APL coexistent with treatment-associated secondary myeloid neoplasm with t(11;19)(q23;p13.1).

  18. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease in a patient of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Rohan; Meena, Seema; Tomar, Ankit Singh; Venkatesh, Pradeep; Vohra, Rajpal

    2017-05-01

    This case report describes the concurrent development of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease in a 39 year old male patient of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The patient being reported was a known case of CML in remission with history of painless sudden loss of vision in both eyes. Cases of leukemia can present with visual loss due to multiple ocular manifestations of leukemia itself or side effects of modern drugs used for its treatment. Clinical examination and multimodal imaging of our patient were suggestive of concurrent development of VKH. The patient was started on oral steroids, to which he showed a good response. Thus, the cases of CML may rarely develop concurrent ocular disorders not related to leukemia. These associated ocular disorders need to be distinguished from the ocular manifestations of leukemia itself. Our case highlights the concurrent development of VKH as the etiology of visual loss in a case of CML.

  19. Diversity of breakpoints of variant Philadelphia chromosomes in chronic myeloid leukemia in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Lopes Ferrari Chauffaille

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic myeloid leukemia is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the Philadelphia chromosome or t(9;22(q34.1;q11.2, resulting in the break-point cluster regionAbelson tyrosine kinase fusion gene, which encodes a constitutively active tyrosine kinase protein. The Philadelphia chromosome is detected by karyotyping in around 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but 5-10% may have variant types. Variant Philadelphia chromosomes are characterized by the involvement of another chromosome in addition to chromosome 9 or 22. It can be a simple type of variant when one other chromosome is involved, or complex, in which two or more chromosomes take part in the translocation. Few studies have reported the incidence of variant Philadelphia chromosomes or the breakpoints involved among Brazilian chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Objective: The aim of this report is to describe the diversity of the variant Philadelphia chromosomes found and highlight some interesting breakpoint candidates for further studies. Methods: the Cytogenetics Section Database was searched for all cases with diagnoses of chronic myeloid leukemia during a 12-year period and all the variant Philadelphia chromosomes were listed. Results: Fifty (5.17% cases out of 1071 Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia were variants. The most frequently involved chromosome was 17, followed by chromosomes: 1, 20, 6, 11, 2, 10, 12 and 15. Conclusion: Among all the breakpoints seen in this survey, six had previously been described: 11p15, 14q32, 15q11.2, 16p13.1, 17p13 and 17q21. The fact that some regions get more fre- quently involved in such rare rearrangements calls attention to possible predisposition that should be further studied. Nevertheless, the pathological implication of these variants remains unclear.

  20. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations - mutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation - is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (Pgene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  1. Combined orbital proptosis and exudative retinal detachment as initial manifestations of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaja, Wassia A; Pogrebniak, Alexander E; Bolling, James P

    2015-10-01

    We report bilateral orbital and choroidal involvement as the presenting sign of acute myeloid leukemia in a 2-year-old white girl. The patient presented with painless proptosis and subconjunctival hemorrhage. Ophthalmic examination and magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral leukemic infiltrates of the orbits and choroid, with an exudative retinal detachment in the right eye. Bone marrow biopsy confirmed acute myeloid leukemia. Following radiation treatment, chemotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the patient was doing well 12 months after presentation. Outcomes can be poor, even with treatment; prompt recognition of ophthalmic manifestations of leukemia, including proptosis, choroidal infiltration, and retinal detachment, is necessary. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lentinan: hematopoietic, immunological, and efficacy studies in a syngeneic model of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Emmet; Skavland, Jørn; Mujic, Maja; Bruserud, Øystein; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore

    2010-01-01

    Lentinan, a beta-glucan nutritional supplement isolated from the shitake mushroom (Lentula edodes), is a biological response modifier with immunostimulatory properties. Concomitantly, the role of beta-glucans as chemoimmunotherapeutic in a number of solid cancers has been widely documented. We investigated the effects of nutritional grade lentinan upon BN rats and in a preclinical syngeneic model of acute myeloid leukemia. BN rats supplemented daily with lentinan exhibited weight gains, increased white blood cells, monocytes, and circulating cytotoxic T-cells; and had a reduction in anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and additionally IL-6. Lentinan treatment of BN rats with BNML leukemia resulted in improved cage-side health and reduced cachexia in the terminal stage of this aggressive disease. Combination of lentinan with standards of care in acute myeloid leukemia, idarubicin, and cytarabine increased average survival compared with monotherapy and reduced cachexia. These results indicate that nutritional supplementation of cancer patients with lentinan should be further investigated.

  3. Malignant pleural effusion in acute myeloid leukemia with hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharti, C; Santosa; Setiawan, Budi

    2015-04-01

    Pleural effusions can be the first presentation of a hematologic malignancy. The most common disorders with pleural effusion are Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a frequency of 20 to 30%, especially if mediastinal involvement. Acute and chronic leukemia are rarely accompanied by pleural involvement. We describe a 46-year-old female with history of progressive dyspnoea. Physical examination was revealed massive left pleural effusion. Complete blood count revealed anemia, trombositopenia and normal leucocyte count. Viral serology test shown positive of HBsAg and total antiHBc. Chest X-ray revealed left pleural effusion. Pleural fluid cytology was myeloblast consistent with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Bone marrow aspiration smear, bone marrow biopsy smear, and flow cytometry analysis were consistent with acute myeloid leukemia without maturation (AML M0-FAB classification).

  4. The evolution of allogeneic stem cell transplant for children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Allyson; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2017-01-01

    Survival rates in subsets of pediatric patients who have acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with favorable risk features are now greater than 90%. However, outcomes for patients with high-risk (HR) features remain unacceptably poor. As novel technologies for the identification of HR biomarkers and the detection of residual disease are developed, risk stratification and the application of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) are evolving. HSCT has been shown to benefit subpopulations of pediatric patients with AML, including those with HR cytogenetic translocations, genetic mutations, and/or residual disease after induction. Targeted therapies have shown promise for improving outcomes, and their integration into standard therapy and HSCT regimens is a critical area of interest. Also, expansion of the donor pool has led to the successful use of alternative donor sources for those patients without a matched sibling. However, transplant-related morbidity and mortality and late effects are major limiting factors. Reduced-intensity conditioning regimens have resulted in outcomes equivalent to those achieved with myeloablative regimens among patients in complete remission. The limitation of transplant-related morbidity and mortality through reduced-intensity conditioning and supportive care, and improved survival through optimal alloreactivity in combination with targeted therapy, are steps toward advancing outcomes for pediatric patients who have AML with HR features.

  5. Dynamic Length Changes of Telomeres and Their Nuclear Organization in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samassekou, Oumar [Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba, Department of Physiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada)

    2013-08-22

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by the t(9;22) translocation. As in most cancers, short telomeres are one of the features of CML cells, and telomere shortening accentuates as the disease progresses from the chronic phase to the blastic phase. Although most individual telomeres are short, some of them are lengthened, and long individual telomeres occur non-randomly and might be associated with clonal selection. Telomerase is the main mechanism used to maintain telomere lengths, and its activity increases when CML evolves toward advanced stages. ALT might be another mechanism employed by CML cells to sustain the homeostasis of their telomere lengths and this mechanism seems predominant at the early stage of leukemogenesis. Also, telomerase and ALT might jointly act to maintain telomere lengths at the chronic phase, and as CML progresses, telomerase becomes the major mechanism. Finally, CML cells display an altered nuclear organization of their telomeres which is characterized by the presence of high number of telomeric aggregates, a feature of genomic instability, and differential positioning of telomeres. CML represents a good model to study mechanisms responsible for dynamic changes of individual telomere lengths and the remodeling of telomeric nuclear organization throughout cancer progression.

  6. Clonal evolution in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia revealed by whole genome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Ley, Timothy J.; Larson, David E.; Miller, Christopher A.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Welch, John S.; Ritchey, Julie K.; Young, Margaret A.; Lamprecht, Tamara; McLellan, Michael D.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Wallis, John W.; Lu, Charles; Shen, Dong; Harris, Christopher C.; Dooling, David J.; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Chen, Ken; Schmidt, Heather; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle; Magrini, Vincent J.; Cook, Lisa; McGrath, Sean D.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Wendl, Michael C.; Heath, Sharon; Watson, Mark A.; Link, Daniel C.; Tomasson, Michael H.; Shannon, William D.; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Westervelt, Peter; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; DiPersio, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) die from progressive disease after relapse, which is associated with clonal evolution at the cytogenetic level1,2. To determine the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, we sequenced the primary tumor and relapse genomes from 8 AML patients, and validated hundreds of somatic mutations using deep sequencing; this allowed us to precisely define clonality and clonal evolution patterns at relapse. Besides discovering novel, recurrently mutated genes (e.g. WAC, SMC3, DIS3, DDX41, and DAXX) in AML, we found two major clonal evolution patterns during AML relapse: 1) the founding clone in the primary tumor gained mutations and evolved into the relapse clone, or 2) a subclone of the founding clone survived initial therapy, gained additional mutations, and expanded at relapse. In all cases, chemotherapy failed to eradicate the founding clone. The comparison of relapse-specific vs. primary tumor mutations in all 8 cases revealed an increase in transversions, probably due to DNA damage caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy. These data demonstrate that AML relapse is associated with the addition of new mutations and clonal evolution, which is shaped in part by the chemotherapy that the patients receive to establish and maintain remissions. PMID:22237025

  7. Treated secondary acute myeloid leukemia: a distinct high-risk subset of AML with adverse prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddu, Prajwal; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Ravandi, Farhad; Verstovsek, Srdan; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Bhalla, Kapil N; Daver, Naval; DiNardo, Courtney D; Benton, Christopher B; Takahashi, Koichi; Estrov, Zeev; Pierce, Sherry R; Andreeff, Michael; Cortes, Jorge E; Kadia, Tapan M

    2017-07-25

    Secondary acute myeloid leukemia (s-AML) includes therapy-related AML and AML evolving from antecedent hematological disorder (AHD). s-AML arising after treating AHD likely represents a prognostically distinct, high-risk disease category. In this study, treated s-AML (ts-AML) was defined by: (1) prior diagnosis of myelodysplasia, myeloproliferative neoplasm, or aplastic anemia and (2) at least 1 therapy for that diagnosis. ts-AML was categorized by age (AML based on prior treatment of AHD (ie, ts-AML vs s-AML with untreated AHD, 4.2 vs 9.2 months; P AML was poor across both cohorts (younger and older, 5 and 4.7 months, respectively). In younger AML, survival was significantly inferior in ts-AML when compared with deletion 5/7, TP53, 3q abnormality, and therapy-related AML groups (median, 5 vs 7.9, 7.8, 7.9, and 11.2 months, respectively; P AML was associated with even worse outcomes (OS range, 1.6-2.8 months). ts-AML represents a very high-risk category, even in younger AML patients. s-AML should be further classified to describe ts-AML, an entity less responsive to currently applied treatment approaches. Future AML trial designs should accommodate ts-AML as a distinct subgroup.

  8. An unusual initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawai, Sonali R; Binesh, V G; Betsy, Ambooken; Jisha, K T

    2017-03-01

    Leukemia cutis is seen in around 20% of acute monocytic leukemia. They usually present as papules or nodules or infiltrated plaques but ulceration is uncommon. A 28-year-old female presented with multiple painless indurated genital ulcers of three weeks' duration with low-grade fever, gum hyperplasia, and generalized lymphadenopathy. Tissue smear from the edge of the ulcer showed atypical monocytes suggestive of leukemic infiltrate which was further confirmed by peripheral smear and bone marrow aspirate. Herein, we report a case of acute monocytic leukemia (AML) with leukemia cutis presenting initially with genital ulcers simulating chancre.

  9. Prostate Mass as a First Manifestation of Myeloid Sarcoma in a Patient With an Occult Acute Myeloid Leukemia-A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Natally; Sergio Brito Panizza, Pedro; Perego Costa, Frederico; Cesar Cavalcanti Viana, Publio

    2017-09-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) with either primary or secondary prostate involvement is extremely rare. Its diagnostic is particularly challenging when prostate lesion precedes the systemic manifestation of a myeloproliferative disorder. We report such a case in a 44-year-old man with a prostate mass as a first manifestation of myeloid sarcoma associated with acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorder was suspected in the prostate magnetic resonance imaging, and myeloid sarcoma was confirmed after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate core biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genomic segmental duplications on the basis of the t(9;22) rearrangement in chronic myeloid leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Albano, F; Anelli, L; Zagaria, A; Coccaro, N; D'Addabbo, P; Liso, V; Rocchi, M; Specchia, G

    2010-01-01

    ...) rearrangement causing the 50BCR/30ABL gene formation has been detected in more than 90% of cases with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In 1018% of patients with CML, genomic deletions were dete...

  11. Overexpression and Constitutive Activation of FLT3 Induces STAT5 Activation in Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Blast Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karsten Spiekermann; Ksenia Bagrintseva; Ruth Schwab; Karin Schmieja; Wolfgang Hiddemann

    2003-01-01

    ...) of FLT3 represent the most frequent genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the functional role of active FLT3 mutants in primary AML blast cells is not well characterized...

  12. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic...... conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required....... syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients...

  13. Integration of gene expression and DNA-methylation profiles improves molecular subtype classification in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taskesen, E.; Babaei, S.; Reinders, M.J.M.; De Ridder, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is characterized by various cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. Detection of these abnormalities is important in the risk-classification of patients but requires laborious experimentation. Various studies showed that gene expression profiles (GEP), and

  14. Extracellular matrix stiffness causes systematic variations in proliferation and chemosensitivity in myeloid leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-Won; Mooney, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix stiffness influences biological functions of some tumors. However, it remains unclear how cancer subtypes with different oncogenic mutations respond to matrix stiffness. In addition, the relevance of matrix stiffness to in vivo tumor growth kinetics and drug efficacy remains elusive. Here, we designed 3D hydrogels with physical parameters relevant to hematopoietic tissues and adapted them to a quantitative high-throughput screening format to facilitate mechanistic investigations into the role of matrix stiffness on myeloid leukemias. Matrix stiffness regulates proliferation of some acute myeloid leukemia types, including MLL-AF9+ MOLM-14 cells, in a biphasic manner by autocrine regulation, whereas it decreases that of chronic myeloid leukemia BCR-ABL+ K-562 cells. Although Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) integrin ligand and matrix softening confer resistance to a number of drugs, cells become sensitive to drugs against protein kinase B (PKB or AKT) and rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF) proteins regardless of matrix stiffness when MLL-AF9 and BCR-ABL are overexpressed in K-562 and MOLM-14 cells, respectively. By adapting the same hydrogels to a xenograft model of extramedullary leukemias, we confirm the pathological relevance of matrix stiffness in growth kinetics and drug sensitivity against standard chemotherapy in vivo. The results thus demonstrate the importance of incorporating 3D mechanical cues into screening for anticancer drugs. PMID:27790998

  15. Causes of death - other than progressive leukemia - in childhood acute lymphoblastic (ALL) and myeloid leukemia (AML) : the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slats, AM; Egeler, RM; van der Does-van den Berg, A; Korbijn, C; Hahlen, K; Kamps, WA; Veerman, AJP; Zwaan, CM

    We analyzed causes of death, other than resistant disease or relapse, in 875 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia ( ALL) and 229 with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), treated on three different Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) ALL and three AML protocols. Overall, 23 (2.6%) ALL and 44

  16. The evolution of arsenic in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia and other myeloid neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Lorenzo; Verstovsek, Srdan; Ravandi-Kashani, Farhad; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of arsenic derivatives has long been recognized and was recently rediscovered in modern literature. Early studies demonstrated impressive activity of this compound in patients with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Over the last 2 decades intravenous arsenic trioxide has been used successfully, both alone and in combination with other agents for the treatment of APL and, with some success, other myeloid neoplasms. Arsenic trioxide is currently part the standard of care for patients with APL. More recently, oral formulations of this compound have been developed and are entering clinical practice. This review will discuss the evolution of arsenic in the treatment of APL and other myeloid neoplasms. PMID:26716387

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  18. Targeting of the BLT2 in chronic myeloid leukemia inhibits leukemia stem/progenitor cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Meifang; Ai, Hongmei; Li, Tao [Department of Laboratory Medicine, JingZhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China); Rajoria, Pasupati; Shahu, Prakash [Department of Clinical Medicine, Medical School of Yangtze University, Jingzhou (China); Li, Xiansong, E-mail: lixiansongjz@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, JingZhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China)

    2016-04-15

    Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has significantly improved clinical outcome for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. However, patients develop resistance when the disease progresses to the blast phase (BP) and the mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that BCR-ABL activates BLT2 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to promote leukemogenesis and this involves the p53 signaling pathway. Compared to normal bone marrow (NBM), the mRNA and protein levels of BLT2 are significantly increased in BP-CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. This is correlated with increasing BCR-ABL expression. In contrast, knockdown of BCR-ABL or inhibition of its tyrosine kinase activity decreases Blt2 protein level. BLT2 inhibition induces apoptosis, inhibits proliferation, colony formation and self-renewal capacity of CD34{sup +} cells from TKI-resistant BP-CML patients. Importantly, the inhibitory effects of BCR-ABL TKI on CML stem/progenitor cells are further enhanced upon combination with BLT2 inhibition. We further show that BLT2 activation selectively suppresses p53 but not Wnt or BMP-mediated luciferase activity and transcription. Our results demonstrate that BLT2 is a novel pathway activated by BCR-ABL and critically involved in the resistance of BP-CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitors to TKIs treatment. Our findings suggest that BLT2 and p53 can serve as therapeutic targets for CML treatment. - Highlights: • BCR-ABL regulates BLT2 expression to promote leukemogenesis. • BLT2 is essential to maintain CML cell function. • Activation of BLT2 suppresses p53 signaling pathway in CML cells. • Inhibition of BLT2 and BCR-ABL synergize in eliminating CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitors.

  19. An operational definition of primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia allowing early identification of patients who may benefit from allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Paul; Hills, Robert K.; Grech, Angela; Betteridge, Sophie; Kjeldsen, Lars; Dennis, Michael; Vyas, Paresh; Goldstone, Anthony H.; Milligan, Donald; Clark, Richard E.; Russell, Nigel H.; Craddock, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Up to 30% of adults with acute myeloid leukemia fail to achieve a complete remission after induction chemotherapy - termed primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia. There is no universally agreed definition of primary refractory disease, nor have the optimal treatment modalities been defined. We studied 8907 patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia, and examined outcomes in patients with refractory disease defined using differing criteria which have previously been proposed. Thes...

  20. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  1. ZFX Controls Propagation and Prevents Differentiation of Acute T-Lymphoblastic and Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart P. Weisberg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-propagating cells in acute leukemia maintain a stem/progenitor-like immature phenotype and proliferative capacity. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML and acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL originate from different lineages through distinct oncogenic events such as MLL fusions and Notch signaling, respectively. We found that Zfx, a transcription factor that controls hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, controls the initiation and maintenance of AML caused by MLL-AF9 fusion and of T-ALL caused by Notch1 activation. In both leukemia types, Zfx prevents differentiation and activates gene sets characteristic of immature cells of the respective lineages. In addition, endogenous Zfx contributes to gene induction and transformation by Myc overexpression in myeloid progenitors. Key Zfx target genes include the mitochondrial enzymes Ptpmt1 and Idh2, whose overexpression partially rescues the propagation of Zfx-deficient AML. These results show that distinct leukemia types maintain their undifferentiated phenotype and self-renewal by exploiting a common stem-cell-related genetic regulator.

  2. NPM1 mutations in therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia with uncharacteristic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Tolstrup; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Christiansen, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Frameshift mutations of the nucleophosmin gene (NPM1) were recently reported as a frequently occurring abnormality in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To evaluate the frequency of NPM1 mutations in patients with therapy-related myelodysplasia (t-MDS) and therapy-related AML (t......-/-7, the most frequent abnormalities of t-MDS/t-AML, were not observed (P=0.002). This raises the question whether some of the cases presenting NPM1 mutations were in fact cases of de novo leukemia. The close association to class I mutations and the inverse association to class II mutations suggest...

  3. Detection of minimal residual disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia with t(8;21) translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Papadaki, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t(8;21) rearrangement, constitutes about 5% of all AML cases and is characterized by the presence of RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene. Although this subtype, referred as CBF leukemia, belongs to the favorable cytogenetic risk group, 25% to 30% of the patients relapse. Detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) is of major importance since it evaluates the “depth” of the remission and therefore, risk adapted therapy based on early detection of relapse becomes feasib...

  4. Evidence of myeloid differentiation in non-M3 acute myeloid leukemia treated with the retinoid X receptor agonist bexarotene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Donald E; Luger, Selina M; Kemner, Allison; Swider, Cezary; Goradia, Ami; Tomczak, Ewa; DiPatri, Doris; Bagg, Adam; Nowell, Peter; Loren, Alison W; Perl, Alexander; Schuster, Stephen; Thompson, James E; Porter, David; Andreadis, Charlambos; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Goldsteini, Steven; Ghalie, Richard; Carroll, Martin

    2007-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid has dramatically changed the treatment paradigm for acute promyelocytic leukemia, however, it has no significant activity in non-M3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In vitro, bexarotene, a retinoid X receptor agonist inhibits the proliferation of non-M3 AML cell lines and induces differentiation of leukemic blasts from patients. We hypothesized that there may be similar activity in patients with AML. We report on two patients with relapsed or refractory non-M3 AML treated with bexarotene monotherapy. After initiating treatment, both patients showed leukemic differentiation in their peripheral blood and reduction in bone marrow blasts to less than 5%. One patient had a significant improvement in her platelet count with loss of platelet transfusion needs. Differentiation syndrome occurred in one patient and was successfully treated with steroids and discontinuation of bexarotene. These data suggest that bexarotene has clinical activity in non-M3 AML and may be able to induce myeloid differentiation in vivo.

  5. Aberrant signal transduction and protein expression in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Hein

    2007-01-01

    Het proces van hematopoiese voorziet het lichaam van miljarden bloedcellen per dag. Het is een strak geregisseerd proces. Acute myeloide leukemie (AML) is een afwijking in de bloedcelontwikkeling. Behandeling van deze en andere vormen van leukemie is veelal gebaseerd op het principe van de

  6. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma as the initial manifestation of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhamid, Mohamed M; Li, Yan Michael; Hall, Walter A

    2011-02-01

    Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma is rare and limited to sporadic case reports, associated with neoplasm, aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation and cocaine use. Subdural hematoma has also been reported in association with leukemic malignancies, either during therapy or after diagnosis. However, there are no reports of spontaneous acute subdural hematoma as the primary initial presenting manifestation of a chronic myeloid leukemia. Here we describe one case of a 53-year-old male that presented with severe right-sided headache and intermittent left-sided paresthesias. CT scan showed non-traumatic right-sided acute subdural hematoma. Further evaluation revealed that the patient had chronic myeloid leukemia. His peripheral white blood count normalized after Gleevec and hydroxyurea chemotherapy. Furthermore, he had no neurological deficits after his subdural collection was adequately evacuated.

  7. Leukostasis Retinopathy: A New Clinical Manifestation of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia With Severe Hyperleukocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awh, Caroline C; Miller, John B; Wu, David M; Eliott, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a new clinical manifestation of chronic myeloid leukemia. A 41-year-old man presented with significant visual loss, leading to a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. His white blood count exceeded that of any previously reported case of the disease with documented retinal findings (562,000/mm(3)), and clinical evaluation revealed the blockage of temporal retinal vessels by white blood cells. Hematologic findings resolved within 1 month of chemotherapy with dasatinib, and further treatment with intravitreal anti-VEGF agents resulted in the complete resolution of fundus findings. The authors propose that leukostasis retinopathy be recognized as a clinical manifestation of this life-threatening disease. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Cytogenetic manifestation of chromosome 11 duplication/amplification in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárová, Iveta; Brezinová, Jana; Zemanová, Zuzana; Izáková, Silvia; Lizcová, Libuse; Malinová, Eva; Berková, Adéla; Cermák, Jaroslav; Maaloufová, Jacqueline; Nováková, Ludmila; Michalová, Kyra

    2010-06-01

    Gene amplification is a frequent genetic abnormality in solid tumors, and many oncogenes are activated in this way. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a frequent target of gene amplification is chromosome 11, particularly chromosome region 11q23, including the MLL (myeloid/lymphoid leukemia) gene. However, the number of other amplicons from the long arm of chromosome 11 has also been described. Duplication/amplification of chromosome 11 was found by cytogenetic methods in 10 of 119 newly diagnosed patients with AML. The amplification was presented as: amplification including only the 5' segment of the MLL gene (1 patient), trisomy 11 (3 patients), partial trisomy 11q (2 patients), isochromosome 11q (1 patient), and multiple amplification of specific regions (3 patients). In two cases, amplification involved parts of not only long arm but also of short arm of the chromosome 11: 11p15 and 11p11.1 to 11p13. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. ChIP-seq Analysis of Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Lars; Li, Zhaodong

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors, chromatin-associated proteins and regulatory DNA elements are genetically and/or epigenetically altered in cancer, including Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). This leads to deregulation of transcription that is often causally linked to the tumorigenic state. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation coupled with massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the key technology to study transcription as it allows in vivo whole-genome mapping of epigenetic modifications and interactions of proteins with DNA or chromatin. However, numerous DNA/chromatin-binding proteins, including EZH2, remain difficult to "ChIP," thus yielding genome-wide binding maps of only suboptimal quality. Here, we describe a ChIP-seq protocol optimized for high-quality protein-genome binding maps that have proven especially useful for studying difficult to 'ChIP' transcription regulatory factors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and related malignancies.

  10. C43 DRUG INDUCED LUNG DISEASE: CASE REPORTS: Rare But Real: Pleural Effusion Associated With Bosutinib Therapy For Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (cml)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    H Fakih; S Daouk; N Moguillansky

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting BCR/ABL such as imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib and ponatinib have transformed the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML...

  11. CD47 Is an Adverse Prognostic Factor and Therapeutic Antibody Target on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majeti, R.; Chao, M.P.; Alizadeh, AA; Pang, W.W.; Jaiswal, S.; Gibbs, K.D.; Rooijen, van N.; Weissman, I.L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is organized as a cellular hierarchy initiated and maintained by a subset of self-renewing leukemia stem cells (LSC). We hypothesized that increased CD47 expression on human AML LSC contributes to pathogenesis by inhibiting their phagocytosis through the interaction of

  12. Ovarian reserve in women treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia with chemotherapy, but not stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Brooke V; Missmer, Stacey; Correia, Katharine F; Wadleigh, Martha; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. It is well known that chemotherapy regimens may have a negative effect on ovarian reserve, leading to amenorrhea or premature ovarian failure. There are little data regarding the effects of leukemia chemotherapy on ovarian reserve, specifically in women who received the chemotherapy as adults and are having regular menstrual periods. Our primary objective was to determine if premenopausal women with a history of chemotherapy for leukemia, without subsequent stem cell transplantation, have decreased ovarian reserve. Materials and Methods. We measured ovarian reserve in five women who had been treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and compared them to age-matched control women without a history of chemotherapy. Results. There appeared to be a trend towards lower antimullerian hormone and antral follicle counts and higher follicle-stimulating hormone levels in the leukemia group. Conclusion. Our results indicate that chemotherapy for AML or ALL without stem cell transplantation may compromise ovarian reserve. Although our results should be confirmed by a larger study, oncologists, infertility specialists, and patients should be aware of the potential risks to ovarian function and should be counseled on options for fertility preservation.

  13. Ultrasensitive detection of acute myeloid leukemia minimal residual disease using single molecule molecular inversion probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waalkes, Adam; Penewit, Kelsi; Wood, Brent L; Wu, David; Salipante, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    The identification of minimal residual disease is the primary diagnostic finding which predicts relapse in patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia. Ultrasensitive detection of minimal residual disease would enable better patient risk stratification and could open opportunities for early therapeutic intervention. Herein we apply single molecule molecular inversion probe capture, a technology combining multiplexed targeted sequencing with error correction schemes based on molecular barcoding, in order to detect mutations identifying minimal residual disease with ultrasensitive and quantitative precision. We designed a single molecule molecular inversion probe capture panel spanning >50 kb and targeting 32 factors relevant to acute myeloid leukemia pathogenesis. We demonstrate linearity and quantitative precision over 100-fold relative abundance of mutant cells (1 in 100 to 1 in 1,500), with estimated error rates approaching 1 in 1,200 base pairs sequenced and maximum theoretical limits of detection exceeding 1 in 60,000 mutant alleles. In 3 of 4 longitudinally collected specimens from patients with acute myeloid leukemia, we find that single molecule molecular inversion probe capture detects somatic mutations identifying minimal residual disease at substantially earlier time points and with greater sensitivity than clinical diagnostic approaches used as current standard of care (flow cytometry and conventional molecular diagnosis), and identifies persisting neoplastic cells during clinical remission. In 2 patients, single molecule molecular inversion probe capture detected heterogeneous, subclonal acute myeloid leukemia populations carrying distinct mutational signatures. Single molecule molecular inversion probe technology uniquely couples scalable target enrichment with sequence read error correction, providing an integrated, ultrasensitive approach for detecting minimal residual disease identifying mutations. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  14. Bosutinib Therapy in Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Practical Considerations for Management of Side Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Ault, Patricia S.; Rose, PharmD, John; Nodzon, PhD, Lisa A.; Kaled, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed great advances in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), brought about in large part by the development of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Bosutinib joins the armamentarium of approved TKIs for the treatment of chronic phase (CP), accelerated phase (AP), and blast phase (BP) Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)?positive CML resistant to or intolerant of prior therapy. Bosutinib has an adverse-event (AE) profile distinct from that of other TKIs. Diarr...

  15. Bosutinib: a SRC–ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Khoury, Jean; El Rassi,

    2013-01-01

    Fuad El Rassi, Hanna Jean KhouryDivision of Hematology, Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USAAbstract: Bosutinib is one of five tyrosine kinase inhibitors commercially available in the United States for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. This review of bosutinib summarizes the mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety data, as well as the patient-focused perspective through quality-of-life dat...

  16. Allografting for Bosutinib, Imatinib, Nilotinib, Dasatinib, and Interferon Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia without ABL Kinase Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Uz, B.; Bektas, O.; Eliacik, E.; Goker, H.; Erbilgin, Y.; Sayitoglu, M.; Sayinalp, N.; Aksu, S.; Buyukasik, Y.; Ozcebe, O.; Haznedaroglu, I. C.

    2011-01-01

    The current treatment of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) consists of oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, high-risk CML may present with an aggressive course which may result in blastic crisis or a “difficult-to-manage” state with available treatments. The aim of this paper is to report a patient with complicated CML resistant to treatment and progressed despite the administration of bosutinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, dasatinib, interferon alpha 2a, cytotoxic ch...

  17. A case of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Găman, Amelia Maria; Dobrea, Camelia; Rotaru, Ionela

    2013-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a clonal expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells characterized by exaggerated proliferation of granulocytic lineage, with chronic phase, accelerated phase and blast crisis. Accelerated phase and blast crisis may be associated with extramedulary disease. Extramedullary transformation of CML can be determined both in nodal and extranodal sites. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is rare in chronic myeloid leukemia and may be misdiagnosed as an extramedullary lymphoid blast transformation; the majorities are T-cell lymphomas with an immature thymic phenotype, while peripheral B-cell lymphomas are rarer. We report the case of a 79-year-old woman carrier Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia who developed at eight months of diagnosis an accelerated phase of CML associated simultaneous with a tumor of soft palate, which was initial considering an extramedullary disease. The patient was treated with specific chemotherapy for accelerated phase of CML (Cytosinarabinoside) + Anagrelide, and reversed to secondary chronic phase of CML, but soft palate tumor persists. The immunohistochemical findings of bone marrow trephine biopsy examination showed chronic phase of CML (negativity for immature cells such as CD34, Tdt) and the biopsy of soft palate tumor and immunohistochemical findings revealed a primitive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with medium B-cells (CD20, CD79a positive) and excluding an extramedullary blast crisis (CD34 negative, Tdt negative). Cytogenetic analysis in tumor revealed absence of Philadelphia chromosome. The patient was treated with local radiotherapy for NHL, with a favorable evolution and Hydroxyurea 1 g/day for CML with hematological remission. A localized lymphoid neoplasm may be an extramedullary localized blast crisis of CML or a distinct malignancy, with distinguished therapy and prognosis. A correct diagnosis based on a complex investigation: immunohistochemistry, conventional cytogenetic analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH

  18. Wnt/ß-Catenin: A New Therapeutic Approach to Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown genetic and epigenetic aberrations resulting in aberrant activation of the Wingless-Int (Wnt pathway, thus influencing the initiation and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Of major importance, these findings may lead to novel treatment strategies exploiting targeted modulation of Wnt signaling. This paper comprises the latest status of knowledge concerning the role of Wnt pathway alteration in AML and outlines future lines of research and their clinical perspectives.

  19. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: a Single-Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakucs Enikő

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT is an important treatment modality for patients with acute myeloid leukemia with low and intermediate risk disease. It has served advantages over allogenic transplantation, because it does not need a matched donor, there is no graft versus host disease, there are less complications and a faster immune reconstitution than in the allo-setting. The disadvantage is the lack of the graft versus leukaemia effect.

  20. Chronic myeloid leukemia in an adult ghanaian with sporadic neurofibromatosis 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edeghonghon E Olayemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, a common, progressive, autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disorder, are predisposed to malignancies. Several types of hematologic malignancies have been described in them. However, to date there has been no report to the best of our knowledge of a patient with NF1 developing chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. We present an adult Ghanaian with NF1, who subsequently developed CML. Relevance of the case report is discussed.

  1. Adherence and/or discontinuation of imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Alves,Alexandra Rodrigues; Lima, William Gustavo; Nagai,Michelly Martins; Rodrigues, João Paulo Vilela; Ayres, Lorena Rocha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adherence to imatinib mesylate improves clinical outcomes and promotes a reduction in health expenditure. However, treatment duration and lack of efficacy decrease adherence to pharmacotherapy, resulting in increased mortality associated with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate and compare adherence and/or discontinuation of imatinib mesylate in different studies from the literature. An integrative review of original articles published between the years of 2004 and...

  2. Aberrant expression of CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane member 5 (CMTM5) by promoter methylation in myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jihong; Li, Henan; Zhang, Yao; Li, Jinlan; Xie, Min; Li, Lingdi; Qin, Xiaoying; Qin, Yazhen; Guo, Xiaohuan; Jiang, Qian; Liu, Yanrong; Chen, Shanshan; Huang, Xiaojun; Han, Wenling; Ruan, Guorui

    2011-06-01

    CMTM5 has been shown to exhibit tumor suppressor activities, however, its role in leukemia is unclear. Herein we firstly reported the expression and function of CMTM5 in myeloid leukemia. CMTM5 was down-regulated, or undetectable, in leukemia cell lines and bone marrow cells from leukemia patients with promoter methylation. Ectopic expression of CMTM5-v1 strongly inhibited the proliferation of K562 and MEG-01 cells. In addition, significant negative correlations were observed between CMTM5 and three leukemia-specific fusion genes (AML1-ETO, PML-RARα and BCR/ABL1). CMTM5 expression was up-regulated in patients who had undergone treatment. Therefore, CMTM5 may be involved in the pathomechanism of myeloid leukemias. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Therapy-related myeloid neoplasm in an 18-year-old boy with B-lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xin; Panosyan, Eduard; Yue, Changjun; Ji, Ping; Gotesman, Moran; French, Samuel; Cai, Junchao

    2017-12-01

    his CSF cytospin smear. Bone marrow biopsy was subsequently performed which was consistent with evolving acute myeloid leukemia. A diagnosis of myeloid neoplasm, consistent with t-MN was made. Chromosomal analysis and FISH studies performed on his bone marrow aspirate showed normal karyotype (46,XY[20]), negative FISH result for deletion 9p21 locus, and positive KMT2A (MLL) rearrangement, respectively. Despite of chemotherapy, the patient died within one month after diagnosis. Diagnosis of t-MN should be suspected in patients with a history of receiving cytotoxic agents and/or irradiation. In this case study, we diagnosed t-MN with KMT2A rearrangement in a patient with history of B-ALL with 9p deletion and gain of X chromosome. Unusual features associated with this case are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Rare cytogenetic abnormalities and alteration of microRNAs in acute myeloid leukemia and response to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shahjahani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common acute leukemia in adults, which is heterogeneous in terms of morphological, cytogenetic and clinical features. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including karyotype aberrations, gene mutations and gene expression abnormalities are the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosis, classification and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemias. Based on World Health Organization (WHO classification, acute myeloid leukemias can be divided to four groups. Due to the heterogeneous nature of AML and since most therapeutic protocols in AML are based on genetic alterations, gathering further information in the field of rare disorders as well as common cytogenetic abnormalities would be helpful in determining the prognosis and treatment in this group of diseases. Recently, the role of microRNAs (miRNAs in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid leukemic cell differentiation in myeloid lineage has been specified. miRNAs can be used instead of genes for AML diagnosis and classification in the future, and can also play a decisive role in the evaluation of relapse as well as response to treatment in the patients. Therefore, their use in clinical trials can affect treatment protocols and play a role in therapeutic strategies for these patients. In this review, we have examined rare cytogenetic abnormalities in different groups of acute myeloid leukemias according to WHO classification, and the role of miRNA expression in classification, diagnosis and response to treatment of these disorders has also been dealt with.

  5. Rare Cytogenetic Abnormalities and Alteration of microRNAs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Response to Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahani, Mohammad; Khodadi, Elahe; Seghatoleslami, Mohammad; Asl, Javad Mohammadi; Golchin, Neda; Zaieri, Zeynab Deris

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, which is heterogeneous in terms of morphological, cytogenetic and clinical features. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including karyotype aberrations, gene mutations and gene expression abnormalities are the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosis, classification and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemias. Based on World Health Organization (WHO) classification, acute myeloid leukemias can be divided to four groups. Due to the heterogeneous nature of AML and since most therapeutic protocols in AML are based on genetic alterations, gathering further information in the field of rare disorders as well as common cytogenetic abnormalities would be helpful in determining the prognosis and treatment in this group of diseases. Recently, the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid leukemic cell differentiation in myeloid lineage has been specified. miRNAs can be used instead of genes for AML diagnosis and classification in the future, and can also play a decisive role in the evaluation of relapse as well as response to treatment in the patients. Therefore, their use in clinical trials can affect treatment protocols and play a role in therapeutic strategies for these patients. In this review, we have examined rare cytogenetic abnormalities in different groups of acute myeloid leukemias according to WHO classification, and the role of miRNA expression in classification, diagnosis and response to treatment of these disorders has also been dealt with. PMID:26779308

  6. Rare Cytogenetic Abnormalities and Alteration of microRNAs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Response to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahani, Mohammad; Khodadi, Elahe; Seghatoleslami, Mohammad; Asl, Javad Mohammadi; Golchin, Neda; Zaieri, Zeynab Deris; Saki, Najmaldin

    2015-02-10

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, which is heterogeneous in terms of morphological, cytogenetic and clinical features. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including karyotype aberrations, gene mutations and gene expression abnormalities are the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosis, classification and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemias. Based on World Health Organization (WHO) classification, acute myeloid leukemias can be divided to four groups. Due to the heterogeneous nature of AML and since most therapeutic protocols in AML are based on genetic alterations, gathering further information in the field of rare disorders as well as common cytogenetic abnormalities would be helpful in determining the prognosis and treatment in this group of diseases. Recently, the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid leukemic cell differentiation in myeloid lineage has been specified. miRNAs can be used instead of genes for AML diagnosis and classification in the future, and can also play a decisive role in the evaluation of relapse as well as response to treatment in the patients. Therefore, their use in clinical trials can affect treatment protocols and play a role in therapeutic strategies for these patients. In this review, we have examined rare cytogenetic abnormalities in different groups of acute myeloid leukemias according to WHO classification, and the role of miRNA expression in classification, diagnosis and response to treatment of these disorders has also been dealt with.

  7. Multifunctional microfluidic chip for optical nanoprobe based RNA detection - application to Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Pedro Urbano; Vinhas, Raquel; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Birol, Semra Zuhal; Trabzon, Levent; Bernacka-Wojcik, Iwona; Igreja, Rui; Lopes, Paulo; Baptista, Pedro Viana; Águas, Hugo; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo

    2018-01-10

    Many diseases have their treatment options narrowed and end up being fatal if detected during later stages. As a consequence, point-of-care devices have an increasing importance for routine screening applications in the health sector due to their portability, fast analyses and decreased cost. For that purpose, a multifunctional chip was developed and tested using gold nanoprobes to perform RNA optical detection inside a microfluidic chip without the need of molecular amplification steps. As a proof-of-concept, this device was used for the rapid detection of chronic myeloid leukemia, a hemato-oncological disease that would benefit from early stage diagnostics and screening tests. The chip passively mixed target RNA from samples, gold nanoprobes and saline solution to infer a result from their final colorimetric properties. An optical fiber network was used to evaluate its transmitted spectra inside the chip. Trials provided accurate output results within 3 min, yielding signal-to-noise ratios up to 9 dB. When compared to actual state-of-art screening techniques of chronic myeloid leukemia, these results were, at microscale, at least 10 times faster than the reported detection methods for chronic myeloid leukemia. Concerning point-of-care applications, this work paves the way for other new and more complex versions of optical based genosensors.

  8. Genetic tests to evaluate prognosis and predict therapeutic response in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Margaret L; Shea, Thomas C; Fedoriw, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    Management of patients with acute myeloid leukemia relies on genetic tests that inform diagnosis and prognosis, predict response to therapy, and measure minimal residual disease. The value of genetics is reinforced in the revised 2008 World Health Organization acute myeloid leukemia classification scheme. The various analytic procedures-karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, and microarray technology-each have advantages in certain clinical settings, and understanding their relative merits assists in specimen allocation and in effective utilization of health care resources. Karyotype and array technology represent genome-wide screens, whereas the other methods target specific prognostic features such as t(15;17) PML-RARA, t(8;21) RUNX1-RUNX1T1, inv(16) CBFB-MYH11, 11q23 MLL rearrangement, FLT3 internal tandem duplication, or NPM1 mutation. New biomarkers and pharmacogenetic tests are emerging. The pathologist's expertise is critical in 1) consulting with clinicians about test selection as well as specimen collection and handling; 2) allocating tissue for immediate testing and preserving the remaining specimen for any downstream testing that is indicated once morphology and other pertinent test results are known; 3) performing tests that maximize outcome based on the strengths and limitations of each assay in each available specimen type; and 4) interpreting and conveying results to the rest of the health care team in a format that facilitates clinical management. Acute myeloid leukemia leads the way for modern molecular medicine.

  9. Pharmaceutical care and home delivery of medication to patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña San José Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the implementation of a new model face to face and remote pharmaceutical care with home delivery of tyronsine kinase inhibitors medicines for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Methods: Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia were selected to start this new model of care. Four characteristics were taken into account for the choice: chronicity of the disease, frequency of doctor visits, pharmaceutical care value and conservation of tyronsine kinase inhibitors medicines at room temperature. Results: Out of 68 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and treated with tyronsine kinase inhibitors, 42 were selected due to the frequency of their hematologist visits. An introductory letter and a questionnaire about their preferences were sent to these patients.Sixteen of them expressed their desire to participate. The legal department designed a confidentiality contract, as well as a model of informed consent. A logistic distribution model based on defined routes and timetables was established. Prior to inclusion, pharmaceutical care was performed in a face to face consultation and the communication way was established for the followings remote consultations. Home delivery had a monthly cost of 13.2 € (including VAT per patient. All the patients who started this program continue in it. To date, 5 deliveries per patient have been conducted Conclusions: It is possible to establish an alternative model of pharmaceutical care with home delivery of medication, keeping the pharmacist-patient relationship, avoiding travel, ensuring the confidentiality and rationalizing the stocks

  10. Imatinib resistance: a review of alternative inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Bitencourt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of point mutations in the BCR-ABL kinase domain is the main reason for imatinib resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia. Different detection methods are used in chronic myeloid leukemia monitoring, such as direct sequencing, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and allele specific polymerase chain reaction. Mutation analysis has become mandatory during patient workup of chronic myeloid leukemia in order for the physician to choose the most suitable tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This article, a review of possible therapies used to overcome imatinib resistance, investigates the current position by searching the PubMed electronic database using the following keywords: imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, aurora kinase, SRC kinase, mutation, treatment, drugs and resistance. New tyrosine kinase inhibitors include BCR-ABL kinase selective inhibitors, dual ABL/SRC kinase inhibitors and aurora kinase inhibitors. Awareness of the spectrum of new drugs against mutations, in particular the T315I mutation, makes it possible to properly select the best therapy for each patient.

  11. Prognostic Value of a CYP2B6 Gene Polymorphism in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazhary, Nevin M; Shafik, Roxan E; Shafik, Hanan E; Kamel, Mahmoud M

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study aimed to detect a CYP2B6 polymorphism in de novo cases of acute myeloid leukemia patients and identify any role in disease progression and outcome. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of 82 newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia cases and the CYP2B6 G15631T gene polymorphism was assayed by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The frequency of the GG genotype (wild type) was 48 (58.5%) and that of the mutant type T allele was 34 (41.9%). GT genotype heterozygous variants were found in 28 (34%), and TT genotype homozygous variants in 6 (7.3%) cases. We found no significant association between the CYP2B6 G15631T polymorphism and complete response (CR) (p-value=0.768), FAB classification (p-value=0.51), cytogenetic analysis (p-value=0.673), and overall survival (p-value=0.325). Also, there were no significant links with early toxic death (p-value=0.92) or progression- free survival (PFS) (p-value=0.245). Our results suggest that the CYP2B6 polymorphism has no role in disease progression, therapeutic outcome, patient free survival, early toxic death and overall survival in acute myeloid leukemia patients.

  12. Global Identification of EVI1 Target Genes in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Glass

    Full Text Available The ecotropic virus integration site 1 (EVI1 transcription factor is associated with human myeloid malignancy of poor prognosis and is overexpressed in 8-10% of adult AML and strikingly up to 27% of pediatric MLL-rearranged leukemias. For the first time, we report comprehensive genomewide EVI1 binding and whole transcriptome gene deregulation in leukemic cells using a combination of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq expression profiling. We found disruption of terminal myeloid differentiation and cell cycle regulation to be prominent in EVI-induced leukemogenesis. Specifically, we identified EVI1 directly binds to and downregulates the master myeloid differentiation gene Cebpe and several of its downstream gene targets critical for terminal myeloid differentiation. We also found EVI1 binds to and downregulates Serpinb2 as well as numerous genes involved in the Jak-Stat signaling pathway. Finally, we identified decreased expression of several ATP-dependent P2X purinoreceptors genes involved in apoptosis mechanisms. These findings provide a foundation for future study of potential therapeutic gene targets for EVI1-induced leukemia.

  13. Phenotypic and gene expression diversity of malignant cells in human blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovsky, Masha; Berlinsky, Sagi; Sinai, Pirchia; Leiba, Merav; Nagler, Arnon; Galski, Hanan

    2008-10-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is considered as a paradigm of neoplasias developing through multistep track. It is believed that in the blast crisis (BC) terminal phase of the disease, blood-circulating blasts represent an expansion of a single CML clone. However, although these blasts grow mostly in suspension under standard culture conditions, a relatively small cell-fraction adheres to the plastic dish. Yet, it is unknown whether these two cell-fractions are distinct sub-populations that originated from a common CML clone and whether they have different biological and malignant properties. To address these questions, we have characterized the plastic-adherent and non-adherent sub-populations of various cell lines and primary cells derived from patients with CML in BC. This study indicated that the adherent-subsets retain repopulating ability with indications of increased malignant properties as greater anchorage-independent clonogenicity, impairment of cell-cell contact inhibition, loss of serum-dependent attenuation of plastic-adhesion, and a significant up-regulation of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, c-JUN, and c-FOS along with the adhesion-related genes KiSS-1, THBS3, and ITGB5. The adherent blasts stably retain their unique properties even after elimination of the adherence selection pressure. Sub-cloning analyses indicated that the adherent cells could be continuously evolved from any parental non-adherent clone in a unidirectional manner. This study provides new insights into the biology and the malignant evolution of CML, indicating that at the BC phase, circulating blasts are heterogeneous and consisting of at least two distinct populations of a common clonal origin. The existence of a minor "pool" of blasts of greater clonogenic capacity along with significantly higher expression level of BCR-ABL, individually or in conjunction with other cancer and adhesion-related genes, might also signify clonal evolution toward subsequent increased malignancy and lower

  14. Relative biological effectiveness of tritium for induction of myeloid leukemia in CBA/H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.R. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Health Protection Branch, Health Div., Richland, WA (United States); Myers, D.K.; Jackson, J.S.; Dunford, D.W.; Gragtmans, N.J.; Wyatt, H.M.; Jones, A.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontairo (Canada); Percy, D.H. [Univ. of Guelph, Ontario Veterinary College, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-07-01

    To help resolve uncertainties as to the most appropriate weighting factor for tritium {beta} rays, a large experiment was carried out to measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water compared to X rays for the induction of myeloid leukemia in male mice of the CBA/H strain. The study was designed to estimate the lifetime incidence of myeloid leukemia in seven groups of about 750 mice each; radiation exposures were approximately 0, 1, 2 and 3 Gy both for tritiated water and for X rays. The lifetime incidence of leukemia in these mice increased from 0.13% in the control group to 6-8% in groups exposed to higher radiation doses. The results were fitted to various equations relating leukemia incidence to radiation dose, using both the raw data and data corrected for cumulative mouse-days at risk. The calculated RBE values for tritium 13 rays compared to X rays ranged from 1.0 {+-} 0.5 to 1.3 {+-} 0.3. A best estimate of the RBE for this experiment was about 1.2 {+-} 0.3. A w{sub R} value of 1 would thus appear to be more appropriate than a W{sub R} of 2 for tritium {beta} rays. (author)

  15. Relative biological effectiveness of tritium for induction of myeloid leukemia in CBA/H mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J R; Myers, D K; Jackson, J S; Dunford, D W; Gragtmans, N J; Wyatt, H M; Jones, A R; Percy, D H

    1995-10-01

    To help resolve uncertainties as to the most appropriate weighting factor for tritium beta rays, a large experiment was carried out to measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water compared to X rays for the induction of myeloid leukemia in male mice of the CBA/H strain. The study was designed to estimate the lifetime incidence of myeloid leukemia in seven groups of about 750 mice each; radiation exposures were approximately 0, 1, 2 and 3 Gy both for tritiated water and for X rays. The lifetime incidence of leukemia in these mice increased from 0.13% in the control group to 6-8% in groups exposed to higher radiation doses. The results were fitted to various equations relating leukemia incidence to radiation dose, using both the raw data and data corrected for cumulative mouse-days at risk. The calculated RBE values for tritium beta rays compared to X rays ranged from 1.0 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3. A best estimate of the RBE for this experiment was about 1.2 +/- 0.3. A wR value of 1 would thus appear to be more appropriate than a wR of 2 for tritium beta rays.

  16. Small-Molecule Disruption of the Myb/p300 Cooperation Targets Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttarkar, Sagar; Piontek, Therese; Dukare, Sandeep; Schomburg, Caroline; Schlenke, Peter; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Schmidt, Thomas J; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-12-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb is essential for the proliferation of hematopoietic cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and other human cancers. Pharmacologic inhibition of Myb is therefore emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy for these diseases. By using a Myb reporter cell line, we have identified plumbagin and several naphthoquinones as potent low-molecular weight Myb inhibitors. We demonstrate that these compounds inhibit c-Myb by binding to the c-Myb transactivation domain and disrupting the cooperation of c-Myb with the coactivator p300, a major driver of Myb activity. Naphthoquinone-induced inhibition of c-Myb suppresses Myb target gene expression and induces the differentiation of the myeloid leukemia cell line HL60. We demonstrate that murine and human primary acute myeloid leukemia cells are more sensitive to naphthoquinone-induced inhibition of clonogenic proliferation than normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Overall, our work demonstrates for the first time the potential of naphthoquinones as small-molecule Myb inhibitors that may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of leukemia and other tumors driven by deregulated Myb. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2905-15. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  18. Megakaryocytic blast crisis as a presenting manifestation of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullarkat, Sheeja T; Vardiman, James W; Slovak, Marilyn L; Rao, Dinesh S; Rao, Nagesh P; Bedell, Victoria; Said, Jonathan W

    2008-11-01

    Acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare form of acute myelogenous leukemia and may occur either de novo or by transformation of a preexisting myelodysplastic or myeloproliferative process including blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Megakaryocytic blast crisis as the presenting manifestation of CML is extremely rare. We describe such a patient with no prior hematologic disease who presented with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia and extramedullary involvement, in whom the leukemic cells carried the BCR-ABL1 translocation as part of a complex karyotype. Using targeted sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization (T-FISH) technique, we detected two copies of BCR-ABL1 fusion gene in the leukemic blasts while the neutrophils carried a single copy of BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, thereby proving the origin of the megakaryoblastic leukemia from a previously undiagnosed CML clone. Blast crisis as a presenting manifestation of CML is rare and detecting clonal evolution of acute leukemia by specialized cytogenetic techniques may have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  19. Granulomatous rosacea: Like leukemid in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škiljević Dušan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Skin findings in leukemias may be divided into specific lesions (leukemia cutis and non-specific lesions (leukemids which may be found in up to 80% of all patients with leukemias. The leukemids vary clinically and they are usually a manifestation of bone marrow or immunologic impairment, but also Sweet syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, erythroderma, maculopapular exanthema, prurigo-like papules, generalized pigmentation, follicular mucinosis, generalized pruritus may be found during the course of leukemia. Case report. We report a 70-year-old male with a 3-month history of erythema, papules and pustules on the face, ears and neck and over a month history of refractory anemia, anorexia, weight loss, malaise, and fever. Physical examination revealed symmetric erythematous, violaceous papules, papulo-nodules and plaques with slate scale and sparse, small pustules on the face, earlobes and neck. Histopathologic findings of involved skin showed diffuse mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate with perifollicular accentuation and focal granulomatous inflammation in the papillary and upper reticular dermis. Extensive checkup revealed the presence of acute myeloid leukemia French- American-British (FAB classification subtype M2, with signs of three-lineage dysplasia. The patient was treated by L6 protocol which led to complete remission, both in bone marrow and skin, but after seven months he had relapse of leukemia with the fatal outcome. Conclusion. This case indicates the importance of skin eruptions in the context of hematological malignancies.

  20. Dual effect of LPS on murine myeloid leukemia cells: Pro-proliferation and anti-proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lingling [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Zhao, Yingmin [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Gu, Xin; Wang, Jijun; Pang, Lei; Zhang, Yanqing; Li, Yaoyao; Jia, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xin [Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Gu, Jian [Department of Hematology, Yangzhou University School of Clinical Medicine, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Yu, Duonan, E-mail: duonan@yahoo.com [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine for Prevention and Treatment of Senile Disease, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Institute of Comparative Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Disease and Zoonosis, Yangzhou 225001 (China)

    2016-06-10

    Modification of the bone marrow microenvironment is considered as a promising strategy to control leukemic cell proliferation, diseases progression and relapse after treatment. However, due to the diversity and complexity of the cellular and molecular compartments in the leukemic microenvironment, it is extremely difficult to dissect the role of each individual molecule or cell type in vivo. Here we established an in vitro system to dissect the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), stromal cells and endothelial cells in the growth of mouse myeloid tumor cells and B-lymphoma cells. We found that either LPS or bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer in culture is required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. Surprisingly, the growth of myeloid leukemic cells on stromal cells is strongly inhibited when coupled with LPS in culture. This opposing effect of LPS, a complete switch from pro-proliferation to antitumor growth is due, at least in part, to the rapidly increased production of interleukin 12, Fas ligand and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 from stromal cells stimulated by LPS. These results demonstrate that LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor cell proliferation, thus changing the disease course of myeloid leukemias through its direct effect or modulation of the tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • LPS alone in culture is required for the proliferation of murine myeloid tumor cells. • Bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer is also required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. • However, the growth of myeloid tumor cells is inhibited when LPS and stromal cells are both available in culture. • Thus LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor growth through its direct effect or modulation of tumor microenvironment.

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Isolated Trisomy 19 Associated with Diffuse Myelofibrosis and Osteosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Stelling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary myelofibrosis (PMF, per WHO criteria, is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm that usually presents with a proliferation of granulocytic and megakaryocytic lineages with an associated fibrous deposition and extramedullary hematopoiesis. The bone marrow histologic findings of this disorder are typically characterized by the presence of myeloid metaplasia with an associated reactive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and osteosclerosis. However, marked myelofibrosis is not solely confined to PMF and may also be associated with other conditions including but not limited to acute megakaryoblastic leukemias (FAB AML-M7. Here, we describe a rare case of a non-megakaryoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with marked myelofibrosis with osteosclerosis and an isolated trisomy 19. A 19-year-old male presented with severe bone pain of one week duration with a complete blood cell count and peripheral smear showing a mild anemia and occasional circulating blasts. A follow up computed tomography (CT scan showed diffuse osteosclerosis with no evidence of hepatosplenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Subsequently, the bone marrow biopsy showed markedly sclerotic bony trabeculae and a hypercellular marrow with marked fibrosis and intervening sheets of immature myeloid cells consistent with myeloblasts with monocytic differentiation. Importantly, these myeloblasts were negative for megakaryocytic markers (CD61 and vWF, erythroid markers (hemoglobin and E-cadherin, and lymphoid markers (CD3, CD19, and TdT. Metaphase cytogenetics showed an isolated triosomy 19 with no JAK2 V617F mutation. The patient was treated with induction chemotherapy followed by allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which subsequently resulted in a rapid resolution of bone marrow fibrosis, suggesting graft-anti-fibrosis effect. This is a rare case of a non-megakaryoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with myelofibrosis and osteosclerosis with trisomy 19 that may provide insights into the prognosis and

  2. MicroRNA-181a enhances the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of chronic myeloid leukemia to imatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, GUANGYU; ZHAO, RAN; ZHAO, XINGSHENG; CHEN, XI; WANG, DONG; JIN, YINJI; LIU, XI; ZHAO, CI; ZHU, YUANYUAN; REN, CHENGCHENG; LI, MINGHUI; JIN, XIAOMING; ZHANG, FENGMIN; ZHONG, ZHAOHUA; WANG, TIANZHEN; LI, XIAOBO

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-181 (miR-181) has been recently demonstrated to participate in the differentiation and development of immune cells, including natural killer cells and B and T lymphocytes, and myeloid linages, including erythroid and megakaryocytic cells. The aberrant expression of miR-181, particularly low expression levels, has been observed in a number of leukemia types, including B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and cytogenetically abnormal acute myeloid leukemia. However, the expression and function of miR-181 in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) remains unknown. In the present study, the aberrant expression of miR-181a was analyzed in a patient with CML and in the CML K562 cell line. In addition, the function and potential mechanisms of miR-181a in K562 cells with regard to their chemotherapeutic sensitivity to imatinib were investigated. The expression levels of miR-181a were significantly reduced in the patient with CML and in the CML K562 cell line. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-181a in the K562 cells enhanced the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of these cells to imatinib. The potential mechanism mediating these effects may be associated with the capacity of miR-181a to inhibit cell growth and/or to induce cells apoptosis and differentiation in K562 cells. The results of the present study suggested that miR-181a may be a target for the treatment of CML and a useful indicator of the therapeutic sensitivity of CML to imatinib. PMID:26722250

  3. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Juvenile Myelomonocytic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  4. Prognostic discrimination based on the EUTOS long-term survival score within the International Registry for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millot, Frédéric; Guilhot, Joëlle; Suttorp, Meinolf

    2017-01-01

    The EUTOS Long-Term Survival score was tested in 350 children with chronic myeloid leukemia in first chronic phase treated with imatinib and registered in the International Registry for Childhood Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. With a median follow up of 3 years (range, 1 month to 6 years) progression ...

  5. T(6;9)(p22;q34)/DEK-NUP214-rearranged pediatric myeloid leukemia: An international study of 62 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Sandahl (Julie Damgaard); E.A. Coenen (Eva); E. Forestier (Erik); J. Harbott (Jochen); B. Johansson (Bert); G. Kerndrup (Gitte); S. Adachi (Susumu); A. Auvrignon (Anne); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); J.-M. Cayuela (Jean-Michel); L. Chilton (Lucy); M.W.J. Fornerod (Maarten); V. de Haas (Valerie); C.J. Harrison (Christine); H. Inaba (Hiroto); G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan); D. Liang (Der); F. Locatelli (Franco); R. Masetti (Riccardo); C. Perot (Christine); S.C. Raimondi (Susana); K. Reinhardt (Katarina); D. Tomizawa (Daisuke); N. von Neuhoff (Nils); M. Zecca (Marco); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); H. Hasle (Henrik)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAcute myeloid leukemia with t(6;9)(p22;q34) is listed as a distinct entity in the 2008 World Health Organization classification, but little is known about the clinical implications of t(6;9)-positive myeloid leukemia in children. This international multicenter study presents the clinical

  6. Inhibition of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Overcomes Differentiation Blockade in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, David B; Kfoury, Youmna S; Mercier, François E; Wawer, Mathias J; Law, Jason M; Haynes, Mark K; Lewis, Timothy A; Schajnovitz, Amir; Jain, Esha; Lee, Dongjun; Meyer, Hanna; Pierce, Kerry A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Waller, Anna; Ferrara, Steven J; Eheim, Ashley L; Stoeckigt, Detlef; Maxcy, Katrina L; Cobert, Julien M; Bachand, Jacqueline; Szekely, Brian A; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Sklar, Larry A; Kotz, Joanne D; Clish, Clary B; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Clemons, Paul A; Janzer, Andreas; Schreiber, Stuart L; Scadden, David T

    2016-09-22

    While acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises many disparate genetic subtypes, one shared hallmark is the arrest of leukemic myeloblasts at an immature and self-renewing stage of development. Therapies that overcome differentiation arrest represent a powerful treatment strategy. We leveraged the observation that the majority of AML, despite their genetically heterogeneity, share in the expression of HoxA9, a gene normally downregulated during myeloid differentiation. Using a conditional HoxA9 model system, we performed a high-throughput phenotypic screen and defined compounds that overcame differentiation blockade. Target identification led to the unanticipated discovery that inhibition of the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) enables myeloid differentiation in human and mouse AML models. In vivo, DHODH inhibitors reduced leukemic cell burden, decreased levels of leukemia-initiating cells, and improved survival. These data demonstrate the role of DHODH as a metabolic regulator of differentiation and point to its inhibition as a strategy for overcoming differentiation blockade in AML. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Unilateral eyelid swelling, proptosis and diplopia as initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Imtiaz A; Alaraj, Ahmad M; Alkatan, Hind M

    2012-04-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a tumor of immature myeloid cells occurring in many extramedullary sites, orbit being one of them where the tumor may occur prior to or after the diagnosis of underlying disease. We report a case of a 17-year-old male who presented with upper eyelid swelling, proptosis and diplopia after presumed blunt trauma without any other clinical signs and symptoms. Initial imaging suggested possibility of subperiosteal hematoma. Magnetic resonance imaging studies demonstrated a solid tumor. Complete excision of the tumor and histopathologic diagnosis revealed evidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). There were no other sites indicating any tumoral process; however, bone marrow aspirate revealed an evidence of systemic disease. After chemotherapy and allogenic bone marrow transplant, the patient had complete remission of his disease. An episode of graft vs host reaction resulting in severe dry eyes along with skin eruptions was treated successfully by immunosuppression and topical lubrication without any visual or systemic sequela. This case emphasizes on the need for an aggressive work-up for any unusual orbital lesion in the absence of any explainable etiology. Further, AML may be suspected in the cases of orbital tumors even in the absence of systemic manifestations of leukemia at any age.

  8. Frequency of fab subtypes in acute myeloid leukemia patients at Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harani, Mahadev S; Adil, Salman Naseem; Shaikh, Mohammad Usman; Kakepoto, Ghulam Nabi; Khurshid, Mohammmad

    2005-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease. Therefore, various parameters are needed to classify this disease into subtypes, so that specific treatment approaches can be utilized effectively. The commonly used method for diagnosis and classification is based on FAB criteria using morphology and cytochemical stains. For some of the categories, immunophenotyping is necessary. The aim of present study is to determine the frequency of various sub types in acute myeloid leukemia using FAB criteria in our population. This will aid in the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia and hence proper management of the patients. This is descriptive case control study conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital from January 1999 to December 2000. The total number of subjects was 116 that included both adults and children. The patients were diagnosed on the basis of bone marrow morphology using FAB classification. Cytochemistry was done in all cases, while immunophenotyping was considered only in those cases that were found to be problematic. Among 116 patients, 70 were males and 46 were females with male to female ratio 1.5:1. The age ranged between 6 months to 85 years with a mean age of 32 years. AML-M4 was the predominant French-American-British (FAB) subtype (36.2%) followed by M2 (30.25%), M3 (10.4%), M1 (8.7%), M0 (7.7%), M5a (3.5%), M5b (2.5%) and M6 (0.8%). The most common FAB subtype observed in our study was Acute myelomonocytic leukemia (M4) which is in accordance with studies reported from Saudia Arabia and a previous study reported from our institution. However,other national and international studies have reported Myeloblastic Leukemia with maturation (M2) as the predominant subtype of AML.

  9. Impact of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System, cytogenetics and monosomal karyotype on outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndromes and secondary acute myeloid leukemia evolving from myelodysplastic syndromes: a retrospective multicenter study of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenecke, Christian; Göhring, Gudrun; de Wreede, Liesbeth C; van Biezen, Anja; Scheid, Christof; Volin, Liisa; Maertens, Johan; Finke, Jürgen; Schaap, Nicolaas; Robin, Marie; Passweg, Jakob; Cornelissen, Jan; Beelen, Dietrich; Heuser, Michael; de Witte, Theo; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the revised 5-group International Prognostic Scoring System cytogenetic classification on outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes or secondary acute myeloid leukemia who were reported to the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation database. A total of 903 patients had sufficient cytogenetic information available at stem cell transplantation to be classified according to the 5-group classification. Poor and very poor risk according to this classification was an independent predictor of shorter relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 1.40 and 2.14), overall survival (hazard ratio 1.38 and 2.14), and significantly higher cumulative incidence of relapse (hazard ratio 1.64 and 2.76), compared to patients with very good, good or intermediate risk. When comparing the predictive performance of a series of Cox models both for relapse-free survival and for overall survival, a model with simplified 5-group cytogenetics (merging very good, good and intermediate cytogenetics) performed best. Furthermore, monosomal karyotype is an additional negative predictor for outcome within patients of the poor, but not the very poor risk group of the 5-group classification. The revised International Prognostic Scoring System cytogenetic classification allows patients with myelodysplastic syndromes to be separated into three groups with clearly different outcomes after stem cell transplantation. Poor and very poor risk cytogenetics were strong predictors of poor patient outcome. The new cytogenetic classification added value to prediction of patient outcome compared to prediction models using only traditional risk factors or the 3-group International Prognostic Scoring System cytogenetic classification. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. Cytogenetically Unrelated Clones in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Showing Different Responses to Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Kasahara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML with two cytogenetically unrelated clones. The patient was a 45-year-old male who was diagnosed with acute monoblastic leukemia (AMoL. Initial G-band analysis showed 51,XY,+6,+8,inv(9(p12q13c,+11,+13,+19[12]/52,idem,+Y[8], but G-band analysis after induction therapy showed 45,XY,-7,inv(9(p12q13c[19]/46,XY,inv(9(p12q13c[1]. Retrospective FISH analysis revealed a cryptic monosomy 7 clone in the initial AML sample. The clone with multiple trisomies was eliminated after induction therapy and never recurred, but a clone with monosomy 7 was still detected in myelodysplastic marrow with a normal blast percentage. Both clones were successfully eliminated after related peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, but the patient died of relapsed AML with monosomy 7. We concluded that one clone was de novo AMoL with chromosome 6, 8, 11, 13, and 19 trisomy and that the other was acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (AML-MRC with chromosome 7 monosomy showing different responses to chemotherapy. Simultaneous onset of cytogenetically unrelated hematological malignancies that each have a different disease status is a rare phenomenon but is important to diagnose for a correct understanding of the disease status and for establishing an appropriate treatment strategy.

  11. A 78-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, Elliot B; Luptakova, Katarina; Joyce, Robin M; Tzachanis, Dimitrios

    2014-08-30

    Male, 78. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Dyspnea • fatigue. Idarubicin followed by cytarabine. Chemotherapy. Hematology. Unusual clinical course. Renal failure is a common presentation of acute myelomonocytic and monocytic leukemia. It is usually the result of a combined glomerular and tubular dysfunction and is associated with a poor prognosis. No guidelines exist for treatment. We herein describe the case of a 78-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute myeloid leukemia M5, leukostasis with a white count of 340 000/ml, and acute renal failure with a creatinine of 7.7/dL. The patient was initially treated with leukapheresis and 3 days of idarubicin in the setting of continuous renal replacement therapy that resulted in rapid reversal of his renal failure. He then received 7 days of continuous infusion cytarabine and went into a complete remission. Renal failure may complicate the presentation of AML but can be reversible with treatment. Dose adjustment of the chemotherapy is not needed and the treatment can be greatly facilitated with the use of continuous renal replacement therapy, as indicated in our case report. In addition, we emphasize that organ dysfunction, even in elderly patients, is not necessarily a contraindication to aggressive treatment if it is felt to be disease-related and reversible.

  12. Improved FRET Biosensor for the Measurement of BCR-ABL Activity in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Mika; Fujioka, Mari; Kondo, Takeshi; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Li, Xinxin; Horiuchi, Kosui; O Satoh, Aya; Nepal, Prabha; Nishide, Shinya; Nanbo, Asuka; Teshima, Takanori; Ohba, Yusuke

    2017-02-02

    Although the co-development of companion diagnostics with molecular targeted drugs is desirable, truly efficient diagnostics are limited to diseases in which chromosomal translocations or overt mutations are clearly correlated with drug efficacy. Moreover, even for such diseases, few methods are available to predict whether drug administration is effective for each individual patient whose disease is expected to respond to the drug(s). We have previously developed a biosensor based on the principle of Förster resonance energy transfer to measure the activity of the tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL and its response to drug treatment in patient-derived chronic myeloid leukemia cells. The biosensor harbors CrkL, one of the major substrates of BCR-ABL, and is therefore named Pickles after phosphorylation indicator of CrkL en substrate. The efficacy of this technique as a clinical test has been demonstrated, but the number of cells available for analysis is limited in a case-dependent manner, owing to the cleavage of the biosensor in patient-derived leukemia cells. Here, we describe an improved biosensor with an amino acid substitution and a nuclear export signal being introduced. Of the two predicted cleavage positions in CrkL, the mutations inhibited one cleavage completely and the other cleavage partially, thus collectively increasing the number of cells available for drug evaluation. This improved version of the biosensor holds promise in the future development of companion diagnostics to predict responses to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

  13. Targeting iron homeostasis induces cellular differentiation and synergizes with differentiating agents in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Celine; Coulon, Séverine; Naudin, Jerome; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Boissel, Nicolas; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Wang, Pamella Huey Mei; Agarwal, Saurabh; Tamouza, Houda; Paubelle, Etienne; Asnafi, Vahid; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Dessen, Philippe; Canioni, Danielle; Chandesris, Olivia; Rubio, Marie Therese; Beaumont, Carole; Benhamou, Marc; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Monteiro, Renato C; Moura, Ivan C; Hermine, Olivier

    2010-04-12

    Differentiating agents have been proposed to overcome the impaired cellular differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, only the combinations of all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide with chemotherapy have been successful, and only in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (also called AML3). We show that iron homeostasis is an effective target in the treatment of AML. Iron chelating therapy induces the differentiation of leukemia blasts and normal bone marrow precursors into monocytes/macrophages in a manner involving modulation of reactive oxygen species expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). 30% of the genes most strongly induced by iron deprivation are also targeted by vitamin D3 (VD), a well known differentiating agent. Iron chelating agents induce expression and phosphorylation of the VD receptor (VDR), and iron deprivation and VD act synergistically. VD magnifies activation of MAPK JNK and the induction of VDR target genes. When used to treat one AML patient refractory to chemotherapy, the combination of iron-chelating agents and VD resulted in reversal of pancytopenia and in blast differentiation. We propose that iron availability modulates myeloid cell commitment and that targeting this cellular differentiation pathway together with conventional differentiating agents provides new therapeutic modalities for AML.

  14. Targeting iron homeostasis induces cellular differentiation and synergizes with differentiating agents in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Celine; Coulon, Séverine; Naudin, Jerome; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Boissel, Nicolas; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Wang, Pamella Huey Mei; Agarwal, Saurabh; Tamouza, Houda; Paubelle, Etienne; Asnafi, Vahid; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Dessen, Philippe; Canioni, Danielle; Chandesris, Olivia; Rubio, Marie Therese; Beaumont, Carole; Benhamou, Marc; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Monteiro, Renato C.

    2010-01-01

    Differentiating agents have been proposed to overcome the impaired cellular differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, only the combinations of all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide with chemotherapy have been successful, and only in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (also called AML3). We show that iron homeostasis is an effective target in the treatment of AML. Iron chelating therapy induces the differentiation of leukemia blasts and normal bone marrow precursors into monocytes/macrophages in a manner involving modulation of reactive oxygen species expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). 30% of the genes most strongly induced by iron deprivation are also targeted by vitamin D3 (VD), a well known differentiating agent. Iron chelating agents induce expression and phosphorylation of the VD receptor (VDR), and iron deprivation and VD act synergistically. VD magnifies activation of MAPK JNK and the induction of VDR target genes. When used to treat one AML patient refractory to chemotherapy, the combination of iron-chelating agents and VD resulted in reversal of pancytopenia and in blast differentiation. We propose that iron availability modulates myeloid cell commitment and that targeting this cellular differentiation pathway together with conventional differentiating agents provides new therapeutic modalities for AML. PMID:20368581

  15. The mutational oncoprint of recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities in adult patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisfeld, A-K; Mrózek, K; Kohlschmidt, J; Nicolet, D; Orwick, S; Walker, C J; Kroll, K W; Blachly, J S; Carroll, A J; Kolitz, J E; Powell, B L; Wang, E S; Stone, R M; de la Chapelle, A; Byrd, J C; Bloomfield, C D

    2017-10-01

    Recurrent chromosomal abnormalities and gene mutations detected at the time of diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are associated with particular disease features, treatment response and survival of AML patients, and are used to denote specific disease entities in the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia. However, large studies that integrate cytogenetic and comprehensive mutational information are scarce. We created a comprehensive oncoprint of mutations associated with recurrent cytogenetic findings by combining the information on mutational patterns of 80 cancer- and leukemia-associated genes with cytogenetic findings in 1603 adult patients with de novo AML. We show unique differences in the mutational profiles among major cytogenetic subsets, identify novel associations between recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities and both specific gene mutations and gene functional groups, and reveal differences in cytogenetic and mutational features between patients younger than 60 years and those aged 60 years or older. The identified associations between cytogenetic and molecular genetic data may help guide mutation testing in AML, and result in more focused application of targeted therapy in patients with de novo AML.

  16. Regulation of myeloid leukemia by the cell fate determinant Musashi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takahiro; Kwon, Hyog Young; Zimdahl, Bryan; Congdon, Kendra L.; Blum, Jordan; Lento, William E.; Zhao, Chen; Lagoo, Anand; Gerrard, Gareth; Foroni, Letizia; Goldman, John; Goh, Harriet; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Wook; Chuah, Charles; Oehler, Vivian G.; Radich, Jerald P.; Jordan, Craig T.; Reya, Tannishtha

    2010-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) can progress from an indolent chronic phase to an aggressive blast crisis phase1 but the molecular basis of this transition remains poorly understood. Here we have used mouse models of CML2,3 to show that disease progression is regulated by the Musashi-Numb signaling axis4,5. Specifically, we find that chronic phase is marked by high and blast crisis phase by low levels of Numb expression, and that ectopic expression of Numb promotes differentiation and impairs advanced phase disease in vivo. As a possible explanation for the decreased levels of Numb in blast crisis, we show that NUP98-HOXA9, an oncogene associated with blast crisis CML6,7, can trigger expression of the RNA binding protein Musashi2 (Msi2) which in turn represses Numb. Importantly, loss of Msi2 restores Numb expression and significantly impairs the development and propagation of blast crisis CML in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Msi2 expression is not only highly upregulated during human CML progression but is also an early indicator of poorer prognosis. These data show that the Musashi-Numb pathway can control the differentiation of CML cells, and raise the possibility that targeting this pathway may provide a new strategy for therapy of aggressive leukemias. PMID:20639863

  17. Myb expression is critical for myeloid leukemia development induced by Setbp1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhu; Vishwakarma, Bandana A; Oakley, Kevin; Han, Yufen; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Du, Yang

    2016-12-27

    SETBP1 missense mutations have been frequently identified in multiple myeloid neoplasms; however, their oncogenic potential remains unclear. Here we show that expression of Setbp1 mutants carrying two such mutations in mouse bone marrow progenitors efficiently induced development of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) in irradiated recipient mice with significantly shorter latencies and greater penetrance than expression of wild-type Setbp1, suggesting that these mutations are highly oncogenic. The increased oncogenicity of Setbp1 missense mutants could be due in part to their capability to drive significantly higher target gene transcription. We further identify Myb as a critical mediator of Setbp1-induced self-renewal as its knockdown caused efficient differentiation of myeloid progenitors immortalized by wild-type Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutants. Interestingly, Myb is also a direct transcriptional target of Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutants as they directly bind to the Myb locus in immortalized cells and dramatically activate a critical enhancer/promoter region of Myb in luciferase reporter assays. Furthermore, Myb knockdown in Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutations-induced AML cells also efficiently induced their differentiation in culture and significantly prolonged the survival of their secondary recipient mice, suggesting that targeting MYB pathway could be a promising strategy for treating human myeloid neoplasms with SETBP1 activation.

  18. Mutated nucleophosmin detects clonal multilineage involvement in acute myeloid leukemia: Impact on WHO classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualucci, Laura; Liso, Arcangelo; Martelli, Maria Paola; Bolli, Niccolò; Pacini, Roberta; Tabarrini, Alessia; Carini, Manola; Bigerna, Barbara; Pucciarini, Alessandra; Mannucci, Roberta; Nicoletti, Ildo; Tiacci, Enrico; Meloni, Giovanna; Specchia, Giorgina; Cantore, Nicola; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Pileri, Stefano; Mecucci, Cristina; Mandelli, Franco; Martelli, Massimo Fabrizio; Falini, Brunangelo

    2006-12-15

    Because of a lack of specific clonality markers, information on lineage involvement and cell of origin of acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK), is missing. Because Nucleophosmin (NPM) gene is frequently mutated in AML-NK and causes aberrant NPM cytoplasmic localization (NPMc+), it was used as an AML lineage clonality marker. Clonal NPM exon 12 mutations were detected in myeloid, monocytic, erythroid, and megakaryocytic cells but not in fibroblasts or endothelia that were laser-microdissected from 3 patients with NPMc+ AML. Aberrant cytoplasmic expression of mutated NPM proteins was identified with anti-NPM antibodies in 2 or more myeloid hemopoietic cell lineages in 99 (61.5%) of 161 of NPMc+ AML paraffin-embedded bone marrow biopsies; lymphoid involvement was excluded in 3 investigated cases. These findings suggest that NPMc+ AML derives from either a common myeloid or earlier progenitor. Immunohistochemical studies show that varying combinations and ratios of NPMc+ leukemic cells from distinct lineages are responsible for heterogeneity within each French-American-British (FAB) classification type and for NPMc+ AML falling into different FAB categories. These findings question the value of FAB criteria in subdividing the WHO category of "AML not otherwise characterized" and suggest that, for clinical use, NPMc+ AML be provisionally regarded as a separate AML with prognostic significance.

  19. BCR-ABL1- positive chronic myeloid leukemia with erythrocytosis presenting as polycythemia vera: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornea, Mihaela I Precup; Levrat, Emmanuel; Pugin, Paul; Betticher, Daniel C

    2015-04-08

    The World Health Organization classification of chronic myeloproliferative disease encompasses eight entities of bone marrow neoplasms, among them Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1-positive chronic myeloid leukemia and polycythemia vera. Polycythemia vera requires, in the majority of cases (95%), the negativity of Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 rearrangement and the presence of the Janus kinase 2 mutation. We report a case of erythrocytosis as the primary manifestation of a chronic myeloid leukemia, with the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome and the Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 fusion gene, and in the absence of any Janus kinase 2 mutation. A 68-year-old Caucasian woman, with a history of cigarette consumption and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (undergoing continuous positive airway pressure treatment) had presented to our institution with fatigue and a hemoglobin level of 18.6g/L, with slight leukocytosis at 16G/L, and no other anomalies on her complete blood cell count. Examination of her arterial blood gases found only a slight hypoxemia; erythropoietin and ferritin levels were very low and could not explain a secondary erythrocytosis. Further analyses revealed the absence of any Janus kinase 2 mutation, thus excluding polycythemia vera. Taken together with a high vitamin B12 level, we conducted a Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 gene analysis and bone marrow cytogenetic analysis, both of which returned positive, leading to the diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. To date, this case is the first description of a Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1-positive chronic myeloid leukemia, presenting with erythrocytosis as the initial manifestation, and mimicking a Janus kinase 2 V617F-negative polycythemia vera. Her impressive response to imatinib

  20. Genome-scale expression and transcription factor binding profiles reveal therapeutic targets in transgenic ERG myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Liat; Tijssen, Marloes R; Birger, Yehudit; Hannah, Rebecca L; Kinston, Sarah J; Schütte, Judith; Beck, Dominik; Knezevic, Kathy; Schiby, Ginette; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Biran, Anat; Kloog, Yoel; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D; Aplan, Peter D; Pimanda, John E; Göttgens, Berthold; Izraeli, Shai

    2013-10-10

    The ETS transcription factor ERG plays a central role in definitive hematopoiesis, and its overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with a stem cell signature and poor prognosis. Yet how ERG causes leukemia is unclear. Here we show that pan-hematopoietic ERG expression induces an early progenitor myeloid leukemia in transgenic mice. Integrated genome-scale analysis of gene expression and ERG binding profiles revealed that ERG activates a transcriptional program similar to human AML stem/progenitor cells and to human AML with high ERG expression. This transcriptional program was associated with activation of RAS that was required for leukemia cells growth in vitro and in vivo. We further show that ERG induces expression of the Pim1 kinase oncogene through a novel hematopoietic enhancer validated in transgenic mice and human CD34(+) normal and leukemic cells. Pim1 inhibition disrupts growth and induces apoptosis of ERG-expressing leukemic cells. The importance of the ERG/PIM1 axis is further underscored by the poorer prognosis of AML highly expressing ERG and PIM1. Thus, integrative genomic analysis demonstrates that ERG causes myeloid progenitor leukemia characterized by an induction of leukemia stem cell transcriptional programs. Pim1 and the RAS pathway are potential therapeutic targets of these high-risk leukemias.

  1. A case of chronic myeloid leukemia with features of essential thrombocythemia in peripheral blood and bone marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Young Jae; Park, Byeong-Bae; Lee, Eun Sung; Choi, Kyung Soo; Lee, Dae Sung

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by overproduction of myeloid white blood cells. Philadelphia chromosome is an essential finding for CML diagnosis. Generally, a clinical diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia (ET) can be established from isolated marked thrombocytosis in peripheral blood. However, Philadelphia chromosome-positivity or bcr/abl rearrangement with isolated thrombocytosis should be diagnosed as CML, not ET, according to World Health Or...

  2. BCR-ABL1-associated reduction of beta catenin antagonist Chibby1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Leo

    Full Text Available Beta Catenin signaling is critical for the self-renewal of leukemic stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. It is driven by multiple events, enhancing beta catenin stability and promoting its transcriptional co-activating function. We investigated the impact of BCR-ABL1 on Chibby1, a beta catenin antagonist involved in cell differentiation and transformation. Relative proximity of the Chibby1 encoding gene (C22orf2 on chromosome 22q12 to the BCR breakpoint (22q11 lets assume its involvement in beta catenin activation in chronic myeloid leukemia as a consequence of deletions of distal BCR sequences encompassing one C22orf2 allele. Forty patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase were analyzed for C22orf2 relocation and Chibby1 expression. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses established that the entire C22orf2 follows BCR regardless of chromosomes involved in the translocation. In differentiated hematopoietic progenitors (bone marrow mononuclear cell fractions of 30/40 patients, the expression of Chibby1 protein was reduced below 50% of the reference value (peripheral blood mononuclear cell fractions of healthy persons. In such cell context, Chibby1 protein reduction is not dependent on C22orf2 transcriptional downmodulation; however, it is strictly dependent upon BCR-ABL1 expression because it was not observed at the moment of major molecular response under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Moreover, it was not correlated with the disease prognosis or response to therapy. Most importantly, a remarkable Chibby1 reduction was apparent in a putative BCR-ABL1+ leukemic stem cell compartment identified by a CD34+ phenotype compared to more differentiated hematopoietic progenitors. In CD34+ cells, Chibby1 reduction arises from transcriptional events and is driven by C22orf2 promoter hypermethylation. These results advance low Chibby1 expression associated with BCR-ABL1 as a component of beta catenin signaling in leukemic stem cells.

  3. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin+) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34+CD38-Lin-/low). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 (7μM) and G2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Platelet Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Does Imatinib Mesylate Improve It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Meltem Akay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of imatinib mesylate on platelet aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP release in chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Materials and Methods: Platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by 5.0 mM adenosine diphosphate, 0.5 mM arachidonic acid, 1.0 mg/ mL ristocetin, and 2 µg/mL collagen were studied by whole blood platelet lumi-aggregometer in 20 newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia patients before and after imatinib mesylate treatment. Results: At the time of diagnosis, 17/20 patients had abnormal platelet aggregation results; 8 (40% had hypoactivity, 6 (30% had hyperactivity, and 3 (15% had mixed hypo- and hyperactivity. Repeat platelet aggregation studies were performed after a mean of 19 months (min: 5 months-max: 35 months in all patients who received imatinib mesylate during this period. After therapy, 18/20 (90% patients had abnormal laboratory results; 12 (60% had hypoactive platelets, 4 (20% had mixed hypo- and hyperactive platelets, and 2 (10% had hyperactive platelets. Three of the 8 patients with initial hypoactivity remained hypoactive, while 2 developed a mixed picture, 2 became hyperactive, and 1 normalized. Of the 6 patients with initial hyperactivity, 4 became hypoactive and 2 developed a mixed pattern. All of the 3 patients with initial hypo- and hyperactivity became hypoactive. Finally, 2 of the 3 patients with initial normal platelets became hypoactive while 1 remained normal. There was a significant decrease in ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation after therapy (p0.05. Conclusion: These findings indicate that a significant proportion of chronic myeloid leukemia patients have different patterns of platelet function abnormalities and imatinib mesylate has no effect on these abnormalities, with a significant impairment in ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation.

  5. BCR-ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia: a new entity? Analysis of clinical and molecular features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuendorff, Nina Rosa; Burmeister, Thomas; Dörken, Bernd; Westermann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    BCR-ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare subtype of AML that is now included as a provisional entity in the 2016 revised WHO classification of myeloid malignancies. Since a clear distinction between de novo BCR-ABL+ AML and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) blast crisis is challenging in many cases, the existence of de novo BCR-ABL+ AML has been a matter of debate for a long time. However, there is increasing evidence suggesting that BCR-ABL+ AML is in fact a distinct subgroup of AML. In this study, we analyzed all published cases since 1975 as well as cases from our institution in order to present common clinical and molecular features of this rare disease. Our analysis shows that BCR-ABL predominantly occurs in AML-NOS, CBF leukemia, and AML with myelodysplasia-related changes. The most common BCR-ABL transcripts (p190 and p210) are nearly equally distributed. Based on the analysis of published data, we provide a clinical algorithm for the initial differential diagnosis of BCR-ABL+ AML. The prognosis of BCR-ABL+ AML seems to depend on the cytogenetic and/or molecular background rather than on BCR-ABL itself. A therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib, dasatinib, or nilotinib is reasonable, but-due to a lack of systematic clinical data-their use cannot be routinely recommended in first-line therapy. Beyond first-line treatment of AML, the use of TKI remains an individual decision, both in combination with intensive chemotherapy and/or as a bridge to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In each single case, potential benefits have to be weighed against potential risks.

  6. Importance of CD117 in the Assignation of a Myeloid Lineage in Acute Leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Alan; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Sergio; Demichelis-Gómez, Roberta; Barrera-Lumbreras, Georgina; Barrales-Benítez, Olga V; Díaz-Huízar, María José; Goldberg-Murow, Monica; López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Aguayo, Álvaro

    2017-02-01

    The correct classification of acute leukemias (AL) is an essential part in the evaluation of any patient with this disease. Historically, CD117 has been an important asset in the diagnosis of patients with mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). In an attempt to simplify the diagnosis of MPAL with fewer and more lineage specific markers, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed in 2008 a new criteria for the diagnosis of this type of AL, which excluded CD117 from the myeloid markers that are utilized to diagnose MPAL. In order to assess whether CD117 is necessary in the diagnosis of MPAL, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of CD117 for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 331 patients with AL. The calculated sensitivity of CD117 for AML was 85.88% (103/120), while the specificity was 83.9% (177/211). Besides myeloperoxidase (MPO), which was used as the gold standard in differentiating AML from other type of ALs, the most specific markers for AML in our study were CD14 and CD64 (99.5 and 95.6%). Although the specificity of CD117 in this study is not as high as CD14 and CD64, markers concomitantly used in this this study and in the WHO classification, based on the results of other researches (i.e. the specificity of CD117 for AML was 100% in one study) and due to the fact that its specificity for AML in this study is relatively high, we recommend the use CD117 in assigning a myeloid lineage in MPAL. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Chronic myeloid leukemia: from cytogenetics to molecular biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissaoui, Z; Lai, J; Fenaux, P; Kerckaert, J P

    1990-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is an excellent model for the study of molecular rearrangements caused by a cytogenetic anomaly associated with a disease. The formation of a Philadelphia chromosome by translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 provokes the breaking and migration of a cellular oncogen (ABL), located in the 9q34 region, towards chromosome 22 and the 22q11 region where the PHL gene is situated. This gene is broken in the bcr area the rearrangements of which are specific to CML. The ABL and PHL genes fragments fuse together, creating a new hybrid gene which is transcribed into an 8.5 kilobase messenger RNA specific to CML. This RNA is translated into a 210 kilodalton protein whose abnormally high tyrosine kinase activity seems to contribute to the development of the disease. Genetic engineering techniques improve our understanding of CML molecular mechanisms and can be very useful to clinicians as they permit the diagnosis of CML in some cases devoid of chromosomal markers, and the detection of a possible relapse in marrow-grafted patients with a much greater sensitivity (one in 100,000 cells) than that of cytogenetics.

  8. Massive splenic infarction and portal vein thrombosis in children with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Tekin; Erdem, Arzu Y; Fettah, Ali; Kaçar, Dilek; Avci, Zekai; Yarali, Nese; Tunc, Bahattin

    2014-10-01

    Massive splenic infarction and portal vein thrombosis (PVT) due to chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is extremely rare. We describe 2 children who were presented with massive splenic infarction and PVT in the course of CML. Massive splenic infarction and PVT treated with splenectomy in one and with medical treatment in another in whom PVT resolved by cytoreductive treatment, led to downsizing of spleen or splenectomy. Splenic infarct and PVT should be considered in CML patients with long-lasting severe abdominal pain despite appropriate medical attempts. Splenectomy should be spared for persistent symptoms and complications.

  9. Radotinib and its clinical potential in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskazan, Ahmet Emre; Keskin, Dilek

    2017-09-01

    Although imatinib has dramatically improved major outcomes in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), there are newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) approved worldwide for the treatment of resistant cases, and two second-generation TKIs (dasatinib, nilotinib) are approved in some nations for treating patients in the upfront setting. Radotinib (IY5511HCL, Supect®) is a novel and selective second-generation BCR-ABL1 TKI, which is currently approved in Korea for the treatment of patients with CML both in the upfront and salvage settings. This review mainly focuses on the clinical potential of radotinib in patients with CML in chronic phase in terms of efficacy and safety.

  10. Benzene-contaminated toluene and acute myeloid leukemia: a case series and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Trevor; Kopstein, Melvyn; Klein, Jason; Dahlgren, James

    2014-02-01

    We report seven cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with occupational exposure to a toluene-based hydrocarbon solvent. The cases were employed at a facility, which manufactured rubber belts and hoses, between 1950 and 2005 for periods ranging from 21 to 37 total years. Detailed histories were obtained for three workers who were diagnosed with AML within a 3-year period (2003-2005). Death certificates, medical records, and accounts by workers were reviewed. Benzene, a known cause of AML, is typically a contaminant of toluene. Benzene contamination in toluene and other widely used solvents and the potential for concurrent benzene exposure during usage of these solvents in occupational settings are discussed.

  11. Laboratory recommendations for scoring deep molecular responses following treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cross, N. C. P.; White, H. E.; Colomer, D.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has advanced to a stage where many patients achieve very low or undetectable levels of disease. Remarkably, some of these patients remain in sustained remission when treatment is withdrawn, suggesting that they may...... of sensitivity. Here we present detailed laboratory recommendations, developed as part of the European Treatment and Outcome Study for CML (EUTOS), to enable testing laboratories to score MR in a reproducible manner for CML patients expressing the most common BCR-ABL1 variants....

  12. TGIF1 is a negative regulator of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, Anton; Jakobsen, Janus Schou; Ohlsson, E

    2015-01-01

    orchestrates a transcriptional program required for the maintenance of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia (AML). TGIF1/TGIF2 are relatively uncharacterized TALE transcription factors, which, in contrast to the remaining family, have been shown to act as transcriptional repressors. Given the general......-AF9-transformed cells promoted differentiation and cell cycle exit in vitro, and delayed leukemic onset in vivo. Mechanistically, we show that TGIF1 interferes with a MEIS1-dependent transcriptional program by associating with MEIS1-bound regions in a competitive manner and that the MEIS1:TGIF1 ratio...

  13. Analyzing the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Yan-Fang Tao; Dong Wu; Li Pang; Wen-Li Zhao; Jun Lu; Na Wang; Jian Wang; Xing Feng; Yan-Hong Li; Jian Ni; Jian Pan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Real-time PCR Array System is the ideal tool for analyzing the expression of a focused panel of genes. In this study, we will analyze the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays. Methods Real-time PCR array was designed and tested firstly. Then gene expression profile of 11 pediatric AML and 10 normal controls was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. We analyzed the expression data with MEV (Multi Experiment View) cluster so...

  14. Chloroma (Granulocytic sarcoma: An unusual cause of shoulder pain in chronic myeloid leukemia; a diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Upadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At one point or another in their lives, most people will experience some degree of shoulder pain. It may be secondary to a variety of underlying pathology. We report a case of shoulder pain caused by a granulocytic sarcoma (chloroma in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patient misdiagnosed initially as synovitis. Although granulocytic sarcoma has many classic musculoskeletal manifestations, to our knowledge, a case of CML concurrent with chloroma of the shoulder joint has not been reported in the literature. We must not forget that the shoulder pain arising from granulocytic sarcoma may be the initial presenting feature of underlying hematological malignancy such as CML.

  15. BAG1: The Guardian of Anti-Apoptotic Proteins in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanja Aveic; Martina Pigazzi; Giuseppe Basso

    2011-01-01

    BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1) is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, M...

  16. DNMT3A GENE POINT MUTATIONS DETECTION IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA PATIENTS USING SEQUENCING TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Vinogradov; A. V. Rezaykin; A. G. Sergeev

    2015-01-01

    Aim: to estimate the frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients (pts) using target automatic sequencing technique.Material and Methods. Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples were obtained from 34 AML pts aged 21 to 64, who were treated in Sverdlovsk Regional Hematological Centre (Ekaterinburg) during the period 2012–2014. Distribution of the pts according to FAB-classification was as follows: AML M0 – 3, M1 – 1, M2 – 12, M3 – 3, M4 – 10, M...

  17. Prognostic Significance of the Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Derived Sequence 1 (LYL1 Gene Expression in Egyptian Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia El Menshawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aberrant activation of transcription factor genes is the most frequent target of genetic alteration in lymphoid malignancies. The lymphoblastic leukemia-derived sequence 1 (LYL1 gene, which encodes a basic helix-loop helix, was first identified with human T-cell acute leukemia. Recent studies suggest its involvement in myeloid malignancies. We aimed to study the expression percent of oncogene LYL1 in primary and secondary high-risk myeloid leukemia and the impact on prognostic significance in those patients. METHODS: Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of LYL1 oncogenes, our study was carried out on 39 myeloid leukemia patients including de novo cases, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS with transformation, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML in accelerated and blast crisis, in addition to 10 healthy individuals as the reference control. RESULTS: LYL1 expression was increased at least 2 times compared to the controls. The highest expression of this transcription factor was observed in the MDS cases transformed to acute leukemia at 7.3±3.1, p=0.0011. LYL1 expression was found in 68.2%, 75%, and 77.8% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia, CML crisis, and MDS, respectively. Significant correlation of LYL1 overexpression with some subtypes of French-American-British classification was found. There was, for the first time, significant correlation between the blood count at diagnosis and LYL1 expression (p=0.023, 0.002, and 0.031 for white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets, respectively. The rate of complete remission was lower with very high levels of LYL1 expression and the risk of relapse increased with higher levels of LYL1 expression, suggesting an unfavorable prognosis for cases with enhanced expression. CONCLUSION: Overexpression of LYL1 is highly associated with acute myeloid leukemia and shows more expression in MDS with unfavorable prognosis in response to induction chemotherapy. These

  18. Recent Advance in Antigen-Specific Immunotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimitsu Kadowaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Relapse after chemotherapy is inevitable in the majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Thus, it is necessary to develop novel therapies that have different antileukemic mechanisms. Recent advances in immunology and identification of promising leukemia-associated antigens open the possibilities for eradicating minimal residual diseases by antigen-specific immunotherapy after chemotherapy. Several methods have been pursued as immunotherapies for AML: peptide vaccines, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting tumor vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, and adoptive T cell therapy. Whereas immunogenicity and clinical outcomes are improving in these trials, severe adverse events were observed in highly avid engineered T cell therapies, indicating the importance of the balance between effectiveness and side effects in advanced immunotherapy. Such progress in inducing antitumor immune responses, together with strategies to attenuate immunosuppressive factors, will establish immunotherapy as an important armament to combat AML.

  19. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Facenda-Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass.

  20. Interferon decreases VEGF levels in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia treated with imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, L; Guilhot, J; Huault, S; Mahon, F X; Preudhomme, C; Guilhot, F; Hueber, A O

    2014-06-01

    In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), evidence is supporting the role of VEGF in growth, and survival of leukemia cells. The evaluation of plasma VEGF levels in 403 CML patients randomized within SPIRIT study to received imatinib-400mg versus imatinib+cytarabine versus imatinib+interferon (IFN) versus imatinib-600mg demonstrated that VEGF is an independent factor of BCR-ABL burden. VEGF low levels at diagnosis were associated with a progression-free survival of 100% at 48 months. Under treatment, significant lowest levels were observed in imatinib+IFN arm. These results support the use of VEGF as a parameter to predict CML evolution and let us to speculate about antiangiogenic properties of IFN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Global proteomics dataset of miR-126 overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin M. Schoof

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A deep proteomics analysis was conducted on a primary acute myeloid leukemia culture system to identify potential protein targets regulated by miR-126. Leukemia cells were transduced either with an empty control lentivirus or one containing the sequence for miR-126, and resulting cells were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD001994. The proteomics data and statistical analysis described in this article is associated with a research article, “miR-126 regulates distinct self-renewal outcomes in normal and malignant hematopoietic stem cells” (Lechman et al., 2016 [1], and serves as a resource for researchers working in the field of microRNAs and their regulation of protein levels.

  2. Chronic myeloid leukemia in children and adolescents: A single center experience from Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Lalit; Bohara, Vinay V; Ray, Siddhartha S; Chakrabarti, Prantar; Chaudhuri, Utpal

    2013-10-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) constitutes around 3% of leukemia in the children and adolescent age group. The aim of the study was to evaluate the characteristics at presentation and the treatment outcome of CML in the children and adolescent age group. Retrospective analysis was carried out at a single center in India. Thirteen patients (≤17 years) attending CML outdoor from April 2008 to August 2012 were included in the analysis. The mean and median of various parameters were calculated using a Microsoft excel sheet. SPSS 16.0 version software was used to calculate OS and PFS. CML-CP was the most common phase at presentation. Maximum patients belonged to the 14 - 17 year old age group. Disease was common in the male sex. Splenic discomfort and asthenia were the most common symptoms and splenomegaly was the most common sign. The treatment with Imatinib was effective and well-tolerated.

  3. CASE REPORT: Adult Type – Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Childhood: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj B. Nikumbh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In pediatric patients, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML accounts for 2 to 5% of all the leukemia’s but has an incidence ofless than 1 case per 1,00,000 population younger than 20 years of age per year. CML is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder. Asper WHO classification, CML is included in Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative disorder. Adult type - CML is extremely rare in childhood. Case history: We report one such a case of Adult type of CML in an 11 year old male patient with chief complaints of abdominal distension since 1 month and cough with feversince 4-5 days. The clinical differential diagnosis was malaria, storage disorder or tropical splenomegaly. Though biologicalbehaviour and prognosis are identical to that of adult type, we are reporting this case because of its extremely uncommon incidence.

  4. Low-dose {gamma}-irradiation enhances the proliferation of myeloid leukemia (M1) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibuki, Yuko; Suzuki, Akifumi; Goto, Rensuke [Shizuoka Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences

    2001-10-01

    We examined the effect of low-dose {gamma}-irradiation on proliferation of myeloid leukemia, M1 cells. M1 cells irradiated with 4 cGy showed increased proliferation as determined by cell number, alamar Blue metabolism and DNA synthesis. The increase by low-dose irradiation was observed at every concentration of serum from 1% to 10%, showing the decrease of the serum requirement in irradiated cells. Furthermore, survival days of SL mice inoculated intraperitoneally with low-dose irradiated M1 cells were shorter than those with sham-irradiated cells. These results shown as the decrease of serum requirement and increase of transplantation ability, indicated the augmentation of leukemia malignancy by low-dose irradiation. (author)

  5. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome: a clinical and morphologic study of 65 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, S D; McKenna, R W; Arthur, D C; Brunning, R D

    1985-06-01

    This study consists of 65 patients (pts) who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (39 pts) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (26 pts) following chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy; the interval from the onset of therapy to bone marrow abnormality ranged from 11 to 192 months (median, 58). Thirty-three patients had been previously treated for lymphoproliferative diseases, 29 for carcinoma, and three for a nonneoplastic disorder. Approximately 30% of the cases presenting in the MDS phase evolved to AML in one to 12 months (median, 3.5). The AML in 49% of the cases was not readily classified according to French-American-British (FAB) criteria; the primary difficulty in classification related to the involvement of multiple cell lines. Among the cases that could be classified, all FAB types were represented except for M1; M2 was the most frequent type. Clonal chromosome abnormalities were found in marrow specimens from 22 of 24 (92%) patients studied with G banding; 11 had abnormalities of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. The median survival for all patients was four months with no significant difference between those treated and not treated with antileukemic therapy. The median survival was three months for the patients presenting with AML, six months for the patients with AML following an MDS, and four months for the patients with an MDS that did not evolve to AML. The findings in the present study suggest that there are three stages of therapy-related panmyelosis: (1) pancytopenia with associated myelodysplastic changes, (2) a frank MDS, and (3) overt AML. Many patients will present in the stage of overt AML that differs from de novo AML primarily by the high incidence of trilineage involvement, difficulty in classification, frequent cytogenetic abnormalities, and poor response to antileukemic therapy. The myelodysplastic phase, with or without evolution to acute leukemia, is a highly lethal disease with a median survival comparable to that of the patients who present with

  6. Intensive induction is effective in selected octogenarian acute myeloid leukemia patients: prognostic significance of karyotype and selected molecular markers used in the European LeukemiaNet classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzler, Meir; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Dombret, Hervé; Döhner, Hartmut; Pilorge, Sylvain; Krug, Utz; Carroll, Andrew J; Larson, Richard A; Marcucci, Guido; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Büchner, Thomas; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2014-02-01

    We investigated whether octogenarian patients with acute myeloid leukemia enrolled onto Cooperative Group clinical trials and treated with intensive induction therapy could be cured, and whether karyotype and selected molecular markers had any prognostic significance in these patients. Among 138 patients with cytogenetic information, normal karyotype was the most common (47.1%) followed by complex karyotype (14.5%) and sole +8 (9.4%). Among these patients, the relapse-free survival rate at 1 year was 37% and 13% at 3 years, and the respective overall survival rates were 24% and 8%. Whereas the 90 patients who survived beyond 30 days had the same relapse-free survival rates, their 1-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 36% and 11%, respectively. Of the 66 patients surviving beyond 30 days who could be classified into European LeukemiaNet genetic groups, those in the intermediate-I group had better overall survival than patients in the adverse group (P=0.01). Among patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia who were tested for the European LeukemiaNet-associated molecular alterations, FLT3-internal tandem duplication and NPM1 mutations, it was found that FLT3-internal tandem duplication (detected in 29% of patients) did not associate with overall survival (P=0.31), whereas NPM1 mutations (30%) were associated with a significantly longer overall survival (P=0.002). We conclude that intensive induction is effective and indicated in selected octogenarians with acute myeloid leukemia, that their overall survival varies among the European LeukemiaNet genetic groups and that NPM1 mutations may be of prognostic significance among octogenarian patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia.

  7. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adi, Y. A., E-mail: yudi.adi@math.uad.ac.id [Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Ahmad Dahlan (Indonesia); Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia); Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L. [Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia); Hardianti, M. S. [Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia)

    2016-04-06

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  8. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML): a potent alternative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheampong, Desmond O; Adokoh, Christian K; Asante, Du-Bois; Asiamah, Ernest A; Barnie, Prince A; Bonsu, Dan O M; Kyei, Foster

    2017-10-26

    The standard therapy of AML for many years has been chemotherapy with or without stem transplantation. However, there has not been any tangible improvement in this treatment beyond induction through chemotherapy and consolidation with allogeneic stem cell transplantation or chemotherapy. Residual AML cells which later cause relapse mostly persist even after rigorous standard therapy. It is imperative therefore to find an alternative therapy that can take care of the residual AML cells. With a better understanding of how the immune system works to destroy tumor cells and inhibit their growth, another therapeutic option immunotherapy has emerged to address the difficulties associated with the standard therapy. Identification of leukemia-associated antigens (LAA) and the fact that T and NK cells can be activated to exert cytotoxicity on AML cells have further introduced diverse immunotherapeutic development strategies. This review discusses the merits of current immunotherapeutic strategies such as the use of antibodies, adoptive T cells and alloreactive NK cell, and vaccination as against the standard therapy of AML. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Successful Bosutinib Experience in an Elderly Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patient with Suspected Central Nervous System Involvement Transformed from Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erden Atilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing the blast phase in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is challenging because limited data are available for elderly patients. The involvement of the central nervous system (CNS increases the risk of a poor prognosis. Here, we present an elderly blast phase CML patient with suspected CNS involvement who was successfully treated with bosutinib.

  10. Successful Bosutinib Experience in an Elderly Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patient with Suspected Central Nervous System Involvement Transformed from Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilla, Erden; Ataca, Pinar; Ozyurek, Elif; Erden, Ilhan; Gurman, Gunhan

    2015-01-01

    Managing the blast phase in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is challenging because limited data are available for elderly patients. The involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) increases the risk of a poor prognosis. Here, we present an elderly blast phase CML patient with suspected CNS involvement who was successfully treated with bosutinib.

  11. Successful Bosutinib Experience in an Elderly Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patient with Suspected Central Nervous System Involvement Transformed from Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Erden Atilla; Pinar Ataca; Elif Ozyurek; Ilhan Erden; Gunhan Gurman

    2015-01-01

    Managing the blast phase in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is challenging because limited data are available for elderly patients. The involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) increases the risk of a poor prognosis. Here, we present an elderly blast phase CML patient with suspected CNS involvement who was successfully treated with bosutinib.

  12. Chronic myeloid leukemia may be associated with several bcr-abl transcripts including the acute lymphoid leukemia-type 7 kb transcript

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selleri, L.; von Lindern, M.; Hermans, A.; Meijer, D.; Torelli, G.; Grosveld, G.

    1990-01-01

    In the majority of Philadelphia (Ph)-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, the c-abl gene is fused to the bcr gene, resulting in the transcription of an 8.5 kb chimeric bcr-abl mRNA, which is translated into a p210bcr-abl fusion protein. In about 50% of the Ph-positive acute lymphoid

  13. [Clinical and biological prognostic factors in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yébenes-Ramírez, Manuel; Serrano, Josefina; Martínez-Losada, Carmen; Sánchez-García, Joaquín

    2016-09-02

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most frequent type of acute leukemia in adults. Despite recent advances in the characterization of pathogenesis of AML, the cure rates are under 40%, being leukemia relapse the most common cause of treatment failure. Leukaemia relapse occurs due to clonal evolution or clonal escape. In this study, we aimed to analyze the clinical and biological factors influencing outcomes in patients with AML relapse. We included a total of 75 AML patients who experienced leukaemia relapse after achieving complete remission. We performed complete immunophenotyping and conventional karyotyping in bone marrow aspirates obtained at diagnosis and at leukemia relapse. Overall survival (OS) of the series was 3.7%±2.3, leukaemia progression being the most common cause of death. Patients relapsing before 12 months and those with adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk had statistically significant worse outcomes. A percentage of 52.5 of patients showed phenotypic changes and 50% cytogenetic changes at relapse. We did not find significant clinical factors predicting clonal evolution. The presence of clonal evolution at relapse did not have a significant impact on outcome. Patients with relapsed AML have a dismal prognosis, especially those with early relapse and adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk. Clonal evolution with phenotypic and cytogenetic changes occurred in half of the patients without predictive clinical factors or impact on outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Myocardial infarction and stroke as the presenting symptoms of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz, Antonio E

    2012-06-01

    Hyperleukocytosis in acute leukemia is associated with lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and central nervous system complications. Patients with hyperleukocytosis have lower complete remission rates and have a higher mortality rate, primarily from intracranial hemorrhage. To present the potential complications from extreme leukocytosis. A 76-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with chest pain, right-sided weakness, and decreased responsiveness. He was diagnosed with both an acute stroke and myocardial infarction due to extreme leukocytosis from acute myeloid leukemia. Each of these complications by itself would be an unusual manifestation of hyperleukocytosis. To the best of the author's knowledge, this represents the first reported case of these two complications simultaneously from extreme leukocytosis. Patients with acute leukemia may present with hyperleukocytosis, which may result in decreased tissue perfusion. Ischemia occurring in the heart can lead to an acute myocardial infarction, whereas ischemia in the brain can lead to a stroke. These events may, on occasion, be the initial presentation of leukemia. Rapid identification and treatment of the hyperleukocytosis may prevent these complications. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Knockdown of miR-128a induces Lin28a expression and reverts myeloid differentiation blockage in acute myeloid leukemia.

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    De Luca, Luciana; Trino, Stefania; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Tagliaferri, Daniela; Falco, Geppino; Grieco, Vitina; Bianchino, Gabriella; Nozza, Filomena; Campia, Valentina; D'Alessio, Francesca; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Villani, Oreste; Cilloni, Daniela; Musto, Pellegrino; Del Vecchio, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    Lin28A is a highly conserved RNA-binding protein that concurs to control the balance between stemness and differentiation in several tissue lineages. Here, we report the role of miR-128a/Lin28A axis in blocking cell differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by abnormally controlled proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells accompanied by partial or total inability to undergo terminal differentiation. First, we found Lin28A underexpressed in blast cells from AML patients and AML cell lines as compared with CD34+ normal precursors. In vitro transfection of Lin28A in NPM1-mutated OCI-AML3 cell line significantly triggered cell-cycle arrest and myeloid differentiation, with increased expression of macrophage associate genes (EGR2, ZFP36 and ANXA1). Furthermore, miR-128a, a negative regulator of Lin28A, was found overexpressed in AML cells compared with normal precursors, especially in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and in 'AML with maturation' (according to 2016 WHO classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia). Its forced overexpression by lentiviral infection in OCI-AML3 downregulated Lin28A with ensuing repression of macrophage-oriented differentiation. Finally, knockdown of miR-128a in OCI-AML3 and in APL/AML leukemic cells (by transfection and lentiviral infection, respectively) induced myeloid cell differentiation and increased expression of Lin28A, EGR2, ZFP36 and ANXA1, reverting myeloid differentiation blockage. In conclusion, our findings revealed a new mechanism for AML differentiation blockage, suggesting new strategies for AML therapy based upon miR-128a inhibition.

  16. Co-operative leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia reveals C/EBPα as a common target of TRIB1 and PML/RARA.

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    Keeshan, Karen; Vieugué, Pauline; Chaudhury, Shahzya; Rishi, Loveena; Gaillard, Coline; Liang, Lu; Garcia, Elaine; Nakamura, Takuro; Omidvar, Nader; Kogan, Scott C

    2016-10-01

    The PML/RARA fusion protein occurs as a result of the t(15;17) translocation in the acute promyelocytic leukemia subtype of human acute myeloid leukemia. Gain of chromosome 8 is the most common chromosomal gain in human acute myeloid leukemia, including acute promyelocytic leukemia. We previously demonstrated that gain of chromosome 8-containing MYC is of central importance in trisomy 8, but the role of the nearby TRIB1 gene has not been experimentally addressed in this context. We have now tested the hypothesis that both MYC and TRIB1 have functional roles underlying leukemogenesis of trisomy 8 by using retroviral vectors to express MYC and TRIB1 in wild-type bone marrow and in marrow that expressed a PML/RARA transgene. Interestingly, although MYC and TRIB1 readily co-operated in leukemogenesis for wild-type bone marrow, TRIB1 provided no selective advantage to cells expressing PML/RARA. We hypothesized that this lack of co-operation between PML/RARA and TRIB1 reflected a common pathway for their effect: both proteins targeting the myeloid transcription factor C/EBPα. In support of this idea, TRIB1 expression abrogated the all-trans retinoic acid response of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo Our data delineate the common and redundant inhibitory effects of TRIB1 and PML/RARA on C/EBPα providing a potential explanation for the lack of selection of TRIB1 in human acute promyelocytic leukemia, and highlighting the key role of C/EBPs in acute promyelocytic leukemia pathogenesis and therapeutic response. In addition, the co-operativity we observed between MYC and TRIB1 in the absence of PML/RARA show that, outside of acute promyelocytic leukemia, gain of both genes may drive selection for trisomy 8. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  17. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: a retrospective cohort study

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    Andrea Christine Shysh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML was determined in the Calgary Metropolitan Area, a major Canadian city. Methods Data from all patients diagnosed with AML between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2015 were retrieved from a single, centralized cancer cytogenetics laboratory for bone marrow samples, the sole diagnostic facility of its kind in Southern Alberta. Results The calculated incidence rate was 2.79 cases per 100,000 person-years with a median age of 60, slightly lower than previously published data. The age-standardized incidence rate for Canada was 3.46 cases per 100,000 person-years. The higher value is reflective of Calgary’s younger population compared to the rest of Canada. Higher male incidence and greatest incidence occurring at approximately the age of 85 is similar to data from other developed countries. The lower incidence rates and median age of diagnosis, in comparison with that of other high-income nations, may be due to differences in the proportion of aging citizens in the population. Conclusion This is the first published incidence rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML in Canada across all age groups.

  18. Therapeutic reactivation of protein phosphatase 2A in acute myeloid leukemia

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    Kavitha eRamaswamy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is required for normal cell growth and development. PP2A is a potent tumor suppressor, which is inactivated in cancer cells as a result of genetic deletions and mutations. In myeloid leukemias, genes encoding PP2A subunits are generally intact. Instead, PP2A is functionally inhibited by post-translational modifications of its catalytic C subunit, and interactions with negative regulators by its regulatory B and scaffold A subunits. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of genetic and functional inactivation of PP2A in human cancers, with a particular focus on human acute myeloid leukemias (AML. By analyzing expression of genes encoding PP2A subunits using transcriptome sequencing, we find that PP2A dysregulation in AML is characterized by silencing and overexpression of distinct A scaffold and B regulatory subunits, respectively. We review the mechanisms of functional PP2A activation by drugs such as fingolimod, forskolin, OP449, and perphenazine. This analysis yields two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for therapeutic PP2A re-activation: i allosteric activation of the phosphatase activity, and ii stabilization of active holo-enzyme assembly and displacement of negative regulatory factors from A and B subunits. Future studies should allow the development of specific and potent pharmacologic activators of PP2A, and definition of susceptible disease subsets based on specific mechanisms of PP2A dysregulation.

  19. A CRISPR Dropout Screen Identifies Genetic Vulnerabilities and Therapeutic Targets in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Konstantinos Tzelepis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is an aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis, for which mainstream treatments have not changed for decades. To identify additional therapeutic targets in AML, we optimize a genome-wide clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR screening platform and use it to identify genetic vulnerabilities in AML cells. We identify 492 AML-specific cell-essential genes, including several established therapeutic targets such as DOT1L, BCL2, and MEN1, and many other genes including clinically actionable candidates. We validate selected genes using genetic and pharmacological inhibition, and chose KAT2A as a candidate for downstream study. KAT2A inhibition demonstrated anti-AML activity by inducing myeloid differentiation and apoptosis, and suppressed the growth of primary human AMLs of diverse genotypes while sparing normal hemopoietic stem-progenitor cells. Our results propose that KAT2A inhibition should be investigated as a therapeutic strategy in AML and provide a large number of genetic vulnerabilities of this leukemia that can be pursued in downstream studies.

  20. Association between MTHFR polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk: a meta-analysis.

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    Yu-Tao Qin

    Full Text Available Previous observational studies investigating the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk (AML have yielded inconsistent results. The aim of this study is to derive a more precise estimation of the association between MTHFR (C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk. PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies from their inception to August 2013. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were the metric of choice. Thirteen studies were selected for C677T polymorphism (1838 cases and 5318 controls and 9 studies (1335 patients and 4295 controls for A1298C polymorphism. Overall, pooled results showed that C677T polymorphism was not significant associated with AML risk(OR, 0.98-1.04; 95% CI, 0.86-0.92 to 1.09-1.25. Similar results were observed for the A1298C polymorphism and in subgroup analysis. All comparisons revealed no substantial heterogeneity nor did we detect evidence of publication bias. In summary, this meta-analysis provides evidence that MTHFR polymorphisms were not associated with AML risk. Further investigations are needed to offer better insight into the role of these polymorphisms in AML carcinogenesis.

  1. Association between MTHFR Polymorphisms and Acute Myeloid Leukemia Risk: A Meta-Analysis

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    Su, Yan; Lu, Ge-Ning; Wang, Ren-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Previous observational studies investigating the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk (AML) have yielded inconsistent results. The aim of this study is to derive a more precise estimation of the association between MTHFR (C677T and A1298C) polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk. PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies from their inception to August 2013. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were the metric of choice. Thirteen studies were selected for C677T polymorphism (1838 cases and 5318 controls) and 9 studies (1335 patients and 4295 controls) for A1298C polymorphism. Overall, pooled results showed that C677T polymorphism was not significant associated with AML risk(OR, 0.98–1.04; 95% CI, 0.86–0.92 to 1.09–1.25). Similar results were observed for the A1298C polymorphism and in subgroup analysis. All comparisons revealed no substantial heterogeneity nor did we detect evidence of publication bias. In summary, this meta-analysis provides evidence that MTHFR polymorphisms were not associated with AML risk. Further investigations are needed to offer better insight into the role of these polymorphisms in AML carcinogenesis. PMID:24586405

  2. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor–Associated Cardiovascular Toxicity in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

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    Moslehi, Javid J.; Deininger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    For most patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have turned a fatal disease into a manageable chronic condition. Imatinib, the first BCR-ABL1 TKI granted regulatory approval, has been surpassed in terms of molecular responses by the second-generation TKIs nilotinib, dasatinib, and bosutinib. Recently, ponatinib was approved as the only TKI with activity against the T315I mutation. Although all TKIs are associated with nonhematologic adverse events (AEs), experience with imatinib suggested that toxicities are typically manageable and apparent early during drug development. Recent reports of cardiovascular AEs with nilotinib and particularly ponatinib and of pulmonary arterial hypertension with dasatinib have raised concerns about long-term sequelae of drugs that may be administered for decades. Here, we review what is currently known about the cardiovascular toxicities of BCR-ABL1 TKIs, discuss potential mechanisms underlying cardiovascular AEs, and elucidate discrepancies between the reporting of such AEs between oncology and cardiovascular trials. Whenever possible, we provide practical recommendations, but we concede that cause-directed interventions will require better mechanistic understanding. We suggest that chronic myeloid leukemia heralds a fundamental shift in oncology toward effective but mostly noncurative long-term therapies. Realizing the full potential of these treatments will require a proactive rational approach to minimize long-term cardiovascular and cardiometabolic toxicities. PMID:26371140

  3. Global target profile of the kinase inhibitor bosutinib in primary chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

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    Remsing Rix, L L; Rix, U; Colinge, J; Hantschel, O; Bennett, K L; Stranzl, T; Müller, A; Baumgartner, C; Valent, P; Augustin, M; Till, J H; Superti-Furga, G

    2009-03-01

    The detailed molecular mechanism of action of second-generation BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including perturbed targets and pathways, should contribute to rationalized therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) or in other affected diseases. Here, we characterized the target profile of the dual SRC/ABL inhibitor bosutinib employing a two-tiered approach using chemical proteomics to identify natural binders in whole cell lysates of primary CML and K562 cells in parallel to in vitro kinase assays against a large recombinant kinase panel. The combined strategy resulted in a global survey of bosutinib targets comprised of over 45 novel tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. We have found clear differences in the target patterns of bosutinib in primary CML cells versus the K562 cell line. A comparison of bosutinib with dasatinib across the whole kinase panel revealed overlapping, but distinct, inhibition profiles. Common among those were the SRC, ABL and TEC family kinases. Bosutinib did not inhibit KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor, but prominently targeted the apoptosis-linked STE20 kinases. Although in vivo bosutinib is inactive against ABL T315I, we found this clinically important mutant to be enzymatically inhibited in the mid-nanomolar range. Finally, bosutinib is the first kinase inhibitor shown to target CAMK2G, recently implicated in myeloid leukemia cell proliferation.

  4. Profile of bosutinib and its clinical potential in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

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    Keller-von Amsberg G

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gunhild Keller-von Amsberg,1 Steffen Koschmieder21Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Cancer Center Hamburg, University Hospital Hamburg Eppendorf, 2Department of Medicine (Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center of Aachen and RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, GermanyAbstract: Bosutinib (SKI-606 is an orally available, once-daily, dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor with promising clinical potential in first-, second-, and third-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Bosutinib effectively inhibits wild-type BCR-ABL and most imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutations except for V299L and T315I. Low hematologic toxicity is a remarkable characteristic of this novel second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and this has been ascribed to its minimal activity against the platelet-derived growth factor receptor and KIT. Low-grade, typically self-limiting diarrhea, which usually appears within the first few weeks after treatment initiation, represents the predominant toxicity of bosutinib. Other treatment-associated adverse events are mostly mild to moderate. Bosutinib has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic, accelerated, or blast phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive CML in adult patients with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy. This review summarizes the main properties of bosutinib and the currently available data on its clinical potential in the treatment of CML.Keywords: bosutinib, chronic myeloid leukemia, BCR-ABL, Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, point mutation, imatinib resistance

  5. Higher EZH2 expression is associated with extramedullary infiltration in acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Zhu, Qiuhua; Zhang, Lingxiu; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, Fang; Jiang, Ling; Yu, Guopan; Wang, Zhixiang; Yin, Changxin; Jiang, Xuejie; Zhong, Qingxiu; Zhou, Hongsheng; Ding, Bingjie; Wang, Chunli; Meng, Fanyi

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) promotes the metastatic ability of solid tumors, but the role of EZH2 in extramedullary infiltration (EMI) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been thoroughly explored. In the present study, we investigated the possible association between EZH2 and EMI. We found that the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels of EZH2 in AML patients were both significantly higher than in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients. Furthermore, a positive correlation between EZH2 mRNA expression and percentage of peripheral blood blasts wa s found in AML patients (r = 0.404, p = 0.009). The migratory capacities of Kasumi-1 and HL-60, which both show a high level of EZH2 expression, were markedly higher than those of U937 and KG-1α. In contrast, silencing of EZH2 resulted in reduction in proliferation and migration ability and an increase in apoptosis. The latter observation was accompanied by reduced expression of associated proteins p-ERK, p-cmyc, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and an increase in epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin). These data suggest that higher expression of EZH2 may be associated with extramedullary infiltration in acute myeloid leukemia and affect pathogenesis via activation of the p-ERK/p-cmyc/MMP-2 and E-cadherin signaling pathways.

  6. Extramedullary Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML: Leukemic Pleural Effusion, Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Naveen ePemmaraju

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Importance: Malignant pleural effusions occur in the setting of both solid and hematologic malignancies. Pleural effusion caused by leukemic infiltration is an unusual extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML with fewer than 20 cases reported.1-11 We report a case of pericardial and pleural effusions in a patient with AML and review the literature. Clinical presentation: In this case, a 55 year old man with previous history of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN experienced transformation AML, heralded by appearance of leukemic pleural effusions. The patient was identified to have leukemic pleural effusion based upon extended cytogenetic analysis of the pleural fluid, as morphologic analysis alone was insufficient. Intervention: The patient was treated with hypomethylator-based and intensive chemotherapy strategies, both of which maintained resolution of the effusions in the remission setting. Conclusion: Due to the rarity of diagnosis of leukemic pleural effusions, both cytogenetic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH testing are recommended. Futhermore, systemic chemotherapy directed at the AML can lead to complete resolution of leukemic pleural effusions. Objective and ImportancePleural effusion caused by leukemic infiltration is an unusual extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML, but may be more common than previously thought. Fewer than 20 cases have been reported.1-11 We report a case of pericardial and pleural effusions in a patient with AML and review the literature.

  7. Mouse models of NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia: biological and clinical implications.

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    Sportoletti, P; Varasano, E; Rossi, R; Mupo, A; Tiacci, E; Vassiliou, G; Martelli, M P; Falini, B

    2015-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) carrying nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutations displays distinct biological and clinical features that led to its inclusion as a provisional disease entity in the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of myeloid neoplasms. Studies of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of NPM1-mutated AML have benefited greatly from several mouse models of this leukemia developed over the past few years. Immunocompromised mice xenografted with NPM1-mutated AML served as the first valuable tool for defining the biology of the disease in vivo. Subsequently, genetically engineered mouse models of the NPM1 mutation, including transgenic and knock-in alleles, allowed the generation of mice with a constant genotype and a reproducible phenotype. These models have been critical for investigating the nature of the molecular effects of these mutations, defining the function of leukemic stem cells in NPM1-mutated AML, identifying chemoresistant preleukemic hemopoietic stem cells and unraveling the key molecular events that cooperate with NPM1 mutations to induce AML in vivo. Moreover, they can serve as a platform for the discovery and validation of new antileukemic drugs in vivo. Advances derived from the analysis of these mouse models promise to greatly accelerate the development of new molecularly targeted therapies for patients with NPM1-mutated AML.

  8. The 2016 revision to the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia.

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    Arber, Daniel A; Orazi, Attilio; Hasserjian, Robert; Thiele, Jürgen; Borowitz, Michael J; Le Beau, Michelle M; Bloomfield, Clara D; Cazzola, Mario; Vardiman, James W

    2016-05-19

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues was last updated in 2008. Since then, there have been numerous advances in the identification of unique biomarkers associated with some myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemias, largely derived from gene expression analysis and next-generation sequencing that can significantly improve the diagnostic criteria as well as the prognostic relevance of entities currently included in the WHO classification and that also suggest new entities that should be added. Therefore, there is a clear need for a revision to the current classification. The revisions to the categories of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia will be published in a monograph in 2016 and reflect a consensus of opinion of hematopathologists, hematologists, oncologists, and geneticists. The 2016 edition represents a revision of the prior classification rather than an entirely new classification and attempts to incorporate new clinical, prognostic, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic data that have emerged since the last edition. The major changes in the classification and their rationale are presented here. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. In vitro evaluation of triazenes: DNA cleavage, antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia cells

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    Domingues, Vanessa O.; Hoerner, Rosmari; Reetz, Luiz G.B.; Kuhn, Fabio, E-mail: rosmari.ufsm@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas; Coser, Virginia M.; Rodrigues, Jacqueline N.; Bauchspiess, Rita; Pereira, Waldir V. [Hospital Universitario de Santa Maria, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Hematologia-Oncologia; Paraginski, Gustavo L.; Locatelli, Aline; Fank, Juliana de O.; Giglio, Vinicius F.; Hoerner, Manfredo, E-mail: hoerner.manfredo@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The asymmetric diazoamines 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-3-(4-carboxyphenyl)triazene (1), 1-(2-fluorophenyl)-3-(4-carboxyphenyl)triazene (2) and 1-(2-fluorophenyl)-3-(4-amidophenyl) triazene (3) were evaluated for their ability to cleave pUC18 and pBSKII plasmid DNA, antibacterial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia cells and normal leukocytes using the bioassay of reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). The triazenes showed ability to cleave the two types of plasmid DNA: triazene 1 at pH 8.0 and 50 deg C; triazene 2 at pH 6.5 and 37 and 50 deg C; triazene 3 at pH 6.5 and 37 deg C. The compounds presented cytotoxic activity against myeloid leukemia cells. Compound 1 showed high activity against B. cereus (MIC = 32 {mu}g mL{sup -1}). The observation of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the solid state of compound 3, based on the structural analysis by X-ray crystallography, as well as the results of IR and UV-Vis spectroscopic analyses of compounds 1, 2 and 3 are discussed in the present work. (author)

  10. A case of acute myeloid leukemia with e6a2 BCR-ABL fusion transcript acquired after progressing from chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jinjuan; Douer, Dan; Wang, Lu; Arcila, Maria E; Nafa, Khedoudja; Chiu, April

    2017-01-01

    Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome is a cytogenetic hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Most patients with CML harbor either the e13a2 or e14a2 BCR-ABL fusion product, while a small subset of the cases expresses e1a2 or e19a2 transcripts. We report a patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), initially Ph chromosome negative at presentation, with rapid disease progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and appearance of Ph chromosome and BCR-ABL e6a2, a very uncommon fusion transcript. The AML was refractory to treatment with subsequent emergence and dominance of a Ph negative leukemic clone. The patient expired shortly after disease progression.

  11. Formaldehyde Exposure and Mortality Risks From Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Lymphohematopoietic Malignancies in the US National Cancer Institute Cohort Study of Workers in Formaldehyde Industries

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    Dell, Linda D.; Boffetta, Paolo; Gallagher, Alexa E.; Crawford, Lori; Lees, Peter SJ.; Mundt, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate associations between cumulative and peak formaldehyde exposure and mortality from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other lymphohematopoietic malignancies. Methods: Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results: Acute myeloid leukemia was unrelated to cumulative exposure. Hodgkin lymphoma relative risk estimates in the highest exposure categories of cumulative and peak exposures were, respectively, 3.76 (Ptrend = 0.05) and 5.13 (Ptrend = 0.003). There were suggestive associations with peak exposure observed for chronic myeloid leukemia, albeit based on very small numbers. No other lymphohematopoietic malignancy was associated with either chronic or peak exposure. Conclusions: Insofar as there is no prior epidemiologic evidence supporting associations between formaldehyde and either Hodgkin leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia, any causal interpretations of the observed risk patterns are at most tentative. Findings from this re-analysis do not support the hypothesis that formaldehyde is a cause of AML. PMID:26147546

  12. XIAP inhibitors induce differentiation and impair clonogenic capacity of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Martínez, Daniel; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Lara-Castillo, María Carmen; Etxabe, Amaia; Pratcorona, Marta; Tesi, Niccolò; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Rozman, María; Montserrat, Emili; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Esteve, Jordi; Risueño, Ruth M

    2014-06-30

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a neoplasia characterized by the rapid expansion of immature myeloid blasts in the bone marrow, and marked by poor prognosis and frequent relapse. As such, new therapeutic approaches are required for remission induction and prevention of relapse. Due to the higher chemotherapy sensitivity and limited life span of more differentiated AML blasts, differentiation-based therapies are a promising therapeutic approach. Based on public available gene expression profiles, a myeloid-specific differentiation-associated gene expression pattern was defined as the therapeutic target. A XIAP inhibitor (Dequalinium chloride, DQA) was identified in an in silico screening searching for small molecules that induce similar gene expression regulation. Treatment with DQA, similarly to Embelin (another XIAP inhibitor), induced cytotoxicity and differentiation in AML. XIAP inhibition differentially impaired cell viability of the most primitive AML blasts and reduced clonogenic capacity of AML cells, sparing healthy mature blood and hematopoietic stem cells. Taken together, these results suggest that XIAP constitutes a potential target for AML treatment and support the evaluation of XIAP inhibitors in clinical trials.

  13. Small Intestinal Obstruction with Intussusception due to Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report

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    Sangeeta Kini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma is known to precede the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML and can be the only clinical manifestation. Gastrointestinal involvement by AML is rare with the commonest site being small intestine. Patients present with vague abdominal pain and/or obstruction. Prognosis is usually poor as most of them rapidly progress to AML. We report a case of 25-year-old man with complaints of abdominal pain and vomiting of one-year duration. OGD scopy revealed infiltration of lesser curvature of stomach. Subsequently patient came back within a week with signs and symptoms of acute intestinal obstruction for which an ileal resection was done. Although the histology of stomach biopsy and ileal segments showing similar features were thought to be non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma. Bone marrow investigations confirmed involvement by AML. Patient succumbed to the disease due to extensive involvement of AML. This case highlights the primary gastrointestinal manifestation of AML which can often prove to be a diagnostic difficulty clinically and histologically. Prompt diagnosis is essential to hasten the management.

  14. The Past, Present and Future Subclassification of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

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    Forthun, Rakel B; Hinrichs, Carina; Dowling, Tara H; Bruserud, Øystein; Selheim, Frode

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized as a heterogeneous disease where the patients are sub grouped according to several classification systems and mutational analyses. Diagnosis of AML is based on identification of the specific myeloid cell initiating the disease, quantification of immature blasts in bone marrow and peripheral blood, as well as detection of mutations and translocations. The heterogeneity of AML is caused by a block in differentiation that may occur in any of the different myeloid cell populations. These undifferentiated cells also harbor an increased proliferation potential that leads to accumulation of immature leukemic cells. The current development of more sensitive and less labor intensive analysis methods has led classification of patients from being a system based on morphology of the leukemic cells to being more sophisticated, detecting translocations and small mutations found in the whole leukemic clone or in a minor subclone. This review aims to describe the most common classification systems of AML, including frequently occurring translocations, mutations and epigenetic alterations, as well as describe traditional and novel methods for diagnosis and analysis of these patients.

  15. Brain infarction and blasts with bilobed nuclei in a patient with monocytic acute myeloid leukemia mimicking acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghazaly, Assem A; Ibrahim, Mamoun H; AlGwaiz, Layla A

    2016-09-01

    We are presenting a case of an adult male patient with monocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who had on presentation brain infarction and bilobed nuclei had been demonstrated in many of the leukemic blasts. There was no laboratory evidence of acute disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, on presentation or later on. Initially the diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was considered, so all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) was added to induction chemo therapy. As the diagnosis of APL was ruled out, based on the flow cytometry, fluorescent in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction findings, the ATRA was discontinued and the patient continued on the standard AML chemo therapy induction regimen. Later on chromosomal analysis was also normal. Sever dehydration on presentation, would have contributed to brain infarction. AML particularly monocytic, can mimic APL, especially its microgranular variant. The possible ATRA therapy side effects, can be avoided by early confirmation of the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Current concerns of undertreatment and overtreatment in chronic myeloid leukemia based on European LeukemiaNet 2013 recommendations.

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    Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to indicate optimal tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) administration practices based on European LeukemiaNet (ELN) 2013 recommendations for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Likewise, current concerns of undertreatment and overtreatment with TKIs during the long-term clinical course of CML will be outlined. Currently available TKIs for the management of CML are reviewed. The survival benefit of TKIs (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib, ponatinib) for the CML is excellent. The CML and TKI literature search was made in PubMed with particular focus on the clinical trials, recommendations, guidelines and expert opinions, as well as the ELN CML 2013 recommendations. Initial TKI treatment for low-risk chronic phase CML is imatinib 400 mg; high-Sokal risk and/or CML patients with complex karyotypic abnormalities would require more powerful second-generation TKIs (dasatinib 100 mg or nilotinib 600 mg). Absence of early molecular response after 6 months, complete cytogenetic response after 12 months and major molecular response after 18 months may require a more powerful TKI switch. If one of the two second-generation TKIs (nilotinib or dasatinib) was used as first-line therapy and failed, the other (dasatinib or nilotinib) could be administered.

  17. Phase 2 study of the JAK kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib in patients with refractory leukemias, including postmyeloproliferative neoplasm acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghtedar, Alireza; Verstovsek, Srdan; Estrov, Zeev; Burger, Jan; Cortes, Jorge; Bivins, Carol; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Borthakur, Gautam; George, Solly; Scherle, Peggy A.; Newton, Robert C.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a phase 2 study of ruxolitinib in patients with relapsed/refractory leukemias. Patients with acceptable performance status (0-2), adequate organ function, and no active infection, received ruxolitinib 25 mg orally twice a day for 4 weeks (1 cycle). Response was assessed after every 2 cycles of treatment, and patients who completed 2 cycles were allowed to continue treatment until disease progression. Dose escalation to 50 mg twice daily was permitted in patients demonstrating a benefit. Thirty-eight patients, with a median age of 69 years (range, 45-88), were treated. The median number of prior therapies was 2 (range, 1-6). Twelve patients had JAK2V617F mutation. Patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy (range, 1-22). Three of 18 patients with postmyeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) showed a significant response; 2 achieved complete remission (CR) and one achieved a CR with insufficient recovery of blood counts (CRi). The responding patients with palpable spleens also had significant reductions in spleen size. Overall, ruxolitinib was very well tolerated with only 4 patients having grade 3 or higher toxicity. Ruxolitinib has modest antileukemic activity as a single agent, particularly in patients with post-MPN AML. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00674479. PMID:22422826

  18. Phase 2 study of the JAK kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib in patients with refractory leukemias, including postmyeloproliferative neoplasm acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghtedar, Alireza; Verstovsek, Srdan; Estrov, Zeev; Burger, Jan; Cortes, Jorge; Bivins, Carol; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Borthakur, Gautam; George, Solly; Scherle, Peggy A; Newton, Robert C; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Ravandi, Farhad

    2012-05-17

    We conducted a phase 2 study of ruxolitinib in patients with relapsed/refractory leukemias. Patients with acceptable performance status (0-2), adequate organ function, and no active infection, received ruxolitinib 25 mg orally twice a day for 4 weeks (1 cycle). Response was assessed after every 2 cycles of treatment, and patients who completed 2 cycles were allowed to continue treatment until disease progression. Dose escalation to 50 mg twice daily was permitted in patients demonstrating a benefit. Thirty-eight patients, with a median age of 69 years (range, 45-88), were treated. The median number of prior therapies was 2 (range, 1-6). Twelve patients had JAK2V617F mutation. Patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy (range, 1-22). Three of 18 patients with postmyeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) showed a significant response; 2 achieved complete remission (CR) and one achieved a CR with insufficient recovery of blood counts (CRi). The responding patients with palpable spleens also had significant reductions in spleen size. Overall, ruxolitinib was very well tolerated with only 4 patients having grade 3 or higher toxicity. Ruxolitinib has modest antileukemic activity as a single agent, particularly in patients with post-MPN AML. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00674479.

  19. MicroRNA-223 dose levels fine tune proliferation and differentiation in human cord blood progenitors and acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Gentner (Bernhard); N. Pochert (Nicole); A. Rouhi (Arefeh); F. Boccalatte (Francesco); T. Plati (Tiziana); T. Berg (Tobias); S.M. Sun; S.M. Mah (Sarah M.); M. Mirkovic-Hösle (Milijana); J. Ruschmann (Jens); A. Muranyi (Andrew); S. Leierseder (Simon); B. Argiropoulos (Bob); D.T. Starczynowski (Daniel T.); A. Karsan (Aly); M. Heuser (Michael); D. Hogge (Donna); F.D. Camargo (Fernando D.); S. Engelhardt (Stefan); H. Döhner (Hartmut); C. Buske (Christian); M. Jongen-Lavrencic (Mojca); L. Naldini (Luigi); R.K. Humphries (R. Keith); F. Kuchenbauer (Florian)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractA precise understanding of the role of miR-223 in human hematopoiesis and in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still lacking. By measuring miR-223 expression in blasts from 115 AML patients, we found significantly higher miR-223 levels in patients with favorable

  20. Treatment strategy and results in children treated on three Dutch Childhood Oncology Group acute myeloid leukemia trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardos, G; Zwaan, CM; Kaspers, GJL; de-Graaf, SSN; de Bont, ESJM; Postma, A; Bokkerink, JPM; Weening, RS; van der Does-van den Berg, A; van Wering, ER; Korbijn, C; Hahlen, K

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the long-term follow-up data of three consecutive Dutch Childhood Oncology Group acute myeloid leukemia (AML) protocols. A total of 303 children were diagnosed with AML, of whom 209 were eligible for this report. The first study was the AML-82 protocol. Results were inferior

  1. High Acute Myeloid Leukemia derived VEGFA levels are associated with a specific vascular morphology in the leukemic bone marrow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weidenaar, Alida C.; ter Elst, Arja; Koopmans-Klein, Gineke; Rosati, Stefano; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Meeuwsen-de Boer, Tiny; Kamps, Willem A.; Vellenga, Edo; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) bone marrow biopsies at diagnosis display enhanced angiogenesis and increased VEGFA expression. In a xenograft mouse model it was described that availability of free VEGFA versus bound VEGFA is related to different vascular morphology. In this study we investigate the

  2. Repression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression by the Runt-Related Transcription Factor 1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Elst, Arja; Ma, Bin; Scherpen, Frank J. G.; de Jonge, Hendrik J. M.; Douwes, Jenny; Wierenga, Albertus T. J.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Kamps, Willem A.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    VEGFA is considered one of the most important regulators of tumor-associated angiogenesis in cancer. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML) VEGFA is an independent prognostic factor for reduced overall and relapse-free survival. Transcriptional activation of the VEGFA promoter, a core mechanism for VEGFA

  3. Dasatinib impairs long-term expansion of leukemic progenitors in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Lina; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Mulder, Andre; Vellenga, Edo

    A number of signaling pathways might be frequently disrupted in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We questioned whether the dual SRC/ABL kinase inhibitor dasatinib can affect AML cells and whether differences can be observed with normal CD34(+) cells. First, we demonstrated that normal cord blood (CB)

  4. Differences between the CD34+ and CD34- blast compartments in apoptosis resistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijn, van A.; Pol, van der M.A.; Kok, A.; Bontje, PM; Roemen, GM; Beelen, R.H.J.; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Schuurhuis, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Altered expression of members of the Bcl-2 family might account for the observed apoptosis resistance to chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Given the poor prognosis associated with CD34+ expression in AML, we studied the role of spontaneous apoptosis and

  5. Alloreactive natural killer cells for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia: from stem cell transplantation to adoptive immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana eRuggeri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells express activating and inhibitory receptors which recognize MHC class I alleles, termed Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIRs. Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched natural killer cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia. Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of natural killer cell infusion in acute myeloid leukemia patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. Aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts of exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against acute myeloid leukemia. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of acute myeloid leukemia.

  6. High syndecan-1 levels in acute myeloid leukemia are associated with bleeding, thrombocytopathy, endothelial cell damage, and leukocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Mette Vestskov; Leinøe, Eva Birgitte; Johansson, Pär I

    2013-01-01

    The risk of hemorrhage is influenced by multiple factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We investigated whether hemorrhage in AML patients was associated with endothelial perturbation, potentially caused by thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction and leukocytosis. Biomarkers of endothelial......, higher age, endothelial cell activation and damage, and leukocytosis. We suggest that platelet dysfunction and leukocytosis in AML causes endothelial perturbation....

  7. Impact of graft-versus-host disease after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, F; Labopin, M; Niederwieser, D

    2012-01-01

    This report investigated the impact of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on transplantation outcomes in 1859 acute myeloid leukemia patients given allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells after reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC allo-SCT). Grade I acute GVHD was associated with a lower risk...

  8. Genome-wide epigenetic analysis delineates a biologically distinct immature acute leukemia with myeloid/T-lymphoid features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. Figueroa (Maria Eugenia); B.J. Wouters (Bas); L. Skrabanek (Lucy); J. Glass (Jacob); Y. Li (Yushan); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); A.W. Langerak (Anton); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M. Fazzari (Melissa); J.M. Greally (John); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); A. Melnick (Ari); H.R. Delwel (Ruud)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAcute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease from the molecular and biologic standpoints, and even patients with a specific gene expression profile may present clinical and molecular heterogeneity. We studied the epigenetic profiles of a cohort of patients who shared a common gene

  9. P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein activities in relation to treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EGE; van Putten, WLJ; Verdonck, LF; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Verhoef, GEG; Vellenga, E

    Despite treatment with intensive chemotherapy, a considerable number of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) die from their disease due to the occurrence of resistance. Overexpression of the transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 1 has been identified

  10. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and the regulation of adhesion molecules in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Noto, R; Lo Pardo, C; Schiavone, E M; Ferrara, F; Manzo, C; Vacca, C; Del Vecchio, L

    1996-04-01

    A review of recent information on the expression and the ATRA-driven modulation of cell surface adhesion molecules of acute myelogenous leukemia blast cells is presented. Cytofluorometric studies on fresh blast cells have demonstrated that CD11a, CD11b CD11c, CD15, CD45RO and CD54 expression is significantly lower in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) than is acute myeloid leukemia of other subtypes (AML). In vitro treatment with ATRA dramatically modifies the adhesion phenotype of APL blast cells, promoting a consistently striking up-regulation of CD11b, CD11c, CD15, CD65, CD54, and CD38. Which is in general, poorly demonstrable in AML. The behaviour of CD15s is variable and fully independent from CD15 and CD65 in induction experiments, suggesting a differential enzyme regulation within the selectin ligand system. ATRA is capable, in both APL and AML, of producing a switch from the high- (RA) to the low- (RO) molecular weight isoform of CD54, Moreover, treatment with this retinoid exerts a negative regulation of the membrane expression of CD49e, CD58 and CD11a in APL as well as in AML. Of particular interest is the fact that the negative effect on CD1 1a expression generates an asynchronous phenotype in APL (CD11a-, CD11b+, CD15+), undetectable on normal maturing myeloid cells. In the last part of this review the possible implications of adhesion molecule modulation in the pathogenesis of ATRA syndrome are discussed.

  11. Lymphoid associated antigen expression in new cases of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occurrence of aberrant phenotype has been reported in acute leukemias with varying frequency though its prognostic importance remains controversial. In acute myeloid leukemias, aberrant phenotype, as high as 88 %, has been reported. To evaluate the occurrence of aberrant lymphoid phenotypes and to correlate their presence with various French American British classification, 100 cases of fresh acute myeloid leukemias were analyzed for lymphoid markers CD 4,7,8,10 and 19. Materials and Methods: Whole blood or bone marrow aspirate collected in EDTA were processed by standard method and subjected to immunophenotyping for B Cells marker CD 19 and 10 and T cell marker CD 4, 7 and 8. Results: Aberrant lymphoid markers were seen in 35(35% cases. All FAB subtypes except M7 showed aberrancy for the markers studied. However it was the most common in M0 (100%, followed by M2 (51.9%. T cell aberrancy was the most common, comprising 62.8% (22/35 of total aberrancy. CD 7 was the most common aberrantly expressed marker, seen in 20% AML, followed by CD 4(14% and CD 19 (8%. Conclusion: Occurrence of lymphoid phenotypes is frequent in pediatric as well adult AML. Though T cell markers are more common, only B cell as well as both B and T cell markers may be co expressed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i6.8999   Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, 487-490

  12. IL-32θ gene expression in acute myeloid leukemia suppresses TNF-α production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man Sub; Kang, Jeong-Woo; Jeon, Jae-Sik; Kim, Jae Kyung; Kim, Jong Wan; Hong, Jintae; Yoon, Do-Young

    2015-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α is highly expressed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and has been demonstrated to induce rapid proliferation of leukemic blasts. Thus suppressing the production of TNF-α is important because TNF-α can auto-regulate own expression through activation of NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In this study, we focused on the inhibitory effect of IL-32θ on TNF-α production in acute myeloid leukemia. Approximately 38% of patients with AML express endogenous IL-32θ, which is not expressed in healthy individuals. Furthermore, plasma samples were classified into groups with or without IL-32θ; then, we measured proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels. TNF-α production was not increased in patients with IL-32θ expression than that in the no-IL-32θ group. Using an IL-32θ stable expression system in leukemia cell lines, we found that IL-32θ attenuated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced TNF-α production. IL-32θ inhibited phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, inhibitor of κB (IκB), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which are key positive regulators of TNF-α expression, and inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Moreover, the presence of IL-32θ attenuated TNF-α promoter activity and the binding of NF-κB with the TNF-α promoter. In addition, IL-32γ-induced TNF-α production has no correlation with inhibition of TNF-α via IL-32θ expression. Thus, IL-32θ may serve as a potent inhibitor of TNF-α in patients with AML. PMID:26516703

  13. Sacral canal myeloid sarcoma as initial manifestation of granulocytic leukemia: MRI features and differential diagnosis (with a case report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anqi, Xiao; Siqing, Huang; Zhenlin, Li; Chao, You

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma initially occurring in the sacral canal is often misdiagnosed as other pathological tumors on MRI due to the lack of a definite history or clinical evidence of granulocytic leukemia. Here, we report a case of 24-year-old male patient with myeloid sarcoma misdiagnosed radiologically. On MRI, sacral myeloid sarcoma is characterized by homogeneous signal intensity, marked enhancement, and the lack of cystic degeneration, calcification and necrosis. Based on our study of this patient and review of the relevant literature, we believe that these MRI features in the sacral region may help us differentiate it from other pathological tumors, which could prompt further clinical examinations to confirm the diagnosis of granulocytic leukemia.

  14. Cyanobacteria from Terrestrial and Marine Sources Contain Apoptogens Able to Overcome Chemoresistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liwei; Herfindal, Lars; Jokela, Jouni; Shishido, Tania Keiko; Wahlsten, Matti; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated forty cyanobacterial isolates from biofilms, gastropods, brackish water and symbiotic lichen habitats. Their aqueous and organic extracts were used to screen for apoptosis-inducing activity against acute myeloid leukemia cells. A total of 28 extracts showed cytotoxicity against rat acute myeloid leukemia (IPC-81) cells. The design of the screen made it possible to eliminate known toxins, such as microcystins and nodularin, or known metabolites with anti-leukemic activity, such as adenosine and its analogs. A cytotoxicity test on human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) fibroblasts indicated that 21 of the 28 extracts containing anti-acute myeloid leukemia (AML) activity showed selectivity in favor of leukemia cells. Extracts L26-O and L30-O were able to partly overcome the chemotherapy resistance induced by the oncogenic protein Bcl-2, whereas extract L1-O overcame protection from the deletion of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In conclusion, cyanobacteria are a prolific resource for anti-leukemia compounds that have potential for pharmaceutical applications. Based on the variety of cellular responses, we also conclude that the different anti-leukemic compounds in the cyanobacterial extracts target different elements of the death machinery of mammalian cells. PMID:24705501

  15. Cyanobacteria from Terrestrial and Marine Sources Contain Apoptogens Able to Overcome Chemoresistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated forty cyanobacterial isolates from biofilms, gastropods, brackish water and symbiotic lichen habitats. Their aqueous and organic extracts were used to screen for apoptosis-inducing activity against acute myeloid leukemia cells. A total of 28 extracts showed cytotoxicity against rat acute myeloid leukemia (IPC-81 cells. The design of the screen made it possible to eliminate known toxins, such as microcystins and nodularin, or known metabolites with anti-leukemic activity, such as adenosine and its analogs. A cytotoxicity test on human embryonic kidney (HEK293T fibroblasts indicated that 21 of the 28 extracts containing anti-acute myeloid leukemia (AML activity showed selectivity in favor of leukemia cells. Extracts L26-O and L30-O were able to partly overcome the chemotherapy resistance induced by the oncogenic protein Bcl-2, whereas extract L1-O overcame protection from the deletion of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In conclusion, cyanobacteria are a prolific resource for anti-leukemia compounds that have potential for pharmaceutical applications. Based on the variety of cellular responses, we also conclude that the different anti-leukemic compounds in the cyanobacterial extracts target different elements of the death machinery of mammalian cells.

  16. Clinical relevance of in vitro chemoresistance in childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, S; Hongo, T; Okada, S; Watanabe, C; Fujii, Y; Ohzeki, T

    2001-12-01

    To determine the clinical relevance of in vitro drug chemoresistance in childhood acute myeloid leukemia, we used an MTT assay to test leukemic cells from 132 newly diagnosed children. Patients were diagnosed according to the French-American-British (FAB) classification as follows: M0 (n = 12), M1 (n = 16), M2 (n = 53), M4 (n = 17), M5 (n = 19) and M7 (n = 15). The results revealed that, compared to leukemic cells from complete-responders (n = 107), those from non-responders who failed induction therapy (n = 17) were 1.4 to 5.0 times more resistant in vitro to cytarabine (P = 0.005), melphalan (P = 0.003), etoposide (P = 0.011), L-asparaginase (P = 0.017), aclarubicin (P = 0.026) and dexamethasone (P = 0.039). For seven other drugs tested, the median lethal dose of 70% and leukemic cell survival of non-responders were higher than those of complete-responders, but the difference was not statistically significant. We sought correlations between FAB subtypes and in vitro drug resistance. Leukemias of the FAB M4 and M5 subtype were more sensitive to L-asparaginase (P = 0.01, P = 0.0036) than those of the FAB M2 subtype. FAB M5 leukemia was more sensitive to etoposide than were the FAB M2, M4 and M7 subtypes (P = 0.001, P = 0.034, P = 0.023, respectively). By contrast, FAB M5 leukemia was significantly more resistant to prednisolone and dexamethasone than were the FAB M0, M1, M2, M4 and M7 subtypes. We sought correlations between in vitro drug resistance and long-term clinical outcome, but found no associations in this case. These results suggest that in vitro resistance to cytarabine, melphalan, etoposide, L-asparaginase, aclarubicin and dexamethasone might represent factors that can predict response to the early course of therapy. Selecting an appropriate anti-cancer drug according to the FAB classification together with drug sensitivity testing may contribute to improved prognoses in childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

  17. Association of Therapy for Autoimmune Disease With Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertz-Archambault, Natalie; Kosiorek, Heidi; Taylor, Gretchen E; Kelemen, Katalin; Dueck, Amylou; Castro, Janna; Marino, Robert; Gauthier, Susanne; Finn, Laura; Sproat, Lisa Z; Palmer, Jeanne; Mesa, Ruben A; Al-Kali, Aref; Foran, James; Tibes, Raoul

    2017-07-01

    Therapy-related myeloid neoplasms are a potentially life-threatening consequence of treatment for autoimmune disease (AID) and an emerging clinical phenomenon. To query the association of cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulating agents to treat patients with AID with the risk for developing myeloid neoplasm. This retrospective case-control study and medical record review included 40 011 patients with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, coded diagnosis of primary AID who were seen at 2 centers from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014; of these, 311 patients had a concomitant coded diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eighty-six cases met strict inclusion criteria. A case-control match was performed at a 2:1 ratio. Odds ratio (OR) assessment for AID-directed therapies. Among the 86 patients who met inclusion criteria (49 men [57%]; 37 women [43%]; mean [SD] age, 72.3 [15.6] years), 55 (64.0%) had MDS, 21 (24.4%) had de novo AML, and 10 (11.6%) had AML and a history of MDS. Rheumatoid arthritis (23 [26.7%]), psoriasis (18 [20.9%]), and systemic lupus erythematosus (12 [14.0%]) were the most common autoimmune profiles. Median time from onset of AID to diagnosis of myeloid neoplasm was 8 (interquartile range, 4-15) years. A total of 57 of 86 cases (66.3%) received a cytotoxic or an immunomodulating agent. In the comparison group of 172 controls (98 men [57.0%]; 74 women [43.0%]; mean [SD] age, 72.7 [13.8] years), 105 (61.0%) received either agent (P = .50). Azathioprine sodium use was observed more frequently in cases (odds ratio [OR], 7.05; 95% CI, 2.35- 21.13; P myeloid neoplasm. The control and case cohorts had similar systemic exposures by agent category. No association was found for anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. Finally, no timeline was found for the association of drug exposure with the incidence in development of myeloid neoplasm.

  18. High throughput digital quantification of mRNA abundance in primary human acute myeloid leukemia samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Jacqueline E.; Grieselhuber, Nicole R.; Chang, Li-Wei; Murakami, Mark; Geiss, Gary K.; Link, Daniel C.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Watson, Mark A.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the t(15;17) chromosomal translocation, which results in fusion of the retinoic acid receptor α (RARA) gene to another gene, most commonly promyelocytic leukemia (PML). The resulting fusion protein, PML-RARA, initiates APL, which is a subtype (M3) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this report, we identify a gene expression signature that is specific to M3 samples; it was not found in other AML subtypes and did not simply represent the normal gene expression pattern of primary promyelocytes. To validate this signature for a large number of genes, we tested a recently developed high throughput digital technology (NanoString nCounter). Nearly all of the genes tested demonstrated highly significant concordance with our microarray data (P < 0.05). The validated gene signature reliably identified M3 samples in 2 other AML datasets, and the validated genes were substantially enriched in our mouse model of APL, but not in a cell line that inducibly expressed PML-RARA. These results demonstrate that nCounter is a highly reproducible, customizable system for mRNA quantification using limited amounts of clinical material, which provides a valuable tool for biomarker measurement in low-abundance patient samples. PMID:19451695

  19. Cytokine-induced memory-like natural killer cells exhibit enhanced responses against myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romee, Rizwan; Rosario, Maximillian; Berrien-Elliott, Melissa M.; Wagner, Julia A.; Jewell, Brea A.; Schappe, Timothy; Leong, Jeffrey W.; Abdel-Latif, Sara; Schneider, Stephanie E.; Willey, Sarah; Neal, Carly C.; Yu, Liyang; Oh, Stephen T.; Lee, Yi-Shan; Mulder, Arend; Claas, Frans; Cooper, Megan A.; Fehniger, Todd A.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an emerging cellular immunotherapy for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the best approach to maximize NK cell antileukemia potential is unclear. Cytokine-induced memory-like NK cells differentiate after a brief preactivation with interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18 and exhibit enhanced responses to cytokine or activating receptor restimulation for weeks to months after preactivation. We hypothesized that memory-like NK cells exhibit enhanced antileukemia functionality. We demonstrated that human memory-like NK cells have enhanced interferon-γ production and cytotoxicity against leukemia cell lines or primary human AML blasts in vitro. Using mass cytometry, we found that memory-like NK cell functional responses were triggered against primary AML blasts, regardless of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) to KIR-ligand interactions. In addition, multidimensional analyses identified distinct phenotypes of control and memory-like NK cells from the same individuals. Human memory-like NK cells xenografted into mice substantially reduced AML burden in vivo and improved overall survival. In the context of a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial, adoptively transferred memory-like NK cells proliferated and expanded in AML patients and demonstrated robust responses against leukemia targets. Clinical responses were observed in five of nine evaluable patients, including four complete remissions. Thus, harnessing cytokine-induced memory-like NK cell responses represents a promising translational immunotherapy approach for patients with AML. PMID:27655849

  20. Integrating current treatment options for TKI-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radich, Jerald P; Shah, Neil P; Mauro, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder that accounts for approximately 10% of new cases of leukemia. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has led to a reduction in mortality rates, and the estimated prevalence of CML is increasing accordingly. Most patients with CML are diagnosed in the chronic phase, and approximately 15% to 30% of these patients will meet some definition of resistance to imatinib. In the more advanced phases of disease, the rates of imatinib resistance are much higher. Both the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) guidelines emphasize adequate monitoring of patients to ensure that they are meeting treatment milestones. Loss of response is most commonly associated with the acquisition of resistance-conferring kinase domain point mutations within BCR-ABL1. The multiple treatment options available for patients with imatinib-resistant CML include dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib, and ponatinib, as well as the non-TKI salvage agent omacetaxine mepesuccinate. Treatment selection is based on factors such as the patient’s disease state, prior therapies, comorbidities, treatment toxicity, and goals of therapy. This clinical roundtable monograph provides expert discussion on the monitoring of TKI-resistant CML, when to change therapy, and how to select the best treatment option.

  1. Induction of differentiation and apoptosis by dithizone in human myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohroki, J; Muto, N; Tanaka, T; Itoh, N; Inada, A; Tanaka, K

    1998-05-01

    We investigated the effect of diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone) and its structurally related compounds on the differentiation and apoptosis of two human myeloid leukemia cell lines. Dithizone caused a time- and concentration-dependent induction of differentiation in both the promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 cells and the myeloblastic leukemia cell line ML-1 cells, as measured by nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reducing activity. Morphological changes and esterase activities confirmed that this differentiation took place. The induction of differentiation required the addition of dithizone to the culture medium for at least 12 h. The differentiation inducing activity was inhibited by the preincubation of dithizone with various metal ions such as Pb2+, Zn2+, Cu2+ and Mn2+ ions, but not with Fe3+ and Mg2+ ions. In addition, the DNA extracted from dithizone-treated HL-60 cells showed a typical ladder pattern characteristic of apoptosis in agarose gel electrophoresis. A quantitative analysis of DNA fragmentation revealed that this apoptosis was concentration- and time-dependent in both the HL-60 and ML-1 cells. Dithizone-induced apoptosis was also inhibited by preincubation with Mn2+ ions, but not with Mg2+ ions. These results indicate that dithizone induces both differentiation and apoptosis in HL-60 and ML-1 cells through a unique mechanism including metal chelation.

  2. Midostaurin treatment in FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Sabine; Levis, Mark J; Schlenk, Richard F

    2017-11-01

    A number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed that inhibit the constitutively activated kinase activity caused by activating tyrosine kinase mutations, such as FLT3 or KIT, thus interrupting signaling pathways. Currently, midostaurin is the only approved TKI as monotherapy for aggressive systemic mastocytosis (SM), SM with associated hematological neoplasm, or mast cell leukemia displaying a KIT mutation as well as in combination with standard intensive chemotherapy for adult patients with newly diagnosed FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Areas covered: We provide a concise review of the pharmacology, tolerability and clinical efficacy of midostaurin and emerging new treatment options for ASM and FLT3-mutated AML. Expert commentary: Currently, midostaurin is the only approved TKI in aggressive SM, SM with associated hematological neoplasm, or mast cell leukemia inducing responses including complete remissions. With regard to AML, midostaurin is the first drug to receive regulatory approval in this indication in the molecularly defined subgroup of AML with FLT3 mutations. By introduction of this new standard in AML with FLT3 mutations, the bare has been raised for future approvals of next generation FLT3 inhibitors which will be based increasingly on head to head comparisons with midostaurin.

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia after kidney transplantation: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cardarelli

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence of malignancy is greater in kidney transplant recipients compared to the general population, though the higher risk is not equally distributed to all types of cancers. In face of the increased longevity of renal transplant recipients, certain cancers, such as acute leukemias, are becoming more prevalent. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML typically presents with cytopenias and infections, both common findings after kidney transplantation. Therefore, the diagnosis of AML may be initially overlooked in these patients. We report the case of a 33-year-old man who presented with fever, pancytopenia and acute worsening of his renal allograft function 9 years after a living unrelated kidney transplant. After initial negative infectious work-up, a kidney biopsy revealed C4d-positive antibody-mediated rejection in combination with scattered atypical inflammatory cells. A subsequent bone marrow biopsy confirmed AML. He underwent successful induction chemotherapy with daunorubucin and cytarabine and ultimately achieved a complete remission. However, he developed a Page kidney with worsening renal function and abdominal pain three weeks after biopsy in the setting of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. Herein, we discuss the prevalence, risk factors, presentation and management of leukemia after kidney transplantation.

  4. Targeting acute myeloid leukemia with a small molecule inhibitor of the Myb/p300 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttarkar, Sagar; Dassé, Emilie; Coulibaly, Anna; Steinmann, Simone; Jakobs, Anke; Schomburg, Caroline; Trentmann, Amke; Jose, Joachim; Schlenke, Peter; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Schmidt, Thomas J; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Frampton, Jon; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-03-03

    The transcription factor Myb plays a key role in the hematopoietic system and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and other human cancers. Inhibition of Myb is therefore emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy for these diseases. However, because of a lack of suitable inhibitors, the feasibility of therapeutic approaches based on Myb inhibition has not been explored. We have identified the triterpenoid Celastrol as a potent low-molecular-weight inhibitor of the interaction of Myb with its cooperation partner p300. We demonstrate that Celastrol suppresses the proliferative potential of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells while not affecting normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, Celastrol prolongs the survival of mice in a model of an aggressive AML. Overall, our work demonstrates the therapeutic potential of a small molecule inhibitor of the Myb/p300 interaction for the treatment of AML and provides a starting point for the further development of Myb-inhibitory compounds for the treatment of leukemia and, possibly, other tumors driven by deregulated Myb. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. CD47 protein expression in acute myeloid leukemia: A tissue microarray-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Serena; Zlobec, Inti; Schürch, Christian; Perren, Aurel; Ochsenbein, Adrian F; Banz, Yara

    2015-07-01

    Binding of CD47 to signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), an inhibitory receptor, negatively regulates phagocytosis. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), CD47 is overexpressed on peripheral blasts and leukemia stem cells and inversely correlates with survival. Aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between CD47 protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a bone marrow (BM) tissue microarray (TMA) and clinical outcome in AML patients. CD47 staining on BM leukemia blasts was scored semi-quantitatively and correlated with clinical parameters and known prognostic factors in AML. Low (scores 0-2) and high (score 3) CD47 protein expression were observed in 75% and 25% of AML patients. CD47 expression significantly correlated with percentage BM blast infiltration and peripheral blood blasts. Moreover, high CD47 expression was associated with nucleophosmin (NPM1) gene mutations. In contrast, CD47 expression did not significantly correlate with overall or progression free survival or response to therapy. In summary, a BM TMA permits rapid and reproducible semi-quantitative analysis of CD47 protein expression by IHC. While CD47 expression on circulating AML blasts has been shown to be a negative prognostic marker for a very defined population of AML patients with NK AML, CD47 expression on AML BM blasts is not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Clinical and Laboratorial Characteristics of Primary Acute Myeloid leukemia with Philadelphia Chromosome and Inversion 16].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Cheng, Zi-Xing; Chen, Su-Ning; Liu, Dan-Dan; Liang, Jian-Ying; Pan, Jin-Lan; Zhu, Ming-Qing; Ding, Wen-Jing; Cen, Jian-Nong

    2015-04-01

    To summarize the clinical characteristics as well as diagnosis and treatment in 1 case of acute myeloid leukemia(AML) with coexpression of Ph and inv(16). A series of clinical tests, the cellular morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular biological examinations of leukemia cells were performed. The clinical characteristics of this patient were very common. The cellular morphology is similar to the AML with inv(16). The leukemia cells were stained positively for CD13, CD33, CD34, CD117 and HLA-DR. Karyotypic analysis showed a complex chromosome abnormality including inv(16) and Ph, and the FISH analysis showed that the percentage of rearrangement of CBFβ allele was over that of the BCR-ABL fusion signals. The obvious adverse events did not occur in this patient within 3 years. Ph as secondary aberration of inv(16) rarely occures in primary AML cases, and so far there have not been the clear criteria of diagnosis and treatment. The cytogenetic and molecular biology could provide the basis for diagnosis. Moreover, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combined with imatinib probably is one of the effective treatment methods.

  7. BAG1: the guardian of anti-apoptotic proteins in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Aveic

    Full Text Available BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1 is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, MCL1, and phospho-ERK1/2, all proteins able to sustain leukemia, without affecting the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. BAG1 down-regulation was also found to increase expression of BAG3, whose similar activity was able to compensate the loss of function of BAG1. BAG1/BAG3 co-silencing caused an enhanced cell predisposition to death in cell lines and also in primary AML cultures, affecting the same proteins. Cell death was CASPASE-3 dependent, was accompanied by PARP cleavage and documented by an increased release of pro-apoptotic molecules Smac/DIABLO and Cytochrome c. BAG1 was found to directly maintain BCL2 and to protect MCL1 from proteasomal degradation by controlling USP9X expression, which appeared to be its novel target. Finally, BAG1 was found able to affect leukemia cell fate by influencing the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins crucial for AML maintenance.

  8. BAG1: the guardian of anti-apoptotic proteins in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveic, Sanja; Pigazzi, Martina; Basso, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1) is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, MCL1, and phospho-ERK1/2, all proteins able to sustain leukemia, without affecting the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. BAG1 down-regulation was also found to increase expression of BAG3, whose similar activity was able to compensate the loss of function of BAG1. BAG1/BAG3 co-silencing caused an enhanced cell predisposition to death in cell lines and also in primary AML cultures, affecting the same proteins. Cell death was CASPASE-3 dependent, was accompanied by PARP cleavage and documented by an increased release of pro-apoptotic molecules Smac/DIABLO and Cytochrome c. BAG1 was found to directly maintain BCL2 and to protect MCL1 from proteasomal degradation by controlling USP9X expression, which appeared to be its novel target. Finally, BAG1 was found able to affect leukemia cell fate by influencing the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins crucial for AML maintenance.

  9. Intracranial CNS Manifestations of Myeloid Sarcoma in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Review of the Literature and Three Case Reports from the Author's Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Gustavo M; Cayci, Zuzan

    2015-05-21

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) of the central nervous system (CNS) is a rare presentation of leukemic mass infiltration outside of the bone marrow. It may involve the subperiosteum and dura mater and, on rare occasions, can also invade the brain parenchyma. The disease is most commonly seen in children or young adults; however, it has been described in multiple age groups. MS can be seen in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders. This entity has the potential to be underdiagnosed if the MS appearance precedes the first diagnosis of leukemia. The main reason is that their appearance on CT and MRI has a broad differential diagnosis, and proper diagnosis of MS can only be made if the imaging findings are correlated with the clinical history and laboratory findings. Herein, we describe the intracranial CNS manifestations of MS in patients with AML on CT and MRI involving the brain and/or meninges. This study is based on a systematic review of the literature. In addition, three case reports from the author's institution with AML and intracranial involvement of MS are included. Our aim is to enhance the awareness of this entity among both clinicians and radiologists.

  10. Intracranial CNS Manifestations of Myeloid Sarcoma in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Review of the Literature and Three Case Reports from the Author’s Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo M. Cervantes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma (MS of the central nervous system (CNS is a rare presentation of leukemic mass infiltration outside of the bone marrow. It may involve the subperiosteum and dura mater and, on rare occasions, can also invade the brain parenchyma. The disease is most commonly seen in children or young adults; however, it has been described in multiple age groups. MS can be seen in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders. This entity has the potential to be underdiagnosed if the MS appearance precedes the first diagnosis of leukemia. The main reason is that their appearance on CT and MRI has a broad differential diagnosis, and proper diagnosis of MS can only be made if the imaging findings are correlated with the clinical history and laboratory findings. Herein, we describe the intracranial CNS manifestations of MS in patients with AML on CT and MRI involving the brain and/or meninges. This study is based on a systematic review of the literature. In addition, three case reports from the author’s institution with AML and intracranial involvement of MS are included. Our aim is to enhance the awareness of this entity among both clinicians and radiologists.

  11. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. A novel nonradioactive CFDA assay to monitor the cellular immune response in myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Chen, Zhi-zhe; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Buhmann, Raymund

    2013-04-01

    Donor lymphocyte transfusion (DLT) may induce the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect for patients with AML relapsed after transplant. However, AML is a highly diverse disease and the limited overall efficacy of DLT in clinical practice emphasizes the importance of identifying a specific subgroup of patients who might benefit from this treatment approach. To monitor the cellular immune response after DLT, we developed an active specific immunization strategy using in vitro generated AML-trained T cells to induce a highly specific antileukemic T-cell response and thus established a novel nonradioactive assay system to assess the antileukemia immunity by flow cytometry, correlated with [3H]-thymidine uptake. The myeloid blasts derived from five patients with AML relapsed post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) were first labeled with CFDA (5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester). To analyze the growth inhibitory potential of the donor T cells trained by AML progenitor cells, the myeloid blasts were induced to proliferate by means of a cytokine cocktail (50ng/mL of SCF; 25ng/mL of IL-3; 100ng/mL of GM-CSF; 100ng/mL of G-CSF; 2U/mL of EPO; 0.47g/L of transferrin; and 5×10(-5)mmol/L of 2-ME). The T cell mediated growth inhibitory potential was detected after 5 days by flow cytometry and correlated with [3H]-thymidine uptake. The simultaneous use of TO-PRO-dye and calibrate beads allowed not only the cell viability to be known but also allowed quantification of the effector function. Here, we applied a CFDA dye to track the proliferation and expansion of AML blasts in response to the cytokine cocktail in vitro. AML-trained T cells, expressed high levels of the activation markers CD25 and CD69, and were generated to recognize the leukemic progenitor cells and inhibit cytokine-induced leukemic cell proliferation, which is an active specific immunization strategy circumventing the identification of leukemia-associated antigens. The

  13. Central nervous system leukemia in a patient with concurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma and acute myeloid leukaemia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Qing; Mai, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Si-Ben; Lou, Yin-Jun; Yan, Sen-Xiang; Jin, Jie; Xu, Wei-Lai

    2017-12-01

    Concurrent case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been reported. Here, we report a case of NPC, who was concurrently suffered from AML one mother after the NPC diagnosis. The patient was a 45-year-old male who presented with a mass on his right side neck. The patient was diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus negative type-2 non-keratinizing carcinoma with clivus involvement and unilateral metastasis to the cervical lymph node. He was treated with one cycle of cisplatin and 69.76 Gy of concurrent external-beam radiation. Three months after completion of chemo-radiotherapy, the patient was diagnosed as acute myeloid leukemia, which achieved complete remission after one course induction chemotherapy. Two months later, however, the patient was diagnosed as central nervous system leukemia. He ultimately died of relapsed leukemia. The overall survival of the patient was 10 months. The co-occurrence of NPC and AML is rare and prognosis is poor. Radiotherapy in NPC can disrupt the blood-brain barrier, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of central nervous system leukemia. Early alert and prevention of central nervous system leukemia following radiotherapy in NPC patient is recommended. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk stratification of intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia: Integrative analysis of a multitude of gene mutation and gene expression markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Rockova (Veronika); S. Abbas (Saman); B.J. Wouters (Bas); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); W.L.J. van Putten (Wim); B. Löwenberg (Bob); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNumerous molecular markers have been recently discovered as potential prognostic factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It has become of critical importance to thoroughly evaluate their interrelationships and relative prognostic importance. Gene expression profiling was conducted in a

  15. An operational definition of primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia allowing early identification of patients who may benefit from allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferguson, Paul; Hills, Robert K; Grech, Angela

    2016-01-01

    .0001) cohorts. The utilization of REF1 criteria permits the early identification of patients whose outcome after one course of induction chemotherapy is very poor, and informs a novel definition of primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that allogeneic stem cell......Up to 30% of adults with acute myeloid leukemia fail to achieve a complete remission after induction chemotherapy - termed primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia. There is no universally agreed definition of primary refractory disease, nor have the optimal treatment modalities been defined. We...... studied 8907 patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia, and examined outcomes in patients with refractory disease defined using differing criteria which have previously been proposed. These included failure to achieve complete remission after one cycle of induction chemotherapy (RES), less than...

  16. Incidence and prognostic impact of c-Kit, FLT3, and Ras gene mutations in core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boissel, N; Leroy, H; Brethon, B; Philippe, N; de Botton, S; Auvrignon, A; Raffoux, E; Leblanc, T; Thomas, X; Hermine, O; Quesnel, B; Baruchel, A; Leverger, G; Dombret, H; Preudhomme, C

    2006-01-01

    In core binding factors (CBF) acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the disruption of CBFalpha/beta genes impairs normal hematopoietic differentiation and is supposed to cooperate with additional mutations promoting proliferation...

  17. The relationship between clinical feature, complex immunophenotype, chromosome karyotype, and outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bingjie; Zhou, Lanlan; Jiang, Xuejie; Li, Xiaodong; Zhong, Qingxiu; Wang, Zhixiang; Yi, Zhengshan; Zheng, Zhongxin; Yin, Changxin; Cao, Rui; Liao, Libin; Meng, Fanyi

    2015-01-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a complex entity expressing both lymphoid and myeloid immunophenotyping. In the present study, 47 MPAL, 60 lymphoid antigen-positive acute myeloid leukemia (Ly(+)AML), and 90 acute myeloid leukemia with common myeloid immunophenotype (Ly(-)AML) patients were investigated. We found that, in MPAL patients, there were high proportions of blast cells in bone marrow and incidence of hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and Philadelphia chromosome. The overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in MPAL patients were significantly shorter than those in Ly(+)AML and Ly(-)AML. With regard to the patients with normal karyotype only, the OS and RFS of MPAL were significantly lower than those of the Ly(+)AML and Ly(-)AML; but there were no significant differences in OS and RFS among the patients with complex karyotype. The OS rates of 3 groups with complex karyotype were lower than those of patients with normal karyotype. In Cox multivariate analysis, complex karyotype was an independent pejorative factor for both OS and RFS. Therefore, MPAL is confirmed to be a poor-risk disease while Ly(+)AML does not impact prognosis. Complex karyotype is an unfavorable prognosis factor in AML patients with different immunophenotype. Mixed immunophenotype and complex karyotype increase the adverse risk when they coexist.

  18. THERAPY-RELATED MYELOID NEOPLASMS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA AND WALDENSTROM MICROGLOBULINEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ricci

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary myelodisplasia (MDS and acute myeloide leukaemia (AML are frequent long term complications in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL and Waldesntrom Macroglobulinemia (WM patients. Although disease-related immune-suppression plays a crucial role in leukemogenesis there is great concern that therapy may further increase the risk of developing these devastating complications. Nucleoside analogs (NA and alkilator agents are considered appropriate agents in the treatment of both CLL and WM patients. Prolonged immunosuppression related to nucleoside analogs therapy and the incorporation of these agents or their metabolites into DNA, with potentially mutagenic action, leads to speculation that their therapeutic use might be responsible for an increased incidence of second cancer especially when combined with other DNA damaging agents like alkylators. In this review the published studies considering the occurrence of secondary MDS and AML in CLL and WM patients are reported and the potential role of chemotherapeutic agents in leukemogenesis is discussed.

  19. Epidemiology and Clinical Significance of Secondary and Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt Østgård, Lene Sofie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Sengeløv, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    leukemia and myeloproliferative neoplasia) versus de novo AML. Limited to intensive therapy patients, we compared chance of complete remission by logistic regression analysis and used a pseudo-value approach to compare relative risk (RR) of death at 90 days, 1 year, and 3 years, overall and stratified.......23 to 1.76; patients ≥ 60 years old: 1-year adjusted RR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.61). CONCLUSION: Our results support that de novo AML, sAML, and tAML are biologically and prognostically distinct subtypes of AML. Patients with non-MDS-sAML have dismal outcomes, independent of age and cytogenetics....... Previous myeloid disorder, age, and cytogenetics are crucial determinants of outcomes and should be integrated in treatment recommendations for these patients....

  20. Turkish Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Study: Retrospective Sectional Analysis of CML Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Fahri; Saydam, Güray; Cömert, Melda; Uz, Burak; Yavuz, Akif Selim; Turan, Esra; Yönal, İpek; Atay, Hilmi; Keltikli, Engin; Turgut, Mehmet; Pehlivan, Mustafa; Akay, Meltem Olga; Gürkan, Emel; Paydaş, Semra; Kahraman, Selda; Demirkan, Fatih; Kırkızlar, Onur; Akpınar, Seval; Pamuk, Gülsüm Emel; Demir, Muzaffer; Özbaş, Hasan Mücahit; Sönmez, Mehmet; Gültürk, Mine; Salihoğlu, Ayşe; Eşkazan, Ahmet Emre; Ar, Cem; Haydaroğlu Şahin, Handan; Öngören, Şeniz; Başlar, Zafer; Aydın, Yıldız; Yenere, Mustafa Nuri; Tüzüner, Nükhet; Ferhanoğlu, Burhan; Haznedaroglu, İbrahim C.; İlhan, Osman; Soysal, Teoman

    2013-01-01

    Objective: here have been tremendous changes in treatment and follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the last decade. Especially, regular publication and updating of NCCN and ELN guidelines have provided enermous rationale and base for close monitorization of patients with CML. But, it is stil needed to have registry results retrospectively to evaluate daily CML practices. Materials and Methods: In this article, we have evaluated 1133 patients’ results with CML in terms of demographical features, disease status, response, resistance and use of second-generation TKIs. Results: The response rate has been found relatively high in comparison with previously published articles, and we detected that there was a lack of appropriate and adequate molecular response assessment. Conclusion: We concluded that we need to improve registry systems and increase the availability of molecular response assessment to provide high-quality patient care. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385824